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Sample records for gill cd binding

  1. Interactive effects of waterborne metals in binary mixtures on short-term gill-metal binding and ion uptake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Som; Nadella, Sunita R; Wood, Chris M

    2015-08-01

    Metal binding to fish gills forms the basis of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach, which has emerged as a useful tool for conducting site-specific water quality assessments for metals. The current BLMs are designed to assess the toxicity of individual metals, and cannot account for the interactive effects of metal mixtures to aquatic organisms including fish. The present study was designed mainly to examine the interactive effects of waterborne metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Ni) in specific binary combinations on short-term (3h) gill-metal binding and essential ion (Ca(2+) and Na(+)) uptake (a physiological index of toxicity) in fish, using juvenile freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as the model species. We hypothesized that binary mixtures of metals that share a common mode of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Zn - Ca(2+) antagonists, Cu and Ag - Na(+) antagonists) would reduce the gill binding of each other via competitive interactions and induce less than additive effects on ion transport. In addition, the mixture of metals that have different modes of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Cu, or Cd and Ni) would not exhibit any interactive effects either on gill-metal binding or ion transport. We found that both Zn and Cu reduced gill-Cd binding and vice versa, however, Ni did not influence gill-Cd binding in fish. Surprisingly, Ag was found to stimulate gill-Cu binding especially at high exposure concentrations, whereas, Cu had no effect on gill-Ag binding. The inhibitory effect of Cd and Zn in mixture on branchial Ca(2+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cd or Zn alone. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of Cu and Ag in mixture on branchial Na(+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cu or Ag alone. The inhibitory effects of Cd and Zn mixture on Ca(2+) uptake as well as Cu and Ag mixture on Na(+) uptake were found to follow the principles of simple additivity. In contrast, no significant additive effect on either Ca(2+) or Na

  2. Sub-cellular partitioning of metals (Cd, Cu, Zn) in the gills of a freshwater bivalve, Pyganodon grandis: role of calcium concretions in metal sequestration.

    PubMed

    Bonneris, Emmanuelle; Giguère, Anik; Perceval, Olivier; Buronfosse, Thierry; Masson, Stéphane; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2005-03-04

    Indigenous unionid molluscs, Pyganodon grandis, were collected from nine lakes in the Rouyn-Noranda area (Quebec, Canada) along a polymetallic concentration gradient (Cd, Cu, Zn). After excision, the gills were gently homogenised and the cellular compartments were separated by a differential centrifugation procedure that yielded the following particulate fractions: "nuclei + cellular debris", "mitochondria", "lysosomes + microsomes" and "granules". The supernatant remaining after the final ultracentrifugation step, i.e., the operationally-defined cytosol, was separated into a "heat-denaturable proteins" (HDP) fraction and a "heat-stable proteins" (HSP) fraction containing metallothionein (MT). The Cd, Cu and Zn content of each particulate and cytosolic fraction was determined and gill metallothionein was quantified independently by a mercury saturation assay. Cytosolic Cd concentrations were significantly related to the dissolved Cd concentrations at each site, but cytosolic Cu and Zn (essential metals) were not related to their respective ambient dissolved metal concentrations. Metallothionein concentrations increased along the metal contamination gradient and were related to cytosolic Cd (and Zn) in a concentration-dependent manner. However mass balance calculations showed that binding to metallothionein could only account for a small proportion of total gill metal ( approximately 10% Cd; approximately 3% Cu; approximately 1% Zn). Under these chronic exposure conditions, the three metals (Cd, Cu and Zn) were mainly located in calcium concretions present in the gills (respectively 58 +/- 13% of the total gill Cd, 64 +/- 6% of the total gill Cu and 73 +/- 6% of the total gill Zn). The overall contribution of granules to the total gill dry weight remained relatively constant among the different lakes, suggesting that lake-to-lake variations in granule synthesis were independent of the metal contamination gradient, i.e., these constituent elements of unionid gills

  3. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.

  4. Genotoxic Effects Induced by Cd(+2), Cr(+6), Cu(+2) in the Gill and Liver of Odontesthes bonariensis (Piscies, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Gasulla, J; Picco, S J; Carriquiriborde, P; Dulout, F N; Ronco, A E; de Luca, J C

    2016-05-01

    Genotoxic effects of Cd(+2), Cr(+6), and Cu(+2) on the gill and liver of the Argentinean Silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis) were studied using the comet assay and in relation with the metal tissue accumulation. Fish were exposed to three waterborne concentrations of each metal for 2 and 16 days. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). After 2 days, significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) was only observed in the gill of fish exposed to Cr(+6) and Cu(+2), and the LOECs were 2160 nM and 921.1 nM, respectively. The gill LOEC for Cd(+2) by 16 days was 9.4 nM. In the liver, LOECs were obtained only for Cd(+2) and Cr(+6) and were 9.4 and 2160 nM, respectively. The three metals were able to induce genotoxic effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and the gill was the most sensitive organ.

  5. Effects of copper and cadmium on ion transport and gill metal binding in the Amazonian teleost tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in extremely soft water.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Aline Y O; Wood, Chris M; Val, Adalberto L

    2005-09-30

    Metal toxicity in fish is expected to be most severe in soft waters because of the low availability of cations (particularly Ca(2+)) to out-compete the metal forms for binding sites on the gills. Natural waters in the Amazon basin are typically soft due to regional geochemistry, but few studies have focused on metal toxicity in fish native to the basin. We assessed the ionoregulatory effects of waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) on tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in extremely soft water (10 micromoll(-1) Ca(2+)). Tambaqui had a very high tolerance to Cu (50-400 microgl(-1)), as indicated by a complete lack of inhibition of Na(+) uptake and an ability to gradually recover over 6h from elevated diffusive Na(+) losses caused by Cu. The insensitivity of active Na(+) influx to Cu further supports the notion that Amazonian fish may have a unique Na(+) transport system. Addition of 5-10 mgCl(-1) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) did not prevent initial (0-3h) negative Na(+) balance in tambaqui exposed to Cu. Exposure to 40 mgCl(-1) DOM prevented Na(+) losses in tambaqui even at 400 microgl(-1) Cu, probably because most Cu was complexed to DOM. Tambaqui exposed to waterborne Cd (10-80 microgl(-1)) experienced an average of 42% inhibition in whole body Ca(2+) uptake relative to controls within 3h of exposure to the metal. Inhibition of Ca(2+) uptake increased over time and, at 24h, Ca(2+) uptake was suppressed by 51% and 91% in fish exposed to 10 and 80 microgl(-1) Cd, respectively. Previous acclimation of fish to either elevated [Ca(2+)] or elevated [DOM] proved to be very effective in protecting against acute short-term metal accumulation at the gills of tambaqui in soft water (in the absence of the protective agent during metal exposure), suggesting a conditioning effect on gill metal binding physiology.

  6. DNA Damage and Transcriptional Changes in the Gills of Mytilus galloprovincialis Exposed to Nanomolar Doses of Combined Metal Salts (Cd, Cu, Hg)

    PubMed Central

    Varotto, Laura; Domeneghetti, Stefania; Rosani, Umberto; Manfrin, Chiara; Cajaraville, Miren P.; Raccanelli, Stefano; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at an integrated and mechanistic view of the early biological effects of selected metals in the marine sentinel organism Mytilus galloprovincialis, we exposed mussels for 48 hours to 50, 100 and 200 nM solutions of equimolar Cd, Cu and Hg salts and measured cytological and molecular biomarkers in parallel. Focusing on the mussel gills, first target of toxic water contaminants and actively proliferating tissue, we detected significant dose-related increases of cells with micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in the treated mussels, with differences in the bioconcentration of the three metals determined in the mussel flesh by atomic absorption spectrometry. Gene expression profiles, determined in the same individual gills in parallel, revealed some transcriptional changes at the 50 nM dose, and substantial increases of differentially expressed genes at the 100 and 200 nM doses, with roughly similar amounts of up- and down-regulated genes. The functional annotation of gill transcripts with consistent expression trends and significantly altered at least in one dose point disclosed the complexity of the induced cell response. The most evident transcriptional changes concerned protein synthesis and turnover, ion homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, and intracellular trafficking (transcript sequences denoting heat shock proteins, metal binding thioneins, sequestosome 1 and proteasome subunits, and GADD45 exemplify up-regulated genes while transcript sequences denoting actin, tubulins and the apoptosis inhibitor 1 exemplify down-regulated genes). Overall, nanomolar doses of co-occurring free metal ions have induced significant structural and functional changes in the mussel gills: the intensity of response to the stimulus measured in laboratory supports the additional validation of molecular markers of metal exposure to be used in Mussel Watch programs. PMID:23355883

  7. Toxicity and Traces of Hg, Pb and Cd in the Hepatopancreas, Gills and Muscles of Perna viridis from Jakarta Bay, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Irnidayanti, Y

    2015-02-01

    Heavy metals contamination on the coast of Jakarta Bay has led to the level of pollution and can cause toxicity to organisms living in the sea, i.e., green mussels. Green mussels have the ability to detoxify metals entering their bodies. Their ability to accumulate metals is higher than other aquatic animals. This is due to their sedentary life which prevents them from avoiding the effects of pollution and their high tolerance to certain metals. The high concentration of metal content would be toxic to the cell because metal ions can act as oxidants and bind to organic and protein molecules. The results of the study showed that traces of heavy metals were detected in the hepatopancreas, gills, muscles and gonads organs of the mussels living in the waters of Muara Angke. Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were found in all four organs, while mercury (Hg) was not detected in the muscles. Traces of Hg and Cd were not detected in hepatopancreas, gills, muscles and gonads of green mussels in Panimbang, while Pb was detected by 0.00 1 in the male gonads and 0.01 in hepatopancreas. The concentration of Pb in the male gonads are still below the acceptable limit and concentration of Pb in the hepatopancreas is relatively equivalent to the acceptable limit. Metal detection in the organs above shows that the Muara Angke waters tend to be polluted and have an impact on the mussels weight loss as a result of heavy metal toxicity.

  8. Early genotoxic effects in gill cells and haemocytes of Dreissena polymorpha exposed to cadmium, B[a]P and a combination of B[a]P and Cd.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Arini, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2011-07-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd on the zebra mussel, an important freshwater sentinel organism, and to determine the stability of DNA damage in gill cells and haemocytes. The oxidative DNA damage and the co-genotoxicity of Cd in combination with B[a]P were investigated. We measured DNA damage in haemocytes and gill cells of zebra mussels exposed for 11 days to a constant concentration of Cd (10μg/L), B[a]P (10μg/L) or the two combined chemicals (10μg/L+1μg/L). Enzymatic dissociation of gills with dispase gave the lower percentage DNA in tail, compared with collagenase/dispase or collagenase. Bioaccumulation of cadmium in the soft tissues of mussels exposed to CdCl(2) or CdCl(2)+B[a]P increased in a time-dependent manner indicating that both exposures were effective. Cd (10μg/L) is genotoxic only during the first 3 days of exposure in gill cells, while in haemocytes the genotoxicity of Cd was observed later. B[a]P (10μg/L) induced an early increase of DNA damage in gill cells (after 10h and 1 day), while in both gill cells and haemocytes, B[a]P caused a marked increase of DNA damage after 3 days of exposure. The Cd+B[a]P mixture decreased the DNA-damaging effect of Cd and B[a]P in both cell types. Cd induced an increase of DNA damage in Fpg-treated slides, indicating that Cd contributed to oxidative DNA damage. Cadmium induced a cytogenetic effect in gill cells, assessed by the number of micronuclei, throughout the duration of the exposure, while B[a]P did not induce any cytogenetic effect. B[a]P, Cd and Cd+B[a]P induced a transient increase in the number of bi-nucleated cells. Our data clearly show that gills are more sensitive to Cd and B[a]P, which makes them more suitable for future bio-monitoring studies.

  9. Influence of natural organic matter source on copper speciation as demonstrated by Cu binding to fish gills, by ion selective electrode, and by DGT gel sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luider, C.D.; Crusius, John; Playle, R.C.; Curtis, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 2 g) were exposed to 0−5 μM total copper in ion-poor water for 3 h in the presence or absence of 10 mg C/L of qualitatively different natural organic matter (NOM) derived from water spanning a large gradient in hydrologic residence time. Accumulation of Cu by trout gills was compared to Cu speciation determined by ion selective electrode (ISE) and by diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gel sampler technology. The presence of NOM decreased Cu uptake by trout gills as well as Cu concentrations determined by ISE and DGT. Furthermore, the source of NOM influenced Cu binding by trout gills with high-color, allochthonous NOM decreasing Cu accumulation by the gills more than low-color autochthonous NOM. The pattern of Cu binding to the NOM measured by Cu ISE and by Cu accumulation by DGT samplers was similar to the fish gill results. A simple Cu−gill binding model required an NOM Cu-binding factor (F) that depended on NOM quality to account for observed Cu accumulation by trout gills; values of F varied by a factor of 2. Thus, NOM metal-binding quality, as well as NOM quantity, are both important when assessing the bioavailability of metals such as Cu to aquatic organisms.

  10. Rabbit CD200R binds host CD200 but not CD200-like proteins from poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Munir; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Akkaya, Erdem; Hatherley, Deborah; Barclay, A. Neil

    2016-01-01

    CD200 is a widely distributed membrane protein that gives inhibitory signals through its receptor (CD200R) on myeloid cells. CD200 has been acquired by herpesviruses where it has been shown to interact with host CD200R and downmodulate the immune system. It has been hypothesized that poxviruses have acquired CD200; but the potential orthologues show less similarity to their hosts. Myxoma virus M141 protein is a potential CD200 orthologue with a potent immune modulatory function in rabbits. Here, we characterized the rabbit CD200, CD200R and tested the CD200-like sequences for binding CD200R. No binding could be detected using soluble recombinant proteins, full length protein expressed on cells or myxoma virus infected cells. Finally, using knockdown models, we showed that the inhibitory effect of M141 on RAW 264.7 cells upon myxoma virus infection is not due to CD200R. We conclude that the rabbit poxvirus CD200-like proteins cause immunomodulation without utilizing CD200R. PMID:26590792

  11. Cytotoxicity and cellular mechanisms involved in the toxicity of CdS quantum dots in hemocytes and gill cells of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Katsumiti, A; Gilliland, D; Arostegui, I; Cajaraville, M P

    2014-08-01

    CdS quantum dots (QDs) show a great promise for treatment and diagnosis of cancer and for targeted drug delivery, due to their size-tunable fluorescence and ease of functionalization for tissue targeting. In spite of their advantages it is important to determine if CdS QDs can exert toxicity on biological systems. In the present work, cytotoxicity of CdS QDs (5 nm) at a wide range of concentrations (0.001-100 mg Cd/L) was screened using neutral red (NR) and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays in isolated hemocytes and gill cells of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The mechanisms of action of CdS QDs were assessed at sublethal concentrations (0.31-5 mg Cd/L) in the same cell types through a series of functional in vitro assays: production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), catalase (CAT) activity, DNA damage, lysosomal acid phosphatase (AcP) activity, multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) transport activity, Na-K-ATPase activity (only in gill cells) and phagocytic activity and damage to actin cytoskeleton (only in hemocytes). Exposures to CdS QDs lasted for 24h and were performed in parallel with exposures to bulk CdS and ionic Cd. Ionic Cd was the most toxic form to both cell types, followed by CdS QDs and bulk CdS. ROS production, DNA damage, AcP activity and MXR transport were significantly increased in both cell types exposed to the 3 forms of Cd. CAT activity increased in hemocytes exposed to the three forms of Cd while in gill cells only in those exposed to ionic Cd. No effects were found on hemocytes cytoskeleton integrity. Effects on phagocytosis were found in hemocytes exposed to bulk CdS and to CdS QDs at concentrations equal or higher than 1.25 mg Cd/L but not in those exposed to ionic Cd, indicating a particle-specific effect on phagocytosis. In conclusion, cell-mediated immunity and gill cell function represent significant targets for CdS QDs toxicity.

  12. Soluble form of the endothelial adhesion molecule CD146 binds preferentially CD16+ monocytes.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Silvano; Barisione, Chiara; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Spallarossa, Paolo; Barsotti, Antonio; Fabbi, Patrizia; Corsiglia, Luca; Palmieri, Daniela; Palombo, Domenico; Brunelli, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    The cell adhesion molecule CD146 is normally located at the endothelial cell-to-cell junction and colocalizes with actin cytoskeleton. The soluble form of CD146 (sCD146) has been identified in the endothelial cell supernatant and in normal human plasma, and is increased in pathologic conditions with altered endothelial function. Soluble CD146 binding to monocytes promotes their transendothelial migration, which represents a central step in the development of atherosclerotic plaque. Since peripheral blood monocytes are characterized by a phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, with different transendothelial migration capacity, we hypothesized that monocyte subsets differently bind sCD146. Based on surface CD14 and CD16 expression monocytes were distinguished by flow cytometry (FACS) into three subsets: CD14++/CD16-, CD14++/CD16+ and CD14+/CD16+. CD16+ monocytes have been found to possess higher transendothelial migration ability. FACS analysis on blood monocytes from 30 healthy subjects revealed that higher percentages of CD14++/CD16+ (median, first and third quartile: 2.26, 1.62-3.87) and of CD14+/CD16+ (2.59, 1.28-4.80) were positive for CD146 (both p < 0.01), in comparison to CD14++/CD16- (0.66, 0.47-1.01). Moreover, in vitro treatment of ficoll separated monocytes with recombinant CD146 showed that both CD16+ subsets increased their percentage of CD146-positive events compared to CD16- monocytes (p < 0.01). Soluble CD146 levels were evaluated by ELISA in plasma samples of subjects from our study group and showed a correlation with percentage of CD146-positive CD14+/CD16+ monocyte subset. In this work we have demonstrated that monocyte subsets behave differently with regard to their sCD146 binding activity; because binding of CD146 influences transendothelial migration of monocytes, modulation of monocyte-CD146 interaction may represent a potential target to limit atherosclerotic plaque development.

  13. Effects of heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+) on DNA damage of the gills, hemocytes and hepatopancreas of marine crab, Charybdis japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Luqing; Liu, Na; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Jing; Miao, Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    There are rising concerns about the hazardous effects of heavy metals on the environment. In this study, comet assay and DNA alkaline unwinding assay were conducted on the tissues (gills, hepatopancreas, and hemocytes) of Charybdis japonica in order to illustrate genotoxicity of three heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Pb2+, and Cd2+) on the marine crabs C. japonica. The crabs were exposed to Cu2+ (10, 50, and 100 μg.L-1), Pb2+ (50, 250, and 500 μg L-1) and Cd2+ (5, 25, and 50 μg L-1), and the tissues were sampled at days 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 15. DNA alkaline unwinding assay was used for testing the DNA single strand break in gills and hepatopancreas and comet assay was employed for testing the DNA damage in hemocytes. The results showed that the DNA damage ( F-value) of gills in the crabs exposed to the three heavy metals was decreased gradually during the exposure periods and there was a dose-time response relationship in certain time, suggesting that the levels of DNA single strand break in all the experimental groups increased significantly compared to the controls. Changes of F-value in hepatopancreas of the crabs exposed to the three heavy metals were similar to those in gills except that the peak values were found in the 500 μg L-1 Pb2+ treatment group at day 3 and the 50 μg L-1 Cd2+ treatment group at day 9. The ranks of DNA damage in gills and hepatopancreas induced by the three heavy metal ions (50 μg L-1, day 15) were Cd2+ >Pb2+ >Cu2+ and Pb2+ >Cu2+ >Cd2+. The levels of DNA damage in gills were higher than those in hepatopancreas in the same experimental group. It can be concluded that indices of DNA damage can be used as the potential biomarkers of heavy metal pollution in marine environment.

  14. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    PubMed

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  16. Differential peptide binding to CD40 evokes counteractive responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Srijit; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Alonso, Livan; Roduit, Charles; Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Singh, Shailza; Saha, Shipra; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Roy, Somenath; Dietler, Giovanni; Kasas, Sandor; Das, Pradeep; Krishnasastry, M V; Saha, Bhaskar

    2012-05-01

    The antigen-presenting cell–expressed CD40 is implied in the regulation of counteractive immune responses such as induction of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)–12 and IL-10, respectively. The mechanism of this duality in CD40 function remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether such duality depends on ligand binding. Based on CD40 binding, we identifed two dodecameric peptides, peptide-7 and peptide-19, from the phage peptide library. Peptide-7 induces IL-10 and increases Leishmania donovani infection in macrophages, whereas peptide-19 induces IL-12 and reduces L. donovani infection. CD40-peptide interaction analyses by surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy suggest that the functional differences are not associated with the studied interaction parameters. The molecular dynamic simulation of the CD40-peptides interaction suggests that these two peptides bind to two different places on CD40. Thus, we suggest for the first time that differential binding of the ligands imparts functional duality to CD40.

  17. Prolactin receptors in liver, kidney, and gill of the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): Characterization and effect of salinity on specific binding of iodinated ovine prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Dauder, S.; Young, G.; Hass, L.; Bern, H.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Specific binding of {sup 125}I-ovine prolactin (oPRL) to microsomal fractions from gill, kidney, and liver of adult tilapia was determined. Specific binding varied among tissues, the highest values being displayed by kidney membranes. In the liver, the binding of oPRL was not strongly displaced by tilapia prolactins (tPRL177 and tPRL188), although tPRL177 was six times more potent than tPRL188. On the other hand, in kidney and gill membranes, the two tPRLs were equipotent. Tilapia PRLs showed low potency in competing for oPRL-binding sites when pregnant rat liver membranes were utilized. Tilapia growth hormone (tGH) and human growth hormone (hGH) displaced {sup 125}I-oPRL from liver as well as did tPRL177 but were not recognized well by renal or branchial receptors. Two {sup 125}I-oPRL-binding sites were detected in every tissue tested. These binding sites are subject to physiological regulation since adaptation to seawater resulted in a significant decrease in specific binding.

  18. Binding of nickel and copper to fish gills predicts toxicity when water hardness varies, but free-ion activity does not

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Bobbitt, J.P.; Debrey, L.D.; Boese, C.J.; Bergman, H.L.; Santore, R.C.; Paquin, P.R.; Ditoro, D.M.; Allen, H.E.

    1999-03-15

    Based on a biotic-ligand model (BLM), the authors hypothesized that the concentration of a transition metal bound to fish gills ([M{sub gill}]) will be a constant predictor of mortality, whereas a free-ion activity model is generally interpreted to imply that the chemical activity of the aquo (free) ion of the metal will be a constant predictor of mortality. In laboratory tests, measured [Ni{sub gill}] and calculated [Cu{sub gill}] were constant predictors of acute toxicity of Ni and Cu to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) when water hardness varied up to 10-fold, whereas total aqueous concentrations and free-ion activities of Ni and Cu were not. Thus, the BLM, which simultaneously accounts for (a) metal speciation in the exposure water and (b) competitive binding of transition-metal ions and other cations to biotic ligands predicts acute toxicity better than does free-ion activity of Ni or Cu. Adopting a biotic-ligand modeling approach could help establish a more defensible, mechanistic basis for regulating aqueous discharges of metals.

  19. The crustacean gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase: allosteric modulation of high- and low-affinity ATP-binding sites by sodium and potassium.

    PubMed

    Masui, D C; Silva, E C C; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L; Furriel, R P M; Leone, F A

    2008-11-15

    The blue crab, Callinectes danae, tolerates exposure to a wide salinity range employing mechanisms of compensatory ion uptake when in dilute media. Although the gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase is vital to hyperosmoregulatory ability, the interactions occurring at the sites of ATP binding on the molecule itself are unknown. Here, we investigate the modulation by Na+ and K+ of homotropic interactions between the ATP-binding sites, and of phosphoenzyme formation of the (Na+,K+)-ATPase from the posterior gills of this euryhaline crab. The contribution of the high- and low-affinity ATP-binding sites to maximum velocity was similar for both Na+ and K+. However, in contrast to Na+, a threshold K+ concentration triggers the appearance of the high-affinity binding sites, displacing the saturation curve to lower ATP concentrations.Further, a low-affinity site for phosphorylation is present on the enzyme. These findings reveal notable differences in the catalytic mechanism of the crustacean (Na+,K+)-ATPase compared to the vertebrate enzyme.

  20. CD4-Induced Antibodies Promote Association of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein with CD4-Binding Site Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fellinger, Christoph H.; Prasad, Neha R.; Zhou, Amber S.; Kondur, Hema R.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120/gp41 heterodimers that mediates viral entry. Env binds cellular CD4, an association which stabilizes a conformation favorable to its subsequent association with a coreceptor, typically CCR5 or CXCR4. The CD4- and coreceptor-binding sites serve as epitopes for two classes of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies: CD4-binding site (CD4bs) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Here we observed that, at a fixed total concentration, mixtures of the CD4i antibodies (E51 or 412d) and the CD4bs antibody VRC01 neutralized the HIV-1 isolates 89.6, ADA, SG3, and SA32 more efficiently than either antibody alone. We found that E51, and to a lesser extent 412d and 17b, promoted association of four CD4bs antibodies to the Env trimer but not to monomeric gp120. We further demonstrated that the binding of the sulfotyrosine-binding pocket by CCR5mim2-Ig was sufficient for promoting CD4bs antibody binding to Env. Interestingly, the relationship is not reciprocal: CD4bs antibodies were not as efficient as CD4-Ig at promoting E51 or 412d binding to Env trimer. Consistent with these observations, CD4-Ig, but none of the CD4bs antibodies tested, substantially increased HIV-1 infection of a CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cell line. We conclude that the ability of CD4i antibodies to promote VRC01 association with Env trimers accounts for the increase potency of VRC01 and CD4i antibody mixtures. Our data further suggest that potent CD4bs antibodies avoid inducing Env conformations that bind CD4i antibodies or CCR5. IMPORTANCE Potent HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies can prevent viral transmission and suppress an ongoing infection. Here we show that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which recognize the conserved coreceptor-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), can increase the association of Env with potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies). We further show that

  1. Characterizing the impact of CD8 antibodies on class I MHC multimer binding.

    PubMed

    Holman, Philmore O; Walsh, Elizabeth R; Jameson, Stephen C

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have suggested that CD8 Abs affect the binding of class I MHC tetramers/multimers to CD8(+) T cells, which has led to the interpretation that CD8 participates directly in multimer binding. In contrast, a recent publication has argued that CD8 Abs instead cause reorganization of TCR distribution and hence have an indirect effect on multimer binding to the TCR alone. We address these issues by testing the role of CD8 and the impact of CD8 Abs on the binding of normal and mutant multimers to Ag-specific mouse T cells. Our data suggest that, in this system, CD8 Abs act directly on CD8 and only mediate their effects on multimer binding when CD8 is capable of binding to the multimer. These data reinforce the paradigm that CD8 plays an active and direct role in binding of class I MHC multimers.

  2. Mutations in the putative HCV-E2 CD81 binding regions and correlation with cell surface CD81 expression.

    PubMed

    Kronenberger, B; Sarrazin, C; Hofmann, W P; von Wagner, M; Herrmann, E; Welsch, C; Elez, R; Rüster, B; Piiper, A; Zeuzem, S

    2004-07-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope (E)2 protein interacts with the cellular receptor CD81 leading to modulation of B and T cell function. Recently, a higher binding affinity of subtype 1a in comparison with 1b derived E2 proteins for CD81 in vitro was described. The importance of mutations within the putative CD81 binding regions of different HCV geno-/subtypes in correlation with CD81 expression is unknown. In the present study, CD81 expression on blood lymphocytes of patients with chronic hepatitis C infected with different HCV geno-/subtypes were analysed by fluorescence activated cell sorter analyses. In addition, the putative CD81 binding regions on the E2 gene comprising the hypervariable region (HVR)2 were analysed by direct sequencing. CD81 expression on CD8(+) T-lymphocytes from patients infected with subtype 1a (n = 6) was significantly higher in comparison with subtype 1b (n = 12) and 3 (n = 5) infected patients before and during antiviral therapy (P = 0.006; P = 0.021, respectively). Sequencing of the putative CD81 binding regions in the E2 protein comprising the HVR2 (codon 474-495 and 522-552 according to the HCV-1a prototype HCV-H) showed a highly conserved motif within HVR2 for subtype 1a isolates and an overall low number of mutations within the putative CD81 binding regions, whereas numerous mutations were detected for subtype 1b isolates (12.0 vs 23.6%). HCV-3 isolates showed an intermediate number of mutations within the putative binding sites (19.2%; P = 0.022). In conclusion, the highly conserved sequence within HVR2 and putative CD81 binding sites of subtype 1a isolates previously associated with a high CD81 binding affinity in vitro is correlated with high CD81 expression on CD8(+) T-lymphocytes in vivo.

  3. Ganglioside binding pattern of CD33-related siglecs.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Eugenia; Mikhalyov, Ilya; Zhang, Jiquan; Crocker, Paul; Bovin, Nicolai

    2003-02-24

    Our study deals with the interaction of CD33 related-siglecs-5,-7,-8,-9,-10 with gangliosides GT1b, GQ1b, GD3, GM2, GM3 and GD1a. Siglec-5 bound preferentially to GQ1b, but weakly to GT1b, whereas siglec-10 interacted only with GT1b ganglioside. Siglec-7 and siglec-9 displayed binding to gangliosides GD3, GQ1b and GT1b bearing a disialoside motif, though siglec-7 was more potent; besides, siglec-9 interacted also with GM3. Siglec-8 demonstrated low affinity to the gangliosides tested compared with other siglecs. Despite high structural similarity of CD33 related siglecs, they demonstrated different ganglioside selectivity, in particular to the Neu5Acalpha2-8Neu5Ac motif.

  4. Measurement of p-nitrophenyl acetate esterase activity (EA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in gills and digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to binary mixtures of Pb, Cd and Cu.

    PubMed

    Franco-Martinez, Lorena; Romero, Diego; García-Navarro, José A; Tecles, Fernando; Teles, Mariana; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2016-12-01

    The aims of the present work were (1) to evaluate oxidative stress biomarkers and AChE in two tissues of wild mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) of high biochemical activity and accumulation capacity (gills and digestive gland) and (2) to study the behaviour of these biomarkers in presence of heavy metals. For this, EA, TOS, TAC and AChE were measured in tissues of mussels exposed to binary combination of Pb, Cd and Cu. Mussels (n = 36) were exposed to one of the binary mixtures of Pb (1000 μg L(-1)), Cd (100 μg L(-1)) and Cu (100 μg L(-1)) for 7 days, under controlled conditions. Gills and digestive gland were extracted and frozen at -80 °C until analysis. The automatic methods employed for the measurement of EA, TAC, TOS and AChE in M. galloprovincialis revealed higher levels of these biomarkers in digestive gland than gills. Study results suggest that gills would be the tissue of election for study oxidative stress markers, whereas digestive tissue should be selected for AChE measurements in case of evaluation of combined metal toxicity in mussels.

  5. CD22 ligand binding regulates normal and malignant B lymphocyte survival in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haas, Karen M; Sen, Suman; Sanford, Isaac G; Miller, Ann S; Poe, Jonathan C; Tedder, Thomas F

    2006-09-01

    The CD22 extracellular domain regulates B lymphocyte function by interacting with alpha2,6-linked sialic acid-bearing ligands. To understand how CD22 ligand interactions affect B cell function in vivo, mouse anti-mouse CD22 mAbs were generated that inhibit CD22 ligand binding to varying degrees. Remarkably, mAbs which blocked CD22 ligand binding accelerated mature B cell turnover by 2- to 4-fold in blood, spleen, and lymph nodes. CD22 ligand-blocking mAbs also inhibited the survival of adoptively transferred normal (73-88%) and malignant (90%) B cells in vivo. Moreover, mAbs that bound CD22 ligand binding domains induced significant CD22 internalization, depleted marginal zone B cells (82-99%), and reduced mature recirculating B cell numbers by 75-85%. The CD22 mAb effects were independent of complement and FcRs, and the CD22 mAbs had minimal effects in CD22AA mice that express mutated CD22 that is not capable of ligand binding. These data demonstrate that inhibition of CD22 ligand binding can disrupt normal and malignant B cell survival in vivo and suggest a novel mechanism of action for therapeutics targeting CD22 ligand binding domains.

  6. CdTe/CdSe quantum dots improve the binding affinities between α-amylase and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaoling

    2012-03-01

    People exposed to engineered nanomaterials have potential health risks associated. Human α-amylase is one of the key enzymes in the digestive system. There are few reports about the influence of quantum dots (QDs) on the digestive enzymes and their inhibition system. This work focused on the toxic effect of CdTe/CdSe QDs on the interactions between α-amylase and its natural inhibitors. Thirty-six dietary polyphenols, natural α-amylase inhibitors from food, were studied for their affinities for α-amylase in the absence and presence of CdTe/CdSe QDs by a fluorescence quenching method. The magnitudes of apparent binding constants of polyphenols for α-amylase were almost in the range of 10(5)-10(7) L mol(-1) in the presence of CdTe/CdSe QDs, which were higher than the magnitudes of apparent binding constants in the absence of CdTe/CdSe QDs (10(4)-10(6) L mol(-1)). CdTe/CdSe QDs obviously improved the affinities of dietary polyphenols for α-amylase up to 389.04 times. It is possible that the binding interaction between polyphenols and α-amylase in the presence of CdTe/CdSe QDs was mainly caused by electrostatic interactions. QDs significantly influence the digestive enzymes and their inhibition system.

  7. Negative Regulation of Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling through the Binding of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Glycoprotein, CD14, with the Sialic Acid-binding Lectin, CD33*

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Akiko; Akita, Kaoru; Mori, Yugo; Tanida, Shuhei; Toda, Munetoyo; Inoue, Mizue; Nakada, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    When monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (imDCs) were stimulated with LPS in the presence of anti-CD33/Siglec-3 mAb, the production of IL-12 and phosphorylation of NF-κB decreased significantly. The cell surface proteins of imDCs were chemically cross-linked, and CD33-linked proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. It was CD14 that was found to be cross-linked with CD33. A proximity ligation assay also indicated that CD33 was colocalized with CD14 on the cell surface of imDCs. Sialic acid-dependent binding of CD33 to CD14 was confirmed by a plate assay using recombinant CD33 and CD14. Three types of cells (HEK293T cells expressing the LPS receptor complex (Toll-like receptor (TLR) cells), and the LPS receptor complex plus either wild-type CD33 (TLR/CD33WT cells) or mutated CD33 without sialic acid-binding activity (TLR/CD33RA cells)) were prepared, and then the binding and uptake of LPS were investigated. Although the level of LPS bound on the cell surface was similar among these cells, the uptake of LPS was reduced in TLR/CD33WT cells. A higher level of CD14-bound LPS and a lower level of TLR4-bound LPS were detected in TLR/CD33WT cells compared with the other two cell types, probably due to reduced presentation of LPS from CD14 to TLR4. Phosphorylation of NF-κB after stimulation with LPS was also compared. Wild-type CD33 but not mutated CD33 significantly reduced the phosphorylation of NF-κB. These results suggest that CD14 is an endogenous ligand for CD33 and that ligation of CD33 with CD14 modulates with the presentation of LPS from CD14 to TLR4, leading to down-regulation of TLR4-mediated signaling. PMID:25059667

  8. Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor-4 signaling through the binding of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein, CD14, with the sialic acid-binding lectin, CD33.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Akiko; Akita, Kaoru; Mori, Yugo; Tanida, Shuhei; Toda, Munetoyo; Inoue, Mizue; Nakada, Hiroshi

    2014-09-05

    When monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (imDCs) were stimulated with LPS in the presence of anti-CD33/Siglec-3 mAb, the production of IL-12 and phosphorylation of NF-κB decreased significantly. The cell surface proteins of imDCs were chemically cross-linked, and CD33-linked proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. It was CD14 that was found to be cross-linked with CD33. A proximity ligation assay also indicated that CD33 was colocalized with CD14 on the cell surface of imDCs. Sialic acid-dependent binding of CD33 to CD14 was confirmed by a plate assay using recombinant CD33 and CD14. Three types of cells (HEK293T cells expressing the LPS receptor complex (Toll-like receptor (TLR) cells), and the LPS receptor complex plus either wild-type CD33 (TLR/CD33WT cells) or mutated CD33 without sialic acid-binding activity (TLR/CD33RA cells)) were prepared, and then the binding and uptake of LPS were investigated. Although the level of LPS bound on the cell surface was similar among these cells, the uptake of LPS was reduced in TLR/CD33WT cells. A higher level of CD14-bound LPS and a lower level of TLR4-bound LPS were detected in TLR/CD33WT cells compared with the other two cell types, probably due to reduced presentation of LPS from CD14 to TLR4. Phosphorylation of NF-κB after stimulation with LPS was also compared. Wild-type CD33 but not mutated CD33 significantly reduced the phosphorylation of NF-κB. These results suggest that CD14 is an endogenous ligand for CD33 and that ligation of CD33 with CD14 modulates with the presentation of LPS from CD14 to TLR4, leading to down-regulation of TLR4-mediated signaling. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. CD4-binding site alterations in CCR5-using HIV-1 envelopes influencing gp120-CD4 interactions and fusogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sterjovski, Jasminka; Churchill, Melissa J.; Roche, Michael; Ellett, Anne; Farrugia, William; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-02-20

    CD4-binding site (CD4bs) alterations in gp120 contribute to different pathophysiological phenotypes of CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 strains, but the potential structural basis is unknown. Here, we characterized functionally diverse R5 envelope (Env) clones (n = 16) to elucidate potential structural alterations within the gp120 CD4bs that influence Env function. Initially, we showed that the magnitude of gp120-CD4-binding correlates with increased fusogenicity and reduced CD4 dependence. Analysis of three-dimensional gp120 structural models revealed two CD4bs variants, D279 and N362, that were associated with reduced CD4 dependence. Further structural analysis showed that a wider aperture of the predicted CD4bs cavity, as constrained by the inner-most atoms at the gp120 V1V2 stem and the V5 loop, was associated with amino acid alterations within V5 and correlated with increased gp120-CD4 binding and increased fusogenicity. Our results provide evidence that the gp120 V5 loop may alter CD4bs conformation and contribute to increased gp120-CD4 interactions and Env fusogenicity.

  10. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6.

    PubMed

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-06-29

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs.

  11. The Binding Site of Human Adenosine Deaminase for Cd26/Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Eva; Arredondo-Vega, Francisco X.; Santisteban, Ines; Kelly, Susan J.; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Hershfield, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Human, but not murine, adenosine deaminase (ADA) forms a complex with the cell membrane protein CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase IV. CD26-bound ADA has been postulated to regulate extracellular adenosine levels and to modulate the costimulatory function of CD26 on T lymphocytes. Absence of ADA–CD26 binding has been implicated in causing severe combined immunodeficiency due to ADA deficiency. Using human–mouse ADA hybrids and ADA point mutants, we have localized the amino acids critical for CD26 binding to the helical segment 126–143. Arg142 in human ADA and Gln142 in mouse ADA largely determine the capacity to bind CD26. Recombinant human ADA bearing the R142Q mutation had normal catalytic activity per molecule, but markedly impaired binding to a CD26+ ADA-deficient human T cell line. Reduced CD26 binding was also found with ADA from red cells and T cells of a healthy individual whose only expressed ADA has the R142Q mutation. Conversely, ADA with the E217K active site mutation, the only ADA expressed by a severely immunodeficient patient, showed normal CD26 binding. These findings argue that ADA binding to CD26 is not essential for immune function in humans. PMID:11067872

  12. Unique properties of cd-binding peptides induced in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Nakagawa, C.W.; Murasugi, A.

    1986-03-01

    Metallothioneins, a class of low molecular weight cysteine-rich proteins that bind heavy metal ions, have been found in various eucaryotic organisms. When fission yeasts are grown in the presence of high concentration of CdCl/sub 2/, large amounts of Cd-binding peptides (Cd-BP1 and Cd-BP2) are synthesized. While Cd-BP2 shows similarities to mammalian Cd-thioneins in UV and CD spectra, Cd-BP1has a characteristic shoulder at 265 nm in the UV absorption spectrum and shows two marked Cotton bands at 257 nm (negative) and 275 nm (positive). These characteristics of Cd-BP1 are not found in the other Cd-thioneins. The UV and CD spectra differences between reconstituted and native Cd-BP1 suggest the requirement for some additional molecular architecture including another peptide-Cd/sup 2 +/ interaction. Induction of cadystin synthesis is almost exclusive for Cd, but an exception is a small amount of cadystin also induced by the higher concentration of CuCl/sub 2/ (2.5 mM). The UV spectrum of the natural Cu-cadystin complex was similar to that of Cd-BP1. On the basis of these findings the models for Cd-BP1 and Cd-BP2 are proposed.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein and soluble CD14 catalyze exchange of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, B; Hailman, E; Wright, S D

    1997-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) is a plasma protein known to facilitate the diffusion of bacterial LPS (endotoxin). LBP catalyzes movement of LPS monomers from LPS aggregates to HDL particles, to phospholipid bilayers, and to a binding site on a second plasma protein, soluble CD14 (sCD14). sCD14 can hasten transfer by receiving an LPS monomer from an LPS aggregate, and then surrendering it to an HDL particle, thus acting as a soluble "shuttle" for an insoluble lipid. Here we show that LBP and sCD14 shuttle not only LPS, but also phospholipids. Phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine, and a fluorescently labeled derivative of phosphatidylethanolamine (R-PE) are each transferred by LBP from membranes to HDL particles. The transfer could be observed using recombinant LBP and sCD14 or whole human plasma, and the plasma-mediated transfer of PI could be blocked by anti-LBP and partially inhibited by anti-CD14. sCD14 appears to act as a soluble shuttle for phospholipids since direct binding of PI and R-PE to sCD14 was observed and because addition of sCD14 accelerated transfer of these lipids. These studies define a new function for LBP and sCD14 and describe a novel mechanism for the transfer of phospholipids in blood. In further studies, we show evidence suggesting that LBP transfers LPS and phospholipids by reciprocal exchange: LBP-catalyzed binding of R-PE to LPS x sCD14 complexes was accompanied by the exit of LPS from sCD14, and LBP-catalyzed binding of R-PE to sCD14 was accelerated by prior binding of LPS to sCD14. Binding of one lipid is thus functionally coupled with the release of a second. These results suggest that LBP acts as a lipid exchange protein. PMID:9006000

  14. CD33/Siglec-3 binding specificity, expression pattern, and consequences of gene deletion in mice.

    PubMed

    Brinkman-Van der Linden, Els C M; Angata, Takashi; Reynolds, Shirley A; Powell, Leland D; Hedrick, Stephen M; Varki, Ajit

    2003-06-01

    Mouse CD33/Siglec-3 (mCD33) is the apparent ortholog of human CD33/Siglec-3 (hCD33), a member of the Siglec (sialic acid-binding Ig superfamily lectin) family of sialic acid-recognizing cell-surface lectins. We examined the binding specificity and expression pattern of mCD33 and explored its functions by generating mice deficient in this molecule. Like hCD33, mCD33 is expressed on myeloid precursors in the bone marrow, albeit mostly in the more mature stages of the granulocytic lineage. Moreover, unlike hCD33, mCD33 in peripheral blood is primarily expressed on granulocytes. Also, unlike hCD33, mCD33 did not bind to alpha2-3- or alpha2-6-linked sialic acids on lactosamine units. Instead, it showed distinctive sialic acid-dependent binding only to the short O-linked glycans of certain mucins and weak binding to the sialyl-Tn epitope. Binding was enhanced by removal of 9-O-acetyl groups and attenuated by truncation of the glycerol-like side chain of sialic acids. Mice deficient in CD33 were viable and fertile in a controlled-access specific-pathogen-free vivarium, showed no major morphological or histological abnormalities, had no changes in bone marrow or peripheral leukocyte subpopulations, and had very minor differences in biochemical and erythrocyte parameters. Cellular responses to intraperitoneally injected proinflammatory stimulants, as well as subsequent interleukin-6 secretion, were also apparently unaffected. These results indicate substantial species differences in CD33 expression patterns and ligand recognition and suggest functional degeneracy between mCD33 and the other CD33-related Siglec proteins expressed on cells of the myeloid lineage.

  15. CD33/Siglec-3 Binding Specificity, Expression Pattern, and Consequences of Gene Deletion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman-Van der Linden, Els C. M.; Angata, Takashi; Reynolds, Shirley A.; Powell, Leland D.; Hedrick, Stephen M.; Varki, Ajit

    2003-01-01

    Mouse CD33/Siglec-3 (mCD33) is the apparent ortholog of human CD33/Siglec-3 (hCD33), a member of the Siglec (sialic acid-binding Ig superfamily lectin) family of sialic acid-recognizing cell-surface lectins. We examined the binding specificity and expression pattern of mCD33 and explored its functions by generating mice deficient in this molecule. Like hCD33, mCD33 is expressed on myeloid precursors in the bone marrow, albeit mostly in the more mature stages of the granulocytic lineage. Moreover, unlike hCD33, mCD33 in peripheral blood is primarily expressed on granulocytes. Also, unlike hCD33, mCD33 did not bind to α2-3- or α2-6-linked sialic acids on lactosamine units. Instead, it showed distinctive sialic acid-dependent binding only to the short O-linked glycans of certain mucins and weak binding to the sialyl-Tn epitope. Binding was enhanced by removal of 9-O-acetyl groups and attenuated by truncation of the glycerol-like side chain of sialic acids. Mice deficient in CD33 were viable and fertile in a controlled-access specific-pathogen-free vivarium, showed no major morphological or histological abnormalities, had no changes in bone marrow or peripheral leukocyte subpopulations, and had very minor differences in biochemical and erythrocyte parameters. Cellular responses to intraperitoneally injected proinflammatory stimulants, as well as subsequent interleukin-6 secretion, were also apparently unaffected. These results indicate substantial species differences in CD33 expression patterns and ligand recognition and suggest functional degeneracy between mCD33 and the other CD33-related Siglec proteins expressed on cells of the myeloid lineage. PMID:12773563

  16. High-Throughput Screening based Identification of Small Molecule Antagonists of Integrin CD11b/CD18 Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Maiguel, Dony; Brown, Brock T.; Suyama, Eigo; Barth, Constantinos J.; Hedrick, Michael; Vasile, Stefan; Sergienko, Eduard; Schürer, Stephan; Gupta, Vineet

    2010-01-01

    Binding of leukocyte specific integrin CD11b/CD18 to its physiologic ligands is important for the development of normal immune response in vivo. Integrin CD11b/CD18 is also a key cellular effector of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, small molecules selectively inhibiting the function of integrin CD11b/CD18 are currently lacking. We used a newly described cell-based high throughput screening assay to identify a number of highly potent antagonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 from chemical libraries containing >100,000 unique compounds. Computational analyses suggest that the identified compounds cluster into several different chemical classes. A number of the newly identified compounds blocked adhesion of wild-type mouse neutrophils to CD11b/CD18 ligand fibrinogen. Mapping the most active compounds against chemical fingerprints of known antagonists of related integrin CD11a/CD18 shows little structural similarity, suggesting that the newly identified compounds are novel and unique. PMID:20188705

  17. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and disruptive behavior disorders: prevalence, associations, and explanation of the relationships.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Mary M; Cavanna, Andrea E; Eapen, Valsamma

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and conduct disorder (CD) are both heterogeneous childhood onset conditions, and although patients with CD have been described in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome cohorts, little is known about the etiology of CD in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome or of the interrelationships. A cohort of 578 consecutive patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome was assessed using standard assessment protocols. A total of 13.5% of participants had only Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, whereas the rest had associated comorbidities and psychopathology. CD occurred in 14.5% of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome probands. These findings suggest that CD is not an integral part of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome but rather that CD in the context of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is related to the presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as, and importantly, a family history of aggressive and violent behavior and forensic encounters.

  18. Unique properties of Cd-binding peptides induced in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y; Nakagawa, C W; Murasugi, A

    1986-01-01

    Metallothioneins, a class of low molecular weight cysteine-rich proteins that bind heavy metal ions, have been found in various eucaryotic organisms. When fission yeasts are grown in the presence of high concentration of CdCl2, large amounts of Cd-binding peptides (Cd-BP1 and Cd-BP2) are synthesized. Cd-BP1 (MW 4000) contains 4 mole of small unit peptide (cadystin, MW 771), 6 mole of Cd2+, and 1 mole of the labile sulfide; on the other hand, Cd-BP2 (MW 1800) contains 2 mole of cadystin and 2 mole of Cd2+. While Cd-BP2 shows similarities to mammalian Cd-thioneins in UV and CD spectra, Cd-BP1 has a characteristic shoulder at 265 nm in the UV absorption spectrum and shows two marked Cotton bands at 257 nm (negative) and 275 nm (positive). These characteristics of Cd-BP1 are not found in the other Cd-thioneins. When Cd-BP1 is acidified (pH 2.0) and successively neutralized, a shoulder of 265 nm in the UV spectrum and a Cotton band at 275 nm disappear, and the molecular weight changes from 4000 to 1800, with simultaneous loss of the labile sulfide. While the reconstituted complex without labile sulfide showed the characteristics of Cd-BP2, the reconstituted complex in the presence of labile sulfide indicated partial reconstitution of Cd-BP1. The UV and CD spectra differences between reconstituted and native Cd-BP1 suggest the requirement for some additional molecular architecture including another peptide-Cd2+ interaction. Induction of cadystin synthesis is almost exclusive for Cd, but an exception is a small amount of cadystin also induced by the higher concentration of CuCl2 (2.5 mM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3709432

  19. Soluble CD83 Inhibits T Cell Activation by Binding to the TLR4/MD-2 Complex on CD14+ Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horvatinovich, Joe M.; Grogan, Elizabeth W.; Norris, Marcus; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Lemos, Henrique; Mellor, Andrew L.; Tcherepanova, Irina Y.; Nicolette, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane protein CD83, expressed on APCs, B cells, and T cells, can be expressed as a soluble form generated by alternative splice variants and/or by shedding. Soluble CD83 (sCD83) was shown to be involved in negatively regulating the immune response. sCD83 inhibits T cell proliferation in vitro, supports allograft survival in vivo, prevents corneal transplant rejection, and attenuates the progression and severity of autoimmune diseases and experimental colitis. Although sCD83 binds to human PBMCs, the specific molecules that bind sCD83 have not been identified. In this article, we identify myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2), the coreceptor within the TLR4/MD-2 receptor complex, as the high-affinity sCD83 binding partner. TLR4/MD-2 mediates proinflammatory signal delivery following recognition of bacterial LPSs. However, altering TLR4 signaling can attenuate the proinflammatory cascade, leading to LPS tolerance. Our data show that binding of sCD83 to MD-2 alters this signaling cascade by rapidly degrading IL-1R–associated kinase-1, leading to induction of the anti-inflammatory mediators IDO, IL-10, and PGE2 in a COX-2–dependent manner. sCD83 inhibited T cell proliferation, blocked IL-2 secretion, and rendered T cells unresponsive to further downstream differentiation signals mediated by IL-2. Therefore, we propose the tolerogenic mechanism of action of sCD83 to be dependent on initial interaction with APCs, altering early cytokine signal pathways and leading to T cell unresponsiveness. PMID:28193829

  20. Temperature effect on IgE binding to CD23 versus Fc epsilon RI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Hung; Kilmon, Michelle A; Ma, Check; Caven, Timothy H; Chan-Li, Yee; Shelburne, Anne E; Tombes, Robert M; Roush, Eric; Conrad, Daniel H

    2003-02-15

    A chimeric soluble CD23, consisting of the extracellular domain of mouse CD23 and a modified leucine zipper (lz-CD23), has been shown to inhibit IgE binding to the FcepsilonRI. A similar human CD23 construct was also shown to inhibit binding of human IgE to human FcepsilonRI. In both systems, the inhibition was found to be temperature dependent; a 10-fold molar excess of lz-CD23 gave 90-98% inhibition at 4 degrees C, dropping to 20-30% inhibition at 37 degrees C. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of lz-CD23 binding to an IgE-coated sensor chip suggested that the effective concentration of lz-CD23 was lower at the higher temperatures. Analysis of (125)I-IgE binding to CD23(+)-Chinese hamster ovary cells also indicated that increased temperature resulted in a lower percentage of IgE capable of interacting with CD23. In contrast, IgE interacts more effectively with FcepsilonRI(+)-rat basophilic leukemia cells at 37 degrees C compared with 4 degrees C. The results support the concept that the open and closed IgE structures found by crystallography interact differently with the two IgE receptors and suggest that temperature influences the relative percentage of IgE in the respective structural forms. Changes in CD23 oligomerization also plays a role in the decreased binding seen at physiological temperatures.

  1. Antibody raised against soluble CD4-rgp120 complex recognizes the CD4 moiety and blocks membrane fusion without inhibiting CD4-gp120 binding

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We studied the humoral response of mice immunized with soluble CD4- rgp120 complex, testing polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the aim of identifying molecular changes that take place after the first interaction between human immunodeficiency virus and the cell surface. The antisera had a paradoxically high syncytia-blocking titer associated with anti-CD4 specificity, while their capacity to inhibit CD4-gp120 binding was relatively modest. One of the mAbs produced from these responders blocks syncytia formation but does not inhibit CD4 interaction with gp120. Apparently, this mAb interacts with the CD4 moiety of CD4-gp120 complex and prevents a post-binding event necessary for membrane fusion and viral infection. PMID:2212945

  2. Influence of surfactants on gill physiology and cadmium uptake in perfused rainbow trout gills

    SciTech Connect

    Paert, P.S.; Svanberg, O.; Bergstroem, E.

    1985-04-01

    Cadmium transfer through and the retention of metal in perfused gills from rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) has been studied in the presence of two detergents, LAS (linear alkylaryl sulphonate) and NP-10EO (nonylphenol ethoxylate). Accordingly, the effects of the metal and the surfactants on gill viability (vascular resistance, oxygen diffusion capacity, sodium net flux) was measured. Cd had no effect on gill viability either at 0.008 or at 9.0 mumol/liter during a 60-min perfusion period. The viability of the gills deteriorated markedly during 60 min of exposure to 100 mumol/liter LAS and to NP-10EO, or to a mixture of 100 mumol/liter surfactant + 8.1-8.3 mumol/liter Cd. LAS, 100 mumol/liter, reduced Cd transfer, whereas NP-10EO had no effect. NP-10EO increased Cd retention in gill tissue. LAS more than doubled Cd transfer through the gills when tested in concentrations expected to be found in a polluted recipient (0.9 micrograms/liter Cd + 0.05 mg/liter LAS). NP-10EO had no effect on the transfer when tested under these environmentally relevant conditions.

  3. Comparative study of the bioaccumulation and elimination of trace metals (Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn and Fe) in the digestive gland, gills and muscle of bivalve Pinna nobilis during a field transplant experiment.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jamel; Chouba, Lassaad; Banni, Mohamed; Boussetta, Hamadi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term bioaccumulation and elimination of Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe by Pinna nobilis tissues after their 90 day-transplantation period at Téboulba fishing harbor. During the transplantation period, the Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe concentrations in the different tissues of the mussels were measured before and after exposure period. Metal (Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe) accumulation in P. nobilis mussels varied depending on the analyzed tissue and the caging times. Notable differences in Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe accumulation patterns within the digestive gland, gills and muscle were found and may be due to the ability of each tissue to accumulate metals. During the depuration phase, the elimination of Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe depended on the target tissue and the metal speciation. Cd, Pb, Mn and Fe were eliminated rapidly from one organ and increased in other when compared to those of 90 day transplanted mussels. The increase of metal loads during the elimination phase is not clear and particularly what kind of processes is responsible for such response. However, it is reasonable to assume that metals increase is related to the existence of an accumulation/detoxification mechanism, which involves the transport of metals from an organ to another. The data obtained indicate that because of the significantly high quantities of Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe accumulated during the exposure phase, the transplanted mussels are suitable bioindicators for monitoring trace metals in marine ecosystem.

  4. Shape-controlled synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) and study on the binding of Cd2+/CdS to trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dezhi; Wang, Li; Wang, Yabo; Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Qiuxia; He, Bingyu

    2017-07-01

    Protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with different morphology have been synthesized under biomimetic condition using trypsin as capping agent in aqueous medium. The reaction parameters including concentration of trypsin, pH value, reaction time, and temperature have a major influence on the morphology and optical property of CdS NCs. XRD, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), TEM, HRTEM, and EDS characterizations were used to investigate the structure, composition, morphology, and size of as-prepared products. The binding reaction between Cd2+/CdS and trypsin was investigated systematically through various spectroscopic methods. UV-vis, FT-IR, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and conductivity analysis of Cd2+-trypsin suggest that Cd2+ ions could coordinate with the functional groups of trypsin and induce the formation of unfolding and loosening structure in protein molecules, and the change of protein conformation was also verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectra. This interaction increased local supersaturation of Cd2+ ions around the groups of trypsin and reduced the nucleation activation energy of CdS nuclei, which favored heterogeneous nucleation in trypsin matrix and resulted in the formation of inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The functional integrity of the enzyme conjugated to CdS NCs was studied by monitoring the enzymatic activity of CdS-trypsin conjugates. The fluorescence of CdS NCs is dependent strongly on trypsin which passivates the surface of NCs.

  5. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline . E-mail: pauline@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-08-26

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding.

  6. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  7. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    PubMed

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  8. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  9. MiniCD4 protein resistance mutations affect binding to the HIV-1 gp120 CD4 binding site and decrease entry efficiency.

    PubMed

    Grupping, Katrijn; Selhorst, Philippe; Michiels, Johan; Vereecken, Katleen; Heyndrickx, Leo; Kessler, Pascal; Vanham, Guido; Martin, Loïc; Ariën, Kevin K

    2012-05-02

    Binding of the viral envelope protein (Env), and particularly of its gp120 subunit, to the cellular CD4 receptor is the first essential step of the HIV-1 entry process. The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp120, and especially a recessed cavity occupied by the CD4 Phe43 residue, are known to be highly conserved among the different circulating subtypes and therefore constitute particularly interesting targets for vaccine and drug design. The miniCD4 proteins are a promising class of CD4bs inhibitors. Studying virus evolution under pressure of CD4bs inhibitors could provide insight on the gp120-CD4 interaction and viral entry. The present study reports on the resistance induction of two subtype B HIV-1 against the most active miniCD4, M48U1, and its ancestor, M48, and how these mutated positions affect CD4bs recognition, entry efficiency, and sensitivity to other CD4bs inhibitors. Resistance against M48U1 was always associated with S375R/N substitution in both BaL and SF162; M48 resistance was associated with D474N substitution in SF162 and with H105Y substitution in BaL. In addition, some other mutations at position V255 and G471 were of importance for SF162 resistant viruses. Except for 474, all of these mutated positions are conserved, and introducing them into an SF162 Env expressing infectious molecular clone (pBRNL4.3 SF162) resulted in decreased entry efficiency. Furthermore, resistant mutants showed at least some cross-resistance towards other CD4bs inhibitors, the V3 monoclonal antibody 447-52D and some even against the monoclonal antibody 17b, of which the epitope overlaps the co-receptor binding site. The mutations H105Y, V255M, S375R/N, G471R/E, and D474N are found to be involved in resistance towards M48 and M48U1. All mutated positions are part of, or in close proximity to, the CD4bs; most are highly conserved, and all have an impact on the entry efficiency, suggesting their importance for optimal virus infectivity.

  10. Endothelial CD99 supports arrest of mouse neutrophils in venules and binds to neutrophil PILRs.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Debashree; März, Sigrid; Li, Yu-Tung; Artz, Annette; Schäfer, Kerstin; Seelige, Ruth; Pacheco-Blanco, Mariana; Jing, Ding; Bixel, Maria Gabriele; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2017-03-30

    CD99 is a crucial regulator of the transmigration (diapedesis) of leukocytes through the blood vessel wall. Here, we report that CD99 acts at 2 different steps in the extravasation process. In agreement with previous antibody-blocking experiments, we found that CD99 gene inactivation caused neutrophil accumulation between venular endothelial cells and the basement membrane in the inflamed cremaster. Unexpectedly, we additionally found that leukocyte attachment to the luminal surface of the venular endothelium was impaired in the absence of CD99. Intravital video microscopy revealed that CD99 supported rapid chemokine-induced leukocyte arrest. Inhibition of leukocyte attachment and extravasation were both solely due to the absence of CD99 on endothelial cells, whereas CD99 on leukocytes was irrelevant. Therefore, we searched for heterophilic ligands of endothelial CD99 on neutrophils. We found that endothelial cells bind to the paired immunoglobulinlike receptors (PILRs) in a strictly CD99-dependent way. In addition, endothelial CD99 was coprecipitated with PILRs from neutrophils that adhered to endothelial cells. Furthermore, soluble CD99 carrying a transferable biotin tag could transfer this tag covalently to PILR when incubated with intact neutrophils. Binding of neutrophils under flow to a surface coated with P-selectin fragment crystallizable (Fc) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) Fc became more shear resistant if CD99 Fc was coimmobilized. This increased shear resistance was lost if neutrophils were preincubated with anti-PILR antibodies. We concluded that endothelial CD99 promotes leukocyte attachment to endothelium in inflamed vessels by a heterophilic ligand. In addition, CD99 binds to PILRs on neutrophils, an interaction that leads to increased shear resistance of the neutrophil attachment to ICAM-1.

  11. Identification of a common hyaluronan binding motif in the hyaluronan binding proteins RHAMM, CD44 and link protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B; Yang, B L; Savani, R C; Turley, E A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two hyaluronan (HA) binding domains in the HA receptor, RHAMM, that occur near the carboxyl-terminus of this protein. We show here that these two HA binding domains are the only HA binding regions in RHAMM, and that they contribute approximately equally to the HA binding ability of this receptor. Mutation of domain II using recombinant polypeptides of RHAMM demonstrates that K423 and R431, spaced seven amino acids apart, are critical for HA binding activity. Domain I contains two sets of two basic amino acids, each spaced seven residues apart, and mutation of these basic amino acids reduced their binding to HA--Sepharose. These results predict that two basic amino acids flanking a seven amino acid stretch [hereafter called B(X7)B] are minimally required for HA binding activity. To assess whether this motif predicts HA binding in the intact RHAMM protein, we mutated all basic amino acids in domains I and II that form part of these motifs using site-directed mutagenesis and prepared fusion protein from the mutated cDNA. The altered RHAMM protein did not bind HA, confirming that the basic amino acids and their spacing are critical for binding. A specific requirement for arginine or lysine residues was identified since mutation of K430, R431 and K432 to histidine residues abolished binding. Clustering of basic amino acids either within or at either end of the motif enhanced HA binding activity while the occurrence of acidic residues between the basic amino acids reduced binding. The B(X7)B motif, in which B is either R or K and X7 contains no acidic residues and at least one basic amino acid, was found in all HA binding proteins molecularly characterized to date. Recombinant techniques were used to generate chimeric proteins containing either the B(X7)B motifs present in CD44 or link protein, with the amino-terminus of RHAMM (amino acids 1-238) that does not bind HA. All chimeric proteins containing the motif bound HA in transblot analyses

  12. Gills of antarctic fish.

    PubMed

    Rankin, J C; Tuurala, H

    1998-01-01

    We review the literature on the way the structure of icefish gills relates the physiology of these haemoglobin-less fishes. Vascular casting confirmed earlier reports that the only special feature of the gills is the large size of the blood vessels, especially the prominent and continuous marginal channels Isolated perfused gill arches were used to study the effects of changes in afferent and efferent pressure on gill resistance and tritiated water influx in Chionobathyscus dewitti. Increasing perfusion rate did not change gill resistance, but there were moderate proportional increases in water influx. Reducing efferent pressure increased gill resistance but did not affect water influx. In both C. dewitti and Cryodraco antarcticus gills perfused at constant flow rate, noradrenaline produced concentration-dependent decreases in gill resistance and, with high concentrations, increases in water influx. Fixation while perfusion continued was used to compare blood space dimensions in control, noradrenaline-treated and unperfused gills. Noradrenaline caused large increases in the thickness of the lamellar blood space and increased lamellar height, despite a greatly reduced afferent pressure. This suggests that modulation of pillar cell active tension might be involved in control of lamellar perfusion. The possible relationship between gill water fluxes and lamellar recruitment is discussed.

  13. CD44v6-Peptide Functionalized Nanoparticles Selectively Bind to Metastatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Linxian; Schmitt, Mark; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Orian-Rousseau, Veronique; Levkin, Pavel A

    2017-01-01

    CD44v6 peptide functionalized nanoparticles are fabricated in a facile and controllable way to selectively bind to CD44v6 positive tumor cells with highly efficient anticancer and antimetastatic properties. The reported modular synthesis and facile preparation makes this system highly potent for developing novel multifunctional nanocarriers for therapeutic and/or diagnostic anticancer applications.

  14. CD22 ligand-binding and signaling domains reciprocally regulate B-cell Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jennifer; Obermeier, Ingrid; Wöhner, Miriam; Brandl, Carolin; Mrotzek, Sarah; Angermüller, Sieglinde; Maity, Palash C.; Reth, Michael; Nitschke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    A high proportion of human B cells carry B-cell receptors (BCRs) that are autoreactive. Inhibitory receptors such as CD22 can downmodulate autoreactive BCR responses. With its extracellular domain, CD22 binds to sialic acids in α2,6 linkages in cis, on the surface of the same B cell or in trans, on other cells. Sialic acids are self ligands, as they are abundant in vertebrates, but are usually not expressed by pathogens. We show that cis-ligand binding of CD22 is crucial for the regulation of B-cell Ca2+ signaling by controlling the CD22 association to the BCR. Mice with a mutated CD22 ligand-binding domain of CD22 showed strongly reduced Ca2+ signaling. In contrast, mice with mutated CD22 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs have increased B-cell Ca2+ responses, increased B-cell turnover, and impaired survival of the B cells. Thus, the CD22 ligand-binding domain has a crucial function in regulating BCR signaling, which is relevant for controlling autoimmunity. PMID:23836650

  15. CD14, a Receptor for Complexes of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Samuel D.; Ramos, Robert A.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.; Mathison, John C.

    1990-09-01

    Leukocytes respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at nanogram per milliliter concentrations with secretion of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Excess secretion of TNF-α causes endotoxic shock, an often fatal complication of infection. LPS in the bloodstream rapidly binds to the serum protein, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), and cellular responses to physiological levels of LPS are dependent on LBP. CD14, a differentiation antigen of monocytes, was found to bind complexes of LPS and LBP, and blockade of CD14 with monoclonal antibodies prevented synthesis of TNF-α by whole blood incubated with LPS. Thus, LPS may induce responses by interacting with a soluble binding protein in serum that then binds the cell surface protein CD14.

  16. Ceramide-CD300f Binding Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Skin Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Emiko; Izawa, Kumi; Kaitani, Ayako; Isobe, Masamichi; Maehara, Akie; Uchida, Koichiro; Maeda, Keiko; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Kitamura, Toshio; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kitaura, Jiro

    2017-01-01

    LPS triggers inflammatory responses; however, the negative regulation of LPS responses in vivo remains poorly understood. CD300f is an inhibitory receptor among the CD300 family of paired activating and inhibitory receptors. We have previously identified ceramide as a ligand for CD300f and shown that the binding of ceramide to CD300f inhibits IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mouse models. Here we identify the critical role of CD300f in inhibiting LPS-induced skin inflammation. CD300f deficiency remarkably enhanced LPS-induced skin edema and neutrophil recruitment in mice. Higher levels of factors that increase vascular permeability and of factors that induce neutrophil recruitment were detected in LPS-injected skin pouch exudates of CD300f−/− mice as compared with wild-type mice. CD300f was highly expressed in mast cells and recruited neutrophils, but not in macrophages, among skin myeloid cells. CD300f deficiency failed to influence the intrinsic migratory ability of neutrophils. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppressed the release of chemical mediators from mast cells and from neutrophils in response to LPS. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that mast cells mediated enhanced edema in LPS-stimulated skin of CD300f−/− mice, whereas mast cells together with recruited neutrophils mediated robust neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, administering a ceramide antibody or ceramide-containing vesicles enhanced or suppressed LPS-induced skin inflammation of wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, ceramide-CD300f binding inhibits LPS-induced skin inflammation, implicating CD300f as a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in vivo. PMID:28073916

  17. Ceramide-CD300f Binding Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Emiko; Izawa, Kumi; Kaitani, Ayako; Isobe, Masamichi; Maehara, Akie; Uchida, Koichiro; Maeda, Keiko; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Kitamura, Toshio; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kitaura, Jiro

    2017-02-17

    LPS triggers inflammatory responses; however, the negative regulation of LPS responses in vivo remains poorly understood. CD300f is an inhibitory receptor among the CD300 family of paired activating and inhibitory receptors. We have previously identified ceramide as a ligand for CD300f and shown that the binding of ceramide to CD300f inhibits IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mouse models. Here we identify the critical role of CD300f in inhibiting LPS-induced skin inflammation. CD300f deficiency remarkably enhanced LPS-induced skin edema and neutrophil recruitment in mice. Higher levels of factors that increase vascular permeability and of factors that induce neutrophil recruitment were detected in LPS-injected skin pouch exudates of CD300f(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type mice. CD300f was highly expressed in mast cells and recruited neutrophils, but not in macrophages, among skin myeloid cells. CD300f deficiency failed to influence the intrinsic migratory ability of neutrophils. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppressed the release of chemical mediators from mast cells and from neutrophils in response to LPS. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that mast cells mediated enhanced edema in LPS-stimulated skin of CD300f(-/-) mice, whereas mast cells together with recruited neutrophils mediated robust neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, administering a ceramide antibody or ceramide-containing vesicles enhanced or suppressed LPS-induced skin inflammation of wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, ceramide-CD300f binding inhibits LPS-induced skin inflammation, implicating CD300f as a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Characterization of the high molecular weight Cd-binding complex in water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) when exposed to Cd.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiann-Shing; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Chien, Hung-Chi; Wu, Yu-Jen; Lin, Shyh-Mirn; Juang, Rong-Huay

    2008-07-23

    Water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes) is a rapid-growing freshwater vascular plant that has been used to remove heavy metals in contaminated water. But the transportation and distribution of the absorbed heavy metal in the plant are not clear. In this study, water hyacinth was exposed to cadmium (Cd, 10 microM, pulse) and then transferred to a Cd-free solution (chase). The Cd content in the tissues was measured, and the Cd-binding complexes were isolated and identified. We found that (1) in two days, up to 80% of the Cd in the solution was absorbed by the plant, and the Cd could not be released back to the growth solution in the chase period; (2) approximately 1 mg of Cd was accumulated in the water hyacinth/g of dry weight in this condition; (3) invading Cd was bound rapidly as the low-molecular-weight (LMW) complex serving as the transient form for further sequestration; (4) the LMW complex in water hyacinth contained no phytochelatins and was different from the LMW complex in fission yeast; (5) the Cd absorbed in the plant was essentially stored in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) form after 1 week; (6) a small fraction of the absorbed Cd was found in the upper part of the plant (stem and leaves) in the form of complexes; (7) the HMW complex was composed of phytochelatins PC 3 and PC 4 primarily, with only a small amount of PC 2; (8) a rare PC-related peptide was found in the HMW complex that might be derived from PC 3. These observations contribute to the further understanding of water hyacinth in serving as an efficient and reliable accumulator for heavy metals.

  19. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74.

  20. Differential expression of SAP and EAT-2-binding leukocyte cell-surface molecules CD84, CD150 (SLAM), CD229 (Ly9) and CD244 (2B4).

    PubMed

    Romero, X; Benítez, D; March, S; Vilella, R; Miralpeix, M; Engel, P

    2004-08-01

    The CD150 (SLAM) family consists of nine leukocyte cell-surface proteins involved in lymphocyte activation that belong to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. Six members of this family--CD84, CD150 (SLAM), CD229 (Ly9), CD244 (2B4), NTB-A, and CS1--associate with adapter proteins--SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and EAT-2. SAP is a short intracellular molecule that is mutated in humans with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Flow cytometric analysis of the expression of CD84, CD150, CD229, and CD244 cell-surface receptors on several leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets was performed. CD84 and CD150 were present on thymocytes, mature T cells and antigen-presenting cells. The expression of CD84 and CD150 was high on memory T cells. CD150 expression was strongly up-regulated after cell activation. In contrast to CD84, CD150 was absent on resting monocytes and immature dendritic cells (DCs). CD229 presented a pattern of expression restricted to lymphocytes. CD244 was preferentially expressed on natural killer cells, CD8(+) effector cells, resting monocytes, basophils, and eosinophils. We describe a broader distribution of CD84, CD150, CD229, and CD244 than previously reported and show that they are differentially expressed on hematopoietic cells. The heterogeneous expression of these receptors indicates that these molecules may play non-redundant functions in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  1. Crystal structure of the CD2-binding domain of CD58 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3) at 1.8-Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ikemizu, Shinji; Sparks, Lisa M.; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Harlos, Karl; Stuart, David I.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Davis, Simon J.

    1999-01-01

    The binding of the cell surface molecule CD58 (formerly lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3) to its ligand, CD2, significantly increases the sensitivity of antigen recognition by T cells. This was the first heterophilic cell adhesion interaction to be discovered and is now an important paradigm for analyzing the structural basis of cell–cell recognition. The crystal structure of a CD2-binding chimeric form of CD58, solved to 1.8-Å resolution, reveals that the ligand binding domain of CD58 has the expected Ig superfamily V-set topology and shares several of the hitherto unique structural features of CD2, consistent with previous speculation that the genes encoding these molecules arose via duplication of a common precursor. Nevertheless, evidence for considerable divergence of CD2 and CD58 is also implicit in the structures. Mutations that disrupt CD2 binding map to the highly acidic surface of the AGFCC′C′′ β-sheet of CD58, which, unexpectedly, lacks marked shape complementarity to the equivalent, rather more basic CD58-binding face of human CD2. The specificity of the very weak interactions of proteins mediating cell–cell recognition may often derive largely from electrostatic complementarity, with shape matching at the protein–protein interface being less exact than for interactions that combine specificity with high affinity, such as those involving antibodies. PMID:10200255

  2. Ligand binding determines whether CD46 is internalized by clathrin-coated pits or macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Crimeen-Irwin, Blessing; Ellis, Sarah; Christiansen, Dale; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Milland, Julie; Lanteri, Marc; Loveland, Bruce E; Gerlier, Denis; Russell, Sarah M

    2003-11-21

    CD46 is a ubiquitous human cell surface receptor for the complement components C3b and C4b and for various pathogens, including the measles virus and human herpes virus 6. Ligand binding to CD46 affects (i) protection of autologous cells from complement attack by breakdown of complement components, (ii) intracellular signals that affect the regulation of immune cell function, (iii) antigen presentation, and (iv) down-regulation of cell surface CD46. Recent evidence indicates that CD46 signaling can link innate and acquired immune function. The molecular mechanisms for these processes and the importance of intracellular trafficking of the receptor have not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that, in nonlymphoid cells, CD46 is constitutively internalized via clathrin-coated pits, traffics to multivesicular bodies, and is recycled to the cell surface. However, cross-linking of CD46 at the cell surface, by either multivalent antibody or by measles virus, induces pseudopodia that engulf the ligand in a process similar to macropinocytosis, and leads to the degradation of cell surface CD46. Thus, we have elucidated two pathways for CD46 internalization, which are regulated by the valence of cross-linking of CD46 and which utilize either clathrin-coated pits or pseudopodial extension. This has important implications for CD46 signaling, antigen presentation, CD46 down-regulation, and engulfment of pathogens.

  3. Resistance of primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to soluble CD4 is independent of CD4-rgp120 binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, A; Smith, D H; Marsters, S A; Riddle, L; Gregory, T J; Ho, D D; Capon, D J

    1991-01-01

    The infection of human cells by laboratory strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be blocked readily in vitro by recombinant soluble CD4 and CD4-immunoglobulin hybrid molecules. In contrast, infection by primary isolates of HIV-1 is much less sensitive to blocking in vitro by soluble CD4-based molecules. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference between HIV-1 strains, we isolated the gp120-encoding genes from several CD4-resistant and CD4-sensitive HIV-1 strains and characterized the CD4-binding properties of their recombinant gp120 (rgp120) products. Extensive amino acid sequence variation was found between the gp120 genes of CD4-resistant and CD4-sensitive HIV-1 isolates. However, the CD4-binding affinities of rgp120 from strains with markedly different CD4 sensitivities were essentially the same, and only small differences were observed in the kinetics of CD4 binding. These results suggest that the lower sensitivity of primary HIV-1 isolates to neutralization by CD4-based molecules is not due to lower binding affinity between soluble CD4 and free gp120. PMID:1871120

  4. Generation of Affibody ligands binding interleukin-2 receptor alpha/CD25.

    PubMed

    Grönwall, Caroline; Snelders, Eveline; Palm, Anna Jarelöv; Eriksson, Fredrik; Herne, Nina; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Affibody molecules specific for human IL-2Ralpha, the IL-2 (interleukin-2) receptor alpha subunit, also known as CD25, were selected by phage-display technology from a combinatorial protein library based on the 58-residue Protein A-derived Z domain. The IL-2R system plays a major role in T-cell activation and the regulation of cellular immune responses. Moreover, CD25 has been found to be overexpressed in organ rejections, a number of autoimmune diseases and T-cell malignancies. The phage-display selection using Fc-fused target protein generated 16 unique Affibody molecules targeting CD25. The two most promising binders were characterized in more detail using biosensor analysis and demonstrated strong and selective binding to CD25. Kinetic biosensor analysis revealed that the two monomeric Affibody molecules bound to CD25 with apparent affinities of 130 and 240 nM respectively. The Affibody molecules were, on biosensor analysis, found to compete for the same binding site as the natural ligand IL-2 and the IL-2 blocking monoclonal antibody 2A3. Hence the Affibody molecules were assumed to have an overlapping binding site with IL-2 and antibodies targeting the IL-2 blocking Tac epitope (for example, the monoclonal antibodies Daclizumab and Basiliximab, both of which have been approved for therapeutic use). Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow-cytometric analysis of CD25-expressing cells demonstrated that the selected Affibody molecules bound to CD4+ CD25+ PMBCs (peripheral-blood mononuclear cells), the IL-2-dependent cell line NK92 and phytohaemagglutinin-activated PMBCs. The potential use of the CD25-binding Affibody molecules as targeting agents for medical imaging and for therapeutic applications is discussed.

  5. In Vivo Binding and Retention of CD4-Specific DARPin 57.2 in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Krarup, Anders; Gettie, Agegnehu; Kuroda, Marcelo; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Trkola, Alexandra; Robbiani, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background The recently described Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin) technology can produce highly selective ligands to a variety of biological targets at a low production cost. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the in vivo use of DARPins for future application to novel anti-HIV strategies, we identified potent CD4-specific DARPins that recognize rhesus CD4 and followed the fate of intravenously injected CD4-specific DARPin 57.2 in rhesus macaques. The human CD4-specific DARPin 57.2 bound macaque CD4+ cells and exhibited potent inhibitory activity against SIV infection in vitro. DARPin 57.2 or the control E3_5 DARPin was injected into rhesus macaques and the fate of cell-free and cell-bound CD4-specific DARPin was evaluated. DARPin-bound CD4+ cells were detected in the peripheral blood as early as 30 minutes after the injection, decreasing within 6 hours and being almost undetectable within 24 hours. The amount of DARPin bound was dependent on the amount of DARPin injected. CD4-specific DARPin was also detected on CD4+ cells in the lymph nodes within 30 minutes, which persisted with similar kinetics to blood. More extensive analysis using blood revealed that DARPin 57.2 bound to all CD4+ cell types (T cells, monocytes, dendritic cells) in vivo and in vitro with the amount of binding directly proportional to the amount of CD4 on the cell surface. Cell-free DARPins were also detected in the plasma, but were rapidly cleared from circulation. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that the CD4-specific DARPin can rapidly and selectively bind its target cells in vivo, warranting further studies on possible clinical use of the DARPin technology. PMID:20805996

  6. Increased flexibility and liposome-binding capacity of CD1e at endosomal pH.

    PubMed

    Bushmarina, Natalia; Tourne, Sylvie; Giacometti, Gaëlle; Signorino-Gelo, François; Garcia-Alles, Luis F; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Hanau, Daniel; de la Salle, Henri

    2011-06-01

    The plasma membrane proteins CD1a, CD1b and CD1c are expressed by human dendritic cells, the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, and present lipid antigens to T lymphocytes. CD1e belongs to the same family of molecules, but accumulates as a membrane-associated form in the Golgi compartments of immature dendritic cells and as a soluble cleaved form in the lysosomes of mature dendritic cells. In lysosomes, the N-terminal propeptide of CD1e is also cleaved, but the functional consequences of this step are unknown. Here, we investigated how the pH changes encountered during transport to lysosomes affect the structure of CD1e and its ligand-binding properties. Circular dichroism studies demonstrated that the secondary and tertiary structures of recombinant CD1e were barely altered by pH changes. Nevertheless, at acidic pH, guanidium chloride-induced unfolding of CD1e molecules required lower concentrations of denaturing agent. The nonfunctional L194P allelic variant was found to be structurally less stable at acidic pH than the functional forms, providing an explanation for the lack of its detection in lysosomes. The number of water-exposed hydrophobic patches that bind 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate was higher in acidic conditions, especially for the L194P variant. CD1e molecules interacted with lipid surfaces enriched in anionic lipids, such as bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, a late endosomal/lysosomal lipid, especially at acidic pH, or when the propeptide was present. Altogether, these data indicate that, in the late endosomes/lysosomes of DCs, the acid pH promotes the binding of lipid antigens to CD1e through increased hydrophobic and ionic interactions. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  7. Virions of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to soluble CD4 (sCD4) neutralization differ in sCD4 binding and glycoprotein gp120 retention from sCD4-sensitive isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; McKeating, J A; Huang, Y X; Ashkenazi, A; Ho, D D

    1992-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are much less sensitive to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and sCD4-immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeras (CD4-IgG) than are HIV-1 strains adapted to growth in cell culture. We demonstrated that there are significant reductions (10- to 30-fold) in the binding of sCD4 and CD4-IgG to intact virions of five primary isolates compared with sCD4-sensitive, cell culture-adapted isolates RF and IIIB. However, soluble envelope glycoproteins (gp120) derived from the primary isolate virions, directly by detergent solubilization or indirectly by recombinant DNA technology, differed in affinity from RF and IIIB gp120 by only one- to threefold. The reduced binding of sCD4 to these primary isolate virions must therefore be a consequence of the tertiary or quaternary structure of the envelope glycoproteins in their native, oligomeric form on the viral surface. In addition, the rate and extent of sCD4-induced gp120 shedding from these primary isolates was lower than that from RF. We suggest that reduced sCD4 binding and increased gp120 retention together account for the relative resistance of these primary isolates to neutralization by sCD4 and CD4-IgG and that virions of different HIV-1 isolates vary both in the mechanism of sCD4 binding and in subsequent conformational changes in their envelope glycoproteins. PMID:1727487

  8. Envelope Conformational Changes Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Attachment Inhibitors Prevent CD4 Binding and Downstream Entry Events

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsu-Tso; Fan, Li; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; McAuliffe, Brian; Li, Chang-Ben; Yamanaka, Gregory; Zhou, Nannan; Fang, Hua; Dicker, Ira; Dalterio, Richard; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, Tao; Yin, Zhiwei; Ueda, Yasutsugu; Matiskella, John; Kadow, John; Clapham, Paul; Robinson, James; Colonno, Richard; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2006-01-01

    BMS-488043 is a small-molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CD4 attachment inhibitor with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The compound inhibits soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to the 11 distinct HIV envelope gp120 proteins surveyed. Binding of BMS-488043 and that of sCD4 to gp120 are mutually exclusive, since increased concentrations of one can completely block the binding of the other without affecting the maximal gp120 binding capacity. Similarly, BMS-488043 inhibited virion envelope trimers from binding to sCD4-immunoglobulin G (IgG), with decreasing inhibition as the sCD4-IgG concentration increased, and BMS-488043 blocked the sCD4-induced exposure of the gp41 groove in virions. In both virion binding assays, BMS-488043 was active only when added prior to sCD4. Collectively, these results indicate that obstruction of gp120-sCD4 interactions is the primary inhibition mechanism of this compound and that compound interaction with envelope must precede CD4 binding. By three independent approaches, BMS-488043 was further shown to induce conformational changes within gp120 in both the CD4 and CCR5 binding regions. These changes likely prevent gp120-CD4 interactions and downstream entry events. However, BMS-488043 could only partially inhibit CD4 binding to an HIV variant containing a specific envelope truncation and altered gp120 conformation, despite effectively inhibiting the pseudotyped virus infection. Taken together, BMS-488043 inhibits viral entry primarily through altering the envelope conformation and preventing CD4 binding, and other downstream entry events could also be inhibited as a result of these induced conformational changes. PMID:16571818

  9. Simulation of the coupling between nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains in the ATP binding cassette transporter BtuCD.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jacob; Kandt, Christian; Peters, Günther H; Hansen, Flemming Y; Jensen, Morten Ø; Tieleman, D Peter

    2007-04-15

    The nucleotide-induced structural rearrangements in ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, leading to substrate translocation, are largely unknown. We have modeled nucleotide binding and release in the vitamin B(12) importer BtuCD using perturbed elastic network calculations and biased molecular dynamics simulations. Both models predict that nucleotide release decreases the tilt between the two transmembrane domains and opens the cytoplasmic gate. Nucleotide binding has the opposite effect. The observed coupling may be relevant for all ABC transporters because of the conservation of nucleotide binding domains and the shared role of ATP in ABC transporters. The rearrangements in the cytoplasmic gate region do not provide enough space for B(12) to diffuse from the transporter pore into the cytoplasm, which could suggest that peristaltic forces are needed to exclude B(12) from the transporter pore.

  10. Identification of Inhibitors of CD36-Amyloid Beta Binding as Potential Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Doens, Deborah; Valiente, Pedro A; Mfuh, Adelphe M; X T Vo, Anh; Tristan, Adilia; Carreño, Lizmar; Quijada, Mario; Nguyen, Vu T; Perry, George; Larionov, Oleg V; Lleonart, Ricardo; Fernández, Patricia L

    2017-06-21

    Neuroinflammation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid β has a central role in microglia activation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory mediators that are associated with neuronal toxicity. The recognition of amyloid β by microglia depends on the expression of several receptors implicated in the clearance of amyloid and in cell activation. CD36 receptor expressed on microglia interacts with fibrils of amyloid inducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and amyloid internalization. The interruption of the interaction CD36-amyloid β compromises the activation of microglia cells. We have developed and validated a new colorimetric assay to identify potential inhibitors of the binding of amyloid β to CD36. We have found seven molecules, structural analogues of the Trichodermamide family of natural products that interfere with the interaction CD36-amyloid β. By combining molecular docking and dynamics simulations, we suggested the second fatty acids binding site within the large luminal hydrophobic tunnel, present in the extracellular domain of CD36, as the binding pocket of these compounds. Free energy calculations predicted the nonpolar component as the driving force for the binding of these inhibitors. These molecules also inhibited the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with fibrils of amyloid β. This work serves as a platform for the identification of new potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Suppression of immune responses in collagen-induced arthritis by a rationally designed CD80-binding peptide agent.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Eri, Rajaraman; Zunt, Susan L; Summerlin, Don-John; Brand, David D; Blum, Janice S

    2007-02-01

    The CD80/CD86-CD28/CD152 costimulatory pathways transmit signals for CD4+ T cell activation and suppression and are critically involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A significant number of CD4+ T cells and macrophages in the rheumatoid synovium express elevated levels of CD80, increasing the potential for costimulation in trans of naive T cells. To determine the effect of blockade of this costimulatory axis in RA, we designed novel CD80-binding peptides and evaluated their therapeutic potential in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of RA. The conserved MYPPPY motif of CD152 adopts a polyproline type II (PPII) helical conformation in the CD80-CD152 complex. The pairing preferences of the critical residues at the CD80-CD152 interface and their propensity to form PPII helices were integrated to design peptides with optimum PPII helical content that selectively block CD80-receptor interactions. The clinical efficacy was tested in DBA/1LacJ mice that were administered the CD80 blocking agents, called CD80-binding competitive antagonist peptides (CD80-CAPs), at the time of immunization with bovine type II collagen or 3 weeks after immunization. A single administration of select CD80-CAPs significantly reduced the clinical, radiologic, and histologic disease severity in CIA. Importantly, administration of CD80-CAPs during activated immune response significantly suppressed disease development by reducing mononuclear cell infiltration in the joints and mediating peripheral deletion of activated CD4+ T cells. A rationally designed CD80-binding peptide both prevents and suppresses CIA, suggesting a potential application in RA. Apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells following in vivo blockade suggests that the effects of CD80-CAPs may be long-lasting.

  12. Visualization of hormone binding proteins in vivo based on Mn-doped CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang fei; Yu, Ying; Lin, Bi xia; Hu, Xiao gang; Cao, Yu juan; Wu, Jian zhong

    2014-10-01

    Daminozide (B9) is a growth inhibitor with important regulatory roles in plant growth and development. Locating and quantifying B9-binding proteins in plant tissues will assist in investigating the mechanism behind the signal transduction of B9. In this study, red fluorescent Mn-doped CdTe quantum dots (CdTeMn QDs) were synthesized by a high-temperature hydrothermal process. Since CdTeMn QDs possess a maximum fluorescence emission peak at 610 nm, their fluorescence properties are more stable than those of CdTe QDs. A B9-CdTeMn probe was synthesized by coupling B9 with CdTeMn QDs. The fluorescence intensity of the probe is double that of CdTeMn QDs; its fluorescence stability is also superior under different ambient conditions. The probe retains the biological activity of B9 and is unaffected by interference from the green fluorescent protein present in plants. Therefore, we used this probe to label B9-binding proteins selectively in root tissue sections of mung bean seedlings. These proteins were observed predominantly on the surfaces of the cell membranes of the cortex and epidermal parenchyma.

  13. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  14. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  15. Expression of CD3-associated antigen-binding receptors on suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Steele, J K; Billings, P R; Selvaraj, P; Dorf, M E

    1988-01-01

    Three suppressor T (Ts)-cell hybridomas specific for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (NP) hapten were selected for surface expression of cluster determinant 3 (CD3) by using antibody (anti-CD3) or antigen (NP-bovine serum albumin) panning procedures followed by cloning at limiting dilution. The CD3-selected Ts hybridomas showed a 1-2 logarithmic enrichment in suppressor activity when compared to the parent lines; they also specifically bound NP-coupled sheep red blood cells in rosette assays. This antigen-binding ability could be down-modulated by anti-CD3 antibody. Similarly, surface expression of CD3 was specifically down-modulated by preincubation of these hybridomas with antigen. Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody under reducing conditions coprecipitated a broad band of 38-50 kDa associated with two CD3 (25 and 16 kDa) bands. T-cell receptor, anti-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody also immunoprecipitated a broad band in the 41 to 49-kDa region. The combined results suggest that, like helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Ts cells also bear antigen-specific receptors associated with CD3 molecules. Images PMID:2973609

  16. IgE binds asymmetrically to its B cell receptor CD23.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Pang, Marie O Y; Keeble, Anthony H; James, Louisa K; Gould, Hannah J; McDonnell, James M; Sutton, Brian J; Beavil, Andrew J

    2017-03-31

    The antibody IgE plays a central role in allergic disease mechanisms. Its effector functions are controlled through interactions between the Fc region and two principal cell surface receptors FcεRI and CD23. The interaction with FcεRI is primarily responsible for allergic sensitization and the inflammatory response, while IgE binding to CD23 is involved in the regulation of IgE synthesis and allergen transcytosis. Here we present the crystal structure of a CD23/IgE-Fc complex and conduct isothermal titration calorimetric binding studies. Two lectin-like "head" domains of CD23 bind to IgE-Fc with affinities that differ by more than an order of magnitude, but the crystal structure reveals only one head bound to one of the two identical heavy-chains in the asymmetrically bent IgE-Fc. These results highlight the subtle interplay between receptor binding sites in IgE-Fc and their affinities, the understanding of which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease.

  17. IgE binds asymmetrically to its B cell receptor CD23

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Pang, Marie O. Y.; Keeble, Anthony H.; James, Louisa K.; Gould, Hannah J.; McDonnell, James M.; Sutton, Brian J.; Beavil, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The antibody IgE plays a central role in allergic disease mechanisms. Its effector functions are controlled through interactions between the Fc region and two principal cell surface receptors FcεRI and CD23. The interaction with FcεRI is primarily responsible for allergic sensitization and the inflammatory response, while IgE binding to CD23 is involved in the regulation of IgE synthesis and allergen transcytosis. Here we present the crystal structure of a CD23/IgE-Fc complex and conduct isothermal titration calorimetric binding studies. Two lectin-like “head” domains of CD23 bind to IgE-Fc with affinities that differ by more than an order of magnitude, but the crystal structure reveals only one head bound to one of the two identical heavy-chains in the asymmetrically bent IgE-Fc. These results highlight the subtle interplay between receptor binding sites in IgE-Fc and their affinities, the understanding of which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. PMID:28361904

  18. CD4 binding site broadly neutralizing antibody selection of HIV-1 escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Dreja, Hanna; Pade, Corinna; Chen, Lei; McKnight, Áine

    2015-07-01

    All human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) viruses use CD4 to enter cells. Consequently, the viral envelope CD4-binding site (CD4bs) is relatively conserved, making it a logical neutralizing antibody target. It is important to understand how CD4-binding site variation allows for escape from neutralizing antibodies. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identifies residues in antigenic sites, whereas escape mutant selection identifies viable mutants. We selected HIV-1 to escape CD4bs neutralizing mAbs b12, A12 and HJ16. Viruses that escape from A12 and b12 remained susceptible to HJ16, VRC01 and J3, whilst six different viruses that escape HJ16 remained sensitive to A12, b12 and J3. In contrast, their sensitivity to VRC01 was variable. Triple HJ16/A12/b12-resistant virus proved that HIV-1 could escape multiple broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, but still retain sensitivity to VRC01 and the llama-derived J3 nanobody. This antigenic variability may reflect that occurring in circulating viruses, so studies like this can predict immunologically relevant antigenic forms of the CD4bs for inclusion in HIV-1 vaccines.

  19. HemoCD as an artificial oxygen carrier: oxygen binding and autoxidation.

    PubMed

    Kano, Koji; Kitagishi, Hiroaki

    2009-02-01

    Despite many attempts to construct completely artificial systems for carrying oxygen (O(2)) in aqueous solution, no successful example had been reported until quite recently except for picket fence porphinatoiron(II) embedded in liposomal membrane. We newly prepared a 1:1 complex (hemoCD) of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphinatoiron(II) (Fe[II]TPPS) and a per-O-methylated beta-cyclodextrin dimer having a pyridine linker (Py3CD). HemoCD binds O(2) reversibly in aqueous solution. The oxygen affinity corresponding to the partial O(2) pressure, at which half of the hemoCD molecules are oxygenated, was 16.9 torr in phosphate buffer at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. Oxy-hemoCD was gradually autoxidized (t(1/2) = 30.1 h) due to nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the O(2)-Fe bond. Encapsulation of the iron center of Fe(II)TPPS by two cyclodextrin truncated cones is essential for binding of O(2) to the ferrous center of the porphyrin. This manuscript reports the basic characteristics of hemoCD and the possible future utility of a totally artificial O(2) carrier.

  20. The structural basis for CD36 binding by the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Turner, Louise; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Robinson, Carol V.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Higgins, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor involved in fatty acid metabolism, innate immunity and angiogenesis. It interacts with lipoprotein particles and facilitates uptake of long chain fatty acids. It is also the most common target of the PfEMP1 proteins of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, tethering parasite-infected erythrocytes to endothelial receptors. This prevents their destruction by splenic clearance and allows increased parasitaemia. Here we describe the structure of CD36 in complex with long chain fatty acids and a CD36-binding PfEMP1 protein domain. A conserved hydrophobic pocket allows the hugely diverse PfEMP1 protein family to bind to a conserved phenylalanine residue at the membrane distal tip of CD36. This phenylalanine is also required for CD36 to interact with lipoprotein particles. By targeting a site on CD36 that is required for its physiological function, PfEMP1 proteins maintain the ability to tether to the endothelium and avoid splenic clearance. PMID:27667267

  1. The crystal structure of avian CD1 reveals a smaller, more primordial antigen-binding pocket compared to mammalian CD1

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Striegl, Harald; Dascher, Christopher C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular details of glycolipid presentation by CD1 antigen-presenting molecules are well studied in mammalian systems. However, little is known about how these non-classical MHC class I (MHCI) molecules diverged from the MHC locus to create a more complex, hydrophobic binding groove that binds lipids rather than peptides. To address this fundamental question, we have determined the crystal structure of an avian CD1 (chCD1–2) that shares common ancestry with mammalian CD1 from ≈310 million years ago. The chCD1–2 antigen-binding site consists of a compact, narrow, central hydrophobic groove or pore rather than the more open, 2-pocket architecture observed in mammalian CD1s. Potential antigens then would be restricted in size to single-chain lipids or glycolipids. An endogenous ligand, possibly palmitic acid, serves to illuminate the mode and mechanism of ligand interaction with chCD1–2. The palmitate alkyl chain is inserted into the relatively shallow hydrophobic pore; its carboxyl group emerges at the receptor surface and is stabilized by electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions with an arginine residue that is conserved in all known CD1 proteins. In addition, other novel features, such as an A′ loop that interrupts and segments the normally long, continuous α1 helix, are unique to chCD1–2 and contribute to the unusually narrow binding groove, thereby limiting its size. Because birds and mammals share a common ancestor, but the rate of evolution is slower in birds than in mammals, the chCD1–2-binding groove probably represents a more primordial CD1-binding groove. PMID:19004781

  2. Comparative binding of soluble fragments (derCD23, sCD23, and exCD23) of recombinant human CD23 to CD21 (SCR 1-2) and native IgE, and their effect on IgE regulation.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Sandra Lyn; Jaeger, Christiane; Ferrara, Claudia; Fingeroth, Joyce; Van De Venter, Maryna; Oosthuizen, Vaughan

    2011-01-01

    IgE, responsible for type I hypersensitivities, is regulated by interactions between its receptor, CD23, and co-receptor CD21. To examine comparative binding of recombinant human CD21 SCR 1-2 and native human IgE to CD23 plus the effect of CD23 on IgE production, we engineered recombinant soluble human CD23 fragments; (1) derCD23, (2) sCD23 and (3) exCD23, formed in vivo by proteolysis. SPR analysis revealed a progressive increment in affinity of soluble fragments for IgE, upon increasing length of CD23 "stalk" domain, exCD23>sCD23>derCD23. Soluble CD23 fragments and their oligomeric state are shown to fine-tune the immune response. Oligomers appear more important in enhancing IgE synthesis and monomers lacking the tail residues fail to bind CD21 yet bind membrane IgE and down-regulate IgE synthesis. Co-ligation of membrane IgE and CD21 through soluble CD23 monomers is disturbed. This study supports anti-allergic therapies involving stabilizing membrane CD23, or preventing shedding of soluble CD23. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CD44 is a macrophage binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis that mediates macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Heikens, Mirjam; Pals, Steven T.; Neut, Ronald van der; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Cell migration and phagocytosis are both important for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are critically dependent on the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Since CD44 is an adhesion molecule involved in inflammatory responses and is connected to the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the role of CD44 in both these processes. Macrophage (Mφ) recruitment into M. tuberculosis–infected lungs and delayed-type hypersensitivity sites was impaired in CD44-deficient (CD44–/–) mice. In addition, the number of T lymphocytes and the concentration of the protective key cytokine IFN-γ were reduced in the lungs of infected CD44–/– mice. The production of IFN-γ by splenocytes of CD44–/– mice was profoundly increased upon antigen-specific stimulation. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that soluble CD44 can directly bind to virulent M. tuberculosis. Mycobacteria also interacted with Mφ-associated CD44, as reflected by reduced binding and internalization of bacilli by CD44–/– Mφs. This suggests that CD44 is a receptor on Mφs for binding of M. tuberculosis. CD44–/– mice displayed a decreased survival and an enhanced mycobacterial outgrowth in lungs and liver during pulmonary tuberculosis. In summary, we have identified CD44 as a new Mφ binding site for M. tuberculosis that mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, Mφ recruitment, and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:12618522

  4. The Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Receptor CD300a Binds Dengue Virus and Enhances Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carnec, Xavier; Meertens, Laurent; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Kitaura, Jiro; Ramdasi, Rasika; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is the etiological agent of the major human arboviral disease. We previously demonstrated that the TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors involved in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells mediate DENV entry into target cells. We show here that human CD300a, a recently identified phospholipid receptor, also binds directly DENV particles and enhances viral entry. CD300a facilitates infection of the four DENV serotypes, as well as of other mosquito-borne viruses such as West Nile virus and Chikungunya virus. CD300a acts as an attachment factor that enhances DENV internalization through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. CD300a recognizes predominantly phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEth) and to a lesser extent PtdSer associated with viral particles. Mutation of residues in the IgV domain critical for phospholipid binding abrogate CD300a-mediated enhancement of DENV infection. Finally, we show that CD300a is expressed at the surface of primary macrophages and anti-CD300a polyclonal antibodies partially inhibited DENV infection of these cells. Overall, these data indicate that CD300a is a novel DENV binding receptor that recognizes PtdEth and PtdSer present on virions and enhance infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue disease, caused by dengue virus (DENV), has emerged as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans and is a major global health concern. The molecular bases of DENV-host cell interactions during virus entry are poorly understood, hampering the discovery of new targets for antiviral intervention. We recently discovered that the TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families involved in the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, interact with DENV particles-associated PtdSer through a mechanism that mimics the recognition of apoptotic cells and mediate DENV infection. In this study, we show that CD300a, a novel identified phospholipid receptor, mediates DENV infection. CD300a

  5. Neutralizing antibodies to an immunodominant envelope sequence do not prevent gp120 binding to CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, M A; Langlois, A J; McDanal, C B; McDougal, J S; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1988-01-01

    Animals immunized with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp160 glycoprotein or certain recombinant envelope components develop potent virus-neutralizing activity. This activity is principally due to antibodies directed toward a hypervariable region of gp120 between cysteine residues 302 and 337 and is virus isolate specific. These antisera, as well as two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed against the same hypervariable sequence, do not appreciably block gp120 from binding CD4. In contrast, serum samples from infected humans possess high titers of antibodies that block gp120-CD4 binding; these titers approximately correlate with the serum neutralization titers. Our results suggest that there are at least two targets on the envelope glycoprotein for virus neutralization. The target responsible for the broader neutralizing activity of human serum may be a conserved region of gp120 involved in CD4 binding. The antibodies directed at the hypervariable region of the envelope inhibit a different step in virus infection which is subsequent to receptor binding. The extent to which these two different epitopes of gp120 may be involved in protection against human immunodeficiency virus infection is discussed. PMID:2845130

  6. CD44 isoforms containing exon V3 are responsible for the presentation of heparin-binding growth factor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan-modified isoforms of CD44 have been implicated in growth factor presentation at sites of inflammation. In the present study we show that COS cell transfectants expressing CD44 isoforms containing the alternatively spliced exon V3 are modified with heparan sulfate (HS). Binding studies with three HS-binding growth factors, basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF), heparin binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), and amphiregulin, showed that the HS-modified CD44 isoforms are able to bind to b-FGF and HB-EGF, but not AR. b-FGF and HB-EGF binding to HS-modified CD44 was eliminated by pretreating the protein with heparitinase or by blocking with free heparin. HS- modified CD44 immunoprecipitated from keratinocytes, which express a CD44 isoform containing V3, also bound to b-FGF. We examined whether HS- modified CD44 isoforms were expressed by activated endothelial cells where they might present HS-binding growth factors to leukocytes during an inflammatory response. PCR and antibody-binding studies showed that activated cultured endothelial cells only express the CD44H isoform which does not contain any of the variably spliced exons including V3. Immunohistological studies with antibodies directed to CD44 extracellular domains encoded by the variably spliced exons showed that vascular endothelial cells in inflamed skin tissue sections do not express CD44 spliced variants. Keratinocytes, monocytes, and dendritic cells in the same specimens were found to express variably spliced CD44. 35SO4(-2)-labeling experiments demonstrated that activated cultured endothelial cells do not express detectable levels of chondroitin sulfate or HS-modified CD44. Our results suggest that one of the functions of CD44 isoforms expressing V3 is to bind and present a subset of HS-binding proteins. Furthermore, it is probable that HS- modified CD44 is involved in the presentation of HS-binding proteins by keratinocytes in inflamed skin. However, our data suggests that CD44 is

  7. Identification of Grb2 as a novel binding partner of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein binding receptor CD229.

    PubMed

    Martín, Margarita; Del Valle, Juana M; Saborit, Ifigènia; Engel, Pablo

    2005-05-15

    Ag recognition by the TCR determines the subsequent fate of the T cell and is regulated by the involvement of other cell surface molecules, termed coreceptors. CD229 is a lymphocyte cell surface molecule that belongs to the CD150 family of receptors. Upon tyrosine phosphorylation, CD229 recruits various signaling molecules to the membrane. One of these molecules is the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein, of which a deficiency leads to the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. We report that CD229 interacts in a phosphorylation-dependent manner with Grb2. We mapped this interaction showing that the Src homology 2 domain of Grb2 and the tyrosine residue Y606 in CD229 are required for CD229-Grb2 complex formation. The Grb2 motif in the cytoplasmic tail of CD229 is distinct and independent from the two tyrosines required for efficient signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein recruitment. CD229, but not other members of the CD150 family, directly bound Grb2. We also demonstrate that CD229 precipitates with Grb2 in T lymphocytes after pervanadate treatment, as well as CD229 or TCR ligation. Interestingly, the CD229 mutant lacking the Grb2 binding site is not internalized after CD229 engagement with specific Abs. Moreover, a dominant negative form of Grb2 (containing only Src homology 2 domain) impaired CD229 endocytosis. Unexpectedly, Erk phosphorylation was partially inhibited after activation of CD229 plus CD3. Consistent with this, CD229 ligation partially inhibited TCR signaling in peripheral blood cells and CD229-Jurkat cells transfected with the 3XNFAT-luciferase reporter construct. Altogether, the data suggest a model whereby CD229 ligation attenuates TCR signaling and Grb2 recruitment to CD229 controls its rate of internalization.

  8. CD44 receptor unfolding enhances binding by freeing basic amino acids to contact carbohydrate ligand.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Amanda J; Faller, Christina E; Guvench, Olgun

    2013-09-03

    The extracellular carbohydrate-binding domain of the Type I transmembrane receptor CD44 is known to undergo affinity switching, where change in conformation leads to enhanced binding of its carbohydrate ligand hyaluronan. Separate x-ray crystallographic and NMR experiments have led to competing explanations, with the former supporting minor conformational changes at the binding site and the latter a major order-to-disorder unfolding transition distant from the binding site. Here, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics studies employing adaptive biasing force sampling revealed a substantial favorable free-energy change associated with contact formation between the Arg(41) side chain and hyaluronan at the binding site, independent of whether the distant site was ordered or disordered. Analogous computational experiments on Arg(41)Ala mutants showed loss of this favorable free-energy change, consistent with existing experimental data. More provocatively, the simulation data revealed the molecular mechanism by which the order-to-disorder transition enhances hyaluronan binding: in the disordered state, a number of basic residues gain sufficient conformational freedom-lacking in the ordered state-to spontaneously form side-chain contacts with hyaluronan. Mutation of these residues to Ala had been known to decrease binding affinity, but there had previously been no structural explanation, given their lack of proximity to the carbohydrate-binding site in existing structures of the complex.

  9. Mechanism of Cd2+ toxicity: Cd2+ inhibits photoactivation of Photosystem II by competitive binding to the essential Ca2+ site.

    PubMed

    Faller, Peter; Kienzler, Katharina; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2005-01-07

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a well-known highly toxic element. The molecular mechanisms of the Cd2+ toxicity are not well understood. In photosynthetic organisms, toxic Cd2+ concentrations are often in the low-microM range. It has been proposed that low-microM Cd2+ concentrations affect photosynthesis at the level of Photosystem II by inhibiting oxygen evolution. However, in vitro studies on isolated, functional Photosystem II showed that much higher Cd2+ concentrations (mM range) were needed for inhibition. Here we show that Cd2+ in the low-microM range inhibited photoactivation (i.e., assembly of the water splitting complex) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in isolated Photosystem II. Photoactivation is the last step in the assembly of Photosystem II before it becomes functional. The exact Cd2+ concentration necessary for inhibition depended on the concentration of calcium. It is proposed that Cd2+ binds competitively to the essential Ca2+ site in Photosystem II during photoactivation. The low Cd2+ concentration needed to inhibit photoactivation suggests that this event is also involved in the Cd2+-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in vivo. This mechanism is likely to be important for Cd2+ toxicity towards photosynthetic organisms in general, at least in unicellular like C. reinhardtii where Cd2+ has easy access to the photosynthetic apparatus.

  10. The Epstein-Barr virus-binding site on CD21 is involved in CD23 binding and interleukin-4-induced IgE and IgG4 production by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Henchoz-Lecoanet, S; Jeannin, P; Aubry, J P; Graber, P; Bradshaw, C G; Pochon, S; Bonnefoy, J Y

    1996-01-01

    Human CD21 has previously been described as a receptor for the C3d,g and iC3b proteins of complement, as a receptor for the gp350/220 envelope glycoprotein of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and also as a receptor for inerferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Structurally, CD21 consists of 15 to 16 short consensus repeats (SCR) of 60 to 75 amino acids followed by a transmembrane domain and an intracytoplasmic region. We reported that CD23, a low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon R2), is a new functional ligand for CD21. We recently found that the sites of interaction of CD23 on CD21 are on SCR 5 to 8 and 1-2. The first site is a lectin-sugar type of interaction and the second site is a protein-protein interaction. We report here that amongst the other ligands for CD21 (EBV, C3d,g and IFN-alpha), only EBV is able to inhibit the binding of CD23 to CD21. Furthermore, even a peptide from gp350/220 of EBV known to bind to CD21 is able to decrease CD23 binding to CD21. Since CD23/CD21 pairing is important in the control of IgE production, we tested the effect of the EBV-derived peptide on immunoglobulin production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified tonsillar B cells. Interestingly, the EBV-peptide inhibited IgE and IgG4 production induced by interleukin-4, in a dose-dependent manner. The same results were obtained using either peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified tonsillar B cells. Another CD21 ligand, C3, did not affect binding of CD23 to CD21 nor the production of IgE and IgG4. This study indicates that blocking CD23 binding to CD21 SCR 2 on human B cells selectively modulates immunoglobulin production. PMID:8707347

  11. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  12. A structural/functional domain on human CD36 is involved in the binding of anti-Nak(a) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; Morel-Kopp, M C; Kaplan, C; McGregor, J L

    1995-03-01

    The human CD36 antigen is an integral membrane glycoprotein expressed by platelets, monocytes, endothelial cells and various tumor cell lines. CD36 acts as a receptor for thrombospondin, collagen, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Individuals possessing the Nak(a)-negative phenotype do not express CD36 and risk developing anti-CD36 isoantibodies upon blood transfusion or during pregnancy. In the present study, we have examined the interaction of an anti-Nak(a) serum with recombinantly expressed CD36. Results obtained show that five functional CD36 monoclonal antibodies (OKM5, FA6-152, L103, ESIV-C7 and 10/5) prevent the binding of the anti-Nak(a) serum whereas a single monoclonal antibody (13/10) has no effect. Consistent with this result, an epitope map of CD36 generated using cross-blocking experiments, indicates that the inhibitory monoclonal antibodies recognize closely-related epitopes whereas 13/10 reacts with a distinct CD36 determinant. Furthermore, we have demonstrated, in a recent study, that OKM5, FA6-152, L103 and 10/5 bind to the same CD36 domain defined by amino acids 155 to 183. Taken together, our results indicate that the 155-183 sequence is important for the binding of the anti-Nak(a) serum to CD36 and may represent a surface-exposed, immunogenic and presumably functional region on human CD36.

  13. CD6 binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns and protects from LPS-induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sarrias, Maria-Rosa; Farnós, Montserrat; Mota, Rubén; Sánchez-Barbero, Fernando; Ibáñez, Anna; Gimferrer, Idoia; Vera, Jorge; Fenutría, Rafael; Casals, Cristina; Yélamos, José; Lozano, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    CD6 is a lymphocyte receptor that belongs to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily. Because some members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily act as pattern recognition receptors for microbial components, we studied whether CD6 shares this function. We produced a recombinant form of the ectodomain of CD6 (rsCD6), which was indistinguishable (in apparent molecular mass, antibody reactivity, and cell binding properties) from a circulating form of CD6 affinity-purified from human serum. rsCD6 bound to and aggregated several Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains through the recognition of lipoteichoic acid and LPS, respectively. The Kd of the LPS–rsCD6 interaction was 2.69 ± 0.32 × 10−8 M, which is similar to that reported for the LPS–CD14 interaction. Further experiments showed that membrane CD6 also retains the LPS-binding ability, and it results in activation of the MAPK signaling cascade. In vivo experiments demonstrated that i.p. administration of rsCD6 before lethal LPS challenge significantly improved mice survival, and this was concomitant with reduced serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL6, and IL-1β. In conclusion, our results illustrate the unprecedented bacterial binding properties of rsCD6 and support its therapeutic potential for the intervention of septic shock syndrome or other inflammatory diseases of infectious origin. PMID:17601777

  14. Putative alpha-helical structures in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein and CD4 are involved in binding and degradation of the CD4 molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Tiganos, E; Yao, X J; Friborg, J; Daniel, N; Cohen, E A

    1997-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpu gene encodes a 16-kDa class I integral membrane phosphoprotein with an N-terminal membrane-spanning region and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. In the cytoplasmic domain, two amphipathic alpha-helices joined by a flexible turn containing two phosphoacceptor sites have been predicted. Previous studies have shown that Vpu downregulates CD4 molecules by inducing their specific degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Phosphorylation of serine residues 52 and 56, present within the cytoplasmic domain of the Vpu protein, has been shown to be essential to this Vpu function. However, the contribution of these two phosphoacceptor sites in the mechanism of CD4 degradation remains undefined. Interestingly, a specific interaction between Vpu and CD4 was recently demonstrated in coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Binding of Vpu was shown to be necessary but not sufficient to mediate CD4 degradation, indicating that interaction between Vpu and CD4 represents an early step critical in triggering a process leading to CD4 degradation. To delineate the sequence(s) and/or structural determinant(s) involved in this Vpu-CD4 interaction and in the Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation, we performed a mutational analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 and Vpu. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments reveal that disruption of the putative alpha-helical structure in the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain of CD4 affects the binding to Vpu, suggesting that this structure may act as an interface for the CD4-Vpu interaction that mediates CD4 degradation. Vpu proteins containing mutations in either or both of the phosphoacceptor sites (Ser52 or/and Ser56) were inactive in regard to CD4 degradation yet retained the capacity to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of CD4. In an attempt to define the minimal region responsible for this interaction, we tested a panel of mutations which were designed to affect the integrity of the putative alpha

  15. Binding strength-associated toxicity reduction by birnessite and hydroxyapatite in Pb and Cd contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungbae; An, Jinsung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2011-02-28

    In situ stabilization of sediment-bound heavy metals has been proposed as an alternative to ex situ treatment due to the concerns on ecosystem disturbance and remediation cost. The present study was conducted to test the performance of birnessite, hydroxyapatite, and zeolite as stabilizing agents for Pb and Cd in sediment. The heavy metal binding capacity and strength of the stabilizing agents were determined by analyzing Langmuir model parameters. The three agents showed the similar binding capacity (i.e., maximum monolayer sorption constant, K(a)) ranging from 1.13 to 3.62×10(5) mg/kg for Pb and 1.07 to 1.33×10(5) mg/kg for Cd. In contrast, binding strength (i.e., binding energy constant, b) of birnessite and hydroxyapatite was about one order higher than that of zeolite. This is further supported by five-step sequential extraction data: more than 99 and 70% of freshly spiked Pb and Cd were present as not-readily extractable fractions in birnessite and hydroxyapatite, respectively while the fractions were 17.9 and 14.1% in zeolite. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was also conducted to verify the effectiveness of the heavy metal-stabilizing ability of birnessite and hydroxyapatite. Birnessite successfully retained both Pb and Cd against the leaching solution, satisfying the TCLP extract concentration limits (i.e., 5 and 1 mg/L, respectively). However, hydroxyapatite released about 223.7 mg/L of Cd into the solution, which greatly exceeded the limit. The toxicity test with Hyalella azteca showed that their survival rate increased by 92.5-100% when birnessite or hydroxyapatite was added to Pb- or Cd-spiked sediment as a stabilizing agent. Our data demonstrate the potential use of birnessite and hydroxyapatite as an effective in situ remediation means for heavy metal-contaminated sediment with minimal risk to the aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural adaptations for ram ventilation: gill fusions in scombrids and billfishes.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Nicholas C; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Aalbers, Scott A; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    For ram-gill ventilators such as tunas and mackerels (family Scombridae) and billfishes (families Istiophoridae, Xiphiidae), fusions binding the gill lamellae and filaments prevent gill deformation by a fast and continuous ventilatory stream. This study examines the gills from 28 scombrid and seven billfish species in order to determine how factors such as body size, swimming speed, and the degree of dependence upon ram ventilation influence the site of occurrence and type of fusions. In the family Scombridae there is a progressive increase in the reliance on ram ventilation that correlates with the elaboration of gill fusions. This ranges from mackerels (tribe Scombrini), which only utilize ram ventilation at fast cruising speeds and lack gill fusions, to tunas (tribe Thunnini) of the genus Thunnus, which are obligate ram ventilators and have two distinct fusion types (one binding the gill lamellae and a second connecting the gill filaments). The billfishes appear to have independently evolved gill fusions that rival those of tunas in terms of structural complexity. Examination of a wide range of body sizes for some scombrids and billfishes shows that gill fusions begin to develop at lengths as small as 2.0 cm fork length. In addition to securing the spatial configuration of the gill sieve, gill fusions also appear to increase branchial resistance to slow the high-speed current produced by ram ventilation to distribute flow evenly and optimally to the respiratory exchange surfaces.

  17. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  18. Hagfish slime ecomechanics: testing the gill-clogging hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeanette; Fudge, Douglas S; Levy, Nimrod; Gosline, John M

    2006-02-01

    Hagfish are able to produce substantial amounts of slime when harassed, but the precise ecological function of the slime is unclear. One possibility is that the slime acts as a defence against gill-breathing predators, whose gills may become entangled with the slime's mixture of mucins and fibrous threads during an attack. We previously demonstrated that hagfish slime does not bind water tightly, but instead behaves like a fine sieve that slows water down via viscous entrainment. These properties are consistent with the gill-clogging hypothesis, which we tested here by quantifying the effects of hagfish slime on water flow through an artificial gill model and real fish gills. Our results indicate that the slime is capable of clogging gills and increasing the resistance that they present to the flow of water. We also characterized the behaviour of slime release from live hagfish and the effect of convective mixing on the formation of slime in vitro. Our observations show that exudate is locally released from the slime glands as a coherent jet and that hagfish do not appear to use their slime as a protective envelope. We found that convective mixing between the exudate and seawater is necessary for proper slime formation, but excessive mixing leads to the slime's collapse. We suggest that the loose binding of water by the slime may be an optimal solution to the problem of delivering an expanding jet of flow-inhibiting material to the gills of would-be predators.

  19. The IL-4 receptor alpha-chain-binding cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, induce forkhead box P3-expressing CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells from CD25-CD4+ precursors.

    PubMed

    Skapenko, Alla; Kalden, Joachim R; Lipsky, Peter E; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik

    2005-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the extrathymic generation of CD25+CD4 regulatory T cells (Tregs) are largely unknown. In this study the IL-4R alpha-chain-binding cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, were identified as inducers of CD25+ Tregs from peripheral CD25-CD4 naive T cells. IL-4-induced CD25+ Tregs phenotypically and functionally resemble naturally occurring Tregs in that they are anergic to mitogenic stimulation, inhibit the proliferation of autologous responder T cells, express high levels of the Forkhead box P3 and the surface receptors glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related protein and CTLA-4, and inhibit effector T cells in a contact-dependent, but cytokine-independent, manner. The IL-4-induced generation of peripheral Tregs was independent of the presence of TGF-beta or IL-10, but was dependent on Ag-specific stimulation and B7 costimulation. The significance of the IL-4Ralpha-binding cytokines in the generation of Ag-specific Tregs was emphasized in a mouse model of oral tolerance, in which neutralization of IL-4 and IL-13 in mice transgenic for the TCR specific for OVA completely inhibited the expansion of OVA-specific Tregs that can be induced in untreated mice by feeding the nominal Ag. Together, our results demonstrate that IL-4 and IL-13 play an important role in generating Forkhead box P3-expressing CD25+ Tregs extrathymically in an Ag-dependent manner and therefore provide an intriguing link between the well-established immunoregulatory capacity of Th2 cells and the powerful CD25+ Treg population. Moreover, our findings might provide the basis for the design of novel therapeutic approaches for targeted immunotherapy with Tregs to known Ags in autoimmune diseases or graft-vs-host reactions.

  20. Modulating DNA methylation in activated CD8+ T cells inhibits regulatory T cell-induced binding of Foxp3 to the CD8+ T Cell IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle M; Akaronu, Nnenna; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Hood, Sylvia F; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) activated during the course of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection suppress CD8(+) CTL function in a TGF-β-dependent fashion, inhibiting IFN-γ and IL-2 production and inducing G1 cell-cycle arrest. In this article, we describe the molecular events occurring at the IL-2 promoter leading to suppression of IL-2 production. These experiments demonstrate that Foxp3 induced by lentivirus-activated Tregs in the CD8(+) target cells binds to the IL-2 promoter, actively repressing IL-2 transcription. We further demonstrate that the chronic activation of CD8(+) T cells during FIV infection results in chromatin remodeling at the IL-2 promoter, specifically, demethylation of CpG residues. These DNA modifications occur during active transcription and translation of IL-2; however, these changes render the IL-2 promoter permissive to Foxp3-induced transcriptional repression. These data help explain, in part, the seemingly paradoxical observations that CD8(+) T cells displaying an activation phenotype exhibit altered antiviral function. Further, we demonstrate that blocking demethylation of CpG residues at the IL-2 promoter inhibits Foxp3 binding, suggesting a potential mechanism for rescue and/or reactivation of CD8(+) T cells. Using the FIV model for lentiviral persistence, these studies provide a framework for understanding how immune activation combined with Treg-mediated suppression may affect CD8(+) T cell IL-2 transcription, maturation, and antiviral function.

  1. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4.

  2. CD5-CK2 Binding/Activation Deficient Mice Are Resistant to EAE

    PubMed Central

    Axtell, Robert C.; Xu, Liang; Barnum, Scott R.; Raman, Chander

    2009-01-01

    Regulating the differentiation and persistence of encephalitogenic T-cells is critical for the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We recently reported that CD5 has an engagement-dependent prosurvival activity in T-cells which had a direct role in the induction and progression EAE. We predicted that CD5 regulates T-cell apoptosis/survival through the activation of CK2, a prosurvival serine/threonine kinase that associates with the receptor. To test this hypothesis we generated mice expressing CD5 with the inability to bind and activate CK2 and assessed their susceptibility to EAE. We found mice deficient in CD5-CK2 signaling pathway were mostly resistant to development of EAE. Resistance to EAE was associated with a dramatic decrease in a population of effector TH-cells that co-express γIFN and IL-17 and to a lesser extent cells that express γIFN or IL-17 in draining lymph nodes and spinal cords. We further show that T-cells deficient in CD5-CK2 signaling hyperproliferate following primary stimulation, however following restimulation, they rapidly develop non-responsiveness and exhibit elevated activation-induced cell death. Our results provide a direct role for CD5-CK2 pathway in T-cell activation and persistence of effector T-cells in neuroinflammatory disease. This study predicts that targeting of γIFN+/IL-17+ TH cells will be useful for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and other systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:17142752

  3. An enriched stable-isotope approach to determine the gill-zinc binding properties of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute zinc exposures in hard and soft waters.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; Brinkman, Stephen; Wolf, Ruth E; Lamothe, Paul J; Smith, Kathleen S; Ranville, James E

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to employ an enriched stable-isotope approach to characterize Zn uptake in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute Zn exposures in hard water (approximately 140 mg/L as CaCO3) and soft water (approximately 30 mg/L as CaCO3). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated to the test hardnesses and then exposed for up to 72 h in static exposures to a range of Zn concentrations in hard water (0-1000 microg/L) and soft water (0-250 microg/L). To facilitate detection of new gill Zn from endogenous gill Zn, the exposure media was significantly enriched with 67Zn stable isotope (89.60% vs. 4.1% natural abundance). Additionally, acute Zn toxicity thresholds (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) were determined experimentally through traditional, flow-through toxicity tests in hard water (580 microg/L) and soft water (110 microg/L). Following short-term (< or =3 h) exposures, significant differences in gill accumulation of Zn between hard and soft water treatments were observed at the three common concentrations (75, 150, and 250 microg/L), with soft water gills accumulating more Zn than hard water gills. Short-term gill Zn accumulation at hard and soft water LCS0s (45-min median lethal accumulation) was similar (0.27 and 0.20 microg/g wet wt, respectively). Finally, comparison of experimental gill Zn accumulation, with accumulation predicted by the biotic ligand model, demonstrated that model output reflected short-term (<1 h) experimental gill Zn accumulation and predicted observed differences in accumulation between hard and soft water rainbow trout gills. Our results indicate that measurable differences exist in short-term gill Zn accumulation following acclimation and exposure in different water hardnesses and that short-term Zn accumulation appears to be predictive of Zn acute toxicity thresholds (96-h LC50s).

  4. An enriched stable-isotope approach to determine the gill-zinc binding properties of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute zinc exposures in hard and soft waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, A.S.; Brinkman, S.; Wolf, R.E.; Lamothe, P.J.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to employ an enriched stable-isotope approach to characterize Zn uptake in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute Zn exposures in hard water (???140 mg/L as CaCO 3) and soft water (???30 mg/L as CaCO3). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated to the test hardnesses and then exposed for up to 72 h in static exposures to a range of Zn concentrations in hard water (0-1,000 ??g/L) and soft water (0-250 ??g/L). To facilitate detection of new gill Zn from endogenous gill Zn, the exposure media was significantly enriched with 67Zn stable isotope (89.60% vs 4.1% natural abundance). Additionally, acute Zn toxicity thresholds (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) were determined experimentally through traditional, flow-through toxicity tests in hard water (580 ??g/L) and soft water (110 ??g/L). Following short-term (???3 h) exposures, significant differences in gill accumulation of Zn between hard and soft water treatments were observed at the three common concentrations (75, 150, and 250 ??g/L), with soft water gills accumulating more Zn than hard water gills. Short-term gill Zn accumulation at hard and soft water LC50s (45-min median lethal accumulation) was similar (0.27 and 0.20 ??g/g wet wt, respectively). Finally, comparison of experimental gill Zn accumulation, with accumulation predicted by the biotic ligand model, demonstrated that model output reflected short-term (<1 h) experimental gill Zn accumulation and predicted observed differences in accumulation between hard and soft water rainbow trout gills. Our results indicate that measurable differences exist in short-term gill Zn accumulation following acclimation and exposure in different water hardnesses and that short-term Zn accumulation appears to be predictive of Zn acute toxicity thresholds (96-h LC50s). ?? 2009 SETAC.

  5. A rat CD4 mutant containing the gp120-binding site mediates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    CD4 is the primary receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Early mutational studies implicated a number of residues of CD4, centered in the region 41-59, in binding to gp120. However, further mutational analyses, together with studies using inhibitory antibodies or CD4-derived peptides, have suggested that other regions of CD4 are also involved in binding or postbinding events during infection. To resolve these ambiguities, we used rat CD4 mutants in which particular regions were replaced with the corresponding sequence of human CD4. We have previously shown that some of these are able to bind HIV-1 gp120, and here we test their ability to act as functional receptors. We find that the presence of human CD4 residues 33-62 is enough to confer efficient receptor function to rat CD4, and we conclude that it is unlikely that regions of CD4 outside this sequence are involved in specific interactions with HIV-1 during either infection or syncytium formation. PMID:8459222

  6. The Crystal Structure of CD8alpha,Beta in Complex With YTS156.7.7 Fab And Interaction With Other CD8 Antibodies Define the Binding Mode of CD8alpha,Beta to MHC Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, D.A.; Issafras, H.; Landais, E.; Teyton, L.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-27

    The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer interacts with class I pMHC on antigen-presenting cells as a co-receptor for TCR-mediated activation of cytotoxic T cells. To characterize this immunologically important interaction, we used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to either CD8{alpha} or CD8{beta} to probe the mechanism of CD8{alpha}{beta} binding to pMHCI. The YTS156.7 mAb inhibits this interaction and blocks T cell activation. To elucidate the molecular basis for this inhibition, the crystal structure of the CD8{alpha}{beta} immunoglobulin-like ectodomains were determined in complex with mAb YTS156.7 Fab at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The YTS156.7 epitope on CD8{beta} was identified and implies that residues in the CDR1 and CDR2-equivalent loops of CD8{beta} are occluded upon binding to class I pMHC. To further characterize the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction, binding of class I tetramers to CD8{alpha}{beta} on the surface of T cells was assessed in the presence of anti-CD8 mAbs. In contrast to YTS156.7, mAb YTS105.18, which is specific for CD8{alpha}, does not inhibit binding of CD8{alpha}{beta} to class I tetramers, indicating the YTS105.18 epitope is not occluded in the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} complex. Together, these data indicate a model for the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction similar to that observed for CD8{alpha}{alpha} in the CD8{alpha}{alpha}/pMHCI complex, but in which CD8{alpha} occupies the lower orientation (membrane proximal to the antigen presenting cell), and CD8{beta} occupies the upper position (membrane distal). The implication of this molecular assembly for the function of CD8{alpha}{beta} in T cell activation is discussed.

  7. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239, but Not SIVmac316, Binds and Utilizes Human CD4 More Efficiently than Rhesus CD4.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, Christoph H; Gardner, Matthew R; Bailey, Charles C; Farzan, Michael

    2017-09-15

    Rhesus macaques are used to model human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections, but they are not natural hosts of HIV-1 or any simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Rather, they became infected with SIV through cross-species transfer from sooty mangabeys in captivity. It has been shown that HIV-1 utilizes rhesus CD4 less efficiently than human CD4. However, the relative ability of SIV envelope glycoproteins to bind or utilize these CD4 orthologs has not been reported. Here we show that several SIV isolates, including SIVmac239, are more efficiently neutralized by human CD4-Ig (huCD4-Ig) than by the same molecule bearing rhesus CD4 domains 1 and 2 (rhCD4-Ig). An I39N mutation in CD4 domain 1, present in human and sooty mangabey CD4 orthologs, largely restored rhCD4-Ig neutralization of SIVmac239 and other SIV isolates. We further observed that SIVmac316, a derivative of SIVmac239, bound to and was neutralized by huCD4-Ig and rhCD4-Ig with nearly identical efficiencies. Introduction of two SIVmac316 CD4-binding site residues (G382R and H442Y) into the SIVmac239 envelope glycoprotein (Env) markedly increased its neutralization sensitivity to rhesus CD4-Ig without altering neutralization by human CD4-Ig, SIV neutralizing antibodies, or sera from SIV-infected macaques. These changes also allowed SIVmac239 Env to bind rhCD4-Ig more efficiently than huCD4-Ig. The variant with G382R and H442Y (G382R/H442Y variant) also infected cells expressing rhesus CD4 with markedly greater efficiency than did unaltered SIVmac239 Env. We propose that infections of rhesus macaques with SIVmac239 G382R/H442Y might better model some aspects of human infections.IMPORTANCE Rhesus macaque infection with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) has served as an important model of human HIV-1 infection. However, differences between this model and the human case have complicated the development of vaccines and therapies. Here we report the surprising observation that SIVmac239, a commonly

  8. Trace metals in gills of fish from the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Yakoob, S.; Bahloul, M. ); Bou-Olayan, A.H.

    1994-11-01

    Complexation of metals by coordinate linkages with appropriate organic molecules in biological tissues is an important process involved in metal accumulation by aquatic organisms. Fish respiratory systems differ from all other systems because damage to gills has immediate impacts on the rest of the fish's body. Veer et al. observed significant correlation between gill-metal concentration and whole-body weight. More nickel is accumulated in gill tissue of the catfish (Clarias batrachus) than in the liver or intestine. More cadmium is accumulated in gill tissue of the fish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) and Channa punctatus (Bloch) than in the liver or kidney. When exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of copper, gills of the freshwater fish Labeo rohita (Hamilton) showed the highest degree of copper accumulation. Petroleum and petrochemical industry wastes contribute significantly to metal enrichment of the Arabian Gulf marine environment. Because accumulation of metal ions is significant in gills, levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb were investigated in gills of fish from potentially impacted areas along the western side of the Arabian Gulf after the 1991 oil-spill. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Determination of the Exciton Binding Energy in CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R; Lee, J; Wolcott, A; Zhang, J; Terminello, L; van Buuren, T

    2009-10-27

    The exciton binding energy (EBE) in CdSe quantum dots (QDs) has been determined using x-ray spectroscopy. Using x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy, the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB) edge shifts as a function of particle size have been determined and combined to obtain the true band gap of the QDs (i.e. without and exciton). These values can be compared to the excitonic gap obtained using optical spectroscopy to determine the EBE. The experimental EBE results are compared with theoretical calculations on the EBE and show excellent agreement.

  10. Saturation Mutagenesis of the HIV-1 Envelope CD4 Binding Loop Reveals Residues Controlling Distinct Trimer Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Bolon, Daniel; Clapham, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The conformation of HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein trimers is key in ensuring protection against waves of neutralizing antibodies generated during infection, while maintaining sufficient exposure of the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) for viral entry. The CD4 binding loop on Env is an early contact site for CD4 while penetration of a proximal cavity by CD4 triggers Env conformational changes for entry. The role of residues in the CD4 binding loop in regulating the conformation of the trimer and trimer association domain (TAD) was investigated using a novel saturation mutagenesis approach. Single mutations identified, resulted in distinct trimer conformations affecting CD4bs exposure, the glycan shield and the TAD across diverse HIV-1 clades. Importantly, mutations that improve access to the CD4bs without exposing the immunodominant V3 loop were identified. The different trimer conformations identified will affect the specificity and breadth of nabs elicited in vivo and are important to consider in design of Env immunogens for vaccines. PMID:27820858

  11. Modes of metal toxicity and impaired branchial ionoregulation in rainbow trout exposed to mixtures of Pb and Cd in soft water.

    PubMed

    Birceanu, Oana; Chowdhury, M Jasim; Gillis, Patricia L; McGeer, James C; Wood, Chris M; Wilkie, Michael P

    2008-09-29

    Models such as the Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) predict how natural organic matter (NOM) and competing ions (e.g., Ca(2+), H(+) and Na(+)) affect metal bioavailability and toxicity in aquatic organisms. However, such models focus upon individual metals, not metal mixtures. This study determined whether Pb and Cd interact at the gill of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) when trout were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals (Cd<100 nmol L(-1); Pb<500 nmol L(-1)) in soft (<100 micromol Ca(2+)L(-1)), moderately acidic (pH 6.0) water. The 96-h LC50 for Pb was 482 nmol L(-1), indicating that Pb was one-order of magnitude more toxic in soft, acidic water than in harder, circumneutral pH waters. The LC50 for Cd alone was also low, 6.7 nmol L(-1). Surprisingly, fish acclimated to soft water had multiple populations of Pb-gill and Cd-gill binding sites. A low capacity, high affinity population of Pb-gill binding sites had a B(max) of 18.2 nmol g(-1) wet weight (ww) and apparent K(Pb-gill)=7.05, but a second low affinity population could not be saturated up to free Pb concentrations approaching 4000 nmol L(-1). Two populations of Cd-gill binding sites were characterized: a high affinity, low capacity population with an apparent K(Cd-gill)=7.33 and B(max)=1.73 nmol g(-1) ww, and a low affinity, high capacity population with an apparent K(Cd-gill)=5.86, and B(max)=13.7 nmol g(-1) ww. At low concentrations, Cd plus Pb accumulation was less than additive because Cd out-competed Pb for gill binding sites, which were likely apical Ca(2+)-channels. While disturbances to Ca(2+) influx were caused by Cd alone, Pb alone had no effect. However, Pb exacerbated Cd-induced disturbances to Ca(2+) influx demonstrating that, although Pb- plus Cd-gill binding was less than additive due to competition, the effects (ionic disturbances) were more than additive (synergistic). Pb was also likely binding to intracellular targets, such as branchial carbonic anhydrase

  12. CD14 mediates binding of high doses of LPS but is dispensable for TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    Borzęcka, Kinga; Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Björkelund, Hanna; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) involves a sequential engagement of serum LPS-binding protein (LBP), plasma membrane CD14, and TLR4/MD-2 signaling complex. We analyzed participation of CD14 in TNF-α production stimulated with 1-1000 ng/mL of smooth or rough LPS (sLPS or rLPS) and in sLPS binding to RAW264 and J744 cells. CD14 was indispensable for TNF-α generation induced by a low concentration, 1 ng/mL, of sLPS and rLPS. At higher doses of both LPS forms (100-1000 ng/mL), TNF-α release required CD14 to much lower extent. Among the two forms of LPS, rLPS-induced TNF-α production was less CD14-dependent and could proceed in the absence of serum as an LBP source. On the other hand, the involvement of CD14 was crucial for the binding of 1000 ng/mL of sLPS judging from an inhibitory effect of the anti-CD14 antibody. The binding of sLPS was also strongly inhibited by dextran sulfate, a competitive ligand of scavenger receptors (SR). In the presence of dextran sulfate, sLPS-induced production of TNF-α was upregulated about 1.6-fold. The data indicate that CD14 together with SR participates in the binding of high doses of sLPS. However, CD14 contribution to TNF α production induced by high concentrations of sLPS and rLPS can be limited.

  13. Quantifying Pb and Cd complexation by alginates and the role of metal binding on macromolecular aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Cristina; Avaltroni, Fabrice; Benedetti, Marc; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2005-01-01

    The Pb and Cd binding capacity of alginates were quantified by the determination of their complex stability constants and the concentration of complexing sites using H+, Pb2+, or Cd2+ selective electrodes in both static and dynamic titrations. Centrifugation filter devices (30 kDa filter cutoff), followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements of lead or cadmium in the filtrates, were used to validate the results. The influence of ionic strength, pH, and the metal-to-alginate ratio was determined for a wide range of metal concentrations. Because of their polyelectrolytic properties, alginates may adopt different conformations depending on the physicochemistry of the medium, including the presence of metals. Therefore, molecular diffusion coefficients of the alginate were determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy under the same conditions of pH, ionic strength, and metal-to-alginate ratios that were used for the metal binding studies. The complexation and conformational properties of the alginate were related within the framework of the nonideal competitive adsorption isotherm (NICA) combined with a Donnan approach to account for both intrinsic and electrostatic contributions.

  14. Endogenous PMN sialidase activity exposes activation epitope on CD11b/CD18 which enhances its binding interaction with ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Almulki, Lama; Faez, Sepideh; Whitford, Melissa; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Cross, Alan S

    2011-08-01

    Diapedesis is a dynamic, highly regulated process by which leukocytes are recruited to inflammatory sites. We reported previously that removal of sialyl residues from PMNs enables these cells to become more adherent to EC monolayers and that sialidase activity within intracellular compartments of resting PMNs translocates to the plasma membrane following activation. We did not identify which surface adhesion molecules were targeted by endogenous sialidase. Upon activation, β2 integrin (CD11b/CD18) on the PMN surface undergoes conformational change, which allows it to bind more tightly to the ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on the EC surface. Removal of sialyl residues from CD18 and CD11b, by exogenous neuraminidase or mobilization of PMN sialidase, unmasked activation epitopes, as detected by flow cytometry and enhanced binding to ICAM-1. One sialidase isoform, Neu1, colocalized with CD18 on confocal microscopy. Using an autoperfused microflow chamber, desialylation of immobilized ICAM-1 enhanced leukocyte arrest in vivo. Further, treatment with a sialidase inhibitor in vivo reversed endotoxin-induced binding of leukocytes to ICAM-1, thereby suggesting a role for leukocyte sialidase in the cellular arrest. These data suggest that PMN sialidase could be a physiologic source of the enzymatic activity that removes sialyl residues on β2 integrin and ICAM-1, resulting in their enhanced interaction. Thus, PMN sialidase may be an important regulator of the recruitment of these cells to inflamed sites.

  15. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is critical for the turnover and subcellular distribution of CD40 ligand mRNA in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Matus-Nicodemos, Rodrigo; Vavassori, Stefano; Castro-Faix, Moraima; Valentin-Acevedo, Anibal; Singh, Karnail; Marcelli, Valentina; Covey, Lori R

    2011-02-15

    CD40L (CD154) is regulated at the posttranscriptional level by an activation-induced process that results in a highly stable transcript at extended times of T cell activation. Transcript stability is mediated by polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB)-containing complexes (complex I and II) that bind to three adjacent CU-rich sequences within the 3' untranslated region. To assess the role of PTB in the expression and distribution of CD40L mRNA, PTB was targeted using short hairpin RNA in both primary T cells and a T cell line that recapitulates the stability phase of regulated CD40L mRNA decay. PTB knockdown resulted in a marked decrease in the mRNA stability that resulted in lowered CD40L surface expression. PTB was also critical for appropriate distribution of CD40L mRNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm and in the cytoplasm between the cytosol and the translating polysomes. The activation-induced formation of PTB-specific ribonucleoprotein complexes was observed only with cytoplasmic and not nuclear PTB indicating functional differences in the protein defined by cellular localization. Finally, we observed that cytoplasmic and nuclear PTB isoforms were differentially modified relative to each other and that the changes in cytoplasmic PTB were consistent with activation-induced phosphorylation. Together this work suggests that differentially modified PTB regulates CD40L expression at multiple steps by 1) retaining CD40L mRNA in the nucleus, 2) directly regulating mRNA stability at late times of activation, and 3) forming a ribonuclear complex that preferentially associates with translating ribosomes thus leading to an enhanced level of CD40L protein.

  16. CD163 Binding to Haptoglobin-Hemoglobin Complexes Involves a Dual-point Electrostatic Receptor-Ligand Pairing*

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the haptoglobin (Hp)-hemoglobin (Hb) complex in human plasma leads to a high affinity recognition by the endocytic macrophage receptor CD163. A fast segregation of Hp-Hb from CD163 occurs at endosomal conditions (pH <6.5). The ligand binding site of CD163 has previously been shown to involve the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain 3. This domain and the adjacent SRCR domain 2 of CD163 contain a consensus motif for a calcium-coordinated acidic amino acid triad cluster as originally identified in the SRCR domain of the scavenger receptor MARCO. Here we show that site-directed mutagenesis in each of these acidic triads of SRCR domains 2 and 3 abrogates the high affinity binding of recombinant CD163 to Hp-Hb. In the ligand, Hp Arg-252 and Lys-262, both present in a previously identified CD163 binding loop of Hp, were revealed as essential residues for the high affinity receptor binding. These findings are in accordance with pairing of the calcium-coordinated acidic clusters in SRCR domains 2 and 3 with the two basic Arg/Lys residues in the Hp loop. Such a two-point electrostatic pairing is mechanistically similar to the pH-sensitive pairings disclosed in crystal structures of ligands in complex with tandem LDL receptor repeats or tandem CUB domains in other endocytic receptors. PMID:23671278

  17. Lineage-specific differences between human and simian immunodeficiency virus regulation of gp120 trimer association and CD4 binding.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Andrés; Pacheco, Beatriz; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pancera, Marie; Herschhorn, Alon; Wang, Liping; Zeng, Xing; Desormeaux, Anik; Kwong, Peter D; Sodroski, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Metastable conformations of the gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) must be maintained in the unliganded state of the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Binding of gp120 to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers the transition to an open conformation of the trimer, promoting interaction with the CCR5 chemokine receptor and ultimately leading to gp41-mediated virus-cell membrane fusion and entry. Topological layers in the gp120 inner domain contribute to gp120-trimer association in the unliganded state and to CD4 binding. Here we describe similarities and differences between HIV-1 and SIVmac gp120. In both viruses, the gp120 N/C termini and the inner domain β-sandwich and layer 2 support the noncovalent association of gp120 with the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Layer 1 of the SIVmac gp120 inner domain contributes more to trimer association than the corresponding region of HIV-1 gp120. On the other hand, layer 1 plays an important role in stabilizing the CD4-bound conformation of HIV-1 but not SIVmac gp120 and thus contributes to HIV-1 binding to CD4. In SIVmac, CD4 binding is instead enhanced by tryptophan 375, which fills the Phe 43 cavity of gp120. Activation of SIVmac by soluble CD4 is dependent on tryptophan 375 and on layer 1 residues that determine a tight association of gp120 with the trimer. Distinct biological requirements for CD4 usage have resulted in lineage-specific differences in the HIV-1 and SIV gp120 structures that modulate trimer association and CD4 binding.

  18. Soluble CD163 masks fibronectin-binding protein A-mediated inflammatory activation of Staphylococcus aureus infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kneidl, Jessica; Mysore, Vijayashree; Geraci, Jennifer; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina; Holzinger, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Barczyk-Kahlert, Katarzyna

    2014-03-01

    Binding to fibronectin (FN) is a crucial pathogenic factor of Staphylococcus aureus mediated by fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBP-A) and extracellular adherence protein (Eap). Recently, we have shown that binding of soluble CD163 (sCD163) to FN linked to these molecules exhibits anti-microbial effects by enhancing phagocytosis and killing activity of S. aureus-infected monocytes. However, it remained unclear whether sCD163 also influences the monocytic activation status. Using genetically modified staphylococcal strains we now identified FnBP-A, but not Eap, as activator of the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection. FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation was masked by sCD163 binding to S. aureus promoting efficient pathogen elimination. Thus, sCD163 protects monocytes from overwhelming activation upon staphylococcal infection by dampening the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 and DAMP molecule MRP8/14. Moreover, sCD163 limited expression of pro-apoptotic transcription factor NR4A1 induced during S. aureus infection and inhibited induction of chemokine CXCL2promoting survival of staphylococci in vivo. sCD163-mediated effects were not due to general immunosuppression since MAP kinase activation and ROS production were unaltered during infection of monocytes with sCD163-bound bacteria. Thus, sCD163 promotes a specific defence of the immune system against FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation enabling successful pathogen elimination, tissue recovery and resolution of inflammation.

  19. Tongue Sole CD209: A Pattern-Recognition Receptor that Binds a Broad Range of Microbes and Promotes Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Sun, Li

    2017-09-04

    CD209 is an immune receptor that plays an important role in the initiation of innate immunity and activation of adaptive immunity in mammals. However, much less is known about the immunological function of CD209 in lower vertebrates. In the present study, we examined the immune effect of a CD209 homologue (CsCD209) from the teleost fish tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis. CsCD209 possesses a lectin domain that shares high levels of similarity with the lectin domains of human and mouse CD209. CsCD209 expression was most abundant in kidney and blood and was significantly upregulated during bacterial infection. CsCD209 exhibited a subcellular localization mainly on the cell surface of myelomonocytes. Recombinant CsCD209 displayed apparent binding capacities to a broad range of bacteria and fungi, and significantly promoted the phagocytosis of the bound bacteria by C. semilaevis leukocytes. Collectively, the results indicate that teleost CD209 serves as a pattern recognition receptor that exerts an influence on the phagocytosis process during pathogen infections.

  20. Peptidic models for the binding of Pb(II), Bi(III) and Cd(II) to mononuclear thiolate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Matzapetakis, Manolis; Ghosh, Debdip; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2006-10-01

    Herein, we evaluate the binding of Pb(II) and Bi(III) to cysteine-substituted versions of the TRI peptides [AcG-(LKALEEK)4G-NH2] which have previously been shown to bind Hg(II) and Cd(II) in unusual geometries as compared with small-molecule thiol ligands in aqueous solutions. Studies of Pb(II) and Bi(III) with the peptides give rise to complexes consistent with the metal ions bound to three sulfur atoms with M-S distances of 2.63 and 2.54 A, respectively. Competition experiments between the metal ions Pb(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and Bi(III) for the peptides show that Hg(II) has the highest affinity, owing to the initial formation of the extremely strong HgS2 bond. Cd(II) and Pb(II) have comparable binding affinities at pH > 8, while Bi(III) displays the weakest affinity, following the model, M(II) + (TRI LXC)3(3-) --> M(II)(TRI LXC)3(-). While the relevant equilibria for Hg(II) binding to the TRI peptides corresponds to a strong first step forming Hg(TRI LXC)2(HTRI LXC), followed by a single deprotonation to give Hg(TRI LXC)3(-), the binding of Cd(II) and Pb(II) is consistent with initial formation of M(II)(TRI LXC)(HTRI LXC)2 (+) at pH < 5 followed by a two-proton dissociation step (pK(a2)) yielding M(II)(TRI LXC)3(-). Pb(II)(TRI LXC)(HTRI LXC)2(+) converts to Pb(II)(TRI LXC)3(-) at slightly lower pH values than the corresponding Cd(II)-peptide complexes. In addition, Pb(II) displays a lower pK (a) of binding to the "d"-substituted peptide, (TRI L12C, pK(a2) = 12.0) compared with the "a"-substituted peptide, (TRI L16C, pK (a2) = 12.6), the reverse of the order seen for Hg(II) and Cd(II). Pb(II) also showed a stronger binding affinity for TRI L12C (K(bind) = 3.2 x 10(7) M(-1)) compared with that with TRI L16C (K(bind) = 1.2 x 10(7) M(-1)) at pH > 8.

  1. Designed short RGD peptides for one-pot aqueous synthesis of integrin-binding CdTe and CdZnTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Feng, Min; Hu, Jing; Chen, Cuixia; Wang, Jiqian; Wang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2012-11-01

    We have designed a series of short RGD peptide ligands and developed one-pot aqueous synthesis of integrin-binding CdTe and CdZnTe quantum dots (QDs). We first examined the effects of different RGD peptides, including RGDS, CRGDS, Ac-CRGDS, CRGDS-CONH₂, Ac-CRGDS-CONH₂, RGDSC, CCRGDS, and CCCRGDS, on the synthesis of CdTe QDs. CRGDS were found to be the optimal ligand, providing the CdTe QDs with well-defined wavelength ranges (500-650 nm) and relatively high photoluminescence quantum yields (up to 15%). The key synthesis parameters (the pH value of the Cd²⁺-RGD precursors and the molar ratio of RGD/Cd²⁺) were assessed. In order to further improve the optical properties of the RGD-capped QDs, zinc was then incorporated by the simultaneous reaction of Cd²⁺ and Zn²⁺ with NaHTe. By using a mixture of CRGDS and cysteine as the stabilizer, the quantum yields of CdZnTe alloy QDs reached as high as 60% without any post-treatment, and they also showed excellent stability against time, pH, and salinity. Note that these properties could not be obtained with CRGDS or cysteine alone as the stabilizer. Finally, we demonstrated that the RGD-capped QDs preferentially bind to cell surfaces because of the specific recognition of the RGD sequence to cell surface integrin receptors. Our synthesis strategy based on RGD peptides thus represents a convenient route for opening up QD technologies for cell-specific tagging and labeling applicable to a wide range of diagnostics and therapy.

  2. Hyperglycosylated Stable Core Immunogens Designed To Present the CD4 Binding Site Are Preferentially Recognized by Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ingale, Jidnyasa; Tran, Karen; Kong, Leopold; Dey, Barna; McKee, Krisha; Schief, William; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer mediates entry into CD4+ CCR5+ host cells. Env possesses conserved antigenic determinants, such as the gp120 primary receptor CD4 binding site (CD4bs), a known neutralization target. Env also contains variable regions and protein surfaces occluded within the trimer that elicit nonneutralizing antibodies. Here we engineered additional N-linked glycans onto a cysteine-stabilized gp120 core (0G) deleted of its major variable regions to preferentially expose the conformationally fixed CD4bs. Three, 6, 7, and 10 new NXT/S glycan (G) motifs were engineered into 0G to encode 3G, 6G, 7G, and 10G cores. Following purification, most glycoproteins, except for 10G, were recognized by broadly neutralizing CD4bs-directed antibodies. Gel and glycan mass spectrometry confirmed that additional N-glycans were posttranslationally added to the redesigned cores. Binding kinetics revealed high-affinity recognition by seven broadly neutralizing CD4bs-directed antibodies and low to no binding by non-broadly neutralizing CD4bs-directed antibodies. Rabbits inoculated with the hyperglycosylated cores elicited IgM and IgG responses to each given protein that were similar in their neutralization characteristics to those elicited by parental 0G. Site-specific glycan masking effects were detected in the elicited sera, and the antisera competed with b12 for CD4bs-directed binding specificity. However, the core-elicited sera showed limited neutralization activity. Trimer priming or boosting of the core immunogens elicited tier 1-level neutralization that mapped to both the CD4bs and V3 and appeared to be trimer dependent. Fine mapping at the CD4bs indicated that conformational stabilization of the cores and addition of N-glycans altered the molecular surface of Env sites of vulnerability to neutralizing antibody, suggesting an explanation for why the elicited neutralization was not improved by this rational design strategy. IMPORTANCE

  3. B cell recognition of the conserved HIV-1 co-receptor binding site is altered by endogenous primate CD4.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Mattias N E; Dey, Barna; Mörner, Andreas; Svehla, Krisha; O'dell, Sijy; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Voss, Gerald; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Shaw, George M; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2008-10-03

    The surface HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds to CD4 on the target cell surface to induce the co-receptor binding site on gp120 as the initial step in the entry process. The binding site is comprised of a highly conserved region on the gp120 core, as well as elements of the third variable region (V3). Antibodies against the co-receptor binding site are abundantly elicited during natural infection of humans, but the mechanism of elicitation has remained undefined. In this study, we investigate the requirements for elicitation of co-receptor binding site antibodies by inoculating rabbits, monkeys and human-CD4 transgenic (huCD4) rabbits with envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers possessing high affinity for primate CD4. A cross-species comparison of the antibody responses showed that similar HIV-1 neutralization breadth was elicited by Env trimers in monkeys relative to wild-type (WT) rabbits. In contrast, antibodies against the co-receptor site on gp120 were elicited only in monkeys and huCD4 rabbits, but not in the WT rabbits. This was supported by the detection of high-titer co-receptor antibodies in all sera from a set derived from human volunteers inoculated with recombinant gp120. These findings strongly suggest that complexes between Env and (high-affinity) primate CD4 formed in vivo are responsible for the elicitation of the co-receptor-site-directed antibodies. They also imply that the naïve B cell receptor repertoire does not recognize the gp120 co-receptor site in the absence of CD4 and illustrate that conformational stabilization, imparted by primary receptor interaction, can alter the immunogenicity of a type 1 viral membrane protein.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles modulate the toxicological response to cadmium in the gills of Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Balbi, Teresa; Grassi, Giacomo; Frenzilli, Giada; Bernardeschi, Margherita; Smerilli, Arianna; Guidi, Patrizia; Canesi, Laura; Nigro, Marco; Monaci, Fabrizio; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Rocco, Lucia; Focardi, Silvano; Monopoli, Marco; Corsi, Ilaria

    2015-10-30

    We investigated the influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) on the response to cadmium in the gills of the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in terms of accumulation and toxicity. Mussels were in vivo exposed to nano-TiO2, CdCl2, alone and in combination. Several cellular biomarkers were investigated in gills: ABC transport proteins and metallothioneins at gene/protein (abcb1, abcc-like and mt-20) and functional level, GST activity, NO production and DNA damage (Comet assay). Accumulation of total Cd and titanium in gills as in whole soft tissue was also investigated. Significant responses to Cd exposure were observed in mussel gills as up-regulation of abcb1 and mt-20 gene transcription, increases in total MT content, P-gp efflux and GST activity, DNA damage and NO production. Nano-TiO2 alone increased P-gp efflux activity and NO production. When combined with Cd, nano-TiO2 reduced the metal-induced effects by significantly lowering abcb1 gene transcription, GST activity, and DNA damage, whereas, additive effects were observed on NO production. A lower concentration of Cd was observed in the gills upon co-exposure, whereas, Ti levels were unaffected. A competitive effect in uptake/accumulation of nano-TiO2 and Cd seems to occur in gills. A confirmation is given by the observed absence of adsorption of Cd onto nano-TiO2 in sea water media.

  5. The crystal structure of human CD21: Implications for Epstein-Barr virus and C3d binding.

    PubMed

    Prota, Andrea E; Sage, David R; Stehle, Thilo; Fingeroth, Joyce D

    2002-08-06

    Human complement receptor type 2 (CD21) is the cellular receptor for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human tumor virus. The N-terminal two short consensus repeats (SCR1-SCR2) of the receptor interact with the EBV glycoprotein gp350/220 and also with the natural CD21 ligand C3d. Here we present the crystal structure of the CD21 SCR1-SCR2 fragment in the absence of ligand and demonstrate that it is able to bind EBV. Based on a functional analysis of wild-type and mutant CD21 and molecular modeling, we identify a likely region for EBV attachment and demonstrate that this region is not involved in the interaction with C3d. A comparison with the previously determined structure of CD21 SCR1-SCR2 in complex with C3d shows that, in both cases, CD21 assumes compact V-shaped conformations. However, our analysis reveals a surprising degree of flexibility at the SCR1-SCR2 interface, suggesting interactions between the two domains are not specific. We present evidence that the V-shaped conformation is induced by deglycosylation of the protein, and that physiologic glycosylation of CD21 would result in a more extended conformation, perhaps with additional epitopes for C3d binding.

  6. Differential regulation of monocyte cytokine release by αV and β(2) integrins that bind CD23.

    PubMed

    Edkins, Adrienne L; Borland, Gillian; Acharya, Mridu; Cogdell, Richard J; Ozanne, Bradford W; Cushley, William

    2012-06-01

    The human soluble CD23 (sCD23) protein displays highly pleiotropic cytokine-like activity. Monocytic cells express the sCD23-binding integrins αVβ(3), αVβ(5), αMβ(2) and αXβ(2), but it is unclear which of these four integrins most acutely regulates sCD23-driven cytokine release. The hypothesis that ligation of different sCD23-binding integrins promoted release of distinct subsets of cytokines was tested. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and sCD23 promoted release of distinct groups of cytokines from the THP-1 model cell line. The sCD23-driven cytokine release signature was characterized by elevated amounts of RANTES (CCL5) and a striking increase in interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8) secretion, but little release of macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β; CCL4). Antibodies to αVβ(3) or αXβ(2) both promoted IL-8 release, consistent with the sCD23-driven pattern, but both also evoked strong MIP-1β secretion; simultaneous ligation of these two integrins further increased cytokine secretion but did not alter the pattern of cytokine output. In both model cell lines and primary tissue, integrin-mediated cytokine release was more pronounced in immature monocyte cells than in mature cells. The capacity of anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies to elicit a cytokine release response is epitope-dependent and also reflects the differentiation state of the cell. Although a pattern of cytokine release identical to that provoked by sCD23 could not be elicited with any individual anti-integrin monoclonal antibody, αXβ(2) and αVβ(3) appear to regulate IL-8 release, a hallmark feature of sCD23-driven cytokine secretion, more acutely than αMβ(2) or αVβ(5).

  7. Selective binding of CD4 and CD8 T-cells to antigen presenting cells for enrichment of CMV and HIV specific T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Ivaldi, Federico; Manca, Fabrizio

    2012-02-28

    Adherent antigen presenting cells (APC) pulsed with protein or peptide antigens were used to capture specific CD4 or CD8 T-cells derived from established T-cell lines or from PBMC of immune subjects based on physiological interaction between TCR and MHC-peptide complex. This method could be applied independently of epitope specificity, HLA restriction alleles, activation markers and secreted cytokines, parameters required by other methods for selection of specific T cells. Non specific T-cells were removed by applying a 1g force that did not affect binding of specific T-lymphocytes. Lymphocyte selection was specific and the average recovery was 36% for CD4 T-cells. CD8 T-cells proved trickier to purify, since solid phase APC were recognized as targets for cytotoxicity. Specificity was comparable to CD4 cells, but the average recovery for CD8 cells was 26%. No residual alloreactivity was detected in expanded T-cells. Frequency and recovery of specific T-cells were comparable to other current technologies, such as generation of T-cell lines and cytokine capture method. Since antigen and IL2 are the only reagents added to the cultures, this physiological procedure can be proposed for selection and expansion of pathogen specific T-cells not only for research purposes, but also for adoptive reconstitution of immunocompromised subjects if performed under GMP conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  9. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors.

  10. γ-Tilmanocept, a New Radiopharmaceutical Tracer for Cancer Sentinel Lymph Nodes, Binds to the Mannose Receptor (CD206)

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Metz, Wendy L.; Cope, Frederick O.; Blue, Michael S.; Vera, David R.

    2015-01-01

    γ-Tilmanocept (99mTc-labeled-tilmanocept or [99mTc]-tilmanocept) is the first mannose-containing, receptor-directed, radiolabeled tracer for the highly sensitive imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in solid tumor staging. To elucidate the mannose-binding receptor that retains tilmanocept in this microenvironment, human macrophages were used that have high expression of the C-type lectin mannose receptor (MR; CD206). Cy3-labeled tilmanocept exhibited high specificity binding to macrophages that was nearly abolished in competitive inhibition experiments. Furthermore, Cy3-tilmanocept binding was markedly reduced on macrophages deficient in the MR by small interfering RNA treatment and was increased on MR-transfected HEK 293 cells. Finally, confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of Cy3-tilmanocept with the macrophage membrane MR and binding of labeled tilmanocept to MR+ cells (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) in human sentinel lymph node tissues. Together these data provide strong evidence that CD206 is a major binding receptor for γ-tilmanocept. Identification of CD206 as the γ-tilmanocept–binding receptor enables opportunities for designing receptor-targeted advanced imaging agents and therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. PMID:26202986

  11. Discovery of Small-Molecule Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Entry Inhibitors That Target the gp120-Binding Domain of CD4†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Quan-en; Stephen, Andrew G.; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; Roberts, Paula E.; Zhu, Weimin; Currens, Michael J.; Feng, Yaxiong; Crise, Bruce J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan R.; Fisher, Robert J.; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Sei, Shizuko

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 and the CD4 receptor is highly specific and involves relatively small contact surfaces on both proteins according to crystal structure analysis. This molecularly conserved interaction presents an excellent opportunity for antiviral targeting. Here we report a group of pentavalent antimony-containing small molecule compounds, NSC 13778 (molecular weight, 319) and its analogs, which exert a potent anti-HIV activity. These compounds block the entry of X4-, R5-, and X4/R5-tropic HIV-1 strains into CD4+ cells but show little or no activity in CD4-negative cells or against vesicular stomatitis virus-G pseudotyped virions. The compounds compete with gp120 for binding to CD4: either immobilized on a solid phase (soluble CD4) or on the T-cell surface (native CD4 receptor) as determined by a competitive gp120 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or flow cytometry. NSC 13778 binds to an N-terminal two-domain CD4 protein, D1/D2 CD4, immobilized on a surface plasmon resonance sensor chip, and dose dependently reduces the emission intensity of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of D1/D2 CD4, which contains two of the three tryptophan residues in the gp120-binding domain. Furthermore, T cells incubated with the compounds alone show decreased reactivity to anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies known to recognize the gp120-binding site. In contrast to gp120-binders that inhibit gp120-CD4 interaction by binding to gp120, these compounds appear to disrupt gp120-CD4 contact by targeting the specific gp120-binding domain of CD4. NSC 13778 may represent a prototype of a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that can break into the gp120-CD4 interface and mask the gp120-binding site on the CD4 molecules, effectively repelling incoming virions. PMID:15857997

  12. Insight into the modified Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor interactions: using a computational binding free energy approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2015-01-01

    Antibody drugs are very useful tools for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Recently, however, patients and doctors have encountered the problem of drug resistance. How to improve the affinity of antibody drugs has therefore become a pressing issue. Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1. This study investigates the mutation residues of the complementarity determining regions of Ibalizumab. We propose using the wild and mutations of Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex structures, molecular dynamics techniques, alanine-scanning mutagenesis calculations and solvated interaction energies methods to predict the binding free energy of the Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex structures. This work found that revealed three key positions (31th, 32th and 33th in HCDR-1) of the residues may play an important role in Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex interactions. Therefore, bioengineering substitutions of the three key positions and increasing number of intermolecular interactions (HCDR-1 of Ibalizumab/human CD4 receptor) might improve the binding affinities of this complex structure.

  13. Insight into the modified Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor interactions: using a computational binding free energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2015-01-01

    Antibody drugs are very useful tools for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Recently, however, patients and doctors have encountered the problem of drug resistance. How to improve the affinity of antibody drugs has therefore become a pressing issue. Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1. This study investigates the mutation residues of the complementarity determining regions of Ibalizumab. We propose using the wild and mutations of Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex structures, molecular dynamics techniques, alanine-scanning mutagenesis calculations and solvated interaction energies methods to predict the binding free energy of the Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex structures. This work found that revealed three key positions (31th, 32th and 33th in HCDR-1) of the residues may play an important role in Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex interactions. Therefore, bioengineering substitutions of the three key positions and increasing number of intermolecular interactions (HCDR-1 of Ibalizumab/human CD4 receptor) might improve the binding affinities of this complex structure.

  14. Link between Intestinal CD36 Ligand Binding and Satiety Induced by a High Protein Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Danielle; Duchampt, Adeline; Vigier, Michèle; Oursel, Delphine; Lessire, René; Poirier, Hélène; Niot, Isabelle; Bégeot, Martine; Besnard, Philippe; Mithieux, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    CD36 is a ubiquitous membrane glycoprotein that binds long-chain fatty acids. The presence of a functional CD36 is required for the induction of satiety by a lipid load and its role as a lipid receptor driving cellular signal has recently been demonstrated. Our project aimed to further explore the role of intestinal CD36 in the regulation of food intake. Duodenal infusions of vehicle or sulfo-N-succinimidyl-oleate (SSO) was performed prior to acute infusions of saline or Intralipid (IL) in mice. Infusion of minute quantities of IL induced a decrease in food intake (FI) compared to saline. Infusion of SSO had the same effect but no additive inhibitory effect was observed in presence of IL. No IL- or SSO-mediated satiety occurred in CD36-null mice. To determine whether the CD36-mediated hypophagic effect of lipids was maintained in animals fed a satietogen diet, mice were subjected to a High-Protein diet (HPD). Concomitantly with the satiety effect, a rise in intestinal CD36 gene expression was observed. No satiety effect occurred in CD36-null mice. HPD-fed WT mice showed a diminished FI compared to control mice, after saline duodenal infusion. But there was no further decrease after lipid infusion. The lipid-induced decrease in FI observed on control mice was accompanied by a rise in jejunal oleylethanolamide (OEA). Its level was higher in HPD-fed mice than in controls after saline infusion and was not changed by lipids. Overall, we demonstrate that lipid binding to intestinal CD36 is sufficient to produce a satiety effect. Moreover, it could participate in the satiety effect induced by HPD. Intestine can modulate FI by several mechanisms including an increase in OEA production and CD36 gene expression. Furthermore, intestine of mice adapted to HPD have a diminished capacity to modulate their food intake in response to dietary lipids. PMID:22295104

  15. Does Variation of the Inter-Domain Linker Sequence Modulate the Metal Binding Behaviour of Helix pomatia Cd-Metallothionein?

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Moreno, Selene; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Palacios, Òscar; Zerbe, Oliver; Dallinger, Reinhard; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Snail metallothioneins (MTs) constitute an ideal model to study structure/function relationships in these metal-binding polypeptides. Helix pomatia harbours three MT isoforms: the highly specific CdMT and CuMT, and an unspecific Cd/CuMT, which represent paralogous proteins with extremely different metal binding preferences while sharing high sequence similarity. Preceding work allowed assessing that, although, the Cys residues are responsible for metal ion coordination, metal specificity or preference is achieved by diversification of the amino acids interspersed between them. The metal-specific MT polypeptides fold into unique, energetically-optimized complexes of defined metal content, when binding their cognate metal ions, while they produce a mixture of complexes, none of them representing a clear energy minimum, with non-cognate metal ions. Another critical, and so far mostly unexplored, region is the stretch linking the individual MT domains, each of which represents an independent metal cluster. In this work, we have designed and analyzed two HpCdMT constructs with substituted linker segments, and determined their coordination behavior when exposed to both cognate and non-cognate metal ions. Results unequivocally show that neither length nor composition of the inter-domain linker alter the features of the Zn(II)- and Cd(II)-complexes, but surprisingly that they influence their ability to bind Cu(I), the non-cognate metal ion. PMID:26703589

  16. Different proportions of cadmium occur as Cd-binding phytochelatin complexes in plants.

    PubMed

    Marentes, Eduardo; Rauser, Wilfried E

    2007-10-01

    The aim was to determine cadmium (Cd) speciation in various plants, between buffer-soluble and acid-soluble Cd, and also within the buffer-soluble Cd. A better understanding of Cd speciation shows the relative importance of different biological mechanisms for Cd sequestration. Roots of Pistia stratiodes, Eichhornia crassipes, Agrostis gigantea, Deschampsia caespitosa and wheat Triticum turgidum var. durum were analyzed. Buffer extractions solubilized varying proportions of Cd, ranging from 12% in Eichhornia to 83% in Agrostis. The proportion increased with time of Cd exposure in Pistia. It also increased in wheat roots as the external Cd rose from 0.05 to 0.5 muM and was lowest in old leaves and highest in roots. The remaining Cd was extractable with acid. Gel filtration resolved buffer-soluble Cd into three peaks distinct from inorganic Cd. Two complexes with phytochelatins and related polythiols were present in all cases, inorganic Cd being prominent only in Eichhornia extracts. The phytochelatin complexes accounted for 2% of the root Cd in Eichhornia to 78% in Agrostis. In wheat, phytochelatins bound 82% of the Cd in roots, 19% in young leaves and 12% in old leaves. The cysteine-rich protein metallothionein from wheat was detected immunologically in the void volume of gel filtrations of old and young leaves, but not of roots, and was distinct from the two phytochelatin-based complexes. Speciation of Cd in the various plants indicated that phytochelatins were not necessarily the major ligands of Cd.

  17. Fish gill morphology: inside out.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jonathan M; Laurent, Pierre

    2002-08-01

    In this short review of fish gill morphology we cover some basic gross anatomy as well as in some more detail the microscopic anatomy of the branchial epithelia from representatives of the major extant groups of fishes (Agnathans, Elasmobranchs, and Teleosts). The agnathan hagfishes have primitive gill pouches, while the lampreys have arch-like gills similar to the higher fishes. In the lampreys and elasmobranchs, the gill filaments are supported by a complete interbranchial septum and water exits via external branchial slits or pores. In contrast, the teleost interbranchial septum is much reduced, leaving the ends of the filaments unattached, and the multiple gill openings are replaced by the single caudal opening of the operculum. The basic functional unit of the gill is the filament, which supports rows of plate-like lamellae. The lamellae are designed for gas exchange with a large surface area and a thin epithelium surrounding a well-vascularized core of pillar cell capillaries. The lamellae are positioned for the blood flow to be counter-current to the water flow over the gills. Despite marked differences in the gross anatomy of the gill among the various groups, the cellular constituents of the epithelium are remarkably similar. The lamellar gas-exchange surface is covered by squamous pavement cells, while large, mitochondria-rich, ionocytes and mucocytes are found in greatest frequency in the filament epithelium. Demands for ionoregulation can often upset this balance. There has been much study of the structure and function of the branchial mitochondria-rich cells. These cells are generally characterized by a high mitochondrial density and an amplification of the basolateral membrane through folding or the presence of an intracellular tubular system. Morphological subtypes of MRCs as well as some methods of MRC detection are discussed. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  19. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of chondrocyte adhesion to scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Zhou, Jian; Shen, Longxiang; Ruan, Yuhui; Dong, Jian; Guo, Changan; Chen, Zhengrong

    2014-04-01

    The clinical need for improved treatment options for patients with cartilage injuries has motivated tissue-engineering studies aimed at the in vitro generation of cell-based implants with functional properties. The success of tissue-engineered repair of cartilage may depend on the rapid and efficient adhesion of transplanted cells to the scaffold. In the present study, chondrocyte-scaffold constructs were engineered by planting porcine chondrocytes into nonporous chitosan membranes and 3D porous chitosan scaffolds that were treated with or without biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system and avidin-biotin binding system. The spreading area, cell exfoliation rates, cell proliferation rates, histological analysis, DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and mRNA expression were investigated to evaluate the efficiency of biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of cell adhesion to scaffolds in the cartilage tissue. The results showed that the biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system improved cell adhesion to scaffolds effectively. These studies suggest that this binding system has the potential to provide improved tissue-engineered cartilage for clinical applications.

  20. The Cd(II)-binding abilities of recombinant Quercus suber metallothionein: bridging the gap between phytochelatins and metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Domènech, Jordi; Orihuela, Rubén; Mir, Gisela; Molinas, Marisa; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we have analyzed both at stoichiometric and at conformational level the Cd(II)-binding features of a type 2 plant metallothionein (MT) (the cork oak, Quercus suber, QsMT). To this end four peptides, the wild-type QsMT and three constructs previously engineered to characterize its Zn(II)- and Cu(I)-binding behaviour, were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II), and the corresponding complexes were purified up to homogeneity. The Cd(II)-binding ability of these recombinant peptides was determined through the chemical, spectroscopic and spectrometric characterization of the recovered clusters. Recombinant synthesis of the four QsMT peptides in cadmium-rich media rendered complexes with a higher metal content than those obtained from zinc-supplemented cultures and, consequently, the recovered Cd(II) species are nonisostructural to those of Zn(II). Also of interest is the fact that three out of the four peptides yielded recombinant preparations that included S(2-)-containing Cd(II) complexes as major species. Subsequently, the in vitro Zn(II)/Cd(II) replacement reactions were studied, as well as the in vitro acid denaturation and S(2-) renaturation reactions. Finally, the capacity of the four peptides for preventing cadmium deleterious effects in yeast cells was tested through complementation assays. Consideration of all the results enables us to suggest a hairpin folding model for this typical type 2 plant Cd(II)-MT complex, as well as a nonnegligible role of the spacer in the detoxification function of QsMT towards cadmium.

  1. Molecular docking guided structure based design of symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea/thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Vangala, Radhika; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2013-08-01

    Induced fit molecular docking studies were performed on BMS-806 derivatives reported as small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding. Comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions guided in identification and design of novel symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors. These molecules were synthesized in aqueous medium using microwave irradiation. Synthesized molecules were screened for their inhibitory ability by HIV-1 gp120-CD4 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Designed compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding in micromolar (0.013-0.247 μM) concentrations.

  2. The cationic peptide LL-37 binds Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) with a low dissociation rate and promotes phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianwei; Bajic, Goran; Andersen, Gregers R; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    As a broad-spectrum anti-microbial peptide, LL-37 plays an important role in the innate immune system. A series of previous reports implicates LL-37 as an activator of various cell surface receptor-mediated functions, including chemotaxis in integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-expressing cells. However, evidence is scarce concerning the direct binding of LL-37 to these receptors and investigations on the associated binding kinetics is lacking. Mac-1, a member of the β2 integrin family, is mainly expressed in myeloid leukocytes. Its critical functions include phagocytosis of complement-opsonized pathogens. Here, we report on interactions of LL-37 and its fragment FK-13 with the ligand-binding domain of Mac-1, the α-chain I domain. LL-37 bound the I-domain with an affinity comparable to the complement fragment C3d, one of the strongest known ligands for Mac-1. In cell adhesion assays both LL-37 and FK-13 supported binding by Mac-1 expressing cells, however, with LL-37-coupled surfaces supporting stronger cell adhesion than FK-13. Likewise, in phagocytosis assays with primary human monocytes both LL-37 and FK-13 enhanced uptake of particles coupled with these ligands but with a tendency towards a stronger uptake by LL-37. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  4. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Santiago, César; Rodríguez Frade, José Miguel; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-05-13

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention.

  5. Modulation of NMDA channel gating by Ca2+ and Cd2+ binding to the external pore mouth

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ya-Chi; Yang, Ya-Chin; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptor channels are characterized by high Ca2+ permeability. It remains unclear whether extracellular Ca2+ could directly modulate channel gating and control Ca2+ influxes. We demonstrate a pore-blocking site external to the activation gate for extracellular Ca2+ and Cd2+, which has the same charge and radius as Ca2+ but is impermeable to the channel. The apparent affinity of Cd2+ or Ca2+ is higher toward the activated (a steady-state mixture of the open and desensitized, probably chiefly the latter) than the closed states. The blocking effect of Cd2+ is well correlated with the number of charges in the DRPEER motif at the external pore mouth, with coupling coefficients close to 1 in double mutant cycle analyses. The effect of Ca2+ and especially Cd2+ could be allosterically affected by T647A mutation located just inside the activation gate. A prominent “hook” also develops after wash-off of Cd2+ or Ca2+, suggesting faster unbinding rates of Cd2+ and Ca2+ with the mutation. We conclude that extracellular Ca2+ or Cd2+ directly binds to the DRPEER motif to modify NMDA channel activation (opening as well as desensitization), which seems to involve essential regional conformational changes centered at the bundle crossing point A652 (GluN1)/A651(GluN2). PMID:27848984

  6. Isolated Polar Amino Acid Residues Modulate Lipid Binding in the Large Hydrophobic Cavity of CD1d.

    PubMed

    Inuki, Shinsuke; Aiba, Toshihiko; Hirata, Natsumi; Ichihara, Osamu; Yoshidome, Daisuke; Kita, Shunsuke; Maenaka, Katsumi; Fukase, Koichi; Fujimoto, Yukari

    2016-11-18

    The CD1d protein is a nonpolymorphic MHC class I-like protein that controls the activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells through the presentation of self- and foreign-lipid ligands, glycolipids, or phospholipids, leading to the secretion of various cytokines. The CD1d contains a large hydrophobic lipid binding pocket: the A' pocket of CD1d, which recognizes hydrophobic moieties of the ligands, such as long fatty acyl chains. Although lipid-protein interactions typically rely on hydrophobic interactions between lipid chains and the hydrophobic sites of proteins, we showed that the small polar regions located deep inside the hydrophobic A' pocket could be used for the modulation of the lipid binding. A series of the ligands, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) derivatives containing polar groups in the acyl chain, was synthesized, and the structure-activity relationship studies demonstrated that simple modification from a methylene to an amide group in the long fatty acyl chain, when introduced at optimal positions, enhanced the CD1d recognition of the glycolipid ligands. Formation of hydrogen bonds between the amide group and the polar residues was supported by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and WaterMap calculations. The computational studies suggest that localized hydrating water molecules may play an important role in the ligand recognition. Here, the results showed that confined polar residues in the large hydrophobic lipid binding pockets of the proteins could be potential targets to modulate the affinity for its ligands.

  7. Cystein 402 of HIV gp 120 is essential for CD4-binding and resistance of gp 120 to intracellular degradation.

    PubMed

    Hemming, A; Bolmstedt, A; Flodby, P; Lundberg, L; Gidlund, M; Wigzell, H; Olofsson, S

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment encoding the CD4-binding region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) gp 120 was excised from an SV40-based expression vector containing gp 160, and subcloned into phage M13 for site-directed mutagenesis. Mutant vectors were constructed and CV-1 cells were transfected with constructs, where Cys402 was substituted for a serine, and metabolically labelled with [3H]-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcN). Radioimmunoprecipitation with an hyperimmunserum, specific for gp 120/gp 160, and subsequent SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated presence of gp 160, whereas gp 120 was replaced by [3H]-GlcN-labelled material, migrating as a diffuse band corresponding to 80-105k, suggesting increased sensitivity of mutant env gene products to proteolysis after cleavage to gp 120. Wild type gp 120 and gp 160 bound to CD4, whereas neither gp 160 nor gp 120 from mutant-transfected cell lysates did bind to CD4. Altogether the results indicated that Cys402, probably by participating in a disulfide bridge, is essential for (i) the CD4-binding ability of env gene products and for (ii) the physical stability of gp 120.

  8. Link protein hyaluronan-binding motif abrogates CD44-hyaluronan-mediated leukemia-liver cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Na; Li, Gongchu

    2013-05-01

    The liver is a frequent site for the metastasis of cancer cells originating from other sites. Leukemic liver metastasis is associated with poor prognosis. The ligation of CD44 with hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to contribute to the drug resistance of leukemic cells. In this study, a link protein HA-binding motif was genetically fused with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) to generate an EGFP-L fusion protein. Furthermore, a coculture system was established to investigate the interaction of leukemic cells with liver cells. CD44-positive Kasumi-1, but not CD44-negative HL-60 cells, were observed to adhere to the liver cell line L02. This cell-cell adhesion was significantly blocked by HA, indicating that Kasumi-L02 cell adhesion was mediated by the CD44-HA interaction. Compared to EGFP, EGFP-L fusion protein bound to L02 and BEL7404 liver cells. EGFP-L partially abrogated the Kasumi-L02 adhesion, suggesting that the link protein-binding motif is able to inhibit CD44-HA-mediated leukemia-liver adhesion. These results may help provide insight into novel therapeutic methods for leukemic patients diagnosed with liver metastasis.

  9. Enhanced immunogenicity of CTL antigens through mutation of the CD8 binding MHC class I invariant region.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Lissina, Anna; Vernazza, Jonathan; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L; Mirza, Fareed; Dunbar, P Rod; Boulter, Jonathan M; Glick, Meir; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; van den Berg, Hugo A; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2007-05-01

    CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are key determinants of immunity to intracellular pathogens and neoplastic cells. Recognition of specific antigens in the form of peptide-MHC class I complexes (pMHCI) presented on the target cell surface is mediated by T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. The CD8 coreceptor binds to invariant domains of pMHCI and facilitates antigen recognition. Here, we investigate the biological effects of a Q115E substitution in the alpha2 domain of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 that enhances CD8 binding by approximately 50% without altering TCR/pMHCI interactions. Soluble and cell surface-expressed forms of Q115E HLA-A*0201 exhibit enhanced recognition by CTL without loss of specificity. These CD8-enhanced antigens induce greater CD3 zeta chain phosphorylation in cognate CTL leading to substantial increases in cytokine production, proliferation and priming of naive T cells. This effect provides a fundamental new mechanism with which to enhance cellular immunity to specific T cell antigens.

  10. Structural reorganization of the antigen-binding groove of human CD1b for presentation of mycobacterial sulfoglycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F.; Collmann, Anthony; Versluis, Cees; Lindner, Buko; Guiard, Julie; Maveyraud, Laurent; Huc, Emilie; Im, Jin S.; Sansano, Sebastiano; Brando, Thérèse; Julien, Sylviane; Prandi, Jacques; Gilleron, Martine; Porcelli, Steven A.; de la Salle, Henri; Heck, Albert J. R.; Mori, Lucia; Puzo, Germain; Mourey, Lionel; De Libero, Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms permitting nonpolymorphic CD1 molecules to present lipid antigens that differ considerably in polar head and aliphatic tails remain elusive. It is also unclear why hydrophobic motifs in the aliphatic tails of some antigens, which presumably embed inside CD1 pockets, contribute to determinants for T-cell recognition. The 1.9-Å crystal structure of an active complex of CD1b and a mycobacterial diacylsulfoglycolipid presented here provides some clues. Upon antigen binding, endogenous spacers of CD1b, which consist of a mixture of diradylglycerols, moved considerably within the lipid-binding groove. Spacer displacement was accompanied by F’ pocket closure and an extensive rearrangement of residues exposed to T-cell receptors. Such structural reorganization resulted in reduction of the A’ pocket capacity and led to incomplete embedding of the methyl-ramified portion of the phthioceranoyl chain of the antigen, explaining why such hydrophobic motifs are critical for T-cell receptor recognition. Mutagenesis experiments supported the functional importance of the observed structural alterations for T-cell stimulation. Overall, our data delineate a complex molecular mechanism combining spacer repositioning and ligand-induced conformational changes that, together with pocket intricacy, endows CD1b with the required molecular plasticity to present a broad range of structurally diverse antigens. PMID:22006319

  11. Colorectal mucus binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Stax, Martijn J; Mouser, Emily E I M; van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W; de Vries, Henry J C; Dekker, Henk L; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1-3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa.

  12. Colorectal Mucus Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Dekker, Henk L.; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1–3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa. PMID:25793526

  13. High- and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with p Ka values of 3.3 ± 0.2, 4.8 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.4, and 9.4 ± 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9(±2.6) × 10 -5, 1.3(±0.2) × 10 -4, 5.9(±3.3) × 10 -5, and 1.1(±0.6) × 10 -4 moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low concentration of very high

  14. Identification of the high affinity binding site in the Streptococcus intermedius toxin intermedilysin for its membrane receptor, the human complement regulator CD59.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy R; Ross, Kirsty S; Cowan, Graeme J M; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Harris, Claire L; Mitchell, Timothy J; Morgan, B Paul

    2009-04-01

    The unique species specificity of the bacterial cytolysin intermedilysin is explained by its requirement for the human complement regulator CD59 as the primary receptor. Binding studies using individual domains of intermedilysin mapped the CD59-binding site to domain 4 and swap mutants between human and rabbit (non-intermedilysin-binding) CD59 implicated a short sequence (residues 42-59) in human CD59 in binding intermedilysin. We set out to map more closely the CD59 binding site in intermedilysin. We first looked for regions of homology between domain 4 in intermedilysin and the terminal complement components that bind CD59, C8 and C9. A nine amino acid sequence immediately adjacent the undecapeptide segment in intermedilysin domain 4 matched (5 of 9 identical, 3 of 9 conserved) a sequence in C9. A peptide containing this sequence caused dose-dependent inhibition of intermedilysin-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and rendered erythrocytes more susceptible to complement lysis. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of intermedilysin binding to immobilized CD59 revealed saturable fast-on, fast-off binding and a calculated affinity of 4.9 nM. Substitution of three residues from the putative binding site caused a 5-fold reduction in lytic potency of intermedilysin and reduced affinity for immobilized CD59 by 2.5-fold. The demonstration that a peptide modeled on the CD59-binding site inhibits intermedilysin-mediated haemolysis leads us to suggest that such peptides might be useful in treating infections caused by intermedilysin-producing bacteria.

  15. Soluble CD14 subtype presepsin (sCD14-ST) and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in neonatal sepsis: new clinical and analytical perspectives for two old biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Mussap, Michele; Noto, Antonio; Fravega, Marco; Fanos, Vassilios

    2011-10-01

    Several biochemical markers have been proposed over the past years to manage critically ill newborns with acute inflammation and sepsis. The state of the art in diagnosing and monitoring neonatal sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock consists of the measurement of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) at the onset and in the course of the disease. CRP and PCT in combination are clinically significant in diagnosing and monitoring septic newborns; however, CRP and PCT have a very limited value for risk stratification and in predicting outcome. The availability of commercial methods for the automated measurement of the soluble CD14 subtype presepsin (sCD14-ST) and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) represent a challenge for the evaluation in clinical practice of reliable markers of neonatal sepsis, specifically for the very early diagnosis, the classification into class of severity, and the prediction of complications and death.

  16. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) inhibits anti-CD32 antibody binding to canine DH82 cells and canine monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Taryn A; Miller, Michelle M; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2013-02-15

    The IgG receptors CD16 and CD32 (Fc(γ)RIII and Fc(γ)RII) link the humoral immune response to effector cell immune responses by binding immune complexes. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) consisting of immunoglobulin from pooled donors is reported to block Fc(γ)Rs and has been used to treat a variety of canine autoimmune disorders. Fc(γ)Rs have been poorly described for canine monocytes; therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (1) identify canine monocyte/macrophage Fc(γ)R (CD16 and CD32) expression and (2) demonstrate in vitro hIVIG binding to these receptors. The canine monocyte/macrophage-like cell line (DH82) and monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy dogs were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) for CD16 and CD32 expression using commercially available anti-CD16 and anti-CD32 antibodies directed against the human isoforms. The mean percentage of cells expressing CD16 was 55% of DH82 cells and 13% of blood monocytes and the mean percentage of cells expressing CD32 was 85% of DH82 cells and 73% of blood monocytes. Immunoprecipitation of canine DH82 cells lysate using the same anti-CD16 or anti-CD32 antibodies suggested that these anti-human antibodies recognize the canine homologues. To demonstrate Fc(γ)R blockade, cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of hIVIG and then incubated with anti-CD16 or anti-CD32 antibodies. The percentage of CD32 expression decreased in a concentration dependent fashion in DH82 cells and blood monocytes after incubation with increasing concentrations of IVIG, suggesting that hIVIG was binding to CD32 and inhibiting anti-CD32 antibody binding. The same results were not demonstrated with anti-CD16 antibody. We believe this is the first report to demonstrate Fc(γ) receptors CD16 and CD32 expression on canine monocytes and in vitro CD32 binding by human IgG, which may represent one of the immunomodulatory mechanisms of hIVIG.

  17. Crystal structure of native and Cd/Cd-substituted Dioclea guianensis seed lectin. A novel manganese-binding site and structural basis of dimer-tetramer association.

    PubMed

    Wah, D A; Romero, A; Gallego del Sol, F; Cavada, B S; Ramos, M V; Grangeiro, T B; Sampaio, A H; Calvete, J J

    2001-07-20

    Diocleinae legume lectins are a group of oligomeric proteins whose subunits display a high degree of primary structure and tertiary fold conservation but exhibit considerable diversity in their oligomerisation modes. To elucidate the structural determinants underlaying Diocleinae lectin oligomerisation, we have determined the crystal structures of native and cadmium-substituted Dioclea guianensis (Dguia) seed lectin. These structures have been solved by molecular replacement using concanavalin (ConA) coordinates as the starting model, and refined against data to 2.0 A resolution. In the native (Mn/Ca-Dguia) crystal form (P4(3)2(1)2), the asymmetric unit contains two monomers arranged into a canonical legume lectin dimer, and the tetramer is formed with a symmetry-related dimer. In the Cd/Cd-substituted form (I4(1)22), the asymmetric unit is occupied by a monomer. In both crystal forms, the tetrameric association is achieved by the corresponding symmetry operators. Like other legume lectins, native D. guianensis lectin contains manganese and calcium ions bound in the vicinity of the saccharide-combining site. The architecture of these metal-binding sites (S1 and S2) changed only slightly in the cadmium/cadmium-substituted form. A highly ordered calcium (native lectin) or cadmium (Cd/Cd-substituted lectin) ion is coordinated at the interface between dimers that are not tetrameric partners in a similar manner as the previously identified Cd(2+) in site S3 of a Cd/Ca-ConA. An additional Mn(2+) coordination site (called S5), whose presence has not been reported in crystal structures of any other homologous lectin, is present in both, the Mn/Ca and the Cd/Cd-substituted D. guianensis lectin forms. On the other hand, comparison of the primary and quaternary crystal structures of seed lectins from D. guianensis and Dioclea grandiflora (1DGL) indicates that the loop comprising residues 117-123 is ordered to make interdimer contacts in the D. grandiflora lectin structure

  18. Identification of a CD4-Binding-Site Antibody to HIV that Evolved Near-Pan Neutralization Breadth

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Ishida, Elise; Zhou, Tongqing; Griesman, Trevor; Sheng, Zizhang; Wu, Fan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Zheng, Anqi; Joyce, M.  Gordon; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Ransier, Amy; Darko, Sam; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Louder, Mark K.; Alam, S.  Munir; Parks, Robert; Kelsoe, Garnett; Von Holle, Tarra; Haynes, Barton F.; Douek, Daniel C.; Hirsch, Vanessa; Seaman, Michael S.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Detailed studies of the broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that underlie the best available examples of the humoral immune response to HIV are providing important information for the development of therapies and prophylaxis for HIV-1 infection. Here, we report a CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody, named N6, that potently neutralized 98% of HIV-1 isolates, including 16 of 20 that were resistant to other members of its class. N6 evolved a mode of recognition such that its binding was not impacted by the loss of individual contacts across the immunoglobulin heavy chain. In addition, structural analysis revealed that the orientation of N6 permitted it to avoid steric clashes with glycans, which is a common mechanism of resistance. Thus, an HIV-1-specific bNAb can achieve potent, near-pan neutralization of HIV-1, making it an attractive candidate for use in therapy and prophylaxis.

  19. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Anthony W; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R; Emmons, Michael F; Argilagos, Raul F; Koomen, John M; McLaughlin, Mark L; Hazlehurst, Lori A

    2013-11-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines. Because of the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as a single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels, and failed to activate caspase-3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach, CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines, indicating that multiple myeloma cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However, ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101-induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101-induced cell death occurs via a Rip1-, Rip3-, or Drp1-dependent and -independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma.

  20. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gebhard, Anthony W.; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R.; Emmons, Michael F.; Argilagos, Raul F.; Koomen, John M.; McLaughlin, Mark L.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. Due to the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels and failed to activate caspase 3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and LC-MS/MS analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in MM cell lines, indicating that MM cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101 induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101 induced cell death occurs via a Rip1, Rip3 or Drp1 dependent and independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma. PMID:24048737

  1. Regulation of T cell receptor activation by dynamic membrane binding of the CD3epsilon cytoplasmic tyrosine-based motif.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenqi; Gagnon, Etienne; Call, Matthew E; Schnell, Jason R; Schwieters, Charles D; Carman, Christopher V; Chou, James J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2008-11-14

    Many immune system receptors signal through cytoplasmic tyrosine-based motifs (ITAMs), but how receptor ligation results in ITAM phosphorylation remains unknown. Live-cell imaging studies showed a close interaction of the CD3epsilon cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor (TCR) with the plasma membrane through fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a C-terminal fluorescent protein and a membrane fluorophore. Electrostatic interactions between basic CD3epsilon residues and acidic phospholipids enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane were required for binding. The nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the lipid-bound state of this cytoplasmic domain revealed deep insertion of the two key tyrosines into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. Receptor ligation thus needs to result in unbinding of the CD3epsilon ITAM from the membrane to render these tyrosines accessible to Src kinases. Sequestration of key tyrosines into the lipid bilayer represents a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of receptor activation.

  2. The Effects of Cadmium Exposure on the Oxidative State and Cell Death in the Gill of Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Pingping; Shen, Qingqing; Wang, Qian; Liu, Dongmei; Li, Jing; Wang, Lan

    2013-01-01

    We studied here the short-term toxicity effects of Cd on the oxidative state and cell death in the gill of freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense. Crabs were exposed to Cd that resulted in Cd accumulation and a significant increase in the metallothionein (MT) level in the gill, but MT level increased disproportionally compared to the Cd accumulation with an extension of exposure time. Significant changes in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were observed. An increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) was detected that will cause oxidative stress. Histological abnormalities of the gills were discovered, including the expansion of gill cavity, a decrease in the numbers of connection of the upper and the lower of the gill lamellae and epithelial cells, and an increase in the number of hemocytes. The results of a TUNEL test and transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that more gill cells had apoptotic characteristics after 48 h of Cd treatment compared to the control, but epithelial cell necrosis and inflammatory response appeared only after 72 h. It was concluded that (1) Cd induced the ROS production and accumulation through inhibiting antioxidant enzyme activities and exceeding the saturation values of MT binging; (2) Cd led to lipid peroxidation and histopathological alternations; and (3) Cd induced apoptotic response at short time exposure, followed by necrotic features and inflammatory reaction after longer time exposure. PMID:23737962

  3. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  4. Engineering HIV envelope protein to activate germline B cell receptors of broadly neutralizing anti-CD4 binding site antibodies.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Hoot, Sam; Dreyer, Anita M; Lippy, Adriana; Stuart, Andrew; Cohen, Kristen W; Jardine, Joseph; Menis, Sergey; Scheid, Johannes F; West, Anthony P; Schief, William R; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2013-04-08

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV are believed to be a critical component of the protective responses elicited by an effective HIV vaccine. Neutralizing antibodies against the evolutionarily conserved CD4-binding site (CD4-BS) on the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) are capable of inhibiting infection of diverse HIV strains, and have been isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Despite the presence of anti-CD4-BS broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) epitopes on recombinant Env, Env immunization has so far failed to elicit such antibodies. Here, we show that Env immunogens fail to engage the germline-reverted forms of known bnAbs that target the CD4-BS. However, we found that the elimination of a conserved glycosylation site located in Loop D and two glycosylation sites located in variable region 5 of Env allows Env-binding to, and activation of, B cells expressing the germline-reverted BCRs of two potent broadly neutralizing antibodies, VRC01 and NIH45-46. Our results offer a possible explanation as to why Env immunogens have been ineffective in stimulating the production of such bNAbs. Importantly, they provide key information as to how such immunogens can be engineered to initiate the process of antibody-affinity maturation against one of the most conserved Env regions.

  5. Binding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebsamen, Werner

    1981-01-01

    Categorizes contemporary methods of binding printed materials in terms of physical preservation--hand binding (archival restoration), edition binding (paperback, hardcover), publication binding (magazines), textbook binding (sidesewn), single-sheet binding (loose-leaf, mechanical), and library binding (oversewn, sidesewn). Seven references are…

  6. The role of higher-order protein structure in supporting binding by heteroclitic monoclonal antibodies: the monoclonal antibody KIM185 to CD18 also binds C4-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Gjelstrup, Louise Carstensen; Andersen, Stig Henrik; Petersen, Steen Vang; Enghild, Jan J; Blom, Anna M; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    Heteroclitic monoclonal antibodies are characterized by the ability to bind multiple epitopes with little or no similarity. Such antibodies have been reported earlier, but insight into to the molecular basis of this propensity is limited. Here we report that the KIM185 antibody to human CD18 reacts with the plasma protein C4b-binding protein (C4BP). This was revealed during affinity purification procedures where human serum was incubated with surfaces coated with monoclonal antibodies to CD18. Other monoclonal antibodies to CD18 (KIM127 and TS1/18) showed no such interaction with C4BP. We constructed a sandwich-type time-resolved immunofluorometric assay using KIM185 both as capture and developing antibody. By use of proteolytic fragments of KIM185 and recombinant deletion mutants of C4BP the interaction sites were mapped to the variable region of KIM185 and the oligomerization domain of C4BP, respectively. C4BP is a large oligomeric plasma protein that binds activated complement factor C4b and other endogenous ligands as well as microorganisms. By use of the recent crystallographic data on the structure of CD11c/CD18 and prediction of the secondary structure of the C4BP oligomerization domain, we show that epitopes bound by KIM185 in these proteins are unlikely to share any major structural similarity. However, both antigens may form oligomers that would enable avid binding by the antibody. Our report points to the astonishing ability of heteroclitic antibodies to accommodate the binding of multiple proteins with no or little structural similarity within the confined space of the variable regions.

  7. Crystal structures of bovine CD1d reveal altered αGalCer presentation and a restricted A' pocket unable to bind long-chain glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C₁₈, while GSLs with fatty acids of C₂₄ do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C₁₂-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C₁₆-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL's to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells.

  8. Crystal Structures of Bovine CD1d Reveal Altered αGalCer Presentation and a Restricted A’ Pocket Unable to Bind Long-Chain Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C18, while GSLs with fatty acids of C24 do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C12-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C16-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL’s to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells. PMID:23110152

  9. Simultaneous determination of Ca, Cu, Ni, Zn and Cd binding strengths with fulvic acid fractions by Schubert's method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.K.; MacCarthy, P.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of Ca2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ with unfractionated Suwannee river fulvic acid (SRFA) and an enhanced metal binding subfraction of SRFA was measured using Schubert's ion-exchange method at pH 6.0 and at an ionic strength (??) of 0.1 (NaNO3). The fractionation and subfractionation were directed towards obtaining an isolate with an elevated metal binding capacity or binding strength as estimated by Cu2+ potentiometry (ISE). Fractions were obtained by stepwise eluting an XAD-8 column loaded with SRFA with water eluents of pH 1.0 to pH 12.0. Subfractions were obtained by loading the fraction eluted from XAD-8 at pH 5.0 onto a silica gel column and eluting with solvents of increasing polarity. Schuberts ion exchange method was rigorously tested by measuring simultaneously the conditional stability constants (K) of citric acid complexed with the five metals at pH 3.5 and 6.0. The logK of SRFA with Ca2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ determined simultaneously at pH 6.0 follow the sequence of Cu2+>Cd2+>Ni2+>Zn2+>Ca2+ while all logK values increased for the enhanced metal binding subfraction and followed a different sequence of Cu2+>Cd2+>Ca2+>Ni2+>Zn2+. Both fulvic acid samples and citric acid exhibited a 1:1 metal to ligand stochiometry under the relatively low metal loading conditions used here. Quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed increases in aromaticity and ketone content and decreases in aliphatic carbon for the elevated metal binding fraction while the carboxyl carbon, and elemental nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur content did not change. The more polar, elevated metal binding fraction did show a significant increase in molecular weight over the unfractionated SRFA. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjun; Larsen, Mette V.; Nielsen, Morten; Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune; Dziegiel, Morten H.; Buus, Søren; Tang, Sheila T.; Lund, Ole; Claesson, Mogens H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes from influenza virus is of importance for the development of new effective peptide-based vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, bioinformatics was used to predict 9mer peptides derived from available influenza A viral proteins with binding affinity for at least one of the 12 HLA-I supertypes. The predicted peptides were then selected in a way that ensured maximal coverage of the available influenza A strains. One hundred and thirty one peptides were synthesized and their binding affinities for the HLA-I supertypes were measured in a biochemical assay. Influenza-specific T cell responses towards the peptides were quantified using IFNγ ELISPOT assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult healthy HLA-I typed donors as responder cells. Of the 131 peptides, 21 were found to induce T cell responses in 19 donors. In the ELISPOT assay, five peptides induced responses that could be totally blocked by the pan-specific anti-HLA-I antibody W6/32, whereas 15 peptides induced responses that could be completely blocked in the presence of the pan-specific anti-HLA class II (HLA-II) antibody IVA12. Blocking of HLA-II subtype reactivity revealed that 8 and 6 peptide responses were blocked by anti-HLA-DR and -DP antibodies, respectively. Peptide reactivity of PBMC depleted of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells prior to the ELISPOT culture revealed that effectors are either CD4+ (the majority of reactivities) or CD8+ T cells, never a mixture of these subsets. Three of the peptides, recognized by CD4+ T cells showed binding to recombinant DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 or DRA1*0101/DRB5*0101 molecules in a recently developed biochemical assay. Conclusions/Significance HLA-I binding 9mer influenza virus-derived peptides induce in many cases CD4+ T cell responses restricted by HLA-II molecules. PMID:20479886

  11. Combined application of a laser ablation-ICP-MS assay for screening and ESI-FTICR-MS for identification of a Cd-binding protein in Spinacia oleracea L. after exposure to Cd.

    PubMed

    Polatajko, Aleksandra; Feldmann, Ingo; Hayen, Heiko; Jakubowski, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the binding of the toxic element Cd to plant proteins and have used for this purpose spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants treated with 50 μM Cd(II) as a model system. Laser ablation ICP-MS has been applied for the screening of Cd-binding proteins after separation by native anodal polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AN-PAGE) and electroblotting onto membranes. The main Cd-carrying protein band was isolated and investigated by nano-electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry after tryptic digestion. By this procedure, the main Cd-binding protein was identified as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The latter enzyme has been discussed in the literature to be affected in its activity by oxidative stress induced by Cd. However, in this paper it is demonstrated for the first time that RuBisCO directly binds Cd and thus may be directly altered by this toxic element. A commercially available protein standard was used to verify direct binding of Cd(II) to the protein, even without metabolisation. The resulting metal-protein complex was shown to be stable enough to survive AN-PAGE separation and electroblotting. By the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ICP-MS it was demonstrated that the RuBisCO protein standard shows similar metal binding properties to Cd. Furthermore, essential elements such as Mn(II), Fe(II) and Cu(II), which are known to possibly replace the RuBisCO activator Mg(II), were investigated in addition to Zn(II). Again, similar binding properties in comparison to the plant protein were observed.

  12. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Moody, M Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Amos, Joshua D; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A; Alam, S Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Sam, Noel E; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S; Tumba, Nancy L; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Mascola, John R; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Sodroski, Joseph G; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3 and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  13. Measles virus recognizes its receptor, CD46, via two distinct binding domains within SCR1-2.

    PubMed

    Manchester, M; Gairin, J E; Patterson, J B; Alvarez, J; Liszewski, M K; Eto, D S; Atkinson, J P; Oldstone, M B

    1997-06-23

    Measles virus (MV) enters cells by attachment of the viral hemagglutinin to the major cell surface receptor CD46 (membrane cofactor protein). CD46 is a transmembrane glycoprotein whose ectodomain is largely composed of four conserved modules called short consensus repeats (SCRs). We have previously shown that MV interacts with SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46. (M. Manchester et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 2303-2307) Here we report mapping the MV interaction with SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46 using a combination of peptide inhibition and mutagenesis studies. By testing a series of overlapping peptides corresponding to the 126 amino acid SCR1-2 region for inhibition of MV infection, two domains were identified that interacted with MV. One domain was found within SCR1 (amino acids 37-56) and another within SCR2 (amino acids 85-104). These results were confirmed by constructing chimeras with complementary regions from structurally similar, but non-MV-binding, SCRs of decay accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). These results indicate that MV contacts at least two distinct sites within SCR1-2.

  14. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE PAGES

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; ...

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore » 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  15. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey  E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan  A.; Alam, S.  Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia  D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron  S.; Sam, Noel  E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy  L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw  K.; Mascola, John  R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George  M.; Sodroski, Joseph  G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  16. Analysis of genes coding for CD46, CD55 and C4b-binding protein in patients with idiopathic, recurrent, spontaneous pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Mohlin, Frida C.; Mercier, Eric; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Blom, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Since a tightly regulated complement system is needed for a successful pregnancy, we hypothesized that alterations in complement inhibitors may be associated with idiopathic, recurrent miscarriage. We sequenced all exons coding for three complement inhibitors: C4b-binding protein (C4BP), CD46 and CD55 in 384 childless women with at least two miscarriages that could not be explained by known risk factors. Several alterations were found in C4BPA, of which the R120H, I126T, and the G423T mutations affected the expression level and/or the ability of recombinant C4BP to serve as cofactor for factor I. The only variant in C4BPB was located in the C-terminal part, and did not impair the polymerization of the molecule. Our results identify for the first time alterations in C4BP in women experiencing recurrent miscarriages. We also found four CD46 alterations in individual patients that were not found in healthy controls. One of the rare variants, P324L, showed decreased expression, whereas N213I resulted in deficient protein processing as well as an impaired cofactor activity in the degradation of both C4b and C3b. The identified alterations may result in in vivo consequences and contribute to the disorder but the degree of association must be evaluated in larger cohorts. PMID:23508668

  17. Influence of Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ on (+)-catechin binding to bovine serum albumin studied by fluorescence spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mijun; Shi, Shuyun; Zhang, Yuping

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heavy metal ions, Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) on (+)-catechin binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic methods. The results indicated that the presence of heavy metal ions significantly affected the binding modes and binding affinities of (+)-catechin to BSA, and the effects depend on the types of heavy metal ion. One binding mode was found for (+)-catechin with and without Cd(2+), while two binding modes - a weaker one at low concentration and a stronger one at high concentration were found for (+)-catechin in the presence of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). The presence of Cd(2+) decreased the binding affinities of (+)-catechin for BSA by 20.5%. The presence of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) decreased the binding affinity of (+)-catechin for BSA by 8.9% and 26.7% in lower concentration, respectively, and increased the binding affinity of (+)-catechin for BSA by 5.2% and 9.2% in higher concentration, respectively. The changed binding affinity and binding distance of (+)-catechin for BSA in the presence of Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) were mainly because of the conformational change of BSA induced by heavy metal ions. However, the quenching mechanism for (+)-catechin to BSA was based on static quenching combined with non-radiative energy transfer irrespective of the absence or presence of heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ on (+)-catechin binding to bovine serum albumin studied by fluorescence spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Mijun; Shi, Shuyun; Zhang, Yuping

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heavy metal ions, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ on (+)-catechin binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic methods. The results indicated that the presence of heavy metal ions significantly affected the binding modes and binding affinities of (+)-catechin to BSA, and the effects depend on the types of heavy metal ion. One binding mode was found for (+)-catechin with and without Cd 2+, while two binding modes - a weaker one at low concentration and a stronger one at high concentration were found for (+)-catechin in the presence of Hg 2+ and Pb 2+. The presence of Cd 2+ decreased the binding affinities of (+)-catechin for BSA by 20.5%. The presence of Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ decreased the binding affinity of (+)-catechin for BSA by 8.9% and 26.7% in lower concentration, respectively, and increased the binding affinity of (+)-catechin for BSA by 5.2% and 9.2% in higher concentration, respectively. The changed binding affinity and binding distance of (+)-catechin for BSA in the presence of Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ were mainly because of the conformational change of BSA induced by heavy metal ions. However, the quenching mechanism for (+)-catechin to BSA was based on static quenching combined with non-radiative energy transfer irrespective of the absence or presence of heavy metal ions.

  19. Mutations in CD2BP1 disrupt binding to PTP PEST and are responsible for PAPA syndrome, an autoinflammatory disorder.

    PubMed

    Wise, Carol A; Gillum, Joseph D; Seidman, Christine E; Lindor, Noralane M; Veile, Rose; Bashiardes, Stavros; Lovett, Michael

    2002-04-15

    PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne, OMIM #604416) and familial recurrent arthritis (FRA) are rare inherited disorders of early onset, primarily affecting skin and joint tissues. Recurring inflammatory episodes lead to accumulation of sterile, pyogenic, neutrophil-rich material within the affected joints, ultimately resulting in significant destruction. We recently localized the genes for PAPA syndrome and FRA to chromosome 15q and suggested that they are the same disorder. We have now established this by the identification of co-segregating disease-causing mutations in the CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1; GenBank accession no XM 044569) gene in the two reported families with this disorder. E250Q or A230T amino acid substitutions occur within a domain highly homologous to yeast cleavage furrow-associated protein CDC15. CD2BP1 and its murine ortholog, proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein (PSTPIP1), are adaptor proteins known to interact with PEST-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). Yeast two-hybrid assays demonstrate severely reduced binding between PTP PEST and both the E250Q and A230T mutant proteins. Previous evidence supports the integral role of CD2BP1 and its interacting proteins in actin reorganization during cytoskeletal-mediated events. We hypothesize that the disease-causing mutations that we have identified compromise physiologic signaling necessary for the maintenance of proper inflammatory response. Accordingly we suggest classification of PAPA syndrome as an autoinflammatory disease. This CD2BP1-mediated biochemical pathway(s) may function in common inflammatory disorders with apparent etiological overlap, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. The cell surface expression of SAP-binding receptor CD229 is regulated via its interaction with clathrin-associated adaptor complex 2 (AP-2).

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Juana M; Engel, Pablo; Martín, Margarita

    2003-05-09

    CD229 (Ly9) is a cell surface receptor selectively expressed on T and B lymphocytes, and it belongs to the CD150 receptor family. Like other receptors of this family, CD229 interacts with SAP/SH2D1a protein, mutation of which is responsible for the fatal X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Receptors of the CD150 family function as costimulatory molecules, regulating cytokine production and cytotoxicity. Thus, their signaling and regulation in lymphocytes may be critical to an understanding of the pathogenesis of the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Here we show that CD229 interacts with the mu(2) chain of the AP-2 adaptor complex that links transmembrane proteins to clathrin-coated pits. CD229 was the only member of the CD150 family associated with AP-2. We also show that the mu(2) chain interacts with the Y(470)EKL motif of CD229. The integrity of this site was necessary for CD229 internalization, but it was not involved in SAP recruitment. Moreover, CD229 binds to the AP-2 complex in T and B cell lines, and it is internalized rapidly from the cell surface on T cells after antibody ligation. In contrast, cross-linking of CD229 receptors with intact antibody inhibited CD229 internalization on B cells. However, when F(ab')(2) antibodies were used, CD229 internalization was similar on T and B cells, suggesting that Fcgamma receptors control CD229 cell surface expression. Furthermore, CD229 was regulated by T cell receptor and B cell receptor signaling because coligation with antibodies against anti-CD3 and anti-IgM increased the rate of CD229 endocytosis. These data suggest that CD229 cell surface expression on lymphocytes surface is strongly and differentially regulated within the CD150 family members.

  1. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  2. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  3. Comparative experiments of graphene covalently and physically binding CdSe quantum dots to enhance the electron transport in flexible photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi-Hee; Chu, Moo-Jung

    2014-08-07

    In this research, we prepared composite films via covalent coupling of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to graphene through the direct binding of aryl radicals to the graphene surface. To compare the carrier transport with the CdSe aryl binding graphene film, we prepared CdSe pyridine capping graphene films through the pi-pi interactions of noncovalent bonds between the graphene and pyridine molecules. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated from the two hybrid films using the electrophoretic deposition method on flexible substrates. Even though the two hybrid films have the same amount of QDs and graphene, time-resolved fluorescence emission decay results show that the emission lifetime of the CdSe aryl group binding graphene film is significantly shorter than that of the pyridine capping CdSe-graphene. The quantum efficiency and photocurrent density of the device fabricated from CdSe aryl binding graphene were also higher than those of the device fabricated from pyridine capping CdSe-graphene. These results indicated that the carrier transport of the QD-graphene system is not related to the additive effect from the CdSe and graphene components but rather is a result of the unique interactions between the graphene and QDs. We could expect that these results can be useful in designing QD-graphene composite materials, which are applied in photovoltaic devices.

  4. Non-POU Domain-Containing Octamer-Binding Protein Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Infection in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    St Gelais, Corine; Roger, Jonathan; Wu, Li

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 interacts with numerous cellular proteins during viral replication. Identifying such host proteins and characterizing their roles in HIV-1 infection can deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between host and pathogen. We previously identified non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NonO or p54nrb) as one of host factors associated with catalytically active preintegration complexes (PIC) of HIV-1 in infected CD4(+) T cells. NonO is involved in nuclear processes including transcriptional regulation and RNA splicing. Although NonO has been identified as an HIV-1 interactant in several recent studies, its role in HIV-1 replication has not been characterized. We investigated the effect of NonO on the HIV-1 life cycle in CD4(+) T cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells using single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection assays. We observed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated stable NonO knockdown in a CD4(+) Jurkat T cell line and primary CD4(+) T cells did not affect cell viability or proliferation, but enhanced HIV-1 infection. The enhancement of HIV-1 infection in Jurkat T cells correlated with increased viral reverse transcription and gene expression. Knockdown of NonO expression in Jurkat T cells modestly enhanced HIV-1 gag mRNA expression and Gag protein synthesis, suggesting that viral gene expression and RNA regulation are the predominantly affected events causing enhanced HIV-1 replication in NonO knockdown (KD) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NonO in Jurkat T cells reduced HIV-1 single-cycle infection by 41% compared to control cells. Our data suggest that NonO negatively regulates HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, albeit it has modest effects on early and late stages of the viral life cycle, highlighting the importance of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PIC in regulating viral replication.

  5. Is CD36 gene polymorphism in region encoding lipid-binding domain associated with early onset CAD?

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika; Safranow, Krzysztof; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Krzystolik, Andrzej; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2013-11-01

    CD36 is a fatty acid translocase in striated muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Some study suggested that alterations in CD36 gene may be associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The aim of the current study was to compare the frequency of CD36 variants in region encoding lipid-binding domain in Caucasian patients with early-onset CAD, no-CAD adult controls and neonates. The study group comprised 100 patients with early onset CAD. The genetic control groups were 306 infants and 40 no-CAD adults aged over 70years. Exons 4, 5 and 6 including fragments of flanking introns were studied using the denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography technique and direct sequencing. Changes detected in analyzed fragment of CD36: IVS3-6 T/C (rs3173798), IVS4-10 G/A (rs3211892), C311T (Thr104Ile, not described so far) in exon 5, G550A (Asp184Asn, rs138897347), C572T (Pro191Leu, rs143150225), G573A (Pro191Pro, rs5956) and A591T (Thr197Thr, rs141680676) in exon 6. No significant differences in the CD36 genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies were found between the three groups. Only borderline differences (p=0.066) were found between early onset CAD patients and newborns in the frequencies of 591T allele (2.00% vs 0.50%) and CGCGCGT haplotype (2.00% vs 0.50%) with both IVS3-6C and 591T variant alleles. In conclusion, CD36 variants: rs3173798, rs3211892, rs138897347, rs5956, rs143150225 rs141680676 and C311T do not seem to be involved in the risk of early-onset CAD in Caucasian population.

  6. Natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structure reveals new mode for antibody recognition of the CD4-binding site

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P; Schamber, Michael; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Seaman, Michael S; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 vaccine design is informed by structural studies elucidating mechanisms by which broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize and/or accommodate N-glycans on the trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env). Variability in high-mannose and complex-type Env glycoforms leads to heterogeneity that usually precludes visualization of the native glycan shield. We present 3.5-Å- and 3.9-Å-resolution crystal structures of the HIV-1 Env trimer with fully processed and native glycosylation, revealing a glycan shield of high-mannose and complex-type N-glycans, which we used to define complete epitopes of two bNAbs. Env trimer was complexed with 10-1074 (against the V3-loop) and IOMA, a new CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody. Although IOMA derives from VH1-2*02, the germline gene of CD4bs-targeting VRC01-class bNAbs, its light chain lacks the short CDRL3 that defines VRC01-class bNAbs. Thus IOMA resembles 8ANC131-class/VH1-46–derived CD4bs bNAbs, which have normal-length CDRL3s. The existence of bNAbs that combine features of VRC01-class and 8ANC131-class antibodies has implications for immunization strategies targeting VRC01-like bNAbs. PMID:27617431

  7. A western type of bacterial gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    The first reference to a pathological condition of the gill tissues of salmonid fishes was made by Osburn in 1910. This author in describing a progressive infolding of the opercula of trout, commonly known to hatcherymen as "short gill covers," mentioned a marked proliferation on the gill epithelium as accompanying this condition. Osburn assumed that the club-like appearance of the gill filaments due to the proliferated epithelium was the result of continual irritation of the delicate gill tissue in the absence of the usual protection offered by the normal opercula. Although such a conclusion seems quite logical, it is also possible that Osburn was dealing with "short gill covers" complicated by the unknown bacterial gill disease which was subsequently described by Davis.

  8. Sp1 binds two sites in the CD11c promoter in vivo specifically in myeloid cells and cooperates with AP1 to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Noti, J D; Reinemann, B C; Petrus, M N

    1996-01-01

    The leukocyte integrin gene, CD11c, is transcriptionally regulated and is expressed predominantly on differentiated cells of the myelomonocytic lineage. In this study we have demonstrated that the regions -72 to -63 and -132 to -104 of the CD11c promoter contain elements responsible for phorbol ester-induced differentiation of the myeloid cell line HL60. DNase I footprinting analysis revealed that these regions can bind purified Sp1, and supershift analysis with Sp1 antibody confirmed that Sp1 in HL60 nuclear extracts could bind these regions. Transfection analysis of CD11c promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs containing deletions of these Sp1-binding sites revealed that these sites are essential for expression of the CD11c gene in HL60 cells but not in the T-cell line Molt4 or the cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa. Moreover, cotransfection of pPacSp1 along with these CD11c promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs into Sp1-deficient Drosophila Schneider 2 cells verified that these sites are essential for Sp1-dependent expression of the CD11c promoter. In vivo genomic footprinting revealed that Sp1 contacts the CD11c promoter within the regions -69 to -63 and -116 to -105 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-differentiated HL60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL60 cells or in Molt4 or HeLa cells. Cotransfection assays in HL60 cells revealed that Sp1 acts synergistically with Ap1 to activate CD11c. Further, both Sp1 sites are capable of cooperating with AP1. In vitro DNase I footprinting analysis with purified Sp1 and c-jun proteins showed that Sp1 binding could facilitate binding of c-jun. We propose that myeloid-specific expression of the CD11c promoter and is facilitated by cooperative interaction between the Sp1- and Ap1-binding sites. PMID:8649405

  9. Influence of relative binding affinity on efficacy in a panel of anti-CD3 scFv immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Hexham, J M; Dudas, D; Hugo, R; Thompson, J; King, V; Dowling, C; Neville, D M; Digan, M E; Lake, P

    2001-09-01

    The in vitro cell killing potency of an immunotoxin reflects the aggregate of several independent biochemical properties. These include antigen binding affinity; internalization rate, intracellular processing and intrinsic toxin domain potency. This study examines the influence of antigen binding affinity on potency in various immunotoxin fusion proteins where target antigen binding is mediated by single chain antibody variable region fragments (scFv). Firstly, the relationship between affinity and potency was examined in a panel of four scFv immunotoxins generated from different anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies fused to the 38 kDa fragment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE38). Of these four scFv-PE38 immunotoxins, the one derived from the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody UCHT1 has highest cell killing potency. Analysis of these four scFv-PE38 immunotoxins indicated a correlation between antigen binding affinity and immunotoxin potency in the cell killing assay with the exception of the scFvPE38 immunotoxin derived from the antibody BC3. However this scFv appeared to suffer a greater drop in affinity ( approximately 100x), relative to the parent Mab than did the other three scFvs used in this study (2-10x). Secondly, the scFv(UCHT1)-PE38 immunotoxin was then compared with a further panel of scFv(UCHT1)-derived immunotoxins including a divalent PE38 version and both monovalent and divalent Corynebacterium diphtheriae toxin (DT389) fusion proteins. When the scFv-UCHT1 domain was amino-terminally positioned relative to the toxin, as in the scFv(UCHT1)-PE38, an approximately 10-fold higher antigen-binding affinity was observed than with the C-terminal fusion, used in the DT389-scFv(UCHT1) molecule. Despite this lower antigen-binding activity, the DT389-scFv immunotoxin had a 60-fold higher potency in the T-cell-killing assay. Thirdly, a divalent form of the DT389-scFv construct, containing tandem scFv domains, had a 10-fold higher binding activity, which was exactly

  10. The ω-carboxyl group of 7-ketocholesteryl-9-carboxynonanoate mediates the binding of oxLDL to CD36 receptor and enhances caveolin-1 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingda; Yu, Chengjie; Wang, Renjun; Xu, Jianrong; Chi, Yan; Qin, Jianzhong; Liu, Qingping

    2017-09-01

    CD36 signal transduction modulates the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and foam cell formation. We previously observed that 7-ketocholesteryl-9-carboxynonanoate (oxLig-1), the lipid moiety of oxLDL, activates the CD36-Src-JNK/ERK1/2 signalling pathway. In this study, we assessed the role of the ω-carboxyl group in the binding of oxLig-1 to CD36 and investigated whether the binding of the ω-carboxyl group to CD36 triggers CD36-mediated signalling, thereby resulting in the upregulation of caveolin-1 expression. Our results showed that oxLig-1 bound to CD36 and that the ω-carboxyl group was critical for this binding. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that interaction between the ω-carboxyl group of oxLig-1 and CD36 triggered intracellular Src-JNK/ERK1/2 signal transduction. Moreover, the binding of the ω-carboxyl group to CD36 induced caveolin-1 expression and translocation to the membrane in macrophages. Additionally, inhibitors of Src, JNK and ERK and siRNA targeting CD36 and NF-κB significantly suppressed the enhanced caveolin-1 expression induced by oxLig-1. In conclusion, these observations suggest that oxLig-1 is a critical epitope of oxLDL that mediates the binding of oxLDL to CD36 and activates downstream Src-JNK/ERK1/2-NF-κB signal transduction, resulting in upregulation of caveolin-1 expression in macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lignasan for bacterial gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, Robert R.; B.J., Earp; Burrows, Roger E.

    1956-01-01

    Bacterial gill disease plagues salmon and trout in many hatcheries: some infections are sporadic, but others are continual. An inexpensive, easily applied, stable, safe chemical would be highly advantageous for treatment. The use of Roccal as a 1-hour treatment for bacterial gill disease (Fish 1947) was developed at the Leavenworth (Washington) Station of the Fish and Wildlife Service in 1942 and was quite successful. Since then, Roccal has been used extensively; but because of variability in composition, its efficacy is not consistent (Rucker et al. 1949). The objection to the variability of Roccal was overcome by using another compound, pyridylmercuric acetate, which was suggested by Van Horn and Katz (1946) as having some therapeutic therapy. Pyridylmercuric acetate was tested experimentally at the Leavenworth Station and was found to be very effective for bacterial gill disease. This compound had highly differential toxicities for bacteria and fish but was quite expensive (Rucker 1948, Burrows and Palmer 1949, Snieszko 1949). Another objection to pyridylmercuric acedate was its toxicity to rainbow trout—not to other species of trout or to salmon—at the concentration necessary to control the bacteria (Seaman 1950, Rodgers et al. 1951, Bryant 1951, Foster and Olson 1951).

  12. Effect of cadmium on protein synthesis in gill tissue of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhuizen-Tsoerkan, M.B.; van der Mast, C.A.; Zandee, D.I. )

    1988-09-01

    Mussels have a high capacity to accumulate cadmium and other heavy metals without notable toxic effects. However, they have recently found that cadmium is toxic to M. edulis at a relatively low concentration, as anoxic survival time of the animals was significantly shortened after two weeks of exposure to 50 ppb Cd. Based on this finding, a research was started to study the toxic effects of cadmium at a macromolecular level (proteins, RNA). Mussels were exposed to 250 ppb Cd for short periods. Then excised gills were incubated with {sup 35}s-methionine for 4 hours. In the gill tissue of 7 and 15 days Cd-exposed animals, a significantly decrease in the incorporation rate of the introduced label was found of 30 and 37%, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the de novo synthesized gill tissue proteins.

  13. Increasing the potency of neutralizing single-domain antibodies by functionalization with a CD11b/CD18 binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Rossotti, Martin A; González-Techera, Andrés; Guarnaschelli, Julio; Yim, Lucia; Camacho, Ximena; Fernández, Marcelo; Cabral, Pablo; Leizagoyen, Carmen; Chabalgoity, José A; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibodies (nanobodies) constitute an attractive alternative for the production of neutralizing therapeutic agents. Their small size warrants rapid bioavailability and fast penetration to sites of toxin uptake, but also rapid renal clearance, which negatively affects their performance. In this work, we present a new strategy to drastically improve the neutralizing potency of single domain antibodies based on their fusion to a second nanobody specific for the complement receptor CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1). These bispecific antibodies retain a small size (˜30 kDa), but acquire effector functions that promote the elimination of the toxin-immunocomplexes. The principle was demonstrated in a mouse model of lethal toxicity with tetanus toxin. Three anti-tetanus toxin nanobodies were selected and characterized in terms of overlapping epitopes and inhibition of toxin binding to neuron gangliosides. Bispecific constructs of the most promising monodomain antibodies were built using anti Mac-1, CD45 and MHC II nanobodies. When co-administered with the toxin, all bispecific antibodies showed higher toxin-neutralizing capacity than the monomeric ones, but only their fusion to the anti-endocytic receptor Mac-1 nanobody allowed the mice to survive a 10-fold lethal dose. In a model of delayed neutralization of the toxin, the anti- Mac-1 bispecific antibodies outperformed a sheep anti-toxin polyclonal IgG that had shown similar neutralization potency in the co-administration experiments. This strategy should have widespread application in the development of nanobody-based neutralizing therapeutics, which can be produced economically and more safely than conventional antisera. PMID:26192995

  14. Measles virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer into quiescent lymphocytes requires binding to both SLAM and CD46 entry receptors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Lévy, Camille; Costa, Caroline; Nègre, Didier; Amirache, Fouzia; Buckland, Robin; Russell, Steven J; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2011-06-01

    Gene transfer into quiescent T and B cells is of importance for gene therapy and immunotherapy approaches to correct hematopoietic disorders. Previously, we generated lentiviral vectors (LVs) pseudotyped with the Edmonston measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins (Hgps and Fgps) (H/F-LVs), which, for the first time, allowed efficient transduction of quiescent human B and T cells. These target cells express both MV entry receptors used by the vaccinal Edmonston strain, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). Interestingly, LVs pseudotyped with an MV Hgp, blind for the CD46 binding site, were completely inefficient for resting-lymphocyte transduction. Similarly, SLAM-blind H mutants that recognize only CD46 as the entry receptor did not allow stable LV transduction of resting T cells. The CD46-tropic LVs accomplished vector-cell binding, fusion, entry, and reverse transcription at levels similar to those achieved by the H/F-LVs, but efficient proviral integration did not occur. Our results indicate that both CD46 and SLAM binding sites need to be present in cis in the Hgp to allow successful stable transduction of quiescent lymphocytes. Moreover, the entry mechanism utilized appears to be crucial: efficient transduction was observed only when CD46 and SLAM were correctly engaged and an entry mechanism that strongly resembles macropinocytosis was triggered. Taken together, our results suggest that although vector entry can occur through the CD46 receptor, SLAM binding and subsequent signaling are also required for efficient LV transduction of quiescent lymphocytes to occur.

  15. The Vα14 invariant natural killer T cell TCR forces microbial glycolipids and CD1d into a conserved binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Yu, Esther Dawen; Painter, Gavin F.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) rapidly produce effector cytokines. In this study, we report the first crystal structures of the iNKT cell T cell receptor (TCR) bound to two natural, microbial glycolipids presented by CD1d. Binding of the TCR induced CDR3-α–dependent structural changes in the F′ roof of CD1d; these changes resemble those occurring in the absence of TCR engagement when the highly potent synthetic antigen α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) binds CD1d. Furthermore, in the Borrelia burgdorferi α–galactosyl diacylglycerol–CD1d complex, TCR binding caused a marked repositioning of the galactose sugar into an orientation that closely resembles α-GalCer. The TCR-dependent reorientation of the sugar, together with the induced CD1d fit, may explain the weaker potency of the microbial antigens compared with α-GalCer. We propose that the TCR of iNKT cells binds with a conserved footprint onto CD1d, regardless of the bound glycolipid antigen, and that for microbial antigens this unique binding mode requires TCR-initiated conformational changes. PMID:20921281

  16. A Salmonella typhi OmpC fusion protein expressing the CD154 Trp140–Ser149 amino acid strand binds CD40 and activates a lymphoma B-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Mario I; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Luría-Perez, Rosendo; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Isibasi, Armado; González-Bonilla, Cesar R

    2003-01-01

    CD154 is a type II glycoprotein member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family, which is expressed mainly on the surface of activated T lymphocytes. The interaction with its receptor CD40, plays a central role in the control of several functions of the immune system. Structural models based on the homology of CD154 with TNF and lymphotoxin indicate that binding to CD40 involves three regions surrounding amino acids K143, R203 and Q220, and that strands W140–S149 and S198–A210 are critical for such interactions. Also, it has been reported that two recombinant CD154 fragments, including amino acid residues Y45–L261 or E108–L261 are biologically active, whereas other polypeptides, including S149–L261, are not. Therefore, we decided to construct a fusion protein inserting the W140-S149 amino acid strand (WAEKGYYTMS) in an external loop of the outer membrane protein C (OmpC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and assess its ability to bind CD40 and activate B cells. The sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the chimeric OmpC–gp39 protein conserved its ability to form trimers. Binding to CD40 was established by three variants of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a direct binding assay by coating plates with a recombinant CD40–Fc protein and through two competition assays between OmpC–gp39 and recombinant CD154 or soluble CD40–Fc. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that OmpC–gp39 increased the expression levels of major histocompatibility complex II, CD23, and CD80, in Raji human B-cell lymphoma similarly to an antibody against CD40. These results further support that the CD154/CD40 interaction is similar to the TNF/TNF receptor. This is the first report of a bacterial fusion protein containing a small amino acid strand form a ligand that is able to activate its cognate receptor. PMID:14511234

  17. Temporal expression of HIV-1 envelope proteins in baculovirus-infected insect cells: Implications for glycosylation and CD4 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.I.; Lennick, M.; Lehar, S.M.; Beltz, G.A.; Young, E. )

    1990-10-01

    Three different human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope derived recombinant proteins and the full length human CD4 polypeptide were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. DNA constructs encoding CD4, gp120, gp160, and gp160 delta were cloned into the baculovirus expression vector pVL941 or a derivative and used to generate recombinant viruses in a cotransfection with DNA from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV). Western blotting of cell extracts of the recombinant HIV-1 proteins showed that for each construct two major bands specifically reacted with anti-HIV-1 envelope antiserum. These bands corresponded to glycosylated and nonglycosylated versions of the HIV proteins as determined by 3H-mannose labeling and tunicamycin treatment of infected cells. A time course of HIV envelope expression revealed that at early times post-infection (24 hours) the proteins were fully glycosylated and soluble in nonionic detergents. However, at later times postinfection (48 hours), expression levels of recombinant protein reached a maximum but most of the increase was due to a rise in the level of the nonglycosylated species, which was largely insoluble in nonionic detergents. Thus, it appears that Sf9 cells cannot process large amounts of glycosylated recombinant proteins efficiently. As a measure of biological activity, the CD4 binding ability of both glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant HIV envelope proteins was tested in a coimmunoprecipitation assay. The results showed that CD4 and the glycosylated versions of recombinant gp120 or gp160 delta specifically associated with one another in this analysis. Nonglycosylated gp120 or gp160 delta proteins from tunicamycin-treated cultures did immunoprecipitate with anti-HIV-1 antiserum but did not interact with CD4.

  18. Automatic sequence design of major histocompatibility complex class I binding peptides impairing CD8+ T cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Koji; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Cohen, William; Briand, Jean-Paul; Connan, Francine; Choppin, Jeannine; Muller, Sylviane; Wodak, Shoshana J

    2003-01-10

    An automatic protein design procedure was used to compute amino acid sequences of peptides likely to bind the HLA-A2 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele. The only information used by the procedure are a structural template, a rotamer library, and a well established classical empirical force field. The calculations are performed on six different templates from x-ray structures of HLA-A0201-peptide complexes. Each template consists of the bound peptide backbone and the full atomic coordinates of the MHC protein. Sequences within 2 kcal/mol of the minimum energy sequence are computed for each template, and the sequences from all the templates are combined and ranked by their energies. The five lowest energy peptide sequences and five other low energy sequences re-ranked on the basis of their similarity to peptides known to bind the same MHC allele are chemically synthesized and tested for their ability to bind and form stable complexes with the HLA-A2 molecule. The most efficient binders are also tested for inhibition of the T cell receptor recognition of two known CD8(+) T effectors. Results show that all 10 peptides bind the expected MHC protein. The six strongest binders also form stable HLA-A2-peptide complexes, albeit to varying degrees, and three peptides display significant inhibition of CD8(+) T cell recognition. These results are rationalized in light of our knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the HLA-A2-peptide and HLA-A2-peptide-T cell receptor complexes.

  19. MHC class I molecules with Superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Mathew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S J; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2010-04-01

    CD8(+) CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of both TCR and CD8 coreceptor to a single ligand (peptide MHCI [pMHCI]). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers Ag specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to Ag. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. In this study, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by approximately 15-fold results in nonspecific, cognate Ag-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with superenhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTLs in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL Ag specificity.

  20. PE-Cy5.5 conjugates bind to the cells expressing mouse DEC205/CD205.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae Gyu; Rodriguez, Anthony; Steinman, Ralph M

    2012-10-31

    DEC205/CD205, an endocytic receptor of C-type multilectin, is expressed highly in dendritic cells (DCs). DEC205 was shown to efficiently deliver vaccine antigens in surrogate ligands to the antigen processing and presentation machinery of DCs, which resulted in the development of DC-targeted vaccines employing anti-DC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). During our studies to characterize a variety of anti-DC mAbs including anti-DEC205 by flow cytometric analysis, we discovered that a secondary anti-immunoglobulin antibody conjugated with PE-Cy5.5 bound strongly to the cells expressing mouse DEC205 (mDEC205) without incubation of a primary anti-mDEC205 mAb. In the present study we demonstrate that various antibodies and streptavidin conjugated with PE-Cy5.5 bind to the mDEC205-expressing cells including CHO, KIT6, and HEK293 cells. The interaction between the PE-Cy5.5 conjugates and the cells expressing mDEC205 appears distinctive, since none of the PE-Cy5.5 conjugates bind to the cells that express human DEC205 on surface. Besides, only PE-Cy5.5 conjugates bind strongly to mDEC205-expressing cells; PerCP-Cy5.5, APC-Cy5.5, and Cy5.5 conjugates bind weakly; PE, PE-Cy5, Cy5, FITC, or Alexa488 conjugates do not bind to mDEC205-expressing cells. Therefore the use of PE-Cy5.5 conjugates, widely utilized in multicolor flow cytometry, requires precaution against nonspecific binding to mDEC205-positive cells.

  1. CD36 Is a Novel Serum Amyloid A (SAA) Receptor Mediating SAA Binding and SAA-induced Signaling in Human and Rodent Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Irina N.; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Kurlander, Roger; Chen, Zhigang; Fu, Dong; Arias, Irwin M.; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P.; Eggerman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. This study provides experimental evidence that CD36, a phagocyte class B scavenger receptor, functions as a novel SAA receptor mediating SAA proinflammatory activity. The uptake of Alexa Fluor® 488 SAA as well as of other well established CD36 ligands was increased 5–10-fold in HeLa cells stably transfected with CD36 when compared with mock-transfected cells. Unlike other apolipoproteins that bind to CD36, only SAA induced a 10–50-fold increase of interleukin-8 secretion in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control cells. SAA-mediated effects were thermolabile, inhibitable by anti-SAA antibody, and also neutralized by association with high density lipoprotein but not by association with bovine serum albumin. SAA-induced cell activation was inhibited by a CD36 peptide based on the CD36 hexarelin-binding site but not by a peptide based on the thrombospondin-1-binding site. A pronounced reduction (up to 60–75%) of SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was observed in cd36−/− rat macrophages and Kupffer cells when compared with wild type rat cells. The results of the MAPK phosphorylation assay as well as of the studies with NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors revealed that two MAPKs, JNK and to a lesser extent ERK1/2, primarily contribute to elevated cytokine production in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In macrophages, four signaling pathways involving NF-κB and three MAPKs all appeared to contribute to SAA-induced cytokine release. These observations indicate that CD36 is a receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion predominantly through JNK- and ERK1/2-mediated signaling. PMID:20075072

  2. CD36 is a novel serum amyloid A (SAA) receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced signaling in human and rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Kurlander, Roger; Chen, Zhigang; Fu, Dong; Arias, Irwin M; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P; Eggerman, Thomas L

    2010-03-12

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. This study provides experimental evidence that CD36, a phagocyte class B scavenger receptor, functions as a novel SAA receptor mediating SAA proinflammatory activity. The uptake of Alexa Fluor 488 SAA as well as of other well established CD36 ligands was increased 5-10-fold in HeLa cells stably transfected with CD36 when compared with mock-transfected cells. Unlike other apolipoproteins that bind to CD36, only SAA induced a 10-50-fold increase of interleukin-8 secretion in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control cells. SAA-mediated effects were thermolabile, inhibitable by anti-SAA antibody, and also neutralized by association with high density lipoprotein but not by association with bovine serum albumin. SAA-induced cell activation was inhibited by a CD36 peptide based on the CD36 hexarelin-binding site but not by a peptide based on the thrombospondin-1-binding site. A pronounced reduction (up to 60-75%) of SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was observed in cd36(-/-) rat macrophages and Kupffer cells when compared with wild type rat cells. The results of the MAPK phosphorylation assay as well as of the studies with NF-kappaB and MAPK inhibitors revealed that two MAPKs, JNK and to a lesser extent ERK1/2, primarily contribute to elevated cytokine production in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In macrophages, four signaling pathways involving NF-kappaB and three MAPKs all appeared to contribute to SAA-induced cytokine release. These observations indicate that CD36 is a receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion predominantly through JNK- and ERK1/2-mediated signaling.

  3. Whether metal (Pb, Cd, Zn) binding property of natural organic matter is source-dependent-A study based on spectroscopy, potentiometry, and voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Gueguen, C.; Smith, S.

    2016-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is a complex molecule of diverse ligands that essentially regulates metal speciation and toxicity. NOM source is heterogeneous, but can be operationally classified into allochthonous, autochthonous, and intermediate between these two groups. Whether the metal binding property (i.e. affinity and capacity) is NOM-source dependent however, remains unclear. The answer of this question is helpful for environmental modeling. If metal binding properties are sensitive to NOM source, then models used to determine metal speciation will need to be revised to take some measurement of NOM quality into consideration. In this study, different sources of NOM were collected for the study of Pb, Cd, and Zn binding. The NOM properties were characterized by different techniques from different chemistry indexes, including acidity chemistry, optical spectroscopy for component and structure, and cathodic stripping voltammetry for thiol determination. Absence of Gradient and Nernstian Equilibrium Stripping was used to selectively determine the concentration of free metal ion for binding isotherm. A model based on continuous site distribution was used to describe this binding isotherm. By best fitting the binding isotherm into the model using a regularized optimization, a conditional affinity spectrum was derived. Comparing binding isotherm and affinity spectrum between NOM samples showed that Pb binding was more dependent on NOM sources than Cd and Zn binding. Under the same binding condition (i.e. DOC, pH and ionic strength), allochthonous NOM mostly showed higher binding level (i.e. up to 3 log unit of bound species concentration) and stronger binding affinity for Pb than autochthonous NOM. This tendency however, was not obvious for Cd and Zn. Humic-like content probably contributed the most significant factor for Pb binding discrimination. Thiol content may be another important factor to differentiate metal binding affinity and capacity between NOM samples.

  4. Regulation of T cell Receptor Activation by Dynamic Membrane Binding of the CD3ε Cytoplasmic Tyrosine-Based Motif

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenqi; Gagnon, Etienne; Call, Matthew E.; Schnell, Jason R.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Carman, Christopher V.; Chou, James J.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many immune system receptors signal through cytoplasmic tyrosine-based motifs (ITAMs), but how receptor ligation results in ITAM phosphorylation remains unknown. Live cell imaging studies showed a close interaction of the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor (TCR) with the plasma membrane through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a C-terminal fluorescent protein and a membrane fluorophore. Electrostatic interactions between basic CD3ε residues and acidic phospholipids enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane were required for binding. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the lipid-bound state of this cytoplasmic domain revealed deep insertion of the two key tyrosines into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. Receptor ligation thus needs to result in unbinding of the CD3ε ITAM from the membrane to render these tyrosines accessible to Src kinases. Sequestration of key tyrosines into the lipid bilayer represents a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of receptor activation. PMID:19013279

  5. Mechanism for strong binding of CdSe quantum dots to multiwall carbon nanotubes for solar energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Azoz, Seyla; Jiang, Jie; Keskar, Gayatri; McEnally, Charles; Alkas, Alp; Ren, Fang; Marinkovic, Nebojsa; Haller, Gary L; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Pfefferle, Lisa D

    2013-08-07

    As hybrid nanomaterials have myriad of applications in modern technology, different functionalization strategies are being intensely sought for preparing nanocomposites with tunable properties and structures. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT)/CdSe Quantum Dot (QD) heterostructures serve as an important example for an active component of solar cells. The attachment mechanism of CdSe QDs and MWNTs is known to affect the charge transfer between them and consequently to alter the efficiency of solar cell devices. In this study, we present a novel method that enables the exchange of some of the organic capping agents on the QDs with carboxyl functionalized MWNTs upon ultrasonication. This produces a ligand-free covalent attachment of the QDs to the MWNTs. EXAFS characterization reveals direct bond formation between the CdSe QDs and the MWNTs. The amount of oleic acid exchanged is quantified by temperature-programmed decomposition; the results indicate that roughly half of the oleic acid is removed from the QDs upon functionalized MWNT addition. Additionally, we characterize the optical and structural properties of the QD-MWNT heterostructures and investigate how these properties are affected by the attachment. The steady state photoluminescence response of QDs is completely quenched. The lifetime of the PL of the QDs measured with time resolved photoluminescence shows a significant decrease after they are covalently bonded to functionalized MWNTs, suggesting a fast charge transfer between QDs and MWNTs. Our theoretical calculations are consistent with and support these experimental findings and provide microscopic models for the QD binding mechanisms.

  6. Optimal lamellar arrangement in fish gills

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-01-01

    Fish respire through gills, which have evolved to extract aqueous oxygen. Fish gills consist of filaments with well-ordered lamellar structures, which play a role in maximizing oxygen diffusion. It is interesting that when we anatomically observe the gills of various fish species, gill interlamellar distances (d) vary little among them, despite large variations in body mass (Mb). Noting that the small channels formed by densely packed lamellae cause significant viscous resistance to water flow, we construct and test a model of oxygen transfer rate as a function of the lamellar dimensions and pumping pressure, which allows us to predict the optimal interlamellar distance that maximizes the oxygen transfer rate in the gill. Comparing our theory with biological data supports the hypothesis that fish gills have evolved to form the optimal interlamellar distances for maximizing oxygen transfer. This explains the weak scaling dependence of d on Mb: d ∼ Mb1/6. PMID:24847065

  7. Impact of chlorpromazine self-association on its apparent binding constants with cyclodextrins: Effect of SBE(7)-beta-CD on the disposition of chlorpromazine in the rat.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Michelle P; Leong, Nathania; Katneni, Kasiram; Morizzi, Julia; Shackleford, David M; Prankerd, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    Chlorpromazine is an antipsychotic agent with poor aqueous solubility. Complexation with SBE(7)-beta-CD can aid intravenous delivery through increasing the apparent solubility of chlorpromazine. However, chlorpromazine has also been known to self-associate. This self-association can influence its capacity to interact with other chemical species, such as cyclodextrins. This study aimed to characterise the self-association and cyclodextrin binding properties of chlorpromazine, and the effect on pharmacokinetic parameters in rats when dosed with a SBE(7)-beta-CD containing formulation. Pharmacokinetic studies of chlorpromazine in the presence and absence of SBE(7)-beta-CD were undertaken in rats. The binding constant of SBE(7)-beta-CD and chlorpromazine was studied relative to chlorpromazine concentration via fluorescence. The self-association of chlorpromazine was studied by fluorescence and UV-visible spectrophotometry. Urinary excretion of intact chlorpromazine increased in the presence of SBE(7)-beta-CD. The SBE(7)-beta-CD binding constant of chlorpromazine is highly concentration dependent and the variation can be attributed to the self-association of chlorpromazine. The apparent binding constant of chlorpromazine is highest at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, providing an explanation for the significant increase in renal chlorpromazine excretion observed in rats. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  8. Neutralization of genetically diverse HIV-1 strains by IgA antibodies to the gp120 CD4 binding site from long-term survivors of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Planque, Stephanie; Salas, Maria; Mitsuda, Yukie; Sienczyk, Marcin; Escobar, Miguel A.; Mooney, Jason P.; Morris, Mary-Kate; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kumar, Amit; Gao, Feng; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify an HIV epitope suitable for vaccine development. Design Diverse HIV-1 strains express few structurally constant regions on their surface vulnerable to neutralizing antibodies. The mostly-conserved CD4 binding site (CD4BS) of gp120 is essential for host cell binding and infection by the virus. Antibodies that recognize the CD4BS are rare, and one component of the CD4BS, the 421–433 peptide region, expresses B cell superantigenic character, a property predicted to impair the anti-CD4BS adaptive immune response. Methods IgA samples purified from the plasma of subjects with HIV infection were analyzed for the ability to bind synthetic mimetics containing the 416–433 gp120 region and full-length gp120. Infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by clinical HIV isolates was measured by p24 ELISA. Results IgA preparations from 3 subjects with subtype B infection for 19–21 years neutralized heterologous, coreceptor CCR5-dependent subtype A, B, C, D and AE strains with exceptional potency. The IgAs displayed specific binding of a synthetic 416–433 peptide mimetics dependent on recognition of the CD4 binding residues located in this region. Immunoadsorption, affinity chromatography and mutation procedures indicated that HIV neutralization occurred by IgA recognition of the CD4BS. Conclusions These observations identify the 421–433 peptide region as a vulnerable HIV site to which survivors of infection can produce powerful neutralizing antibodies. This indicates that the human immune system can bypass restrictions on the adaptive B cell response to the CD4BS, opening the route to targeting the 421–433 region for attaining control of HIV infection. PMID:20186035

  9. A human antibody to the CD4 binding site of gp120 capable of highly potent but sporadic cross clade neutralization of primary HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gach, Johannes S; Quendler, Heribert; Tong, Tommy; Narayan, Kristin M; Du, Sean X; Whalen, Robert G; Binley, James M; Forthal, Donald N; Poignard, Pascal; Zwick, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Primary isolates of HIV-1 resist neutralization by most antibodies to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on gp120 due to occlusion of this site on the trimeric spike. We describe 1F7, a human CD4bs monoclonal antibody that was found to be exceptionally potent against the HIV-1 primary isolate JR-FL. However, 1F7 failed to neutralize a patient-matched primary isolate, JR-CSF even though the two isolates differ by <10% in gp120 at the protein level. In an HIV-1 cross clade panel (n = 157), 1F7 exhibited moderate breadth, but occasionally achieved considerable potency. In binding experiments using monomeric gp120s of select resistant isolates and domain-swap chimeras between JR-FL and JR-CSF, recognition by 1F7 was limited by sequence polymorphisms involving at least the C2 region of Env. Putative N-linked glycosylation site (PNGS) mutations, notably at position 197, allowed 1F7 to neutralize JR-CSF potently without improving binding to the cognate, monomeric gp120. In contrast, flow cytometry experiments using the same PNGS mutants revealed that 1F7 binding is enhanced on cognate trimeric Env. BN-PAGE mobility shift experiments revealed that 1F7 is sensitive to the diagnostic mutation D368R in the CD4 binding loop of gp120. Our data on 1F7 reinforce how exquisitely targeted CD4bs antibodies must be to achieve cross neutralization of two closely related primary isolates. High-resolution analyses of trimeric Env that show the orientation of glycans and polymorphic elements of the CD4bs that affect binding to antibodies like 1F7 are desirable to understand how to promote immunogenicity of more conserved elements of the CD4bs.

  10. Analysis of Metal-Binding Features of the Wild Type and Two Domain-Truncated Mutant Variants of Littorina littorea Metallothionein Reveals Its Cd-Specific Character

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Òscar; Gil-Moreno, Selene; Zerbe, Oliver; Atrian, Sílvia; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    After the resolution of the 3D structure of the Cd9-aggregate of the Littorina littorea metallothionein (MT), we report here a detailed analysis of the metal binding capabilities of the wild type MT, LlwtMT, and of two truncated mutants lacking either the N-terminal domain, Lltr2MT, or both the N-terminal domain, plus four extra flanking residues (SSVF), Lltr1MT. The recombinant synthesis and in vitro studies of these three proteins revealed that LlwtMT forms unique M9-LlwtMT complexes with Zn(II) and Cd(II), while yielding a complex mixture of heteronuclear Zn,Cu-LlwtMT species with Cu(I). As expected, the truncated mutants gave rise to unique M6-LltrMT complexes and Zn,Cu-LltrMT mixtures of lower stoichiometry with respect to LlwtMT, with the SSVF fragment having an influence on their metal binding performance. Our results also revealed a major specificity, and therefore a better metal-coordinating performance of the three proteins for Cd(II) than for Zn(II), although the analysis of the Zn(II)/Cd(II) displacement reaction clearly demonstrates a lack of any type of cooperativity in Cd(II) binding. Contrarily, the analysis of their Cu(I) binding abilities revealed that every LlMT domain is prone to build Cu4-aggregates, the whole MT working by modules analogously to, as previously described, certain fungal MTs, like those of C. neoformans and T. mesenterica. It is concluded that the Littorina littorea MT is a Cd-specific protein that (beyond its extended binding capacity through an additional Cd-binding domain) confers to Littorina littorea a particular adaptive advantage in its changeable marine habitat. PMID:28684668

  11. Conformational Change of a Tryptophan Residue in BtuF Facilitates Binding and Transport of Cobinamide by the Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD-F

    PubMed Central

    Mireku, S. A.; Ruetz, M.; Zhou, T.; Korkhov, V. M.; Kräutler, B.; Locher, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    BtuCD-F is an ABC transporter that mediates cobalamin uptake into Escherichia coli. Early in vivo data suggested that BtuCD-F might also be involved in the uptake of cobinamide, a cobalamin precursor. However, neither was it demonstrated that BtuCD-F indeed transports cobinamide, nor was the structural basis of its recognition known. We synthesized radiolabeled cyano-cobinamide and demonstrated BtuCD-catalyzed in vitro transport, which was ATP- and BtuF-dependent. The crystal structure of cobinamide-bound BtuF revealed a conformational change of a tryptophan residue (W66) in the substrate binding cleft compared to the structure of cobalamin-bound BtuF. High-affinity binding of cobinamide was dependent on W66, because mutation to most other amino acids substantially reduced binding. The structures of three BtuF W66 mutants revealed that tight packing against bound cobinamide was only provided by tryptophan and phenylalanine, in line with the observed binding affinities. In vitro transport rates of cobinamide and cobalamin were not influenced by the substitutions of BtuF W66 under the experimental conditions, indicating that W66 has no critical role in the transport reaction. Our data present the molecular basis of the cobinamide versus cobalamin specificity of BtuCD-F and provide tools for in vitro cobinamide transport and binding assays. PMID:28128319

  12. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Al-Darmarki, Salma; Flinko, Robin; Lovo, Elena; Wu, Xueji; Robinson, James E.; Seaman, Michael S.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Gallo, Robert C.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Lewis, George K.

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain; and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.

  13. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; ...

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain;more » and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.« less

  14. A unique secreted adenovirus E3 protein binds to the leukocyte common antigen CD45 and modulates leukocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Windheim, Mark; Southcombe, Jennifer H; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Chaplin, Lucy; Urlaub, Doris; Falk, Christine S; Claus, Maren; Mihm, Janine; Braithwaite, Myles; Dennehy, Kevin; Renz, Harald; Sester, Martina; Watzl, Carsten; Burgert, Hans-Gerhard

    2013-12-10

    The E3 transcription unit of human adenoviruses (Ads) encodes immunomodulatory proteins. Interestingly, the size and composition of the E3 region differs considerably among Ad species, suggesting that distinct sets of immunomodulatory E3 proteins may influence their interaction with the human host and the disease pattern. However, to date, only common immune evasion functions of species C E3 proteins have been described. Here we report on the immunomodulatory activity of a species D-specific E3 protein, E3/49K. Unlike all other E3 proteins that act on infected cells, E3/49K seems to target uninfected cells. Initially synthesized as an 80- to 100-kDa type I transmembrane protein, E3/49K is subsequently cleaved, with the large ectodomain (sec49K) secreted. We found that purified sec49K exhibits specific binding to lymphoid cell lines and all primary leukocytes, but not to fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Consistent with this binding profile and the molecular mass, the sec49K receptor was identified as the cell surface protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Antibody-blocking studies suggested that sec49K binds to the membrane proximal domains present in all CD45 isoforms. Functional studies showed that sec49K can suppress the activation and cytotoxicity of natural killer cells as well as the activation, signaling, and cytokine production of T cells. Thus, we have discovered an adenovirus protein that is actively secreted and describe immunomodulatory activities of an E3 protein uniquely expressed by a single Ad species.

  15. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  16. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  17. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells.

  18. Basigin (CD147), a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein with various binding partners.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Basigin, also called CD147 or EMMPRIN, is a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Basigin has isoforms; the common form (basigin or basigin-2) has two immunoglobulin domains, and the extended form (basigin-1) has three. Basigin is the receptor for cyclophilins, S100A9 and platelet glycoprotein VI, whereas basigin-1 serves as the receptor for the rod-derived cone viability factor. Basigin tightly associates with monocarboxylate transporters and is essential for their cell surface translocation and activities. In the same membrane plane, basigin also associates with other proteins including GLUT1, CD44 and CD98. The carbohydrate portion of basigin is recognized by lectins, such as galectin-3 and E-selectin. These molecular recognitions form the basis for the role of basigin in the transport of nutrients, migration of inflammatory leukocytes and induction of matrix metalloproteinases. Basigin is important in vision, spermatogenesis and other physiological phenomena, and plays significant roles in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including cancer. Basigin is also the receptor for an invasive protein RH5, which is present in malaria parasites. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society.

  19. Basigin (CD147), a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein with various binding partners

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Basigin, also called CD147 or EMMPRIN, is a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Basigin has isoforms; the common form (basigin or basigin-2) has two immunoglobulin domains, and the extended form (basigin-1) has three. Basigin is the receptor for cyclophilins, S100A9 and platelet glycoprotein VI, whereas basigin-1 serves as the receptor for the rod-derived cone viability factor. Basigin tightly associates with monocarboxylate transporters and is essential for their cell surface translocation and activities. In the same membrane plane, basigin also associates with other proteins including GLUT1, CD44 and CD98. The carbohydrate portion of basigin is recognized by lectins, such as galectin-3 and E-selectin. These molecular recognitions form the basis for the role of basigin in the transport of nutrients, migration of inflammatory leukocytes and induction of matrix metalloproteinases. Basigin is important in vision, spermatogenesis and other physiological phenomena, and plays significant roles in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including cancer. Basigin is also the receptor for an invasive protein RH5, which is present in malaria parasites. PMID:26684586

  20. Analysis of CD44-hyaluronan interactions in an artificial membrane system: insights into the distinct binding properties of high and low molecular weight hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Wolny, Patricia M; Banerji, Suneale; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R; Day, Anthony J; Jackson, David G; Richter, Ralf P

    2010-09-24

    CD44 is a major cell surface receptor for the large polydisperse glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA). Binding of the long and flexible HA chains is thought to be stabilized by the multivalent nature of the sugar molecule. In addition, high and low molecular weight forms of HA provoke distinct proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects upon binding to CD44 and can deliver either proliferative or antiproliferative signals in appropriate cell types. Despite the importance of such interactions, however, neither the stoichiometry of multivalent HA binding at the cell surface nor the molecular basis for functional distinction between different HA size categories is understood. Here we report on the design of a supported lipid bilayer system that permits quantitative analysis of multivalent binding through presentation of CD44 in a stable, natively oriented manner and at controlled density. Using this system in combination with biophysical techniques, we show that the amount of HA binding to bilayers that are densely coated with CD44 increases as a function of HA size, with half-maximal saturation at ∼30 kDa. Moreover, reversible binding was confined to the smaller HA species (molecular weight of ≤10 kDa), whereas the interaction was essentially irreversible with larger polymers. The amount of bound HA decreased with decreasing receptor surface density, but the stability of binding was not affected. From a physico-chemical perspective, the binding properties of HA share many similarities with the typical behavior of a flexible polymer as it adsorbs onto a homogeneously attractive surface. These findings provide new insight into the multivalent nature of CD44-HA interactions and suggest a molecular basis for the distinct biological properties of different size fractions of hyaluronan.

  1. Structural basis for germ-line gene usage of a potent class of antibodies targeting the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    West, Anthony P; Diskin, Ron; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2012-07-24

    A large number of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on the envelope glycoprotein gp120 have recently been reported. These antibodies, typified by VRC01, are remarkable for both their breadth and their potency. Crystal structures have revealed a common mode of binding for several of these antibodies; however, the precise relationship among CD4bs antibodies remains to be defined. Here we analyze existing structural and sequence data, propose a set of signature features for potent VRC01-like (PVL) antibodies, and verify the importance of these features by mutagenesis. The signature features explain why PVL antibodies derive from a single germ-line human V(H) gene segment and why certain gp120 sequences are associated with antibody resistance. Our results bear on vaccine development and structure-based design to improve the potency and breadth of anti-CD4bs antibodies.

  2. Adaptation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to cells expressing a binding-deficient CD4 mutant (lysine 46 to aspartic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Choe, H R; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) was adapted to replicate efficiently in cells expressing an altered form of the CD4 viral receptor. The mutant CD4 (46 K/D) contained a single amino acid change (lysine 46 to aspartic acid) in the CDR2 loop of domain 1, which results in a 15-fold reduction in affinity for the viral gp120 glycoprotein. The ability of the adapted virus to replicate in CD4 46 K/D-expressing cells was independently enhanced by single amino acid changes in the V2 variable loop, the V3 variable loop, and the fourth conserved (C4) region of the gp120 glycoprotein. Combinations of these amino acids in the same envelope glycoprotein resulted in additive enhancement of virus replication in cells expressing the CD4 46 K/D molecule. In cells expressing the wild-type CD4 glycoproteins, the same V2 and V3 residue changes also increased the efficiency of replication of a virus exhibiting decreased receptor-binding ability due to an amino acid change (aspartic acid 368 to glutamic acid) in the gp120 glycoprotein. In neither instance did the adaptive changes restore the binding ability of the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein or the oligomeric envelope glycoprotein complex for the mutant or wild-type CD4 glycoproteins, respectively. Thus, particular conformations of the gp120 V2 and V3 variable loops and of the C4 region allow postreceptor binding events in the membrane fusion process to occur in the context of less than optimal receptor binding. These results suggest that the fusion-related functions of the V2, V3, and C4 regions of gp120 are modulated by CD4 binding. PMID:7707502

  3. Cyclophilin A (CyPA) induces chemotaxis independent of its peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity: direct binding between CyPA and the ectodomain of CD147.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Zhang, Xin; Ren, Xiao-Bai; Zhu, Ping; Xu, Jing; Wang, Li; Li, Yi-Fei; Zhong, Nan; Ru, Qiang; Zhang, Da-Wei; Jiang, Jian-Li; Xia, Bin; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2011-03-11

    Cyclophilin A (CyPA) is a ubiquitously distributed peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that possesses diverse biological functions. Extracellular CyPA is a potent chemokine, which can directly induce leukocyte chemotaxis and contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammation-mediated diseases. Although it has been identified that the chemotaxis activity of CyPA is mediated through its cell surface signaling receptor CD147, the role of CyPA PPIase activity in this process is disputable, and the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we present the first evidence that CyPA induces leukocyte chemotaxis through a direct binding with the ectodomain of CD147 (CD147(ECT)), independent of its PPIase activity. Although NMR study indicates that the CD147(ECT) binding site on CyPA overlaps with the PPIase active site, the PPIase inactive mutant CyPA(R55A) exhibits similar CD147(ECT) binding ability and chemotaxis activity to those of CyPA(WT). Furthermore, we have identified three key residues of CyPA involved in CD147(ECT) binding and found that mutations H70A, T107A, and R69A result in similar levels of reduction in CD147(ECT) binding ability and chemotaxis activity for CyPA, without affecting the PPIase activity. Our findings indicate that there exists a novel mechanism for CyPA to regulate cellular signaling processes, shedding new light on its applications in drug development and providing a new targeting site for drug design.

  4. Allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA binding activity, and inhibit phosphorylated NF-κB p65 nuclear localization in CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Obata, Fumiya; Kubo, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    CD8+ T-cells of asymptomatic HIV-1 carriers (AC) suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-restricted and -unrestricted manner. In order to investigate the mechanism of MHC-I-unrestricted CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 suppression, we previously established allo-antigen stimulated CD8+T-cells from HIV-1-uninfected donors. These allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppressed HIV-1 replication in acutely infected autologous CD4+ T-cells when directly co-cultured. To elucidate the mechanism of HIV-1 replication suppression, we analyzed DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of transcriptional factors associated with HIV-1 replication by electrophoresis mobility shift assay and Western blotting. When CD4+ T-cells were cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells, the reduction of NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA-binding activity was observed. Nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 was suppressed in CD4+ T-cells. Although NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 are known to be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), no difference was observed in the expression and phosphorylation of the PKA catalytic subunit in CD4+ T-cells cultured with PHA-treated CD8+ T-cells or allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Cyclic AMP is also known to enter through gap junctions, but the suppression of HIV-1 replication mediated by allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells was not affected by the gap junction inhibitor. The nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276) was inhibited only in CD4+ T-cells cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Our results indicate that allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress the transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 or Ets-1 in an antigen-nonspecific manner, and inhibit the nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276).

  5. A Quantitative Description of the Binding Equilibria of para-Substituted Aniline Ligands and CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Donakowski, Martin D.; Godbe, Jacqueline M.; Sknepnek, Rastko; Knowles, Kathryn E.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Weiss, Emily A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of ¹H NMR spectroscopy to measure the equilibrium constants for the solution-phase binding of two para-substituted aniline molecules (R-An), p-methoxyaniline (MeO-An) and p-bromoaniline (Br-An), to colloidal 4.1 nm CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Changes in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons located ortho to the amine group on R-An were used to construct a binding isotherm for each R-An/QD system. These isotherms fit to a Langmuir function to yield K{sub a}, the equilibrium constant for binding of the R-An ligands to the QDs; Ka ≈ 150 M-1 and ΔGads ≈ -19 kJ/mol for both R = MeO and R = Br. ³¹P NMR indicates that the native octylphosphonate ligands, which, by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, cover 90% of the QD surface, are not displaced upon binding of R-An. The MeO-An ligand quenches the photoluminescence of the QDs at much lower concentrations than does Br-An; the observation, therefore, that Ka,MeO-An ≈ Ka,Br-An shows that this difference in quenching efficiencies is due solely to differences in the nature of the electronic interactions of the bound R-An with the excitonic state of the QD.

  6. Temporal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interaction between human CD3ε antigen-targeted monoclonal antibody otelixizumab and CDbinding and expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell static culture.

    PubMed

    Page, Kevin R; Mezzalana, Enrica; MacDonald, Alexander J; Zamuner, Stefano; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; van Maurik, Andre

    2015-11-01

    Otelixizumab is a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to human CD3ε, a protein forming part of the CD3/T-cell receptor (TCR) complex on T lymphocytes. This study investigated the temporal interaction between varying concentrations of otelixizumab, binding to human CD3 antigen, and expression of CD3/TCR complexes on lymphocytes in vitro, free from the confounding influence of changing lymphocyte frequencies observed in vivo. A static in vitro culture system was established in which primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were incubated over an extended time course with titrated concentrations of otelixizumab. At each time point, free, bound, and total CD3/TCR expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the amount of free otelixizumab antibody in the supernatant were measured. The pharmacokinetics of free otelixizumab in the culture supernatants was saturable, with a shorter apparent half-life at low concentration. Correspondingly, a rapid, otelixizumab concentration-, and time-dependent reduction in CD3/TCR expression was observed. These combined observations were consistent with the phenomenon known as target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD). A mechanistic, mathematical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was then used to characterize the free otelixizumab-CD3 expression-time relationship. CD3/TCR modulation induced by otelixizumab was found to be relatively fast compared with the re-expression rate of CD3/TCR complexes following otelixizumab removal from supernatants. In summary, the CD3/TCR receptor has been shown to have a major role in determining otelixizumab disposition. A mechanistic PK/PD model successfully captured the PK and PD in vitro data, confirming TMDD by otelixizumab.

  7. CD43-mediated signals induce DNA binding activity of AP-1, NF-AT, and NFkappa B transcription factors in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Santana, M A; Pedraza-Alva, G; Olivares-Zavaleta, N; Madrid-Marina, V; Horejsi, V; Burakoff, S J; Rosenstein, Y

    2000-10-06

    Although numerous reports document a role for CD43 in T cell signaling, the direct participation of this molecule in cell activation has been questioned. In this study we show that CD43 ligation on human normal peripheral T cells was sufficient to induce interleukin-2, CD69, and CD40-L gene expression, without requiring signals provided by additional receptor molecules. This response was partially inhibited by cyclosporin A and staurosporine, suggesting the participation of both the Ca(2+) and the protein kinase C pathways in CD43 signaling. Consistent with the transient CD43-dependent intracellular Ca(2+) peaks reported by others, signals generated through the CD43 molecule resulted in the induction of NF-AT DNA binding activity. CD43-dependent signals resulted also in AP-1 and NFkappaB activation, probably as a result of protein kinase C involvement. AP-1 complexes bound to the AP-1 sequence contained c-Jun, and those bound to the NF-AT-AP-1 composite site contained c-Jun and Fos. NFkappaB complexes containing p65 could be found as early as 1 h after CD43 cross-linking, suggesting that CD43 participates in early events of T cell activation. The induction of the interleukin-2, CD69, and CD-40L genes and the participation of AP-1, NF-AT, and NFkappaB in the CD43-mediated signaling cascade implicate an important role for this molecule in the regulation of gene expression and cell function.

  8. Heavy Chain-Only IgG2b Llama Antibody Effects Near-Pan HIV-1 Neutralization by Recognizing a CD4-Induced Epitope That Includes Elements of Coreceptor- and CD4-Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Luongo, Timothy S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Louder, Mark K.; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy. PMID:23843638

  9. Heavy chain-only IgG2b llama antibody effects near-pan HIV-1 neutralization by recognizing a CD4-induced epitope that includes elements of coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Luongo, Timothy S; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D; Louder, Mark K; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2013-09-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy.

  10. Binding of soluble CD4 proteins to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and infected cells induces release of envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, T K; Kirsh, R; Ellens, H; Sweet, R W; Lambert, D M; Petteway, S R; Leary, J; Bugelski, P J

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects cells after binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell surface recognition marker CD4. gp120 is noncovalently associated with the HIV transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41, and this complex is believed responsible for the initial stages of HIV infection and cytopathic events in infected cells. Soluble constructs of CD4 that contain the gp120 binding site inhibit HIV infection in vitro. This is believed to occur by competitive inhibition of viral binding to cellular CD4. Here we suggest an alternative mechanism of viral inhibition by soluble CD4 proteins. We demonstrate biochemically and morphologically that following binding, the soluble CD4 proteins sT4, V1V2,DT, and V1[106] (amino acids 1-369, 1-183, and -2 to 106 of mature CD4) induced the release of gp120 from HIV-1 and HIV-1-infected cells. gp120 release was concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent. The reaction was biphasic at 37 degrees C and did not take place at 4 degrees C, indicating that binding of soluble CD4 was not sufficient to release gp120. The appearance of free gp120 in the medium after incubation with sT4 correlated with a decrease in envelope glycoprotein spikes on virions and exposure of a previously cryptic epitope near the amino terminus of gp41 on virions and infected cells. The concentration of soluble CD4 proteins needed to induce the release of gp120 from virally infected cells also correlated with those required to inhibit HIV-mediated syncytium formation. These results suggest that soluble CD4 constructs may inactivate HIV by inducing the release of gp120. We propose that HIV envelope-mediated fusion is initiated following rearrangement and/or dissociation of gp120 from the gp120-gp41 complex upon binding to cellular CD4, thus exposing the fusion domain of gp41. Images PMID:2006155

  11. Exploring the interactions and binding sites between Cd and functional groups in soil using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fusheng; Polizzotto, Matthew L; Guan, Dongxing; Wu, Jun; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Yu, Guanghui

    2017-03-15

    Understanding how heavy metals bind and interact in soils is essential for predicting their distributions, reactions and fates in the environment. Here we propose a novel strategy, i.e., combining two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D COS) and synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies, for identifying heavy metal binding to functional groups in soils. The results showed that although long-term (23 yrs) organic fertilization treatment caused the accumulation of Cd (over 3 times) in soils when compared to no fertilization and chemical fertilization treatments, it significantly (p<0.05) reduced the Cd concentration in wheat grain. The 2D COS analyses demonstrated that soil functional groups controlling Cd binding were modified by fertilization treatments, providing implications for the reduced bioavailability of heavy metals in organic fertilized soils. Furthermore, correlative micro X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer mapping, and synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR spectromicroscopy analysis showed that Cd, minerals, and organic functional groups were heterogeneously distributed at the micro-scale in soil colloids. Only minerals, rather than organic groups, had a similar distribution pattern with Cd. Together, this strategy has a potential to explore the interactions and binding sites among heavy metals, minerals and organic components in soil.

  12. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-20

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. An interim report on gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Johnson, H.E.; Kaydas, G.M.

    1952-01-01

    GILL DISEASE among fish, a disease which is characterized by a proliferation of the gill epithelium, has been attributed to a number of different causes. Generally, there are two recognized types: the eastern or bacterial type, in which long filamentous bacteria can always be demonstrated; and the western type, in which, by definition, bacteria cannot be demonstrated.

  14. Dextran Sulfate Suppression of Viruses in the HIV Family: Inhibition of Virion Binding to CD4+ Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Looney, David J.; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Broder, Samuel

    1988-04-01

    The first step in the infection of human T lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is attachment to the target cell receptor, the CD4 antigen. This step may be vulnerable to attack by antibodies, chemicals, or small peptides. Dextran sulfate (molecular weight approximately 8000), which has been given to patients as an anticoagulant or antilipemic agent for more than two decades, was found to block the binding of virions to various target T lymphocytes, inhibit syncytia formation, and exert a potent inhibitory effect against HIV-1 in vitro at concentrations that may be clinically attainable in human beings. This drug also suppressed the replication of HIV-2 in vitro. These observations could have theoretical and clinical implications in the strategy to develop drugs against HIV types 1 and 2.

  15. Identification of key residues in virulent canine distemper virus hemagglutinin that control CD150/SLAM-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Zipperle, Ljerka; Langedijk, Johannes P M; Orvell, Claes; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Morbillivirus cell entry is controlled by hemagglutinin (H), an envelope-anchored viral glycoprotein determining interaction with multiple host cell surface receptors. Subsequent to virus-receptor attachment, H is thought to transduce a signal triggering the viral fusion glycoprotein, which in turn drives virus-cell fusion activity. Cell entry through the universal morbillivirus receptor CD150/SLAM was reported to depend on two nearby microdomains located within the hemagglutinin. Here, we provide evidence that three key residues in the virulent canine distemper virus A75/17 H protein (Y525, D526, and R529), clustering at the rim of a large recessed groove created by beta-propeller blades 4 and 5, control SLAM-binding activity without drastically modulating protein surface expression or SLAM-independent F triggering.

  16. Role of curdlan sulfate in the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to CD4 molecules and the production of gp120-mediated TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Takeda-Hirokawa, N; Neoh, L P; Akimoto, H; Kaneko, H; Hishikawa, T; Sekigawa, I; Hashimoto, H; Hirose, S; Murakami, T; Yamamoto, N; Mimura, T; Kaneko, Y

    1997-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism by which curdlan sulfate (CRDS) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, we examined its influence on the binding of gp120 to CD4 molecules on T cells and macrophages, as well as on the production of TNF-alpha by gp120-stimulated macrophages (which promotes HIV-1 replication). CRDS treatment of cells not only inhibited the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to CD4+ cells, but also inhibited TNF-alpha production induced by gp120. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by CRDS may be related to these two actions.

  17. Changes in T cell subsets identify responders to FcR non-binding anti-CD3 mAb (teplizumab) in patients with Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, James E; Vudattu, Nalini; Choi, Jinmyung; Cotsapas, Chris; Devine, Lesley; Raddassi, Khadir; Ehlers, Mario R; McNamara, James G; Harris, Kristina M; Kanaparthi, Sai; Phippard, Deborah; Herold, Kevan C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby immune therapies affect progression of Type 1 diabetes (T1D) are not well understood. Teplizumab, an FcR non-binding anti-CD3 mAb, has shown efficacy in multiple randomized clinical trials. We previously reported an increase in the frequency of circulating CD8+ central memory (CD8CM) T cells in clinical responders, but the generalizability of this finding and the molecular effects of teplizumab on these T cells have not been evaluated. We analyzed data from 2 randomized clinical studies of teplizumab in patients with new and recent onset T1D. At the conclusion of therapy clinical responders showed a significant reduction in circulating CD4+ effector memory (CD4EM) T cells. Afterwards, there was an increase in the frequency and absolute number of CD8CM T cells. In vitro, teplizumab expanded CD8CM T cells by proliferation and conversion of non-CM T cells. Nanostring analysis of gene expression of CD8CM T cells from responders and non-responders vs placebo-treated control subjects identified decreases in expression of genes associated with immune activation and increases in expression of genes associated with T cell differentiation and regulation. We conclude that CD8CM T cells with decreased activation and regulatory gene expression are associated with clinical responses to teplizumab in patients with T1D. PMID:26518356

  18. Vaccine-Elicited Tier 2 HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Bind to Quaternary Epitopes Involving Glycan-Deficient Patches Proximal to the CD4 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Ema T.; Tong, Tommy; Chakrabarti, Bimal; Narayan, Kristin; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Xiaoxing; Kulp, Daniel; Osawa, Keiko; Muranaka, Janelle; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Destefano, Joanne; O’Dell, Sijy; LaBranche, Celia; Robinson, James E.; Montefiori, David C.; McKee, Krisha; Du, Sean X.; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Zhu, Ping; Schief, William R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Whalen, Robert G.; Binley, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Eliciting broad tier 2 neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research. Here we investigated the ability of native, membrane-expressed JR-FL Env trimers to elicit nAbs. Unusually potent nAb titers developed in 2 of 8 rabbits immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs) expressing trimers (trimer VLP sera) and in 1 of 20 rabbits immunized with DNA expressing native Env trimer, followed by a protein boost (DNA trimer sera). All 3 sera neutralized via quaternary epitopes and exploited natural gaps in the glycan defenses of the second conserved region of JR-FL gp120. Specifically, trimer VLP sera took advantage of the unusual absence of a glycan at residue 197 (present in 98.7% of Envs). Intriguingly, removing the N197 glycan (with no loss of tier 2 phenotype) rendered 50% or 16.7% (n = 18) of clade B tier 2 isolates sensitive to the two trimer VLP sera, showing broad neutralization via the surface masked by the N197 glycan. Neutralizing sera targeted epitopes that overlap with the CD4 binding site, consistent with the role of the N197 glycan in a putative “glycan fence” that limits access to this region. A bioinformatics analysis suggested shared features of one of the trimer VLP sera and monoclonal antibody PG9, consistent with its trimer-dependency. The neutralizing DNA trimer serum took advantage of the absence of a glycan at residue 230, also proximal to the CD4 binding site and suggesting an epitope similar to that of monoclonal antibody 8ANC195, albeit lacking tier 2 breadth. Taken together, our data show for the first time that strain-specific holes in the glycan fence can allow the development of tier 2 neutralizing antibodies to native spikes. Moreover, cross-neutralization can occur in the absence of protecting glycan. Overall, our observations provide new insights that may inform the future development of a neutralizing antibody vaccine. PMID:26023780

  19. Vaccine-Elicited Tier 2 HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Bind to Quaternary Epitopes Involving Glycan-Deficient Patches Proximal to the CD4 Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Ema T; Tong, Tommy; Chakrabarti, Bimal; Narayan, Kristin; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Xiaoxing; Kulp, Daniel; Osawa, Keiko; Muranaka, Janelle; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Destefano, Joanne; O'Dell, Sijy; LaBranche, Celia; Robinson, James E; Montefiori, David C; McKee, Krisha; Du, Sean X; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Zhu, Ping; Schief, William R; Wyatt, Richard T; Whalen, Robert G; Binley, James M

    2015-05-01

    Eliciting broad tier 2 neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research. Here we investigated the ability of native, membrane-expressed JR-FL Env trimers to elicit nAbs. Unusually potent nAb titers developed in 2 of 8 rabbits immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs) expressing trimers (trimer VLP sera) and in 1 of 20 rabbits immunized with DNA expressing native Env trimer, followed by a protein boost (DNA trimer sera). All 3 sera neutralized via quaternary epitopes and exploited natural gaps in the glycan defenses of the second conserved region of JR-FL gp120. Specifically, trimer VLP sera took advantage of the unusual absence of a glycan at residue 197 (present in 98.7% of Envs). Intriguingly, removing the N197 glycan (with no loss of tier 2 phenotype) rendered 50% or 16.7% (n = 18) of clade B tier 2 isolates sensitive to the two trimer VLP sera, showing broad neutralization via the surface masked by the N197 glycan. Neutralizing sera targeted epitopes that overlap with the CD4 binding site, consistent with the role of the N197 glycan in a putative "glycan fence" that limits access to this region. A bioinformatics analysis suggested shared features of one of the trimer VLP sera and monoclonal antibody PG9, consistent with its trimer-dependency. The neutralizing DNA trimer serum took advantage of the absence of a glycan at residue 230, also proximal to the CD4 binding site and suggesting an epitope similar to that of monoclonal antibody 8ANC195, albeit lacking tier 2 breadth. Taken together, our data show for the first time that strain-specific holes in the glycan fence can allow the development of tier 2 neutralizing antibodies to native spikes. Moreover, cross-neutralization can occur in the absence of protecting glycan. Overall, our observations provide new insights that may inform the future development of a neutralizing antibody vaccine.

  20. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  1. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  2. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  3. Effect of cadmium on the extracellular Na⁺, K⁺, and Ca²⁺ in the gill and small intestine of goldfish Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Guo, Hong; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Ying

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the toxic effect of cadmium on extracellular Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) in the gill and small intestine of goldfish Carassius auratus was determined with the technique of ion chromatograph. Two-way ANOVA indicated that the two factors (Cd(2+) treatment and time) and the interaction factor had significant effect on the level of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) in the small intestine and gill. 1.0 mg/L Cd(2+) significantly increased Ca(2+) level in the small intestine, but Ca(2+) level in the gill was significantly decreased by 1.0 and 5.0 mg/L Cd(2+) at 24, 48, and 72 h. Na(+) and K(+) level in the small intestine and gill was increased by 1.0 mg/L Cd(2+) at three time points, but increased by 5.0 mg/L Cd(2+) at a certain different time. In addition, Na(+) level was significantly decreased by 5.0 mg/L Cd(2+) at 24 or 48 h in the small intestine and gill. The results indicated that Cd(2+) played an important role in regulating the level of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) in the small intestine and gill of goldfish C. auratus. A method was constructed to investigate the extracellular Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) in the tissues of gold fish with ion chromatography.

  4. The CD11a binding site of efalizumab in psoriatic skin tissue as analyzed by Multi-Epitope Ligand Cartography robot technology. Introduction of a novel biological drug-binding biochip assay.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Böckelmann, R; Pommer, A J; Malykh, Y; Philipsen, L; Gollnick, H

    2007-01-01

    Efalizumab (Raptiva) is an immunomodulating recombinant humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds to CD11a, the alpha-subunit of leukocyte function antigen-1 (LFA-1). By blocking the binding of LFA-1 to ICAM-1, efalizumab inhibits the adhesion of leukocytes to other cell types and interferes with the migration of T lymphocytes to sites of inflammation (including psoriatic skin plaques). Analysis of the response in patients treated with efalizumab to date shows that distinct groups of responders and nonresponders to the drug exist. It would therefore be of great practical value to be able to predict which patients are most likely to respond to treatment, by identifying key parameters in the mechanism of action of efalizumab. Detailed investigation and detection of multiple epitopes in microcompartments of skin tissue has until recently been restricted by the available technology. However, the newly developed technique of Multi-Epitope Ligand Cartography (MELC) robot technology combines proteomics and biomathematical tools to visualize protein networks at the cellular and subcellular levels in situ, and to decipher cell functions. The MELC technique, which is outlined in this paper, was used to help characterize the binding of efalizumab to affected and unaffected psoriatic skin as compared to normal control skin under ex vivomodel conditions. Efalizumab was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and integrated into a MELC library of more than 40 antibodies. These antibodies were selected for their potential to detect epitopes which may be indicative of (a) various cell types, (b) structural components of the extracellular matrix, or (c) the processes of cell proliferation, activation and adhesion. Efalizumab bound to CD11a in affected psoriatic skin by a factor 15x and 32x higher than in unaffected psoriatic skin and normal control skin, respectively. CD11a and the efalizumab binding site were primarily expressed in the extravascular dermis, whereas CD54 (ICAM

  5. Effect of CD44 Binding Peptide Conjugated to an Engineered Inert Matrix on Maintenance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorsphere Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As cancer cells are affected by many factors in their microenvironment, a major challenge is to isolate the effect of a specific factor on cancer stem cells (CSCs) while keeping other factors unchanged. We have developed a synthetic inert 3D polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) gel culture system as a unique tool to study the effect of microenvironmental factors on CSCs response. We have reported that CSCs formed in the inert PEGDA gel by encapsulation of breast cancer cells maintain their stemness within a certain range of gel stiffness. The objective was to investigate the effect of CD44 binding peptide (CD44BP) conjugated to the gel on the maintenance of breast CSCs. Methods 4T1 or MCF7 breast cancer cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gel with CD44BP conjugation. Control groups included dissolved CD44BP and the gel with mutant CD44BP conjugation. Tumorsphere size and density, and expression of CSC markers were determined after 9 days. For in vivo, cell encapsulated gels were inoculated in syngeneic Balb/C mice and tumor formation was determined after 4 weeks. Effect of CD44BP conjugation on breast CSC maintenance was compared with integrin binding RGD peptide (IBP) and fibronectin-derived heparin binding peptide (FHBP). Results Conjugation of CD44BP to the gel inhibited breast tumorsphere formation in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the encapsulated cells to form tumorspheres in the peptide-conjugated gels correlated with the expression of CSC markers. Tumorsphere formation in vitro was enhanced by FHBP while it was abolished by IBP. Conclusion CD44BP and IBP conjugated to the gel abolished tumorsphere formation by encapsulated 4T1 cells while FHBP enhanced tumorsphere formation compared to cells in the gel without peptide. The PEGDA hydrogel culture system provides a novel tool to investigate the individual effect of factors in the microenvironment on CSC maintenance without interference of other factors. PMID:23527117

  6. T cell transcripts and T cell activities in the gills of the teleost fish sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Nuñez Ortiz, N; Gerdol, M; Stocchi, V; Marozzi, C; Randelli, E; Bernini, C; Buonocore, F; Picchietti, S; Papeschi, C; Sood, N; Pallavicini, A; Scapigliati, G

    2014-12-01

    The gills of fish are a mucosal tissue that contains T cells involved in the recognition of non-self and pathogens, and in this work we describe some features of gill-associated T cells of European sea bass, a marine model species. A whole transcriptome was obtained by deep sequencing of RNA from unstimulated gills that has been analyzed for the presence of T cell-related transcripts. Of the putative expressed sequences identified in the transcriptome, around 30 were related to main functions related to T cells including Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cell subpopulations, thus suggesting their possible presence in the branchial epithelium. The number of T cells in the gills of sea bass, measured with the specific T cell mAb DLT15 range from 10% to 20%, and IHC analysis shows their abundance and distribution in the epithelium. Leukocytes from gills are able to proliferate in the presence of lectins ConA and PHA, as measured by flow cytometry using CFSE fluorescence incorporation, and during proliferation the number of T cells counted by immunofluorescence increased. In lectin-proliferating cells the expression of T cell-related genes TRβ, TRγ, CD4, CD8α, CD45 and IL-10 increased dramatically. Our data represent a first analysis on T cell genes and on basic T cell activities of fish gills, and suggest the presence of functionally active subpopulations of T lymphocytes in this tissue.

  7. The N276 Glycosylation Site Is Required for HIV-1 Neutralization by the CD4 Binding Site Specific HJ16 Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Balla-Jhagjhoorsingh, Sunita S.; Corti, Davide; Heyndrickx, Leo; Willems, Elisabeth; Vereecken, Katleen; Davis, David; Vanham, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Immunogen design for HIV-1 vaccines could be based on epitope identification of naturally occurring neutralizing antibodies in infected patients. A tier 2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb), HJ16 recognizes a new epitope in the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) region that only partially overlaps with the b12 epitope. We aimed to identify the critical binding site by resistance induction in a sensitive primary CRF02_AG strain. In four independent dose-escalation studies, the N276D mutation was consistently the only alteration found and it was confirmed to be responsible for resistance to HJ16 by site-directed mutagenesis in envelopes (envs) of the homologous CRF02_AG, as well as of a subtype A and a subtype C primary isolate. This mutation removes an N-linked glycosylation site. The effect of N276D was very selective, as it failed to confer resistance to a range of other entry inhibitors. Remarkably, sensitivity to the CD4bs VRC01 and VRC03 mAbs was increased in the N276D mutated viruses. These data indicate that binding of the CD4bs specific HJ16 mAb critically depends on the interaction with the N276-glycan, thus indicating that HJ16 is the first glycan dependent CD4bs-specific mAb. PMID:23874792

  8. Why mushrooms form gills: efficiency of the lamellate morphology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mark W F; Money, Nicholas P

    2010-01-01

    Gilled mushrooms are produced by multiple orders within the Agaricomycetes. Some species form a single array of unbranched radial gills beneath their caps, many others produce multiple files of lamellulae between the primary gills, and branched gills are also common. In this largely theoretical study we modeled the effects of different gill arrangements on the total surface area for spore production. Relative to spore production over a flat surface, gills achieve a maximum 20-fold increase in surface area. The branching of gills produces the same increase in surface area as the formation of free-standing lamellulae (short gills). The addition of lamellulae between every second gill would offer a slightly greater increase in surface area in comparison to the addition of lamellulae between every pair of opposing gills, but this morphology does not appear in nature. Analysis of photographs of mushrooms demonstrates an excellent match between natural gill arrangements and configurations predicted by our model.

  9. Why mushrooms form gills: efficiency of the lamellate morphology

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER, Mark W. F.; MONEY, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Gilled mushrooms are produced by multiple orders within the Agaricomycetes. Some species form a single array of unbranched radial gills beneath their caps, many others produce multiple files of lamellulae between the primary gills, and branched gills are also common. In this largely theoretical study we modeled the effects of different gill arrangements on the total surface area for spore production. Relative to spore production over a flat surface, gills achieve a maximum 20-fold increase in surface area. The branching of gills produces the same increase in surface area as the formation of freestanding lamellulae (short gills). The addition of lamellulae between every second gill would offer a slightly greater increase in surface area in comparison to the addition of lamellulae between every pair of opposing gills, but this morphology does not appear in nature. Analysis of photographs of mushrooms demonstrates an excellent match between natural gill arrangements and configurations predicted by our model. PMID:20965062

  10. Transcriptomic responses in rainbow trout gills upon infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Carolina; Castro, Rosario; Fischer, Uwe; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-05-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that even though the fin bases constitute the main portal of entry of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), an important number of chemokine genes are up-regulated in the gills upon bath exposure to the virus. Because chemokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes through the action of specific chemokine receptors, in the current study, we have studied the transcription of several immune genes in response to a VHSV bath infection in the gills, focusing both on chemokine receptor genes and on genes characteristic of distinct leukocyte populations such as IgM, IgD, IgT, CD4, CD8, perforin and MHC-II. We have studied the response to the virus in naïve fish as well as in fish that had been previously intramuscularly (i.m.) injected with a VHSV DNA vaccine. Additionally, we have sorted both IgM(+) and CD8(+) cells from the gills of naïve and infected animals to study some of these up-regulated genes in specific leukocyte populations. Our results indicate that despite the low replication level, VHSV provokes an up-regulation of IgM, IgT, CD3 and perforin transcription together with the up-regulation of CCR7, CCR9, CXCR3B and CXCR4 mRNA levels. Interestingly, MHC-II mRNA was up-regulated and CCR7 was down-modulated in IgM(+) cells from infected gills, whereas perforin, CCR7 and CXCR4 mRNA levels were higher in sorted CD8(+) cells from infected animals. Surprisingly, when fish had been previously injected with either the empty plasmid or the VHSV DNA vaccine, these up-regulations in immune gene transcription were no longer observed. Our results point to the gills as an important site for innate and acquired viral defense.

  11. Cadmium-binding proteins from blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) environmentally exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedow, M.A.; Kneip, T.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1982-06-01

    Two heat-stable (90/sup 0/C) cadmium-binding proteins were isolated from the hepatopancreas of Hudson River blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography. These proteins have molecular weights of 10,600 and 9,400, and ultraviolet absorbance ratios at 250/280 nm of 12.4 and 5.4, respectively. Repeated freezing and thawing and prolonged (3-6 weeks) storage resulted in protein degradation or loss of Cd-binding activity. These proteins were induced by laboratory injection of CdCl/sub 2/ in blue crabs from pristine (Chesapeake Bay) areas; however, injection of CdCl/sub 2/ into Hudson River animals yielded anomalous chromatography profiles. Cadmium-binding proteins were also identified in blue crab thoracic muscle and gill. The possibility is discussed that these proteins are a type of metallothionein and could contribute to the human toxicity of this cadmium-contaminated edible crustacean.

  12. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Mary M; Eapen, Valsamma; Singer, Harvey S; Martino, Davide; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Paschou, Peristera; Roessner, Veit; Woods, Douglas W; Hariz, Marwan; Mathews, Carol A; Črnčec, Rudi; Leckman, James F

    2017-02-02

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by several motor and phonic tics. Tics usually develop before 10 years of age, exhibit a waxing and waning course and typically improve with increasing age. A prevalence of approximately 1% is estimated in children and adolescents. The condition can result in considerable social stigma and poor quality of life, especially when tics are severe (for example, with coprolalia (swearing tics) and self-injurious behaviours) or when GTS is accompanied by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder or another neuropsychiatric disorder. The aetiology is complex and multifactorial. GTS is considered to be polygenic, involving multiple common risk variants combined with rare, inherited or de novo mutations. These as well as non-genetic factors (such as perinatal events and immunological factors) are likely to contribute to the heterogeneity of the clinical phenotype, the structural and functional brain anomalies and the neural circuitry involvement. Management usually includes psychoeducation and reassurance, behavioural methods, pharmacotherapy and, rarely, functional neurosurgery. Future research that integrates clinical and neurobiological data, including neuroimaging and genetics, is expected to reveal the pathogenesis of GTS at the neural circuit level, which may lead to targeted interventions.

  13. David Gill: clock maker to global astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    Reduction in the uncertainty of physical measurements underpinned many advances in solar and stellar parallax, the determination of longitude, geodesy, and the accurate mapping of the heavens using celestial photography in the late nineteenth century. A pioneer in these areas, who successfully made the transition from clock maker in Aberdeen to H.M. Astronomer at the Cape of Good Hope was David Gill (1843-1914); Sir David Gill, K.C.B. from 1900. This paper celebrates the first third of Gill's career in astronomy and geodesy up to the time he was made redundant from Dun Echt Observatory at the end of 1875. It highlights how his horological skills were applied to telescope design and also how his aspirations to become a global astronomer started. The paper is timed to coincide with Gill's centenary anniversary year - he died 24 January 1914.

  14. ZNT7 binds to CD40 and influences CD154-triggered p38 MAPK activity in B lymphocytes-a possible regulatory mechanism for zinc in immune function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc deficiency impairs immune system leading to frequent infections. Although it is known that zinc plays critical roles in maintaining healthy immune function, the underlying molecular targets are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that zinc is important for the CD154-CD40-mediated activati...

  15. Functional analysis of ligand-binding and signal transduction domains of CD69 and CD23 C-type lectin leukocyte receptors.

    PubMed

    Sancho, D; Santis, A G; Alonso-Lebrero, J L; Viedma, F; Tejedor, R; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    2000-10-01

    CD69 and CD23 are leukocyte receptors with distinctive pattern of cell expression and functional features that belong to different C-type lectin receptor subfamilies. To assess the functional equivalence of different domains of these structurally related proteins, a series of CD69/CD23 chimeras exchanging the carbohydrate recognition domain, the neck region, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains were generated. Biochemical analysis revealed the importance of the neck region (Cys68) in the dimerization of CD69. Functional analysis of these chimeras in RBL-2H3 mast cells and Jurkat T cell lines showed the interchangeability of structural domains of both proteins regarding Ca2+ fluxes, serotonin release, and TNF-alpha synthesis. The type of the signal transduced mainly relied on the cytoplasmic domain and was independent of receptor oligomerization. The cytoplasmic domain of CD69 transduced a Ca2+-mediated signaling that was dependent on the extracellular uptake of Ca2+. Furthermore, a significant production of TNF-alpha was induced through the cytoplasmic domain of CD69 in RBL-2H3 cells, which was additive to that promoted via FcepsilonRI, thus suggesting a role for CD69 in the late phase of reactions mediated by mast cells. Our results provide new important data on the functional equivalence of homologous domains of these two leukocyte receptors.

  16. Binding of NO and CO to the d(1) Heme of cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Das, T K; Wilson, E K; Cutruzzolà, F; Brunori, M; Rousseau, D L

    2001-09-11

    The cd(1) nitrite reductase, a key enzyme in bacterial denitrification, catalyzes the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. The enzyme contains two redox centers, a c-type heme and a unique d(1) heme, which is a dioxoisobacteriochlorin. Nitric oxide, generated by this enzymatic pathway, if not removed from the medium, can bind to the ferrous d(1) cofactor with extremely high affinity and inhibit enzyme activity. In this paper, we report the resonance Raman investigation of the properties of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide binding to the d(1) site of the reduced enzyme. The Fe-ligand (Fe-NO and Fe-CO) stretching vibrational frequencies are unusually high in comparison to those of other ferrous heme complexes. The frequencies of the Fe-NO and N-O stretching modes appear at 585 and 1626 cm(-1), respectively, in the NO complex, while the frequencies of the Fe-CO and C-O stretching modes are at 563 and 1972 cm(-1), respectively, for the CO complex. Also, the widths (fwhm) of the Fe-CO and C-O stretching modes are smaller than those observed in the corresponding complexes of other heme proteins. The unusual spectroscopic characteristics of the d(1) cofactor are discussed in terms of both its unique electronic properties and the strongly polar distal environment around the iron-bound ligand. It is likely that the influence of a highly ruffled structure of heme d(1) on its electronic properties is the major factor causing anomalous Fe-ligand vibrational frequencies.

  17. Enhanced expression of mRNA for FK506-binding protein 5 in bone marrow CD34 positive cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, R; Hashimoto, A; Tomita, T; Yoshitawa, H; Tanaka, S; Endo, H; Hirohata, S

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have disclosed that several genes are up-regulated in bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. However, it remains unclear whether such abnormalities result from systemic inflammation or from abnormalities at stem cell level. The current study therefore examined the expression of several representative genes, including amphiregulin (AREG), chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), and FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5) in RA BM CD34+ cells. BM samples were obtained from 52 patients with RA and 35 patients with osteroarthritis (OA) during joint operations. CD34+ cells were purified from the BM mononuclear cells by positive selection with magnetic beads. The mRNA expression for AREG, CXCR4, and FKBP5 was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The expression of mRNA for FKBP5, but not that of AREG or CXCR4, was significantly higher in RA BM CD34+ cells than in OA BM CD34+ cells. The FKBP5 mRNA expression level was not correlated with serum CRP or treatment. In addition, tumour necrosis factor-alpha did not enhance the expression of FKBP5 mRNA in BM CD34+ cells from healthy donors. The results suggest that the enhanced expression of FKBP5 in BM CD34+ cells might be an intrinsic abnormality of RA BM CD34+ cells, whereas the enhanced expression of AREG and CXCR4 in BM mononuclear cells might be secondary to systemic inflammation.

  18. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Rev-binding protein (HRB) is a co-factor for HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessia; Timermans, Cristina Garcia; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Stove, Veronique; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-mediated CD4 downregulation is an important determinant of viral replication in vivo. Research on cellular co-factors involved in this process could lead to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. We found that CD4 surface levels were significantly higher in HIV-1-infected cells knocked-down for the HIV Rev-binding protein (HRB) compared with control cells. HRB knock-down affected CD4 downregulation induced by Nef but not by HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, the knock-down of the related protein HRBL (HRB-like), but not of the HRB interaction partner EPS15 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15), increased CD4 levels in Vpu-expressing cells significantly. Both of these proteins are known to be involved in HIV-1-mediated CD4 downregulation as co-factors of HIV-1 Nef. These results identify HRB as a previously unknown co-factor for HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation and highlight differences with the related protein HRBL, which affects the CD4 downregulation in a dual role as co-factor of both HIV-1 Nef and Vpu.

  19. Impact of wall shear stress and ligand avidity on binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles to murine tumor endothelium under flow.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Stefan; Baek, Sunhwa; Ryschich, Eduard

    2015-11-24

    The endothelial phenotype of tumor blood vessels differs from the liver and forms an important base for endothelium-specific targeting by antibody-coated nanoparticles. Although differences of shear stress and ligand avidity can modulate the nanoparticle binding to endothelium, these mechanisms are still poorly studied. This study analyzed the binding of antibody-coated nanoparticles to tumor and liver endothelium under controlled flow conditions and verified this binding in tumor models in vivo. Binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles, but not of antibody was significantly reduced under increased wall shear stress and the degree of nanoparticle binding correlated with the avidity of the coating. The intravascular wall shear stress favors nanoparticle binding at the site of higher avidity of endothelial epitope which additionally promotes the selectivity to tumor endothelium. After intravenous application in vivo, pegylated self-coated nanoparticles showed specific binding to tumor endothelium, whereas the nanoparticle binding to the liver endothelium was very low. This study provides a rationale that selective binding of mAb-coated nanoparticles to tumor endothelium is achieved by two factors: higher expression of endothelial epitope and higher nanoparticle shearing from liver endothelium. The combination of endothelial marker targeting and the use of shear stress-controlled nanoparticle capture can be used for selective intratumoral drug delivery.

  20. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  1. c-Abl-Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the T-bet DNA-Binding Domain Regulates CD4+ T-Cell Differentiation and Allergic Lung Inflammation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, An; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Gao, Beixue; Shannon, Stephen; Zhu, Zhou; Fang, Deyu

    2011-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase c-Abl is required for full activation of T cells, while its role in T-cell differentiation has not been characterized. We report that c-Abl deficiency skews CD4+ T cells to type 2 helper T cell (Th2) differentiation, and c-Abl−/− mice are more susceptible to allergic lung inflammation. c-Abl interacts with and phosphorylates T-bet, a Th1 lineage transcription factor. c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation enhances the transcriptional activation of T-bet. Interestingly, three tyrosine residues within the T-bet DNA-binding domain are the predominant sites of phosphorylation by c-Abl. Mutation of these tyrosine residues inhibits the promoter DNA-binding activity of T-bet. c-Abl regulates Th cell differentiation in a T-bet-dependent manner because genetic deletion of T-bet in CD4+ T cells abolishes c-Abl-deficiency-mediated enhancement of Th2 differentiation. Reintroduction of T-bet-null CD4+ T cells with wild-type T-bet, but not its tyrosine mutant, rescues gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production and inhibits Th2 cytokine production. Therefore, c-Abl catalyzes tyrosine phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain of T-bet to regulate CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:21690296

  2. The lectins Griffithsin, Cyanovirin-N and Scytovirin inhibit HIV-1 binding to the DC-SIGN receptor and transfer to CD4+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Kabamba B.; Gray, Elin S.; Mufhandu, Hazel; McMahon, James B.; Chakauya, Ereck; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that during the sexual transmission of HIV-1, the glycan-specific DC-SIGN receptor binds the virus and mediates its transfer to CD4+ cells. The lectins griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN) inhibit HIV-1 infection by binding to mannose-rich glycans on gp120. We measured the ability of these lectins to inhibit both the HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN and the DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 infection of CD4+ cells. While GRFT, CV-N and SVN were moderately inhibitory to DC-SIGN binding, they potently inhibited DC-SIGN-transfer of HIV-1. The introduction of the 234 glycosylation site abolished HIV-1 sensitivity to lectin inhibition of binding to DC-SIGN and virus transfer to susceptible cells. However, the addition of the 295 glycosylation site increased the inhibition of transfer. Our data suggest that GRFT, CV-N and SVN can block two important stages of the sexual transmission of HIV-1, DC-SIGN binding and transfer, supporting their further development as microbicides. PMID:22209231

  3. The lectins griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and scytovirin inhibit HIV-1 binding to the DC-SIGN receptor and transfer to CD4(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Kabamba B; Gray, Elin S; Mufhandu, Hazel; McMahon, James B; Chakauya, Ereck; O'Keefe, Barry R; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2012-02-20

    It is generally believed that during the sexual transmission of HIV-1, the glycan-specific DC-SIGN receptor binds the virus and mediates its transfer to CD4(+) cells. The lectins griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN) inhibit HIV-1 infection by binding to mannose-rich glycans on gp120. We measured the ability of these lectins to inhibit both the HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN and the DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 infection of CD4(+) cells. While GRFT, CV-N and SVN were moderately inhibitory to DC-SIGN binding, they potently inhibited DC-SIGN-transfer of HIV-1. The introduction of the 234 glycosylation site abolished HIV-1 sensitivity to lectin inhibition of binding to DC-SIGN and virus transfer to susceptible cells. However, the addition of the 295 glycosylation site increased the inhibition of transfer. Our data suggest that GRFT, CV-N and SVN can block two important stages of the sexual transmission of HIV-1, DC-SIGN binding and transfer, supporting their further development as microbicides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Binding of CD40L to Mac-1’s I-domain involves the EQLKKSKTL motif and mediates leukocyte recruitment and atherosclerosis – but does not affect immunity and thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Dennis; Hohmann, Jan-David; Wiedemann, Ansgar; Bledzka, Kamila; Blankenbach, Hermann; Marchini, Timoteo; Gutte, Katharina; Zeschky, Katharina; Bassler, Nicole; Hoppe, Natalie; Rodriguez, Alexandra Ortiz; Herr, Nadine; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Stachon, Peter; Willecke, Florian; Dürschmied, Daniel; von zur Mühlen, Constantin; Soloviev, Dmitry A.; Zhang, Li; Bode, Christoph; Plow, Edward F.; Libby, Peter; Peter, Karlheinz; Zirlik, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Rationale CD40L figures prominently in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. However, since CD40L potently regulates immune function and haemostasis by interaction with CD40 receptor and the platelet integrin GPIIb/IIIa, its global inhibition compromises host defense and generated thromboembolic complications in clinical trials. We recently reported that CD40L mediates atherogenesis independently of CD40 and proposed Mac-1 as an alternate receptor. Objective Here, we molecularly characterized the CD40L-Mac-1 interaction and tested whether its selective inhibition by a small peptide modulates inflammation and atherogenesis in vivo. Methods and Results CD40L concentration-dependently bound to Mac-1 I-domain in solid phase binding assays, and a high affinity interaction was revealed by surface-plasmon-resonance analysis. We identified the motif EQLKKSKTL, an exposed loop between the α1 helix and the β-sheet B, on Mac-1 as binding site for CD40L. A linear peptide mimicking this sequence, M7, specifically inhibited the interaction of CD40L and Mac-1. cM7, a cyclisized version optimized for in vivo use, decreased peritoneal inflammation and inflammatory cell recruitment in vivo. Finally, LDLr-/- mice treated with intraperitoneal injections of cM7 developed smaller, less inflamed atherosclerotic lesions featuring characteristics of stability. However, cM7 did not interfere with CD40L-CD40 binding in vitro and CD40L-GPIIb/IIIa-mediated thrombus formation in vivo. Conclusions We present the novel finding that CD40L binds to the EQLKKSKTL motif on Mac-1 mediating leukocyte recruitment and atherogenesis. Specific inhibition of CD40L-Mac-1 binding may represent an attractive anti-inflammatory treatment strategy for atherosclerosis and other inflammatory conditions, potentially avoiding the unwanted immunologic and thrombotic effects of global inhibition of CD40L. PMID:21998326

  5. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of entry inhibitors that target the CD4-binding site of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Curreli, Francesca; Choudhury, Spreeha; Pyatkin, Ilya; Zagorodnikov, Victor P.; Bulay, Anna Khulianova; Altieri, Andrea; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D.; Debnath, Asim K.

    2012-01-01

    The CD4 binding site on HIV-1 gp120 has been validated as a drug target to prevent HIV-1 entry to cells. Previously, we identified two small molecule inhibitors consisting of a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine ring linked by an oxalamide to a p-halide-substituted phenyl group, which target this site, specifically, a cavity termed “Phe43 cavity”. Here we use synthetic chemistry, functional assessment and structure-based analysis to explore variants of each region of these inhibitors for improved antiviral properties. Alterations of the phenyl group and of the oxalamide linker indicated that these regions were close to optimal in the original lead compounds. Design of a series of compounds, where the tetramethylpiperidine ring was replaced with new scaffolds, lead to improved antiviral activity. These new scaffolds provide insight into the surface chemistry at the entrance of the cavity and offer additional opportunities by which to optimize further these potential-next-generation therapeutics and microbicides against HIV-1. PMID:22524483

  6. Artificial mutations and natural variations in the CD46 molecules from human and monkey cells define regions important for measles virus binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, E C; Dörig, R E; Sarangi, F; Marcil, A; Iorio, C; Richardson, C D

    1997-01-01

    CD46 was previously shown to be a primate-specific receptor for the Edmonston strain of measles virus. This receptor consists of four short consensus regions (SCR1 to SCR4) which normally function in complement regulation. Measles virus has recently been shown to interact with SCR1 and SCR2. In this study, receptors on different types of monkey erythrocytes were employed as "natural mutant proteins" to further define the virus binding regions of CD46. Erythrocytes from African green monkeys and rhesus macaques hemagglutinate in the presence of measles virus, while baboon erythrocytes were the least efficient of the Old World monkey cells used in these assays. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the SCR2 domain of baboon CD46 contained an Arg-to-Gln mutation at amino acid position 103 which accounted for reduced hemagglutination activity. Surprisingly, none of the New World monkey erythrocytes hemagglutinated in the presence of virus. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the lymphocytes of these New World monkeys and analysis of their erythrocytes with SCR1-specific polyclonal antibodies indicated that the SCR1 domain was deleted in these cells. Additional experiments, which used 35 different site-specific mutations inserted into CD46, were performed to complement the preceding studies. The effects of these artificial mutations were documented with a convenient binding assay using insect cells expressing the measles virus hemagglutinin. Mutations which mimicked the change found in baboon CD46 or another which deleted the SCR2 glycosylation site reduced binding substantially. Another mutation which altered GluArg to AlaAla at positions 58 and 59, totally abolished binding. Finally, the epitopes for two monoclonal antibodies which inhibit measles virus attachment were mapped to the same regions implicated by mutagenesis. PMID:9223509

  7. High-and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Boyanov, M.; Bunker, B. A.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with pK{sub a} values of 3.3 {+-} 0.2, 4.8 {+-} 0.2, 6.7 {+-} 0.4, and 9.4 {+-} 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -5}, 1.3({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -4}, 5.9({+-}3.3) x 10{sup -5}, and 1.1({+-}0.6) x 10{sup -4} moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low

  8. Specific localization of scallop gill epithelial calmodulin in cilia.

    PubMed

    Stommel, E W; Stephens, R E; Masure, H R; Head, J F

    1982-03-01

    Calmodulin has been isolated and characterized from the gill of the bay scallop aequipecten irradians. Quantitative electrophoretic analysis of epithelial cell fractions show most of the calmodulin to be localized in the cilia, specifically in the detergent- solubilized membrane-matrix fraction. Calmodulin represents 2.2 +/- 0.3 percent of the membrane-matrix protein or 0.41 +/- 0.5 percent of the total ciliary protein. Its concentration is at least 10(-4) M if distributed uniformly within the matrix. Extraction in the presence of calcium suggests that the calmodulin is not bound to the axoneme proper. The ciliary protein is identified as a calmodulin on the basis of its calcium- dependent binding to a fluphenazine-sepharose affinity column and its comigration with bovine brain calmodulin on alkaline-urea and SDS polyacrylamide gels in both the presence and absence of calcium. Scallop ciliary calmodulin activates bovine brain phosphodiesterase to the same extent as bovine brain and chicken gizzard calmodulins. Containing trimethyllysine and lacking cysteine and tryptophan, the amino acid composition of gill calmodulin is typical of known calmodulins, except that it is relatively high in serine and low in methionine. Its composition is less acidic than other calmodulins, in agreement with an observed isoelectric point approximately 0.2 units higher than that of bovine brain. Comparative tryptic peptide mapping of scallop gill ciliary and bovine brain calmodulins indicates coincidence of over 75 percent of the major peptides, but at least two major peptides in each show no near-equivalency. Preliminary results using ATP-reactivated gill cell models show no effect of calcium at micromolar levels on ciliary beat or directionality of the lateral cilia, the cilia which constitute the vast majority of those isolated. However, ciliary arrest will occur at calcium levels more than 150 muM. Because calmodulin usually functions in the micromolar range, its role in this system

  9. Pyrin binds the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 protein, defining familial Mediterranean fever and PAPA syndrome as disorders in the same pathway.

    PubMed

    Shoham, Nitza G; Centola, Michael; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Hull, Keith M; Wood, Geryl; Wise, Carol A; Kastner, Daniel L

    2003-11-11

    Pyrin, the familial Mediterranean fever protein, is found in association with the cytoskeleton in myeloid/monocytic cells and modulates IL-1beta processing, NF-kappaB activation, and apoptosis. These effects are mediated in part through cognate interactions with the adaptor protein ASC, which shares an N-terminal motif with pyrin. We sought additional upstream regulators of inflammation by using pyrin as the bait in yeast two-hybrid assays. We now show that proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein [PSTPIP1, or CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1)], a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein involved in cytoskeletal organization, also interacts with pyrin. Recently, PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutations were shown to cause the syndrome of pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA), a dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disorder mediated predominantly by granulocytes. Endogenous PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 and pyrin are coexpressed in monocytes and granulocytes and can be coimmunoprecipitated from THP-1 cells. The B box segment of pyrin was necessary and the B box/coiled-coil segment sufficient for this interaction, whereas the SH3 and coiled-coil domains of PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 were both necessary, but neither was sufficient, for pyrin binding. The Y344F PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutation, which blocks tyrosine phosphorylation, was associated with a marked reduction in pyrin binding in pervanadate-treated cells. PAPA-associated A230T and E250Q PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutations markedly increased pyrin binding as assayed by immunoprecipitation and, relative to WT, these mutants were hyperphosphorylated when coexpressed with c-Abl kinase. Consistent with the hypothesis that these mutations exert a dominant-negative effect on the previously reported activity of pyrin, we found increased IL-1beta production by peripheral blood leukocytes from a clinically active PAPA patient with the A230T PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutation and in cell lines transfected with both PAPA-associated mutants.

  10. Soluble CD14 acts as a shuttle in the neutralization of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by LPS-binding protein and reconstituted high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have recently shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is a lipid transfer protein that catalyzes two distinct reactions: movement of bacterial LPS (endotoxin) from LPS micelles to soluble CD14 (sCD14) and movement of LPS from micelles to reconstituted high density lipoprotein (R-HDL) particles. Here we show that LBP facilitates a third lipid transfer reaction: movement of LPS from LPS- sCD14 complexes to R-HDL particles. This action of LBP is catalytic, with one molecule of LBP enabling the movement of multiple LPS molecules into R-HDL. LBP-catalyzed movement of LPS from LPS-sCD14 complexes to R-HDL neutralizes the capacity of LPS to stimulate polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Our findings show that LPS may be transferred to R-HDL either by the direct action of LBP or by a two- step reaction in which LPS is first transferred to sCD14 and subsequently to R-HDL. We have observed that the two-step pathway of LPS transfer to R-HDL is strongly favored over direct transfer. Neutralization of LPS by LBP and R-HDL was accelerated more than 30- fold by addition of sCD14. Several observations suggest that sCD14 accelerates this reaction by serving as a shuttle for LPS: addition of LBP and sCD14 to LPS micelles resulted in LPS-sCD14 complexes that could diffuse through a 100-kD cutoff filter; LPS-sCD14 complexes appeared transiently during movement of LPS to R-HDL facilitated by purified LBP; and sCD14 could facilitate transfer of LPS to R-HDL without becoming part of the final LPS-R-HDL complex. Complexes of LPS and sCD14 were formed transiently when LPS was incubated in plasma, suggesting that these complexes may play a role as intermediates in the neutralization of LPS under physiological conditions. These findings detail a new activity for sCD14 and suggest a novel mechanism for lipid transfer by LBP. PMID:7536794

  11. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn; Kirchhoff, F.

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  12. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage. IMPORTANCE The conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of different antibody lineages to this site

  13. Marine sediment and interstitial water: Effects on bioavailability of cadmium to gills of the clam Protothaca staminea

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.T.; Schmidt, R.L.; Apts, C.W.

    1981-12-01

    A study was made to determine first, the kinetics of cadmium sorption on a natural marine sediment and second, the degree to which this sorption as well as interstitial water might effect bioavailability of cadmium to gills of the clam Protothaca staminea. Surface sediment from Sequim Bay, Washington was labelled with Cd 109 and total cadmium concentration determined by radioassay. Gills were added to three types of exposures: 1) control (0.45 um filtered seawater, 2) sediment interstitial water and 3) washed sediment. Prepared samples of gills were counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Results show that addition of a small quantity of washed sediment to the exposure system reduced cadmium accumulation by gills to only 17% of the control. Interstitial water had no significant effect. 1 table, 3 figures (JMT)

  14. Analysis of reactive oxygen species, Ca²+ , and Hsp70 in the gill and mantle of clams Ruditapes philippinarum exposed in cadmium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Zhenxing

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the probes 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (H2 DCF-DA) and Fluo-3 AM were used to investigate the instantaneous change of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) in the gill and mantle of clams Ruditapes philippinarum exposed in 0.05 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) with the laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The results indicated that Ca(2+) level was declined in the gill and slightly increased in the mantle. The level of ROS was declined in the gill, while the oscillation of ROS level was observed in the mantle. These data revealed that Ca(2+) could stimulate mitochondrial activity and enhance the respiratory chain in the gill and mantle. In addition, the expression of Hsp70 was increased in the gill and mantle of clams exposed in 0.05 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) . The change of Ca(2+) and ROS level affected the expression of Hsp70 in the gill and mantle. An appropriate method was established to analyze the effects of Cd(2+) on ROS, Ca(2+) , and Hsp70 in the gill and mantle of clams with confocal microscopy. Both confocal microscopy and chemical fluorescent are valuable tools for measurement of time-dependent intracellular ROS and Ca(2+) signals.

  15. A novel regulatory pathway for autoimmune disease: binding of partial MHC class II constructs to monocytes reduces CD74 expression and induces both specific and bystander T-cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Vandenbark, Arthur A; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Benedek, Gil; Andrew, Shayne; Huan, Jianya; Chou, Yuan K; Buenafe, Abigail C; Dahan, Rony; Reiter, Yoram; Mooney, Jeffery L; Offner, Halina; Burrows, Gregory G

    2013-02-01

    Treatment with partial (p)MHC class II-β1α1 constructs (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTL) linked to antigenic peptides can induce T-cell tolerance, inhibit recruitment of inflammatory cells and reverse autoimmune diseases. Here we demonstrate a novel regulatory pathway that involves RTL binding to CD11b(+) mononuclear cells through a receptor comprised of MHC class II invariant chain (CD74), cell-surface histones and MHC class II itself for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Binding of RTL constructs with CD74 involved a previously unrecognized MHC class II-α1/CD74 interaction that inhibited CD74 expression, blocked activity of its ligand, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and reduced EAE severity. These findings implicate binding of RTL constructs to CD74 as a key step in both antigen-driven and bystander T-cell tolerance important in treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  16. Atomistic tight-binding theory of excitonic splitting energies in CdX(X = Se, S and Te)/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkabot, Worasak; Pinsook, Udomsilp

    2017-01-01

    Using the atomistic tight-binding theory (TB) and a configuration interaction description (CI), we numerically compute the excitonic splitting of CdX(X = Se, S and Te)/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals with the objective to explain how types of the core materials and growth shell thickness can provide the detailed manipulation of the dark-dark (DD), dark-bright (DB) and bright-bright (BB) excitonic splitting, beneficial for the active application of quantum information. To analyze the splitting of the excitonic states, the optical band gaps, ground-state wave function overlaps and atomistic electron-hole interactions tend to be numerically demonstrated. Based on the atomistic computations, the single-particle and excitonic gaps are mainly reduced with the increasing ZnS shell thickness owing to the quantum confinement. In the range of the higher to lower energies, the order of the single-particle gaps is CdSe/ZnS, CdS/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals, while one of the excitonic gaps is CdS/ZnS, CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals because of the atomistic electron-hole interaction. The strongest electron-hole interactions are mainly observed in CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals. In addition, the computational results underline that the energies of the dark-dark (DD), dark-bright (DB) and bright-bright (BB) excitonic splitting are generally reduced with the increasing ZnS growth shell thickness as described by the trend of the electron-hole exchange interaction. The high-to-low splitting of the excitonic states is demonstrated in CdSe/ZnS, CdTe/ZnS and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals because of the fashion in the electron-hole exchange interaction and overlaps of the electron-hole wave functions. As the resulting calculations, it is expected that CdS/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals are the best candidates to be the source of entangled photons. Finally, the comprehensive information on the excitonic splitting can enable the use of suitable core

  17. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppresses experimental colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Izawa, Kumi; Isobe, Masamichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Maehara, Akie; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Kaitani, Ayako; Okumura, Ko; Teshima, Takanori; Kitamura, Toshio; Kitaura, Jiro

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular ATP mediates mast cell-dependent intestinal inflammation via P2X7 purinoceptors. We have previously shown that CD300f (also called the leucocyte mono-immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LMIR3)) suppresses immunoglobulin E-dependent and mast cell-dependent allergic responses by binding to ceramide. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of ceramide-LMIR3 interaction in the development of IBD. The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used in wild-type (WT), LMIR3(-/-), mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh), Kit(W-sh/W-sh)LMIR3(-/-) or Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice engrafted with WT or LMIR3(-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The severity of colitis was determined by clinical and histological criteria. Lamina propria cell populations were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Production of chemical mediators from ATP-stimulated BMMCs in the presence or absence of ceramide was measured by ELISA. The severity of DSS-induced colitis was assessed in mice given either an Fc fusion protein containing an extracellular domain of LMIR3, and anticeramide antibody, or ceramide liposomes. LMIR3 deficiency exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in mice. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice harbouring LMIR3(-/-) mast cells exhibited more severe colitis than those harbouring WT mast cells. Ceramide-LMIR3 interaction inhibited ATP-stimulated activation of BMMCs. DSS-induced colitis was aggravated by disrupting the ceramide-LMIR3 interaction, whereas it was suppressed by treating with ceramide liposomes. LMIR3-deficient colonic mast cells were pivotal in the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis in LMIR3(-/-) mice. Ceramide liposomes attenuated DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated activation of colonic mast cells through ceraimide-LMIR3 binding. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  18. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppresses experimental colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Izawa, Kumi; Isobe, Masamichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Maehara, Akie; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Kaitani, Ayako; Okumura, Ko; Teshima, Takanori; Kitamura, Toshio; Kitaura, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracellular ATP mediates mast cell-dependent intestinal inflammation via P2X7 purinoceptors. We have previously shown that CD300f (also called the leucocyte mono-immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LMIR3)) suppresses immunoglobulin E-dependent and mast cell-dependent allergic responses by binding to ceramide. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of ceramide–LMIR3 interaction in the development of IBD. Design The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used in wild-type (WT), LMIR3−/−, mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh, KitW-sh/W-shLMIR3−/− or KitW-sh/W-sh mice engrafted with WT or LMIR3−/− bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The severity of colitis was determined by clinical and histological criteria. Lamina propria cell populations were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Production of chemical mediators from ATP-stimulated BMMCs in the presence or absence of ceramide was measured by ELISA. The severity of DSS-induced colitis was assessed in mice given either an Fc fusion protein containing an extracellular domain of LMIR3, and anticeramide antibody, or ceramide liposomes. Results LMIR3 deficiency exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in mice. KitW-sh/W-sh mice harbouring LMIR3−/− mast cells exhibited more severe colitis than those harbouring WT mast cells. Ceramide–LMIR3 interaction inhibited ATP-stimulated activation of BMMCs. DSS-induced colitis was aggravated by disrupting the ceramide–LMIR3 interaction, whereas it was suppressed by treating with ceramide liposomes. Conclusions LMIR3-deficient colonic mast cells were pivotal in the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis in LMIR3−/− mice. Ceramide liposomes attenuated DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated activation of colonic mast cells through ceraimide–LMIR3 binding. PMID:25673319

  19. Targeting HIV Reservoir in Infected CD4 T Cells by Dual-Affinity Re-targeting Molecules (DARTs) that Bind HIV Envelope and Recruit Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek D.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Irrinki, Alivelu; Liu, Liqin; Tsai, Angela; Pace, Craig S.; Kaur, Jasmine; Murry, Jeffrey P.; Balakrishnan, Mini; Moore, Paul A.; Johnson, Syd; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.; Cihlar, Tomas; Koenig, Scott

    2015-01-01

    HIV reservoirs and production of viral antigens are not eliminated in chronically infected participants treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Novel therapeutic strategies aiming at viral reservoir elimination are needed to address chronic immune dysfunction and non-AIDS morbidities that exist despite effective cART. The HIV envelope protein (Env) is emerging as a highly specific viral target for therapeutic elimination of the persistent HIV-infected reservoirs via antibody-mediated cell killing. Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting (DART) molecules exhibit a distinct mechanism of action via binding the cell surface target antigen and simultaneously engaging CD3 on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We designed and evaluated Env-specific DARTs (HIVxCD3 DARTs) derived from known antibodies recognizing diverse Env epitopes with or without broadly neutralizing activity. HIVxCD3 DARTs derived from PGT121, PGT145, A32, and 7B2, but not VRC01 or 10E8 antibodies, mediated potent CTL-dependent killing of quiescent primary CD4 T cells infected with diverse HIV isolates. Similar killing activity was also observed with DARTs structurally modified for in vivo half-life extension. In an ex vivo model using cells isolated from HIV-infected participants on cART, combinations of the most potent HIVxCD3 DARTs reduced HIV expression both in quiescent and activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures isolated from HIV-infected participants on suppressive cART. Importantly, HIVxCD3 DARTs did not induce cell-to-cell virus spread in resting or activated CD4 T cell cultures. Collectively, these results provide support for further development of HIVxCD3 DARTs as a promising therapeutic strategy for targeting HIV reservoirs. PMID:26539983

  20. Metal concentration in the gill, gastrointestinal tract, and carcass of white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) in relation to lake acidity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, T.A.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Adult white suckers were collected from four lakes in Maine that ranged in pH from 7.0 to 5.4. The gastrointestinal tract and remainder of the carcass of fishes of similar age and size from each lake, and gills from additional fishes of similar size, were analyzed for Al, Cd, Pb, and Zn. Carcasses were also analyzed for Hg. Concentrations of Al, Cd, and Pb were highest in the gastrointestinal tract and lowest in the carcass; Zn concentration was highest in the gill. For carcass, all metals except Al differed significantly among lakes, for gill tissue Cd and Pb differed, and for gastrointestinal tract, only Cd differed among lakes. Where differences were significant, patterns among lakes were similar in each tissue analyzed. Concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb were negatively correlated with lake water pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), Ca, and lake:watershed area, and positively correlated with lake water SO4, indicating that concentrations were higher in fish from more acidic lakes. Zinc concentrations in gills were unrelated to lake acidity, and carcass concentrations were higher in the less acidic lakes, which is the opposite of the pattern for the other metals studied. Zinc in gastrointestinal tract did not differ among lakes. Although the lakes we studied were located in undisturbed watersheds and did not receive any point source discharges, fish metal concentrations were comparable to or higher than those reported from waters receiving industrial discharges.

  1. Strength of Neisseria meningitidis binding to endothelial cells requires highly-ordered CD147/β2-adrenoceptor clusters assembled by alpha-actinin-4

    PubMed Central

    Maïssa, Nawal; Covarelli, Valentina; Janel, Sébastien; Durel, Beatrice; Simpson, Nandi; Bernard, Sandra C.; Pardo-Lopez, Liliana; Bouzinba-Ségard, Haniaa; Faure, Camille; Scott, Mark G.H.; Coureuil, Mathieu; Morand, Philippe C.; Lafont, Frank; Nassif, Xavier; Marullo, Stefano; Bourdoulous, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) is an invasive bacterial pathogen that colonizes human vessels, causing thrombotic lesions and meningitis. Establishment of tight interactions with endothelial cells is crucial for meningococci to resist haemodynamic forces. Two endothelial receptors, CD147 and the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), are sequentially engaged by meningococci to adhere and promote signalling events leading to vascular colonization, but their spatiotemporal coordination is unknown. Here we report that CD147 and β2AR form constitutive hetero-oligomeric complexes. The scaffolding protein α-actinin-4 directly binds to the cytosolic tail of CD147 and governs the assembly of CD147–β2AR complexes in highly ordered clusters at bacterial adhesion sites. This multimolecular assembly process increases the binding strength of meningococci to endothelial cells under shear stress, and creates molecular platforms for the elongation of membrane protrusions surrounding adherent bacteria. Thus, the specific organization of cellular receptors has major impacts on host–pathogen interaction. PMID:28569760

  2. Antibodies from a patient with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease bind to macrophages that express the scavenger receptor CD163.

    PubMed

    Sonier, Brigitte; Strom, Alexander; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Patrick, Christopher; Crookshank, Jennifer A; Mojibian, Majid; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Scott, Fraser W

    2011-06-01

    Antibodies against the wheat storage globulin Glo-3A from a patient with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease were enriched to identify potential molecular mimicry between wheat antigens and T1D target tissues. Recombinant Glo-3A was used to enrich anti-Glo-3A immunoglobulin G antibodies from plasma by batch affinity chromatography. Rat jejunum and pancreas, as well as human duodenum and monocytes were probed, and binding was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Glo-3A-enriched antibodies bound to a specific subset of cells in the lamina propria of rat jejunum that co-localized mostly with a marker of resident, alternatively activated CD163-positive (CD163⁺) macrophages. Blood monocytes and macrophage-like cells in human duodenum were also labelled with the enriched antibodies. Blocking studies revealed that binding to CD163⁺ macrophages was not due to cross-reactivity with anti-Glo-3A antibodies, but rather to non-Glo-3A antibodies co-purified during antibody enrichment. The novel finding of putative autoantibodies against tolerogenic intestinal CD163⁺ macrophages suggests that regulatory macrophages were targeted in this patient with celiac disease and T1D.

  3. Antibodies from a patient with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease bind to macrophages that express the scavenger receptor CD163

    PubMed Central

    Sonier, Brigitte; Strom, Alexander; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Patrick, Christopher; Crookshank, Jennifer A; Mojibian, Majid; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Scott, Fraser W

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies against the wheat storage globulin Glo-3A from a patient with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease were enriched to identify potential molecular mimicry between wheat antigens and T1D target tissues. Recombinant Glo-3A was used to enrich anti-Glo-3A immunoglobulin G antibodies from plasma by batch affinity chromatography. Rat jejunum and pancreas, as well as human duodenum and monocytes were probed, and binding was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Glo-3A-enriched antibodies bound to a specific subset of cells in the lamina propria of rat jejunum that co-localized mostly with a marker of resident, alternatively activated CD163-positive (CD163+) macrophages. Blood monocytes and macrophage-like cells in human duodenum were also labelled with the enriched antibodies. Blocking studies revealed that binding to CD163+ macrophages was not due to cross-reactivity with anti-Glo-3A antibodies, but rather to non-Glo-3A antibodies co-purified during antibody enrichment. The novel finding of putative autoantibodies against tolerogenic intestinal CD163+ macrophages suggests that regulatory macrophages were targeted in this patient with celiac disease and T1D. PMID:21766094

  4. Influence of potassium permanganate, cobalt chloride, and dietary supplement of vitamin B complex on the histopathological changes in gill epithelium of common carp exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Das, B.K.; Kaviraj, A.

    1994-10-01

    Fry of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were chronically exposed to 2.5 mg Cd/L alone and in combination with 1.0 mg KMnO{sub 4}/L or 2.0 mg CoCl{sub 2}/L or a dietary supplement of vitamin B complex at the rate of 26.5 mg/100 g food. Cadmium induced edema of primary and secondary gill lamellae, nuclear swelling, and necrosis and hypertrophy of epithelial cells of the secondary gill lamellae. Similar or more severe lamellar damages were observed with exposure to cadmium together with potassium permanganate and to cadmium together with cobalt chloride. Potassium permanganate alone was also found to produce severe edema of the gill lamellae. A dietary supplement of vitamin B complex reduced the cadmium-induced gill damages and resulted in a normal gill in exposed fish. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Identification of putative ligand-binding sites of the integrin alpha 4 beta 1 (VLA-4, CD49d/CD29)

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, T; Puzon, W; Takada, Y

    1995-01-01

    Integrin alpha 4 beta 1 recognizes both fibronectin (CS-1 sequence) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). To localize the ligand-binding sites of alpha 4, we located the epitopes for function-blocking anti-alpha 4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including those that recognize previously described (but not yet physically localized) functional epitopes (A, B1, B2 and C) using interspecies alpha 4 chimeras expressed in mammalian cells. Epitopes B1 and B2 were associated with ligand binding, and epitopes A and B2 with homotypic cellular aggregation. mAbs P4C2 (epitope B2), 20E4 and PS/2 were mapped within residues 108-182; mAbs HP2/1 (epitope B1), SG/73 and R1-2 within residues 195-268; mAbs HP1/3 (epitope A) and P4G9 within residues 1-52; and B5G10 (epitope C) within residues 269-548. The data suggest that residues 108-268, which do not include bivalent-cation-binding motifs, are related to VCAM-1 and CS-1 binding, and more N-terminal portions of alpha 4 (residues 1 and 52 and 108-182) to homotypic aggregation. Since mAbs PS/2 and HP2/1 block alpha 4 beta 7 binding to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), the MAdCAM-1-binding site is close to, or overlapping with, VCAM-1- and CS-1-binding sites. The role of Asp-130 of beta 1 in the binding to VCAM-1 and CS-1 peptide was examined. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing beta 1 (D130A) (Asp-130 to Ala mutant of beta 1) and alpha 4 showed much less binding to both ligands than CHO cells expressing wild-type beta 1 and alpha 4 [a dominant negative effects of beta 1 (D130A)], suggesting that Asp-130 of beta 1 is critical for binding to both ligands and that the two ligand share common binding mechanisms [corrected]. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7531439

  6. Homodimerization and Heterodimerization of Minimal Zinc(II)-Binding Domain Peptides of T-cell Proteins CD4, CD8α, and Lck

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alisa M.; Berg, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    Metal-mediated protein oligomerization is an emerging mode of protein-protein interaction. The C-terminal cytosolic domains of T-cell coreceptors CD4 and CD8α form zinc-bridged heterodimers with the N-terminal region of the kinase Lck, with each protein contributing two cysteinate ligands to the complex. Using size exclusion chromatography, 1H NMR, and UV/visible absorption spectroscopy with cobalt(II) as a spectroscopic probe, we demonstrate that small peptides derived from these regions form metal-bridged heterodimers but also homodimers, in contrast to previous reports. The Lck-CD4 and Lck-CD8α cobalt(II)-bridged heterodimer complexes are more stable than the corresponding (Lck)2cobalt(II) complex by factors of 11 ± 4 and 22 ± 9, respectively. These studies were aided by the discovery that cobalt(II) complexes with a cobalt(II)(-Cys-X-X-Cys-)(-Cys-X-Cys-) chromophore show unusual optical spectra with one component of the visible d to d (4A2 to 4T1(P)) transition red-shifted and well separated from the other components. These results provide insights into the basis of specificity of metal-bridged complex formation and on the potential biological significance of metal-bridged homodimers in T-cells. PMID:19624124

  7. Changes in Structure and Antigenicity of HIV-1 Env Trimers Resulting from Removal of a Conserved CD4 Binding Site-Proximal Glycan

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Guttman, Miklos; Williams, James A.; Verkerke, Hans; Alvarado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the major target for HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). One of the mechanisms that HIV has evolved to escape the host's immune response is to mask conserved epitopes on Env with dense glycosylation. Previous studies have shown that the removal of a particular conserved glycan at N197 increases the neutralization sensitivity of the virus to antibodies targeting the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), making it a site of significant interest from the perspective of vaccine design. At present, the structural consequences that result from the removal of the N197 glycan have not been characterized. Using native-like SOSIP trimers, we examine the effects on antigenicity and local structural dynamics resulting from the removal of this glycan. A large increase in the binding of CD4bs and V3-targeting antibodies is observed for the N197Q mutant in trimeric Env, while no changes are observed with monomeric gp120. While the overall structure and thermostability are not altered, a subtle increase in the flexibility of the variable loops at the trimeric interface of adjacent protomers is evident in the N197Q mutant by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Structural modeling of the glycan chains suggests that the spatial occupancy of the N197 glycan leads to steric clashes with CD4bs antibodies in the Env trimer but not monomeric gp120. Our results indicate that the removal of the N197 glycan enhances the exposure of relevant bNAb epitopes on Env with a minimal impact on the overall trimeric structure. These findings present a simple modification for enhancing trimeric Env immunogens in vaccines. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein presents a dense patchwork of host cell-derived N-linked glycans. This so-called glycan shield is considered to be a major protective mechanism against immune recognition. While the positions of many N-linked glycans are isolate specific, some are highly conserved and are believed to play key

  8. Cadmium accumulation in gill, liver, kidney and muscle tissues of common carp, Cyprinus carpio, and Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Yeşilbudak, Burcu; Erdem, Cahit

    2014-05-01

    Accumulation of cadmium in gill, liver, muscle and kidney tissues of Cyprinus carpio and Oreochromis niloticus were investigated in fish exposed to 0.5 ppm cadmium over 1, 15 and 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. Tissue accumulation of the metal was measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric techniques. Cadmium accumulation in gill, liver, kidney and muscle, tissues of C. carpio and O. niloticus exposed to metal for 1, 15 and 30 days increased significantly compared with the control group (p < 0.05), except muscle tissue of O. niloticus. A general increase was observed in Cd accumulation with increasing exposure periods. Highest metal accumulation was observed in kidney followed by liver, gill and muscle tissues in both species. Liver accumulation of Cd was higher in C. carpio than O. niloticus, whereas kidney accumulation of the metal was higher in O. niloticus than C. carpio.

  9. Inhibition of TCR/CD3-mediated signaling by a mutant of the hematopoietically expressed G16 GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Stanners, J; Kabouridis, P; Han, H; Tsoukas, C D

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated the role of the hematopoietically expressed G16 GTP-binding protein on T cell activation. We constructed transfectants of Jurkat T cells that express a function-deficient mutant of G alpha 16 predicted to prevent activation of this G protein. Upon stimulation with anti-CD3 epsilon antibodies, mutant G alpha 16 transfectants display a profound defect in the production of IL-2 and IL-10, as well as in the expression of CD69. In contrast, the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced IL-10 production and CD69 expression, and the ionomycin plus PMA-induced IL-2 production are not affected. Consistent with the reduction in cytokine production is the inhibition of early signaling events in the mutant G alpha 16-expressing cells. There are significant reductions in anti-epsilon-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of zeta, epsilon, ZAP-70, and phospholipase C gamma 1, as well as in intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. In accordance with the effects on tyrosine phosphorylation is the reduction of TCR/CD3-mediated Fyn and Lck activities in G alpha 16 mutant cells. Even though the mechanism through which the G alpha 16 mutant mediates inhibition of T cell activation is not known, the data suggest a model where G proteins become activated upon TCR/CD3 engagement and regulate the activation of tyrosine kinases and subsequent downstream signaling events that lead to the activation of cytokine genes.

  10. The Cytoplasmic Tail of the T Cell Receptor CD3 ε Subunit Contains a Phospholipid-Binding Motif that Regulates T Cell Functions1

    PubMed Central

    DeFord-Watts, Laura M.; Tassin, Tara C.; Becker, Amy M.; Medeiros, Jennifer J.; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Love, Paul E.; Wülfing, Christoph; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.

    2010-01-01

    The CD3 ε subunit of the TCR complex contains two defined signaling domains, a proline-rich sequence and an ITAM. We identified a third signaling sequence in CD3 ε, termed the basic-rich stretch (BRS). Herein, we show that the positively charged residues of the BRS enable this region of CD3 ε to complex a subset of acidic phospholipids, including PI(3)P, PI(4)P, PI(5)P, PI(3,4,5)P3, and PI(4,5)P2. Transgenic mice containing mutations of the BRS exhibited varying developmental defects, ranging from reduced thymic cellularity to a complete block in T cell development. Peripheral T cells from BRS-modified mice also exhibited several defects, including decreased TCR surface expression, reduced TCR-mediated signaling responses to agonist peptide-loaded APCs, and delayed CD3 ε localization to the immunological synapse. Overall, these findings demonstrate a functional role for the CD3 ε lipid-binding domain in T cell biology. PMID:19542373

  11. Binding mode characterization of NBD series CD4-mimetic HIV-1 entry inhibitors by X-ray structure and resistance study.

    PubMed

    Curreli, Francesca; Kwon, Young Do; Zhang, Hongtao; Yang, Yongping; Scacalossi, Daniel; Kwong, Peter D; Debnath, Asim K

    2014-09-01

    We previously identified two small-molecule CD4 mimetics--NBD-556 and NBD-557--and synthesized a series of NBD compounds that resulted in improved neutralization activity in a single-cycle HIV-1 infectivity assay. For the current investigation, we selected several of the most active compounds and assessed their antiviral activity on a panel of 53 reference HIV-1 Env pseudoviruses representing diverse clades of clinical isolates. The selected compounds inhibited tested clades with low-micromolar potencies. Mechanism studies indicated that they act as CD4 agonists, a potentially unfavorable therapeutic trait, in that they can bind to the gp120 envelope glycoprotein and initiate a similar physiological response as CD4. However, one of the compounds, NBD-09027, exhibited reduced agonist properties, in both functional and biophysical studies. To understand the binding mode of these inhibitors, we first generated HIV-1-resistant mutants, assessed their behavior with NBD compounds, and determined the X-ray structures of two inhibitors, NBD-09027 and NBD-10007, in complex with the HIV-1 gp120 core at ∼2-Å resolution. Both studies confirmed that the NBD compounds bind similarly to NBD-556 and NBD-557 by inserting their hydrophobic groups into the Phe43 cavity of gp120. The basic nitrogen of the piperidine ring is located in close proximity to D368 of gp120 but it does not form any H-bond or salt bridge, a likely explanation for their nonoptimal antagonist properties. The results reveal the structural and biological character of the NBD series of CD4 mimetics and identify ways to reduce their agonist properties and convert them to antagonists. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Oxidative stress intensity-related effects of cadmium (Cd) and paraquat (PQ) on UV-damaged-DNA binding and excision repair activities in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Ling, Li-Bin; Chang, Yung; Liu, Chia-Wei; Lai, Po-Ling; Hsu, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Our earlier studies showed the inhibitory effects of cadmium (Cd) and paraquat (PQ) on the gene expression of DNA mismatch recognition proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study explored the effects of Cd and PQ on nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity in zebrafish embryos. Exposure of embryos at 1 h post fertilization (hpf) to 3-5 μM Cd or 30-100 μM PQ for 9 h induced a 2-3-fold increase of oxidative stress, while a 6.5-fold increase of oxidative stress was induced by 200 μM PQ. Real-time RT-PCR detected a down-regulated xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) and an up-regulated UV-DDB2 gene expression in mildly-stressed embryos, whereas 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression increased with PQ exposure levels. NER of UV-damaged DNA was enhanced in weakly oxidant-stressed embryos as shown by a transcription-based DNA repair assay, yet repair activities of both UV and cisplatin-damaged DNA were inhibited in embryos exposed to 200 μM PQ. Band shift assay showed a suppression of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) binding activity in all stressed embryos. In contrast, (6-4) photoproduct (6-4PP) recognition activity was weakly stimulated except in embryos exposed to 200 μM PQ, revealing a link of NER capacity to 6-4PP binding. Our results showed that Cd and PQ imposed similar inducing effects on UV-DDB2 gene expression, NER of UV-damaged DNA and 6-4PP binding activity in zebrafish embryo under low levels of oxidative stress and NER capacity could be inhibited if the intensity of oxidative stress increased to a critical level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The CD24/P-selectin binding pathway initiates lung arrest of human A125 adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, J; Zeller, Y; Hafezi-Moghadam, A; Gröne, H J; Ley, K; Altevogt, P

    2000-12-01

    Carbohydrates on tumor cells have been shown to play an important role in tumor metastasis. We demonstrated before that CD24, a Mr 35,000-60,000 mucine-type glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked cell surface molecule, can function as ligand for P-selectin and that the sialylLex carbohydrate is essential for CD24-mediated rolling of tumor cells on P-selectin. To investigate the role of both antigens more closely, we transfected human A125 adenocarcinoma cells with CD24 and/or fucosyltransferase VII (Fuc TVII) cDNAs. Stable transfectants expressed CD24 and/or sialylLex. Biochemical analysis confirmed that in A125-CD24/FucTVII double transfectants, CD24 was modified with sialylLex. Only double transfectants showed rolling on P-selectin in vivo. When injected into mice, double transfectants arrested in the lungs, and this step was P-selectin dependent because it was strongly enhanced in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreated wild-type mice but not in P-selectin knockout mice. CD24 modified by sialylLex was required on the tumor cells because the LPS-induced lung arrest was abolished by removal of CD24 from the cell surface by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. A125-FucTVII single transfectants expressing sialylLex but not CD24 did not show P-selectin-mediated lung arrest. The sialylLex epitope is abundantly expressed on human carcinomas, and significant correlations between sialylLex expression and clinical prognosis exist. Our data suggest an important role for sialylLex-modified CD24 in the lung colonization of human tumors.

  14. Histopathology of fish. V. Gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1957-01-01

    Possibly no single disease accounts for greater annual mortality than gill disease. Apparently endemic in many hatcheries, the disease is characterized by periodic sharp upsurges which are sometimes correlated with rising water temperatures, excessive foreign matter in the water (Wales and Evins 1937), or borderline nutritional conditions.

  15. Cadmium kinetics in freshwater clams. Uptake of cadmium by the excised gill of Anodonta anatina

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, D.A.; de Knecht, J.A.; Hemelraad, J.; Veenhof, P.R.

    1989-03-01

    There are several, and sometimes conflicting, reports on metal interaction during bioaccumulation from a mixture of heavy metals by marine or estuarine organisms. Concerning the influence of zinc on Cd uptake, it was found in a previous study with the freshwater clam Anodonta cygnea that zinc retarded the accumulation of cadmium when present in a hundred-fold excess over the latter metal. In the only in vitro investigation known, it was shown that the uptake of cadmium by the excised gills of the seal mussel Mytilus edulis was not affected by co-exposure with other metal ions or by the presence of metabolic inhibitors. By contrast, bioaccumulation of cadmium in M. edulis was strongly reduced by co-exposure to zinc in a hundred-fold excess over cadmium. The clear effect of zinc on Cd accumulation in A. cygnea prompted the authors to investigate this phenomenon in an in vitro model. The primary aim was to detect whether the in vivo effect of zinc is caused by a direct influence on the gill epithelium or is sustained by a behavioral response of the animal. At the same time, the possible effect of some other exogenous factors on Cd uptake was examined. In addition, it was investigated whether the rate of in vitro uptake is a function of gill size.

  16. Isolating the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 binding site on complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21).

    PubMed

    Young, Kendra A; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2007-12-14

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) is essential for the attachment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the surface of B-lymphocytes in an interaction mediated by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350. The heavily glycosylated structure of EBV gp350 has recently been elucidated by x-ray crystallography, and the CR2 binding site on this protein has been characterized. To identify the corresponding gp350 binding site on CR2, we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis study targeting regions of CR2 that have previously been implicated in the binding of CR2 to the C3d/C3dg fragments of complement component C3. Wild-type or mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on K562 cells, and the ability of these CR2-expressing cells to bind gp350 was measured using flow cytometry. Mutations directed toward the two N-terminal extracellular domains of CR2 (SCR1-2) reveal that a large contiguous surface of CR2 SCR1-2 is involved in gp350 binding, including a number of positively charged residues (Arg-13, (Arg-28, (Arg-36, Lys-41, Lys-57, Lys-67, and Arg-83). These data appear to complement the CR2 binding site on gp350, which is characterized by a preponderance of negative charge. In addition to identifying the importance of charge in the formation of a CR2-gp350 complex, we also provide evidence that both SCR1 and SCR2 make contact with gp350. Specifically, two anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, designated as monoclonal antibodies 171 and 1048 whose primary epitopes are located within SCR2, inhibit binding of wild-type CR2 to EBV gp350; with regard to SCR1, both K562 cells expressing an S15P mutation and recombinant S15P CR2 proteins exhibit diminished gp350 binding.

  17. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  18. Ligand binding specificities and signal transduction pathways of Fc gamma receptor IIc isoforms: the CD32 isoforms expressed by human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Metes, D; Manciulea, M; Pretrusca, D; Rabinowich, H; Ernst, L K; Popescu, I; Calugaru, A; Sulica, A; Chambers, W H; Herberman, R B; Morel, P A

    1999-09-01

    We recently reported that human NK cells express, in addition to CD16 [Fcgamma receptor (FcgammaR) IIIA], a second type of FcgammaR, namely CD32 (FcgammaRII). Molecular characterization of CD32 transcripts expressed by highly purified NK cells revealed that they predominantly express products of the FcgammaRIIC gene. Using stable Jurkat transfectants we have analyzed the functional properties of two FcgammaRIIc-specific isoforms isolated from NK cells, namely FcgammaRIIc1 and FcgammaRIIc3, which differ in their cytoplasmic tails. The ligand binding specificity for both murine and human IgG isotypes was found to be similar to that observed for FcgammaRIIb isoforms. Immunoprecipitation studies of FcgammaRIIc isoforms expressed in Jurkat cells revealed a protein of around 40 kDa for FcgammaRIIc1, and a protein of around 32 kDa for FcgammaRIIc3. Signal transduction studies performed on FcgammaRIIc1-expressing Jurkat cells indicated that this molecule is functional, i. e. capable of Ca2+ mobilization and activation of Lck, Zap-70 and Syk protein tyrosine kinases, although the CD3 zeta chain was not found to functionally associate with FcgammaRIIc1. In contrast, FcgammaRIIc3 transfectants showed an impaired ability of this molecule to mobilize Ca2+, but activation of Lck was detected following activation via FcgammaRIIc3. These studies demonstrate the functional activity of FcgammaRIIc isoforms and suggest that the presence of CD32, in addition to CD16, on NK cells may have functional relevance.

  19. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  20. Direct Binding of Fluorescent CdSe-ZnS Core shell Semiconductor Nanocrystals to Biological Macromolecules: Efficient Tool for Fluorescence Tagging of Biological Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoussi, Hedi; Anderson, George P.; Mauro, J. Matthew; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2000-03-01

    We present a study that describes a novel and direct approach of binding highly luminescent CdSe-ZnS core-shell nanocrystals to biological molecules for use as fluorescent probes in biosensing and diagnostics. We use dithiol-based groups as the surface capping agent, which provides nanocrystal dispersions with high quantum yield. The approach makes use of a recombinant protein, which binds directly to the dithiol cap, and provides addition stability of the quantum dots in water solutions. Hence stable and highly luminescent bound nanocrystal-biomolecules have been prepared. The present process provides aggregation-free solutions with a high luminescence yield. Combining the properties of the CdSe-ZnS (photochemical stability and wide range of emission wavelengths) and the simple binding approach, the resultant materials provide a sensitive and powerful tool for tagging of biological molecules. We will discuss the chemistry involved and present various characterization studies of these complex systems, such as photoluminescence spectroscopy, high-resolution microscopy. We will also discuss the use of these materials in immunoassays.

  1. Stokes shift and fine structure splitting in composition-tunable ZnxCd1-xSe nanocrystals: Atomistic tight-binding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkabot, Worasak

    2017-02-01

    I report on the atomistic correlation of the structural properties and excitonic splitting of ternary alloy ZnxCd1-xSe wurtzite nanocrystals using the sp3s* empirical tight-binding method with the description of the first nearest neighbouring interaction and bowing effect. Based on a successful model, the computations are presented under various Zn compositions (x) and diameters of alloy ZnxCd1-xSe nanocrystals with the experimentally synthesized compositions and sizes. With increasing Zn contents (x), the optical band gaps and electron-hole coulomb energies are improved, while ground electron-hole wave function overlaps, electron-hole exchange energies, stokes shift and fine structure splitting are reduced. A composition-tunable emission from blue to yellow wavelength is obviously demonstrated. The optical band gaps, ground electron-hole wave function overlaps, electron-hole interactions, stokes shift and fine structure splitting are progressively decreased with the increasing diameters. Alloy ZnxCd1-xSe nanocrystal with Zn rich and large diameter is the best candidate to optimistically be used as a source of entangled photon pairs. The agreement with the experimental data is remarkable. Finally, the present systematic study on the structural properties and excitonic splitting predominantly opens a new perspective to understand the size- and composition-dependent properties of ZnxCd1-xSe nanocrystals with a comprehensive strategy to design the optoelectronic devices.

  2. Mechanical force effect on the two-state equilibrium of the hyaluronan-binding domain of CD44 in cell rolling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Suzuki, Miho; Ogino, Shinji; Umemoto, Ryo; Nishida, Noritaka; Shimada, Ichio

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the receptor for hyaluronan (HA) and mediates cell rolling under fluid shear stress. The HA-binding domain (HABD) of CD44 interconverts between a low-affinity, ordered (O) state and a high-affinity, partially disordered (PD) state, by the conformational change of the C-terminal region, which is connected to the plasma membrane. To examine the role of tensile force on CD44-mediated rolling, we used a cell-free rolling system, in which recombinant HABDs were attached to beads through a C-terminal or N-terminal tag. We found that the rolling behavior was stabilized only at high shear stress, when the HABD was attached through the C-terminal tag. In contrast, no difference was observed for the beads coated with HABD mutants that constitutively adopt either the O state or the PD state. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the force from the C terminus disrupts the interaction between the C-terminal region and the core of the domain, thus providing structural insights into how the mechanical force triggers the allosteric O-to-PD transition. Based on these results, we propose that the force applied from the C terminus enhances the HABD–HA interactions by inducing the conformational change to the high-affinity PD transition more rapidly, thereby enabling CD44 to mediate lymphocyte trafficking and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing under high-shear conditions. PMID:26038553

  3. Fusion of the Fc part of human IgG1 to CD14 enhances its binding to gram-negative bacteria and mediates phagocytosis by Fc receptors of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Vida, András; Bardoel, Bart; Milder, Fin; Majoros, László; Sümegi, Andrea; Bácsi, Attila; Vereb, György; van Kessel, Kok P M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Antal-Szalmás, Péter

    2012-08-30

    Microbial resistance to antimicrobial drugs is promoting a search for new antimicrobial agents that target highly conservative structures of pathogens. Human CD14 - a known pattern recognition receptor (PRR) which recognizes multiple ligands from different microbes might be a worthy candidate. The aim of our work was to create a CD14/Fc dimer protein and evaluate its whole bacteria binding and opsonizing capabilities. Fusion of CD14 with the fragment crystallisable (Fc) part of human IgG1 could not only lead to an artificial opsonin but the dimerization through the Fc part might also increase its affinity to different ligands. Human CD14 and the Fc part of human IgG1 was fused and expressed in HEK293 cells. A histidine tagged CD14 (CD14/His) was also expressed as control. Using flow cytometry we could prove that CD14/Fc bound to whole Gram-negative bacteria, especially to short lipopolysaccharide (Ra and Re) mutants, and weak interaction was observed between the fusion protein and Listeria monocytogenes. Other Gram-positive bacteria and fungi did not show any association with CD14/Fc. CD14/His showed about 50-times less potent binding to Gram-negative bacteria. CD14/Fc acted as an opsonin and enhanced phagocytosis of these bacteria by neutrophil granulocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. Internalization of bacteria was confirmed by trypan blue quenching and confocal microscopy. On neutrophils the Fc part of the fusion protein was recognized by Fc receptors (CD16, CD32), as determined by blocking experiments. CD14/Fc enhanced the killing of bacteria in an ex vivo whole blood assay. Our experiments confirm that PRR/Fc fusion proteins can give a boost to FcR dependent phagocytosis and killing provided the antimicrobial part binds efficiently to microbes.

  4. Thymic pathogenicity of an HIV-1 envelope is associated with increased CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-dependent activity, but not V1/V2-associated CD4 binding efficiency and viral entry.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Eric G; Coffield, Vernon M; Su, Lishan

    2005-06-05

    We previously described a thymus-tropic HIV-1 envelope (R3A Env) from a rapid progressor obtained at the time of transmission. An HIV-1 molecular recombinant with the R3A Env supported extensive replication and pathogenesis in the thymus and did not require Nef. Another Env from the same patient did not display the same thymus-tropic pathogenesis (R3B Env). Here, we show that relative to R3B Env, R3A Env enhances viral entry of T cells, increases fusion-induced cytopathicity, and shows elevated binding efficiency for both CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, in vitro. We created chimeric envelopes to determine the region(s) responsible for each in vitro phenotype and for thymic pathogenesis. Surprisingly, while V1/V2 contributed to enhanced viral entry, CD4 binding efficiency, and cytopathicity in vitro, it made no contribution to thymic pathogenesis. Rather, CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-associated activity appear to independently contribute to thymic pathogenesis of the R3A Env. These data highlight the contribution of unique HIV pathogenic factors in the thymic microenvironment and suggest that novel mechanisms may be involved in Env pathogenic activity in vivo.

  5. Thymic pathogenicity of an HIV-1 envelope is associated with increased CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-dependent activity, but not V1/V2-associated CD4 binding efficiency and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Eric G.; Coffield, Vernon M.; Su Lishan . E-mail: lsu@med.unc.edu

    2005-06-05

    We previously described a thymus-tropic HIV-1 envelope (R3A Env) from a rapid progressor obtained at the time of transmission. An HIV-1 molecular recombinant with the R3A Env supported extensive replication and pathogenesis in the thymus and did not require Nef. Another Env from the same patient did not display the same thymus-tropic pathogenesis (R3B Env). Here, we show that relative to R3B Env, R3A Env enhances viral entry of T cells, increases fusion-induced cytopathicity, and shows elevated binding efficiency for both CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, in vitro. We created chimeric envelopes to determine the region(s) responsible for each in vitro phenotype and for thymic pathogenesis. Surprisingly, while V1/V2 contributed to enhanced viral entry, CD4 binding efficiency, and cytopathicity in vitro, it made no contribution to thymic pathogenesis. Rather, CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-associated activity appear to independently contribute to thymic pathogenesis of the R3A Env. These data highlight the contribution of unique HIV pathogenic factors in the thymic microenvironment and suggest that novel mechanisms may be involved in Env pathogenic activity in vivo.

  6. Transcellular activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat in T lymphocytes requires CD4-gp120 binding.

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, A; Lowy, I; Weinberger, O K

    1992-01-01

    Cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) tat can transactivate the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) in cocultured T lymphocytes. In this report, we describe the molecular requirements for transcellular activation of the LTR in Jurkat cells. An analysis with deletion mutants and blocking antibodies demonstrated a requirement for env expression in addition to tat expression for transcellular activation to occur. The results suggest that the transient association of CD4 and gp120 in cocultured cells is required for tat-mediated transcellular activation. The events that follow CD4-gp120 binding in transactivation, however, do not require the gp120-neutralizing domain, in contrast to HIV-mediated fusion and infection. The consequences of this interaction on cellular function are currently under investigation. Images PMID:1351104

  7. Peptide ligands selected with CD4-induced epitopes on native dualtropic HIV-1 envelope proteins mimic extracellular coreceptor domains and bind to HIV-1 gp120 independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Dervillez, Xavier; Klaukien, Volker; Dürr, Ralf; Koch, Joachim; Kreutz, Alexandra; Haarmann, Thomas; Stoll, Michaela; Lee, Donghan; Carlomagno, Teresa; Schnierle, Barbara; Möbius, Kalle; Königs, Christoph; Griesinger, Christian; Dietrich, Ursula

    2010-10-01

    During HIV-1 entry, binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor triggers conformational changes resulting in exposure of new epitopes, the highly conserved CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes that are essential for subsequent binding to chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Due to their functional conservation, CD4i epitopes represent attractive viral targets for HIV-1 entry inhibition. The aim of the present study was to select peptide ligands for CD4i epitopes on native dualtropic (R5X4) HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins by phage display. Using CD4-activated retroviral particles carrying Env from the R5X4 HIV-1 89.6 strain as the target, we performed screenings of random peptide phage libraries under stringent selection conditions. Selected peptides showed partial identity with amino acids in the extracellular domains of CCR5/CXCR4, including motifs rich in tyrosines and aspartates at the N terminus known to be important for gp120 binding. A synthetic peptide derivative (XD3) corresponding to the most frequently selected phages was optimized for Env binding on peptide arrays. Interestingly, the optimized peptide could bind specifically to gp120 derived from HIV-1 strains with different coreceptor usage, competed with binding of CD4i-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17b, and interfered with entry of both a CCR5 (R5)-tropic and a CXCR4 (X4)-tropic Env pseudotyped virus. This peptide ligand therefore points at unique properties of CD4i epitopes shared by gp120 with different coreceptor usage and could thus serve to provide new insight into the conserved structural details essential for coreceptor binding for further drug development.

  8. NeutrAvidin Functionalization of CdSe/CdS Quantum Nanorods and Quantification of Biotin Binding Sites using Biotin-4-Fluorescein Fluorescence Quenching.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Lisa G; Hallock, Jeffrey T; Dadosh, Tali; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Goldman, Yale E

    2016-03-16

    We developed methods to solubilize, coat, and functionalize with NeutrAvidin elongated semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum nanorods, QRs) for use in single molecule polarized fluorescence microscopy. Three different ligands were compared with regard to efficacy for attaching NeutrAvidin using the "zero-length cross-linker" 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC). Biotin-4-fluorescene (B4F), a fluorophore that is quenched when bound to avidin proteins, was used to quantify biotin binding activity of the NeutrAvidin coated QRs and biotin binding activity of commercially available streptavidin coated quantum dots (QDs). All three coating methods produced QRs with NeutrAvidin coating density comparable to the streptavidin coating density of the commercially available quantum dots (QDs) in the B4F assay. One type of QD available from the supplier (ITK QDs) exhibited ∼5-fold higher streptavidin surface density compared to our QRs, whereas the other type of QD (PEG QDs) had 5-fold lower density. The number of streptavidins per QD increased from ∼7 streptavidin tetramers for the smallest QDs emitting fluorescence at 525 nm (QD525) to ∼20 tetramers for larger, longer wavelength QDs (QD655, QD705, and QD800). QRs coated with NeutrAvidin using mercaptoundecanoicacid (MUA) and QDs coated with streptavidin bound to biotinylated cytoplasmic dynein in single molecule TIRF microscopy assays, whereas Poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-ocatdecene) (PMAOD) or glutathione (GSH) QRs did not bind cytoplasmic dynein. The coating methods require optimization of conditions and concentrations to balance between substantial NeutrAvidin binding vs tendency of QRs to aggregate and degrade over time.

  9. In vitro differentiation from naive to mature E-selectin binding CD4 T cells: acquisition of skin-homing properties occurs independently of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Mizukawa, Yoshiko; Yamazaki, Yoshimi; Hayakawa, Kazuhito; Hayakawa, Jun; Kudo, Akihiko; Shiohara, Tetsuo

    2003-12-01

    We previously showed that skin-homing CD4 T cells in peripheral blood can be subdivided into three populations on the basis of the expression pattern of the cutaneous lymphocyte Ag (CLA) and fucosyltransferase VII (FucT-VII): FucT-VII(+)CLA(-), FucT-VII(+)CLA(+), and FucT-VII(-)CLA(+). In view of the known late appearance of CLA during T cell differentiation, T cells programmed to attain skin-homing properties may start to generate E-selectin-binding epitopes at early stages of differentiation before induction of CLA expression. To this end, the in vitro differentiation from naive to CLA(+) memory T cells was followed after activation with anti-CD3 mAb. Here we demonstrate that naive skin-homing CD4 T cell precursors undergo a linear differentiation process from the FucT-VII(+)CLA(-) phenotype to the FucT-VII(+)CLA(+) phenotype and eventually to the FucT-VII(-)CLA(+) phenotype. The appearance of the FucT-VII(+)CLA(-) subset coincided with or could be immediately followed by the generation of E-selectin binding epitopes, and even after E-selectin-binding epitopes were no longer detectable, CLA remained expressed for prolonged periods of time, suggesting that induction of functional E-selectin ligands depends primarily on the expression of FucT-VII, but not CLA. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies of these T cells confirm that most E-selectin ligands were found independently of CLA expression.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  11. Prolonged antigen presentation by immune complex-binding dendritic cells programs the proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E

    2014-07-28

    The commitment of naive CD8 T cells to effector or memory cell fates can occur after a single day of antigenic stimulation even though virus-derived antigens (Ags) are still presented by DCs long after acute infection is resolved. However, the effects of extended Ag presentation on CD8 T cells are undefined and the mechanisms that regulate prolonged Ag presentation are unknown. We showed that the sustained presentation of two different epitopes from influenza virus by DCs prevented the premature contraction of the primary virus-specific CD8 T cell response. Although prolonged Ag presentation did not alter the number of memory CD8 T cells that developed, it was essential for programming the capacity of these cells to proliferate, produce cytokines, and protect the host after secondary challenge. Importantly, prolonged Ag presentation by DCs was dependent on virus-specific, isotype-switched antibodies (Abs) that facilitated the capture and cross-presentation of viral Ags by FcγR-expressing DCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that B cells and Abs can regulate the quality and functionality of a subset of antiviral CD8 T cell memory responses and do so by promoting sustained Ag presentation by DCs during the contraction phase of the primary T cell response.

  12. Immune complexes bind preferentially to Fc gamma RIIA (CD32) on apoptotic neutrophils, leading to augmented phagocytosis by macrophages and release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Alexander, Karen M; Dransfield, Ian

    2004-02-01

    Many human inflammatory diseases are associated with tissue deposition of immune complexes and influx of neutrophils. We show that immune complexes bind preferentially to apoptotic neutrophils via FcgammaRIIA (CD32) and that increased binding is associated with clustering of immune complexes on the plasma membrane of the apoptotic cell. Phagocytosis of immune complex-opsonized apoptotic neutrophils by human macrophages was substantially enhanced (4.4-fold increase compared with control apoptotic neutrophils) and stimulated macrophages to release the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6. Immune complexes may perturb the normal pathways for clearance of apoptotic neutrophils by augmenting their clearance at the price of proinflammatory cytokine release. This represents a novel mechanism by which immune complexes may modulate the resolution of inflammation.

  13. Control of the binding energy by tuning the single dopant position, magnetic field strength and shell thickness in ZnS/CdSe core/shell quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Feddi, E.; Zouitine, A.; Haouari, M. El; Zazoui, M.; Oukerroum, A.; Dujardin, F.; Assaid, E.; Addou, M.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, the new tunable optoelectronic devices associated to the inclusion of the single dopant are in continuous emergence. Combined to other effects such as magnetic field, geometrical confinement and dielectric discontinuity, it can constitute an approach to adjusting new transitions. In this paper, we present a theoretical investigation of magnetic field, donor position and quantum confinement effects on the ground state binding energy of single dopant confined in ZnS/CdSe core/shell quantum dot. Within the framework of the effective mass approximation, the Schrödinger equation was numerically been solved by using the Ritz variational method under the finite potential barrier. The results show that the binding energy is very affected by the core/shell sizes and by the external magnetic field. It has been shown that the single dopant energy transitions can be controlled by tuning the dopant position and/or the field strength.

  14. Bile Salt-Stimulated Lipase from Human Milk Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transfer to CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs and a subset of B cells. More specifically, the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein of HIV-1 with DC-SIGN can facilitate the transfer of virus to CD4+ T lymphocytes in trans and enhance infection. We have previously demonstrated that a multimeric LeX component in human milk binds to DC-SIGN, preventing HIV-1 from interacting with this receptor. Biochemical analysis reveals that the compound is heat resistant, trypsin sensitive, and larger than 100 kDa, indicating a specific glycoprotein as the inhibitory compound. By testing human milk from three different mothers, we found the levels of DC-SIGN binding and viral inhibition to vary between samples. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization analysis, we identified bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), a Lewis X (LeX)-containing glycoprotein found in human milk, to be the major variant protein between the samples. BSSL isolated from human milk bound to DC-SIGN and inhibited the transfer of HIV-1 to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Two BSSL isoforms isolated from the same human milk sample showed differences in DC-SIGN binding, illustrating that alterations in the BSSL forms explain the differences observed. These results indicate that variations in BSSL lead to alterations in LeX expression by the protein, which subsequently alters the DC-SIGN binding capacity and the inhibitory effect on HIV-1 transfer. Identifying the specific molecular interaction between the different forms may aid in the future design of antimicrobial agents. PMID:17005819

  15. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Naarding, Marloes A; Dirac, Annette M; Ludwig, Irene S; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A

    2006-10-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs and a subset of B cells. More specifically, the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein of HIV-1 with DC-SIGN can facilitate the transfer of virus to CD4+ T lymphocytes in trans and enhance infection. We have previously demonstrated that a multimeric LeX component in human milk binds to DC-SIGN, preventing HIV-1 from interacting with this receptor. Biochemical analysis reveals that the compound is heat resistant, trypsin sensitive, and larger than 100 kDa, indicating a specific glycoprotein as the inhibitory compound. By testing human milk from three different mothers, we found the levels of DC-SIGN binding and viral inhibition to vary between samples. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization analysis, we identified bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), a Lewis X (LeX)-containing glycoprotein found in human milk, to be the major variant protein between the samples. BSSL isolated from human milk bound to DC-SIGN and inhibited the transfer of HIV-1 to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Two BSSL isoforms isolated from the same human milk sample showed differences in DC-SIGN binding, illustrating that alterations in the BSSL forms explain the differences observed. These results indicate that variations in BSSL lead to alterations in LeX expression by the protein, which subsequently alters the DC-SIGN binding capacity and the inhibitory effect on HIV-1 transfer. Identifying the specific molecular interaction between the different forms may aid in the future design of antimicrobial agents.

  16. Diverse CdII coordination complexes derived from bromide isophthalic acid binding with auxiliary N-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Meng; Dong, Bao-Xia; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yang, Fang; Liu, Wen-Long; Teng, Yun-Lei

    2016-12-01

    The coordination characteristics of 4-bromoisophthalic acid (4-Br-H2ip) have been investigated in a series of CdII-based frameworks. Hydrothermal reactions of CdII salts and 4-Br-H2ip together with flexible or semiflexible N-donor auxiliary ligands resulted in the formation of four three-dimensional coordination complexes with diverse structures: {Cd(bix)0.5(bix)0.5(4-Br-ip)]·H2O}n (1), [Cd(bbi)0.5(bbi)0.5(4-Br-ip)]n (2), {[Cd(btx)0.5(4-Br-ip)(H2O)]·0.5CH3OH·H2O}n (3) and {[Cd(bbt)0.5(4-Br-ip)(H2O)]·3·5H2O}n (4). These compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. They displayed diverse structures depending on the configuration of the 4-connected metal node, the coordination mode of the 4-Br-H2ip, the coordination ability and conformationally flexibility of the N-donor auxiliary. Compound 1 exhibits 3-fold interpenetrated 66 topology and compound 2 has a 412 topology. Compounds 3-4 have similar 3D pillar-layered structures based on 3,4-connected binodal net with the Schläfli symbol of (4·38). The thermal stabilities and photoluminescence properties of them were discussed in detail.

  17. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with super-enhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and non-specifically activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Matthew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S. J.; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K.; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are essential for effective immune defence against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTL recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Antigen recognition involves the binding of both T cell receptor (TCR) and CD8 co-receptor to a single ligand (pMHCI). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers antigen specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to antigen. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. Here, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by ~15-fold results in non-specific, cognate antigen-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with super-enhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTL in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL antigen specificity. PMID:20190139

  18. Vascular anatomy of the fish gill.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kenneth R

    2002-08-01

    The fish gill is the most physiologically diversified vertebrate organ, and its vasculature the most intricate. Application of vascular corrosion techniques that couple high-fidelity resins, such as methyl methacrylate, with scanning electron microscopy yields three-dimensional replicas of the microcirculation that have fostered a better appreciate gill perfusion pathways. This is the focus of the present review. Three vascular networks can be identified within the gill filament. The arterioarterial (respiratory) pathway consists of the lamellae and afferent and efferent segments of the branchial and filamental arteries and lamellar arterioles. The body of the filament contains two post-lamellar pathways: the interlamellar and nutrient. The interlamellar system is an extensive ladder-like network of thin-walled, highly distensible vessels that traverses the filament between, and parallel to, the lamellae and continues around the afferent and efferent borders of the filament. Interlamellar vessels are supplied by short, narrow-bore feeder vessels from the medial wall of the efferent filamental artery. A myriad of narrow-bore, tortuous arterioles arise from the basal efferent filamental artery and efferent branchial artery and anastomose to form the nutrient circulation of the arch and filament. In the filament body, nutrient capillaries and interlamellar vessels are often closely associated, and the former may ultimately drain into the latter. Many of the anatomical characteristics of interlamellar vessels are strikingly similar to those of mammalian lymphatic capillaries, with the exception that interlamellar vessels are directly fed by arteriovenous-like anastomoses. It is likely that gill interlamellar and mammalian lymphatics are physiologically, if not embryologically, equivalent.

  19. The McGill-Costa Rica Project

    PubMed Central

    Davis, M. William L.; Haggerty, Jeannie; Filion-Laporte, Liliane

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, health authorities in Costa Rica started a training program in family and community medicine and requested assistance from the Department of Family Medicine at McGill University. The authors outline the health care system in Costa Rica and the background of the project. The design, implementation, and progress of the project to date are discussed. The problems associated with this kind of project and its future are also discussed. Imagesp1152-a PMID:21221332

  20. An anti-human immunodeficiency virus multiple antigen peptide encompassing the cleavage region of the env precursor interferes with membrane fusion at a post-CD4 binding step.

    PubMed

    Barbouche, R; Decroly, E; Kieny, M P; Fenouillet, E

    2000-07-20

    CLIV is a multiple antigen peptide ([PTKAKRRVVQREKR](4)-K(2)-K-betaA) that encompasses the cleavage region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope precursor. It displays an antiviral activity against HIV-1 and HIV-2 and inhibits HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. This effect has previously been attributed to interference with Env processing, resulting in the expression of a nonfusogenic envelope [Virology (1998) 247, 137]. However, we show here that CLIV does not alter the status of Env cleavage at steady state. Using various aggregation/syncytium assays that allow us to discriminate between gp120/CD4 binding and binding followed by gp41-mediated fusion, we demonstrate that CLIV inhibits a step of the cell-to-cell fusion process after CD4 binding. We demonstrate also that CLIV binds at 37 degrees C to a single class of protein present at the CD4(+) cell surface (Scatchard analysis: K(d) = 8 nM; B(max) = 10(4) sites/cell) and that the fusion inhibition activity seems to correlate with binding to this proteic component. In contrast, CLIV interacts with neither membrane-inserted nor CD4-associated Env. We therefore propose that CLIV interferes after Env/CD4 binding with a step of the membrane fusion process that may involve the C-terminal domain of gp120. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Increased, Durable B-Cell and ADCC Responses Associated with T-Helper Cell Responses to HIV-1 Envelope in Macaques Vaccinated with gp140 Occluded at the CD4 Receptor Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Bogers, Willy M J M; Barnett, Susan W; Oostermeijer, Herman; Nieuwenhuis, Ivonne G; Beenhakker, Niels; Mortier, Daniella; Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Remarque, Edmund; Martin, Gregoire; Lai, Rachel Pei-Jen; Dey, Antu K; Sun, Yide; Burke, Brian; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David; Martin, Loic; Davis, David; Srivastava, Indresh; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2017-10-01

    Strategies are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope (Env) antigens (Ag) for more long-lived, efficacious HIV-1 vaccine-induced B-cell responses. HIV-1 Env gp140 (native or uncleaved molecules) or gp120 monomeric proteins elicit relatively poor B-cell responses which are short-lived. We hypothesized that Env engagement of the CD4 receptor on T-helper cells results in anergic effects on T-cell recruitment and consequently a lack of strong, robust, and durable B-memory responses. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp140 by stable cross-linking with a 3-kDa CD4 miniprotein mimetic, serving to block ligation of gp140 on CD4(+) T cells while preserving CD4-inducible (CDi) neutralizing epitopes targeted by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effector responses. Importantly, immunization of rhesus macaques consistently gave superior B-cell (P < 0.001) response kinetics and superior ADCC (P < 0.014) in a group receiving the CD4bs-occluded vaccine compared to those of animals immunized with gp140. Of the cytokines examined, Ag-specific interleukin-4 (IL-4) T-helper enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays of the CD4bs-occluded group increased earlier (P = 0.025) during the inductive phase. Importantly, CD4bs-occluded gp140 antigen induced superior B-cell and ADCC responses, and the elevated B-cell responses proved to be remarkably durable, lasting more than 60 weeks postimmunization.IMPORTANCE Attempts to develop HIV vaccines capable of inducing potent and durable B-cell responses have been unsuccessful until now. Antigen-specific B-cell development and affinity maturation occurs in germinal centers in lymphoid follicles through a critical interaction between B cells and T follicular helper cells. The HIV envelope binds the CD4 receptor on T cells as soluble shed antigen or as antigen-antibody complexes, causing impairment in the activation of these specialized CD4-positive T cells. We proposed that CD4

  2. Measurement and interpretation of Q0 and Q1 band property changes of two cationic metalloporphyrins upon binding with B-DNA: electronic MCD, CD, and optical absorption.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N R; Schreiner, A F; Dolan, M A

    1998-10-01

    Room-temperature Q-band electronic MCD, CD, and optical spectra are reported for the first time for two free and nucleic acid-bound cationic metalloporphyrins. Metalloporphyrins are the high-symmetry (C4v or D4h), four-coordinate tetragonal type MP(X) [M = CuII and PtII; P(X) = meso-tetrakis(X-N-methylpyridyl)porphine; X = 2 or 4], and the nucleic acid is native, B-form calf thymus DNA (CT DNA). For intercalation system PtP(4)/CT DNA, large optical (lambda 0, epsilon max) and MCD (lambda peak, lambda trough, A(aj), A(aj)/D(aj), and delta[theta]Mp-t/epsilon max) band parameter shifts, as well as a single negative (-) induced CD peak for each of Q0 and Q1, were observed upon binding of the porphyrin to chiral DNA. The directions and magnitudes of these changes are comparable to those observed for the Soret (B0) band of this system. Decreases of MCD/optical ratio delta[theta]Mp-t/epsilon max (varies; is directly proportional to A(aj)/D(aj)) of 30% (Q0) and 50% (Q1) upon intercalation indicate substantial reductions of the Q0[1Eu(a) (0,0), approximately 1a1u1 4eg1] and Q1[1Eu(a)(0,1), approximately 1a1u1 4eg1] excited state angular momenta, . It is of additional interest that intercalation leads to intensity cancellation of one of the four A-term lobes, the (+)lobe of the Q0 MCD (+)pseudo-A-term, which was also observed previously for intercalation systems PdP(4)/poly(G-C)2 and /CT DNA. Application of the CD sector method to the constituent x- and y-polarized porphyrin edtms, square root of D(aj), of the Q0 (edtms mu0x and mu0y) and Q1 (edtms mu1x and mu1y) CD bands leads to the conclusion that PtP(4) is symmetrically intercalated between adjacent GC base pairs, specifically at 5'GC3' sites, with each of two adjacent 4-N-methylpyridyl groups extending into each of the major and minor grooves. For outside binder CuP(2), small optical and MCD band parameter shifts and smaller, single positive (+) induced CD peaks are observed for Q0 and Q1 upon interaction with CT

  3. A basic patch on alpha-adaptin is required for binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef and cooperative assembly of a CD4-Nef-AP-2 complex.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rittik; Mattera, Rafael; Lindwasser, O Wolf; Robinson, Margaret S; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2009-03-01

    A critical function of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein is the downregulation of CD4 from the surfaces of infected cells. Nef is believed to act by linking the cytosolic tail of CD4 to the endocytic machinery, thereby increasing the rate of CD4 internalization. In support of this model, weak binary interactions between CD4, Nef, and the endocytic adaptor complex, AP-2, have been reported. In particular, dileucine and diacidic motifs in the C-terminal flexible loop of Nef have been shown to mediate binding to a combination of the alpha and sigma2 subunits of AP-2. Here, we report the identification of a potential binding site for the Nef diacidic motif on alpha-adaptin. This site comprises two basic residues, lysine-297 and arginine-340, on the alpha-adaptin trunk domain. The mutation of these residues specifically inhibits the ability of Nef to bind AP-2 and downregulate CD4. We also present evidence that the diacidic motif on Nef and the basic patch on alpha-adaptin are both required for the cooperative assembly of a CD4-Nef-AP-2 complex. This cooperativity explains how Nef is able to efficiently downregulate CD4 despite weak binary interactions between components of the tripartite complex.

  4. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody PGT121 Allosterically Modulates CD4 Binding via Recognition of the HIV-1 gp120 V3 Base and Multiple Surrounding Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Sok, Devin; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Ramos, Alejandra; Diwanji, Devan C.; Pejchal, Robert; Cupo, Albert; Katpally, Umesh; Depetris, Rafael S.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; McBride, Ryan; Marozsan, Andre J.; Paulson, James C.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Burton, Dennis R.; Poignard, Pascal; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    New broad and potent neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies have recently been described that are largely dependent on the gp120 N332 glycan for Env recognition. Members of the PGT121 family of antibodies, isolated from an African donor, neutralize ∼70% of circulating isolates with a median IC50 less than 0.05 µg ml−1. Here, we show that three family members, PGT121, PGT122 and PGT123, have very similar crystal structures. A long 24-residue HCDR3 divides the antibody binding site into two functional surfaces, consisting of an open face, formed by the heavy chain CDRs, and an elongated face, formed by LCDR1, LCDR3 and the tip of the HCDR3. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the antibody paratope reveals a crucial role in neutralization for residues on the elongated face, whereas the open face, which accommodates a complex biantennary glycan in the PGT121 structure, appears to play a more secondary role. Negative-stain EM reconstructions of an engineered recombinant Env gp140 trimer (SOSIP.664) reveal that PGT122 interacts with the gp120 outer domain at a more vertical angle with respect to the top surface of the spike than the previously characterized antibody PGT128, which is also dependent on the N332 glycan. We then used ITC and FACS to demonstrate that the PGT121 antibodies inhibit CD4 binding to gp120 despite the epitope being distal from the CD4 binding site. Together, these structural, functional and biophysical results suggest that the PGT121 antibodies may interfere with Env receptor engagement by an allosteric mechanism in which key structural elements, such as the V3 base, the N332 oligomannose glycan and surrounding glycans, including a putative V1/V2 complex biantennary glycan, are conformationally constrained. PMID:23658524

  5. [Methylenebisphosphonic acid alters the pattern of pericellular glycosaminoglycans and binding properties of CD44 in human endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Ievdokymova, N Iu; Karlova, N P; Baranova, N S; Komisarenko, S V

    2006-01-01

    The effect of methylenebisphosphonic acid (MBPA) on glycosaminoglycan metabolism, adhesive and proliferative properties of human endothelial cells has been investigated. It was demonstrated that MBPA (100 microM) inhibited the synthesis of all studied groups of glycosaminoglycans, but promoted the accumulation of heparan sulphate in endothelial pericellular matrix. Simultaneously, the redistribution of hyaluronic acid from pericellular matrix to the conditioned medium was observed. The decreased adhesion of endothelial cells to immobilized hyaluronic acid was not mediated by the alterations of CD44 expression. It was also demonstrated that MBPA affected the proliferative properties of endothelial cells. The alterations of glycosaminoglycan metabolism are considered to be involved in antiangiogenic effects of MBPA.

  6. Thermodynamic Switch in Binding of Adhesion/Growth Regulatory Human Galectin-3 to Tumor-Associated TF Antigen (CD176) and MUC1 Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A shift to short-chain glycans is an observed change in mucin-type O-glycosylation in premalignant and malignant epithelia. Given the evidence that human galectin-3 can interact with mucins and also weakly with free tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen (CD176), the study of its interaction with MUC1 (glyco)peptides is of biomedical relevance. Glycosylated MUC1 fragments that carry the TF antigen attached through either Thr or Ser side chains were synthesized using standard Fmoc-based automated solid-phase peptide chemistry. The dissociation constants (Kd) for interaction of galectin-3 and the glycosylated MUC1 fragments measured by isothermal titration calorimetry decreased up to 10 times in comparison to that of the free TF disaccharide. No binding was observed for the nonglycosylated control version of the MUC1 peptide. The most notable feature of the binding of MUC1 glycopeptides to galectin-3 was a shift from a favorable enthalpy to an entropy-driven binding process. The comparatively diminished enthalpy contribution to the free energy (ΔG) was compensated by a considerable gain in the entropic term. 1H–15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal contact at the canonical site mainly by the glycan moiety of the MUC1 glycopeptide. Ligand-dependent differences in binding affinities were also confirmed by a novel assay for screening of low-affinity glycan–lectin interactions based on AlphaScreen technology. Another key finding is that the glycosylated MUC1 peptides exhibited activity in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-based assays revealing selectivity among human galectins. Thus, the presentation of this tumor-associated carbohydrate ligand by the natural peptide scaffold enhances its affinity, highlighting the significance of model studies of human lectins with synthetic glycopeptides. PMID:26129647

  7. Proflavine binding to poly(rC-rA) inverts the CD spectrum but not the helix handedness.

    PubMed

    Westhof, E; Sundaralingam, M

    1984-08-01

    The interaction of proflavine hemisulfate with the sodium salt of poly(rC-rA) in solution (unbuffered) yields an inverted (mirror-like) circular dichroism (CD) spectrum to that of the free poly(rC-rA). Simultaneously, an induced negative Cotton effect appears in the proflavine band region with a maximum at 467 nm and a slight shoulder at 420 nm. This observation may be explained as resulting from the formation of a poly(rC-rA).proflavine complex with the polynucleotide existing as a right-handed parallel chain duplex with the proflavine intercalated between the CpA sequence and not the ApC sequence. The intercalation geometry here is expected to be analogous to that found in the crystal structure of the dinucleotide CpA.proflavine complex (Westhof et al. J. Mol. Biol., 1981) which forms a miniature right-handed helix. Although normally an inverted spectra could be attributed to a reversal in the helix handedness, the similarity in the 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra between the free and proflavine bound poly(rC-rA) indicates that their handedness is the same. The inverted CD spectrum may be a result of the different stacking orientation between the intercalated proflavine and the A-A base-pair on one hand and the triply hydrogen bonded protonated C-C base-pair on the other.

  8. Mapping of the C3d ligand binding site on complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) using nuclear magnetic resonance and chemical shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, James M; Hannan, Jonathan P; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Holers, V Michael

    2009-04-03

    Complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) is a cell membrane protein, with 15 or 16 extracellular short consensus repeats (SCRs), that promotes B lymphocyte responses and bridges innate and acquired immunity. The most distally located SCRs (SCR1-2) mediate the interaction of CR2 with its four known ligands (C3d, Epstein-Barr virus gp350, interferon-alpha, and CD23). Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies against SCR1-2 block binding of all ligands. To develop ligand-specific inhibitors that would also assist in identifying residues unique to each receptor-ligand interaction, phage were selected from randomly generated libraries by panning with recombinant SCR1-2, followed by specific ligand-driven elution. Derived peptides were tested by competition ELISA. One peptide, C3dp1 (APQHLSSQYSRT) exhibited ligand-specific inhibition at midmicromolar IC(50). C3d was titrated into (15)N-labeled SCR1-2, which revealed chemical shift changes indicative of specific intermolecular interactions. With backbone assignments made, the chemical shift changes were mapped onto the crystal structure of SCR1-2. With regard to C3d, the binding surface includes regions of SCR1, SCR2, and the inter-SCR linker, specifically residues Arg(13), Tyr(16), Arg(28), Tyr(29), Ser(32), Thr(34), Lys(48), Asp(56), Lys(57), Tyr(68), Arg(83), Gly(84), Asn(101), Asn(105), and Ser(109). SCR1 and SCR2 demonstrated distinct binding modes. The CR2 binding surface incorporating SCR1 is inconsistent with a previous x-ray CR2-C3d co-crystal analysis but consistent with mutagenesis, x-ray neutron scattering, and inhibitory monoclonal antibody epitope mapping. Titration with C3dp1 yielded chemical shift changes (Arg(13), Tyr(16), Thr(34), Lys(48), Asp(56), Lys(57), Tyr(68), Arg(83), Gly(84), Asn(105), and Ser(109)) overlapping with C3d, indicating that C3dp1 interacts at the same CR2 site as C3d.

  9. Tuning the binding energy of on-center donor in CdSe/ZnTe core/shell quantum dot by spatial parameters and magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafai, A.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Dujardin, F.; Ahuja, R.

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of the electron ground state and of the ground state binding energy of an on-center donor confined in a CdSe/ZnTe core/shell spherical nanodot was examined theoretically within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and using a variational calculation. The radial dependence of the dielectric constant and of the electron effective mass as well as the effect of the polarization charge were considered. Our results highlight the large impact of the magnetic field strength and the spatial parameters on the energy behavior for both the electron and the donor. Our study points out also the fact that the magnetic confinement may be eclipsed by the spatial confinement in heteronanostructures with small size and expected to be dominant in the opposite case.

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Liver, Gill, and Olfactory Rosettes of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) After Acclimation to Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Bammler, Theo K.; Gallagher, Evan P.; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Beyer, Richard P.; Farin, Federico M.; Hardiman, Gary; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Most Pacific salmonids undergo smoltification and transition from freshwater to saltwater, making various adjustments in metabolism, catabolism, osmotic, and ion regulation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are largely unknown. In the present study, we acclimated coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to four different salinities and assessed gene expression through microarray analysis of gills, liver, and olfactory rosettes. Gills are involved in osmotic regulation, liver plays a role in energetics, and olfactory rosettes are involved in behavior. Between all salinity treatments, liver had the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 1616, gills had 1074, and olfactory rosettes had 924, using a 1.5-fold cutoff and a false discovery rate of 0.5. Higher responsiveness of liver to metabolic changes after salinity acclimation to provide energy for other osmoregulatory tissues such as the gills may explain the differences in number of differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes were tissue- and salinity-dependent. There were no known genes differentially expressed that were common to all salinity treatments and all tissues. Gene ontology term analysis revealed biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components that were significantly affected by salinity, a majority of which were tissue-dependent. For liver, oxygen binding and transport terms were highlighted. For gills, muscle, and cytoskeleton-related terms predominated and for olfactory rosettes, immune response-related genes were accentuated. Interaction networks were examined in combination with GO terms and determined similarities between tissues for potential osmosensors, signal transduction cascades, and transcription factors. PMID:26260986

  11. Involvement of lipopolysaccharide binding protein, CD14, and Toll-like receptors in the initiation of innate immune responses by Treponema glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Schröder, N W; Opitz, B; Lamping, N; Michelsen, K S; Zähringer, U; Göbel, U B; Schumann, R R

    2000-09-01

    Culture supernatants from Treponema maltophilum associated with periodontitis in humans and Treponema brennaborense found in a bovine cattle disease accompanied with cachexia caused a dose-dependent TNF-alpha synthesis in human monocytes increasing with culture time. This activity could be reduced significantly by blocking the CD14-part of the LPS receptor using the My 4 mAb and by polymyxin B. In the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, Treponema culture supernatants induced TNF-alpha secretion in a LPS binding protein (LBP)-dependent fashion. To enrich for active compounds, supernatants were extracted with butanol, while whole cells were extracted using a phenol/water method resulting in recovery of material exhibiting a similar activity profile. An LPS-LBP binding competition assay revealed an interaction of the treponeme phenol/water extracts with LBP, while precipitation studies implied an affinity to polymyxin B and endotoxin neutralizing protein. Macrophages obtained from C3H/HeJ mice carrying a Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mutation were stimulated with treponeme extracts for NO release to assess the role of TLRs in cell activation. Furthermore, NF-kappaB translocation in TLR-2-negative Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was studied. We found that phenol/water-extracts of the two strains use TLRs differently with T. brennaborense-stimulating cells in a TLR-4-dependent fashion, while T. maltophilum-mediated activation apparently involved TLR-2. These results indicate the presence of a novel class of glycolipids in Treponema initiating inflammatory responses involving LBP, CD14, and TLRs.

  12. Studies on the interactions of SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S) with its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-01-01

    SAP-1 is a 113 amino acid long single-chain protein which belongs to the type 2 cystatin gene family. In our previous study, we have purified SAP-1 from human seminal plasma and observed its cross-class inhibitory property. At this time, we report the interaction of SAP-1 with diverse proteases and its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the conformation of SAP-1 is changed after its complexation with proteases, and the alterations in protein secondary structure are quantitatively calculated with increase of α-helices and reduction of β-strand content. To get insight into the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases, we make an effort to model the three-dimensional structure of SAP-1 by molecular modeling and verify its stability and viability through molecular dynamics simulations and finally complexed with different proteases using ClusPro 2.0 Server. A high degree of shape complementarity is examined within the complexes, stabilized by a number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions. Using HB analyses in different protein complexes, we have identified a series of key residues that may be involved in the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases. These findings will assist to understand the mechanism of inhibition of SAP-1 for different proteases and provide intimation for further research.

  13. A NOVEL MUTATION CAUSING COMPLETE THYROID BINDING GLOBULIN DEFICIENCY (TBG-CD MIA) IN A MALE WITH COEXISTING GRAVES DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hara Rosen; Creech, Matthew K; Hannoush, Zeina; Watanabe, Yui; Kargi, Atil; Weiss, Roy E

    2017-01-01

    An asymptomatic male was found on screening to have a low serum TSH and total T4. The diagnosis of Graves' disease was made with positive thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) and elevated free T4 in the presence of complete TBG deficiency (TBG-CD). Genetic testing of the patient and family members revealed a novel frameshift mutation in the TBG (SERPINA7) gene resulting in a complete deficiency of the protein. The laboratory testing included total T4, free T4 by analog method and direct dialysis and TBG measurements. Sequencing of genomic DNA was performed from peripheral blood. A 35-year-old East Indian male was referred to endocrinology because of abnormal thyroid function tests (TFTs): TSH 0.01 mIU/L (0.4-3.6), total T4 3.0 µg/dl (5.5-10.5) done as part of a "routine office visit". Upon further testing, the serum free T4 2.0 ng/dl (0.8-1.8) and TSI 355% (<140% baseline) were elevated and the diagnosis of Graves' disease was made. TBG deficiency was suspected because the total T4 concentration was inconsistent with hyperthyroidism and further testing confirmed TBG was undetectable. Sequencing of the TBG gene revealed a novel hemizygous frameshift mutation: p.Ala64ProfsTer106, TBG-CD Mia (numbering excludes 20 a.a. signal peptide) associated with the complete deficiency of TBG in a patient with Graves' disease. Patients with Graves' disease harboring a TBG mutation have conflicting TFTs. If a clinically hyperthyroid patient presents with normal or low total T4, serum TBG should be measured to identify an abnormality and prevent unnecessary testing.

  14. Biomarkers of environmental stress in gills of ribbed mussel Aulacomya atra atra (Nuevo Gulf, Northern Patagonia).

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Gil, Mónica N; Malanga, Gabriela

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we assessed in gills of native ribbed mussels Aulacomya atra atra from three sites within Nuevo Gulf (Northern Patagonia) several biomarkers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid radicals (LR), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and metallothionein (MT). Furthermore, concentrations of main trace metals (Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb) were quantified in mussel tissue. Results showed significant induction of SOD, GST, MT and MDA, as well as, higher concentration of Fe, Al and Cd in winter than in summer. The high MDA content measured in mussels from Folías Wreck seemed to be caused by the very high levels of Fe that would come from the corrosion of the vessel. Mussels from the control site Punta Cuevas presented the lowest levels of Cd and the highest of Al in winter. Despite positive correlations were found between Al and GST and MT, no spatial differentiation was detected in those biomarkers. On the other hand, MT was only related to Al been most likely influenced by environmental variables than by the trace metals. It has to be highlighted that the relationship detected among water temperature, nutrients and antioxidant responses in gills is probably related to the fact that this tissue is in direct contact with water and it is sensitive to its fluctuations. Taking into account that mussel gill is a tissue actively proliferating and the first target of contaminants present in water, so that changes in its antioxidant system can provide an earlier warning signal than in other tissues.

  15. Measles virus attachment proteins with impaired ability to bind CD46 interact more efficiently with the homologous fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2009-01-05

    Fusion promotion by measles virus (MV) depends on an interaction between the hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Amino acid substitutions in MV H that drastically reduce hemagglutinating activity result in an increase in the amount of H (primarily the 74 kDa isoform) detectable in a complex with F at the cell surface. This is in direct contrast to the loss of the ability to detect a complex between the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus and most attachment proteins that lack receptor binding activity. These opposing results provide support for the existence of different mechanisms for the regulation of fusion by these two paramyxoviruses.

  16. Measurement of Phenotype and Absolute Number of Circulating Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and Purified Protein Derivative Antigen-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Discriminate Active from Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barkham, Timothy M. S.; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M.; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154+ TNF-α+ cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154+ TNF-α+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ and CD154+ TNF-α+ CXCR3+. Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  17. Structural insights into the functional role of the Hcn sub-domain of the receptor-binding domain of the botulinum neurotoxin mosaic serotype C/D.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna S; Edwards, Thomas E; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M; Buchko, Garry W

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding domain (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell's membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a β-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been identified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) moiety bound in a hydrophobic cleft between β-strands in the β-sheet jelly roll fold of the Hcn sub-domain. The PG4 moiety is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophilic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophobic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein's side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid molecule was observed bound to the equivalent residues suggesting that residues T

  18. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Waserman, Jack; Lal, Samarthji; Gauthier, Serge

    1983-01-01

    Concordance is reported of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome in a male twin pair in whom phenotyping revealed a >98·7% probability that they were monozygotic. The development and extent of the illness differed markedly in the two subjects. Our findings are compatible with the view that there is a genetic form of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:6573436

  19. Atomistic tight-binding computations in structural and optical properties of CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS core/multi-shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkabot, Worasak

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, I attempt to theoretically describe, analyze and compare the structural and optical properties in the core/multi-shell nanocrystal structure of a cadmium selenide (CdSe) core surrounded by zinc selenide (ZnSe) inner and zinc sulphide (ZnS) external growth shells. The atomistic tight-binding model (TB) and a configuration interaction method (CI) are implemented to calculate the single-particle spectra, optical band gaps, ground-state wave function overlaps, ground-state oscillation strengths, ground-state coulomb energies, ground-state exchange energies and Stokes shift as a function of ZnS external growth shell thicknesses. I underline that these computations are principally sensitive with the ZnS external growth shell thickness. The reduction of the optical band gaps, overlaps of ground electron-hole wave function, electron-hole interactions and Stokes shift is realized with the increasing ZnS external growth shell thickness. The improvement of the optical intensities is mainly achieved by including the ZnS exterior growth shell encapsulation. Importantly, the optical band gaps based on atomistic tight-binding theory are in a good agreement with the experiment. Finally, this emphasizes that the external passivation shell can now be engineered in a defined way, thus leading to manipulate the natural behaviors of nanodevices based on the scrutinized core/multi-shell nanocrystals.

  20. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  1. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies to V2, V3, the CD4-binding site and gp41 HIV-1 Mediate Phagocytosis in a Dose-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Musich, Thomas; Li, Liuzhe; Liu, Lily; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Gorny, Miroslaw K

    2017-01-25

    In light of weak or absent neutralizing activity mediated by anti-V2 monoclonal Abs (mAbs), we tested whether they can mediate Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) which is an important element of anti-HIV-1 immunity. We tested six anti-V2 mAbs and compared them with 21 mAbs specific for V3, the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), and gp41 derived from HIV-1 chronically infected individuals and produced by hybridoma cells. ADCP activity was measured by flow cytometry using uptake by THP-1 monocytic cells of fluorescent beads coated with gp120, gp41, BG505 SOSIP.664 or BG505 DS-SOSIP.664 complexed with mAbs. The ADCP activity measured by the area under the curve showed significantly higher activity of anti-gp41 mAbs compared to three other groups of mAbs tested using beads coated with monomeric gp41 or gp120; anti-V2 mAbs were dominant over anti-V3 and anti-CD4bs against clade C gp120ZM109. ADCP mediated by V2 and V3 mAbs was positive against stabilized DS-SOSIP.664 trimer but negligible against SOSIP.664 targets, suggesting a closed envelope conformation better exposes the variable loops. Two IgG3 mAbs against V2 and V3 regions displayed dominant ADCP activity over a panel of IgG1 mAbs. This superior ADCP activity was confirmed when two of three recombinant IgG3 anti-V2 mAbs were compared to IgG1 counterparts. The study demonstrated dominant ADCP activity of anti-gp41 against monomers but not trimers with some higher activity of anti-V2 mAbs over anti-V3 and anti-CD4bs mAbs. The ability to mediate ADCP suggests a mechanism by which anti-HIV-1 envelope Abs can contribute to protective efficacy.

  3. Influence of chemical and environmental stresses on metal-binding proteins: Species-dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, K.N.

    1988-01-01

    The development of tolerance to cadmium toxicity was investigated in mammals. In adult mice pretreated with 20 mg Cd/kg, no mortality was observed following administration of a 100 mg/kg cadmium challenge dose. In animals receiving prior exposure to cold stress a mortality of 40% was observed, while in animals receiving no pretreatment an 80% mortality was observed following cadmium challenge. Analysis of the metal-binding proteins using G-75 gel-filtration chromatography revealed that MT-like protein was responsible, in part, for the observed tolerance to cadmium toxicity. For example, following 20 mg Cd/kg and cold pretreatment, the MT-like reserve capacity was 56 and 42 nmoles cadmium, respectively, compared to a control value of 12 nmoles cadmium. The influence of pretreatments on the subcellular distribution of cadmium was also examined. The influence of chemical and environmental stresses on metal-binding proteins in teleosts was investigated. Following cadmium exposure, cadmium increased in the MT fraction in both the gill and liver. However, following exposure to environmental stresses such as cold and hypoxia, significant decreases in zinc and copper were observed in the gill MT fraction, as compared to control. In the liver, no significant alterations were observed in the MT fraction, as compared to control.

  4. Gill microsomal (Na+,K+)-ATPase from the blue crab Callinectes danae: Interactions at cationic sites.

    PubMed

    Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; Silva, E C C; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L; Leone, F A

    2005-12-01

    Euryhaline crustaceans tolerate exposure to a wide range of dilute media, using compensatory, ion regulatory mechanisms. However, data on molecular interactions occurring at cationic sites on the crustacean gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase, a key enzyme in this hyperosmoregulatory process, are unavailable. We report that Na+ binding at the activating site leads to cooperative, heterotropic interactions that are insensitive to K+. The binding of K+ ions to their high affinity sites displaces Na+ ions from their sites. The increase in Na+ ion concentrations increases heterotropic interactions with the K+ ions, with no changes in K0.5 for K+ ion activation at the extracellular sites. Differently from mammalian (Na+,K+)-ATPases, that from C. danae exhibits additional NH4+ ion binding sites that synergistically activate the enzyme at saturating concentrations of Na+ and K+ ions. NH4+ binding is cooperative, and heterotropic NH4+ ion interactions are insensitive to Na+ ions, but Na+ ions displace NH4+ ions from their sites. NH4+ ions also displace Na+ ions from their sites. Mg2+ ions modulate enzyme stimulation by NH4+ ions, displacing NH4+ ion from its sites. These interactions may modulate NH4+ ion excretion and Na+ ion uptake by the gill epithelium in euryhaline crustaceans that confront hyposmotic media.

  5. Purification and characterization studies of cadmium-binding proteins from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A.; Engel, D.W.; Brouwer, M.

    1986-03-01

    The previously reported low molecular weight cadmium-binding protein (CdBP) from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, has been further purified and characterized by improved technical methods. The internal organ distribution of the protein within the oyster and effects of life cycle/season on CdBP production also have been evaluated. CdBP isolated by extended ion-exchange gradients or double ion-exchange chromatography followed by HPLC analysis possesses an electrophoretic R/sub f/ of about 0.7 and contains relatively little Zn. Cysteine, lysine, and glycine are the dominant amino acids. When ion-exchange columns are developed with NaCl gradients, the aromatic residues tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine are found to be present. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of CdBP also was variable, with 250/280 nm ratios ranging from 17:1 immediately after ion-exchange chromatography to 2:1 following concentration procedures. Internal organ distribution studies showed that the visceral mass contained most of the Cd present with lesser amounts in the gills and mantle. Relative oyster dormancy during the winter also reduces CdBP production in response to Cd, and the protein is obtained most readily during the fall and spring.

  6. The CD25-binding antibody Daclizumab High-Yield Process has a distinct glycosylation pattern and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in comparison to Zenapax®.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bishu; Balasa, Balaji; Efros, Lyubov; Hinton, Paul R; Hartman, Stephen; Thakur, Archana; Xiong, Joanna M; Schmidt, Brian; Robinson, Randy R; Sornasse, Thierry; Vexler, Vladimir; Sheridan, James P

    2016-10-01

    The CD25-binding antibody daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) is an interleukin (IL)-2 signal modulating antibody that shares primary amino acid sequence and CD25 binding affinity with Zenapax®, a distinct form of daclizumab, which was approved for the prevention of acute organ rejection in patients receiving renal transplants as part of an immunosuppressive regimen that includes cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Comparison of the physicochemical properties of the two antibody forms revealed the glycosylation profile of DAC HYP differs from Zenapax in both glycan distribution and the types of oligosaccharides, most notably high-mannose, galactosylated and galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) oligosaccharides, resulting in a DAC HYP antibody material that is structurally distinct from Zenapax. Although neither antibody elicited complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro, DAC HYP antibody had significantly reduced levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ADCC activity required natural killer (NK) cells, but not monocytes, suggesting the effects were mediated through binding to Fc-gamma RIII (CD16). Incubation of each antibody with peripheral blood mononuclear cells also caused the down-modulation of CD16 expression on NK cells and the CD16 down-modulation was greater for Zenapax in comparison to that observed for DAC HYP. The substantive glycosylation differences between the two antibody forms and corresponding greater Fc-mediated effector activities by Zenapax, including cell killing activity, manifest as a difference in the biological function and pharmacology between DAC HYP and Zenapax.

  7. Different Binding Modes of Cu and Pb vs. Cd, Ni, and Zn with the Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B at Seawater Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Kailee J; Schijf, Johan; Christenson, Emily A.

    2015-03-03

    The solution speciation in seawater of divalent trace metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) is dominated by strong, ostensibly metal-specific organic ligands that may play important roles in microbial metal acquisition and/or detoxification processes. We compare the effective stabilities of these metal-organic complexes to the stabilities of their complexes with a model siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB). While metal-DFOB complexation has been studied in various dilute but often moderately coordinating media, for the purpose of this investigation we measured the stability constants in a non-coordinating background electrolyte at seawater ionic strength (0.7 M NaClO4). Potentiometric titrations of single metals (M) were performed in the presence of ligand (L) at different M:L molar ratios, whereupon the stability constants of multiple complexes were simultaneously determined by non-linear regression of the titration curves with FITEQL, using the optimal binding mode for each metal. Cadmium, Ni, and Zn, like trivalent Fe, sequentially form a bi-, tetra-, and hexadentate complex with DFOB as pH increases, consistent with their coordination number of 6 and regular octahedral geometry. Copper has a Jahn-Teller-distorted square-bipyramidal geometry whereas the geometry of Pb is cryptic, involving a range of bond lengths. Supported by a thermodynamic argument, our data suggest that this impedes binding of the third hydroxamate group and that the hexadentate Cu-DFOB and Pb-DFOB complex identified in earlier reports may instead be a deprotonated tetradentate complex. Absence of the hexadentate complex promotes the formation of a dinuclear (bidentate-tetradentate) complex, M2HL2+, albeit not for Pb in 0.7 M NaCl, evidently due to extensive complexation with chloride. Stabilities of the hexadentate Ni-DFOB, Zn-DFOB, and the tetradentate Pb-DFOB complex are nearly equal, yet about 2 orders of magnitude higher and 4 orders of magnitude lower than those of the hexadentate Cd-DFOB and

  8. Human Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protein (LBP) and CD14 Independently Deliver Triacylated Lipoproteins to Toll-like Receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR2 and Enhance Formation of the Ternary Signaling Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Ranoa, Diana Rose E.; Kelley, Stacy L.; Tapping, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are the most potent microbial agonists for the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) subfamily, and this pattern recognition event induces cellular activation, leading to host immune responses. Triacylated bacterial lipoproteins coordinately bind TLR1 and TLR2, resulting in a stable ternary complex that drives intracellular signaling. The sensitivity of TLR-expressing cells to lipoproteins is greatly enhanced by two lipid-binding serum proteins known as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14); however, the physical mechanism that underlies this increased sensitivity is not known. To address this, we measured the ability of LBP and sCD14 to drive ternary complex formation between soluble extracellular domains of TLR1 and TLR2 and a synthetic triacylated lipopeptide agonist. Importantly, addition of substoichiometric amounts of either LBP or sCD14 significantly enhanced formation of a TLR1·TLR2 lipopeptide ternary complex as measured by size exclusion chromatography. However, neither LBP nor sCD14 was physically associated with the final ternary complex. Similar results were obtained using outer surface protein A (OspA), a naturally occurring triacylated lipoprotein agonist from Borrelia burgdorferi. Activation studies revealed that either LBP or sCD14 sensitized TLR-expressing cells to nanogram levels of either the synthetic lipopeptide or OspA lipoprotein agonist. Together, our results show that either LBP or sCD14 can drive ternary complex formation and TLR activation by acting as mobile carriers of triacylated lipopeptides or lipoproteins. PMID:23430250

  9. Purification and characterization of metallothionein-like cadmium binding protein from Asian periwinkle Littorina brevicula.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Chung, Soohee; Park, Il-Seon; Kim, Yangsun; Koh, Chul- Hwan; Lee, In-Sook

    2002-04-01

    Although mussels and oysters in the ocean are known to act as bioconcentrators for contaminants such as heavy metals, their ability to survive in heavily polluted water is relatively limited. The Asian periwinkle, Littorina brevicula, is one species that can accumulate a variety of environmental heavy metals, and the expression of its metal binding protein (MBP) is induced by cadmium. To better characterize this protein and its detoxification mechanism against cadmium, the present work examined the induction of a cadmium binding protein (Cd-BP) in Littorina brevicula exposed to 400 microg/l CdCl(2) for 30 days. The induced Cd-BP was purified by chromatography from the supernatants of homogenized organs (digestive gland, gonad, gill and kidney). This Cd-BP was found to consist of 103 amino acids, was rich in Cys (21 residues), and partial C-terminal sequence obtained by MALDI-TOF MS analysis revealed a Cys-XXX-Cys motif, which resembles a typical feature of mollusc metallothionein (MT). The Cd-BP molecular weight of 9.8 kDa is a little larger than that of other MTs.

  10. Surprisingly minor influence of TRAV11 (Valpha14) polymorphism on NK T-receptor mCD1/alpha-galactosylceramide binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sim, Bee-Cheng; Holmberg, Kaisa; Sidobre, Stephane; Naidenko, Olga; Niederberger, Nathalie; Marine, Shane D; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J

    2003-03-01

    Defects in natural killer T (NK T) cell function and of interleukin-4 -production in SJL and NOD mice have been linked to susceptibility to autoimmune disease. As SJL and NOD mice both carry the T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha-chain locus "c" (Tcra(c)) haplotype, found in few other strains, we have attempted to determine the influence of Tcra polymorphism on NK T-cell recognition of ligand, selection, and immune responses. The majority of NK T cells use an "invariant" TRAV11J15 (previously called AV14J18 or Valpha14 Jalpha281) alpha- chain paired with either TRBV13-2, BV29, or BV1 to recognize ligands presented by mCD1 molecules, including the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer). Sequencing of TRAV11 from the mouse strains B10.A (encoding the Tcra(b) haplotype), B10.A- Tcra(c), and NOD (Tcra(c)) shows that Tcra(c) has a single TRAV11 gene (TRAV11*01) and that Tcra(b) has a single expressed gene (TRAV11*02), plus a closely related pseudogene. There is no apparent difference in alpha-chain J-region usage or in the CDR3alpha sequence at the TRAV11-J15 junction between the haplotypes in TRAV11-bearing NK T cells. Using Biacore and tetramer-binding and decay assays, we have determined that the interaction between Tcra(c) TRAV11*01 NK T TCR and the mCD1/alpha-GalCer complex is slightly weaker than that of Tcra(b) (i.e., TRAV11*02) NK T TCR. These differences are minor compared with differences between agonist and antagonist ligands in other TCR systems, suggesting that it is unlikely that TCR polymorphism explains the defect in NK T cells in the autoimmune mouse strains.

  11. Human C1qRp is identical with CD93 and the mNI-11 antigen but does not bind C1q.

    PubMed

    McGreal, Eamon P; Ikewaki, Nobunao; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Morgan, B Paul; Gasque, Philippe

    2002-05-15

    It has been suggested that the human C1qRp is a receptor for the complement component C1q; however, there is no direct evidence for an interaction between C1q and C1qRp. In this study, we demonstrate that C1q does not show enhanced binding to C1qRp-transfected cells compared with control cells. Furthermore, a soluble recombinant C1qRp-Fc chimera failed to interact with immobilized C1q. The proposed role of C1qRp in the phagocytic response in vivo is also unsupported in that we demonstrate that this molecule is not expressed by macrophages in a variety of human tissues and the predominant site of expression is on endothelial cells. Studies on the rodent homolog of C1qRp, known as AA4, have suggested that this molecule may function as an intercellular adhesion molecule. Here we show that C1qRp is the Ag recognized by several previously described mAbs, mNI-11 and two anti-CD93 Abs (clones X2 and VIMD2b). Interestingly, mNI-11 (Fab') has been shown to promote monocyte-monocyte and monocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions. We produced a recombinant C1qRp-Fc chimera containing the C-type lectin-like domain of C1qRp and found specific binding to vascular endothelial cells in sections of inflamed human tonsil, indicating the presence of a C1qRp ligand at this site. This interaction was Ca(2+) independent and was not blocked by our anti-C1qRp mAb BIIG-4, but was blocked by the proadhesive mAb mNI-11. Collectively, these data indicate that C1qRp is not a receptor for C1q, and they support the emerging role of C1qRp (here renamed CD93) in functions relevant to intercellular adhesion.

  12. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar C, Selvaa; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  13. Gill morphometrics of the thresher sharks (Genus Alopias): Correlation of gill dimensions with aerobic demand and environmental oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Thomas P; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Wegner, Nicholas C

    2015-05-01

    Gill morphometrics of the three thresher shark species (genus Alopias) were determined to examine how metabolism and habitat correlate with respiratory specialization for increased gas exchange. Thresher sharks have large gill surface areas, short water-blood barrier distances, and thin lamellae. Their large gill areas are derived from long total filament lengths and large lamellae, a morphometric configuration documented for other active elasmobranchs (i.e., lamnid sharks, Lamnidae) that augments respiratory surface area while limiting increases in branchial resistance to ventilatory flow. The bigeye thresher, Alopias superciliosus, which can experience prolonged exposure to hypoxia during diel vertical migrations, has the largest gill surface area documented for any elasmobranch species studied to date. The pelagic thresher shark, A. pelagicus, a warm-water epi-pelagic species, has a gill surface area comparable to that of the common thresher shark, A. vulpinus, despite the latter's expected higher aerobic requirements associated with regional endothermy. In addition, A. vulpinus has a significantly longer water-blood barrier distance than A. pelagicus and A. superciliosus, which likely reflects its cold, well-oxygenated habitat relative to the two other Alopias species. In fast-swimming fishes (such as A. vulpinus and A. pelagicus) cranial streamlining may impose morphological constraints on gill size. However, such constraints may be relaxed in hypoxia-dwelling species (such as A. superciliosus) that are likely less dependent on streamlining and can therefore accommodate larger branchial chambers and gills.

  14. Sequences in Glycoprotein gp41, the CD4 Binding Site, and the V2 Domain Regulate Sensitivity and Resistance of HIV-1 to Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Sara M.; Schweighardt, Becky; Phung, Pham; Mesa, Kathryn A.; Vollrath, Aaron L.; Tatsuno, Gwen P.; To, Briana; Sinangil, Faruk; Limoli, Kay; Wrin, Terri

    2012-01-01

    The swarm of quasispecies that evolves in each HIV-1-infected individual represents a source of closely related Env protein variants that can be used to explore various aspects of HIV-1 biology. In this study, we made use of these variants to identify mutations that confer sensitivity and resistance to the broadly neutralizing antibodies found in the sera of selected HIV-1-infected individuals. For these studies, libraries of Env proteins were cloned from infected subjects and screened for infectivity and neutralization sensitivity. The nucleotide sequences of the Env proteins were then compared for pairs of neutralization-sensitive and -resistant viruses. In vitro mutagenesis was used to identify the specific amino acids responsible for the neutralization phenotype. All of the mutations altering neutralization sensitivity/resistance appeared to induce conformational changes that simultaneously enhanced the exposure of two or more epitopes located in different regions of gp160. These mutations appeared to occur at unique positions required to maintain the quaternary structure of the gp160 trimer, as well as conformational masking of epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies. Our results show that sequences in gp41, the CD4 binding site, and the V2 domain all have the ability to act as global regulators of neutralization sensitivity. Our results also suggest that neutralization assays designed to support the development of vaccines and therapeutics targeting the HIV-1 Env protein should consider virus variation within individuals as well as virus variation between individuals. PMID:22933284

  15. Anionic Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Inhibit Inflammatory Responses from Alveolar Macrophages and U937 Cells by Binding the Lipopolysaccharide-interacting Proteins CD14 and MD-2*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kuronuma, Koji; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Nishitani, Chiaki; Chan, Edward D.; Kuroki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Mari; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a major cause of acute lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome. Pulmonary surfactant is secreted as a complex mixture of lipids and proteins onto the alveolar surface of the lung. Surfactant phospholipids are essential in reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface and preventing alveolar collapse at the end of the respiratory cycle. In the present study, we determined that palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol, which are minor components of pulmonary surfactant, and synthetic dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol regulated the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages. The anionic lipids significantly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production from rat and human alveolar macrophages and a U937 cell line by reducing the LPS-elicited phosphorylation of multiple intracellular protein kinases. The anionic lipids were also effective at attenuating inflammation when administered intratracheally to mice challenged with LPS. Binding studies revealed high affinity interactions between the palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and the Toll-like receptor 4-interacting proteins CD14 and MD-2. Our data clearly identify important anti-inflammatory properties of the minor surfactant phospholipids at the environmental interface of the lung. PMID:19584052

  16. The CEA/CD3-Bispecific Antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) Binds a Nonlinear Epitope in the Full-Length but Not a Short Splice Variant of CEA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R.; Dall’Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326–349 and 388–410, with critical residues F326, T328, N333, V388, G389, P390, E392, I408, and N410. Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA. PMID:22574157

  17. Gill morphometry of the red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Don Stevens, E

    1992-08-01

    The structure and morphometry of the gills of the marine teleost, red drum, have been studied. The present analysis of gas exchange area of fish gills is one of the most intensive and the results are compared to less intense averaging methods. Based on the gill area estimates, red drum falls into the category of a fish of intermediate activity. Its gill clearly has an exchange area less than that of the tunas, but is slightly greater than that of trout or bass. The three components that contribute to total exchange area (filament length, lamellar density, and area of individual lamellae) are not all greater in species with a greater total exchange area. The best correlate is total filament length.

  18. McGill's Integrated Civil and Common Law Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morissette, Yves-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Describes the bijural program of McGill University Faculty of Law. The program educates all first-degree law students in both the common law and civil law traditions, preparing them for the increasing globalization of legal practice. (EV)

  19. The Matsuno-Gill model and equatorial superrotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2010-09-01

    Equatorial superrotation can be generated in global general circulation models (GCMs) when forced with longitudinally varying heating, similar to that postulated in the Matsuno-Gill model. However, the implications of the classical Matsuno-Gill theory for equatorial superrotation have not, to date, been addressed. Here, we show that the classic, shallow-water Matsuno-Gill solutions do not exhibit equatorial superrotation: although the flow converges westerly momentum from high latitudes to the equator—promoting superrotation—they also contain an artificial source of easterly momentum at the equator that cancels the latitudinal momentum convergence and prevents superrotation from emerging. This artificial momentum source results from a physically inconsistent representation of vertical momentum transport in the model. We show that if the Matsuno-Gill model is modified to properly account for momentum exchange with an underlying quiescent layer, the solutions naturally exhibit equatorial superrotation, at any forcing amplitude.

  20. The Symptomatology and Diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Arthur; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The symptomatology of 34 patients with Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome was described in detail. The purpose was to clarify the diagnostic criteria for Tourette's syndrome by describing the type, variety, and frequency of symptoms in this illness. (Author)

  1. Insights into the nature of uranium target proteins within zebrafish gills after chronic and acute waterborne exposures.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Guillaume; Mounicou, Sandra; Simon, Olivier; Floriani, Magali; Lobinski, Ryszard; Frelon, Sandrine

    2016-03-01

    New data on the nature of the protein targets of uranium (U) within zebrafish gills were collected after waterborne exposure, with the aim of a better understanding of U toxicity mechanisms. Some common characteristics of the U protein target binding properties were found, such as their role in the regulation of other essential metals and their phosphorus content. In total, 21 potential protein targets, including hemoglobin, are identified and discussed in terms of the literature.

  2. CD5 Binds to Interleukin-6 and Induces a Feed-Forward Loop with the Transcription Factor STAT3 in B Cells to Promote Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyan; Xin, Hong; Zhang, Wang; Yazaki, Paul J; Zhang, Zhifang; Le, Keith; Li, Wenzhao; Lee, Heehyoung; Kwak, Larry; Forman, Stephen; Jove, Richard; Yu, Hua

    2016-04-19

    The participation of a specific subset of B cells and how they are regulated in cancer is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the proportion of CD5(+) relative to interleukin-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα)-expressing B cells was greatly increased in tumors. CD5(+) B cells responded to IL-6 in the absence of IL-6Rα. IL-6 directly bound to CD5, leading to activation of the transcription factor STAT3 via gp130 and its downstream kinase JAK2. STAT3 upregulated CD5 expression, thereby forming a feed-forward loop in the B cells. In mouse tumor models, CD5(+) but not CD5(-) B cells promoted tumor growth. CD5(+) B cells also showed activation of STAT3 in multiple types of human tumor tissues. Thus, our findings demonstrate a critical role of CD5(+) B cells in promoting cancer.

  3. Concentrations of metals and potential metal-binding compounds and speciation of Cd, Zn and Cu in phloem and xylem saps from castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with four levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Kenji; Nagata, Shinji; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2015-06-01

    We examined the concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn) and potential metal-binding compounds [nicotianamine (NA), thiol compounds and citrate] in xylem and phloem saps from 4-week-old castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with 0 (control), 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM Cd for 3 weeks. Treatment with 0.1 and 1 μM Cd produced no visible damage, while 10 μM Cd retarded growth. Cadmium concentrations in both saps were higher than those in the culture solution at 0.1 μM, similar at 1.0 μM and lower at 10 μM. Cd at 10 μM reduced Cu and Fe concentrations in both saps. NA concentrations measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MS) in xylem sap (20 μM) were higher than the Cu concentrations, and those in phloem sap (150 μM) were higher than those of Zn, Fe and Cu combined. Reduced glutathione concentrations differed in xylem and phloem saps (1-2 and 30-150 μM, respectively), but oxidized glutathione concentrations were similar. Phloem sap phytochelatin 2 concentration increased from 0.8 μM in controls to 8 μM in 10 μM Cd. Free citrate was 2-4 μM in xylem sap and 70-100 μM in phloem sap. Total bound forms of Cd in phloem and xylem saps from 1 μM Cd-treated plants were 54 and 8%, respectively. Treatment of phloem sap with proteinaseK reduced high-molecular compounds while increasing fractions of low-molecular Cd-thiol complexes. Zinc-NA, Fe-NA and Cu-NA were identified in the phloem sap fraction of control plants by electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS, and the xylem sap contained Cu-NA.

  4. A CD4 homologue in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): molecular characterization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Randelli, Elisa; Casani, Daniela; Guerra, Laura; Picchietti, Simona; Costantini, Susan; Facchiano, Angelo M; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris J; Scapigliati, Giuseppe

    2008-06-01

    CD4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein fundamental for cell-mediated immunity. Its action as a T cell co-receptor increases the avidity of association between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell by interacting with portions of the complex between MHC class II and TR molecules. In this paper we report the cDNA cloning, expression and structural analysis of a CD4 homologue from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). The sea bass CD4 cDNA consists of 2071 bp that translates in one reading frame to give the entire molecule containing 480 amino acids. The analysis of the sequence shows the presence of four putative Ig-like domains and that some fundamental structural features, like a disulphide bond in domain D2 and the CXC signalling motif in the cytoplasmic tail, are conserved from sea bass to mammals. Real-time PCR analysis showed that very high levels of CD4 mRNA transcripts are present in thymus, followed by gut and gills. In vitro stimulation of head kidney leukocytes with LPS and PHA-L gave an increase of CD4 mRNA levels after 4h and a decrease after 24h. Homology modelling has been applied to create a 3D model of sea bass CD4 and to investigate its interaction with sea bass MHC-II. The analysis of the 3D complex between sea bass CD4 and sea bass MHC-II suggests that the absence of a disulfide bond in the CD4 D1 domain could make this molecule more flexible, inducing a different conformation and affecting the binding and the way of interaction between CD4 and MHC-II. Our results will add new insights into the sea bass T cell immune responses and will help in the identification of T cell subsets in teleost fishes to better understand the evolution of cell-mediated immunity from fish to mammals.

  5. CCR7 is mainly expressed in teleost gills, where it defines an IgD+IgM- B lymphocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Bromage, Erin; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; González Granja, Aitor; Luque, Alfonso; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7, the receptor for both CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, regulates the recruitment and clustering of circulating leukocytes to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Even though teleost fish do not have either of these secondary lymphoid structures, we have recently reported a homolog to CCR7 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of leukocytes bearing extracellular CCR7 in naive adult tissues by flow cytometry, observing that among the different leukocyte populations, the highest numbers of cells with membrane (mem)CCR7 were recorded in the gill (7.5 ± 2% CCR7(+) cells). In comparison, head kidney, spleen, thymus, intestine, and peripheral blood possessed <5% CCR7(+) cells. When CCR7 was studied at early developmental stages, we detected a progressive increase in gene expression and protein CCR7 levels in the gills throughout development. Surprisingly, the majority of the CCR7(+) cells in the gills were not myeloid cells and did not express membrane CD8, IgM, nor IgT, but expressed IgD on the cell surface. In fact, most IgD(+) cells in the gills expressed CCR7. Intriguingly, the IgD(+)CCR7(+) population did not coexpress memIgM. Finally, when trout were bath challenged with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, the number of CCR7(+) cells significantly decreased in the gills while significantly increased in head kidney. These results provide evidence of the presence of a novel memIgD(+)memIgM(-) B lymphocyte subset in trout that expresses memCCR7 and responds to viral infections. Similarities with IgD(+)IgM(-) subsets in mammals are discussed.

  6. Metal detoxification and gene expression regulation after a Cd and Zn contamination: an experimental study on Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Arini, A; Gourves, P Y; Gonzalez, P; Baudrimont, M

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the recovery potential of Danio rerio after Cd and Zn contaminations. Fish demonstrated high accumulation capacities of Cd with concentrations reaching 3716.4±578.6 μg Cd/kg FW in gills after 15 d of contamination. The 75-day decontamination failed to completely eliminate Cd (93.4% and 82.2% eliminated respectively in the gills of fish exposed to Cd and Cd/Zn) whereas Zn, poorly accumulated, was quickly depurated. The fast Cd depuration in the gills likely resulted from a metal transfer to the liver. MT response was clearly correlated to the Zn contamination, while genetic responses were more pronounced in case of Cd contamination. Cd induced over-expressions of genes involved against oxidative stress (sod, sodmt), and involved in detoxification mechanisms (mt1, mt2), mitochondrial mechanisms (cox1) and DNA repair (rad51 and gadd45). Zn binary contamination with Cd was demonstrated to provide protective effects on Cd-induced toxicity in D.rerio. Results highlighted that the genetic response was metal- and tissue-dependent. The brain and the muscles showed very few genetic responses, probably due to the low bioaccumulations measured in these tissues. Conversely, genes expressed in gills and liver of fish exposed to Cd were strongly affected (sod×3 and×12, mt1×11 and ×30 at T3 respectively in gills and liver). However, after 14-30 d of depuration, genes were no longer over expressed in response to Cd contamination in gills and liver of fish exposed to Cd and Cd/Zn conditions, suggesting an gene expression regulation of fish to the residual Cd contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus activates immune cells via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), and CD14, whereas TLR-4 and MD-2 are not involved.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Nicolas W J; Morath, Siegfried; Alexander, Christian; Hamann, Lutz; Hartung, Thomas; Zähringer, Ulrich; Göbel, Ulf B; Weber, Joerg R; Schumann, Ralf R

    2003-05-02

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) derived from Streptococcus pneumoniae, purified employing a chloroform/methanol protocol, and from Staphylococcus aureus, prepared by the recently described butanol extraction procedure, was investigated regarding its interaction with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP), CD14, Toll-like receptors (TLRs)-2 and -4, and MD-2. LTA from both organisms induced cytokine synthesis in human mononuclear phagocytes. Activation was LBP- and CD14-dependent, and formation of complexes of LTA with LBP and soluble CD14 as well as catalytic transfer of LTA to CD14 by LBP was verified by PhastGel(TM) native gel electrophoresis. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293/CD14 cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were responsive to LTA only after transfection with TLR-2. Additional transfection with MD-2 did not affect stimulation of these cells by LTA. Our data suggest that innate immune recognition of LTA via LBP, CD14, and TLR-2 represents an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of systemic complications in the course of infectious diseases brought about by the clinically most important Gram-positive pathogens. However, the involvement of TLR-4 and MD-2 in this process was ruled out.

  8. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans.

  9. Purification and characterization studies of cadmium-binding proteins from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Fowler, B A; Engel, D W; Brouwer, M

    1986-03-01

    The previously reported low molecular weight cadmium-binding protein (CdBP) from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, has been further purified and characterized by improved technical methods. The internal organ distribution of the protein within the oyster and effects of life cycle/season on CdBP production also have been evaluated. CdBP isolated by extended ion-exchange gradients or double ion-exchange chromatography followed by HPLC analysis possesses an electrophoretic Rf of about 0.7 and contains relatively little Zn, as previously reported. Cysteine, lysine, and glycine are the dominant amino acids. When ion-exchange columns are developed with NaCl gradients, the aromatic residues tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine are found to be present, but these may be largely removed depending upon whether the protein is denatured and carboxymethylated prior to analysis. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of CdBP also was variable, with 250/280 nm ratios ranging from 17:1 immediately after ion-exchange chromatography to 2:1 following concentration procedures. Internal organ distribution studies showed that the visceral mass contained most of the Cd present with lesser amounts in the gills and mantle. In contrast with mammals, CdBP accounts for only about 30% of the total cell Cd burden in these tissues. Cu displacement of Cd from the protein is a particular problem during the summer spawning season and appears to stem from altered Cu metabolism during this period. Relative oyster dormancy during the winter also reduces CdBP production in response to Cd, and the protein is obtained most readily during the fall and spring.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Structural Insights into the Functional Role of the Hcn Sub-domain of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Mosaic Serotype C/D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna; Edwards, Tom E.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.; Buchko, Garry W.

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding module (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell’s membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a B-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been indentified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) molecule bound in an hydrophobic cleft between B-strands in the B-sheet jelly fold roll of the Hcn sub-domain. The molecule is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophobic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophilic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein’s side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid

  11. CD6 and Syntaxin Binding Protein 6 Variants and Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors in Danish Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Krintel, Sophine B.; Essioux, Laurent; Wool, Assaf; Johansen, Julia S.; Schreiber, Ehud; Zekharya, Tomer; Akiva, Pinchas; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hetland, Merete L.

    2012-01-01

    Background TNFα inhibitor therapy has greatly improved the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however at least 30% do not respond. We aimed to investigate insertions and deletions (INDELS) associated with response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methodology and Principal Findings In the DANBIO Registry we identified 237 TNFα inhibitor naïve patients with RA (81% women; median age 56 years; disease duration 6 years) who initiated treatment with infliximab (n = 160), adalimumab (n = 56) or etanercept (n = 21) between 1999 and 2008 according to national treatment guidelines. Clinical response was assessed at week 26 using EULAR response criteria. Based on literature, we selected 213 INDELS potentially related to RA and treatment response using the GeneVa® (Compugen) in silico database of 350,000 genetic variations in the human genome. Genomic segments were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and genotyped by Sanger sequencing or fragment analysis. We tested the association between genotypes and EULAR good response versus no response, and EULAR good response versus moderate/no response using Fisher’s exact test. At baseline the median DAS28 was 5.1. At week 26, 68 (29%) patients were EULAR good responders, while 81 (34%) and 88 (37%) patients were moderate and non-responders, respectively. A 19 base pair insertion within the CD6 gene was associated with EULAR good response vs. no response (OR = 4.43, 95% CI: 1.99–10.09, p = 7.211×10−5) and with EULAR good response vs. moderate/no response (OR = 4.54, 95% CI: 2.29–8.99, p = 3.336×10−6). A microsatellite within the syntaxin binding protein 6 (STXBP6) was associated with EULAR good response vs. no response (OR = 4.01, 95% CI: 1.92–8.49, p = 5.067×10−5). Conclusion Genetic variations within CD6 and STXBP6 may influence response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with RA. PMID:22685579

  12. Effects of exposure to multiple trace metals on biochemical, histological and ultrastructural features of gills of a freshwater fish, Channa punctata Bloch.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suwarna; Parvez, Suhel; Ansari, Rizwan Ahamd; Ali, Mehboob; Kaur, Manpreet; Hayat, Faisal; Ahmad, Firoz; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2008-08-11

    The trace metals are frequently encountered as mixtures of essential and non-essential elements. Therefore, evaluation of their toxic effects individually does not offer a realistic estimate of their impact on biological processes. We studied effects of a mixture of four essential and toxic metals (Cu, Cd, Fe and Ni) on biochemical and morphological characteristics of the gills of a biomarker freshwater fish Channa punctata (Bloch) using environmentally relevant concentrations. Fish were exposed to metal mixture through tank water for 7, 15 and 30 days. Biochemical studies as well as light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed significant metal exposure-induced alterations in gills. Besides ultastructural changes, activities of antioxidant enzymes such catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly altered in the gills of exposed fish. The reduced glutathione (GSH) was significantly (p<0.001) decreased, while lipid peroxidation (LPO) was significantly (p<0.001) increased. The main alterations in general morphology of fish gills included spiking and fusion of secondary lamellae, formation of club-shaped filaments, and vacuolization and necrosis of filament epithelium in the interlamellar regions. SEM studies showed gradual increase of the density and apical surface area of the chloride cells and transformation of the surface structure of the pavement cells. The results of this study indicate adaptive as well a toxic responses in fish gills exposed to mixture of trace metals. Low concentrations of trace metal appear to compromise the antioxidant defense of gills. Lesions in the gill morphology caused by the effect of low concentrations of trace metals could lead to functional alterations and interference with fundamental processes such as maintenance of osmoregulation, gas exchange and xenobiotic metabolism in the exposed fish populations.

  13. The CD25-binding antibody Daclizumab High-Yield Process has a distinct glycosylation pattern and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in comparison to Zenapax®

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Bishu; Balasa, Balaji; Efros, Lyubov; Hinton, Paul R.; Hartman, Stephen; Thakur, Archana; Xiong, Joanna M.; Schmidt, Brian; Robinson, Randy R.; Sornasse, Thierry; Vexler, Vladimir; Sheridan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CD25-binding antibody daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) is an interleukin (IL)-2 signal modulating antibody that shares primary amino acid sequence and CD25 binding affinity with Zenapax®, a distinct form of daclizumab, which was approved for the prevention of acute organ rejection in patients receiving renal transplants as part of an immunosuppressive regimen that includes cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Comparison of the physicochemical properties of the two antibody forms revealed the glycosylation profile of DAC HYP differs from Zenapax in both glycan distribution and the types of oligosaccharides, most notably high-mannose, galactosylated and galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) oligosaccharides, resulting in a DAC HYP antibody material that is structurally distinct from Zenapax. Although neither antibody elicited complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro, DAC HYP antibody had significantly reduced levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ADCC activity required natural killer (NK) cells, but not monocytes, suggesting the effects were mediated through binding to Fc-gamma RIII (CD16). Incubation of each antibody with peripheral blood mononuclear cells also caused the down-modulation of CD16 expression on NK cells and the CD16 down-modulation was greater for Zenapax in comparison to that observed for DAC HYP. The substantive glycosylation differences between the two antibody forms and corresponding greater Fc-mediated effector activities by Zenapax, including cell killing activity, manifest as a difference in the biological function and pharmacology between DAC HYP and Zenapax. PMID:27367933

  14. Selective staining of CdS on ZnO biolabel for ultrasensitive sandwich-type amperometric immunoassay of human heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein and immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Liu, Ling; Sui, Yuyun; Li, Yunlong; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2017-05-15

    We report on an ultrasensitive metal-labeled amperometric immunoassay of proteins, which is based on the selective staining of nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) on ZnO nanocrystals and in-situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) detection on the immunoelectrode. Briefly, antibody 1 (Ab1), bovine serum albumin (BSA), antigen and ZnO-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) labeled antibody 2 (Ab2-ZnO-MWCNTs) were successively anchored on a β-cyclodextrin-graphene sheets (CD-GS) nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), forming a sandwich-type immunoelectrode (Ab2-ZnO-MWCNTs/antigen/BSA/Ab1/CD-GS/GCE). CdS was selectively grown on the catalytic ZnO surfaces through chemical reaction of Cd(NO3)2 and thioacetamide (ZnO-label/CdS-staining), due to the presence of an activated cadmium hydroxide complex on ZnO surfaces that can decompose thioacetamide. A beforehand cathodic "potential control" in air and then injection of 7μL of 0.1M aqueous HNO3 on the immunoelectrode allow dissolution of the stained CdS and simultaneous cathodic preconcentration of atomic Cd onto the electrode surface, thus the following in-situ ASV detection can be used for immunoassay with enhanced sensitivity. Under optimized conditions, human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) are analyzed by this method with ultrahigh sensitivity, excellent selectivity and small reagent-consumption, and the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) are 0.4fgmL(-1) for IgG and 0.3fgmL(-1) for FABP (equivalent to 73 FABP molecules in the 6μL sample employed).

  15. Extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 binds to metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif of integrin β1 to modulate malignant properties of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jiao; Song, Fei; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2012-02-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that HAb18G/CD147 interacts with the integrin variants α3β1 and α6β1. However, the mechanism of the interaction remains largely unknown. In this study, mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a mammalian two-hybrid method, was used to study the CD147-integrin β1 subunit interaction. CD147 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells was interfered with by small hairpin RNA. Nude mouse xenograft model and metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in carcinogenesis and metastasis. We found that the extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 (I-type domain) binds at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site in the βA domain of the integrin β1 subunit, and Asp(179) in the I-type domain of HAb18G/CD147 plays an important role in the interaction. The levels of the proteins that act downstream of integrin, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phospho-FAK, were decreased, and the cytoskeletal structures of HCC cells were rearranged bearing the HAb18G/CD147 deletion. Simultaneously, the migration and invasion capacities, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, colony formation rate in vitro, and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo were decreased. These results indicate that the interaction of HAb18G/CD147 extracellular I-type domain with the integrin β1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif activates the downstream FAK signaling pathway, subsequently enhancing the malignant properties of HCC cells.

  16. Recognition properties of a panel of human recombinant Fab fragments to the CD4 binding site of gp120 that show differing abilities to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roben, P; Moore, J P; Thali, M; Sodroski, J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R

    1994-01-01

    Six recombinant human Fab fragments that were derived from the same human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individual and are directed against the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein were studied. A range of neutralizing activity against the HIV-1 (HXBc2) isolate was observed, with Fab b12 exhibiting the greatest potency among the Fabs tested. The neutralizing potency of Fab b12 was better than that of monoclonal whole antibodies directed against the third variable (V3) region of gp120. To explore the basis for the efficient neutralizing activity of b12, the recognition of a panel of HIV-1 gp120 mutants by the six Fabs was studied. The patterns of sensitivity to particular gp120 amino acid changes were similar for all six Fabs to those seen for anti-CD4bs monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1-infected individuals by conventional means. In addition, recognition by Fab b12 demonstrated an atypical sensitivity to changes in the V1 and V2 variable regions. Next, the binding of the Fabs to monomeric gp120 and to the envelope glycoprotein complex was examined. Neither the binding properties of the b12 Fab to monomeric gp120 nor the ability of the Fab to compete with soluble CD4 for monomeric gp120 binding appeared to account for the greater neutralizing potency. However, both quantitative and qualitative differences between the binding of b12 and that of less potent Fabs to the cell surface envelope glycoprotein complex were observed. Relative to less potently neutralizing Fabs, Fab b12 exhibited a higher affinity for a subpopulation of cell surface envelope glycoproteins, the conformation of which was best approximated by the mature gp120 glycoprotein. Apparently, subtle differences in the gp120 epitope recognized allow some members of the group of anti-CD4bs antibodies to bind to the functionally relevant envelope glycoprotein complex and to neutralize virus more efficiently. Images PMID:7518527

  17. Key Role of Effector Memory CD4+ T Lymphocytes in a Short-Incubation Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin Gamma Interferon Release Assay for the Detection of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham-Thomas, Chloé; Corbière, Véronique; Dirix, Violette; Smits, Kaatje; Domont, Fanny; Libin, Myriam; Loyens, Marc; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in target populations is one of the current WHO strategies for preventing active tuberculosis (TB) infection and reducing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis reservoir. Therefore, powerful LTBI screening tools are indispensable. A gamma interferon release assay (IGRA) in response to the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by the latency antigen native heparin-binding hemagglutinin (nHBHA-IGRA) has proven its potential for this purpose. We have evaluated its possible optimization through a reduction of incubation time from 96 to 24 h, while compensating for this by adding interleukin 7 (IL-7) to the medium. We have also investigated the phenotypes of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after both short and long incubation times. One hundred thirty-one nonimmunocompromised patients were recruited from 3 Brussels-based university hospitals. They were divided into 1 of 4 subgroups according to their M. tuberculosis infection status (LTBI, TB infection, undetermined M. tuberculosis infection status, and noninfected controls). The novel 24-h nHBHA-IGRA was performed for all subjects, and a simultaneous 96-h classical HBHA-IGRA was performed for 79 individuals. The results showed a good correlation between the two tests, and the novel 24-h nHBHA-IGRA maintained the principal advantages of the classical test, namely, a high specificity for LTBI diagnosis, an absence of interference of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination during infancy, and a relative discrimination between LTBI and TB infection. Whereas the commercialized IGRAs show a greater sensitivity for recent than for remote M. tuberculosis infections, the 24-h nHBHA-IGRA appears to have comparable diagnostic powers for recent and remote LTBI. The IFN-γ detected by the 24-h nHBHA-IGRA was mainly secreted by effector memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, a finding suggestive of continuous HBHA presentation during latency. PMID:24391135

  18. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed Central

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-01-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  19. Boosting of HIV envelope CD4 binding site antibodies with long variable heavy third complementarity determining region in the randomized double blind RV305 HIV-1 vaccine trial

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret; Saunders, Kevin O.; Pollara, Justin; Vandergrift, Nathan; Parks, Rob; Michael, Nelson L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Vasan, Sandhya; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Sinangil, Faruk; Phogat, Sanjay; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David C.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2017-01-01

    The canary pox vector and gp120 vaccine (ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120) in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial conferred an estimated 31% vaccine efficacy. Although the vaccine Env AE.A244 gp120 is antigenic for the unmutated common ancestor of V1V2 broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAbs), no plasma bnAb activity was induced. The RV305 (NCT01435135) HIV-1 clinical trial was a placebo-controlled randomized double-blinded study that assessed the safety and efficacy of vaccine boosting on B cell repertoires. HIV-1-uninfected RV144 vaccine recipients were reimmunized 6–8 years later with AIDSVAX B/E gp120 alone, ALVAC-HIV alone, or a combination of ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120 in the RV305 trial. Env-specific post-RV144 and RV305 boost memory B cell VH mutation frequencies increased from 2.9% post-RV144 to 6.7% post-RV305. The vaccine was well tolerated with no adverse events reports. While post-boost plasma did not have bnAb activity, the vaccine boosts expanded a pool of envelope CD4 binding site (bs)-reactive memory B cells with long third heavy chain complementarity determining regions (HCDR3) whose germline precursors and affinity matured B cell clonal lineage members neutralized the HIV-1 CRF01 AE tier 2 (difficult to neutralize) primary isolate, CNE8. Electron microscopy of two of these antibodies bound with near-native gp140 trimers showed that they recognized an open conformation of the Env trimer. Although late boosting of RV144 vaccinees expanded a novel pool of neutralizing B cell clonal lineages, we hypothesize that boosts with stably closed trimers would be necessary to elicit antibodies with greater breadth of tier 2 HIV-1 strains. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01435135 PMID:28235027

  20. Boosting of HIV envelope CD4 binding site antibodies with long variable heavy third complementarity determining region in the randomized double blind RV305 HIV-1 vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Easterhoff, David; Moody, M Anthony; Fera, Daniela; Cheng, Hao; Ackerman, Margaret; Wiehe, Kevin; Saunders, Kevin O; Pollara, Justin; Vandergrift, Nathan; Parks, Rob; Kim, Jerome; Michael, Nelson L; O'Connell, Robert J; Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Vasan, Sandhya; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Sinangil, Faruk; Tartaglia, James; Phogat, Sanjay; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Harrison, Stephen C; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-02-01

    The canary pox vector and gp120 vaccine (ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120) in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial conferred an estimated 31% vaccine efficacy. Although the vaccine Env AE.A244 gp120 is antigenic for the unmutated common ancestor of V1V2 broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAbs), no plasma bnAb activity was induced. The RV305 (NCT01435135) HIV-1 clinical trial was a placebo-controlled randomized double-blinded study that assessed the safety and efficacy of vaccine boosting on B cell repertoires. HIV-1-uninfected RV144 vaccine recipients were reimmunized 6-8 years later with AIDSVAX B/E gp120 alone, ALVAC-HIV alone, or a combination of ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120 in the RV305 trial. Env-specific post-RV144 and RV305 boost memory B cell VH mutation frequencies increased from 2.9% post-RV144 to 6.7% post-RV305. The vaccine was well tolerated with no adverse events reports. While post-boost plasma did not have bnAb activity, the vaccine boosts expanded a pool of envelope CD4 binding site (bs)-reactive memory B cells with long third heavy chain complementarity determining regions (HCDR3) whose germline precursors and affinity matured B cell clonal lineage members neutralized the HIV-1 CRF01 AE tier 2 (difficult to neutralize) primary isolate, CNE8. Electron microscopy of two of these antibodies bound with near-native gp140 trimers showed that they recognized an open conformation of the Env trimer. Although late boosting of RV144 vaccinees expanded a novel pool of neutralizing B cell clonal lineages, we hypothesize that boosts with stably closed trimers would be necessary to elicit antibodies with greater breadth of tier 2 HIV-1 strains.

  1. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding.

    PubMed

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs.

  2. Gill histopathologies following exposure to nanosilver or silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Adam D; Thornton, Cammi; Kennedy, Alan J; Bu, Kaixuan; Cizdziel, James; Jones, Bradley W; Steevens, Jeffery A; Willett, Kristine L

    2015-01-01

    Fish gill is the site for many crucial physiological functions. It is among the first sites of xenobiotic exposure, and gill histopathological alterations may be detected soon after toxicant exposure. Silver (Ag) is one of the most toxic metals to aquatic organisms mainly due to its ability to disrupt ionic regulation. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of ionic and nanoscale Ag on fathead minnow gills by examining gill histology and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity. Fathead minnows were exposed to two measured concentrations of silver nitrate (AgNO3: 1.3 or 3.7 μg/L as Ag(+)), citrate silver nanoparticles (citrate-AgNP: 15 or 39 μg/L), and polyvinylpyrrolidone-AgNP (PVP-AgNP) (AgNP: 11 or 50 μg/L). Circulatory disturbances were the most prevalent gill alterations detected and were significantly increased in all Ag treatment groups compared to control. AgNO3 (1.3 μg/L) was the only treatment that significantly elevated the number of total mucous goblet cells present. In all other Ag treatments, the percent of degenerated goblet cells was significantly increased compared to control. When the sum of all histopathological abnormalities (weighted index) was calculated, all Ag groups displayed a significantly higher index, with citrate-AgNP having the highest toxicity (index of 10 ± 0.32 versus 2.4 ± 0.6 in controls). Gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity was decreased by Ag. These results indicated that both AgNO3 and AgNP created similar disruptions in gill structure and ionic regulation, possibly due to the ionic Ag portion of each treatment.

  3. Parallel developmental genetic features underlie stickleback gill raker evolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Convergent evolution, the repeated evolution of similar phenotypes in independent lineages, provides natural replicates to study mechanisms of evolution. Cases of convergent evolution might have the same underlying developmental and genetic bases, implying that some evolutionary trajectories might be predictable. In a classic example of convergent evolution, most freshwater populations of threespine stickleback fish have independently evolved a reduction of gill raker number to adapt to novel diets. Gill rakers are a segmentally reiterated set of dermal bones important for fish feeding. A previous large quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study using a marine × freshwater F2 cross identified QTL on chromosomes 4 and 20 with large effects on evolved gill raker reduction. Results By examining skeletal morphology in adult and developing sticklebacks, we find heritable marine/freshwater differences in gill raker number and spacing that are specified early in development. Using the expression of the Ectodysplasin receptor (Edar) gene as a marker of raker primordia, we find that the differences are present before the budding of gill rakers occurs, suggesting an early change to a lateral inhibition process controlling raker primordia spacing. Through linkage mapping in F2 fish from crosses with three independently derived freshwater populations, we find in all three crosses QTL overlapping both previously identified QTL on chromosomes 4 and 20 that control raker number. These two QTL affect the early spacing of gill raker buds. Conclusions Collectively, these data demonstrate that parallel developmental genetic features underlie the convergent evolution of gill raker reduction in freshwater sticklebacks, suggesting that even highly polygenic adaptive traits can have a predictable developmental genetic basis. PMID:24851181

  4. The nephridial hypothesis of the gill slit origin.

    PubMed

    Ezhova, Olga V; Malakhov, Vladimir V

    2015-12-01

    Metameric gill slits are mysterious structures, unique for Chordata and Hemichordata, and also, perhaps, for the extinct Cambrian Calcichordata. There is a discussed hypothesis of the gill slits origin from the metameric nephridia. According to the hypothesis, the hypothetical metameric deuterostome ancestor had in each segment a pair of coelomoducts and a pair of intestinal pockets. In the anterior segments, the coelomoducts have fused with the intestinal pockets. As a result, each nephridium opened both into the gut and into the environment. Then the dissepiments and funnels reduced in all segments except the collar one. Thus, in recent enteropneusts, only the first pair of gill slits keeps the ancestral arrangement communicating at the same time with the gut, with the environment, and with the coelom of the preceding (collar) segment. In the anterior part of the branchio-genital trunk region of enteropneusts, the metameric intestinal pockets remained, as well as the metameric coelomoducts functioning as the ducts of the metameric gonads, i.e., as the gonoducts. The consequence of the hypothesis is that the metameric gill pores originate from the metameric excreting pores, and the metameric branchial sacs originate from the metameric endodermal pockets of the gut fused with the coelomoducts. The metameric gill slits by themselves correspond with metameric openings connecting the gut with metameric intestinal pockets. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 647-652, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Non-respiratory blood vessels in Latimeria gill filaments

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, W. O. P.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the blood pathways within the gills of Latimeria has been carried out using light and transmission electron microscopy. Clear evidence has been found for the presence of a secondary non-respiratory circulation in addition to the well-established respiratory pathway through the gill lamellae. All essential components of this system have been observed and have the same relationships and basic structure as comparable secondary systems in actinopterygian and elasmobranch fishes. These include a central venous sinus (CVS), arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) and central filament arteries (CFAs). AVAs connect both arterial vessels of the primary circulation and CFAs of the secondary circulation to the CVS. The latter contained many red blood cells. The presence of this secondary circulation in Latimeria gills contrasts with the situation in the gills of the three living genera of lungfishes where a system possessing the essential features of the tetrapod lymphatic vessel system has been recognized. No suggestions of a true lymphatic vessel system were observed in Latimeria. Other features of gill and vascular anatomy in Latimeria show its closer relationship to dipnoans than other groups of living fishes but evidence derived from this study of the secondary circulation clearly supports the view that the Dipnoi rather than Latimeria represent the living fishes most closely related to the tetrapods.

  6. Effect of cadmium, copper and mercury on antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in the gills of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    PubMed

    Company, R; Serafim, A; Bebianno, M J; Cosson, R; Shillito, B; Fiala-Médioni, A

    2004-01-01

    Metals are known to influence lipid peroxidation and oxidative status of marine organisms. Hydrothermal vent mussels Bathymodiolus azoricus live in deep-sea environments with anomalous conditions, including high metal concentrations. Although B. azoricus are aerobic organisms they possess abundant methano and thioautotrophic symbiotic bacteria in the gills. The enzymatic defences (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (Total GPx) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx)) and lipid peroxidation were determined in the gills of B. azoricus exposed to Cd (0.9 microM), Cu (0.4 microM) and Hg (0.1 microM) with different times of exposure. The experiments were performed in pressurized containers at 9+/-1 degrees C and 85 bars. Results show that vent mussels possess antioxidant enzymatic protection in the gills. Cd and Cu had an inhibitory effect in the enzymatic defence system, contrarily to Hg. These enzymatic systems are not completely understood in the B. azoricus, since reactive oxygen species might be produced through other processes than natural redox cycling, due to hydrogen sulphide and oxygen content present. Also the symbiotic bacteria may play an important contribution in the antioxidant protection of the gills.

  7. Human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins that use human CD55 (decay-accelerating factor) as a receptor does not bind the rodent and pig analogues of CD55.

    PubMed

    Hudault, Sylvie; Spiller, O Brad; Morgan, B Paul; Servin, Alain L

    2004-08-01

    Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) bacteria that are responsible for recurrent urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections recognized as a receptor the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55) at the brush border of cultured human intestinal cells. Results show that Afa/Dr DAEC C1845 bacteria were poorly associated with the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract of infected mice. We conducted experiments with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with mouse (GPI or transmembrane forms), pig, or human CD55 or mouse Crry cDNAs or transfected with empty vector pDR2EF1 alpha. Recombinant E. coli AAEC185 bacteria expressing Dr or F1845 adhesins bound strongly to CHO cells expressing human CD55 but not to the CHO cells expressing mouse (transmembrane and GPI anchored), rat, or pig CD55 or mouse Crry. Positive clustering of CD55 around Dr-positive bacteria was observed in human CD55-expressing CHO cells but not around the rarely adhering Dr-positive bacteria randomly distributed at the cell surface of CHO cells expressing mouse, rat, or pig CD55.

  8. The tyrosinase-encoding gene of Lentinula edodes, Letyr, is abundantly expressed in the gills of the fruit-body during post-harvest preservation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshitsugu; Kanda, Katsuhiro; Okawa, Kumiko; Takahashi, Machiko; Watanabe, Hisayuki; Hirano, Tatsuya; Yaegashi, Kaori; Sakamoto, Yuichi; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2009-05-01

    The gill browning of Lentinula edodes fruit-bodies during preservation is thought to be due to melanin biosynthesis catalyzed by tyrosinase. We isolated a genomic DNA sequence and cDNA encoding a putative tyrosinase from the white rot basidiomycete Lentinula edodes (shiitake mushroom). The gene, named Letyr, consists of a 1,854-bp open reading frame interrupted by eight introns, and encodes a putative protein of 618 amino acid residues with an estimated molecular mass of 68 kDa. Amino acid residues known to be involved in copper-binding domains were conserved in the deduced amino acid residues of LeTyr. Transcriptional and translational expression of Letyr in the gills of the fruit-body increased during preservation after harvest. This correlation between Letyr expression and fruit-body preservation suggests that tyrosinase gene expression contributes to gill browning.

  9. Protein domain histochemistry (PDH): binding of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of recombinant human glycoreceptor CLEC10A (CD301) to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Nollau, Peter; Wolters-Eisfeld, Gerrit; Mortezai, Naghmeh; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Klampe, Birgit; Debus, Annegret; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Niendorf, Axel; Wagener, Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Specialized protein domains bind to posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation or glycosylation. When such PTM-binding protein domains are used as analytical tools, the functional states of cells and tissues can be determined with high precision. Here, we describe the use of recombinant CLEC10A (CD301), a human glycoreceptor of the C-type lectin family, for the detection of ligands in sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded normal and cancerous mammary tissues. A construct, in which part of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) was deleted, was used as a negative control. In comparison to normal mammary glands, a pronounced staining of tumor tissues was observed. Because the construct with the truncated CRD did not show any tissue staining, the binding of the wild-type glycoreceptor can be attributed to its carbohydrate recognition domain. To distinguish our novel approach from immunohistochemistry, we propose the designation "protein domain histochemistry" (PDH).

  10. Sodium polyacrylate as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique for the measurement of Cu2+ and Cd2+ in waters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongtao; Sun, Ting; Li, Weijia; Sui, Dianpeng; Jin, Shuang; Lian, Xiaojing

    2009-10-15

    An aqueous solution containing sodium polyacrylate (PA, 0.0030M) was used in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique (DGT) to measure DGT-labile Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) concentrations. The DGT devices (PA DGT) were validated in four types of solutions, including synthetic river waters containing metal ions with or without complexing EDTA, natural river water (Hun River, Shenyang, China) spiked with Cu(2+) and Cd(2+), and an industrial wastewater (Shenyang, China). Results showed that only free metal ions were measured by PA DGT, recovery=98.79% for Cu(2+) and recovery=97.80% for Cd(2+) in solutions containing only free metal ions, recovery=51.02% for Cu(2+) and recovery=51.92% for Cd(2+) in solution with metal/EDTA molar ratio of 2:1 and recovery=0 in solutions with metal/EDTA molar ratio of 1:1 and 1:2. These indicated that the complexes of Cu-EDTA and Cd-EDTA were DGT-inert or not DGT-labile. The DGT performance in spiked river water (recovery=8.47% for Cu(2+) and recovery=27.48% for Cd(2+)) and in industrial wastewater (recovery=14.16% for Cd(2+)) were also investigated. Conditional stability constants (logK) of PA-Cu and PA-Cd complexes were determined as 6.98 and 5.61, respectively, indicating strong interaction between PA and the metals.

  11. Bioconcentration of zinc and its effect on the biochemical constituents of the gill tissues of Labeo rohita: An FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, PL. RM.; Nishanth, T.; Renju, V. B.

    2010-03-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to assess the bioconcentration and distribution of zinc on the selected organs of Labeo rohita and to study the effect of zinc exposure on the biochemical constitutions of gill tissues of L. rohita by using FT-IR Spectroscopy. The concentration pattern in the organs reveals that the liver is the prime site of metal binding and muscle accumulates least metal concentration. The accumulation profile is in the order: liver > gill > kidney > brain > bone > muscle. It has also been observed that the administration of chelating agent D-Penicillamine (DPA) reduces the zinc concentration in all tissues more effectively than the administration of the chelating agent Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid. The FT-IR spectra reveal that zinc exposure causes significant changes in the biochemical constitutions of the gill tissues. It causes an alteration in the protein secondary structures by decreasing the α-helix and increasing the β-sheet contents. Further, it has been observed that the administration of chelating agent DPA improves the protein and lipid contents in the gill tissues compared to zinc exposed tissues. This result shows that DPA is the effective chelator of zinc in reducing the body burden of L. rohita fingerlings. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggest that zinc exposure causes significant changes in both lipids and proteins of the gill tissues, and changes the protein profile in favour of β-sheet structure.

  12. Teleost chloride cell. II. Autoradiographic localization of gill Na,K- ATPase in killifish Fundulus heteroclitus adapted to low and high salinity environments

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The specific binding and inhibitory action of (3H)ouabain were employed to localize transport Na,K-ATPase in the euryhaline teleost gill, a NaCl-transporting osmoregulatory tissue in which both enzyme activity and transepithelial transport vary with environmental salinity. In killifish fully adapted to 10%, 100%, or 200% seawater, the gills were internally perfused and externally irrigated in situ. After suitable internal or external exposure to (3H)ouabain, individual gill arches were excised for Na,K-ATPase assay, measurement of radiolabel binding, or quantitative high-resolution autoradiography. Internal exposure to 50 muM ouabain resulted in essentially complete enzyme inhibition, and binding paralleled the increases in enzyme activity at higher salinities; in contrast, external exposure gave minimal and erratic results consistent with leakage of external ouabain into interstitial fluid. (3H)Ouabain autoradiographs demonstrated that, irrespective of exposure or salinity, most of the gill binding was associated with chloride cell. These cells increased in size and number with salinity and, at the subcellular level, the distribution pattern for bound ouabain was always identical to that for the amplified basal-lateral (tubular system) membrane. The combined physiologicmorphologic results constitute final direct proof that chloride cells are the primary site of gill Na,K-ATPase. More important, they provide convincing evidence for unexpected increases in basal-lateral enzyme at higher salinities and thus raise a fundamental objection to the long-postulated role of the Na pump in secretory NaCl transport. PMID:132451

  13. High frequency of autoantibodies in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis that bind biliary epithelial cells and induce expression of CD44 and production of interleukin 6

    PubMed Central

    Xu, B; Broome, U; Ericzon, B-G; Sumitran-Holgersson, S

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Sera of patients with autoimmune liver diseases were investigated for the presence of autoantibodies binding to human biliary epithelial cells (BECs). Furthermore, their functional capacity was investigated by testing their capacity to fix complement as well as induce expression of various adhesion molecules and production of cytokines. Methods: Sera from patients with various stages of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; n=30), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC; n=29), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n=25), and normal controls (n=12) were investigated for the presence of antibodies that reacted with unstimulated and cytokine stimulated BECs isolated from a normal healthy liver. To demonstrate organ specificity, lung epithelial cells (LECs) were used as control cells. Antibodies were tested for their functional capacity. Results: Compared with controls (8%), significantly higher numbers of PSC patients (63%, p=0.001), but not PBC (37%, NS) or AIH (16%, NS) patients, had anti-BEC antibodies. In 90% of PSC patients, the autoantibodies reacted only with cytokine stimulated target cells. Lower numbers of PSC (6%), PBC (10%), and AIH (0%) patients had LEC antibodies. Other significant findings were that anti-BEC antibodies were found in (i) PSC patients with either the HLA-DRB1*0301 or DR2 allele compared with those without (p=0.007); and (ii) in PBC patients with end stage disease compared with those without (p=0.018). Furthermore, anti-BEC antibodies from PSC and PBC but not AIH patients induced BECs to produce high levels of the cytokine interleukin 6. IgM and IgG fractions isolated from PSC but not PBC and AIH sera induced significantly increased expression of the cell adhesion molecule CD44. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis of BEC membranes demonstrated a specific band of 40 kDa with PSC sera and 45, 42, 30, and 33 kDa bands with PBC sera, which were absent in control groups. Conclusion: Thus for the first time we

  14. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC)

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (LewisX), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system. PMID:26418972

  15. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system.

  16. A Membrane-bound Hemoglobin from Gills of the Green Shore Crab Carcinus maenas*

    PubMed Central

    Ertas, Beyhan; Kiger, Laurent; Blank, Miriam; Marden, Michael C.; Burmester, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Most hemoglobins serve for the transport or storage of O2. Although hemoglobins are widespread in “entomostracan” Crustacea, malacostracans harbor the copper-containing hemocyanin in their hemolymph. Usually, only one type of respiratory protein occurs within a single species. Here, we report the identification of a hemoglobin of the shore crab Carcinus maenas (Malacostraca, Brachyura). In contrast to the dodecameric hemocyanin of this species, C. maenas hemoglobin does not reside in the hemolymph but is restricted to the gills. Immunofluorescence studies and cell fractioning showed that C. maenas hemoglobin resides in the membrane of the chief cells of the gill. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a membrane-bound hemoglobin has been identified in eukaryotes. Bioinformatic evaluation suggests that C. maenas hemoglobin is anchored in the membrane by N-myristoylation. Recombinant C. maenas hemoglobin has a hexacoordinate binding scheme at the Fe2+ and an oxygen affinity of P50 = 0.5 Torr. A rapid autoxidation rate precludes a function as oxygen carrier. We rather speculate that, analogous to prokaryotic membrane-globins, C. maenas hemoglobin carries out enzymatic functions to protect the lipids in cell membrane from reactive oxygen species. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic studies suggested that the ancestral arthropod hemoglobin was most likely an N-myristoylated protein that did not have an O2 supply function. True respiratory hemoglobins of arthropods, however, evolved independently in chironomid midges and branchiopod crustaceans. PMID:21118803

  17. Increased Sensitivity to CD4 Binding Site-Directed Neutralization following In Vitro Propagation on Primary Lymphocytes of a Neutralization-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus IIIB Strain Isolated from an Accidentally Infected Laboratory Worker

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Tim; Quakkelaar, Esther; van Nuenen, Ad; Pantophlet, Ralph; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2004-01-01

    We previously described the adaptation of the neutralization-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain IIIB to a neutralization-resistant phenotype in an accidentally infected laboratory worker. During long-term propagation of this resistant isolate, designated FF3346, on primary peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro, an HIV-1 variant appeared that had regained sensitivity to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody b12. When an early passage of FF3346 was subjected to limiting-dilution culture in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, eight virus variants with various degrees of neutralization resistance were isolated. Two of them, the sCD4 neutralization-resistant variant LW_H8res and the sCD4 neutralization-sensitive variant LW_G9sens, were selected for further study. Interestingly, these two viruses were equally resistant to neutralization by agents that recognize domains other than the CD4 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the increased neutralization sensitivity of variant LW_G9sens resulted from only two changes, an Asn-to-Ser substitution at position 164 in the V2 loop and an Ala-to-Glu substitution at position 370 in the C3 domain of gp120. In agreement with this notion, the affinity of b12 for monomeric gp120 containing the N164S and A370E substitutions in the background of the molecular clone LW_H8res was higher than its affinity for the parental gp120. Surprisingly, no correlation was observed between CD4 binding affinity for monomeric gp120 and the level of neutralization resistance, suggesting that differences in sCD4 neutralization sensitivity between these viruses are only manifested in the context of the tertiary or quaternary structure of gp120 on the viral surface. The results obtained here indicate that the neutralization-sensitive strain IIIB can become neutralization resistant in vivo under selective pressure by neutralizing antibodies but that this resistance may

  18. IFN-gamma and prostaglandin E2 inhibit IL-4-induced expression of Fc epsilon R2/CD23 on B lymphocytes through different mechanisms without altering binding of IL-4 to its receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Galizzi, J.P.; Cabrillat, H.; Rousset, F.; Menetrier, C.; de Vries, J.E.; Banchereau, J.

    1988-09-15

    Human rIL-4 specifically induces the expression of the low affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon R2/CD23) on normal B cells and on the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Jijoye. IL-4 does not induce the generation of the second messenger cAMP in Jijoye cells. PGE2 (at 10(-7) M) was found to inhibit by 50% the IL-4 mediated Fc epsilon R2/CD23 induction on Jijoye cells. The PGE2 half maximum inhibitory concentration (1 nM) was comparable to that inducing a half maximal increase of intracellular cAMP (4nM PGE2). 8-bromo-cAMP (10(-3) M), forskolin (10(-5) M), and cholera toxin (100 ng/ml), which increase intracellular cAMP levels, also inhibited by 40 to 80% the IL-4 induced Fc epsilon R2/CD23 expression on Jijoye cells. PGE2 8-bromo-cAMP, forskolin, and cholera toxin also inhibited the IL-4-induced Fc epsilon R2/CD23 expression on normal B lymphocytes. Taken together these data suggest that PGE2 inhibits the IL-4 induced Fc epsilon R2/CD23 through an increase of intracellular cAMP. In contrast, IFN-gamma, which strongly inhibits IL-4-mediated Fc epsilon R2/CD23 expression on Jijoye cells, did not increase intracellular cAMP levels and thus probably acts through another mechanism. IFN-gamma and PGE2 did not inhibit binding of IL-4 to its receptor. It could be excluded that IFN-gamma and PGE2 were acting via an alteration/desensitization of the IL-4R inasmuch as 24 h pre-incubation of Jijoye cells with these agents affected neither the affinity of 125I-IL-4 for its receptor (Kd = 0.8 to 1.5 x 10(-10) M) nor the maximal number of binding sites per Jijoye cells (Bmax = 390 to 550). Furthermore, IFN-gamma and PGE2 did not affect the internalization and degradation of 125I-IL-4. These data demonstrate that PGE2 and IFN-gamma inhibit the IL-4-mediated induction of Fc epsilon R2/CD23 on B lymphocytes via different mechanisms that do not alter the interaction of IL-4 with its receptor.

  19. Spectroscopic, DNA binding ability, biological activity, DFT calculations and non linear optical properties (NLO) of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes with ONS Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A.; Elantabli, Fatma M.; Moustafa, H.; El-Medani, Samir M.

    2017-08-01

    The reaction of Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) with the synthesized N-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene)-2-aminothiophenol Schiff base ligand (H2L) at room temperature resulted in the formation of the five complexes; [Co(HL)2]H2O, 1; [M(HL)2] (M = Cu, Zn and Cd), (2-4) and [Hg(HL)Cl], 5. The ligand and its complexes were characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, magnetic measurement, molar conductance, and thermal analysis. Coats and Redfern method was used to compute the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Antimicrobial activities of H2L and its complexes have been studied. The binding of Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated using UV-Vis and fluorescence absorption spectra. The results indicated that the ligand and its complexes may bind to DNA by intercalation modes, with a much higher binding affinity of the complexes than that of the ligand. The equilibrium geometries of the studied complexes are investigated theoretically at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory, and it was found that these geometries are non-linear. The calculated EHOMO and ELUMO energies of the studied complexes can be used to calculate the global properties. The calculated nonlinear optical parameters (NLO); first order hyperpolarizibility (β) of the studied complexes show promising optical properties.

  20. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay*

    PubMed Central

    AbuSamra, Dina B.; Al-Kilani, Alia; Hamdan, Samir M.; Sakashita, Kosuke; Gadhoum, Samah Z.; Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2015-01-01

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. PMID:26124272

  1. Psychological Aspects of Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Hildreth Youkilis; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Evaluated the psychopathological features that may underlie or accompany Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome. Univariate analyses indicated that Tourette subjects scored higher on the following scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory: Schizophrenia, Depression, Psychopathic Deviate, Psychasthenia and Hypochondriasis. The results…

  2. Matter in Motion: The Educational Materialism of Gilles Deleuze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically examines the materialism that Gilles Deleuze espouses in his oeuvre to the benefit of educational theory. In "Difference and Repetition", he presented transcendental empiricism by underwriting Kant with realism (Deleuze, 1994). Later, in "Capitalism & Schizophrenia I & II" that were co-written with Felix Guattari (1984, 1988)…

  3. Matter in Motion: The Educational Materialism of Gilles Deleuze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically examines the materialism that Gilles Deleuze espouses in his oeuvre to the benefit of educational theory. In "Difference and Repetition", he presented transcendental empiricism by underwriting Kant with realism (Deleuze, 1994). Later, in "Capitalism & Schizophrenia I & II" that were co-written with Felix Guattari (1984, 1988)…

  4. Identifying the Child with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donna J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics and obsessive-compulsive behaviors). It describes the nature of the disorder, treatment, and service provision (evaluation and assessment and the Individual Education Plan). (DB)

  5. Gilles Lecture: Ocular Motility in a Time of Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding of the structure and function of extraocular muscles, and our ability to image them clinically, allows prediction of revolutionary progress in diagnosis and treatment of strabismus in the coming decades. This perspective memorializes a lecture given in honor of Dr. William Gilles, who has for decades been the paternal leader of strabismology in southern Australia. PMID:17181611

  6. Reconciling catch differences from multiple fishery independent gill net surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Richard T.; Vandergoot, Christopher; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Rogers, Mark W.; Cook, H. Andrew; Brenden, Travis O.

    2017-01-01

    Fishery independent gill net surveys provide valuable demographic information for population assessment and resource management, but relative to net construction, the effects of ancillary species, and environmental variables on focal species catch rates are poorly understood. In response, we conducted comparative deployments with three unique, inter-agency, survey gill nets used to assess walleye Sander vitreus in Lake Erie. We used an information-theoretic approach with Akaike’s second-order information criterion (AICc) to evaluate linear mixed models of walleye catch as a function of net type (multifilament and two types of monofilament netting), mesh size (categorical), Secchi depth, temperature, water depth, catch of ancillary species, and interactions among selected variables. The model with the greatest weight of evidence showed that walleye catches were positively associated with potential prey and intra-guild predators and negatively associated with water depth and temperature. In addition, the multifilament net had higher average walleye catches than either of the two monofilament nets. Results from this study both help inform decisions about proposed gear changes to stock assessment surveys in Lake Erie, and advance our understanding of how multispecies associations explain variation in gill net catches. Of broader interest to fishery-independent gill net studies, effects of abiotic variables and ancillary species on focal specie’s catch rates were small in comparison with net characteristics of mesh size or twine type.

  7. TCR/CD3-Induced activation and binding of Emt/Itk to linker of activated T cell complexes: requirement for the Src homology 2 domain.

    PubMed

    Ching, K A; Grasis, J A; Tailor, P; Kawakami, Y; Kawakami, T; Tsoukas, C D

    2000-07-01

    Expressed in mast and T cells/inducible T cell tyrosine kinase (Emt/Itk), a Tec family protein tyrosine kinase, is critical for the development and activation of T lymphocytes. The mechanism through which Emt/Itk mediates its effector functions is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the Emt/Itk Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is critical for the transphosphorylation and activation of Emt/Itk catalytic activity that is mediated by TCR/CD3 engagement. Furthermore, we find that the Emt/Itk SH2 domain is essential for the formation of TCR/CD3-inducible Emt/Itk-LAT complexes, whereas the SH3 domain and catalytic activity are not required. The Emt/Itk-linker of activated T cells (LAT) complexes are biologically important because Jurkat T cells with deficient LAT expression (JCaM2) fail to increase Emt/Itk tyrosine phosphorylation upon TCR/CD3 stimulation. Confocal microscopy reveals that in activated cells, LAT complexes colocalize with TCR/CD3. The present data suggest that upon TCR/CD3 engagement, the Emt/Itk SH2 domain mediates the formation of a molecular complex containing Emt/Itk, LAT, and TCR/CD3; this complex is essential for Emt/Itk activation and function.

  8. 1,25D3 prevents CD8+Tc2 skewing and asthma development through VDR binding changes to the Cyp11a1 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Schedel, Michaela; Jia, Yi; Michel, Sven; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Domenico, Joanne; Joetham, Anthony; Ning, Fangkun; Strand, Matthew; Han, Junyan; Wang, Meiqin; Lucas, Joseph J.; Vogelberg, Christian; Kabesch, Michael; O'Connor, Brian P.; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Effector CD8+ T cells convert from IFN-γ+ (Tc1) to IL-13+ (Tc2) cells in the presence of IL-4. Underlying regulatory mechanisms are not fully defined. Here, we show that addition of 1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D3, during CD8+ T-cell differentiation prevents IL-4-induced conversion to IL-13-producers. Transfer of 1,25D3-treated CD8+ T cells into sensitized and challenged CD8+-deficient recipients fails to restore development of lung allergic responses. 1,25D3 alters vitamin D receptor (VDR) recruitment to the Cyp11a1 promoter in vitro and in vivo in the presence of IL-4. As a result, protein levels and enzymatic activity of CYP11A1, a steroidogenic enzyme regulating CD8+ T-cell conversion, are decreased. An epistatic effect between CYP11A1 and VDR polymorphisms may contribute to the predisposition to childhood asthma. These data identify a role for 1,25D3 in the molecular programming of CD8+ T-cell conversion to an IL-13-secreting phenotype through regulation of steroidogenesis, potentially governing asthma susceptibility. PMID:26750596

  9. Host-guest inclusion systems of daidzein with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD): Preparation, binding behaviors and water solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yinghui; Pang, Yanhua; Guo, Yafei; Ren, Yufeng; Wang, Fen; Liao, Xiali; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Daidzein is an isoflavone of naturally abundance existing in plants and foods which has attracted much attention for its significant benefits on human health. However, its application was severely limited by its poor solubilities, instability and low bioavailability. To overcome these drawbacks, inclusion complexes of daidzein with two cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives, i.e., 2-hydropropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) were prepared and characterized both in solution and solid state by 1D and 2D NMR, XRD, SEM and elemental analyses. Fluorescence spectroscopy and the Job plot were used to demonstrate a mainly 1:1 inclusion mode between daidzein and CDs. Their thermal stabilities were evaluated with TG and DSC experiments. Moreover, water solubility of daidzein was significantly improved by inclusion complexation with CDs. These results might suggest valuable approaches to developments of new pharmaceutical formulations of daidzein.

  10. BINDING OF TRACE ELEMENTS (Ag, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni AND Tl) TO CYTOSOLIC BIOMOLECULES IN LIVERS OF JUVENILE YELLOW PERCH (Perca flavescens) COLLECTED FROM LAKES REPRESENTING METAL CONTAMINATION GRADIENTS.

    PubMed

    Caron, Antoine; Rosabal, Maikel; Drevet, Ophélie; Couture, Patrice; Campbell, Peter G C

    2017-10-06

    Biomolecules involved in handling cytosolic metals in the liver of the yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were characterized in juvenile fish collected from four lakes constituting metal contamination gradients. Using size-exclusion liquid chromatography coupled to an inductively-coupled mass spectrometer (SEC-ICP-MS), we determined metal distributions among ligands of different molecular weights in the cytosol, before and after a heat denaturation step designed to isolate metallothionein-like peptides and proteins (MTLPs). Silver, Cd and Cu found in the heat-stable protein (HSP) supernatants were indeed largely present as MTLP complexes, but Co, Ni and Tl, also present in the HSP supernatants, did not co-elute with MTLPs. This difference in metal partitioning is consistent with the kn