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Sample records for gingival enlargement biofilm

  1. Drug-induced gingival enlargement: biofilm control and surgical therapy with gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser-A 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Guaré, Renata; Costa, Soraya Carvalho; Baeder, Fernando; de Souza Merli, Luiz Antonio; Dos Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival enlargement has been reported in patients treated with various types of anticonvulsant drugs, and is generally associated with the presence of plaque, gingival inflammation, and a genetic predisposition. Effective treatment includes daily oral hygiene and periodic professional prophylaxis. However, in some patients, surgical removal of the gingival tissue overgrowth becomes necessary. The patient in this case report was mentally impaired and had severe drug-induced gingival enlargement. This report describes the initial protocol, the gingivectomy, and a 2-year follow-up. A diode laser was used as an effective and safe method to remove the patient's overgrown gingival tissue.

  2. An unusual case of generalized severe gingival enlargement during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Crystal L; Kolhatkar, Shilpa; Winkler, James R; Ojha, Junu; Bhola, Monish

    2010-01-01

    Increased hormone levels that are present during puberty and pregnancy are associated with localized or generalized gingival enlargement. This article reviews the gingival alterations that can occur during pregnancy and describes a case of generalized severe gingival enlargement associated with pregnancy and its management. A 36-year-old woman had severe bilateral gingival enlargement of short duration. The patient denied taking any medications. The laboratory report revealed no systemic abnormalities; however, the report disclosed that she was pregnant. Surgical therapy for the gingival enlargement included gingivectomy and gingivoplasty of all quadrants, which reduced the size of the enlarged gingiva. Postoperative visits demonstrated uneventful healing, with no recurrence seen at the one-year follow-up appointment. It appears that the English literature includes only one other case report that discusses generalized gingival enlargement during pregnancy. Pregnancy-related gingival enlargement should be included as a differential diagnosis in women who have non-drug-induced generalized gingival enlargement.

  3. Gingival enlargements: Differential diagnosis and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargement is one of the frequent features of gingival diseases. However due to their varied presentations, the diagnosis of these entities becomes challenging for the clinician. They can be categorized based on their etiopathogenesis, location, size, extent, etc. Based on the existing knowledge and clinical experience, a differential diagnosis can be formulated. Subsequently, after detailed investigation, clinician makes a final diagnosis or diagnosis of exclusion. A perfect diagnosis is critically important, since the management of these lesions and prevention of their recurrence is completely dependent on it. Furthermore, in some cases where gingival enlargement could be the primary sign of potentially lethal systemic diseases, a correct diagnosis of these enlargements could prove life saving for the patient or at least initiate early treatment and improve the quality of life. The purpose of this review article is to highlight significant findings of different types of gingival enlargement which would help clinician to differentiate between them. A detailed decision tree is also designed for the practitioners, which will help them arrive at a diagnosis in a systematic manner. There still could be some lesions which may present in an unusual manner and make the diagnosis challenging. By knowing the existence of common and rare presentations of gingival enlargement, one can keep a broad view when formulating a differential diagnosis of localized (isolated, discrete, regional) or generalized gingival enlargement. PMID:26380825

  4. Idiopathic gingival enlargement associated with generalized aggressive periodontitis in a 19-year-old female

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Arvind; Gupta, Neha; Shetty, Devanand; Kadakia, Rukshit

    2014-01-01

    Gingival enlargement, one of the manifestations of gingival and periodontal disease, is also known as gingival overgrowth. Idiopathic gingival enlargement is a rare gingival overgrowth, which is of an undetermined cause. This unknown etiology has now been linked to specific genes and idiopathic gingival enlargement is at times referred to as hereditary gingival enlargement. This condition is a benign, slow growing proliferation of gingival tissues. Aggressive periodontitis is the rapid form of periodontal disease which is characterized by extensive periodontal tissue destruction, increased host-susceptibility toward periodontal disease progress and a genetic predilection toward disease occurrence. We present a rare case of idiopathic gingival fibromatosis associated with generalized aggressive periodontitis in a young female. The patient presented with classic clinical and radiographic presentation associated with gingival enlargement and aggressive periodontitis. The diagnosis was then confirmed by histopathological and neutrophil functions tests. PMID:24872638

  5. Association between gingivitis and anterior gingival enlargement in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Antoniazzi, Raquel Pippi; Pinto, Tatiana Militz Perrone; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association among gingival enlargement (GE), periodontal conditions and socio-demographic characteristics in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods A sample of 330 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment for at least 6 months were examined by a single calibrated examiner for plaque and gingival indexes, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and gingival enlargement. Socio-economic background, orthodontic treatment duration and use of dental floss were assessed by oral interviews. Associations were assessed by means of unadjusted and adjusted Poisson's regression models. Results The presence of gingival bleeding (RR 1.01; 95% CI 1.00-1.01) and excess resin around brackets (RR 1.02; 95% CI 1.02-1.03) were associated with an increase in GE. No associations were found between socio-demographic characteristics and GE. Conclusion Proximal anterior gingival bleeding and excess resin around brackets are associated with higher levels of anterior gingival enlargement in subjects under orthodontic treatment. PMID:25162567

  6. Gingival Enlargement in a Case of Variant Jones Syndrome: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    DA, Roopa; Singh, Shinkhala; Gupta, Ira; Gopal, Saumiya

    2016-01-01

    Gingival enlargement can be caused by a variety of etiological factors like inflammation, drugs, and systemic diseases or can be presented as a part of a syndrome. One such syndrome is Jones Syndrome, which is associated with gingival enlargement and progressive hearing loss. We present here a case of fifteen-year-old boy with gingival enlargement, hearing loss, and generalized alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as Jones syndrome. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. Gingival enlargement was surgically managed using gingivectomy and no recurrence was observed. The patient showed remarkable esthetical and functional improvement. PMID:26966711

  7. Low dose amlodipine-induced gingival enlargement: A clinical case series

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Mukherjee, Sudarshana; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Kumar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargement sometimes has an adverse effect of certain systemic drugs such as the use of anticonvulsants, phenytoin, antihypertensive, calcium channel blockers and immunosuppressant, cyclosporine. Amlodipine, a relatively newer calcium channel blocker drugs, exhibit adverse effect of gingival enlargement in middle to older aged adults. There are very few reports of amlodipine-induced gingival enlargement at a lower dose (5 mg). In this article, three cases of amlodipine-induced gingival enlargement in the age range of 50-65 years old hypertensive patient with a lower dose of amlodipine (5 mg). PMID:25684923

  8. Successful management of phenytoin and phenobarbitone induced gingival enlargement: A multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Priyadharshini, V.; Belure, Vinita V.; Triveni, M. G.; Tarun Kumar, A. B.; Mehta, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Medication-related gingival enlargement is a common reactionary phenomenon that occurs with the use of several types of therapeutic agents, including antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This disorder has been documented since 1939, shortly after the introduction of phenytoin. In the present case, a concise review of literature concerning the etiopathogenesis and management of AEDs (phenobarbitone and phenytoin) induced gingival enlargement has been described. It is vital that not only the periodontist, but also dental surgeons and medical practitioners should become aware of the potential etiologic agents, characteristic features, and the differential diagnosis of drug induced gingival enlargement in order to be able to prevent, diagnose and successfully manage the condition. PMID:24963262

  9. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  10. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingival enlargement in a patient with AML.

    PubMed

    Sonoi, Norihiro; Soga, Yoshihiko; Maeda, Hiroshi; Ichimura, Koichi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Fujii, Nobuharu; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Logan, Richard; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Takashiba, Shogo

    2012-07-01

    Here, we discuss the pathophysiology of leukemia-associated gingival enlargement based on a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) with typical gingival enlargement. Uniquely, this patient was well enough to allow full periodontal examination and incisional gingival biopsy to be performed both before and after chemotherapy. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese woman with AML-M4 showing gingival enlargement. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingiva and bacterial counts in the periodontal pockets were examined before and after chemotherapy. The results were as follows: (1) infiltration of myelomonocytic blasts in enlarged gingiva; (2) resolution of gingival enlargement with complete remission of AML by anticancer chemotherapy; and (3) the numbers of bacteria in the periodontal pockets were not high and were not altered before or after chemotherapy. In patients with AML-M4, remarkable mucosal enlargement is not generally observed in the body except in the gingiva. We hypothesized that antigens derived from periodontal bacteria, even if they are not present in large numbers, could act as chemoattractants for myelomonocytic leukemic cells.

  11. Sarcoidosis presenting as isolated gingival enlargement: a rare case entity.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pragya; Aggarwal, Jaihans; Chopra, Deepak; Bagga, Sukhchain; Sethi, Kanika

    2014-11-01

    Sarcoidosis is a non-caseating granulomatous disease . It is a multiorgan inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. Conditions affecting skin or other organs frequently involve oral cavity and rarely manifest as gingival disease. Here we are reporting a rare case in which gingival hyperplasia was the initial symptom which finally led to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Oral mucous membrane needs to be examined carefully as it may constitute in presenting first sign of systemic sarcoidosis.

  12. Influence of sex hormone levels on gingival enlargement in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Nabeel Althaf, M. S.; Hegde, Shashikanth; Rajesh, Kashyap S.; Arun Kumar, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sex hormones may be a modifying factor in the periodontal disease pathogenesis. Aim: The association between gingival enlargement and sex hormone levels in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy needs to be determined. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Periodontology in association with the Department of Orthodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Yenepoya University, Mangaluru. Materials and Methods: A pilot study was conducted on 21 adolescent patients between the age group of 13–19 years, who had undergone fixed orthodontic therapy for at least 3 months. Apicocoronally, the gingival enlargement was assessed by the index described by Miller and Damm. Miranda and Brunet index was used to assess gingival overgrowth in the buccal–lingual direction in the interdental papilla. Furthermore, the patients were assigned to two groups - Group 1-GE and Group 2-non-GE. Sex hormones assessed were estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males in both groups. Results: 57.1% of the study population had enlargement of the gingiva. The mean plaque score was 0.59 and 0.56, respectively, in both groups. A statistically significant relationship was found between estradiol and testosterone levels with gingival enlargement. However, a significant relationship was not obtained for progesterone levels with the gingival enlargement. Conclusion: Direct correlation between estradiol, testosterone, and gingival enlargement was seen. PMID:27994419

  13. Surgical treatment of cyclosporine A- and nifedipine-induced gingival enlargement: gingivectomy versus periodontal flap.

    PubMed

    Pilloni, A; Camargo, P M; Carere, M; Carranza, F A

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare probing depth resolution achieved by gingivectomy and periodontal flap techniques in the treatment of cyclosporine A- and nifedipine-induced gingival enlargement. Ten kidney transplant patients who were receiving cyclosporine A and nifedipine for at least 6 months participated in the study. Five patients were randomly assigned to the gingivectomy group and 5 patients to the periodontal flap group. Only anterior segments of the oral cavity (canine to canine) were surgically treated. Clinical measurements, including probing depths, plaque index, and gingival sulcus index, were taken at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Results showed that probing depths, while similar for both groups in the first 6 weeks of the study, were significantly shallower for the periodontal flap group when compared to the gingivectomy group at 6 months (2.48 +/- 0.34 mm versus 4.87 +/- 0.79 mm, respectively) and 1 year (322 +/- 0.65 mm versus 6.40 +/- 1.02 mm, respectively). Within its limitations, this study suggests that the pocket reduction achieved by the periodontal flap may be sustained for longer periods of time than by the gingivectomy technique in the treatment of cyclosporine A- and nifedipine-induced gingival enlargement.

  14. Gingival Enlargement

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Vision Leadership Executive Committee Board of Trustees Governance Past Presidents Staff/Contact History Awards Our Partners ... to be less of an issue than having good oral hygiene (less plaque present on your teeth). ...

  15. Ipsilateral idiopathic gingival enlargement and it's management using conventional gingivectomy and diode laser: A recurrent case after 15 years.

    PubMed

    Devi, Potharaju Kamala; Kumar, Gudi Pavan; Bai, Yendluri Durga; Ammaji, Annamdevula Durga

    2013-05-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis is a relatively rare condition characterized by the proliferation of the gingival tissues resulting in masticatory, esthetics, phonetics and psychological disturbances. The severity of the overgrowth can range from a solitary isolated mass to a more generalized and diffused enlargement. The etiopathogenesis of this bizarre condition is poorly understood and has been attributed to various factors. It can present as a single disorder or may manifest as part of a syndrome. This case reports an ipsilateral diffused idiopathic gingival enlargement in a middle aged adult recurring after a gap of 15 years. External bevel gingivectomy on the buccal aspects of maxillary and mandibular gingiva and diode laser for excision of the enlarged tissue on the lingual/palatal aspect was carried out to eliminate the excessive tissue. Periodic recalls showed maintenance of good oral hygiene and 1 year follow-up revealed no recurrence.

  16. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the "red complex" species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the "red complex." In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection.

  17. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the “red complex” species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the “red complex.” In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection. PMID:26305580

  18. [Cyclosporine-induced gingival hyperplasia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, Carlos; Godoy, Jorge

    2007-03-01

    Gingival enlargement can be an adverse effect of cyclosporine A and nifedipine use. It has a high relapse rate if the drugs are not discontinued. There is a genetic predisposition to the development of this condition and dental biofilm can also play a role. We report a 64 years old male who received a renal allograft and was treated with cyclosporine and nifedipine. He required six surgical interventions for generalized gingival enlargement. After the sixth relapse, the patient was subjected to a periodontal treatment to eliminate the dental biofilm, which decreased the rate of recurrence of gingival enlargement.

  19. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Schinus terebinthifolius Mouthwash to Treat Biofilm-Induced Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Alves, Livia Araújo; Ferreira, Gabriela Lacet Silva; Jovito, Vanessa de Carvalho; de Castro, Ricardo Dias; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a Schinus terebinthifolius (ST) mouthwash in reducing gingival inflammation levels (GI) and biofilm accumulation (BA) in children with gingivitis. Methods. This was a randomized, controlled, triple blind, and phase II clinical trial, with children aged 9–13 years (n = 27) presenting with biofilm-induced gingivitis. The sample was randomized into experimental (0.3125% ST, n = 14) and control (0.12% chlorhexidine/CHX, n = 13) groups. Products were masked as regards color, flavor and aroma. Intervention protocol consisted in supervised rinsing of 10 mL/day for 01 minute for 10 days. Gingival bleeding and simplified oral hygiene indexes were used to assess the efficacy variables, measured at baseline and after intervention by calibrated examiners. Data were statistically treated with paired t-test, unpaired t-test, and Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (α = .05). Results. It was found that both ST and CHX were able to significantly reduce GI levels after 10 days (P < 0.001) and there was no significant difference between them (P > 0.05). CHX was the only product able to significantly reduce BA after 10 days when compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Conclusion. ST mouthwash showed significant anti-inflammatory activity (equivalent to CHX), but it was not able to reduce biofilm accumulation. PMID:23843886

  20. A Papilloma-like Atypical Gingival Enlargement Treated Using Nd:YAG Laser Surgery: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Develioglu, H; Bakar, O; Goze, F

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gingival overgrowths can occur due to various factors, such as inflammation, or rarely without a reason and are significant in periodontology. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of a 33-year old female with a papilloma-like atypical enlargement of the gingiva attached to the molar vestibular region of her lower jaw. After the patient’s medical history was taken and the clinical examination done, the enlargement was surgically removed with a Nd:YAG laser and evaluated histopathologically. There was an inflamed, oedematous and vascularized stroma with a thick spongy squamous epithelium layer. After six months, there were no problems at the surgical area and recurrence was not observed. PMID:25803386

  1. Gingivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gums that are tender when touched, but otherwise painless Mouth sores Swollen gums Shiny appearance to gums ... reddish-purple gums. The gums are most often painless or mildly tender when gingivitis is present. Plaque ...

  2. Leukemic gingival enlargement: Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Khan, Nabeel Ishrat; Reddy, L Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Oral cavity functions as an early indicator for a variety of systemic diseases. Early and accurate diagnosis of these underlying systemic disorders entails thorough examination of the oral mucosa, gingiva, teeth, tongue and other oral tissues. Although gingival changes may be related to local factors in the oral cavity, it can also be an expression of systemic conditions such as blood dyscrasias, endocrinal imbalance, and nutritional deficiencies. Leukemia, a malignancy of white blood cells is a dreadful disease, which, if not diagnosed properly and treated early may result in significant morbidity and mortality. Oral changes may be the first and only presenting signs in leukemic patients. This paper aims to throw light on an interesting case of acute leukemia diagnosed on the basis of oral signs and emphasizes the importance of thorough oral examination to identify the threatening condition. PMID:25664273

  3. Bifunctional bioceramics stimulating osteogenic differentiation of a gingival fibroblast and inhibiting plaque biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Jiao; Zhou, Yinghong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chengtie; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Gingival recession is a common clinical problem that results in esthetic deficiencies and poor plaque control and predominantly occurs in aged patients. In order to restore the cervical region, ideal biomaterials should possess the ability to stimulate proliferation and osteogenesis/cementogenesis of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and have a strong antibiofilm effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions of HGF and oral multispecies biofilms with Ca, Mg and Si-containing bredigite (BRT, Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics. BRT extract induced osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of HGF and its inhibition of plaque biofilm formation were systematically studied. BRT extract in concentrations lower than <200 mg mL(-1) presented high biocompatibility to HGF cells in 3 days. Ion extracts from BRT also stimulated a series of bone-related gene and protein expressions in HGF cells. Furthermore, BRT extract significantly inhibited oral multispecies plaque biofilm growth on its surface and contributed to over 30% bacterial cell death without additional antibacterial agents in two weeks. A planktonic killing test showed that BRT suppressed 98% plaque bacterial growth compared to blank control in 3 days. The results also revealed that BRT extract has an osteostimulation effect on HGF. The suppression effect on plaque biofilms suggested that BRT might be used as a bioactive material for cervical restoration and that the synergistic effect of bioactive ions, such as Ca, Mg and Si ions, played an important role in the design and construction of bifunctional biomaterials in combination with tissue regeneration and antibiofilm activity.

  4. Mouthwashes for the control of supragingival biofilm and gingivitis in orthodontic patients: evidence-based recommendations for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Haas, Alex Nogueira; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Andrade, Ana Karina Pinto de; Escobar, Elaine Cristina; Almeida, Eliete Rodrigues de; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Cortelli, José Roberto; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Rode, Sigmar de Melo; Pedrazzi, Vinicius; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2014-07-11

    Properly performed daily mechanical biofilm control is the most important prevention strategy for periodontal diseases. However, proper mechanical biofilm control is not performed effectively by the majority of the population, mainly due to lack of motivation and of manual dexterity. Local biofilm retention factors may aggravate home oral hygiene quality. For this reason, patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances comprise a group that may benefit from the daily use of mouthwashes. The purpose of this review was to perform a systematic search in the literature on antiseptics used to control supragingival biofilm and gingivitis in orthodontic patients. Six studies investigating the effect of chlorhexidine and 5 studies evaluating the effect of the daily use of antiseptics were found. Chlorhexidine showed better results in reducing plaque and gingivitis. However, because of its adverse effects after continuous use, it should not be indicated for long-term periods. Among the agents considered for daily use, the fixed combination of essential oils was the only one evaluated in a clinical trial, in which a comparative group presented a statistically significant clinical impact. There is no direct evidence supporting the indication of antiseptic agents for orthodontic patients other than chlorhexidine and essential oils. It can be concluded that, for patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, chlorhexidine should be considered for treating acute gingival inflammation, whereas essential oils should be indicated for long-term daily use in controlling supragingival biofilm.

  5. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:26941525

  6. [THE CHARACTERISTICS OF MORPHOLOGY OF BIOFILM OF PERIODONTIUM UNDER INFLAMMATORY DISEASES OF GUMS (CHRONIC CATARRHAL GINGIVITIS, CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS, CANDIDA-ASSOCIATED PERIODONTITIS) ACCORDING RESULTS OF ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY].

    PubMed

    Ippolitov, E V; Didenko, L V; Tzarev, V N

    2015-12-01

    The study was carried out to analyze morphology of biofilm of periodontium and to develop electronic microscopic criteria of differentiated diagnostic of inflammatory diseases of gums. The scanning electronic microscopy was applied to analyze samples of bioflm of periodont from 70 patients. Including ten patients with every nosologic form of groups with chronic catarrhal periodontitis. of light, mean and severe degree, chronic catarrhal gingivitis, Candida-associated paroperiodontitis and 20 healthy persons with intact periodontium. The analysis was implemented using dual-beam scanning electronic microscope Quanta 200 3D (FEI company, USA) and walk-through electronic micJEM 100B (JEOL, Japan). To detect marker DNA of periodont pathogenic bacteria in analyzed samples the kit of reagentsfor polymerase chain reaction "MultiDent-5" ("GenLab", Russia). The scanning electronic microscopy in combination with transmission electronic microscopy and polymerase chain reaction permits analyzing structure, composition and degree of development of biofilm of periodontium and to apply differentiated diagnostic of different nosologic forms of inflammatory diseases of periodontium, including light form of chronic periodontitis and gingivitis. The electronic microscopical indications of diseases ofperiodontium of inflammatory character are established: catarrhal gingivitis, (coccal morphological alternate), chronic periodontitis (bacillary morphological alternate), Candida-associated periodontitis (Candida morphological alternate of biofilm ofperiodontium).

  7. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  8. Disruption of the ECM33 gene in Candida albicans prevents biofilm formation, engineered human oral mucosa tissue damage and gingival cell necrosis/apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Chmielewski, Witold; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen). We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida.

  9. Disruption of the ECM33 Gene in Candida albicans Prevents Biofilm Formation, Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Tissue Damage and Gingival Cell Necrosis/Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Chmielewski, Witold; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen). We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida. PMID:22665950

  10. Occurrence of yeasts, enterococci and other enteric bacteria in subgingival biofilm of HIV-positive patients with chronic gingivitis and necrotizing periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Nakano, Viviane; Wahasugui, Thais C; Cabral, Fátima C; Gamba, Rosa; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric bacteria and yeasts in biofilm of 80 HIV-positive patients with plaque-associated gingivitis or necrotizing periodontitis. Patients were subjected to extra, intra oral and radiographic examinations. The oral hygiene, bleeding on probing, gingival conditions, and attachment loss were evaluated. Clinical specimens were collected from gingival crevices or periodontal pockets, transferred to VMGA III, diluted and transferred to Sabouraud Dextrose agar with 100 μg/ml of chloramphenicol, peptone water, EVA broth, EMB agar, SS agar, Bile esculin agar and Brilliant green agar. Isolation of yeasts was carried out at room temperature, for 3-7 days; and for the isolation of enteric microorganisms plates were incubated at 37°C, for 24-48 h. The yeasts identification was performed according to the carbon and nitrogen assimilation, fermentation of carbohydrates and germ tube formation. Bacteria were identified according to their colonial and cellular morphologies and biochemical tests. Yeasts were identified as Candida albicans and its occurrence was more common in patients with CD4+ below 200/mm(3) and was affected by the extension of periodontal involvement (P = 0.0345). Enteric bacteria recovered from clinical specimens were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella oxytoca and Enterococcus sp. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were detected in 32.5% of clinical samples from patients with necrotizing periodontitis. In conclusion, non-oral pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans were more prevalent in periodontal sites of HIV-positive patients with necrotizing periodontitis and chronic gingivitis.

  11. Occurrence of yeasts, enterococci and other enteric bacteria in subgingival biofilm of HIV-positive patients with chronic gingivitis and necrotizing periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Nakano, Viviane; Wahasugui, Thais C.; Cabral, Fátima C.; Gamba, Rosa; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric bacteria and yeasts in biofilm of 80 HIV-positive patients with plaque-associated gingivitis or necrotizing periodontitis. Patients were subjected to extra, intra oral and radiographic examinations. The oral hygiene, bleeding on probing, gingival conditions, and attachment loss were evaluated. Clinical specimens were collected from gingival crevices or periodontal pockets, transferred to VMGA III, diluted and transferred to Sabouraud Dextrose agar with 100 μg/ml of chloramphenicol, peptone water, EVA broth, EMB agar, SS agar, Bile esculin agar and Brilliant green agar. Isolation of yeasts was carried out at room temperature, for 3-7 days; and for the isolation of enteric microorganisms plates were incubated at 37°C, for 24-48 h. The yeasts identification was performed according to the carbon and nitrogen assimilation, fermentation of carbohydrates and germ tube formation. Bacteria were identified according to their colonial and cellular morphologies and biochemical tests. Yeasts were identified as Candida albicans and its occurrence was more common in patients with CD4+ below 200/mm3 and was affected by the extension of periodontal involvement (P = 0.0345). Enteric bacteria recovered from clinical specimens were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella oxytoca and Enterococcus sp. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were detected in 32.5% of clinical samples from patients with necrotizing periodontitis. In conclusion, non-oral pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans were more prevalent in periodontal sites of HIV-positive patients with necrotizing periodontitis and chronic gingivitis. PMID:24031212

  12. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Generalized Gingival Overgrowth Resembling Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis in Siblings: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Emre; Subaşı, Meryem Gülce; Avunduk, Mustafa; Aykent, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of hereditary disorders primarily characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/or quality of enamel. There are some reports suggesting an association between AI and generalized gingival enlargement. This paper describes the clinical findings and oral management of two siblings presenting both AI and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) like generalized gingival enlargements. The treatment of gingival enlargements by periodontal flap surgery was successful in the management of the physiologic gingival form for both patients in the 3-year follow-up period. Prosthetic treatment was also satisfactory for the older patient both aesthetically and functionally. PMID:23091740

  13. Fontanelles - enlarged

    MedlinePlus

    Soft spot - large; Newborn care - enlarged fontanelle; Neonatal care - enlarged fontanelle ... causes: Achondroplasia Apert syndrome Cleidocranial dysostosis Congenital rubella Neonatal hypothyroidism Osteogenesis imperfecta Rickets

  14. Conflation of gingival overgrowth and schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Bhartiya, Kishlay; Sareen, Sagar

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe a seminal case report of a 10-year-old boy with enlarged gingivae in relation to his maxillary anterior teeth. The lesion, provisionally diagnosed as idiopathic gingival enlargement, was completely excised and divided into two sections. The histological and immunohistochemical findings in one of the sections showed it to be characteristic of schwannoma while the other section showed indications of idiopathic gingival enlargement. The patient has been followed up carefully and no recurrence has been noted. PMID:25331149

  15. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  16. Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Callow, J A; Callow, M E

    2006-01-01

    Biofilms of bacteria, frequently in association with algae, protozoa and fungi, are found on all submerged structures in the marine environment. Although it is likely that for the majority of organisms a biofilmed surface is not a pre-requisite for settlement, in practice, colonization by spores and larvae of fouling organisms almost always takes place via a biofilmed surface. Therefore, the properties of the latter may be expected to influence colonization, positively or negatively. Biofilms are responsible for a range of surface-associated and diffusible signals, which may moderate the settling behaviour of cells, spores and larvae. However, there is no consensus view regarding either cause and effect or the mechanism(s) by which biofilms moderate settlement. Studies with mixed biofilms, especially field experiments, are difficult to interpret because of the conflicting signals produced by different members of the biofilm community as well as their spatial organisation. Molecular techniques highlight the deficiencies of culture methods in identifying biofilm bacteria; hence, the strains with the most impact on settlement of spores and larvae may not yet have been isolated and cultured. Furthermore, secondary products isolated from cultured organisms may not reflect the situation that pertains in nature. The evidence that bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules stimulate settlement of spores of the green macroalga, Ulva, is discussed in some detail. New molecular and analytical tools should provide the opportunity to improve our fundamental understanding of the interactions between fouling organisms and biofilms, which in turn may inform novel strategies to control biofouling.

  17. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinctive facies.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sunkara Shree Ramalinga; Radharani, Chitturi; Sinha, Soumya; Kumar, Sv Kiran

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary gingival enlargement also known as gingivitis or familial elephantiasis is a rare type of gingival enlargement. It appears as an isolated autosomal dominant disorder or maybe associated with other conditions. Oral manifestations may vary from minimal involvement of only tuberosity area and the buccal gingiva around the lower molars to a generalized enlargement inhibiting eruption of the teeth. This paper discusses the case of a 13-year-old female patient with distinctive facial characteristics who presented to the department with a chief complaint of swollen gums since 1 year. She had severe diffuse gingival enlargement of the maxilla and mandible. Diagnosis was made based upon clinical examination and family history. Quadrant wise internal bevel gingivectomy procedure was done for the patient to restore her functional and esthetic needs.

  18. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-11-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding. The phylum Synergistetes is a novel bacterial phylum consisting of Gram-negative anaerobes, with evidence of presence in biofilms associated with periodontal and endodontic infections. To date, the involvement of members of this phylum in NUG has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and levels of known human oral Synergistetes bacterial clusters in dental plaque from patients with NUG and compare them with those found in gingivitis. Marginal dental plaque samples from 21 NUG and 21 gingivitis patients were analysed quantitatively by fluorescent in situ hybridization and microscopy for members of two oral Synergistetes clusters (A and B) and for Jonquetella anthropi. Synergistetes cluster A bacteria were detected in all samples but at higher levels (9.4-fold) and proportions (2.5-fold) in NUG patients than in gingivitis patients. However, with regard to Synergistetes cluster B bacteria, there were no differences between NUG and gingivitis patients. J. anthropi was detected in only half of the samples and at lower levels than the other taxa. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that Synergistetes cluster A bacteria, but not cluster B bacteria or J. anthropi, are more strongly associated with NUG than with gingivitis.

  19. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  20. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis with asymmetrical presentation and electrosurgical management

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Dilip Ganpat; Lobo, Tanya Marguerite; Pol, Samruddhi Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis is a rare genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by recurrent gingival enlargement without any identifiable cause. We report a case of 14-year-old female patient affected with sporadic, nonsyndromic, progressive gingival enlargement. It manifested more severely on the right side of the mouth with history of recurrence after prior conventional surgical excision. Electrosurgical resection of the enlargement was done, and overall patient management had a successful outcome along with achieving preservation of teeth with poor prognosis in the 2 years follow-up. PMID:27041849

  1. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  2. A review of factors influencing the incidence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Farina, R

    2013-06-01

    An individual variation in the gingival inflammatory response to the dental biofilm has been demonstrated. This variability can be observed between individuals with neither quantitative nor qualitative differences in plaque accumulation. The reported significant differences in gingival inflammatory response under quantitatively and/or qualitatively almost identical bacterial challenge suggest that the gingival response to plaque accumulation may be an individual trait, possibly genetic in origin. The most recent classification of periodontal diseases acknowledges that the clinical expression of plaque-induced gingival inflammation can be substantially modified by systemic factors, either inherent to the host or related to environmental influences. The aim of the present literature review is to describe (i) the factors influencing the development of plaque-induced gingivitis as well as (ii) those metabolic, environmental and systemic factors which have a direct impact on the etiopathogenetic pathway of plaque-induced gingivitis, thus altering the nature or course of the gingival inflammatory response to dental biofilm.

  3. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment.

  4. Gingival fibromatosis: clinical, molecular and therapeutic issues.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-27

    Gingival fibromatosis is a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders that develop as slowly progressive, local or diffuse enlargements within marginal and attached gingiva or interdental papilla. In severe cases, the excess tissue may cover the crowns of the teeth, thus causing functional, esthetic, and periodontal problems, such as bone loss and bleeding, due to the presence of pseudopockets and plaque accumulation. It affects both genders equally. Hereditary, drug-induced, and idiopathic gingival overgrowth have been reported. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome. The pathologic manifestation of gingival fibromatosis comprises excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, of which collagen type I is the most prominent example. Mutation in the Son-of-Sevenless-1 gene has been suggested as one possible etiological cause of isolated (non-syndromic) hereditary gingival fibromatosis, but mutations in other genes are also likely to be involved, given the heterogeneity of this condition. The most attractive concept of mechanism for drug-induced gingival overgrowth is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which interactions between gingival cells and the extracellular matrix are weakened as epithelial cells transdifferentiate into fibrogenic fibroblast-like cells. The diagnosis is mainly made on the basis of the patient's history and clinical features, and on histopathological evaluation of affected gingiva. Early diagnosis is important, mostly to exclude oral malignancy. Differential diagnosis comprises all pathologies in the mouth with excessive gingival overgrowth. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis may present as an autosomal-dominant or less commonly autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. If a systemic disease or syndrome is suspected, the patient is directed to a geneticist for additional clinical examination and specialized diagnostic tests. Treatments vary according to the

  5. Familial gingival fibromatosis: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shweta; Goyal, Dhawal; Shah, Gaurav; Ray, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare condition that can occur as an isolated disease or as part of a syndrome or chromosomal abnormality. In severe cases, the gingival enlargement may cover the crowns of teeth and cause severe functional and aesthetic concerns. Here, we present a case of an 8-year-old girl with severe enlargement of gums in maxilla and mandible. Both deciduous and permanent teeth were not erupted in the oral cavity at all. Mutation in the Son-of-Sevenless (SOS-1) gene has been associated with the disease. The diagnosis was made based on clinical examination and family history. Surgical removal of the hyperplastic tissue was performed under general anesthesia. PMID:22629070

  6. Diagnosis and management of nonsyndromic hereditary gingival fibromatosis in a 13 year old girl: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Lata; Bey, Afshan; Gupta, N. D.; Varshney, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare condition characterized by various degree of gingival overgrowth. It usually develops as an isolated disorder but can manifest with multisystem syndrome. We are here presenting a case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with severe enlargement of gingiva covering all most the entire crown involving both maxillary and mandibular arches. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced and idiopathic gingival enlargement. Excess gingival tissue was removed by full mouth gingivectomy and sent for histopathological examination. Postoperative course was uneventful and patient's esthetics improved significantly. A 12 month postoperative period shows no recurrence. PMID:23230366

  7. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis and sensorineural hearing loss in a 42-year-old man with Jones syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasaboğlu, O; Tümer, C; Balci, S

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis and sensorineural hearing loss in a 42-year-old man with Jones syndrome: Gingival fibromatosis is a rare disease, which can be seen as an isolated condition or associated with some uncommon syndromes. This case report describes the evaluation and treatment of a 42-year-old male patient with hereditary gingival fibromatosis, sensorineural hearing loss, undescended testis and maxillary odontogenic cyst (Jones Syndrome). Six years follow up of the index patient after the surgery revealed no recurrence of the gingival fibromatosis. This report also describes the anamnestic data of the patient's family that showed progressive deafness and gingival enlargement in three generations.

  8. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Janus, Marleen M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries. PMID:27997567

  9. The Autosomal Recessive Inheritance of Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vineet; Mukherjee, Malancha; Ghosh, Sujoy; Dey, Subrata Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition which is marked by enlargement of gingival tissue that covers teeth to various extents leading to aesthetic disfigurement. This study presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient and 18-year-old male who belong to the same family suffering from HGF with chief complaint of overgrowing swelling gingiva. The presence of enlarged gingiva with the same eruption was found in their other family members with no concomitant drug or medical history, and the occurrence of HGF has been found in one generation of this family which may indicate the autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of HGF. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is an idiopathic condition as its etiology is unknown and it was found to recur in some cases even after surgical treatment. Both patients underwent thorough oral prophylaxis and later surgical therapy to correct the deformity. PMID:24416600

  10. Management of idiopathic gingival fibromatosis: report of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ramnarayan, B K; Sowmya, Krishna; Rema, J

    2011-01-01

    Gingival hyperplasia is a rare condition and is of importance for cosmetic and mechanical reasons. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis, a benign, slow-growing proliferation of the gingival tissues, is genetically heterogeneous. The enlargement is most intense during the eruption of the primary and permanent teeth, and minimal or nondetectable growth is observed in adults. The genetic aspect, clinical feature, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and treatment aspects are reviewed. The purpose of this paper was to report a case of idiopathic gingival fibromatosis in a 13-year-old female who had a negative family history for a similar type of gingival enlargement. The diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, and histopathology using both hematoxylin and eosin and Van Giesen stain (a special stain for collagen). Surgical treatment, which included both gingivectomy and gingivoplasty, was carried out. The case showed remarkable esthetic and functional improvement. The patient returned after a year and showed no recurrence.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of a hereditary gingival fibromatosis case.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Xu, Li; Meng, Huan Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by severe gingival hyperplasia, which could result in serious aesthetic and emotional problems and functional impairment. Here the present authors report a case of a 28-year-old female patient with generalised severe gingival enlargement covering almost all of the teeth and diagnosed as HGF. Her family history was of significance, since her father and 3-year-old daughter suffered from the same symptoms. Many studies have agreed that surgical removal should be used in the treatment of HGF, and gingivectomy is the most common method. This study tried both external and internal bevel incisions. The results suggest that the former is better for shaping gingival contour, if the attached gingiva is adequate. Correct physiological contour of the marginal gingiva, good oral hygiene and periodic recall can decrease recurrence risk. Post-surgical follow-up after 26 months demonstrated no recurrence and the patient was satisfied with her appearance.

  12. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  13. Management of Cyclosporine and Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Aral, Kübra; Sarica, Yagmur; Sivrikoz, Oya Nermin

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargements modified by medications are becoming more common because of the increased use of inducing drugs, and may create speech, mastication, tooth eruption, periodontal, and aesthetic problems. We hereby present a case of a 54-year-old man with 12-month history of generalized gingival enlargement in the keratinized gingiva was referred to our clinic. The patient had a history of kidney transplant and was under medication of cyclosporine and nifedipine. After medical consultation, cyclosporine was changed to tacrolimus and nifedipine was changed to captopril. Gingivectomy was performed using a diode laser, and scaling and root planning were performed. At five months postoperative, the gingival enlargements relapsed and diode laser-assisted surgery was repeated. The patient was followed-up on second postoperatively at 18 months and no relapse was seen. Diode laser-assisted gingivectomy was found to be useful for coagulation during surgery and decreased postoperative bleeding. Recurrence risk of cyclosporine and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth is high, thus, there is a great need for prolonged care of patients following treatment and prosthetic restoration. PMID:26812935

  14. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  15. Gingival Cyst of Newborn.

    PubMed

    Moda, Aman

    2011-01-01

    Gingival cyst of newborn is an oral mucosal lesion of transient nature. Although it is very common lesion within 3 to 6 weeks of birth, it is very rare to visualize the lesion thereafter. Presented here is a case report of gingival cyst, which was visible just after 15 days of birth. Clinical diagnoses of these conditions are important in order to avoid unnecessary therapeutic procedure and provide suitable information to parents about the nature of the lesion.

  16. An unusual clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis related to “Acacia” containing herbal toothpaste

    PubMed Central

    Makkar, Anjali; Tewari, Shikha; Kishor, Kamal; Kataria, Santprakash

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with unusual enlargement of the gingiva with generalized alveolar bone loss. In spite of periodontal therapy, including plaque control, scaling, root planning and surgical treatment, recurrence with the same degree of the gingival enlargement and further loss of attachment level occurred. Biopsy revealed dense infiltration of normal plasma cells separated by collagenous stroma. Discontinuation of herbal toothpaste resulted in remarkable remission of the gingival enlargement within 2 weeks. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of toothpaste components disclosed “Acacia” as an etiologic antigenic agent and confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell gingivitis (PCG). Usually, PCG is not associated with the loss of attachment. This case report appears to be the first publication to document an atypical presentation of PCG with generalized aggressive periodontitis related to the use of herbal toothpaste containing “Acacia” extract from the tree “Acacia Arabica.” PMID:24174738

  17. An update on crown lengthening. Part 1: Gingival tissue excess.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Harpoonam Jeet; Hussain, Zahra; Darbar, Ulpee

    2015-03-01

    This is the first article in a two-part series which aims to provide an overview of the different techniques used to increase clinical crown height. In the first paper, the focus will be on the management of patients who present with gingival tissue excess. The different aetiologies are discussed and illustrated with clinical cases, following which a range of procedures that may be employed in the management of these patients are presented. With an increasingly ageing population, more patients are taking regular medications prescribed from their general medical practitioner, and so having a working knowledge of the specific drugs that may cause gingival enlargement is essential. Clinical Relevance: When patients with gingival tissue excess present in primary or secondary care, a clinician must have a good knowledge of the possible causes of the condition, as well as an idea of how the patient may be managed.

  18. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-07-21

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO.

  19. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO. PMID:25053668

  20. Gingival overgrowth as secondary effect of calcium channel blockers administration. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mironiuc-Cureu, M; Dumitriu, A S; Gheorghiu, I M; Stoian, I M

    2014-06-15

    Gingival overgrowth is, among other things, a side effect of the administration of dihydropyridine antihypertensives, generally associated with irritant factors of marginal periodontium. This case refers to a patient, female, who developed a large gingival enlargement that has a combined etiology: the systemic medication with lercanidipina and the presence of dental bridges, which are incorrectly adjusted to the dental cervix. The treatment for this case, involved a complex local treatment (antimicrobial, surgical, endodontic and prosthetic) and the collaboration with a specialist cardiologist. Maintaining the normal gingival parameters in time depends on the possibility of changing the antihypertensive medication, the accuracy of the new dental bridges and the periodic monitoring of the patient.

  1. Improved pathologic teeth migration following gingivectomy in a case of idiopathic gingival fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Seki, Keisuke; Sato, Shuichi; Asano, Yukhiro; Akutagawa, Hideyasu; Ito, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A case is reported of a 20-year-old woman with generalized severe gingival overgrowth covering almost all of the teeth with diastemata, diagnosed as idiopathic gingival fibromatosis. After initial therapy, the patient underwent surgery consisting of a full-mouth internal beveled gingivectomy. Postoperatively, the maxillary anterior teeth spontaneously moved to almost optimal positions. Removing the cause by gingivectomy can lead to spontaneous correction of the pathologic tooth migration. With supportive periodontal treatment, the patient showed no recurrence of gingival enlargement or repositioning of the teeth at the 5-year follow-up.

  2. [Gingival hypertrophy during orthodontic treatment: contribution of external bevel gingivectomy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Benoist, H M; Ngom, P I; Seck-Diallo, A; Diallo, P D

    2007-12-01

    Gingival enlargement is a condition that commonly develops during orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic appliances are irritation and retention plaque factors holding up oral hygiene and control of gingival inflammation. Two cases of gingival hypertrophy in young Senegalese females undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances are described and treated by gingivectomy. This surgical procedure have led to morphological conditions of gingiva allowing better plaque control and the orthodontic treatment going on. Periodical controls in child and adolescent are required for healthy periodontium during orthodontic therapy. Collaboration between orthodontist and periodontist is one of the most important keys to successful treatment.

  3. Immunoexpression of interleukin-6 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To analyze the role of proinflammatory cytokines in drug-induced gingival enlargement in Indian population. Aim: To evaluate for the presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in drug-induced gingival enlargement and to compare it with healthy control in the absence of enlargement. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients selected for the study and divided into control group (10) and study group (25) consisting of phenytoin (10); cyclosporin (10) and nifedipine (5) induced gingival enlargement. Gingival overgrowth index of Seymour was used to assess overgrowth and allot groups. Under LA, incisional biopsy done, tissue sample fixed in 10% formalin and immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of IL-6 using LAB-SA method, Labeled- Streptavidin-Biotin Method (LAB-SA kit from Zymed- 2nd generation LAB-SA detection system, Zymed Laboratories, CA). The results of immunohistochemistry were statistically analyzed using Kruskaal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The data obtained from immunohistochemistry assessment shows that drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) samples express more IL-6 than control group and cyclosporin expresses more IL-6 followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. Conclusion: Increased IL-6 expression was noticed in all three DIGO groups in comparison with control group. Among the study group, cyclosporin expressed maximum IL-6 expression followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. PMID:27307657

  4. Effects of a Novel Dental Gel on Plaque and Gingivitis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, M; Chung, NE; Ajdaharian, J; Wink, C; Klokkevold, P; Wilder-Smith, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on plaque and gingival health. The dental gel was designed to (1) break up and prevent re-accumulation of microbial biofilm, and (2) inhibit metal mediated inflammation. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. On Days 0, 7, 14 and 21, plaque levels (Quigley-Hein, Turesky Modification Plaque Index), gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index) and gingival bleeding (modified Sulcus Bleeding Index) were determined by one blinded, investigator using a pressure sensitive probe. Results After 3 weeks, all 3 clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P<0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P<0.05). Conclusion The novel dental gel formulation was provided effective plaque control and reduced gingival inflammation. Clinical Relevance A novel dentifrice formulation may be an effective tool for plaque removal and maintaining gingival health. PMID:26052472

  5. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development.

  6. [Biofilms in otolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Mena Viveros, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    According to the National Institute of Health of the USA, «more than 60% of all microbial infections are caused by biofilms».'This can surprise us, but it is enough to consider that common infections like those of the genito-urinary tract, infections produced by catheters, middle ear infections in children, the formation of dental plaque and gingivitis are caused by biofilms, for this statement to seem more realistic. At present this is one of the subjects of great interest within medicine, particularly in otolaryngology. Bacteria have traditionally been considered to be in a free state without evident organization, partly perhaps by the ease of studying them in this form. Nevertheless, the reality is that, in nature, the great majority of these germs form complex colonies adhered to surfaces, colonies that have received the name of biofilms. These biofilms are more common than previously thought and almost all of the people have been in contact with them in the form of infections in the teeth or humid, slippery areas. New treatments that can eradicate them are currently being investigated.

  7. Long-term management of an idiopathic gingival fibromatosis patient with the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Kamolmatyakul, S; Kietthubthew, S; Anusaksathien, O

    2001-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is usually seen as an isolated finding or occasionally in association with other features as part of a syndrome. The combination of gingival enlargement, hypertrichosis, epilepsy and mental retardation is also a commonly reported syndrome that features gingival fibromatosis. The following report is about a mentally retarded patient who has shown no sign of hypertrichosis, but has been taking phenobarbital as a long-term therapy drug for anti-convulsion. Long-term management of this patient has been carried out from the age of one-and-a-half years to 14 years old. The patient's clinical features, treatment received, histopathologic presentation of gingival fibromatosis and proper management of the condition are discussed.

  8. Free gingival grafting procedure after excisional biopsy, 12-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Keskiner, Ilker; Alkan, B. Arzu; Tasdemir, Zekeriya

    2016-01-01

    The total removal of a lesion via excisional biopsy causes gingival recession, resulting in dentin hypersensitivity and esthetical problems. In this case report, a gingival recession defect resulting from an excisional biopsy was treated with a free gingival grafting procedure performed during the same appointment, and its 12-year follow-up was presented. A 44-year-old female patient was presented to our clinic with a firm, pedunculated, red gingival enlargement located on the labial surface of lower incisors. The exposed root surface, after the excisional biopsy, was covered with a free gingival graft. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as pyogenic granuloma, and in the early postoperative phase, no recurrence was observed, but partial root coverage was determined. At 6-month follow-up, root coverage resulting from “creeping attachment” was observed, and this situation was maintained throughout the 12-year follow-up period. Repetitious postoperative discomfort and emotional stress for the patient may be avoided with a timesaving single appointment performing excisional biopsy and free gingival graft. Free gingival grafting procedure was used for this purpose not only to cover exposed root surfaces but also to eliminate dentin hypersensitivity and make oral hygiene procedures more effective. PMID:27403067

  9. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  10. Genetic linkage of hereditary gingival fibromatosis to chromosome 2p21.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, T C; Pallos, D; Bowden, D W; Bolyard, J; Pettenati, M J; Cortelli, J R

    1998-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by a slowly progressive benign enlargement of the oral gingival tissues. The condition results in the teeth being partially or totally engulfed by keratinized gingiva, causing aesthetic and functional problems. Both genetic and pharmacologically induced forms of gingival fibromatosis are known. The most common genetic form, hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF), is usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, although sporadic cases are common and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. The genetic basis of gingival fibromatosis is unknown. We identified an extended family (n=32) segregating an autosomal dominant form of isolated gingival fibromatosis. Using a genomewide search strategy, we identified genetic linkage (Zmax=5.05, straight theta=.00) for the HGF phenotype to polymorphic markers in the genetic region of chromosome 2p21 bounded by the loci D2S1788 and D2S441. This is the first report of linkage for isolated HGF, and the findings have implications for identification of the underlying genetic basis of gingival fibromatosis. PMID:9529355

  11. Lymphoplasmacytic gingivitis in a cat

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A 12-year-old male neutered short haired cat was presented due to difficulty eating and pawing at the face. Examination revealed severe gingivitis and stomatitis throughout the oral cavity. Gingival biopsy provided a diagnosis of lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis. Extraction of all premolars and molars resulted in elimination of all clinical signs. PMID:16048015

  12. Lymphoplasmacytic gingivitis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Baird, Kristin

    2005-06-01

    A 12-year-old male neutered short haired cat was presented due to difficulty eating and pawing at the face. Examination revealed severe gingivitis and stomatitis throughout the oral cavity. Gingival biopsy provided a diagnosis of lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis. Extraction of all premolars and molars resulted in elimination of all clinical signs.

  13. Management of hereditary gingival fibromatosis: A 2 years follow-up case report

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Dete, Gopal; Saimbi, Charanjeet Singh; Kumar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva due to increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of an 18-year-old female suffering from HGF with positive family history. Her 42-year-old mother also have enlargement of the gums. After through clinical examination of both the patients, routine blood investigation was advised. All the investigations were within normal physiological limits of both the patients. Surgical excision of enlarged gingival tissue was planned after meticulous scaling and root planing. Patients were recalled 1 week after surgery. Postoperative healing were good and desired crown lengthening was achieved with significant improvement in speech and masticatory problems in both the patients. There was no recurrence of the disease even after 2 years follow-up. PMID:26229281

  14. Management of hereditary gingival fibromatosis: A 2 years follow-up case report.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Dete, Gopal; Saimbi, Charanjeet Singh; Kumar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva due to increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of an 18-year-old female suffering from HGF with positive family history. Her 42-year-old mother also have enlargement of the gums. After through clinical examination of both the patients, routine blood investigation was advised. All the investigations were within normal physiological limits of both the patients. Surgical excision of enlarged gingival tissue was planned after meticulous scaling and root planing. Patients were recalled 1 week after surgery. Postoperative healing were good and desired crown lengthening was achieved with significant improvement in speech and masticatory problems in both the patients. There was no recurrence of the disease even after 2 years follow-up.

  15. Job Enlargement: A Multidimensional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Lex

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation study into the effects of a job enlargement exercise indicates that the expected increases in satisfaction associated with greater work variety, novelty, and felt use of abilities were achieved. (Author/MLF)

  16. Eugenia uniflora Dentifrice for Treating Gingivitis in Children: Antibacterial Assay and Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Jovito, Vanessa de Carvalho; Freires, Irlan Almeida; Ferreira, Danilo Augusto de Holanda; Paulo, Marçal de Queiroz; Castro, Ricardo Dias de

    2016-01-01

    School-age children are frequently at high risk for the onset of biofilm-dependent conditions, including dental caries and periodontal diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a dentifrice containing Eugenia uniflora Linn. (Surinam cherry) extract versus a triclosan-based comparator in treating gingivitis in children aged 10-12 years. The in vitro antibacterial potential of the dentifrice was tested against oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis and Lactobacillus casei). Then a phase-II clinical trial was conducted with 50 subjects aged 10-12 years, with clinical signs of gingivitis. The subjects were randomly assigned to the experimental group (n=25) and control group (n=25), in which participants used the experimental dentifrice and a triclosan-based fluoridated dentifrice (Colgate Total 12(r)), respectively. Clinical examinations assessed the presence of gingivitis (primary outcome) and biofilm accumulation (secondary outcome) using the Gingival-Bleeding Index (GBI) and Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S), respectively, at baseline and after seven days of tooth brushing 3x/day. The data were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-test (GBI) and Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney (OHI-S), with p≤0.05. The experimental dentifrice showed efficient antibacterial activity in vitro. In the clinical trial, a significant reduction in gingival bleeding was observed in both experimental and control groups (p<0.0001), with no statistical difference between them (p=0.178), although a small size effect was observed. Biofilm accumulation was only reduced in the control group (p=0.0039). In conclusion, E. uniflora dentifrice showed anti-gingivitis properties in children aged 10-12 years. Thus, it may be a potentially efficient and safe product to be used alternatively in preventive dental practice.

  17. Management of Gingival Overgrowth in a Cardiac Transplant Patient Using Laser-Assisted Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty.

    PubMed

    Maddi, Abhiram; Alluri, Leela Subhashini; Ciancio, Sebastian G

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) is an oral clinical manifestation associated with certain medications such as immunosuppressants that are administered to organ transplant patients to prevent graft rejection. In patients with cardiac transplants, management of DIGO is critical. In such patients, plaque biofilm accumulation at the gingival interface might be detrimental as it may lead to transient bacteremia as well as systemic inflammation resulting in thromboembolic events. This case report describes the management of DIGO in a cardiac transplant recipient by change of immunosuppressant medication, non-surgical periodontal therapy and laser-assisted gingivectomy.

  18. Effects of immunization with natural and recombinant lysine decarboxylase on canine gingivitis development.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jennifer L; DeMars, Paul L; Collins, Lindsay M; Stoner, Julie A; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Komori, Naoka; Singh, Anil; Feasley, Christa L; Haddock, James A; Levine, Martin

    2012-10-19

    Periodontal disease, gingival inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontal attachment loss (periodontitis), causes tooth loss and susceptibility to chronic inflammation. Professionally scaling and cleaning the teeth regularly controls the disease, but is expensive in companion animals. Eikenella corrodens is common in canine oral cavities where it is a source of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). In human dental biofilms (plaques), LDC converts lysine to cadaverine and impairs the gingival epithelial barrier to bacteria. LDC vaccination may therefore retard gingivitis development. Year-old beagle dogs provided blood samples, and had weight and clinical measurements (biofilm and gingivitis) recorded. After scaling and cleaning, two dogs were immunized subcutaneously with 0.2mg native LDC from E. corrodens and 2 sets of four dogs with 0.2mg recombinant LDC purified from Escherichia coli. A third set of 4 dogs was immunized intranasally. Rehydragel(®), Emulsigen(®), Polygen™ or Carbigen™ were used as adjuvant. Four additional pairs of dogs were sham-immunized with each adjuvant alone (controls). Immunizations were repeated twice, 3 weeks apart, and clinical measurements were obtained after another 2 weeks, when the teeth were scaled and cleaned again. Tooth brushing was then stopped and the diet was changed from hard to soft chow. Clinical measurements were repeated after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Compared with sham-immunized dogs, gingivitis was reduced over all 8 weeks of soft diet after subcutaneous immunization with native LDC, or after intranasal immunization with recombinant LDC in Carbigen™, but for only 6 of the 8 weeks after subcutaneous immunization with recombinant LDC in Emulsigen(®) (repeated measures ANOVA). Subcutaneous vaccination induced a strong serum IgG antibody response that decreased during the soft diet period, whereas intranasal immunization induced a weak serum IgA antibody response that did not decrease. Immunization with recombinant LDC may

  19. Permeabilizing biofilms

    DOEpatents

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas,; Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  20. Medical Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell: product separation. Unwanted biofilms can create enormous increases in fluid frictional resistances, unacceptable reductions in heat transfer efficiency, product contamination, enhanced material deterioration, and accelerated corrosion. Missing from B&B has been an equivalent research dialogue regarding the basic molecular microbiology, immunology, and biotechnological aspects of medical biofilms. Presented here are the current problems related to medical biofilms; current concepts of biofilm formation, persistence, and interactions with the host immune system; and emerging technologies for controlling medical biofilms. PMID:18366134

  1. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-07

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections.

  2. Diode Laser Versus Scalpel in the Treatment of Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis in a 6-Year Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Aboujaoude, Samia; Cassia, Antoine; Moukarzel, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare disease characterized by a benign enlargement of the gingiva involving both the mandible and the maxilla. This case is about a 6-year-old child with non syndromic HGF showing a severe gingival enlargement covering almost all surfaces of the teeth, in both arches, hence causing major aesthetic, phonetic and masticatory problems. The aim of the present article is to compare the outcomes of two therapeutical approaches: i) classical surgical removal with scalpel; and ii) diode laser resection. Compared to the surgical approach, the clinical results show that the main advantages of the diode laser technique are a better visibility during the intervention, minimal postoperative discomfort combined to a better gingival recontouring. However, the time consumption and the high cost of the laser equipment remain the main disadvantages of the systematic use of this technique. PMID:27994842

  3. Enlarging NATO: The Russian Factor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Responses to Enlargement 104 Summary 107 Contents vii Chapter Five RESOURCES FORSTATISM 109 Russia’s Economy HO Defense Policy: Getting... Economy Will Bear 144 Procurement. Requirements 145 All-Volunteer Force 147 Summary 147 Combat Capability 148 Technology 148 Skills and Doctrine...absorb capitalism, re- cover lost wealth, and build a modern economy . Moreover, Russia will lack the military strength of the Soviet Union by a

  4. A rare clinical presentation of sarcoidosis; gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Güzel, Aygül; Köksal, Nurhan; Aydın, Davut; Aslan, Kerim; Gören, Fikret; Karagöz, Filiz

    2013-10-01

    Gingivitis due to sarcoidosis is a relatively rare condition. Gingivitis or isolated gingival involvement may be the first sign of systemic sarcoidosis. We report the case of a 37 year-old woman with isolated gingivitis due to sarcoidosis confirmed by biopsy. Following treatment with a systemic corticosteroid (prednisolone 40 mg/day), all clinical and radiologic findings were completely improved. In cases of chronic and intractable gingivitis, systemic sarcoidosis should be suspected. It should be confirmed with a biopsy, and the patient should be referred to a chest disease clinic to exclude other organ involvement.

  5. Gingival Fibromatosis with Significant De Novo Formation of Fibrotic Tissue and a High Rate of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 11 Final Diagnosis: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis Symptoms: Gingival overgrowth Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare disease Background: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or a part of various syndromes. Case Report: An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the pre-operative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient’s gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health would not be compromised. Conclusions: It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition. PMID:27609299

  6. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  7. Multimodality Imaging of the Effects of a Novel Dentifrice on Oral Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Ajdaharian, Janet; Dadkhah, Mohammad; Sabokpey, Sara; Biren-Fetz, John; Chung, Na Eun; Wink, Cherie; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Objective Oral biofilm formation and progression on the surface of the tooth can lead to advanced oral disease such as gingivitis. The purpose of this randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on oral plaque biofilm using multimodal imaging techniques. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥ 2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. In vivo multimodality in situ imaging was performed over a 3-week period using in vivo Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Non-Linear Optical microscopy (NLOM). Plaque levels, gingival inflammation and gingival bleeding were also charted on days 0, 7, 14, and 21 using standard clinical indices. Results After 3 weeks, OCT and NLOM images showed a macroscopic break-up of the plaque layer and smaller, fragmented residual deposits in the test group with no apparent changes in the pellicle. Biofilm was also reduced in the control group, but to a lesser degree with regard to thickness, continuity and surface area. Paralleling these imaging results, clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P <0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P <0.05). Conclusion Both dental gels reduced oral biofilm with the test gel showing greater efficacy (P <0.05) as determined by clinical and imaging parameters. PMID:24916419

  8. The Slowly Enlarging Ventriculus Terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Woodley-Cook, Joel; Konieczny, Magdalena; Spears, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) cavity within the conus medullaris has been described by the term ventriculus terminalis (VT) or the fifth ventricle. The finding of a VT on MRI imaging of the lumbar spine is often incidental but may be found in patients with low back pain or neuromuscular deficits. These lesions, when identified, are thought to regress or remain stable in terms of size, although some have been described to enlarge in the presence of post-traumatic meningeal hemorrhages or deformities of the vertebral canal. Case Report We describe a case of a slowly growing VT in a patient with progressing lower limb weakness without any history or imaging findings of trauma or spinal canal abnormalities. Conclusions We present an intriguing case of a slowly growing VT in a woman with progressive neurological symptoms. Surgical fenestration provided complete symptomatic relief and follow-up imaging two years after surgery demonstrated no evidence of recurrence. This, to our knowledge, is the first described case of a slowly enlarging VT independent of any other imaging findings. PMID:27867442

  9. Gingival Enlargement Induced by Felodipine Resolves with a Conventional Periodontal Treatment and Drug Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, David; Yie, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 47-year-old male who suffered from GE around his lower anterior teeth as soon as he started treatment with Felodipine 400 mg. We show that oral hygiene measures, antibiotics, and conventional periodontal treatment (scaling and root planing SRP) were all not sufficient to resolve the drug induced GE, which will persist and/or recur provided that systemic effect of the offending medication is still present. The condition immediately resolved after switching to a different medication. The mechanism of GE is complex and not fully understood yet. It is mainly due to overexpression of a number of growth factors due to high concentrations of calcium ions (Ca2+). This affects fibroblasts proliferation and DNA synthesis and leads to a heavy chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate. Our case was managed according to the suggested protocols in previous case studies. The unique features in our case were the immediate onset of the adverse effect after starting the medication and the absence of any underlying medical condition apart from high blood pressure. Improving the oral hygiene together with SRP and cessation of the medication resolves drug induced GE. PMID:27034854

  10. The Fungal Defensin Family Enlarged

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiajia; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are an emerging source of peptide antibiotics. With the availability of a large number of model fungal genome sequences, we can expect that more and more fungal defensin-like peptides (fDLPs) will be discovered by sequence similarity search. Here, we report a total of 69 new fDLPs encoded by 63 genes, in which a group of fDLPs derived from dermatophytes are defined as a new family (fDEF8) according to sequence and phylogenetic analyses. In the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpine, fDLPs have undergone extensive gene expansion. Our work further enlarges the fungal defensin family and will help characterize new peptide antibiotics with therapeutic potential. PMID:25230677

  11. Distinguishing the Signals of Gingivitis and Periodontitis in Supragingival Plaque: a Cross-Sectional Cohort Study in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Harjunmaa, Ulla; Doyle, Ronan; Mulewa, Simeon; Charlie, Davie; Maleta, Ken; Callard, Robin; Walker, A. Sarah; Balloux, Francois; Ashorn, Per; Klein, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periodontal disease ranges from gingival inflammation (gingivitis) to the inflammation and loss of tooth-supporting tissues (periodontitis). Previous research has focused mainly on subgingival plaque, but supragingival plaque composition is also known to be associated with disease. Quantitative modeling of bacterial abundances across the natural range of periodontal severities can distinguish which features of disease are associated with particular changes in composition. We assessed a cross-sectional cohort of 962 Malawian women for periodontal disease and used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing (V5 to V7 region) to characterize the bacterial compositions of supragingival plaque samples. Associations between bacterial relative abundances and gingivitis/periodontitis were investigated by using negative binomial models, adjusting for epidemiological factors. We also examined bacterial cooccurrence networks to assess community structure. The main differences in supragingival plaque compositions were associated more with gingivitis than periodontitis, including higher bacterial diversity and a greater abundance of particular species. However, even after controlling for gingivitis, the presence of subgingival periodontitis was associated with an altered supragingival plaque. A small number of species were associated with periodontitis but not gingivitis, including members of Prevotella, Treponema, and Selenomonas, supporting a more complex disease model than a linear progression following gingivitis. Cooccurrence networks of periodontitis-associated taxa clustered according to periodontitis across all gingivitis severities. Species including Filifactor alocis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were central to this network, which supports their role in the coaggregation of periodontal biofilms during disease progression. Our findings confirm that periodontitis cannot be considered simply an advanced stage of gingivitis even when only considering supragingival plaque

  12. Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. It is estimated that 23% of adults in the US have one or more tooth surfaces with ≥ 3 mm gingival recession. Clinicians often time face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. Therefore, we were charged by the editorial board to answer this critical question: “Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?” An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights our limited understanding of the factors that often guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the etiology, prognosis and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in the field of periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  13. Plant Biofilm Inhibitors to Discover Biofilm Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-08

    REPORT Final Report for Plant Biofilm Inhibitors to Discover Biofilm Genes 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: To control biofilms , we have...synthesized the natural biofilm inhibitor (5Z)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene) -3-butyl-2(5H)-furanone from the red alga Delisea pulchra and determined that...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS biofilms , biofilm inhibitors Thomas K. Wood Texas Engineering

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in Cochlear Implantation: Enlarged Cochlear versus Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (Common Cavity Excluded)

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Valeria; Formigoni, Patrizia; Russo, Carmela; Tribi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To share our experience of cerebrospinal fluid gusher in cochlear implantation in patients with enlarged cochlear or vestibular aqueduct. Study Design. Case series with comparison and a review of the literature. Methods. A retrospective study was performed. Demographic and radiological results of patients with enlarged cochlear aqueduct or enlarged vestibular aqueduct in 278 consecutive cochlear implant recipients, including children and adults, were evaluated between January 2000 and December 2015. Results. Six patients with enlarged cochlear aqueduct and eight patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct were identified. Cerebrospinal fluid gusher occurs in five subjects with enlarged cochlear aqueduct and in only one case of enlarged vestibular aqueduct. Conclusion. Based on these findings, enlarged cochlear aqueduct may be the best risk predictor of cerebrospinal fluid gusher at cochleostomy during cochlear implant surgery despite enlarged vestibular aqueduct. PMID:27847516

  15. Algorithm For Enlargement Of Digitized Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Digital Image Enlarging Balanced Reconstruction Algorithm (DIEBRA) enlarges digitized image composed of square pixels to make image look more like real scene. Synthesizes enlarged image at greater number of pixels, smoothing out blockiness while providing resolution finer than original pixels and closer to scene. Based on more-realistic treatment of pixels, not as points but as areas representing spatial-resolution elements or fields of view of imaging instrument.

  16. [Periodontology and esthetics: the gingival recession].

    PubMed

    Corba, N H

    1991-06-01

    Gingival recessions are regarded by many people as an esthetical problem. Successively the etiology, the significance and the indications for therapy are discussed. Different kinds of therapy such as oral hygiene instruction, the free gingival graft and various pedicle grafts are explained. Finally it is advocated that surgical kinds of therapy have to be applied with reservedness.

  17. Urinary catecholamine levels and gingivitis in children.

    PubMed

    Vanderas, A P; Kavvadia, K; Papagiannoulis, L

    1998-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between gingivitis and emotionally stressful states measured by the urinary catecholamines in children. Three-hundred and fourteen (314) children, boys and girls, aged 6 to 8 years were included in the study. Gingivitis was recorded by the gingival bleeding index and dental plaque by the plaque control record index. Proximal decayed surfaces, faulty restorations, and stainless steel crowns were diagnosed clinically and radiographically. Information concerning systemic and socioeconomic factors was collected by a questionnaire. A 24-hour urine sample was collected for each subject and analyzed by the HPLC technique to assay the catecholamine content. The multiple-regression analysis was carried out to test whether gingivitis was affected by the studied variables. The 95% probability was used. The results showed that epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine did not have a significant association with gingival index. Dental plaque and proximal decayed surfaces significantly affected gingivitis. Of the socioeconomic factors, mother's education had a significant association with gingivitis when all factors were included in the analysis. The data suggest that emotionally stressful states may not increase the probability of developing gingivitis in children of this age.

  18. [Gingival retraction methods. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Tosches, Nino A; Salvi, Giovanni E

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of the preparation margin and the control of the hemorrhage in the gingival sulcus are prerequisites for precise impressions and thereby improving the quality of indirectly fabricated restorations. The purpose of this review article is to summarize available evidence with respect to current methods of gingival retraction and to provide the clinician with practical tips.

  19. Feline gingivitis-stomatitis-pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Diehl, K; Rosychuk, R A

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions of the feline mouth are commonly encountered in small animal practice. Although the majority can be attributed to dental disease and a small percentage are due to autoimmune diseases, the eosinophilic granuloma complex, neoplasia, and other miscellaneous syndromes, many cases appear to be due to a gingivitis-stomatitis-pharyngitis complex, which is likely multifactorial in origin. Viruses, bacterial infection, diet, dental disease, oral conformation, genetic predisposition, hypersensitivities, immunoinsufficiencies, and other defects in oral defense mechanisms may all be contributory. The complexities of this syndrome have made it one of the most challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in feline medicine.

  20. Assessment of Photodynamic Inactivation against Periodontal Bacteria Mediated by a Chitosan Hydrogel in a 3D Gingival Model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Po-Chun; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Chueh-Pin; Tsai, Tsuimin; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and toluidine blue O were prepared and assessed for their mucoadhesive property and antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Increased HPMC content in the hydrogels resulted in increased mucoadhesiveness. Furthermore, we developed a simple In Vitro 3D gingival model resembling the oral periodontal pocket to culture the biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The PDI efficacy of chitosan hydrogel was examined against periodontal biofilms cultured in this 3D gingival model. We found that the PDI effectiveness was limited due to leaving some of the innermost bacteria alive at the non-illuminated site. Using this 3D gingival model, we further optimized PDI procedures with various adjustments of light energy and irradiation sites. The PDI efficacy of the chitosan hydrogel against periodontal biofilms can significantly improve via four sides of irradiation. In conclusion, this study not only showed the clinical applicability of this chitosan hydrogel but also the importance of the light irradiation pattern in performing PDI for periodontal disease. PMID:27809278

  1. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-10-16

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement.

  2. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P < 0.05). The water stream alone showed no statistically significant difference in removal compared with the untreated control (P = 0.24). High-speed videography demonstrated a rapid rate (151 mm(2) in 1 s) of biofilm removal. The UAS was also highly effective at S. mutans, A. naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene.

  3. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:26674427

  4. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-12-18

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity.

  5. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  6. Salivary and crevicular fluid interleukins in gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Boronat-Catalá, Montserrat; Bagán Sebastián, José V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gingivitis is a frequent inflammatory process of the gum tissue that is mainly caused by the accumulation of plaque. The immune response against inflammatory processes is regulated in part by cytokines. Aims: Given that a continuous inflammation exists in gingivitis, it would be logical to assume that the interleukins will be altered locally in those patients. Therefore, the aim of this review was to check whether there is evidence that the interleukins can be used as diagnostic markers of inflammation levels in patients with gingivitis. Materials and Methods: A bibliographical search was undertaken using the key words interleukin and gingivitis in Pubmed, Cochrane, Scopus and Embase. Only those articles published over the last 10 years that were systematic reviews, case-controls or cohort studies in which interleukins in saliva and/or crevicular fluid was investigated in patients with gingivitis were selected. Results: Finally 15 articles were selected, all of them being case-control studies. The interleukins analyzed in the reviewed articles were: IL-1β, IL-8, IL-18, IL-11, IL-12, TNFα, IL-4, IL-17, IL-1α and IL-6. The most commonly studied interleukin is IL-1β and most authors agree that it is higher in the saliva and/or crevicular fluid of patients with gingivitis. Therefore, it could be used as a diagnostic marker of the degree of inflammation in gingivitis. Moreover, as far as the other interleukins studied are concerned, there is no clear consensus among the authors. Conclusion: There is sufficient evidence to suggest that IL-1β in saliva and/or crevicular fluid can be used as a marker of the degree of inflammation in gingivitis. Key words:Interleukins, gingivitis, saliva, crevicular fluid. PMID:24790719

  7. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  8. Is periodontal health a predictor of drug-induced gingival overgrowth? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Banthia, Ruchi; Gupta, Santosh; Banthia, Priyank; Singh, Pallavi; Raje, Sapna; Kaur, Navkiran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gingival overgrowth is a common side-effect of amlodipine regimen on the oral cavity. There is controversy regarding the cause and effect relationship of periodontal health and drug induced gingival overgrowth. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate and to assess the relationship between the periodontal health and the onset and severity of gingival overgrowth in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 known hypertensive patients on amlodipine regimen were included in this study. Probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were noted on four sites of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Gingival enlargement scores were assessed for each patient by employing the hyperplastic index. Oral hygiene status was evaluated using the calculus index (CI). Patients were divided into H, E and L groups based on their periodontal status and responders and non-responders based on their hyperplastic index scores. Differences in means of different periodontal variables in different groups were tested for significance by using ANOVA and unpaired Student t-test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between different variables. For all analyses, P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All the periodontal parameters were statistically highly significant (P = 0.00) amongst H, E and L groups and between responders and non-responders. Statistically highly significant Pearson correlation coefficients were found between mean PPD and mean hyperplastic score, mean CAL and mean hyperplastic score and mean calculus and mean hyperplastic score. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated a definite association between periodontal health and development and severity of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth PMID:25426150

  9. Gingival Fibromatosis with Significant De Novo Formation of Fibrotic Tissue and a High Rate of Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-09-09

    BACKGROUND Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or present as part of various syndromes. CASE REPORT An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the preoperative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient's gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health was not be compromised.  CONCLUSIONS It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition.

  10. Treatment of Desquamative Gingivitis with Free Gingival Graft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vatankhah, Mehdi; Taghi Chitsazi, Mohammad; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Estakhri, Rasoul

    2010-01-01

    Recalcitrant gingival erythematous lichen planus lesions comprise a considerable therapeutic problem. This case of chronic desquamative gingivitis in a 25-year-old woman with erosive oral lichen planus was treated with topical and systemic corti-costeroid administration, followed by placement of a free gingival graft on right upper quadrant. Although recurrence of the lesions was observed following both treatment modalities, free gingival graft despite being an aggressive therapy, proved more effective and with fewer side effects compared with topical or systemic steroid therapy, and seems to be a promising treatment modality with the benefit of more stable results, among others. PMID:22991593

  11. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... as men get older. This is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). An enlarged prostate may cause you problems ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234640 . Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: enlarged parietal foramina

    MedlinePlus

    ... parietal foramina is an inherited condition of impaired skull development. It is characterized by enlarged openings (foramina) ... that form the top and sides of the skull. This condition is due to incomplete bone formation ( ...

  13. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  14. Gender Based Comparison of Gingival Zenith Esthetics.

    PubMed

    Humagain, M; Rokaya, D; Srii, R; Dixit, S; Kafle, D

    2016-01-01

    Background The size, proportion and gingival zenith position of maxillary anterior teeth plays in the anterior teeth esthetics. Objective To compare the gingival zenith positions and levels between male and female in right and left side as an esthetic parameter. Method Impression of the maxillary arch was made in each participant with irreversible hydrocolloid, and dental cast was made with dental stone type IV. Two clinical parameters were evaluated: (1) the gingival zenith position (GZP) from the vertical bisected midline along the long axis of each individual maxillary anterior tooth; and (2) the gingival zenith level (GZL) of the lateral incisors in an apical-coronal direction relative to the gingival line joining the tangents of the GZP of the adjacent central incisor and canine teeth under healthy conditions. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS with the level of significance (α) = 0.05. Descriptive statistics was done and Independent t-test was used to compare the GZP and GZL between male and female. Result In male, the gingival zenith position for right side central, lateral and canine were 1.05 mm, 0.57 mm and 0.14 mm, and in left side were 1.02 mm, 0.53 mm, 0.15 mm. In female, the gingival zenith position for right side central, lateral and canine were 0.99 mm, 0.48 mm and 0.15 mm, and in left side were 0.94 mm, 0.44 mm and 0.14 mm. The gingival zenith position was significantly different between male and female for both lateral incisors. In addition, significantly different was found for the lateral incisor between right and left side. In male, the gingival zenith level of right and left lateral incisors 0.74 mm and 0.71 mm. In female, the gingival zenith level of right and left lateral incisors 0.76 mm and 0.72 mm. No significant difference was found between male and female for the gingival zenith level of right and left lateral incisors. Conclusion The GZP and GZL obtained from this study can be clinically applied to reestablish the GZP of

  15. Experimental Models of Oral Biofilms Developed on Inert Substrates: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Darrene, Lopez-Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    The oral ecosystem is a very complex environment where more than 700 different bacterial species can be found. Most of them are organized in biofilm on dental and mucosal surfaces. Studying this community is important because a rupture in stability can lead to the preeminence of pathogenic microorganisms, causing dental decay, gingivitis, or periodontitis. The multitude of species complicates biofilm analysis so its reproduction, collection, and counting are very delicate. The development of experimental models of dental biofilms was therefore essential and multiple in vitro designs have emerged, each of them especially adapted to observing biofilm formation of specific bacteria within specific environments. The aim of this review is to analyze oral biofilm models. PMID:27699173

  16. Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth: The Genetic Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Noronha Shyam Curtis; Chavan, Rahul; Moon, Ninad Joshirao; Nalla, Srinivas; Mali, Jaydeepchandra; Prajapati, Anchal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, the etiology of drug-induced gingival overgrowth is not entirely understood but is clearly multifactorial. Phenytoin, one of the common drugs implicated in gingival enlargement, is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and partly by CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes are polymorphically expressed and most of the variants result in decreased metabolism of the respective substrates. Aims: The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of the CYP2C9*2 and *3 variant genotypes on phenytoin hydroxylation in subjects diagnosed with epilepsy from South India, thus establishing the genetic polymorphisms leading to its defective hydroxylation process. Materials and Methods: Fifteen epileptic subjects, age 9 to 60 years were included in the study. Among the study subjects, 8 were males and 7 were females. Genomic DNA was extracted from patients’ blood using Phenol-chloroform method and genotyping was done for CYP2C9 using customized TaqMan genotyping assays on a real time thermocycler, by allelic discrimination method. The genetic polymorphisms *1, *2 and *3 on CYP2C9 were selected based on their function and respective allele frequencies in Asian subcontinent among the Asian populations. Results: CYP2C9*1*2 and CYP2C9*3/*3 were identified with equal frequency in the study population. There were seven subjects with CYP2C9*1/*2 genotype (heterozygous mutant), one subject with CYP2C9*1/*1 (wild type) and seven study subjects with CYP2C9*3/*3 (homozygous mutant). Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study will be helpful in the medical prescription purposes of phenytoin, and a more personalized patient approach with its administration can be advocated. PMID:25317394

  17. Gingivitis/stomatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Aller, M S

    1992-11-01

    Any alteration in the balance of bacterial challenge versus the host's ability to resist and repair will result in oral lesions that are similar in appearance. The bacterial cause of gingivitis and periodontitis in humans and in all other animals in which it has been studied is firmly established, and specific species of predominantly gram-negative anaerobes have been implicated. Naturally occurring or acquired immunopathologies are likely to result in premature dental disease. When oral disease is associated with the accumulation of plaque, a positive response can be achieved by reducing the bacterial challenge to the host through the maintenance of oral hygiene by timely professional dental prophylaxis and home care. Disease that is the result of atypical immune responses, however, can be much more difficult to manage. Such oral disease can occur with either immune deficiencies or exaggerated immune responses, and it is likely that multiple mechanisms are active concurrently. In any case, gram-negative anaerobes present in plaque are likely to be a major contributing factor. Therefore patients with chronic refractory gingivitis-stomatitis must be considered to be plaque intolerant. Only with a frequent regimen of aggressive and thorough professional dental treatment plus meticulous oral home care on a daily basis can one expect to keep these cases in remission. Because this is often unrealistic, the only other way to keep these patients free of disease is by total dental extraction. The tissues that are colonized by the causative organisms must be eliminated. All root tips and bony sequestra must be removed and healing with intact epithelium accomplished before these cases will go into remission. Edentulous feline patients that continue to have signs of gingivostomatitis have been found to have an area of nonhealed bony sequestrum and chronic osteomyelitis. Once effective debridement has been accomplished and epithelial healing completed, nonresponsive cases can

  18. Atypical And Severe Enlargement Of Right Atrium.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Carmine; Rossetti, Pietro; Rocci, Anna; Rubino, Pasquale; Basaglia, Manuela; Gaibazzi, Nicola; Quintavalla, Roberto

    2016-09-13

    A 76 year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department for recent-onset dyspnea and cough. The electrocardiogram was considered inconclusive. A thoracic X-ray showed global cardiac profile enlargement. Computed tomography, acutely performed in the clinical suspicion of atypical pneumonia/myocarditis or pericardial effusion, showed cardiac enlargement especially of the right chambers. In order to investigate Ebstein's anomaly, pericardial cysts, tumors or other conditions of the right heart a simple trans-thoracic echocardiogram was performed. Four chambers view showed a giant right atrium aneurysm with moderate tricuspid regurgitation without stenosis or typical Ebstein's echocardiographic pattern.

  19. A newborn with unilateral limb enlargement.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shanel; Maino, Anna P F; Husain, Shad M; Adams, Gill G W

    2012-03-01

    On routine neonatal examination, a newborn term male was noted to have unilateral enlargement of the right lower limb, loose thickened red skin over the palm and widening of all the fingers on the right hand. His body was pinker and warmer on the right side compared with the left and he had a right undescended testicle and hypoplastic scrotum. Radiological examination of the lower limbs demonstrated the enlargement of the soft tissue of the right lower limb compared to the left (Fig. 1). Therefore, the diagnosis was unclear from this constellation of findings and an ophthalmic assessment was requested.

  20. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could: 1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, 2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, 3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and 4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  1. Etiology and occurrence of gingival recession - An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Sarpangala; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya; Hegde, Shashikanth; Rajesh, Shanker Kashyap; Munaz, Mohamed; Ashwin, Devasya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gingival recession is the term used to characterize the apical shift of the marginal gingiva from its normal position on the crown of the tooth. It is frequently observed in adult subjects. The occurrence and severity of the gingival recession present considerable differences between populations. To prevent gingival recession from occurring, it is essential to detect the underlying etiology. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of gingival recession and to identify the most common factor associated with the cause of gingival recession. Methods: A total of 710 subjects aged between 15 years to 60 years were selected. Data were collected by an interview with the help of a proforma and then the dental examination was carried out. The presence of gingival recession was recorded using Miller's classification of gingival recession. The Silness and Loe Plaque Index, Loe and Silness gingival index, community periodontal index were recorded. The data thus obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using Chi-square test and Student's unpaired t-test. Results: Of 710 subjects examined, 291 (40.98%) subjects exhibited gingival recession. The frequency of gingival recession was found to increase with age. High frequency of gingival recession was seen in males (60.5%) compared to females (39.5%). Gingival recession was commonly seen in mandibular incisors (43.0%). Miller's class I gingival recession was more commonly seen. The most common cause for gingival recession was dental plaque accumulation (44.1%) followed by faulty toothbrushing (42.7%). Conclusion: Approximately half of the subjects examined exhibited gingival recession. The etiology of gingival recession is multifactorial, and its appearance is always the result of more than one factor acting together. PMID:26941519

  2. [Gingival fibromatosis (hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis) in a wild European red fox (Vulpes vulpes)].

    PubMed

    Schulze, C; Bensch, M; Winterhoff, N; Ansorge, H; Teifke, J P

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a case of gingival fibromatosis in an otherwise healthy and well nourished wild European red fox (Vulpes vulpes), which was shot by a hunter and submitted to the state laboratory in the context of the rabies monitoring program of the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany. At necropsy, a severe papillomatous proliferation of the complete gingival tissue of the upper and lower jaw was present. This gingival proliferation had already resulted in malocclusion, loosening and loss of several incisival, premolar and molar teeth. Histologically, the primary lesion was a massive increase in the amount of collagen rich and relatively avascular connective tissue within the gingival lamina propria mucosae. A papillomavirus infection was excluded by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and molecular biological methods. The gingival lesions in the red fox are identical to those seen in hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in farmed silver foxes and hereditary gingival fibromatosis in man. It is presumed that, in analogy to the genetic diseases in silver foxes and man, a still unidentified genetic defect is responsible for the development of the disease in the red fox, too.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Gingival Depigmentation using Tetrafluoroethane Cryosurgery and Gingival Abrasion Technique: Two Years Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santhosh; Bhat, G. Subraya; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A comparative evaluation of the gingival depigmentation by using Tetrafluoroethane cryosurgery and the gingival abrasion technique – 2 years of follow up. Material and Methods: Ten systemically healthy patients who were aged 18 to 36 years were selected for the study. Tetrafluoroethane was used for the cryosurgical depigmentation and the gingival abrasion technique used a coarse flame shaped bur. The presence or absence of pigmentation was tabulated, based on the GPI (Gingival Pigmentation Index). For the statistical analysis, Freidman’s test was used. Results: The keratinization was completed within a week after the application of the cryogen and about 10 days after the gingival abrasion technique was done. The statistical analysis which was done after 90th, 180th days and 2 years. The p-value which was obtained (p<.001) showed the superiority of cryosurgery over the gingival abrasion. During the follow up period, no side effects were seen for both the techniques and the improved aesthetics was maintained upto 2 years. Conclusion: The use of cryogen Tetrafluoroethane is easy, practical and inexpensive as compared to gingival abrasion, due to its high rate of recurrence. Hence, it is more acceptable to the patients and the operator. Further studies are needed to assess the long term effectiveness of the cryosurgical method of depigmentation. PMID:23543863

  4. Enlarging Our Perspectives on Two American Revolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Margaret Stimmann

    1976-01-01

    Examines ways in which social studies teachers can help students identify and evaluate significant changes in the past and present and enlarge their perspectives on change. Information on the roles of women in the first American Revolution and insights on the present revolution are provided. (Author/DB)

  5. Angiotensin II Levels in Gingival Tissues from Healthy Individuals, Patients with Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth and Non Responders on Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Anitha; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi

    2015-01-01

    Context The Renin Angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO), a fibrotic condition, caused by Phenytoin, Nifedipine and Cyclosporine. Aim This study quantified Angiotensin II levels in gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy individuals, patients on Nifedipine manifesting/not manifesting drug induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were obtained from healthy individuals (n=24), patients on nifidipine manifesting gingival overgrowth (n= 18) and patients on nifidipine not manifesting gingival overgrowth (n=8). Angiotensin II levels were estimated in the samples using a commercially available ELISA kit. Results Angiotensin II levels were significantly elevated in patients on Nifedipine manifesting gingival overgrowth compared to the other 2 groups (p<0.01). Conclusion The results of the study give an insight into the role played by Angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of drug induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:26436057

  6. [Neutrophils and monocytes in gingival epithelium

    PubMed

    Meng, H X; Zheng, L P

    1994-06-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes of gingival epithellium in health gingiva(H),marginal gingivitis(MG),juvenile periodontitis(JP),adult periodontitis(AP) and subgingival bacteria were quantitated and analyzed,The results showed that the numbers of PMN within either pocket epithelium or oral gingival epithelium in JP were significantly lower than in AP and G.The amounts of PMN in AP were much larger than other three groups.Positive correlation between the number of PMN in sulcular pocket epitelium and the motile bacteri of subgingival plaque was demonstrated by correlation analysis.Monocytes mainly presented in deep pocket and junctional epithelum which were stained by NAE method,however very few Langhans cells were seen in these areas.

  7. [Frenectomy associated with a triangular gingival graft].

    PubMed

    Borghetti, A; Guy, J P; Cesano, B

    1991-11-01

    In periodontal therapy, frenectomy is indicated when the frenum exerts tension on the gingival margin and interferes with proper oral hygiene. The procedure is also employed when the frenum prevents closure of a diastema during orthodontic therapy. Frenectomy should be done after the canines have erupted and before retention is started to prevent separation of the teeth. For an improved surgical and cosmetic result, the authors propose a triangular-shaped gingival graft after the frenum has been excised. The advantage of the procedure is to create an area of attached gingiva and enhance healing.

  8. Comparison of gingival health and gingival crevicular fluid flow in children with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ringelberg, M L; Dixon, D O; Francis, A O; Plummer, R W

    1977-02-01

    GCF flow measurements and a clinical scoring of gingival health were both recorded for a group of 56 children with diabetes and 41 children without diabets. The children with diabetes had significantly more gingival disease than the children without diabetes when compared with either measure. A small but significant correlation was found between the GCF flow and the clinical scores with the children with diabetes but not with the children without diabetes.

  9. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM) post aortic valve replacement (AVR) is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR) and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI). PMID:28028424

  10. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  11. Effect of estradiol on planktonic growth, coaggregation, and biofilm formation of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quantity and quality of biofilms at gingival margin are considered to play a role in the initiation and development of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to consume estradiol, the major sex hormone secreted during pregnancy, in the absence of vitamin K. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of estradiol on the planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation of the P. intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens. In all experiments, the type strain (ATCC) and a clinical strain (AHN) of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol. Planktonic growth was assessed by means of the colony forming unit method, while coaggregation and biofilm formation were assessed by spectrophotometric methods. In the determination of protein and polysaccharide levels, the Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid methods were used, respectively. P. pallens AHN 9283 and P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 increased their numbers at planktonic stage with increasing estradiol concentrations. In 48-h biofilm tests, elevated protein levels were found for both strains of P. intermedia, and the strains P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 and P. pallens AHN 9283 in the presence of estradiol. The P. intermedia strains also increased the levels of polysaccharide formation in the biofilm. Coaggregation of the P. intermedia group organisms with Fusobacterium nucleatum was enhanced only in P. intermedia AHN 8290. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation characteristics of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens differently. These results may, at least partly, explain the differences seen in their contribution to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis.

  12. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species.

  13. Penile enlargement: from medication to surgery.

    PubMed

    Nugteren, Helena M; Balkema, G T; Pascal, A L; Schultz, W C M Weijmar; Nijman, J M; van Driel, M F

    2010-01-01

    Penis lengthening pills, stretch apparatus, vacuum pumps, silicone injections, and lengthening and thickening operations are available for men who worry about their penis size. Surgery is thus far the only proven scientific method for penile enlargement. In this article, we consider patient selection, outcome evaluation, and techniques applied. In our view, sexological counseling and detailed explanation of risks and complications are mandatory before any operative intervention.

  14. The relation of gingival thickness to dynamics of gingival margin position pre- and post-surgically

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, Kharidhi Laxman; Gupta, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the gingival margin position (GMP) before and after open flap debridement in different gingival thickness (GT). Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy patients with moderate to advanced adult periodontitis were included in a randomized control clinical trial. A calibrated UNC-15 periodontal probe, an occlusal onlay stent was used for clinical measurements recorded at baseline, 3 month, 6 month, and 16 month. The changes in the GMP were studied at midbuccal (Mi-B), mesiobuccal (MB), and distobuccal sites. GT was measured presurgically, transgingivally at Mi-B and interdental sites, divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (thin) and Group 2 (thick). Results: In GT of ≤1 mm group, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP led to gingival recession at all study sites in the early postsurgical period of 1 and 3 months. During 6 and 16 months, the apical shift of GMP coincided with the Chernihiv Airport at Mi-B site (6 months), MB site (16 months). The gingival recession was obvious at Mi-B sites (16 months). In the GT of >1 mm, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP did not cause gingival recession at any sites throughout postsurgical (1, 3, 6, and 16 months) period. Conclusion: Thin gingiva showed apical shift of GMP leading to gingival recession as compared to thick gingiva postsurgically. PMID:27143829

  15. Quantitative characterization of airspace enlargement in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Ito, Satoru; Alencar, Adriano M; Suki, Béla

    2006-01-01

    The mean linear intercept (L(m)) can be used to estimate the surface area for gas exchange in the lung. However, in recent years, it is most commonly used as an index for characterizing the enlargement of airspaces in emphysema and the associated severity of structural destruction in the lung. Specifically, an increase in L(m) is thought to result from an increase in airspace sizes. In this paper, we examined how accurately L(m) measures the linear dimensions of airspaces from histological sections and a variety of computer-generated test images. To this end, we developed an automated method for measuring linear intercepts from digitized images of tissue sections and calculate L(m) as their mean. We examined how the shape of airspaces and the variability of their sizes influence L(m) as well as the distribution of linear intercepts. We found that, for a relatively homogeneous enlargement of airspaces, L(m) was a reliable index for detecting emphysema. However, in the presence of spatial heterogeneities with a large variability of airspace sizes, L(m) did not significantly increase and sometimes even decreased compared with its value in normal tissue. We also developed an automated method for measuring the area and computed an equivalent diameter of each individual airspace that is independent of shape. Finally, we introduced new indexes based on the moments of diameter that we found to be more reliable than L(m) to characterize airspace enlargement in the presence of heterogeneities.

  16. Biofilms: A microbial home

    PubMed Central

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  17. Aloe vera: It's effect on gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Neha; Chatterjee, Anirban; Goyal, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Aloe vera is the oldest medicinal plant that has maintained its popularity over the course of time. It is widely known for its medicinal uses in wound healing, as an analgesic, and for its anti-inflammatory properties. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory property of aloe vera mouthwash on plaque-induced gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients who were diagnosed with plaque-induced gingivitis were included in the study. They were divided into three groups with fifteen patients in each group. Group 1 was asked to rinse with 10 ml of aloe vera mouthwash twice daily for three months. Group 2 were treated with scaling only. Group 3 patients were asked to rinse with aloe vera mouthwash and scaling was done. The clinical changes were evaluated with Loe and Silness gingival index (1963) and Muhlemann and Son's Sulcus bleeding index (1971) at baseline, after one month and three months, respectively. Results: The data obtained was compared statistically. The paired ‘t’ test was done for intragroup comparison and one-way analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test was used for intergroup comparison. The data was obtained at the baseline, end of first month, and end of the third month. The result suggested reduction in gingival inflammation in all the three groups, but it was more in the aloe vera mouthwash and scaling group. Hence, it was concluded that aloe vera had a significant anti-inflammatory property. Thus, it can be used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy for treating plaque-induced gingivitis. PMID:24174720

  18. Treating Enlarged Prostate (BPH): Which Drugs Work Best

    MedlinePlus

    ... the prostate gets larger. This is called prostate enlargement, or BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Why should I ... alpha-blocker doxazosin for a first treatment. Prostate enlargement affects millions of men, including about half of ...

  19. Investigation of biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Flemming, H.C.; Griebe, T.; Szewzyk, U.

    1999-07-01

    Drinking water systems, wastewater operations, and even groundwater and surface water, have in common the presence of cellular colonies called biofilms. Until now the means for studying biofilms have been limited. The present text provides the first in-depth assessment of current and experimental ways of studying biofilms, both in sample form and in situ. It shows how sensors, microscopy, lasers, and calorimetry, among other tools, can be used to obtain data on the morphology and metabolism of biofilms. In clarifying the way biofilms are studied, the book offers new insights into biofilms themselves. At the same time the text applies the techniques of inquiry to many problems confronting the environmental specialist, notably, the control of corrosion and biofouling, and the improvement of fixed-biofilm reactors in wastewater treatment.

  20. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  1. Novel carbocyle enlargement in aqueous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.J.; Chen, D.L.; Lu, Y.Q.; Haberman, J.X.; Mague, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    For two-atom ring expansions, the photochemical method of [2+2] cyclization-decyclization is the most successful. The [2+2] cycloaddition of an acetylenic ester to an enamine of a cyclic ketone and subsequent opening of the annulated cyclobutene moiety formed in another useful method for two-carbon ring expansion. We report here a novel two-atom carbocycle enlargement based on the indium-mediated Barbier-Grignard type reaction in water. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. 48 CFR 6101.3 - Time: enlargement; computation [Rule 3].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time: enlargement..., GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.3 Time: enlargement; computation . (a) Time... enlargement of time may be granted even though the request was filed after the time for taking the...

  3. USAREUR 2010: Harnessing the Potential of NATO Enlargement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    in The Challenge of NATO Enlargement, 20. 28 Jeffrey Simon, “NATO Enlargement: Crossing the Rubicon ,” in NATO after Fifty Years, ed. S. Victor...11_10_99Europe.htm>. Internet. Accessed 29 September 2002. Simon, Jeffrey. “NATO Enlargement: Crossing the Rubicon .” In NATO after Fifty Years, ed. S. Victor

  4. Distribution of smile line, gingival angle and tooth shape among the Saudi Arabian subpopulation and their association with gingival biotype

    PubMed Central

    AlQahtani, Nabeeh A.; Haralur, Satheesh B.; AlMaqbol, Mohammad; AlMufarrij, Ali Jubran; Al Dera, Ahmed Ali; Al-Qarni, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the occurrence of smile line and maxillary tooth shape in the Saudi Arabian subpopulation, and to estimate the association between these parameters with gingival biotype. Materials and Methods: On the fulfillment of selection criteria, total 315 patients belong to Saudi Arabian ethnic group were randomly selected. Two frontal photographs of the patients were acquired. The tooth morphology, gingival angle, and smile line classification were determined with ImageJ image analyzing software. The gingival biotype was assessed by probe transparency method. The obtained data were analyzed with SPSS 19 (IBM Corporation, New York, USA) software to determine the frequency and association between other parameters and gingival biotype. Results: Among the clinical parameters evaluated, the tapering tooth morphology (56.8%), thick gingival biotype (53%), and average smile line (57.5%) was more prevalent. The statistically significant association was found between thick gingival biotype and the square tooth, high smile line. The high gingival angle was associated with thin gingival biotype. Conclusions: The study results indicate the existence of an association between tooth shape, smile line, and gingival angle with gingival biotype. PMID:27195228

  5. Gingival hypertrophy: a solitary manifestation of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ryan; Byers, Karin; Walvekar, Rohan R

    2008-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with rapid onset hypertrophy of both the upper and lower gingiva. A detailed history and a diet nearly void of fruits and vegetables raised the suspicion of a possible deficiency of vitamin C. An estimation of the serum ascorbic acid level confirmed our suspicions (<0.12 mg/dL; normal range, 0.4-1.0 mg/dL) and a diagnosis of scurvy was confirmed. A course of 1000 mg/d of ascorbic acid was initiated that caused a dramatic resolution of the gingival lesions. Gingival hypertrophy has a large differential diagnosis; however, it is also known to be an extremely rare manifestation of scurvy. A high index of suspicion for scurvy is relevant given its low prevalence in developed nations and how easily remediable the disease can be, even when it presents in a severe form.

  6. Chronic inflammatory gingival overgrowths: laser gingivectomy & gingivoplasty.

    PubMed

    Shankar, B Shiva; T, Ramadevi; S, Neetha M; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar; Saritha, G; Reddy, J Muralinath

    2013-02-01

    It is quite common to note chronic inflammatory Gingival overgrowths during and/or post orthodontic treatment. Sometimes the overgrowths may even potentially complicate and/or interrupt orthodontic treatment. With the introduction of soft tissue lasers these problems can now be addressed more easily. Amongst many LASERS now available in Dentistry DIODE LASERS seem to be most ideal for orthodontic soft tissue applications. As newer treatments herald into minimally invasive techniques, DIODE LASERS are becoming more promising both in patient satisfaction and dentist satisfaction. How to cite this article: Shankar BS, Ramadevi T, Neetha M S, Reddy P S K, Saritha G, Reddy J M. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):83-87.

  7. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, B Shiva; T, Ramadevi; S, Neetha M; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar; Saritha, G; Reddy, J Muralinath

    2013-01-01

    It is quite common to note chronic inflammatory Gingival overgrowths during and/or post orthodontic treatment. Sometimes the overgrowths may even potentially complicate and/or interrupt orthodontic treatment. With the introduction of soft tissue lasers these problems can now be addressed more easily. Amongst many LASERS now available in Dentistry DIODE LASERS seem to be most ideal for orthodontic soft tissue applications. As newer treatments herald into minimally invasive techniques, DIODE LASERS are becoming more promising both in patient satisfaction and dentist satisfaction. How to cite this article: Shankar BS, Ramadevi T, Neetha M S, Reddy P S K, Saritha G, Reddy J M. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):83-87. PMID:24155582

  8. The sociobiology of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nadell, Carey D; Xavier, Joao B; Foster, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms are densely packed communities of microbial cells that grow on surfaces and surround themselves with secreted polymers. Many bacterial species form biofilms, and their study has revealed them to be complex and diverse. The structural and physiological complexity of biofilms has led to the idea that they are coordinated and cooperative groups, analogous to multicellular organisms. We evaluate this idea by addressing the findings of microbiologists from the perspective of sociobiology, including theories of collective behavior (self-organization) and social evolution. This yields two main conclusions. First, the appearance of organization in biofilms can emerge without active coordination. That is, biofilm properties such as phenotypic differentiation, species stratification and channel formation do not necessarily require that cells communicate with one another using specialized signaling molecules. Second, while local cooperation among bacteria may often occur, the evolution of cooperation among all cells is unlikely for most biofilms. Strong conflict can arise among multiple species and strains in a biofilm, and spontaneous mutation can generate conflict even within biofilms initiated by genetically identical cells. Biofilms will typically result from a balance between competition and cooperation, and we argue that understanding this balance is central to building a complete and predictive model of biofilm formation.

  9. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  10. Treatment of gingival pigmentation: a case series.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Prasad; Sunil, S; Mishra, R; Sheshadri

    2005-01-01

    A smile expresses a feeling of joy, success, sensuality, affection and courtesy, and reveals self confidence and kindness. The harmony of the smile is determined not only by the shape, the position and the color of the teeth but also by the gingival tissues. Gingival health and appearance are essential components of an attractive smile. Gingival pigmentation results from melanin granules, which are produced by melanoblasts. The degree of pigmentation depends on melanoblastic activity. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign and does not present a medical problem, complaints of 'black gums' are common particularly in patients having a very high smile line (gummy smile). For depigmentation of gingiva different treatment modalities have been reported like- Bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and laser. In the present case series bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap (epithelial excision) cryotherapy and electrosurgery have been tried for depigmentation, which are simple, effective and yield good results, along with good patient satisfaction. The problems encountered with some of these techniques have also been discussed.

  11. Rare Gingival Metastasis by Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Li-Jun; Geng, Jian; Chen, Ya-Nan; Wang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) uncommonly metastasizes to the gingiva, which always means a poor outcome. We reported a rare HCC case with multiple metastases to gingiva, lungs, and brain. A 60-year-old man was initially diagnosed as HCC with metastases to double lungs. He was subjected to a transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) (5-fluorouracil, 750 mg) and two cycles of intravenous chemotherapy (gemcitabine 1.8 g at days 1 and 8, oxaliplatin 200 mg at day 2, every 4 weeks). However, the volume of liver tumor still increased. A bean-size gingival nodule growing with occasional bleeding was also found. TACE (5-fluorouracil 750 mg, perarubicin 40 mg, cisplatin 20 mg) was performed again and an oral sorafenib therapy (400 mg, twice per day) was adopted. The disease maintained relatively stable for about 6 months until a second obvious progress. The gingival nodule was then palliatively excised and identified as a poorly differentiated metastatic HCC by histopathological examination. Best supportive treatments were made since the performance score was too bad. Finally, cerebral metastases occurred and the patient died of systemic failure. Upon review of previous reports, we discussed risk factors, clinical and pathological characteristics, treatments, and prognosis of gingival metastasis by HCC. PMID:28386283

  12. Biofilm Formation by Drug Resistant Enterococci Isolates Obtained from Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Manjula; Sood, Shaveta; Sharma, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Enterococci are an important cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections and several multidrug resistant strains have emerged. The severity of periodontal diseases is managed by reduction in the pathogenic bacteria. There is a need to assess the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of enterococci colonizing the periodontal pocket and correlate its biofilm formation ability because oral biofilms provide a protective environment and are a reservoir of bacterial colonization of the gingival crevice. Aim To investigate possible association between antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation in enterococci isolates from chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Dr. Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Punjab University, Chandigarh from January 2015 to October 2015. Sterile paper points were inserted in the periodontal pocket of 100 subjects and put in a transport media. Forty -six isolates were identified as enterococci. The isolates were further examined for their ability to form biofilm by microtitre plate assay and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion method for clinically relevant antibiotics. Results Significant relationship (p<0.001) was found between biofilm production with antibiotic resistance to Vancomycin, Erythromycin, Ciprofloxacin, Tiecoplanin, Amoxycillin and Gentamycin. Conclusion The study demonstrates a high propensity among the isolates of Enterococci to form biofilm and a significant association of biofilm with multiple drug resistance. PMID:28273964

  13. A quantitative proteomic analysis of biofilm adaptation by the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Roy, Sumita; Noirel, Josselin; Douglas, Ian; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P

    2010-09-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobe that is one of the most prominent inhabitants of the sub-gingival plaque biofilm, which is crucial for causing periodontitis. We have used iTRAQ proteomics to identify and quantify alterations in global protein expression of T. forsythia during growth in a biofilm. This is the first proteomic study concentrating on biofilm growth in this key periodontal pathogen, and this study has identified several changes in protein expression. Moreover, we introduce a rigorous statistical method utilising peptide-level intensities of iTRAQ reporters to determine which proteins are significantly regulated. In total, 348 proteins were identified and quantified with the expression of 44 proteins being significantly altered between biofilm and planktonic cells. We identified proteins from all cell compartments, and highlighted a marked upregulation in the relative abundances of predicted outer membrane proteins in biofilm cells. These included putative transport systems and the T. forsythia S-layer proteins. These data and our finding that the butyrate production pathway is markedly downregulated in biofilms indicate possible alterations in host interaction capability. We also identified upregulation of putative oxidative stress response proteins, and showed that biofilm cells are 10 to 20 fold more resistant to oxidative stress. This may represent an important adaptation of this organism to prolonged persistence and immune evasion in the oral cavity.

  14. Photodynamic inactivation of biofilm: taking a lightly colored approach to stubborn infection

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Wanessa CMA; Avci, Pinar; de Oliveira, Milene Nóbrega; Gupta, Asheesh; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Perussi, Livia R; Tegos, George P; Perussi, Janice R; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are responsible for a variety of microbial infections in different parts of the body, such as urinary tract infections, catheter infections, middle-ear infections, gingivitis, caries, periodontitis, orthopedic implants, and so on. The microbial biofilm cells have properties and gene expression patterns distinct from planktonic cells, including phenotypic variations in enzymic activity, cell wall composition and surface structure, which increase the resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobial treatments. There is consequently an urgent need for new approaches to attack biofilm-associated microorganisms, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may be a promising candidate. aPDT involves the combination of a nontoxic dye and low-intensity visible light which, in the presence of oxygen, produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. It has been demonstrated that many biofilms are susceptible to aPDT, particularly in dental disease. This review will focus on aspects of aPDT that are designed to increase efficiency against biofilms modalities to enhance penetration of photosensitizer into biofilm, and a combination of aPDT with biofilm-disrupting agents. PMID:23879608

  15. Quercitrin-nanocoated titanium surfaces favour gingival cells against oral bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A.; Fernández-Calderón, Maria C.; Córdoba, Alba; González-Martín, Maria L.; Monjo, Marta; Ramis, Joana M.

    2016-01-01

    Many dental implants fail due to the infection and inflammation that walk hand in hand with poor healing and soft tissue integration. Titanium surfaces were nanocoated with quercitrin, a natural flavonoid, with the aim to improve soft tissue integration and increase dental implants success. Streptococcus mutans attachment and biofilm formation was analysed. Then, the anti-inflammatory properties and the potential of quercitrin-nanocoated surfaces to boost soft tissue regeneration were tested using human gingival fibroblasts. An inflammatory situation was mimicked using interleulin-1-beta. We found that quercitrin-nanocoated surfaces decreased initial bacterial adhesion while increasing human gingival fibroblasts attachment. Furthermore, quercitrin-nanocoated Ti increased collagen mRNA levels and decreased matrix metalloproteinase-1/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinanse-1 mRNA ratio, which is related to a reduced metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation, while also decreasing the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E2 release under basal and inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that quercitrin-nanocoated surfaces could enhance the soft tissue integration and increase dental implants success. PMID:26925553

  16. Characterization of the human immune cell network at the gingival barrier

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.

    2015-01-01

    The oral mucosa is a barrier site constantly exposed to rich and diverse commensal microbial communities, yet little is known of the immune cell network maintaining immune homeostasis at this interface. We have performed a detailed characterization of the immune cell subsets of the oral cavity in a large cohort of healthy subjects. We focused our characterization on the gingival interface, a particularly vulnerable mucosal site, with thin epithelial lining and constant exposure to the tooth adherent biofilm. In health, we find a predominance of T cells, minimal B cells, a large presence of granulocytes/neutrophils, a sophisticated network of professional antigen presenting cells (APC) and a small population of innate lymphoid cells (ILC) policing the gingival barrier. We further characterize cellular subtypes in health and interrogate shifts in immune cell populations in the common oral inflammatory disease periodontitis. In disease we document an increase in neutrophils and an up regulation of IL-17 responses. We identify the main source of IL-17 in health and periodontitis within the CD4+ T cell compartment. Collectively our studies provide a first view of the landscape of physiologic oral immunity and serve as a baseline for the characterization of local immunopathology. PMID:26732676

  17. Gingival Recession: Review and Strategies in Treatment of Recession

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Koppolu; Rajababu, Palaparthy; Satyanarayana, Durvasula; Sagar, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues is gingival recession. Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins; gingival margin migrates apical to the cementoenamel junction. Although it rarely results in tooth loss, marginal tissue recession is associated with thermal and tactile sensitivity, esthetic complaints, and a tendency toward root caries. This paper reviews etiology, consequences, and the available surgical procedures for the coverage of exposed root surfaces, including three case reports. PMID:23082256

  18. The Biofilm Community-Rebels with a Cause

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Dou, Yuetan; Mishra, Arunima; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2015-01-01

    Oral Biofilms are one of the most complex and diverse ecosystem developed by successive colonization of more than 600 bacterial taxa. Development starts with the attachment of early colonizers such as Actinomyces species and oral streptococci on the acquired pellicle and tooth enamel. These bacteria not only adhere to tooth surface but also interact with each other and lay foundation for attachment of bridging colonizer such as Fusobacterium nucleatum followed by late colonizers including the red complex species: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola-the founders of periodontal disease. As the biofilm progresses from supragingival sites to subgingival sites, the environment changes from aerobic to anaerobic thus favoring the growth of mainly Gram-negative obligate anaerobes while restricting the growth of the early Gram-positive facultative aerobes. Microbes present at supragingival level are mainly related to gingivitis and root-caries whereas subgingival species advance the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and thus causing periodontitis. This review summarizes our present understanding and recent developments on the characteristic features of supra- and subgingival biofilms, interaction between different genera and species of bacteria constituting these biofilms and draws our attention to the role of some of the recently discovered members of the oral community. PMID:26120510

  19. Conductance enlargement in picoscale electroburnt graphene nanojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Mol, Jan A.; Lau, Chit Siong; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Warner, Jamie; Lambert, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Provided the electrical properties of electroburnt graphene junctions can be understood and controlled, they have the potential to underpin the development of a wide range of future sub-10-nm electrical devices. We examine both theoretically and experimentally the electrical conductance of electroburnt graphene junctions at the last stages of nanogap formation. We account for the appearance of a counterintuitive increase in electrical conductance just before the gap forms. This is a manifestation of room-temperature quantum interference and arises from a combination of the semimetallic band structure of graphene and a cross-over from electrodes with multiple-path connectivity to single-path connectivity just before breaking. Therefore, our results suggest that conductance enlargement before junction rupture is a signal of the formation of electroburnt junctions, with a picoscale current path formed from a single sp2 bond. PMID:25730863

  20. Patient with bilateral breast enlargement and hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Ahmed, T; Rashid, M M

    2009-01-01

    A 20 year old man was admitted in the surgical unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital on August 2007 presented with Hypospadias & underdeveloped penis from childhood, gradual enlargement of both breasts for the last 10 years, absence of axillary and pubic hair from puberty & painful swelling of both testes for the last 3 years. The patient was regarded as a female upto the age of 10 years. He has got no voice change since puberty. On examination he had average body built, there was bilateral gynaecomastia, hypospadias, rudimentary penis & absence of pubic and axillary hair. His testosterone level, serum prolactin level, serum progesterone level, serum estradiol level was done. Cytology on buccal smear done and ultrasonography revealed no ovary and uterus. Ultimately patient was diagnosed as a case of androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). The case is reported for clinical awareness & to share our experience.

  1. E-Cigarette Vapor Induces an Apoptotic Response in Human Gingival Epithelial Cells Through the Caspase-3 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Park, Hyun Jin; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Zakrzewski, Andrew; Chmielewski, Witold; Chakir, Jamila

    2017-06-01

    Electronic cigarettes represent an increasingly significant proportion of today's consumable tobacco products. E-cigarettes contain several chemicals which may promote oral diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of e-cigarette vapor on human gingival epithelial cells. Results show that e-cigarette vapor altered the morphology of cells from small cuboidal form to large undefined shapes. Both single and multiple exposures to e-cigarette vapor led to a bulky morphology with large faint nuclei and an enlarged cytoplasm. E-cigarette vapor also increased L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the targeted cells. This activity was greater with repeated exposures. Furthermore, e-cigarette vapor increased apoptotic/necrotic epithelial cell percentages compared to that observed in the control. Epithelial cell apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL assay showing that exposure to e-cigarette vapor increased apoptotic cell numbers, particularly after two and three exposures. This negative effect involved the caspase-3 pathway, the activity of which was greater with repeated exposure and which decreased following the use of caspase-3 inhibitor. The adverse effects of e-cigarette vapor on gingival epithelial cells may lead to dysregulated gingival cell function and result in oral disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1539-1547, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

  3. Clinical efficacy of a 1% Matricaria chamomile L. mouthwash and 0.12% chlorhexidine for gingivitis control in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

    PubMed

    Goes, Paula; Dutra, Caio S; Lisboa, Mário R P; Gondim, Delane V; Leitão, Renata; Brito, Gerly A C; Rego, Rodrigo O

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the clinical efficacy of a mouthwash containing 1% Matricaria chamomilla L. (MTC) extract in reducing gingival inflammation and plaque formation in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolled a total of 30 males and females (age, 10-40 years) with fixed orthodontic appliances and a minimum of 20 natural teeth. The participants were allocated to three groups (n = 10 each) and asked to rinse with 15 mL of a placebo, 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX), or 1% MTC mouthwash, immediately after brushing for 1 min, in the morning and evening, for 15 days. Data (mean ± SD) on visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI) were recorded on days 1 and 15. The placebo group exhibited increases in VPI and GBI (10.2% and 23.1%, respectively) from day 1 to day 15. As compared with placebo, VPI and GBI significantly decreased in the MTC group (-25.6% and -29.9%, respectively) and the CHX group (-39.9% and -32.0%, respectively). In summary, MTC reduced biofilm accumulation and gingival bleeding in patients with gingivitis, probably because of its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.(J Oral Sci 58, 569-574, 2016).

  4. Effect of chlorhexidine varnish on gingival growth in orthodontic patients: a randomized prospective split-mouth study

    PubMed Central

    Pretti, Henrique; Barbosa, Gabriella Lopes de Rezende; Lages, Elizabeth Maria Bastos; Gala-García, Alfonso; de Magalhães, Claudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fixed orthodontic appliances patients suffer limitations on the effective control of biofilm by mechanical methods, bringing the need of a coadjutant in the control of inflammation and oral health improvement. Objective: The aim of this prospective split-mouth blind study was to analyze the effect of a 40% chlorhexidine (CHX) varnish on gingival growth of patients with orthodontic fixed appliances. Methods: Healthy teenage patients with fixed orthodontic appliances and increased gingival volume were recruited (n = 30). Each individual was his own control, having in the maxilla one control side and one treatment side. An application of varnishes occurred on the vestibular area of the upper premolars and first molar crowns, on the control side (placebo varnish) and on the experimental side (EC40(r) Biodentic CHX varnish). The varnishes and sides were randomly chosen and its identification and group was kept by a third party observer and it was not revealed to the researchers and participants until the end of study. In order to establish a baseline registration, digital photographs were taken by a trained photographer before varnish application at baseline (T0), as well as 14 days (T14) and 56 days (T56) after the application. The gingival volume was calculated indirectly using the vestibular areas (mm2) of the upper second premolars' clinical crowns by RapidSketch(r) software, at all study times. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Turkey-Krammer test. Results: It was observed, in the final sample of 30 individuals, that at T0, the control and treatment groups were similar. At T14 and T56, a progressive reduction of the clinical crown area was seen in the control group, and an increase in the average area was detected in the experimental group (p < 0,05). Conclusions: The use of 40% CHX varnish decreases the gingival overgrowth in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Further studies are necessary to set the action time and frequency of

  5. The Effect of Age on the Gingival Crevicular Fluid Composition During Experimental Gingivitis. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsalikis, Lazaros

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cytokines have been proposed as potentially useful diagnostic or prognostic markers of periodontal inflammation related alterations during the experimental gingivitis model. The role of ageing in periodontal disease needs further elucidation; therefore investigations of its influence on host response are needed. Objective: To study the effect of age on interleukins IL -6, IL-8 and TNF-a levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and their correlations to clinical parameters during experimental gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Five young subjects (20-22 years old) and five old subjects (61-65 years old), all periodontal healthy, participated in this clinical trial. A professional plaque control programme was undertaken to establish healthy gingival conditions at baseline. Plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI) were recorded at 60 sites at baseline, after 21 days of no oral hygiene and one week later after professional cleaning and reestablishment of oral hygiene procedures. A total of 180 samples were analyzed with ELISA for levels of IL -6, IL-8 and TNF-a in gingival crevicular fluid. The examination included the mesiobuccal sites of the Ramfjord teeth. Comparisons between and within groups were performed by non-parametric tests (Mann- Withney) and correlations were sought for with Wilcoxon test. Significance was set at p=0.05. Results: Results showed significant diferences between the two groups with regard to the plaque and bleeding scores and GCF volume, all of which proved to be more pronounced in old group. With respect to laboratory data, mean cytokine concentrations were in general lower in young group. TNF-a had a steady increase for the adults, which was found to be statistically significant between Days 0 and 21, IL-8 showed a statistically significant decrease at Day 28 in the young group and finally IL-6 showed a fluctuation, which was totally adverse for the two groups at each time point. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present

  6. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... sulcus (depression between the tooth and gums) to determine if there is a gingivitis condition....

  7. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... sulcus (depression between the tooth and gums) to determine if there is a gingivitis condition....

  8. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... sulcus (depression between the tooth and gums) to determine if there is a gingivitis condition....

  9. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... sulcus (depression between the tooth and gums) to determine if there is a gingivitis condition....

  10. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... sulcus (depression between the tooth and gums) to determine if there is a gingivitis condition....

  11. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  12. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  13. Enlarged vestibular aqueduct in pediatric SNHL

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Wippold, Franz J.; Lieu, Judith E C

    2010-01-01

    Objective Comparison of the Cincinnati criteria (midpoint >0.9 mm or operculum >1.9 mm) to the Valvassori criterion (midpoint ≥ 1.5 mm) for enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) in pediatric cochlear implant patients. Study Design Cohort study Subjects 130 Pediatric cochlear implant recipients. Methods We reviewed temporal bone CT scans to measure the vestibular aqueduct midpoint and opercular width. Results The Cincinnati criteria identified 44% of patients with EVA versus 16% with the Valvassori criterion (P<0.01). Of those with EVA, 45% were unilateral and 55% were bilateral using Cincinnati criteria; 64% were unilateral and 36% bilateral using Valvassori criterion (P<0.01). The Cincinnati criteria diagnosed 70 ears with EVA classified as normal using the Valvassori criterion (P<0.01);59 lacked another medical explanation for their hearing loss. Conclusion The Cincinnati criteria identified a large percentage of pediatric cochlear implant patients with EVA who might otherwise have no known etiology for their deafness. PMID:19328346

  14. Drop in transforming growth factor-alpha and osteoprotegerin level in gingival crevicular fluid from patients with gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Otogoto, Junichi; Mogi, Makio

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators, especially cytokine, play a central role in the pathogenesis of gingivitis. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the various growth factors, and cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with gingivitis, as compared with those of control subjects. The levels of cytokine in the samples were determined by their respective ELISAs. The transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and osteoprotegerin (OPG) level were significantly lower in patients with gingivitis than in the controls (p < 0.05). Also, there was a positive correlation between TGF-alpha and OPG levels (r = 0.761). These results suggest that the decrease in growth factor TGF-alpha is associated with the pathophysiology and/or the progress of gingivitis.

  15. Untypical amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pavlic, Verica; Zubovic, Nina; Ilic, Sanja; Adamovic, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Amlodipine is a third generation dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker that is frequently used in therapy of hypertension. Among many side effects, amlodipine has been found associated with gingival overgrowth (GO) which usually occurs within the first three months of starting therapy at a dose of 10 mg/day. However, there are very few reports on amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth (AIGO) at a lower dose (5 mg/day) and only after short term administration. A 64-year-old male patient with hypertension, who received amlodipine (5 mg/day) for four years, sought medical attention at the Department of Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The patient complained of masticatory problems due to extensive maxillary GO along with pain, bleeding, and foul odor. The clinical and the histological evidences were consistent with AIGO. The first line treatment consisted of the amlodipine substitution (amlodipine was replaced with enalapril, 5 mg/day) and the scaling and root planning/SRP. At one-month follow-up, drug replacement and SRP resulted in some reduction of the inflammation and significant reduction of symptoms. Further, gingivectomy/gingivoplasty helped overcome the effect of these drugs. The possibility of AIGO should be considered for a lower dose, as well as a late presentation.

  16. Untypical Amlodipine-Induced Gingival Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pavlic, Verica; Zubovic, Nina; Ilic, Sanja; Adamovic, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Amlodipine is a third generation dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker that is frequently used in therapy of hypertension. Among many side effects, amlodipine has been found associated with gingival overgrowth (GO) which usually occurs within the first three months of starting therapy at a dose of 10 mg/day. However, there are very few reports on amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth (AIGO) at a lower dose (5 mg/day) and only after short term administration. A 64-year-old male patient with hypertension, who received amlodipine (5 mg/day) for four years, sought medical attention at the Department of Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The patient complained of masticatory problems due to extensive maxillary GO along with pain, bleeding, and foul odor. The clinical and the histological evidences were consistent with AIGO. The first line treatment consisted of the amlodipine substitution (amlodipine was replaced with enalapril, 5 mg/day) and the scaling and root planning/SRP. At one-month follow-up, drug replacement and SRP resulted in some reduction of the inflammation and significant reduction of symptoms. Further, gingivectomy/gingivoplasty helped overcome the effect of these drugs. The possibility of AIGO should be considered for a lower dose, as well as a late presentation. PMID:25692048

  17. Gingival Diseases in Childhood – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ilango, Paavai; Subbareddy, Venkat; Katamreddy, Vineela; Parthasarthy, Harinath

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents are subject to a wide variety of gingival infections. Epidemiological studies indicate that gingivitis of varying severity is nearly a universal finding in children and adolescents. The shorter life span of the primary dentition may be the reason why in general little attention is given to periodontitis in children. Since early diagnosis is important for successful treatment, it is imperative that children receive a periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visit. Furthermore destructive periodontal disease occurs in children with certain systemic diseases. Indeed the presence of severe periodontitis may be an early sign of systemic disease. A general medical evaluation to determine if systemic diseases are present should be considered in children who exhibit severe periodontitis, especially if the disease appears resistant to therapy. Though periodontal health awareness and therapy are increasing day by day in our country compared to earlier days, it is much restricted to adults rather than children. Oral cavity examination in children is much oriented in hard tissue evaluation than soft tissue health. Hence, this article enlightens about the prevalence of various soft tissue diseases and importance of long term overall oral health maintenance in childhood. PMID:25478471

  18. Foreign body gingivitis: An iatrogenic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Wysocki, G.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Gingival biopsy specimens from eight patients exhibiting a localized, erythematous, or mixed erythematous/leukoplakic gingivitis that was refractory to conventional periodontal therapy were examined histologically and by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Histologic examination revealed variable numbers of small, usually subtle, sometimes equivocal, and occasionally obvious foci of granulomatous inflammation. Special stains for fungi and acid-fast bacilli were consistently negative. In all cases, the granulomatous foci contained particles of foreign material that were often inconspicuous and easily overlooked during routine histologic examination. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of these foreign particles disclosed Ca, Al, Si, Ti, and P in most lesions. However, other elements such as Zr, V, Ag, and Ni were found only in specific biopsy specimens. By comparing the elemental analyses, clinical features, and history of the lesions, strong evidence for an iatrogenic source of the foreign material was found in one case, and good evidence in five cases. In the remaining two patients, the source of the foreign particles remains unresolved.

  19. Enlargement of the Baldone near-surface radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Dreimanis, A.

    2007-07-01

    A unified analysis of the enlargement of the Baldone near-surface radioactive waste (RW) repository RADONS considers the interplay of the existing engineering, safety and infrastructure premises, with the foreseen newly socio-technical features. This enlargement consists in construction of two additional RW disposal vaults and in building a long-term storage facility for spent sealed sources at the RADONS territory. Our approach is based on consecutive analysis of following basic elements: - the origin of enlargement - the RADONS safety analysis and a set of optimal socio-technical solutions of Salaspils research reactor decommissioning waste management; - the enlargement - a keystone of the national RW management concept, including the long-term approach; - the enlargement concept - the result of international co-operation and obligations; - arrangement optimization of new disposal and storage space; - environmental impact assessment for the repository enlargement - the update of socio-technical studies. The study of the public opinion revealed: negative attitude to repository enlargement is caused mainly due to missing information on radiation level and on the RADONS previous operations. These results indicate: basic measures to improve the public attitude to repository enlargement: the safety upgrade, public education and compensation mechanisms. A detailed stakeholders engagement and public education plan is elaborated. (author)

  20. Sulfadiazines prevent plaque formation and gingivitis in beagles.

    PubMed

    Howell, T H; Reddy, M S; Weber, H P; Li, K L; Alfano, M C; Vogel, R; Tanner, A C; Williams, R C

    1990-07-01

    The effect of zinc sulfadiazine (ZnSD) and silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) on developing plaque formation and gingivitis was studied in 12 beagle dogs over a 14-week period. Plaque and gingival indices were used to measure plaque formation and gingivitis. During a 2-wk baseline period each dog was brought to optimal gingival health with prophylaxis and tooth brushing. Thereafter, 4 dogs were treated twice daily with topical application of 3.0% zinc sulfadiazine; 4 dogs were treated with 2.0% silver sulfadiazine while 4 dogs treated with placebo gel served as controls over a 12-wk treatment period. At wk 2 of treatment, all three groups of dogs showed an increase in plaque build-up on their teeth from baseline. By wk 6, plaque accumulation on the teeth was significantly less in dogs treated with either ZnSD or AgSD compared to control dogs. At wk 2 of treatment, gingival inflammation was increased from baseline in all three groups. Thereafter, over the course of the 12-wk treatment period, gingival inflammation in the ZnSD and the AgSD treated dogs was significantly less than the placebo treated dogs. The data indicate that both ZnSD and AgSD inhibit developing plaque formation in beagles. This significant inhibition of plaque formation was accompanied by a significant reduction in gingival inflammation.

  1. Comparison of two different gingivectomy techniques for gingival cleft treatment.

    PubMed

    Malkoc, Siddik; Buyukyilmaz, Tamer; Gelgor, Ibrahim; Gursel, Mihtikar

    2004-06-01

    Interdental clefts or invaginations contribute to orthodontic relapse and poor periodontal health in extraction cases. These clefts or invaginations can be removed both by electrosurgical or conventional surgical gingivectomy techniques. This study investigates and compares the efficacy of two different techniques to remove gingival clefts with respect to periodontal health and patient tolerance. Twenty-two patients (mean age, 15.7 years) with bilateral gingival clefts participated in this study. In each patient, the gingival invaginations were removed by gingivectomy using electrosurgery on one side and conventional surgery on the contralateral side. The length and depth of the invaginations, the gingival index of the adjacent teeth, and the changes in visual analogue scale scores were recorded before and after the operation for both groups. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data statistically. The results showed significant improvement in invagination depth and length and gingival index scores for both techniques. There were no statistical differences between the two gingivectomy techniques with respect to gingival health and patient tolerance. Both techniques can be used to remove the gingival invaginations efficiently.

  2. Gingival Biotype Assessment in a Healthy Periodontium: Transgingival Probing Method

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, R. G. Shiva; Sarkar, Arijit

    2015-01-01

    Background Gingival biotype is the thickness of the gingiva in the faciopalatal dimension. It has a significant impact on the outcome of the restorative, regenerative and implant therapy. It has been suggested that a direct co-relation exists with the susceptibility of gingival recession followed by any surgical procedure. So, the study was aimed to assess gingival biotype in different age groups of males and females using transgingival probing method. Materials and Methods Gingival thickness (GT) was evaluated in 336 patients including males and females of different age groups. The latter was based on the transparency of the periodontal probe through the gingival margin while probing the buccal sulcus. Final data collected was then used for statistical analysis. Results A significant difference was found between males and females with males showing thick biotype. Out of the total samples 76.9% of males showed thick biotype compared to 13.3 % of females which was statistically significant. Conclusion This was probably one of the few attempts to correlate gingival biotype with different age groups in males and females. A clear thick gingiva was found in more than two-third of the male subjects whereas majority of female subjects showed thin biotype. Also, it was seen that in females, the gingival biotype varies with age unlike in male. PMID:26155566

  3. Relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival health: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Boke, Fatma; Gazioglu, Cagri; Akkaya, Sevil; Akkaya, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival health. Materials and Methods: A total of 251 patients among whom 177 were girls and 74 were boys, recruited from the records pool of the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Gazi, were included in the study. Patients’ treatments have been completed by postgraduate students during the period between 2006 and 2012. Patients’ folders were analyzed according to their age, treatment time, and the type of orthodontic treatment. Intra-oral photographs were analyzed, and the presence or absence of visible plaque, visible inflammation, and gingival recession were recorded, and incisor inclinations analyzed on lateral cephalometric films, before and after orthodontic treatment. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in patients treated with functional appliances before and after treatment. In patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances, visible plaque, visible inflammation, and gingival recession showed significant increases after treatment, gingival biotype did not show any significant difference. Positive correlation was found between lower incisor position and gingival recession in patients treated with fixed appliance and extraction. And also cuspids were the teeth with the highest prevalence of gingival recession. Conclusion: Considering the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival health, cooperation among patients, orthodontists, and periodontists is important. PMID:25202219

  4. Chronic gingivitis: the prevalence of periodontopathogens and therapy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Igic, M; Kesic, L; Lekovic, V; Apostolovic, M; Mihailovic, D; Kostadinovic, L; Milasin, J

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of gingival inflammation and the prevalence of periodontopathogenic microorganisms in adolescents with chronic gingivitis, as well as to compare the effectiveness of two approaches in gingivitis treatment-basic therapy alone and basic therapy + adjunctive low-level laser therapy (LLLT). After periodontal evaluation, the content of gingival pockets of 140 adolescents with gingivitis was analyzed by multiplex PCR for the presence of P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, T. forsythensis and P. intermedia. Subsequent to bacteria detection, the examinees were divided into two groups with homogenous clinical and microbiological characteristics. Group A was subjected to basic gingivitis therapy, and group B underwent basic therapy along with adjunctive LLLT. A statistically significant difference between the values of plaque-index (PI) and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) before and after therapy was confirmed in both groups (p<0.001), though more pronounced in group B. Following therapy, the incidence of periodontopathogenic microorganisms decreased considerably. The best result was obtained in P. gingivalis eradication by combined therapy (p=0.003). The presence of periodontopathogens in adolescents with gingivitis should be regarded as a sign for dentists to foster more effective oral health programs. LLLT appears to be beneficial as adjuvant to basic therapy.

  5. Microcirculation alterations in experimentally induced gingivitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masato; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Maeda, Shingo; Iimura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to morphologically examine the gingival microvascular network using a microvascular resin cast (MRC) technique, and to investigate how inflammatory disease functionally affects gingival microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We used four beagle dogs with healthy periodontal tissue as experimental animals. To cause periodontal inflammation, dental floss was placed around the cervical neck portions of the right premolars. The unmanipulated left premolars served as controls, and received plaque control every 7 days. After 90 days, gingivitis was induced in the experimental side, while the control side maintained healthy gingiva. To perform morphological examinations, we used an MRC method involving the injection of low-viscosity synthetic resin into the blood vessels, leading to peripheral soft-tissue dissolution and permitting observation of the bone, teeth, and vascular cast. Gingival blood flow was estimated using an LDF meter. The control gingival vasculature showed hairpin-loop-like networks along the tooth surface. The blood vessels had diameters of 20-40 μm and were regularly arranged around the cervical portion. On the other hand, the vasculature in the experimental group was twisted and gathered into spiral forms, with blood vessels that had uneven surfaces and smaller diameters of 8-10 μm. LDF revealed reduced gingival blood flow in the group with experimentally induced gingivitis compared to controls. The actual measurements of gingival blood flow by LDF were in agreement with the alterations that would be expected based on the gingivitis-induced morphological alterations observed with the MRC technique.

  6. Keratinized Gingiva Determines a Homeostatic Behavior of Gingival Sulcus through Transudation of Gingival Crevice Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Maria Luiza P.; Sant'Ana, Adriana Campos Passanezi; Greghi, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; Passanezi, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To shed light on the role of KG, its influence on periodontal behavior was investigated. Methods. Tissue fluid transudation was assessed in alveolar mucosa (P1A), outer gingival margin (P1B), at entrance of (P2) and within gingival sulcus (P3), before and after chewing of fibrous food in 16 patients portraying ≥2 mm KG at one tooth (group 1), and <2 mm at another homologous tooth (group 2). Results. There was a significant increase in GCF after chewing at P1B and P3 in group 1 and at P1A in group 2 (t-test, P < 0.05). Conclusions. The results suggest that KG plays a role in marginal periodontal homeostasis. PMID:22145005

  7. Gingival pigmentation index proposal of a new index with a brief review of current indices

    PubMed Central

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Peeran, Syed Ali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetic expectations have increased with time and current trends speak volumes about gingival esthetics and smile designing. Gingival pigmentation especially on the labial aspect of anterior teeth has become an important component of general esthetics. Various physiologic and pathologic factors cause gingival pigmentation. The existing indices do not deal with the etiology, extent and severity of gingival pigmentation. Hence, we propose a new classification and index for gingival pigmentation to assess the treatment needs for the patient. PMID:24966785

  8. Surgical management of gingival recession: A clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Hamdan; Babay, Nadir; Sukumaran, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Gingival recession is defined as the apical migration of the junctional epithelium with exposure of root surfaces. It is a common condition seen in both dentally aware populations and those with limited access to dental care. The etiology of the condition is multifactorial but is commonly associated with underlying alveolar morphology, tooth brushing, mechanical trauma and periodontal disease. Given the high rate of gingival recession defects among the general population, it is imperative that dental practitioners have an understanding of the etiology, complications and the management of the condition. The following review describes the surgical techniques to treat gingival recession. PMID:23960465

  9. The relationships between malocclusion, gingival inflammation, plaque and calculus.

    PubMed

    Buckley, L A

    1981-01-01

    Certain features of malocclusion considered important in relation to periodontal health were analyzed in a study of 300 subjects. It was found that plaque and gingival inflammation were not related to vertical incisor overbite, horizontal incisor overjet or posterior cuspal interdigitation. Individual tooth irregularity measured as tilting, rotation, displacement and crowding had a low but statistically significant correlation with plaque, calculus and gingival inflammation. However, the study showed that these features of malocclusion are far less important than the extent of plaque and calculus deposits in the development of gingival inflammation.

  10. Parameter on plaque-induced gingivitis. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on plaque-induced gingivitis in the absence of clinical attachment loss. Plaque-induced gingivitis is the most common form of the periodontal diseases, affecting a significant portion of the population in susceptible individuals. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. No treatment may result in continuation of clinical signs of disease, with possible development of gingival defects and progression to periodontitis. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  11. Measurement of Reduced Gingival Melanosis after Smoking Cessation: A Novel Analysis of Gingival Pigmentation Using Clinical Oral Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomotaka; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Makino, Michiko; Noguchi, Satoshi; Katayama-Ono, Tomoko; Hanioka, Takashi; Naito, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to moisture and the anatomical complexity of the oral mucosa, it is difficult to measure the extent of gingival melanosis in an optical manner. Therefore, we developed a new quantitative method using clinical oral photographs and compared the extent of gingival melanosis before and after smoking cessation. Methods: A new analysis method, which we named the gingival melanosis record (GMR), is a quantitative analysis method using clinical oral photographs. We obtained 659 clinical photographs from 263 patients from 16 general dental offices in Japan. Standardized measuring sites were automatically spotted on the screen, and the presence of gingival melanosis was determined at the measuring sites. We assessed the validity of the GMR with the previously reported Hedin’s classification using Spearman’s rank correlation and intraclass correlation coefficients. Results: The GMR showed a significant association with Hedin’s classification (p < 0.01, correlation coefficient = 0.94). The GMR also showed excellent reproducibility of the substantial repeated agreement intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) (1,1) and ICC (2,1), p > 0.61). The longitudinal loss of gingival melanosis was confirmed by a change in the GMR among patients who successfully achieved smoking cessation for a mean of 4.5 years. Conclusion: The GMR is an effective method to assess gingival melanosis. The loss of gingival melanosis after smoking cessation can be objectively confirmed with the use of the GMR. PMID:27322294

  12. Interleukin-1β is internalised by viable Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm and locates to the outer edges of nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Lohermaa, Elina; Sormunen, Raija; Tuominen, Heidi; Korhonen, Jari; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2012-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes periodontitis, which is a biofilm infection that destroys tooth-supportive tissues. Interleukin (IL)-1β, a central proinflammatory cytokine of periodontitis, is an essential first line cytokine for local inflammation that modulates the cell proliferation and anti-pathogen response of human gingival keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms bind IL-1β; however, whether this binding is an active process is not known. In this study, we showed for the first time with immuno-electron microscopy that viable bacterial biofilm cells internalised IL-1β when co-cultured with an organotypic mucosa. Decreased biofilm viability hindered the ability of biofilm to sequester IL-1β and caused IL-1β leakage into the culture medium. In some A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, intracellular IL-1β localized to the outer edges of the nucleoids. We identified the DNA-binding protein HU as an IL-1β interacting protein with mass spectroscopy and showed the interaction of recombinant HU and IL-1βin vitro using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Close contact with a viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm decreased the proliferation and apoptosis of human gingival keratinocytes as demonstrated using Ki-67 and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining, respectively. Our results suggest that viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms may disturb the critical first steps of local inflammation in periodontitis by binding and internalising IL-1β. The interaction of IL-1β with conserved HU provides a potential mechanism for shaping bacterial gene expression.

  13. Pemphigus vulgaris: gingival involvement. A case report.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M A; Abitbol, T E

    1995-01-01

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune disease in which intraepithelial vesicles and bullae of the skin and oral mucosa are produced by the action of autoantibodies against specific desmosomal proteins of squamous epithelium. Usually, oral lesions will appear before skin lesions, and in a majority of the cases only oral lesions are present. The dentist may then be the first to make and early diagnosis. The importance of this case report is to alert the dentist that subtle gingival lesions can be recognized and treated early in such a life-threatening disease. Diagnosis is based on the clinical presentation and confirmed by histologic study and direct immunofluorescence. This case describes the clinical signs, symptoms, histology, and immunofluorescence of pemphigus vulgaris of the gingiva.

  14. In vivo biofilm formation on stainless steel bonded retainers during different oral health-care regimens

    PubMed Central

    Jongsma, Marije A; van der Mei, Henny C; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Retention wires permanently bonded to the anterior teeth are used after orthodontic treatment to prevent the teeth from relapsing to pre-treatment positions. A disadvantage of bonded retainers is biofilm accumulation on the wires, which produces a higher incidence of gingival recession, increased pocket depth and bleeding on probing. This study compares in vivo biofilm formation on single-strand and multi-strand retention wires with different oral health-care regimens. Two-centimetre wires were placed in brackets that were bonded to the buccal side of the first molars and second premolars in the upper arches of 22 volunteers. Volunteers used a selected toothpaste with or without the additional use of a mouthrinse containing essential oils. Brushing was performed manually. Regimens were maintained for 1 week, after which the wires were removed and the oral biofilm was collected to quantify the number of organisms and their viability, determine the microbial composition and visualize the bacteria by electron microscopy. A 6-week washout period was employed between regimens. Biofilm formation was reduced on single-strand wires compared with multi-strand wires; bacteria were observed to adhere between the strands. The use of antibacterial toothpastes marginally reduced the amount of biofilm on both wire types, but significantly reduced the viability of the biofilm organisms. Additional use of the mouthrinse did not result in significant changes in biofilm amount or viability. However, major shifts in biofilm composition were induced by combining a stannous fluoride- or triclosan-containing toothpaste with the mouthrinse. These shifts can be tentatively attributed to small changes in bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity after the adsorption of the toothpaste components, which stimulate bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic oil, as illustrated for a Streptococcus mutans strain. PMID:25572920

  15. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  16. Distinct phenotype and therapeutic potential of gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu; Fournier, Benjamin P J

    2014-09-01

    Gingiva of the oral mucosa provides a practical source to isolate fibroblasts for therapeutic purposes because the tissue is easily accessible, tissue discards are common during routine clinical procedures and wound healing after biopsy is fast and results in complete wound regeneration with very little morbidity or scarring. In addition, gingival fibroblasts have unique traits, including neural crest origin, distinct gene expression and synthetic properties and potent immunomodulatory functions. These characteristics may provide advantages for certain therapeutic approaches over other more commonly used cells, including skin fibroblasts, both in intraoral and extra-oral sites. However, identity and phenotype of gingival fibroblasts, like other fibroblasts, are still not completely understood. Gingival fibroblasts are phenotypically heterogeneous, and these…fibroblast subpopulations may play different roles in tissue maintenance, regeneration and pathologies. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is currently known about gingival fibroblasts, their distinct potential for tissue regeneration and their potential therapeutic uses in the future.

  17. Biofilm formation on titanium implants counteracted by grafting gallium and silver ions.

    PubMed

    Cochis, Andrea; Azzimonti, Barbara; Della Valle, Cinzia; Chiesa, Roberto; Arciola, Carla Renata; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-03-01

    Biofilm-associated infections remain the leading cause of implant failure. Thanks to its established biocompatibility and biomechanical properties, titanium has become one of the most widely used materials for bone implants. Engineered surface modifications of titanium able to thwart biofilm formation while endowing a safe anchorage to eukaryotic cells are being progressively developed. Here surfaces of disks of commercial grade 2 titanium for bone implant were grafted with gallium and silver ions by anodic spark deposition. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface morphology and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used for characterization. Gallium-grafted titanium was evaluated in comparison with silver-grafted titanium for both in vivo and in vitro antibiofilm properties and for in vitro compatibility with human primary gingival fibroblasts. Surface-modified materials showed: (i) homogeneous porous morphology, with pores of micrometric size; (ii) absence of cytotoxic effects; (iii) ability to support in vitro the adhesion and spreading of gingival fibroblasts; and (iv) antibiofilm properties. Although both silver and gallium exhibited in vitro strong antibacterial properties, in vivo gallium was significantly more effective than silver in reducing number and viability of biofilm bacteria colonies. Gallium-based treatments represent promising titanium antibiofilm coatings to develop new bone implantable devices for oral, maxillofacial, and orthopedic applications.

  18. Nonneoplastic enlargement of the pituitary gland in children.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Kristian; Boop, Frederick A

    2011-05-01

    Primary neoplasms of the pituitary gland are uncommon in children. Physiological enlargement of the gland, however, is universal and can sometimes be confused with a tumor. Due to widespread availability of MR imaging, the number of children referred to pediatric neurosurgeons with an enlarged pituitary associated with nonspecific symptoms, most commonly headache, is increasing. In this review, the authors illustrate two common causes of pituitary enlargement in children, namely physiological hypertrophy of puberty, more commonly seen in females, and secondary hyperplasia caused by hypothyroidism. The importance of early and accurate diagnosis, without recourse to extensive endocrine investigations or inappropriate surgery, is underscored.

  19. [Unilateral idiopathic gingival fibromatosis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Gawron, Katarzyna; Darczuk, Dagmara; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a painless gingival overgrowth. It may result in difficulties with proper dental hygiene keeping, mastication and occlusion. Herein, a case of a 10-year-old patient was described. The patient reported to the Department of Periodontology and Oral Medicine of the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow due to the problems with permanent teeth eruption (23-26), chewing and dental hygiene maintaining. Based on medical history, clinical examination, diagnostic tests and histopathological study of gingival tissue biopsies the patient was diagnosed with unilateral idiopathic gingival fibromatosis. After oral cavity hygienization, patient un- derwent dental surgery procedures by gingivectomy and gingivoplasty. The follow-up examination 2 and 6 months post operation showed un- eventful healing, proper tooth eruption, improved oral hygiene and chewing function. Twelve months post surgery no recurrence was noted. Due to the etiological diversity of gingival lesions occurring as an overgrowth, accurate medical history, clinical examination, laboratory tests and histopathological study are needed. Accurate diagnos- tics is crucial mainly to exclude he- matological and oncological diseases. Gingivectomy being the "gold method" of gingival fibromatosis treatment was effective and sufficient to cure the case presented in this article.

  20. Orthodontic considerations for gingival health during pregnancy: a review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, P M; Almas, K

    2010-02-01

    Gingivitis is caused by several known systemic and local factors. Among systemic factors, the role of hormonal changes during pregnancy is well established. While presence of fixed orthodontic appliances alone may not cause gingivitis, factors such as pregnancy and poor oral hygiene combined together could precipitate acute gingival inflammation that may progress to a periodontal condition in a patient receiving orthodontic therapy. There has been an increase in the number of adult patients who are receiving orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic appliances could act as a potential plaque retentive source and aggravate inflammatory reactions that are seen during pregnancy. There is a lack of awareness regarding oral healthcare issues among patients who are pregnant and choose to seek orthodontic treatment. In addition, there is a need in the literature to outline management guidelines for patients who want to receive orthodontic treatment during pregnancy, with or without pre-existing gingival conditions. This review focuses on the aetiology of pregnancy gingivitis and the management of orthodontic patients during pregnancy. Our emphasis is on patient education, oral hygiene maintenance, preventive and treatment strategies for the management of gingival health in orthodontic patients during pregnancy. We also highlight some of the possible complications of initiating orthodontic treatment during pregnancy.

  1. Predictive modeling of gingivitis severity and susceptibility via oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi; Li, Rui; Zeng, Xiaowei; He, Tao; Zhao, Helen; Chang, Alice; Bo, Cunpei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Fang; Knight, Rob; Liu, Jiquan; Davis, Catherine; Xu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Predictive modeling of human disease based on the microbiota holds great potential yet remains challenging. Here, 50 adults underwent controlled transitions from naturally occurring gingivitis, to healthy gingivae (baseline), and to experimental gingivitis (EG). In diseased plaque microbiota, 27 bacterial genera changed in relative abundance and functional genes including 33 flagellar biosynthesis-related groups were enriched. Plaque microbiota structure exhibited a continuous gradient along the first principal component, reflecting transition from healthy to diseased states, which correlated with Mazza Gingival Index. We identified two host types with distinct gingivitis sensitivity. Our proposed microbial indices of gingivitis classified host types with 74% reliability, and, when tested on another 41-member cohort, distinguished healthy from diseased individuals with 95% accuracy. Furthermore, the state of the microbiota in naturally occurring gingivitis predicted the microbiota state and severity of subsequent EG (but not the state of the microbiota during the healthy baseline period). Because the effect of disease is greater than interpersonal variation in plaque, in contrast to the gut, plaque microbiota may provide advantages in predictive modeling of oral diseases.

  2. Microbiota-based Signature of Gingivitis Treatments: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi; Li, Zhen; He, Tao; Bo, Cunpei; Chang, Jinlan; Li, Lin; He, Yanyan; Liu, Jiquan; Charbonneau, Duane; Li, Rui; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-20

    Plaque-induced gingivitis can be alleviated by various treatment regimens. To probe the impacts of various anti-gingivitis treatments on plaque microflora, here a double blinded, randomized controlled trial of 91 adults with moderate gingivitis was designed with two anti-gingivitis regimens: the brush-alone treatment and the brush-plus-rinse treatment. In the later group, more reduction in both Plaque Index (TMQHI) and Gingival Index (mean MGI) at Day 3, Day 11 and Day 27 was evident, and more dramatic changes were found between baseline and other time points for both supragingival plaque microbiota structure and salivary metabonomic profiles. A comparison of plaque microbiota changes was also performed between these two treatments and a third dataset where 50 subjects received regimen of dental scaling. Only Actinobaculum, TM7 and Leptotrichia were consistently reduced by all the three treatments, whereas the different microbial signatures of the three treatments during gingivitis relieve indicate distinct mechanisms of action. Our study suggests that microbiota based signatures can serve as a valuable approach for understanding and potentially comparing the modes of action for clinical treatments and oral-care products in the future.

  3. 9. (5 X 7 enlargement from 4 X 5 negative) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. (5 X 7 enlargement from 4 X 5 negative) FIRST FLOOR, WINDOW MOLDING ON SOUTH WALL LOOKING SOUTH - Sites Homestead, Monongahela National Forest (Tract 390) East of Route 28, Seneca Rocks, Pendleton County, WV

  4. How do plants enlarge? A balancing act; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    Cells of plants are surrounded by strong walls that prevent rupture from internal pressures that can be two or three times that of an automobile tire. In this way, the walls protect the cytoplasm. However, at the same time, the cells can enlarge as they grow. How this balancing act works and how it enlarges the plant were the subject of a recent conference at the University of Delaware in Lewes. The aim was to identify areas for future research that could explain the enlargement of whole plants. There is a large practical need to predict and modify plant enlargement but the additional processes that overlie the molecular ones need to be integrated with the molecular information before a picture will emerge. How best to accomplish this involved input from cross-disciplinary areas in biomechanics, physics and engineering as well as molecular biology, biochemistry and ultrastructure.

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged Photo From photo of Miss Edith Johnston, Savannah, Ga. 1936 VIEW OF FRONT AND RIGHT SIDE (Restoration 1936) - Wild Heron Plantation, Little Ogeechee River Vicinity, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged Photo From Photo of Miss Edith Johnston's, Savannah, Ga. 1936 VIEW OF FRONT AND SIDE (Before Restoration, 1936). - Wild Heron Plantation, Little Ogeechee River Vicinity, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  7. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer (Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer (Enlarged by) Aug. 6, 1936 Photographed by Harold Bush-Brown SIDE VIEW - Covered Bridge, Spanning Soap Creek, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  8. Investigations into Monochloramine Biofilm Penetration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed by direct b...

  9. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  10. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  11. Ubx Regulates Differential Enlargement and Diversification of Insect Hind Legs

    PubMed Central

    Mahfooz, Najmus; Turchyn, Nataliya; Mihajlovic, Michelle; Hrycaj, Steven; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Differential enlargement of hind (T3) legs represents one of the hallmarks of insect evolution. However, the actual mechanism(s) responsible are yet to be determined. To address this issue, we have now studied the molecular basis of T3 leg enlargement in Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug) and Acheta domesticus (house cricket). In Oncopeltus, the T3 tibia displays a moderate increase in size, whereas in Acheta, the T3 femur, tibia, and tarsus are all greatly enlarged. Here, we show that the hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) is expressed in the enlarged segments of hind legs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of Ubx during embryogenesis has a primary effect in T3 legs and causes shortening of leg segments that are enlarged in a wild type. This result shows that Ubx is regulating the differential growth and enlargement of T3 legs in both Oncopeltus and Acheta. The emerging view suggests that Ubx was co-opted for a novel role in regulating leg growth and that the transcriptional modification of its expression may be a universal mechanism for the evolutionary diversification of insect hind legs. PMID:17848997

  12. Gingival crevicularfluid osteoprotegerin levels in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Bandari, Purnima; Prasad, M. V. Ramachandra; Maradi, Arun; Pradeep, A. R.; Mallika, A.; Sharma, Dileep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Initial research indicated that higher concentration of osteoprotegerin (OPG) is associated with healthy periodontium (protective) and its concentration decreases as the periodontal disease progresses. However, till date, there are no studies to investigate the levels of OPG in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after the treatment of periodontitis. Hence, the present study was carried out to assess its concentration in GCF to find out their association if any, and to explore its possible use as a ‘novel bone marker’ of the host modulation of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four subjects were divided into 4 groups (16 each), based on clinical attachment loss (CAL) and radiological parameters (bone loss); healthy (group I), gingivitis (group II), slight periodontitis (group III), and moderate-to-severe periodontitis (group IV). Moderate-to-severe periodontitis subjects, after nonsurgical periodontal treatment, (SRP) constituted group V. GCF samples were collected to estimate the levels of OPG using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The Kruskal-Wallis, Man-Whitney U test, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were carried out to compare OPG levels among groups. The Spearman rank correlation test was used to correlate OPG levels between the study groups and the clinical parameters; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The highest mean OPG concentration in GCF was obtained for group I (162.47 ± 51.171 pg/ μL) and the least for group IV (10.92 ± 1.913 pg/μL), suggesting a negative correlation between OPG concentration and CAL. OPG concentrations in GCF after the treatment of group IV increased from 10.92 ± 1.913 pg/μL to 15.63 ± 4.679 pg/μL. Conclusion: OPG concentration in GCF was inversely proportional to CAL and not an active progression factor for periodontal disease. Further, after the treatment of moderate-to-severe periodontitis subjects (group IV), OPG concentrations increased. Hence, it can be concluded that OPG

  13. The closure of the gingival crevice following gingival retraction for impression making.

    PubMed

    Laufer, B Z; Baharav, H; Langer, Y; Cardash, H S

    1997-09-01

    Scant attention has been paid to the effectiveness of chemomechanical displacement of the gingiva prior to impression making for fixed partial dentures. The closure of the gingival crevice following removal of medicated retraction cord was observed using a miniature video camera. Sulcular widths were measured at time intervals at the midbuccal and transitional line angle areas. The closure rate of the transitional line angle area was significantly faster than that of the mid-buccal area during the first 90 s. An average sulcular width of 0.2 mm was reached at the transitional line angle after less than 30 s.

  14. Anti-biofilm and bactericidal effects of magnolia bark-derived magnolol and honokiol on Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Yuuki; Domon, Hisanori; Oda, Masataka; Takenaka, Shoji; Kubo, Miwa; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Okiji, Takashi; Terao, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries affects people of all ages and is a worldwide health concern. Streptococcus mutans is a major cariogenic bacterium because of its ability to form biofilm and induce an acidic environment. In this study, the antibacterial activities of magnolol and honokiol, the main constituents of the bark of magnolia plants, toward planktonic cell and biofilm of S. mutans were examined and compared with those of chlorhexidine. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of magnolol, honokiol and chlorhexidine for S. mutans were 10, 10 and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, each agent showed bactericidal activity against S. mutans planktonic cells and inhibited biofilm formation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Magnolol (50 µg/mL) had greater bactericidal activity against S. mutans biofilm than honokiol (50 µg/mL) and chlorhexidine (500 µg/mL) at 5 min after exposure, while all showed scant activity against biofilm at 30 s. Furthermore; chlorhexidine (0.5-500 µg/mL) exhibited high cellular toxicity for the gingival epithelial cell line Ca9-22 at 1 hr, whereas magnolol (50 µg/mL) and honokiol (50 µg/mL) did not. Thus; it was found that magnolol has antimicrobial activities against planktonic and biofilm cells of S. mutans. Magnolol may be a candidate for prevention and management of dental caries.

  15. A Five-Species Transcriptome Array for Oral Mixed-Biofilm Studies

    PubMed Central

    Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral polymicrobial interactions and biofilm formation are associated with initiation and progression of caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Transcriptome studies of such interactions, allowing a first mechanistic insight, are hampered by current single-species array designs. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used 385 K NimbleGene™ technology for design and evaluation of an array covering the full genomes of 5 important physiological-, cariogenic-, and periodontitis-associated microorganisms (Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis). Array hybridization was done with cDNA from cultures grown for 24 h anaerobically. Single species experiments identified cross-species hybridizing array probes. These probes could be neglected in a mixed-species experimental setting without the need to exclude the whole genes from the analysis. Between 69% and almost 99% of the genomes were actively transcribed under the mono-species planktonic, monolayer, and biofilm conditions. The influence of Streptococcus mitis (not represented on the array) on S. mutans gene transcription was determined as a test for a dual-species mixed biofilm setup. Phenotypically, under the influence of S. mitis an increase in S. mutans biofilm mass and a decrease in media pH-value were noticed, thereby confirming previously published data. Employing a stringent cut-off (2-fold, p<0.05), 19 S. mutans transcripts were identified with increased abundance, and 11 with decreased abundance compared to a S. mutans mono-species biofilm. Several of these genes have previously been found differentially regulated under general and acid stress, thereby confirming the value of this array. Conclusions/Significance This new array allows transcriptome studies on multi-species oral biofilm interactions. It may become an important asset in future oral biofilm and inhibitor/therapy studies. PMID

  16. Escherichia coli biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beloin, Christophe; Roux, Agnès; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a predominant species among facultative anaerobic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract. Both its frequent community lifestyle and the availability of a wide array of genetic tools contributed to establish E. coli as a relevant model organism for the study of surface colonization. Several key factors, including different extracellular appendages, are implicated in E. coli surface colonization and their expression and activity are finely regulated, both in space and time, to ensure productive events leading to mature biofilm formation. This chapter will present known molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm development in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli. PMID:18453280

  17. Gingival recession in postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    DUNCEA, IOANA; POP, DAN; GEORGESCU, CARMEN

    2013-01-01

    Background The periodontal disease is a complex chronic progressive inflammatory and destructive process of the tooth attachment apparatus: gingiva, alveolar bone, desmodontium, cementum. Systemic osteoporosis has a potential influence on both the periodontal and gingival inflammation indices, on the gingival recession (GR) and teeth mobility. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between the menopause osteoporosis and gingival recession, by studying the correlations between osteoporosis and gingival recession, and between the bone mineral density (BMD) at the level of L1–L4, femur, hip, mandible and gum recession. Materials and methods The present study included a total of 97 postmenopausal patients. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was made based on the WHO definition. The results were expressed as absolute BMD values in g/cm2 and as T score form. We used dual x-ray absortiometry (DXA) measurements in assessing the lumbar column, proximal femur and mandible and we calculated the T scores. The gingival recession, which is an indicator of ligament tissue lysis and apical migration of the periodontal tissue, was measured as the distance between the anatomical tooth neck and the gumline. For the statistical analysis the Medcalc program version 12.3 was used. Results We found statistically significant differences between the two groups of women, with and without osteoporosis, in terms of the distribution of the cases of GR (p=0.003). The only parameter with statistical significance of the differences between the three categories of gingival recessions (absent, moderate, major), was p=0.034 for the femoral neck BMD. There were significant differences between the mean values of lumbar column L1–L4 BMD according to the presence or absence of recession signs. Conclusions 1) The prevalence of moderate and major gingival recession was statistically significantly higher in the group of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. 2) In postmenopausal

  18. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  19. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  20. Antifungal activity against Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iñigo, Melania; Pemán, Javier; Del Pozo, Jose L

    2012-10-01

    Candida species have two distinct lifestyles: planktonic, and surface-attached communities called biofilms. Mature C. albicans biofilms show a complex three-dimensional architecture with extensive spatial heterogeneity, and consist of a dense network of yeast, hyphae, and pseudohyphae encased within a matrix of exopolymeric material. Several key processes are likely to play vital roles at the different stages of biofilm development, such as cell-substrate and cell-cell adherence, hyphal development, and quorum sensing. Biofilm formation is a survival strategy, since biofilm yeasts are more resistant to antifungals and environmental stress. Antifungal resistance is a multifactorial process that includes multidrug efflux pumps, target proteins of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Most studies agree in presenting azoles as agents with poor activity against Candida spp. biofilms. However, recent studies have demonstrated that echinocandins and amphotericin B exhibit remarkable activity against C. albicans and Candida non-albicans biofilms. The association of Candida species with biofilm formation increases the therapeutic complexity of foreign body-related yeast infections. The traditional approach to the management of these infections has been to explant the affected device. There is a strong medical but also economical motivation for the development of novel anti-fungal biofilm strategies due to the constantly increasing resistance of Candida biofilms to conventional antifungals, and the high mortality caused by related infections. A better description of the extent and role of yeast in biofilms may be critical for developing novel therapeutic strategies in the clinical setting.

  1. Microbial Biofilms and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Amin; Wright, J. Barry; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Nadworny, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Background is provided on biofilms, including their formation, tolerance mechanisms, structure, and morphology within the context of chronic wounds. The features of biofilms in chronic wounds are discussed in detail, as is the impact of biofilm on wound chronicity. Difficulties associated with the use of standard susceptibility tests (minimum inhibitory concentrations or MICs) to determine appropriate treatment regimens for, or develop new treatments for use in, chronic wounds are discussed, with alternate test methods specific to biofilms being recommended. Animal models appropriate for evaluating biofilm treatments are also described. Current and potential future therapies for treatment of biofilm-containing chronic wounds, including probiotic therapy, virulence attenuation, biofilm phenotype expression attenuation, immune response suppression, and aggressive debridement combined with antimicrobial dressings, are described. PMID:28272369

  2. Microbial Biofilms and Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Omar, Amin; Wright, J Barry; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Nadworny, Patricia

    2017-03-07

    Background is provided on biofilms, including their formation, tolerance mechanisms, structure, and morphology within the context of chronic wounds. The features of biofilms in chronic wounds are discussed in detail, as is the impact of biofilm on wound chronicity. Difficulties associated with the use of standard susceptibility tests (minimum inhibitory concentrations or MICs) to determine appropriate treatment regimens for, or develop new treatments for use in, chronic wounds are discussed, with alternate test methods specific to biofilms being recommended. Animal models appropriate for evaluating biofilm treatments are also described. Current and potential future therapies for treatment of biofilm-containing chronic wounds, including probiotic therapy, virulence attenuation, biofilm phenotype expression attenuation, immune response suppression, and aggressive debridement combined with antimicrobial dressings, are described.

  3. Physicochemical regulation of biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Lars D.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the physical and chemical constraints of environments on biofilm formation. We provide a perspective on how materials science and engineering can address fundamental questions and unmet technological challenges in this area of microbiology, such as biofilm prevention. Specifically, we discuss three factors that impact the development and organization of bacterial communities. (1) Physical properties of surfaces regulate cell attachment and physiology and affect early stages of biofilm formation. (2) Chemical properties influence the adhesion of cells to surfaces and their development into biofilms and communities. (3) Chemical communication between cells attenuates growth and influences the organization of communities. Mechanisms of spatial and temporal confinement control the dimensions of communities and the diffusion path length for chemical communication between biofilms, which, in turn, influences biofilm phenotypes. Armed with a detailed understanding of biofilm formation, researchers are applying the tools and techniques of materials science and engineering to revolutionize the study and control of bacterial communities growing at interfaces. PMID:22125358

  4. Critical review on biofilm methods.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Joana; Azevedo, Nuno F; Briandet, Romain; Cerca, Nuno; Coenye, Tom; Costa, Ana Rita; Desvaux, Mickaël; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Hébraud, Michel; Jaglic, Zoran; Kačániová, Miroslava; Knøchel, Susanne; Lourenço, Anália; Mergulhão, Filipe; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Nychas, George; Simões, Manuel; Tresse, Odile; Sternberg, Claus

    2017-05-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms.

  5. Biofilms: Microbial Life on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down- regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. An established biofilm structure comprises microbial cells and EPS, has a defined architecture, and provides an optimal environment for the exchange of genetic material between cells. Cells may also communicate via quorum sensing, which may in turn affect biofilm processes such as detachment. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and importance in a variety of device-related infections. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management. PMID:12194761

  6. White-spot lesions and gingivitis microbiotas in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Tanner, A C R; Sonis, A L; Lif Holgerson, P; Starr, J R; Nunez, Y; Kressirer, C A; Paster, B J; Johansson, I

    2012-09-01

    White-spot lesions (WSL) associated with orthodontic appliances are a cosmetic problem and increase risk for cavities. We characterized the microbiota of WSL, accounting for confounding due to gingivitis. Participants were 60 children with fixed appliances, aged between 10 and 19 yrs, half with WSL. Plaque samples were assayed by a 16S rRNA-based microarray (HOMIM) and by PCR. Mean gingival index was positively associated with WSL (p = 0.018). Taxa associated with WSL by microarray included Granulicatella elegans (p = 0.01), Veillonellaceae sp. HOT 155 (p < 0.01), and Bifidobacterium Cluster 1 (p = 0.11), and by qPCR, Streptococcus mutans (p = 0.008) and Scardovia wiggsiae (p = 0.04) Taxa associated with gingivitis by microarray included: Gemella sanguinis (p = 0.002), Actinomyces sp. HOT 448 (p = 0.003), Prevotella cluster IV (p = 0.021), and Streptococcus sp. HOT 071/070 (p = 0.023); and levels of S. mutans (p = 0.02) and Bifidobacteriaceae (p = 0.012) by qPCR. Species' associations with WSL were minimally changed with adjustment for gingivitis level. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis yielded good discrimination between children with and those without WSL. Granulicatella, Veillonellaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae, in addition to S. mutans and S. wiggsiae, were associated with the presence of WSL in adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment. Many taxa showed a stronger association with gingivitis than with WSL.

  7. Comparative clinical efficacy evaluation of three gingival displacement systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Kirti Jajoo; Bhoyar, Anjali; Agarwal, Surendra; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Parlani, Swapnil; Murthy, Varsha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We compared the clinical efficacy of three gingival displacement systems to accurately record intra-crevicular margins of tooth preparation. Materials and Methods: One mechanical (magic foam cord) and two chemico-mechanical (expasyl paste and retraction cord impregnated with 15% aluminum chloride) gingival displacement systems were used. This study was conducted on the maxillary central incisors of 20 patients (20-60 years old) requiring full coverage restoration. All the three gingival displacement systems were tested in three sessions at an interval of 14 days in same order. The casts were sectioned and viewed under an optical microscope, followed by quantitative measurements of the width of the pre and postretracted sulci. Results: All the three displacement systems produced highly significant horizontal gingival displacement. Retraction cord soaked in 15% aluminum chloride produced maximum displacement (0.74 mm), followed by expasyl paste (0.48 mm) whereas magic foam cord produced the least displacement (0.41 mm). Conclusions: Gingival displacement shown by each displacement system was found to be more than the accepted value necessary for elastomeric impression accuracy (0.2 mm) to record intra-crevicular margins of tooth preparation. PMID:26604620

  8. Localized Juvenile Spongiotic Gingival Inflammation: A Report on 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    PETRUŢIU, ŞTEFAN ADRIAN; ROMAN, ALEXANDRA; SOANCĂ, ANDRADA; SÂRBU, CIPRIAN; STRATUL, ŞTEFAN IOAN

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. A new pathological entity with distinct clinicopathological features has been recently described and termed as juvenile spongiotic gingivitis. Histopathological associated features are unique and characterized by prominent intercellular edema (spongiosis) and neutrophil infiltrate. The aims of this paper were to: introduce juvenile spongiotic gingivitis to the dental and pediatric communities, to report three cases based on clinical and histopathological findings, and to discuss the most common clinical differential diagnoses. The cases were documented at baseline and follow-ups. The clinical appearance of the lesions described in this paper correspond to the pattern described by the literature: 1) localized lesions as bright red slightly raised overgrowths, most often with a subtle papillary or finely granular surface; or 2) multifocal masses or raised papular lesions with a pebbly texture. The first intention treatment approach was personal and professional plaque control. Because of the lack of a good clinical response to conventional therapy, excisional biopsies were performed, which helped establish the diagnosis. The plaque control was reinforced and additional antiseptic local treatment was administered. A real improvement in the local gingival conditions was recorded for all the patients. However, because of the persistence of some bright reddish gingival masses in one of the patients these lesions were treated by surgical excision. The overall clinical outcome was good and stable after one year. Conclusions. The presented cases might raise awareness of this condition among orthodontic specialists because orthodontic treatment could not be applied until the gingival gum disease was resolved. PMID:26528024

  9. Effect of listerine on dental plaque and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Fornell, J; Sundin, Y; Lindhe, J

    1975-01-01

    The present study was performed in 10 adults in order to evaluate the effect of an antiseptic mouthrinse (Listerine) on the rate of dental plaque formation and gingivitis development during a 2-week period when all efforts towards active mechanical oral hygiene were withdrawn. The study was performed as a crossover study and was carried out during four consecutive 2-week periods. During the first and third periods (preparatory periods) the participants were subjected to repeated professional tooth cleanings in order to establish plaque- and gingivitis-free dentitions. During the second and fourth periods (test and control periods) the participants were not allowed to brush their teeth but rinsed their mouths three times a day with Listerine or a placebo mouthwash. Plaque Index, Gingival Index, gingival fluid flow, and crevicular leukocytes were assessed on d 0, 2, 4, 7, and 14. On d 7 and 14, dental plaque was removed from the right and left jaws respectively and the wet weights determined. The chemotactic activity elaborated by the plaques was studied in Boyden chambers. During the Listerine test period, significantly lower Plaque and Gingival Index values were scored and lower amounts of plaque could be sampled in comparison to the control period.

  10. Current concepts on gingival fibromatosis-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Poulopoulos, Athanasios; Kittas, Dimitrios; Sarigelou, Asimina

    2011-08-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a rare, benign, slowly-growing fibrous overgrowth of the gingiva, with great genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Gingival fibromatosis/overgrowth can be inherited as an isolated trait (hereditary gingival fibromatosis) and/or as a component of a syndrome, or it can be drug induced. As a clinical manifestation of a syndrome, gingival fibromatosis is usually associated with generalized hypertrichosis, mental retardation, or epilepsy. Gingival fibromatosis and its related syndromes are mainly inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner, but autosomal-recessive inheritance has also been reported. Clinical syndromic presentation includes Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, Ramon syndrome, Rutherford syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Cross syndrome, Göhlich-Ratmann syndrome, Avani syndrome, and I-cell disease. However, a phenotypic overlap has been suggested, as many combinations of their systemic manifestations have been reported. Treatment of choice is usually gingivectomy with gingivoplasty. Before any therapy, clinical practitioners must take into consideration the clinical course of a particular syndrome and every possible functional and esthetic disorder.

  11. The Effectiveness of Propolis on Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E.; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Methods: Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days −14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). Results: The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13–22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Conclusions: Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period. PMID:25380344

  12. Clinical parameters predictive of enlargement of melanocytic choroidal lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Augsburger, J J; Schroeder, R P; Territo, C; Gamel, J W; Shields, J A

    1989-01-01

    The authors followed up 197 melanotic choroidal lesions (62 categorised as benign naevi, 76 classified as suspicious naevi, 41 diagnosed as dormant melanomas, and 18 categorised as active melanomas) left untreated after their initial clinical documentation. Thirty-nine of these lesions enlarged during a five-year follow-up interval (cumulative proportion of lesions that enlarged = 26.2% by Kaplan-Meier method). Individual clinical parameters predictive of lesion enlargement (p less than 0.01) included larger size of the lesion, especially lesion thickness, presence of retinal detachment, location of the lesion's posterior margin within 2 disc diameters of the optic disc, presence of symptoms, and presence of orange pigment clumps on the lesion's surface. The best combination of these parameters for prediction of lesion enlargement, as identified by multivariate Cox regression analysis, consisted of thickness of the lesion, retinal detachment, and symptoms. The five-year incidence of lesion enlargement for patients with none of these prognostic parameters was 5.8%, while that for patients with all three unfavourable parameters simultaneously was 90.6%. Images PMID:2605146

  13. Quick, painless, and atraumatic gingival retraction: An overview of advanced materials

    PubMed Central

    Rajambigai, M. Aarti; Raja, S. Ramesh; Soundar, S. I. Joephin; Kandasamy, M.

    2016-01-01

    The success of any fixed prosthesis depends on the accuracy of impressions. Finish line exposure has to be adequate during impression making. The goal of gingival retraction is to atraumatically displace gingival tissues to allow access for impression material to record the finish line and provide sufficient thickness of gingival sulcus so that the impression does not tear off during removal. Numerous advanced materials are available for gingival retraction. This article describes the different advanced materials available. PMID:27829736

  14. Quick, painless, and atraumatic gingival retraction: An overview of advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Rajambigai, M Aarti; Raja, S Ramesh; Soundar, S I Joephin; Kandasamy, M

    2016-10-01

    The success of any fixed prosthesis depends on the accuracy of impressions. Finish line exposure has to be adequate during impression making. The goal of gingival retraction is to atraumatically displace gingival tissues to allow access for impression material to record the finish line and provide sufficient thickness of gingival sulcus so that the impression does not tear off during removal. Numerous advanced materials are available for gingival retraction. This article describes the different advanced materials available.

  15. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  16. Effects of titania nanotubes with or without bovine serum albumin loaded on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Shaobing; Lai, Renfa; Zhou, Zhiying; Zhang, Ye; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Modifying the surface of the transmucosal area is a key research area because this process positively affects the three functions of implants: attachment to soft tissue, inhibiting bacterial biofilm adhesion, and the preservation of the crestal bone. To exploit the potential of titania nanotube arrays (TNTs) with or without using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to modify the surface of a dental implant in contact with the transmucosal area, BSA was loaded into TNTs that were fabricated by anodizing Ti sheets; the physical characteristics of these arrays, including their morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, contact angle, and surface free energy (SFE), were assessed. The effect of Ti surfaces with TNTs or TNTs-BSA on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was determined by analyzing cell morphology, early adhesion, proliferation, type I collagen (COL-1) gene expression, and the extracellular secretion of COL-1. The results indicate that early HGF adhesion and spreading behavior is positively correlated with surface characteristics, including hydrophilicity, SFE, and surface roughness. Additionally, TNT surfaces not only promoted early HGF adhesion, but also promoted COL-1 secretion. BSA-loaded TNT surfaces promoted early HGF adhesion, while suppressing late proliferation and COL-1 secretion. Therefore, TNT-modified smooth surfaces are expected to be applicable for uses involving the transmucosal area. Further study is required to determine whether BSA-loaded TNT surfaces actually affect closed loop formation of connective tissue because BSA coating actions in vivo are very rapid.

  17. Effects of titania nanotubes with or without bovine serum albumin loaded on human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Shaobing; Lai, Renfa; Zhou, Zhiying; Zhang, Ye; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Modifying the surface of the transmucosal area is a key research area because this process positively affects the three functions of implants: attachment to soft tissue, inhibiting bacterial biofilm adhesion, and the preservation of the crestal bone. To exploit the potential of titania nanotube arrays (TNTs) with or without using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to modify the surface of a dental implant in contact with the transmucosal area, BSA was loaded into TNTs that were fabricated by anodizing Ti sheets; the physical characteristics of these arrays, including their morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, contact angle, and surface free energy (SFE), were assessed. The effect of Ti surfaces with TNTs or TNTs-BSA on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was determined by analyzing cell morphology, early adhesion, proliferation, type I collagen (COL-1) gene expression, and the extracellular secretion of COL-1. The results indicate that early HGF adhesion and spreading behavior is positively correlated with surface characteristics, including hydrophilicity, SFE, and surface roughness. Additionally, TNT surfaces not only promoted early HGF adhesion, but also promoted COL-1 secretion. BSA-loaded TNT surfaces promoted early HGF adhesion, while suppressing late proliferation and COL-1 secretion. Therefore, TNT-modified smooth surfaces are expected to be applicable for uses involving the transmucosal area. Further study is required to determine whether BSA-loaded TNT surfaces actually affect closed loop formation of connective tissue because BSA coating actions in vivo are very rapid. PMID:24623977

  18. An improved method for echographic detection of left atrial enlargement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. R.; Harrison, D. C.; Popp, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Echographic dimensions of the aortic root and left atrium were compared in 170 patients in order to assess dilation of the left atrium with reference to the relatively nondistensible fibrous aortic root. In 50 patients without cause for left atrial or aortic enlargement, the ratio of left atrial/aortic root dimensions was 0.87 to 1.11. In 80 patients with known cause for left atrial enlargement, the left atrial/aortic root ratio was greater than or equal to 1.17. In 40 patients with isolated valve disease, dilation of both the aortic root and the left atrium resulted in a left atrial/aortic root dimension ratio less than 1.17 in some patients. Despite this consideration, the comparison of left atrial and aortic root dimension appears to be as specific as, and more sensitive than, previously proposed methods for the evaluation of left atrial enlargement.

  19. Neurovascular Compression Caused by Popliteus Muscle Enlargement Without Discrete Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Popliteal entrapment syndrome caused by isolated popliteus muscle enlargement is very rare, although its occurrence has been reported after discrete trauma. However, popliteal artery stenosis with combined peroneal and proximal tibial neuropathy caused by popliteus muscle enlargement without preceding trauma has not been reported. A 57-year-old man presented with a tingling sensation and pain in his left calf. He had no previous history of an injury. The symptoms were similar to those of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Calf pain became worse despite treatment, and the inability to flex his toes progressed. Computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremity showed popliteal artery stenosis caused by popliteus muscle enlargement and surrounding edema. An electrodiagnostic study confirmed combined peroneal and proximal tibial neuropathy at the popliteal fossa. Urgent surgical decompression was performed because of the progressive neurologic deficit and increasing neuropathic pain. The calf pain disappeared immediately after surgery, and he was discharged after the neurologic functions improved. PMID:27446794

  20. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Stewart, Philip S.; Hozalski, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacterial biofilms appear to be designed to withstand extreme forces rather than typical or average loads. In scenarios requiring the removal or control of unwanted biofilms, this emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for structurally weakening the biofilms in conjunction with bacterial inactivation. PMID:26819559

  1. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  2. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  3. Evaluation of Co-Q10 anti-gingivitis effect on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Kandwal, Abhishek; Singh, Nidhi; Singh, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deficiency of Co-Q10 has been found to be responsible for periodontal destruction; therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-gingivitis effect of Co-Q10 on plaque induced gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects with plaque induced gingivitis were enrolled in a split mouth randomized controlled trial. For each subject, scaling was randomly performed for any two quadrants, followed by the topical application of Co-Q10 randomly in a previously scaled and as an unscaled quadrant for a period of 28 days. Four treatment options were planned: option A: scaling only; option B: Co-Q10 along with scaling; option C: Co-Q10. Results: Marked reduction in gingival, bleeding, and plaque scores were recorded at the sites where C0-Q10 was applied. Mean±S.D of aforementioned periodontal parameters at 28th day showed significant reduction for option A, B, and C when compared with baseline. Conclusion: Promising results were obtained after the solitary application of Co-Q10 as well as when it was used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for treatment of plaque induced gingivitis. PMID:23493408

  4. Prevention of Phenytoin-Induced Gingival Overgrowth by Lovastatin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Assaggaf, Mohammad A.; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Sume, Siddika S.; Trackman, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is caused by the antiseizure medication phenytoin, calcium channel blockers, and ciclosporin. Characteristics of these drug-induced gingival overgrowth lesions differ. We evaluate the ability of a mouse model to mimic human phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth and assess the ability of a drug to prevent its development. Lovastatin was chosen based on previous analyses of tissue-specific regulation of CCN2 production in human gingival fibroblasts and the known roles of CCN2 in promoting fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Data indicate that anterior gingival tissue overgrowth occurred in phenytoin-treated mice based on gross tissue observations and histomorphometry of tissue sections. Molecular markers of epithelial plasticity and fibrosis were regulated by phenytoin in gingival epithelial tissues and in connective tissues similar to that seen in humans. Lovastatin attenuated epithelial gingival tissue growth in phenytoin-treated mice and altered the expressions of markers for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Data indicate that phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth in mice mimics molecular aspects of human gingival overgrowth and that lovastatin normalizes the tissue morphology and the expression of the molecular markers studied. Data are consistent with characterization of phenytoin-induced human gingival overgrowth in vivo and in vitro characteristics of cultured human gingival epithelial and connective tissue cells. Findings suggest that statins may serve to prevent or attenuate phenytoin-induced human gingival overgrowth, although specific human studies are required. PMID:25843680

  5. Effect of topical application of phenylephrine hydrochloride on hyperplastic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Pernsteiner, C L; Ash, M M

    1977-08-01

    A double blind study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Phenodent Type A (brand of phenylephrine hydrochloride) on decongesting hyperplastic gingivitis. Three solutions were used: a 0.5% a placebo, and a 0.25% concentration of phenylephrine hydrochloride. The periodontal disease index was used to score variables which might have an effect on gingival response to local irritants. Impressions were taken and casts were made on 45 subjects at 0, 1, 3, and 6-week intervals. An instrument with accuracy of 0.001 inch was constructed to measure the changes in the interdental papillae of the stone casts. No significant reduction of gingival volume was established for any of the three solutions.

  6. Alternative method of conservative esthetic treatment for gingival recession.

    PubMed

    Zalkind, M; Hochman, N

    1997-06-01

    The health and appearance of gingival tissue play an essential role in esthetics. The esthetic function of the tissue is enhanced when it frames the restoration. With gingival recession, the effect of natural gingiva is created with pink composites or ceramics on the cervical part of the crown, as described in this clinical report. This goal depends on the absence of adverse effects on the color, shape, and health of the surrounding tissue. The new composites are more color stable and wear resistant, and the latest generation of dental bonding agents allows the bonding of composites to dentin, various metals, and porcelain. The application of soft-tissue colored composite on dentin cementum, enamel, or porcelain is a good solution for correcting gingival recessions.

  7. Plaque formation and marginal gingivitis associated with restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, Luis A; Cabanilla, Leyvee L; Abbott, Lawrence J

    2011-05-01

    The presence of restorative materials on tooth surfaces is perceived to be a contributing factor to periodontal disease. This observation is a result of the increased accumulation of plaque on restorations adjacent to the gingiva, which may lead to gingivitis. Plaque is believed to adhere better to restorations than to enamel. This may be due to the surface characteristics of restorative materials such as surface roughness and surface-free energy inherent in the materials. This article reviews the experimental studies of plaque formation on different restorative materials. In addition, clinical studies analyzing and comparing restorative materials and the consequent formation of gingivitis are reviewed. While in vitro and in vivo studies show variations in plaque formation among restorative materials and enamel, clinical studies demonstrate that the progression of gingivitis can be prevented if patients maintain adequate oral hygiene and home care. Therefore, instructing the patient to maintain proper oral hygiene and home care is more important than the choice of restorative material.

  8. Plaque formation and marginal gingivitis associated with restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, Luis A; Cabanilla, Leyvee L; Abbott, Lawrence J

    2012-01-01

    The presence of restorative materials on tooth surfaces is perceived to be a contributing factor to periodontal disease. This observation is a result of the increased accumulation of plaque on restorations adjacent to the gingiva, which may lead to gingivitis. Plaque is believed to adhere better to restorations than to enamel. This may be due to the surface characteristics of restorative materials such as surface roughness and surface-free energy inherent in the materials. This article reviews the experimental studies of plaque formation on different restorative materials. In addition, clinical studies analyzing and comparing restorative materials and the consequent formation of gingivitis are reviewed. While in vitro and in vivo studies show variations in plaque formation among restorative materials and enamel, clinical studies demonstrate that the progression of gingivitis can be prevented if patients maintain adequate oral hygiene and home care. Therefore, instructing the patient to maintain proper oral hygiene and home care is more important than the choice of restorative material.

  9. Arachnoid cyst slit valves: the mechanism for arachnoid cyst enlargement.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Safain, Mina G; Heilman, Carl B

    2013-07-01

    Arachnoid cysts are common, accounting for approximately 1% of intracranial mass lesions. Most are congenital, clinically silent, and remain static in size. Occasionally, they increase in size and produce symptoms due to mass effect or obstruction. The mechanism of enlargement of arachnoid cysts is controversial. One-way slit valves are often hypothesized as the mechanism for enlargement. The authors present 4 cases of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts in which a slit valve was identified. The patients presented with hydrocephalus due to enlargement of the cyst. The valve was located in the arachnoid wall of the cyst directly over the basilar artery. The authors believe this slit valve was responsible for the net influx of CSF into the cyst and for its enlargement. They also present 1 case of an arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa that had a small circular opening but lacked a slit valve. This cyst did not enlarge but surgery was required because of rupture and the development of a subdural hygroma. One-way slit valves exist and are a possible mechanism of enlargement of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts. The valve was located directly over the basilar artery in each of these cases. Caudad-to-cephalad CSF flow during the cardiac cycle increased the opening of the valve, whereas cephalad-to-caudad CSF flow during the remainder of the cardiac cycle pushed the slit opening against the basilar artery and decreased the size of the opening. Arachnoid cysts that communicate CSF via circular, nonslit valves are probably more likely to remain stable.

  10. Candida albicans stimulates Streptococcus mutans microcolony development via cross-kingdom biofilm-derived metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongyeop; Sengupta, Arjun; Niepa, Tagbo H. R.; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Weljie, Aalim; Freitas-Blanco, Veronica S.; Murata, Ramiro M.; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Lee, Daeyeon; Koo, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is frequently detected with heavy infection of Streptococcus mutans in plaque-biofilms from children affected with early-childhood caries, a prevalent and costly oral disease. The presence of C. albicans enhances S. mutans growth within biofilms, yet the chemical interactions associated with bacterial accumulation remain unclear. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate how microbial products from this cross-kingdom association modulate S. mutans build-up in biofilms. Our data revealed that bacterial-fungal derived conditioned medium (BF-CM) significantly increased the growth of S. mutans and altered biofilm 3D-architecture in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in enlarged and densely packed bacterial cell-clusters (microcolonies). Intriguingly, BF-CM induced S. mutans gtfBC expression (responsible for Gtf exoenzymes production), enhancing Gtf activity essential for microcolony development. Using a recently developed nanoculture system, the data demonstrated simultaneous microcolony growth and gtfB activation in situ by BF-CM. Further metabolites/chromatographic analyses of BF-CM revealed elevated amounts of formate and the presence of Candida-derived farnesol, which is commonly known to exhibit antibacterial activity. Unexpectedly, at the levels detected (25–50 μM), farnesol enhanced S. mutans-biofilm cell growth, microcolony development, and Gtf activity akin to BF-CM bioactivity. Altogether, the data provide new insights on how extracellular microbial products from cross-kingdom interactions stimulate the accumulation of a bacterial pathogen within biofilms. PMID:28134351

  11. Spleen and liver enlargement in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, María Eugenia; Ceccato, Federico; Paira, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with a seropositive, erosive, and non-nodular rheumatoid arthritis of 15 year of evolution. The patient had poor compliance with medical visits and treatment. She came to the clinic with persistent pancytopenia and spleen and liver enlargement. Liver and bone marrow biopsies were carried out and amyloidosis, neoplasias and infections were ruled out. We discuss the differential diagnosis of pancytopenia and spleen and liver enlargement in a long-standing rheumatoid arthritis patient.

  12. Binding, uptake, and release of nicotine by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, P.J.; Schuster, G.S.; Lubas, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of the effects of nicotine on fibroblasts have reported an altered morphology and attachment of fibroblasts to substrates and disturbances in protein synthesis and secretion. This altered functional and attachment response may be associated with changes in the cell membrane resulting from binding of the nicotine, or to disturbances in cell metabolism as a result of high intracellular levels of nicotine. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to (1) determine whether gingival fibroblasts bound nicotine and if any binding observed was specific or non-specific in nature; (2) determine whether gingival fibroblasts internalized nicotine, and if so, at what rate; (3) determine whether gingival fibroblasts also released nicotine back into the extracellular environment; and (4) if gingival fibroblasts release nicotine intact or as a metabolite. Cultures of gingival fibroblasts were prepared from gingival connective tissue biopsies. Binding was evaluated at 4{degree}C using a mixture of {sup 3}H-nicotine and unlabeled nicotine. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between {sup 3}H-nicotine bound in the presence and absence of unlabeled nicotine. The cells bound 1.44 (+/- 0.42) pmols/10(6) cells in the presence of unlabeled nicotine and 1.66 (+/- 0.55) pmols/10(6) cells in the absence of unlabeled nicotine. The difference was not significant. Uptake of nicotine was measured at 37{degree}C after treating cells with {sup 3}H-nicotine for time periods up to 4 hours. Uptake in pmols/10(6) cells was 4.90 (+/- 0.34) at 15 minutes, 8.30 (+/- 0.75) at 30 minutes, 12.28 (+/- 2.62) at 1 hour and 26.31 (+/- 1.15) at 4 hours.

  13. Prevalence of gingival biotype and its relationship to clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rucha; Sowmya, N. K.; Mehta, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The dimensions of gingiva and different parts of the masticatory mucosa have a profound impact in periodontics as it governs the way; the gingival tissue reacts to various physical, chemical, or bacterial insults. The purpose of the following study was to assess the gingival thickness (GT) and correlate it to gender, presence of recession, and width of keratinized gingiva (WKG) in a subset of the Indian population. Methods: A total of 400 subjects in the age range of 20–35 years (200 males and 200 females) were included in the study. Clinical parameters such as probing depth, recession depth, WKG, and GT were recorded for all the patients. Results: The prevalence of thin biotype was 43.25%, and that of thick gingival biotype was 56.75%. The mean GT of central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine in Group I was 1.11 ± 0.17, 1.01 ± 0.16, and 0.82 ± 0.17 mm, respectively. No significant association was observed between the gender and the presence of gingival recession to GT. The mean WKG of central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine in Group I was 4.38 ± 1.18, 5.18 ± 1.25, 4.16 ± 1.16 mm, respectively. A positive correlation exists between WKG and the GT (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that the prevalence of thick and thin gingival biotype is 56.75% versus 43.25%, respectively, and there is no significant relationship between age, gender, and the presence of recession to gingival biotype. A positive correlation exists between WKG and the GT. PMID:26604569

  14. [Parodontocid efficiency in complex treatment and prevention of gingivitis].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Turkina, A Iu; Poliakova, M A; Babina, K S

    2013-01-01

    Antiplaque/antigingivitis effect of an alcohol-free mouthrinse Parodontocid were evaluated by randomized parallel group clinical trial. Sixty patients with gingivitis were clinically examined to determine PHP, RMNPI and PMA indexes. After professional dental prophylaxis, subjects were randomly assigned in two groups to 10 days oral hygiene program. Group 1 patients used only toothbrush and prophylactic toothpaste while in group 2 persons used Parodontocid in conjunction with normal brushing and flossing.Parodontocid significantly reduced plaque and gingivitis compared to negative control.

  15. Cytotoxicity of halothane on human gingival fibroblast cultures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Chou, M Y

    2001-02-01

    Recently halothane has been reported to be the most suitable alternative to chloroform in dissolving gutta-percha. Periapical tissue toxicity of halothane is not completely known. In this study gutta-percha dissolved by halothane was evaluated with the almar blue dye assay using human gingival fibroblast cultures. The cytotoxic effects of halothane on human gingival fibroblasts depended on the exposure dose, frequency, and duration. A reduced concentration and smaller amount of gutta-percha solvents may minimize the cytotoxic effects on host tissues.

  16. A practical clinical recording system for cases with desquamative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Arduino, P G; Broccoletti, R; Sciannameo, V; Scully, C

    2016-09-17

    The most frequent autoimmune disorders that involve the oral mucosae are lichen planus, pemphigoid, pemphigus, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, erythema multiforme, discoid lupus erythematosus and chronic ulcerative stomatitis, affected individuals presenting with variable oral lesions; mainly(1-3) hyperkeratosis, erythema, blisters, erosions and ulcerations. The gingival tissues are commonly involved, not least because of decreases in oral hygiene(4) but the gingiva can be the unique site of onset or the first manifestation of the disorder(5) often as "desquamative gingivitis" (DG).(3,6,7)(This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.)

  17. A rare case of isolated idiopathic gingival fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Saini, Ashish; Singh, Meghna; Singh, Saimbi C

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare condition. It is genetically heterogeneous and is usually part of a syndrome or, rarely, an isolated disorder. This study presents a rare case of 13 year old boy who was diagnosed with isolated IGF. This diagnosis has been based on clinical examination and after ruling out family, drug, and medical histories. External bevel gingivectomy has been done to remove excess gingival tissues. Excised tissue has been examined histologically. The patient has been followed up for a period of two and half years. No recurrence has been observed.

  18. Gingival pain: an unusual side effect of ziprasidone

    PubMed Central

    Raghunath, Ashwati

    2013-01-01

    The patient is a 52-year-old man with schizophrenia who developed severe, unremitting gingival pain after his ziprasidone dosage was increased from 80 to 120 mg. His physical examination and laboratory findings were unremarkable. He did not have any extra-pyramidal side effects. His pain did not ameliorate after taking acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. As a last resort, the patient took benztropine and his pain subsided within half an hour. His ziprasidone dosage was decreased and the patient is currently doing well. He has not experienced gingival pain since his medication was adjusted. PMID:23283612

  19. Desquamative gingivitis: what's behind it? A case report.

    PubMed

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Desquamative gingivitis (DG) is a clinical term used to describe red, painful, glazed, friable gingiva. It may be a manifestation of a mucocutaneous condition, such as lichen planus or other vesiculobulous disorders. Dentists must be aware of this rare clinical entity in order to distinguish DG from the far more common plaque-induced gingivitis. This case is unique in that it involves oral lichen planus and chronic DG, which may be secondary to plaque or a manifestation of the oral lichen planus. Intraoral examination and biopsy reports revealed features of chronic DG and oral reticular lichen planus.

  20. Can Chemical Mouthwash Agents Achieve Plaque/Gingivitis Control?

    PubMed

    Van der Weijden, Fridus A; Van der Sluijs, Eveline; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Slot, Dagmar E

    2015-10-01

    Also note that structured abstracts are not allowed per journal style: What is the effect of a mouthwash containing various active chemical ingredients on plaque control and managing gingivitis in adults based on evidence gathered from existing systematic reviews? The summarized evidence suggests that mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine(CHX) and essential oils (EO) had a large effect supported by a strong body of evidence. Also there was strong evidence for a moderate effect of cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC). Evidence suggests that a CHX mouthwash is the first choice, the most reliable alternative is EO. No difference between CHX and EO with respect to gingivitis was observed.

  1. Inhibition of biofilm formation and antibacterial properties of a silver nano-coating on human dentine.

    PubMed

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The survival of pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity depends on their successful adhesion to dental surfaces and their ability to develop into biofilms, known as dental plaque. Bacteria from the dental plaque are responsible for the development of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, stomatitis and peri-implantitis. Certain metal nanoparticles have been suggested for infection control and the management of the oral biofilm. Here, it is shown that application of a silver nano-coating directly on dentine can successfully prevent the biofilm formation on dentine surfaces as well as inhibit bacterial growth in the surrounding media. This silver nano-coating was found to be stable (>98.8%) and to maintain its integrity in biological fluids. Its antibacterial activity was compared to silver nitrate and the widely used clinical antiseptic, chlorhexidine. The bacterial growth and cell viability were quantitatively assessed by measuring the turbidity, proportion of live and dead cells and lactate production. All three bioassays showed that silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate dentine coatings were equally highly bactericidal (>99.5%), while inhibiting bacterial adhesion. However, the latter caused significant dentine discolouration (ΔE* = 50.3). The chlorhexidine coating showed no antibacterial effect. Thus, silver nanoparticles may be a viable alternative to both chlorhexidine and silver nitrate, protecting from dental plaque and secondary caries when applied as a dentine coating, while they may provide the platform for creating anti-biofilm surfaces in medical devices and other biomedical applications.

  2. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  3. 46 CFR 502.102 - Enlargement of time to file documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enlargement of time to file documents. 502.102 Section... AND PROCEDURE Time § 502.102 Enlargement of time to file documents. (a) Motions for enlargement of...) Replies to such motions for enlargement of time shall conform to the requirements of § 502.74....

  4. 17. Historic photograph, photographer unknown, 1943. ENLARGEMENT OF PORTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic photograph, photographer unknown, 1943. ENLARGEMENT OF PORTION OF PHOTOGRAPH AZ-10-16, SHOWING WOOD TOWER BEFORE CONCRETE WAS ADDED. NOTE GUY CABLE CONNECTED TO TOP RIGHT OF TOWER. - Verde River Sheep Bridge, Spanning Verde River (Tonto National Forest), Cave Creek, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. The Print and Computer Enlargement System--PACE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Ronald A.

    The Print and Computer Enlargement (PACE) System is being designed as a portable computerized reading and writing system that enables a low-vision person to read regular print and then create and edit text using large-print computerized output. The design goal was to develop a system that: weighed no more than 12 pounds so it could be easily…

  6. Construction and enlargement of traversable wormholes from Schwarzschild black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Hiroko; Hayward, Sean A.

    2004-10-15

    Analytic solutions are presented which describe the construction of a traversable wormhole from a Schwarzschild black hole, and the enlargement of such a wormhole, in Einstein gravity. The matter model is pure radiation which may have negative-energy density (phantom or ghost radiation) and the idealization of impulsive radiation (infinitesimally thin null shells) is employed.

  7. The Optiscope Enlarger: A Report of Initial Field Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellinger, George O.; Berger, Arthur W.

    1972-01-01

    Thirty randomly selected, low vision patients were evaluated on their performance in viewing a standard near-point chart and selected materials without any vision aids, then with their customary low vision aid handheld, and finally, with their customary low vision aid viewed in an optiscope enlarger. (GW)

  8. 9. 8' X 10' Enlargement from 4' x 5' negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 8' X 10' Enlargement from 4' x 5' negative Kevin Kriesel-Coons, Photographer PUMPS AFTER REMOVAL FROM PUMPHOUSE BEFORE EXCAVATION OF POND AREA IN 1989. PHOTOGRAPHED LYING ON GROUND NEAR CROSSCUT STEAM PLANT BUILDING. - Crosscut Steam Plant, Indian Bend Pond & Pump Ditch, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. Congenital enlargement of the suburethral diverticulum in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Susan R.; Doré, Elizabeth; Breteau, Gaëlle; Desrochers, André; Babkine, Marie; Nichols, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    A 3-month-old, female Holstein calf was examined because of marked perineal swelling and tenesmus of 4-days duration. A congenitally enlarged urethral diverticulum was diagnosed using fluoroscopic and ultrasonographic imaging techniques. The urethral diverticulum was surgically resected and the perineal area was reconstructed. PMID:21532825

  10. 23. Photocopy of photograph (4 x 5 inch enlargement of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (4 x 5 inch enlargement of 1940 3-1/4 x 4-1/4 inch print by R. Nevan McCullough; in Cultural Resource files, Supervisor's Office, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest) SOUTH FRONT - Suntop Lookout, Forest Road 510, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Greenwater, Pierce County, WA

  11. Construction and enlargement of traversable wormholes from Schwarzschild black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Hiroko; Hayward, Sean A.

    2004-10-01

    Analytic solutions are presented which describe the construction of a traversable wormhole from a Schwarzschild black hole, and the enlargement of such a wormhole, in Einstein gravity. The matter model is pure radiation which may have negative-energy density (phantom or ghost radiation) and the idealization of impulsive radiation (infinitesimally thin null shells) is employed.

  12. 30. Photocopy from enlarged microfiche of 1896 drawing captioned: Part ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy from enlarged microfiche of 1896 drawing captioned: Part of Plan C/80 showing changes proposed in end doors of Storehouse, then under construction by the Penn Bridge Co. of Beaver Falls, Pa. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Pattern Shop, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  13. 24. Lake Hodges Flume conduit enlargement. April 1930. Courtesy of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Lake Hodges Flume conduit enlargement. April 1930. Courtesy of the Mandeville Department of Special Collections, Central Library, University of California, San Diego. - Lake Hodges Flume, Along San Dieguito River between Lake Hodges & San Dieguito Reservoir, Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego County, CA

  14. Income, Deprivation and Economic Stress in the Enlarged European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Christopher T.; Maitre, Bertrand

    2007-01-01

    At risk of poverty indicators based on relative income measures suggest that within the enlarged EU societies located at quite different points on a continuum of affluence have similar levels of poverty. Substantial differences in levels of income between societies do not in themselves invalidate this approach. However, the relative income…

  15. Photographic Enlargement of Printed Music: Technique, Application, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Pauline T.; Rich, A. Jeanette

    1982-01-01

    Addressed a need for enlargement of music when retirement home residents were deprived of a self-fulfillment opportunity from choir activities due to failing eyesight. A photographic process yielded the needed feasible large reproductions. Innovative application of this technique affords wide-ranging potential for positive benefit beyond music…

  16. Amygdala and Hippocampus Enlargement during Adolescence in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Wouter; Teluij, Michelle; Buitelaar, Jan; Tendolkar, Indira

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The amygdala and hippocampus are key components of the neural system mediating emotion perception and regulation and are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of autism. Although some studies in children with autism suggest that there is an enlargement of amygdala and hippocampal volume, findings in adolescence are sparse.…

  17. 22. PHOTOGRAPHIC ENLARGEMENT OF UPPER PHOTOGRAPH ON PAGE 986 IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. PHOTOGRAPHIC ENLARGEMENT OF UPPER PHOTOGRAPH ON PAGE 986 IN Keystone Coal Buyers Catalog, 1922, VIEW SOUTH, COMMUNITY OF ETHEL; ETHEL COAL COMPANY MINE SUPPLY BUILDING IS LOCATED IN MID-GROUND LEFT OF CENTER PARTIALLY OBSCURED BY ROOF OF HOUSE IN FOREGROUND - Ethel Coal Company & Supply Building, Left fork of Dingess Run (Ethel Hollow), Ethel, Logan County, WV

  18. 23. PHOTOGRAPHIC ENLARGEMENT OF UPPER PHOTOGRAPH ON PAGE 986 IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. PHOTOGRAPHIC ENLARGEMENT OF UPPER PHOTOGRAPH ON PAGE 986 IN Keystone Coal Buyers Catalog, 1922, VIEW SOUTH, COMMUNITY OF ETHEL; ETHEL COAL COMPANY MINE SUPPLY BUILDING IS LOCATED IN MID-GROUND IN CENTER PARTIALLY OBSCURED BY ROOF OF HOUSE IN FOREGROUND - Ethel Coal Company & Supply Building, Left fork of Dingess Run (Ethel Hollow), Ethel, Logan County, WV

  19. Does Society Matter? Life Satisfaction in the Enlarged Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnke, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Life satisfaction is quite heterogeneously distributed across countries of the enlarged European Union. Previous research has shown how living conditions within individual countries, such as access to material and emotional resources, are important for personal well-being, but it has been less successful in explaining differences between…

  20. Electrochemical biofilm control: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are to (1) present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control, (2) establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it, (3) discuss current proposed mechanisms, and (4) introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing data sets across the literature and generating comparable data sets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use. PMID:26592420

  1. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  2. Biofilm and dental unit waterlines.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Jolanta

    2003-01-01

    Aquatic biofilms, which are well-organized communities of microorganisms, are widespread in nature. They constitute a major problem in many environmental, industrial and medical settings. The use of advanced techniques has revealed biofilm structure, formation and ecology. Special attention was given to the build-up of biofilm in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs), which are small-bore flexible plastic tubing to bring water to different handpieces. They are coated with well-established biofilms. Active biofilm is a source of microbial contamination of DUWLs water. The safety of dental treatment requires a good quality of the water used. The knowledge of nature, formation and the ways to eliminate the biofilm is the first step towards reducing health risk, both for patients and dental personnel. The article reviews these issues.

  3. Quorum sensing and microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Irie, Y; Parsek, M R

    2008-01-01

    Some bacterial species engage in two well-documented social behaviors: the formation of surface-associated communities known as biofilms, and intercellular signaling, or quorum sensing. Recent studies have begun to reveal how these two social behaviors are related in different species. This chapter will review the role quorum sensing plays in biofilm formation for different species. In addition, different aspects of quorum sensing in the context of multispecies biofilms will be discussed.

  4. Early Canine Plaque Biofilms: Characterization of Key Bacterial Interactions Involved in Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Lucy J.; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  5. Clinician perceptions of wound biofilm.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel G; Bowler, Philip G

    2016-10-01

    In wound care today, biofilm is a subject area of great interest and debate. There is an increasing awareness that biofilm exists in the majority of non-healing wounds, and that it is implicated in both recalcitrance and infection. Together with the presence of devitalised host tissue, biofilm is recognised as a component of the wound environment that requires removal to enable wound progression. However, uncertainty exists among wound care practitioners regarding confirmation of the presence of biofilm, and how best to remove biofilm from a non-healing wound. While recent efforts have been taken to assist practitioners in signs and symptoms of wound biofilm, continuing research is required to characterise and confirm wound biofilm. This research was conducted as part of a market research process to better understand the knowledge levels, experiences, clinical awareness and impact of biofilm in wound care, which was undertaken across the USA and Europe. While knowledge levels and experiences vary from country to country, certain wound characteristics were consistently associated with the presence of biofilm.

  6. Lasers in esthetic treatment of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation: a review article.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rahmani, Somayeh; Rahmani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The health and suitability of mouth components play an important role towards defining facial attractiveness. An important component of the oral cavity is the color of the gingival tissue. Gingival melanin hyperpigmentation is caused by several reasons and affects people across ethnicity, race, age, and both gender. Lasers are presently being used for gingival melanin depigmentation. In this article, we reviewed studies on laser parameters, duration of gingival healing, pain perception during and after the operation, scores used for the evaluation of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation, follow-up period, treatment results, and recurrence reports. We conclude that laser ablation for gingival depigmentation is one of the most pleasant, reliable, acceptable, and impressive techniques available for treating gingival melanin hyperpigmentation.

  7. Dynamic behavior of biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, R.M. ); Donaldson, T.L. )

    1986-01-01

    Biological fixed films, or biofilms, are composed of a dense cluster of cells bound to one another or a support surface by the glycocalyx, a cell-secreted carbohydrate matrix. A key advantage of fixed films over other types of immobilized-cell systems is that the immobilization occurs naturally, and hence does not require the additional materials and labor for cell entrapment within gels or covalent bonding to supports. Applications of microbial film fermenters have included animal-cell culture, bacterial leaching of ores, waste treatment, and the production of vinegar, ethanol, critic acid, and beer. Analysis of the unsteady-state behavior of biofilms can provide insight into basic scientific phenomena such as intracellular metabolic regulation patterns.

  8. Local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Leishman, Shaneen J; Seymour, Gregory J; Ford, Pauline J

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P < 0.001). These results support the concept that gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual.

  9. Evaluation of gingival vascularisation using laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitez, B.; Todea, C.; Velescu, A.; Şipoş, C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: The present study aims to assess the level of vascularisation of the lower frontal gingiva of smoker patients, in comparison with non-smokers by using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF), in order to determine the changes in gingival microcirculation. Material & methods: 16 volunteers were included in this study and separated into 2 equal groups: non-smoker subjects in Group I and smoker subjects in Group II. All patients were submitted to a visual examination and professional cleaning The gingival bloodflow of each patient was recorded in 5 zones using LDF, resulting in a total of 80 recordings. LDF was done with the Moor Instruments Ltd. "moorLAB" Laser Doppler. All data were collected as graphs, raw values and statistically analyzed. Results: After strict analysis results show that Group II presents a steady level of gingival microcirculation with even patterns in the graph, while Group I shows many signs of damage to it`s microvascular system through many irregularities in the microcirculation level and graph patterns. Conclusion: The results suggest that prolonged smoking has a definitive effect on the gingival vascularisation making it a key factor in periodontal pathology.

  10. Cytotoxicity and arecoline mechanisms in human gingival fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Hu, C C; Lii, C K; Tai, K W; Yang, S H; Chou, M Y

    2001-03-01

    Betel nut chewing, like cigarette smoking, is a popular oral habit which impinges on the daily lives of a population of approximately 200 million. People who chew betel nuts have a higher prevalence of periodontal diseases than those who do not. Many of the undesirable effects of betel nuts have been attributed to arecoline, a major component of the particular alkaloid in betel nuts. In this in vitro study, we have focused on the effects of arecoline and the role it could play in periodontal breakdown via its direct effects on human gingival fibroblasts. Human gingival fibroblasts were derived from three healthy individuals undergoing crown-lengthening procedures. We found that arecoline is cytotoxic to human gingival fibroblasts at a concentration higher than 50 micrograms/ml by depleting intracellular thiols and inhibiting mitochondrial activity (P < 0.05). In addition, the cells displayed a marked arrest at G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner. Repeated and long-term exposure to arecoline could impair the gingival fibroblast functions. As they are cytotoxic, the use of betel nut products in conjunction with periodontal therapy may interfere with optimal healing and/or lead to further periodontal breakdown.

  11. Proinflammatory cytokines induce amelotin transcription in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yohei; Takai, Hideki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Zhou, Liming; Kato, Ayako; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2014-12-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a secreted protein transcribed predominantly during the maturation stage of enamel formation and localized in the junctional epithelium. We investigated differences in the levels of AMTN gene expression between non-inflamed gingiva and inflamed gingiva from patients with chronic periodontitis. Total RNAs were isolated from these tissues and their gene expression profiles were monitored by DNA microarray. The observed induction of AMTN mRNA in inflamed gingiva and cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was confirmed by real-time PCR. Transient transfection assays were performed using chimeric constructs of mouse AMTN gene promoter fragments linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Immunohistochemical localization of AMTN in inflamed and non-inflamed gingiva was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Among many differentially expressed genes, the level of AMTN mRNA was significantly increased in inflamed gingiva. Treatment of HGF with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced the expression of AMTN mRNA, and increased the luciferase activities of the AMTN promoter constructs. AMTN protein was detected in inflamed gingival connective tissue and junctional epithelium. These findings demonstrate that proinflammatory cytokines induce AMTN gene expression in human gingival fibroblasts and suggest a role for AMTN in gingival inflammation.

  12. The effect of two toothpastes on plaque and gingival inflamation.

    PubMed

    Saxer, U P; Menghini, G; Bohnert, K J; Ley, F

    1995-01-01

    In this study on 60 adult subjects, the effective of Parodontax, a dentifrice containing herbal ingredients and sodium bicarbonate abrasive, was compared to a non-marketed new toothpaste containing herbal ingredients and calcium hydrogen phosphate as the abrasive. Plaque, gingivitis and gingival bleeding parameters were scored. The periodontal probe bleeding index of Ainamo and Bay was modified to score slight and moderate bleeding. In this first four-week period all subjects used the new toothpaste. After this period the new toothpaste produced a significant decrease (p<0.01) in gingivitis and bleeding on probing, but no effect on plaque was observed. During the second period of eight weeks the subjects were randomly divided into two groups, one using Parodontax and the other group continuing with the new toothpaste. The study design was a double-blind procedure. At the end of the 12-week study period the plaque index showed no changes in both groups. The gingivitis and bleeding indices decreased significantly (p<0.001) by 40% in both groups compared to the baseline examination.

  13. Enamel-renal-gingival syndrome and FAM20A mutations.

    PubMed

    Kantaputra, Piranit Nik; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Khemaleelakul, Udomrat; Dejkhamron, Prapai; Sutthimethakorn, Suchitra; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Iamaroon, Anak

    2014-01-01

    The enamel-renal syndrome of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) and nephrocalcinosis, and the amelogenesis imperfecta-gingival fibromatosis syndrome have both been associated with mutations in FAM20A. We report on two unrelated Thai patients with three novel and one previously reported mutations in FAM20A with findings suggesting both disorders, including hypoplastic AI, gingival fibromatosis, unerupted teeth, aggressive periodontitis, and nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis. Additional findings consisted of a supernumerary premolar, localized aggressive periodontitis, thin alveolar bone, vitamin D deficiency-associated hyperparathyroidism, and heterotopic calcification in other tissues, including lungs, dental pulp, gingiva, dental follicles, and periodontal tissues, and early cessation of limited menstruation. Greater promotory activity of urine on calcium oxalate crystal growth compared to controls may help to explain the pathogenesis, and suggest that FAM20A mutations can contribute to nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of FAM20A mutations. Since both of our patients and a large number of previously reported cases had all the important features of both syndromes, including AI, renal anomalies, and gingival fibromatosis, we are convinced that these two disorders actually are the same entity. The name of enamel-renal-gingival syndrome is suggested.

  14. Smad2 decelerates re-epithelialization during gingival wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tomikawa, K; Yamamoto, T; Shiomi, N; Shimoe, M; Hongo, S; Yamashiro, K; Yamaguchi, T; Maeda, H; Takashiba, S

    2012-08-01

    During periodontal regeneration, inhibition of gingival downgrowth is necessary to promote migration of mesenchymal cells into the defects. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a pleiotropic cytokine that has numerous cell functions, including regulation of epithelial growth. Recent studies have shown that Smad2, a downstream transcription factor of TGF-β, plays crucial roles in wound healing in the epithelia. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Smad2 overexpression on re-epithelialization of gingival wounds. Transgenic mice overexpressing smad2 driven by the keratin 14 promoter (k14-smad2) were confirmed to have significant Smad2 phosphorylation in gingival basal epithelia. Punch wounds were made in the palatal gingiva, and wound healing was assessed histologically for 7 days. Re-epithelialization was significantly retarded on day 2, while collagen deposition was enhanced on day 7 in k14-smad2 compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, expression of keratin 16 (K16), an indicator of keratinocyte migration, was significantly inhibited in wound-edge keratinocytes in k14-smad2. The inhibition of K16 coincided with the induction of Smad2 in the corresponding epithelia, while BrdU incorporation was unaffected. These results indicated that Smad2 has inhibitory effects in regulating keratinocyte migration during gingival wound healing. TGF-β/Smad2 signaling mediating alteration of K16 expression must be tightly regulated during periodontal regeneration.

  15. Prevalence of Gingival Biotypes among Young Dentate North Indian Population: A Biometric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Polsani L; Bhoria, Mohaneesh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of various gingival biotypes and to corroborate gingival thickness and gingival biotypes across tooth type, site, and gender. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted across systemically healthy subjects. A systematic clinical evaluation for gingival biotypes and gingival thicknesses was recorded by modified Iwanson’s gauge, to the nearest 0.1 mm, probing the gingival sulcus at the midfacial aspect of maxillary and mandibular central incisors and first molars. All measurements were made across a total of 920 sites in 115 subjects (69 female and 46 male) based on gingival transparency and were statistically analyzed. Results: A significant agreement on the reproducibility of the measurements was noted. The median overall gingival thickness was recorded at 0.75 mm with interquantile difference of 0.39 mm. The thin biotype variant showed across the ranges of 0.3 to 0.6 mm of gingival thicknesses and thick biotype variant across the ranges of 1.0 to 1.2 mm, with more prevalence in anterior and posterior site respectively. Moreover, for gingi-val thickness of 0.7 mm, the probe visibility showed tendency toward both thin/thick biotype variant in both anterior and posterior segments. The disposition of male participants toward thick biotype and female participants toward the thin biotype variant has been noted. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the current study, our data support the traditional hypothesis of two main gingival biotypes as distinguishable by gingival transparency. In addition, we provide evidence of existence of intermediate biotypes with respect to gingival thickness. These findings can be utilized as objective guidelines for determination of biotype and can be implicated in many dental operative procedures. How to cite this article: Rathee M, Rao PL, Bhoria M. Prevalence of Gingival Biotypes among Young Dentate North Indian Population: A Biometric Approach. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016

  16. Overview of microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Costerton, J W

    1995-09-01

    As the success of this two-issue special section of the Journal of Industrial Microbiology attests, the study of microbial biofilms is truly burgeoning as the uniqueness and the importance of this mode of growth is increasingly recognized. Because of its universality the biofilm concept impacts virtually all of the subdivisions of Microbiology (including Medical, Dental, Agricultural, Industrial and Environmental) and these two issues incorporate contributions from authors in all of these disciplines. Some time ago we reasoned that bacteria cannot possibly be aware (sic) of their precise location, in terms of this spectrum of anthrocentric subspecialties, and that their behavior must be dictated by a standard set of phenotypic responses to environmental conditions in what must seem to them (sic) to be a continuum of very similar aquatic ecosystems. In this overview I will, therefore, stress the common features of microbial biofilms that we should bear in mind as we use this simple universal concept to seek to understand bacterial behavior in literally hundreds of aquatic ecosystems traditionally studied by dozens of subspecies of microbiologists reared in sharply different scientific and academic conventions.

  17. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  18. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis.

  19. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4) from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total). Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p < 9.15 × 10-7), 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response. PMID:19835625

  20. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the amount of gingival displacement produced by three different gingival retraction systems: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Jignesh; Prajapati, Paranjay; Patel, Jayanti; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Naveen, Y.G

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Tetrahydrozoline has been introduced as new gingival retraction agent but its clinical efficacy with widely used conventional retraction agents has not been tested. Purpose: The study was designed to clinically evaluate efficacy of newer retraction agent tetrahydrozoline with two widely used retraction systems i.e., Expasyl retraction system and medicated retraction cords on basis of amount of gingival retraction. Materials and Methods: 30 subjects were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Maxillary Impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid for all subjects. Tray material was used for making the special tray. Latin Block Design was Used in the Study to avoid tissue fatigue. Retraction was done with aluminium chloride; Tetrahydrozoline and Expasyl according to Latin block design. Impressions were poured with die stone. Casts were retrieved and sections were made with die cutter. 3 mm thin slices were obtained. Each slice was used to measure the amount of retraction under stereomicroscope under 20x and images were transferred to image analyser. Results: The amount of gingival retraction obtained by using aluminium chloride as gingival retraction agent was maximum (148238.33 μm2) compared to tetrahydrozoline (140737.87 μm2) and Expasyl (67784.90 μm2). PMID:26097353

  2. Polymicrobial Biofilm Studies: From Basic Science to Biofilm Control

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Hubertine ME; Xu, Zhenbo; Peters, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Microbes rarely exist as single species planktonic forms as they have been commonly studied in the laboratory. Instead, the vast majority exists as part of complex polymicrobial biofilm communities attached to host and environmental surfaces. The oral cavity represents one of the most diverse and well-studied polymicrobial consortia. Despite a burgeoning field of mechanistic biofilm research within the past decades, our understanding of interactions that occur between microbial members within oral biofilms is still limited. Thus, the primary objective of this review is to focus on polymicrobial biofilm formation, microbial interactions and signaling events that mediate oral biofilm development, consequences of oral hygiene on both local and systemic disease, and potential therapeutic strategies to limit oral dysbiosis. PMID:27134811

  3. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    PubMed

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Jessica L.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections. PMID:25566513

  5. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    PubMed Central

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  6. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  7. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, Brent M.; Truex, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  8. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  9. How Biofilms Evade Host Defenses.

    PubMed

    Roilides, Emmanuel; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Katragkou, Aspasia; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    The steps involved during the biofilm growth cycle include attachment to a substrate followed by more permanent adherence of the microorganisms, microcolony arrangement, and cell detachment required for the dissemination of single or clustered cells to other organ systems. Various methods have been developed for biofilm detection and quantitation. Biofilm-producing microorganisms can be detected in tissue culture plates, using silicone tubes and staining methods, and by visual assessment using scanning electron microscopy or confocal scanning laser microscopy. Quantitative measurement of biofilm growth is determined by using methods that include dry cell weight assays, colony-forming-unit counting, DNA quantification, or XTT 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide reduction assay. Upon infection, innate immune defense strategies are able to establish an immediate response through effector mechanisms mediated by immune cells, receptors, and several humoral factors. We present an overview of the life cycle of biofilms and their diversity, detection methods for biofilm development, and host immune responses to pathogens. We then focus on current concepts in bacterial and fungal biofilm immune evasion mechanisms. This appears to be of particular importance because the use of host immune responses may represent a novel therapeutic approach against biofilms.

  10. A new psoralen derivative with enlarged antiproliferative properties.

    PubMed

    Dalla Via, Lisa; González-Gómez, Jose Carlos; Pérez-Montoto, Lázaro Guillermo; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Marciani Magno, Sebastiano; Gia, Ornella

    2009-05-15

    Following our results with benzopsoralens as potent photochemotherapeutic agents, we report the antiproliferative evaluation of nitrogenated isoster upon and without UVA irradiation. The evaluated pyridazinopsoralen showed a higher photochemotherapeutic activity with respect to the well-known drug, 8-MOP, and a significant cytotoxicity, also in the dark. This result enlarges the interest in this tetracyclic psoralen derivative skeleton in the search of new anticancer agents.

  11. Abdominal cavity myolipoma presenting as an enlarging incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mark O; Richardson, Michael L; Rubin, Brian P; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of an abdominal cavity myolipoma which herniated through a low transverse abdominal (Pfannenstiel) incision, and presented as an enlarging abdominal wall mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery demonstrated an encapsulated solid tumor mass demonstrating fat signal and and increased T2-weighted signal. Postsurgical histological tissue diagnosis was myolipoma. Recognition of the intra- and extraperitoneal location of this abdominal tumor was essential for accurate surgical planning.

  12. Breast enlargement after two reduction mastoplasties: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A Aldo

    2007-01-01

    In 1989, a bilateral breast reduction was performed for a large-breasted woman. She returned 1 year later with bilateral breast enlargement as severe as in the original case. The operation was repeated but in a more aggressive way. She became pregnant 2 years later, and both her small breasts began to grow again until they became gigantic. Hormonal tests showed results within the standard limits, and no medical treatment was effective. After the delivery, her breasts reduced in size spontaneously.

  13. Nystagmus in Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Krakovitz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is one of the commonly identified congenital temporal bone abnormalities associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss may be unilateral or bilateral, and typically presents at birth or in early childhood. Vestibular symptoms have been reported in up to 50% of affected individuals, and may be delayed in onset until adulthood. The details of nystagmus in patients with EVA have not been previously reported. The objectives were to describe the clinical history, vestibular test findings and nystagmus seen in a case series of patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct anomaly. Chart review, included computed tomography temporal bones, infrared nystagmography with positional and positioning testing, caloric testing, rotary chair and vibration testing. Clinical history and nystagmus varied among the five patients in this series. All patients were initially presumed to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but repositioning treatments were not effective, prompting referral, further testing and evaluation. In three patients with longstanding vestibular complaints, positional nystagmus was consistently present. One patient had distinct recurrent severe episodes of positional nystagmus. Nystagmus was unidirectional and horizontal. In one case horizontal nystagmus was consistently reproducible with seated head turn to the affected side, and reached 48 d/s. Nystagmus associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct is often positional, and can be confused with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Unexplained vestibular symptoms in patients with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss should prompt diagnostic consideration of EVA. PMID:26557362

  14. Stochastic Schrödinger evolution over piecewise enlarged filtrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengütürk, Levent Ali

    2016-03-01

    This paper constructs a nonlinear filtering framework that admits appearances of new information processes at random times by introducing piecewise enlargements of filtrations and proposes a new energy-based Schrodinger evolution expressed as a stochastic differential equation on a complex Hilbert space. Each information process is modeled as the sum of a random variable taking the eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian and an independent Brownian bridge noise. It is shown that under a piecewise enlarged filtration, the wave function is a jump-diffusion process until it collapses at some terminal time. In between discontinuities, the dynamics of the state vector are governed by different Wiener processes and diffusion coefficients. This motivates the introduction of an inclusive chain of Kolmogorov probability spaces or a *-isomorphic chain of commutative von Neumann probability spaces, on which the quantum system evolves differently based on the number of active information processes. The expectation of the Hamiltonian at a given state is the solution of a second-order nonlinear differential equation determined by one of the possible regimes that the quantum system belongs to. It is shown that the collapse rate is a submartingale with positive jumps and the Shannon entropy process is a supermartingale with expected negative jumps when passing to higher-order probability spaces. The framework is extended to the case when the Hamiltonian is modeled as a function of a set of commutative operators, where each operator is associated with a different piecewise enlarged filtration.

  15. Biofilm models of polymicrobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microbes are complex and play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections. These interactions can range from fierce competition for nutrients and niches to highly evolved cooperative mechanisms between different species that support their mutual growth. An increasing appreciation for these interactions, and desire to uncover the mechanisms that govern them, has resulted in a shift from monomicrobial to polymicrobial biofilm studies in different disease models. Here we provide an overview of biofilm models used to study select polymicrobial infections and highlight the impact that the interactions between microbes within these biofilms have on disease progression. Notable recent advances in the development of polymicrobial biofilm-associated infection models and challenges facing the study of polymicrobial biofilms are addressed. PMID:26592098

  16. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  17. Metal resistance in Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Rabiei, Maryam; Turner, Raymond J; Badry, Erin A; Sproule, Kimberley M; Ceri, Howard

    2006-03-01

    Yeasts are often successful in metal-polluted environments; therefore, the ability of biofilm and planktonic cell Candida tropicalis to endure metal toxicity was investigated. Fifteen water-soluble metal ions, chosen to represent groups 6A to 6B of the periodic table, were tested against this organism. With in vitro exposures as long as 24 h, biofilms were up to 65 times more tolerant to killing by metals than corresponding planktonic cultures. Of the most toxic heavy metals tested, only very high concentrations of Hg2+, CrO4 (2-) or Cu2+ killed surface-adherent Candida. Metal-chelator precipitates could be formed in biofilms following exposure to the heavy metals Cu2+ and Ni2+. This suggests that Candida biofilms may adsorb metal cations from their surroundings and that sequestration in the extracellular matrix may contribute to resistance. We concluded that biofilm formation may be a strategy for metal resistance and/or tolerance in yeasts.

  18. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jeremy S; Givskov, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2003-12-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight into differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity.

  19. Fungal Biofilms, Drug Resistance, and Recurrent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar V.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A biofilm is a surface-associated microbial community. Diverse fungi are capable of biofilm growth. The significance of this growth form for infection biology is that biofilm formation on implanted devices is a major cause of recurrent infection. Biofilms also have limited drug susceptibility, making device-associated infection extremely difficult to treat. Biofilm-like growth can occur during many kinds of infection, even when an implanted device is not present. Here we summarize the current understanding of fungal biofilm formation, its genetic control, and the basis for biofilm drug resistance. PMID:25274758

  20. Right Ventricular Enlargement In Utero: Is It Coarctation?

    PubMed

    Sivanandam, Shanthi; Nyholm, Jessica; Wey, Andrew; Bass, John L

    2015-10-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of right heart enlargement has a wide spectrum of differential diagnosis from maternal, placental and fetal causes, and outcomes of all are not known. Coarctation of the aorta is in the differential diagnosis of right heart enlargement. In our study, we focused to measure multiple cardiac dimensions in fetuses with right heart enlargement to identify the fetus with coarctation of the aorta utilizing echocardiographic measurements. Ten cardiovascular dimensions were measured from fetal studies between 20- and 34-week gestation, and six were measured on postnatal echocardiograms. Z-scores for the cardiac dimensions were calculated, and each variable for fetuses and infants was tested using a two-sample t test between patients with and without coarctation. We excluded fetuses with TAPVR, Shone complex, interrupted aortic arch, Ebstein anomaly or HLHS. Of the 31 fetuses with in utero right heart enlargement, 11 had coarctation postnatally and 20 did not have coarctation. We compared the fetal and newborn cardiac dimensions between the groups. The mean fetal carotid-subclavian index (CS Index) was 0.7 mm with coarctation compared with 1.1 mm without coarctation (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in diameter z-scores for fetal aortic isthmus (p < 0.0001), mitral valve (<0.001) and aortic valve (p < 0.009) was also significantly different. Similar significant differences were noted postnatally in the diameters of the cardiac dimensions between the coarctation and no-coarctation group: CS index (p < 0.0001), aortic isthmus (p < 0.0002) and aortic valve annulus (p < 0.007). A spectrum of diagnoses was found postnatally in fetuses with right heart enlargement, including a normal heart. The likelihood of identifying fetuses with coarctation of the aorta and planning for postnatal management can be refined by noninvasive screening measurements. A smaller CS index and smaller diameters of the aortic isthmus, mitral valve and aortic valve were significantly

  1. Spatial Patterns of Carbonate Biomineralization in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobao; Chopp, David L.; Russin, William A.; Brannon, Paul T.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbially catalyzed precipitation of carbonate minerals is an important process in diverse biological, geological, and engineered systems. However, the processes that regulate carbonate biomineralization and their impacts on biofilms are largely unexplored, mainly because of the inability of current methods to directly observe biomineralization within biofilms. Here, we present a method for in situ, real-time imaging of biomineralization in biofilms and use it to show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms produce morphologically distinct carbonate deposits that substantially modify biofilm structures. The patterns of carbonate biomineralization produced in situ were substantially different from those caused by accumulation of particles produced by abiotic precipitation. Contrary to the common expectation that mineral precipitation should occur at the biofilm surface, we found that biomineralization started at the base of the biofilm. The carbonate deposits grew over time, detaching biofilm-resident cells and deforming the biofilm morphology. These findings indicate that biomineralization is a general regulator of biofilm architecture and properties. PMID:26276112

  2. Environmental factors that shape biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Toyofuku, Masanori; Inaba, Tomohiro; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Obana, Nozomu; Yawata, Yutaka; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to the environment and alter gene expression. Recent studies have revealed the social aspects of bacterial life, such as biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is largely affected by the environment, and the mechanisms by which the gene expression of individual cells affects biofilm development have attracted interest. Environmental factors determine the cell's decision to form or leave a biofilm. In addition, the biofilm structure largely depends on the environment, implying that biofilms are shaped to adapt to local conditions. Second messengers such as cAMP and c-di-GMP are key factors that link environmental factors with gene regulation. Cell-to-cell communication is also an important factor in shaping the biofilm. In this short review, we will introduce the basics of biofilm formation and further discuss environmental factors that shape biofilm formation. Finally, the state-of-the-art tools that allow us investigate biofilms under various conditions are discussed.

  3. Uncertainty in bulk-liquid hydrodynamics and biofilm dynamics creates uncertainties in biofilm reactor design.

    PubMed

    Boltz, J P; Daigger, G T

    2010-01-01

    While biofilm reactors may be classified as one of seven different types, the design of each is unified by fundamental biofilm principles. It follows that state-of-the art design of each biofilm reactor type is subject to the same uncertainties (although the degree of uncertainty may vary). This paper describes unifying biofilm principles and uncertainties of importance in biofilm reactor design. This approach to biofilm reactor design represents a shift from the historical approach which was based on empirical criteria and design formulations. The use of such design criteria was largely due to inherent uncertainty over reactor-scale hydrodynamics and biofilm dynamics, which correlate with biofilm thickness, structure and function. An understanding of two fundamental concepts is required to rationally design biofilm reactors: bioreactor hydrodynamics and biofilm dynamics (with particular emphasis on mass transfer resistances). Bulk-liquid hydrodynamics influences biofilm thickness control, surface area, and development. Biofilm dynamics influences biofilm thickness, structure and function. While the complex hydrodynamics of some biofilm reactors such as trickling filters and biological filters have prevented the widespread use of fundamental biofilm principles and mechanistic models in practice, reactors utilizing integrated fixed-film activated sludge or moving bed technology provide a bulk-liquid hydrodynamic environment allowing for their application. From a substrate transformation perspective, mass transfer in biofilm reactors defines the primary difference between suspended growth and biofilm systems: suspended growth systems are kinetically (i.e., biomass) limited and biofilm reactors are primarily diffusion (i.e., biofilm growth surface area) limited.

  4. Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Application to Nitrifying Biofilm: Comparison of Biofilm Penetration, Activity, and Viability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable and effective biofilm control maintains public health. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. ...

  5. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria.

  6. Gingival necrosis due to the ill-fitting denture

    PubMed Central

    Boras, Vucicevic

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an 80-year-old male who was referred to the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia due to gingival ulcer which was present for eight days. Clinical examination has revealed exposed bone on the toothless alveolar ridge in the lower molar region on the right side of 0.8 cm in diameter. Otherwise, the patient was taking doxazosin due to urinary problems and ipatropium bromide due to respiratory problems. The patient wore a 6-year-old partial lower denture. He was initially treated with periodontal bandage (Resopack, HagenWerken, Germany) for the first three days and was instructed not to wear the denture; however, no benefit could be seen. Therefore, we added a local corticosteroid (betamethasone) and am oral antiseptic (chlorhexidine digluconate) applied three times a day. After 3 weeks the lesion healed. A list of possible causative factors regarding gingival ulcers is included. PMID:27688371

  7. Pink esthetics in periodontics - Gingival depigmentation: A case series.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Arthiie; Elavarasu, Sugumari; Jayapalan, Piranitha

    2012-08-01

    Smile expresses a feeling of joy, success, sensuality, affection, and courtesy, and reveals self-confidence and kindness. The harmony of the smile is determined not only by the shape, the position, and the color of the teeth, but also by the gingival tissues. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign and does not present a medical problem, complaints of "black gums" are common, particularly in patients having a very high smile line. Thus, perio-esthetic treatment modalities strive to achieve a harmonious inter-relationship of the pink with white, which is imperative of all treatment procedures. For depigmentation of gingival, different treatment modalities have been reported, such as bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, and laser. In the present case series, scraping, electrosurgery, and diode laser have been tried for depigmentation, which are simple, effective, and yield good results, along with good patient satisfaction.

  8. Aesthetic Depigmentation of Gingival Smoker's Melanosis Using Carbon Dioxide Lasers.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Costa, José Adriano; da Câmara, Marco Infante; Albuquerque, Rui; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Figueira, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Melanic pigmentation results from melanin produced by the melanocytes present in the basal layer of the oral epithelium. One of the most common causes of oral pigmentation is smoker melanosis, a condition associated with the melanocyte stimulation caused by cigarette smoke. This paper aims to illustrate the use of a carbon dioxide laser in the removal of the gingival melanic pigmentation for aesthetic reasons in a 27-year-old female patient with history of a smoking habit. The carbon dioxide laser vaporisation was performed on the gingival mucosa with effective and quick results and without any complications or significant symptoms after the treatment. We conclude that a carbon dioxide laser could be a useful, effective, and safe instrument to treat the aesthetic complications caused by oral smoker melanosis.

  9. Pink esthetics in periodontics – Gingival depigmentation: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, Arthiie; Elavarasu, Sugumari; Jayapalan, Piranitha

    2012-01-01

    Smile expresses a feeling of joy, success, sensuality, affection, and courtesy, and reveals self-confidence and kindness. The harmony of the smile is determined not only by the shape, the position, and the color of the teeth, but also by the gingival tissues. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign and does not present a medical problem, complaints of “black gums” are common, particularly in patients having a very high smile line. Thus, perio-esthetic treatment modalities strive to achieve a harmonious inter-relationship of the pink with white, which is imperative of all treatment procedures. For depigmentation of gingival, different treatment modalities have been reported, such as bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, and laser. In the present case series, scraping, electrosurgery, and diode laser have been tried for depigmentation, which are simple, effective, and yield good results, along with good patient satisfaction. PMID:23066249

  10. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  11. Inhibitory effects of lactoferrin on growth and biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2009-08-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron-binding antimicrobial protein present in saliva and gingival crevicular fluids, and it is possibly associated with host defense against oral pathogens, including periodontopathic bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro effects of LF-related agents on the growth and biofilm formation of two periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which reside as biofilms in the subgingival plaque. The planktonic growth of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was suppressed for up to 5 h by incubation with >or=130 microg/ml of human LF (hLF), iron-free and iron-saturated bovine LF (apo-bLF and holo-bLF, respectively), and >or=6 microg/ml of bLF-derived antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B (LFcin B); but those effects were weak after 8 h. The biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia over 24 h was effectively inhibited by lower concentrations (>or=8 microg/ml) of various iron-bound forms (the apo, native, and holo forms) of bLF and hLF but not LFcin B. A preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was also reduced by incubation with various iron-bound bLFs, hLF, and LFcin B for 5 h. In an examination of the effectiveness of native bLF when it was used in combination with four antibiotics, it was found that treatment with ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and minocycline in combination with native bLF for 24 h reduced the amount of a preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis compared with the level of reduction achieved with each agent alone. These results demonstrate the antibiofilm activity of LF with lower iron dependency against P. gingivalis and P. intermedia and the potential usefulness of LF for the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases and as adjunct therapy for periodontal diseases.

  12. Improving gingival smile by means of guided bone regeneration principles

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo de Almeida; Brandão, Roberto Carlos Bodart; Martinelli, Carolina Borges; Pignaton, Túlio Bonna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of guided bone regeneration (GBR) carried out with xenogenic bone substitute (Bio-OssTM) and collagen resorbable membrane (Bio-GideTM) to improve gingival smile (GS) in patients with excessive vertical maxillary growth (EVMG). Methods: Twelve healthy women aged between 20 and 49 years old (mean age of 26 years), with 5 mm or more of gingival exposure during fully posed smile (FPS) due to EVMG, were included. Baseline digital photographs were taken with standardized head position at rest and FPS. In eight out of 12 cases, crown lengthening procedure was indicated and the initial incision was made 2 to 4 mm from the gingival margin. In four cases, with no indication for crown lengthening procedure, a sulcular incision was performed. GBR was performed in all cases, using micro screws and/or titanium mesh associated with Bio-OssTM and Bio-GideTM. After 10 days, sutures were removed. Recall appointments were scheduled at 1, 6, and 12 months when standardized photographs were again taken. ImageToolTM software was used to measure the gingival exposure (GE) during FPS from the standardized close-up smile photographs at baseline and 12 months. Results: GE mean at baseline was 275.44 mm2. After 12 months, patients who undergone exclusively GBR procedure, presented GE reduction of 40.7%, ∆ = 112.01 mm2 (statistically significant, p = 0.12), and patients who had crown lengthening associated with the graft had a reduction of 60%, ∆ = 167.01 mm2. Conclusion: Our results using GBR to improve GS in cases of EVMG showed an exceptionally high patient acceptance and satisfaction. One-year follow-up confirmed stable results. PMID:27409660

  13. Luteolin inhibits lipopolysaccharide actions on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Arroyo-Cruz, Santa Rita; Maldonado-Frías, Silvia

    2006-07-10

    Periodontal disease comprises a group of infections that lead to inflammation of the gingiva, periodontal tissue destruction, and in severe cases is accompanied by alveolar bone loss with tooth exfoliation. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative microorganism, which possesses and produces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules that play a key role in disease development. Human gingival fibroblasts are the major constituents of gingival connective tissue and may interact directly with bacteria and bacterial products including LPS. Flavonoids possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce inflammatory molecule expression in macrophages and monocytes. In this study, we evaluated the ability of diverse flavonoids to regulate nitric oxide production of LPS-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts, and studied the effect of luteolin on diminish phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members as well as in protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We also found that pretreatment with three flavonoids, including quercetin, genistein, and luteolin, blocked nitric oxide synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. Luteolin exerted the strongest blocking action on expression of this inflammatory mediator. Luteolin pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and Akt phosphorylation. LPS treatment of human gingival fibroblasts resulted in NF-kappaB translocation. Cell pretreatment with luteolin abolished LPS effects on NF-kappaB translocation. In addition, luteolin treatment blocked LPS-induced cellular proliferation inhibition without affecting genetic material integrity. We concluded that luteolin interferes with LPS signaling pathways, reducing activation of several mitogen-activated protein kinase family members, and inhibits inflammatory mediator expression.

  14. Treatment of Gingival Hyperpigmentation by Diode Laser for Esthetical Purposes

    PubMed Central

    El Shenawy, Hanaa M.; Nasry, Sherine A.; Zaky, Ahmed A.; Quriba, Mohamed A. A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gingival hyperpigmentation is a common esthetical concern in patients with gummy smile or excessive gingival display. Laser ablation has been recognized recently as the most effective, pleasant and reliable technique. It has the advantage of easy handling, short treatment time, hemostasis, decontamination, and sterilization effect. AIM: In the present study we wanted to explore the efficacy of a 980 nm wavelength diode laser in gingival depigmentation clinically by using both VAS and digital imaging method as means of assessment. METHODS: Diode laser ablation was done for 15 patients who requested cosmetic therapy for melanin pigmented gums. The laser beam delivered by fiberoptic with a diameter of 320 µm, the diode laser system has 980 nm wave lengths and 3 W irradiation powers, in a continuous contact mode in all cases, the entire surface of each pigmented maxillary and mandibular gingiva that required treatment was irradiated in a single session. Clinical examination and digital image analysis were done and the patients were followed up for 3 successive months. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant change in prevalence of bleeding after treatment, as none of the cases showed any signs of bleeding 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after ablation. No statistically significant change was observed in the prevalence of swelling after treatment The VAS evaluation demonstrated that only 4 patients complained of mild pain immediately after the procedure. No pain was perceived from the patients in the rest of the follow up period. There was no statistically significant change in prevalence of pain immediately after treatment compared to pain during treatment. There was a decrease in cases with mild pain after 1 week, 1 month as well as 3 months compared to pain during treatment and immediately after treatment. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, the use of diode laser was shown to be a safe and effective treatment modality that provides

  15. Congenital Gingival Granular Cell Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ceren; Zerener, Tamer; Şençimen, Metin; Akgün, Özlem Martı; Altuğ, Hasan Ayberk; ÇİÇEK, Ali Fuat

    2017-01-01

    The congenital gingival granular cell tumor (CGCT), also as known as congenital epulis, is an unusual benign oral mucosal lesion in newborns. A two-day-old female patient was admitted to the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Gulhane Medical Academy, Ankara, Turkey with her family, and an intraoral examination showed a CGCT located in the buccal region of the maxillary right first primary molar. In this report, we present a case of CGCT in a newborn. PMID:28293667

  16. Soft Tissue Engineering with Micronized-Gingival Connective Tissues.

    PubMed

    Noda, Sawako; Sumita, Yoshinori; Ohba, Seigo; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Asahina, Izumi

    2017-02-24

    The free gingival graft (FGG) and connective tissue graft (CTG) are currently considered to be the gold standards for keratinized gingival tissue reconstruction and augmentation. However, these procedures have some disadvantages in harvesting large grafts, such as donor-site morbidity as well as insufficient gingival width and thickness at the recipient site post-treatment. To solve these problems, we focused on an alternative strategy using micronized tissue transplantation (micro-graft). In this study, we first investigated whether transplantation of micronized gingival connective tissues (MGCTs) promotes skin wound healing. MGCTs (≤100 µm) were obtained by mincing a small piece (8 mm(3) ) of porcine keratinized gingiva using the RIGENERA system. The MGCTs were then transplanted to a full skin defect (5 mm in diameter) on the dorsal surface of immunodeficient mice after seeding to an atelocollagen matrix. Transplantations of atelocollagen matrixes with and without micronized dermis were employed as experimental controls. The results indicated that MGCTs markedly promote the vascularization and epithelialization of the defect area 14 days after transplantation compared to the experimental controls. After 21 days, complete wound closure with low contraction was obtained only in the MGCT grafts. Tracking analysis of transplanted MGCTs revealed that some mesenchymal cells derived from MGCTs can survive during healing and may function to assist in wound healing. We propose here that micro-grafting with MGCTs represents an alternative strategy for keratinized tissue reconstruction that is characterized by low morbidity and ready availability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis: Microbial and Immunologic Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-05

    dexamethasone and cortisol whereas F. nucleatum and B. intermedius do not. Biopsies of the diseased tissues from two of the ptients were obtained and the... intermedius in the sera of ANUG patients when compared to sera of healthy > J -10- individuals and those with gingivitis (57). Immunologic studies of... intermedius was shown to be a prominent microorganism in ANUG by Slots and Zambon (61). Other black-pigmented Bacteroides, including B. ginqivalis and B

  18. Technique to Match Gingival Shade when Using Pink Ceramics for Anterior Fixed Implant Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Papaspyridakos, Panos; Amin, Sarah; El-Rafie, Khaled; Weber, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    Use of pink gingival ceramics can reduce the necessity for extensive surgical procedures attempting to restore missing soft and hard tissues in the maxillary esthetic zone. Selecting the appropriate shade for pink porcelain poses a challenge, especially when the patient presents with a high smile line. This paper describes a simple and effective technique to facilitate shade selection for gingival ceramics to match the patient's existing gingival shade.

  19. An alternative treatment approach to gingival recession: gingiva-colored partial porcelain veneers: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Capa, Nuray

    2007-08-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of excessive gingival recession involving maxillary right and left central incisors in a 30-year-old woman. The loss of the gingival soft tissue caused an increase in crown length. Gingiva-colored partial porcelain laminate veneers were applied to imitate the lost gingiva and to provide a natural anatomical tooth length. This method may be a minimally invasive alternative treatment method for gingival soft tissue loss, providing esthetic results and patient satisfaction.

  20. Bacteriology of experimental gingivitis in young adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Smibert, R M; Good, I J; Burmeister, J A; Palcanis, K G; Ranney, R R

    1982-01-01

    From replicate trials of experimental gingivitis in four periodontally healthy subjects, 166 bacterial species and subspecies were detected among 3,034 randomly selected isolates from 96 samples. Of these bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii (serotype III and phenotypically similar strains that were unreactive with available antisera), Actinomyces odontolyticus (serotype I and phenotypically similar strains that were unreactive with available antisera), Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus species D-2, Streptococcus anginosus, Veillonella parvula, and Treponema species A appeared to be the most likely etiological agents of gingivitis. Statistical interpretations indicated that the greatest source of microbiological variation of the total flora observed was person-to-person differences in the floras. The next greatest source of variation was the inflammatory status of the sample sites. Person-to-person differences were smallest at experimental day 4. The floras became more diverse with time and as gingivitis developed and progressed. Analyses indicated that sequential colonization by certain species was repeatable and therefore probably predictable. Variation was relatively small between replicate trials, between two sites on the same teeth sampled on the same day, and between the same sites sampled at the same relative time in a replicate trial. PMID:7141708

  1. Immune System Transcriptome in Gingival Tissues of Young Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Nagarajan, R.; Novak, M.J.; Orraca, L.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.A.; Kirakodu, S. S.; Ebersole, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Young/adolescent humans demonstrate many microorganisms associated with periodontal disease in adults and substantial gingival inflammatory responses. However, younger individuals do not demonstrate the soft and hard tissue destruction that hallmark periodontitis. This study evaluated responses to the oral microbial ecology in gingival tissues from clinically healthy young Macaca mulatta (<3 years old) compared to older animals (5-23 years old). Global transcriptional profiling of four age groups revealed a subset of 159 genes that were differentially expressed at least across one of the age comparisons. Correlation metrics generated a relevance network abstraction of these genes. Partitioning of the relevance network revealed seven distinct communities comprising functionally related genes associated with host inflammatory and immune responses. A group of genes were identified that were selectively increased/decreased or positively/negatively correlated with gingival profiles in the animals. A Principal Components Analysis created metagenes of expression profiles for classifying the 23 animals. The results provide novel system-level insights into gene expression differences in healthy young tissues weighted towards host responses that were associated with anti-inflammatory biomolecules or those linked with T cell regulation of responses. The combination of the regulated microenvironment may help to explain the apparent “resistance” of younger individuals to developing periodontal disease. PMID:26077888

  2. Diagnostic dilemmas in enlarged and diffusely hemorrhagic adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Khani, Francesca; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    We have noted an increasing number of cases of enlarged adrenal glands where the underlying diagnosis was masked by a diffusely hemorrhagic process. We identified from our database 59 cases (32 consults, 27 routine) of adrenal glands with diffuse (>25%) hemorrhage received between 2000 and 2014. Fifty-three adrenalectomies and 6 biopsies were identified. The diagnoses after central review were 41 adrenocortical adenomas, 1 nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia with associated myelolipoma, 1 benign adrenocortical cyst, and 10 nonneoplastic adrenal glands with hemorrhage. A definitive diagnosis for the 6 biopsies was precluded by the sample size. The adrenocortical adenomas (size, 1-13 cm; 25%-95% hemorrhage) showed clear cell change in the neoplastic area (10%-80% of the tumor), 19 showed focal calcification (1 with ossification), 11 showed areas of papillary endothelial hyperplasia, 10 showed scattered lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, 6 showed benign cortical tissue extending beyond the adrenal capsule into soft tissue, 1 showed necrosis in the form of ghost cells, 2 showed lipomatous change, and 6 were associated with incidental benign lesions (1 cortical cyst, 1 schwannoma, and 4 myelolipomas). Twenty-four of the adrenocortical adenomas were consults where the referring pathologist had trouble classifying the lesion. Of the 10 nonneoplastic adrenals (4.5-22 cm; 40%-80% hemorrhage), 2 were consults. In summary, pathologists have difficulties recognizing adrenocortical adenomas in the setting of a massively enlarged and hemorrhagic adrenal gland. Although there is a correlation between adrenocortical malignancy and size, hemorrhage into nonmalignant adrenal glands can result in markedly enlarged adrenals.

  3. Cyclosporine A: Novel concepts in its role in drug-induced gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ponnaiyan, Deepa; Jegadeesan, Visakan

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine is a selective immunosuppressant that has a variety of applications in medical practice. Like phenytoin and the calcium channel blockers, the drug is associated with gingival overgrowth. This review considers the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and unwanted effects of cyclosporine, in particular the action of the drug on the gingival tissues. In addition, elucidates the current concepts in mechanisms of cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth. Clinical and cell culture studies suggest that the mechanism of gingival overgrowth is a result of the interaction between the drug and its metabolites with susceptible gingival fibroblasts. Plaque-induced gingival inflammation appears to enhance this interaction. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth is incomplete at best. Hence, it would be pertinent to identify and explore possible risk factors relating to both prevalence and severity of drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Newer molecular approaches are needed to clearly establish the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth and to provide novel information for the design of future preventive and therapeutic modalities. PMID:26759584

  4. Esthetic impact of gingival plastic surgery from the dentistry students’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Erdem; Tan, Enes; Keklik, Hakan; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Celebi, Ahmet Arif; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the this study was to evaluate the perception of smile esthetics and alterations in cases of gingival plastic surgery for correction of a gummy smile, by means of alterations in smile photograph among dentistry degree students. Materials and Methods: A frontal smile photograph of a 40-year-old woman having normal occlusion was used with diverse compositions of gingival exposure level and crown length of maxillary teeth. The eight photographs were evaluated by 216 dentistry students in five class groups (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th classes). Results: The results revealed that almost all of the class’ students perceived differences between images, additionally, the highest percentage of students that answered “no difference” was 12% at 1st class’ students. 1st and 2nd class’ students most liked photograph which is 2.5 mm gingival display and 3rd class students liked two different photographs which are 2.5 mm gingival display and 2 mm gingival display whereas 4th class students preferred two different photographs which are 1.5 mm gingival display and 1 mm gingival display, 5th class students preferred photograph which is 1.5 mm gingival display as the most. Conclusion: Esthetic perception of smile improve as a student passes to higher study classes in terms of gingival exposure. The harmonious display of gingiva exhibits an important effect in the smile esthetics rather than reduced or excessive display. PMID:27403061

  5. Gingival Recession in a Child-Patient; Easily Missed Etiologies: Case Report with Video

    PubMed Central

    Nwhator, SO

    2014-01-01

    Gingival recession is commonly associated with plaque-induced inflammation and calculus. A high frenal attachment is more important in gingival recession in the child-patient. A healthy child-patient with impeccable oral hygiene presented with localized gingival recession without plaque-induced inflammation which led to the exploration of other possible etiologies. Multiple factors appeared to be acting in consonance (Concomitant multiple etiologies [CME]). The factors were a high frenal attachment, traumatic overbite and bruxism induced by premature tooth contacts. Pedodontists and periodontists should rule out CME in cases of gingival recession in the child-patient. PMID:25031899

  6. Assesment of gingival microcirculation in anterior teeth using laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canjau, Silvana; Miron, Mariana I.; Todea, Carmen D.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Evaluating the health status of the gingival tissue represents an important objective in the daily practice. Inflammation changes the microcirculatory and micromorphological dynamics of human gingiva. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microcirculation in subjects with moderate gingivitis and healthy gingiva by using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Material and Methods: Recordings of the gingival microcirculation (GM) were taken from 20 healthy gingival sites and from 20 sites with moderate gingivitis. The gingival blood flows in the gingivitis group before treatment was significantly different from those in the healthy gingiva group. Signals were recorded with the aid of a laser Doppler MoorLab instrument VMS-LDF2 probe VP3 10 mm S/N 2482. Three consecutive determinations of the GM were registered for each site, as follows: before the initial therapy, at 24 hours after the initial therapy and then, 7 days after the initial therapy. The data were processed using the statistical analysis software SPSS v16.0.1. Results: The results of this preliminary study showed statistically significant differences among the GM values recorded before and after the initial therapy. Conclusions: LDF could be a useful, noninvasive, sensitive, reproducible, and harmless method for measuring gingival blood flow (gingival microcirculation) in humans.

  7. Phenytoin-Induced Gingival Overgrowth: A Review of the Molecular, Immune, and Inflammatory Features

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Costa, José Eustáquio; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Silva, Tarcilia Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    Gingival overgrowth (GO) is a side effect associated with some distinct classes of drugs, such as anticonvulsants, immunosuppressant, and calcium channel blockers. GO is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix in gingival connective tissues, particularly collagenous components, with varying degrees of inflammation. One of the main drugs associated with GO is the antiepileptic phenytoin, which affects gingival tissues by altering extracellular matrix metabolism. Nevertheless, the pathogenesis of such drug-induced GO remains fulfilled by some contradictory findings. This paper aims to present the most relevant studies regarding the molecular, immune, and inflammatory aspects of phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:21991476

  8. Enlargement of choroid plexus in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Hotta, Jaakko; Lehtinen, Maria K; Forss, Nina; Hari, Riitta

    2015-09-21

    The choroid plexus, located in brain ventricles, has received surprisingly little attention in clinical neuroscience. In morphometric brain analysis, we serendipitously found a 21% increase in choroid plexus volume in 12 patients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) compared with age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. No enlargement was observed in a group of 8 patients suffering from chronic pain of other etiologies. Our findings suggest involvement of the choroid plexus in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Since the choroid plexus can mediate interaction between peripheral and brain inflammation, our findings pinpoint the choroid plexus as an important target for future research of central pain mechanisms.

  9. Enlarging vertebral body pneumatocysts in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Tomoaki; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Tamai, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Saiki, Kazuhiko; Omata, Sadatoshi; Saotome, Koichi

    2003-09-01

    An intravertebral pneumatocyst is a relatively rare condition, and its natural course and etiology are unclear. We report a case of intravertebral pneumatocysts in the C5 vertebra that gradually enlarged during a 16-month period as documented by follow-up CT. In addition, direct communication was observed between the gas in the intervertebral disk and another pneumatocyst in the C6 vertebral body, which suggests that the gas in the pneumatocyst had an association with the gas in the degenerated intervertebral disk.

  10. Unusual presentation of hidradenitis suppurativa with massive enlargement of penis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Steven M; Cespedes, R Duane

    2004-08-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory disease affecting the cutaneous apocrine glands and resulting in their obstruction. This enigmatic disease causes recurrent episodes of infection, edema, scarring, and fibrosis of surrounding tissues. We present the case of a 55-year-old man with two decades of inguinal hidradenitis suppurativa that resulted in extensive penile subcutaneous lymphedema and enlargement secondary to scarring and obstructive lymphadenopathy. Reconstructive phalloplasty to restore normal penile function was required. Minimal recurrent induration, normal cutaneous sensation, and normal voiding and erectile function were noted at 3 years of follow-up.

  11. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  12. Idiopathic salivary gland enlargement (sialadenosis) in dogs: a microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Sozmen, M; Brown, P J; Whitbread, T J

    2000-06-01

    A histological, histochemical and morphometric study was performed on submandibular salivary glands from 13 dogs which had presented with a submandibular mass or swelling that proved to be a portion of non-inflammatory and non-neoplastic submandibular salivary gland. There were no consistent changes in lectin-binding histochemistry or immunohistochemical expression of various cell markers, and, in most cases, there was no measurable difference in acinar size in the affected gland. The possible explanation for the clinical salivary gland enlargement is therefore unclear.

  13. Enlargement of the Excluded Left Atrial Appendage With Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Tobinaga, Satoru; Saisho, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-07

    We report progressive enlargement of the excluded left atrial appendage (LAA) with a thrombus in a patient who had undergone valve surgery and endocardial suture closure of the LAA previously. Echocardiography and CT detected no communication between the LAA and the left atrium. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the LAA was filled with fresh and old thrombi. Coronary arteriography demonstrated small left coronary artery-LAA fistulae. At surgery, successful exclusion of the LAA was confirmed after removal of the thrombi. Persistent inflow of blood through the coronary artery fistulae to the excluded LAA may be the primary mechanism of this pathology.

  14. 46 CFR 502.228 - Request for enlargement of time for filing exceptions and replies thereto.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Request for enlargement of time for filing exceptions... § 502.228 Request for enlargement of time for filing exceptions and replies thereto. Requests for enlargement of time within which to file exceptions, and briefs in support thereof, or replies to...

  15. 46 CFR 502.222 - Requests for enlargement of time for filing briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests for enlargement of time for filing briefs. 502.222 Section 502.222 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES... enlargement of time for filing briefs. Requests for enlargement of time within which to file briefs...

  16. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Dejea, Christine M.; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T.; Santidrian, Antonio F.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; White, James R.; Patti, Gary J.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N1, N12-diacetylspermine in both biofilm positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N1, N12-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome, to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  17. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-02

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  18. The ``Swiss cheese'' instability of bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria often adhere to surfaces, where they develop polymer-encased communities (biofilms) that display dramatic resistance to antibiotic treatment. A better understanding of cell detachment from biofilms may lead to novel strategies for biofilm disruption. Here we describe a new detachment mode, whereby a biofilm develops a nearly regular array of ~50-100 μm holes. Using surface-treated microfluidic devices, we create biofilms of controlled shape and size. After the passage of an air plug, the break-up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a ``Swiss cheese'' pattern is left in the residual biofilm. Fluorescent staining of the polymeric matrix (EPS) reveals that resistance to cell dislodgement correlates with local biofilm age, early settlers having had more time to hunker down. Because few survivors suffice to regrow a biofilm, these results point at the importance of considering microscale heterogeneity in assessing the effectiveness of biofilm removal strategies.

  19. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    PubMed

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  20. Exploiting social evolution in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kerry E; Heilmann, Silja; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Xavier, Joao B

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria are highly social organisms that communicate via signaling molecules, move collectively over surfaces and make biofilm communities. Nonetheless, our main line of defense against pathogenic bacteria consists of antibiotics-drugs that target individual-level traits of bacterial cells and thus, regrettably, select for resistance against their own action. A possible solution lies in targeting the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other within biofilms. The emerging field of microbial social evolution combines molecular microbiology with evolutionary theory to dissect the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures underpinning bacterial sociality. This exciting new research can ultimately lead to new therapies against biofilm infections that exploit evolutionary cheating or the trade-off between biofilm formation and dispersal.

  1. Capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans grows by enlargement of polysaccharide molecules

    PubMed Central

    Frases, Susana; Pontes, Bruno; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Viana, Nathan B.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has a distinctive polysaccharide (PS) capsule that enlarges during infection. The capsule is essential for virulence, but the mechanism for capsular growth is unknown. In the present study, we used dynamic light scattering (LS) analysis of capsular PS and optical tweezers (OT) to explore the architecture of the capsule. Analysis of capsular PS from cells with small and large capsules by dynamic LS revealed a linear correlation between PS effective diameter and microscopic capsular diameter. This result implied that capsule growth was achieved by the addition of molecules with larger effective diameter, such that some molecules can span the entire diameter of the capsule. Measurement of polystyrene bead penetration of C. neoformans capsules by using OT techniques revealed that the outer regions were penetrable, but not the inner regions. Our results provide a mechanism for capsular enlargement based on the axial lengthening of PS molecules and suggest a model for the architecture of a eukaryotic microbial capsule. PMID:19164571

  2. An enlarged cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Vincent; Duruflé, Harold; San Clemente, Hélène; Albenne, Cécile; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-12-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls playing many roles during development and in response to environmental constraints. Cell walls are mainly composed of polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins), but they also contain proteins which are critical players in cell wall remodeling processes. Today, the cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana, a major dicot model plant, comprises more than 700 proteins predicted to be secreted (cell wall proteins-CWPs) identified in different organs or in cell suspension cultures. However, the cell wall proteome of rosettes is poorly represented with only 148 CWPs identified after extraction by vacuum infiltration. This new study allows enlarging its coverage. A destructive method starting with the purification of cell walls has been performed and two experiments have been compared. They differ by the presence/absence of protein separation by a short 1D-electrophoresis run prior to tryptic digestion and different gradient programs for peptide separation before mass spectrometry analysis. Altogether, the rosette cell wall proteome has been significantly enlarged to 361 CWPs, among which 213 newly identified in rosettes and 57 newly described. The identified CWPs fall in four major functional classes: 26.1% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 11.1% oxido-reductases, 14.7% proteases and 11.7% proteins possibly related to lipid metabolism.

  3. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  4. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  5. Enlargement and Contracture of C2-Ceramide Channels

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.; Davoody, Amirparviz; Lewin, Naomi; Marshall, Stephanie; Colombini, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Ceramides are known to play a major regulatory role in apoptosis by inducing cytochrome c release from mitochondria. We have previously reported that ceramide, but not dihydroceramide, forms large and stable channels in phospholipid membranes and outer membranes of isolated mitochondria. C2-ceramide channel formation is characterized by conductance increments ranging from <1 to >200 nS. These conductance increments often represent the enlargement and contracture of channels rather than the opening and closure of independent channels. Enlargement is supported by the observation that many small conductance increments can lead to a large decrement. Also the initial conductances favor cations, but this selectivity drops dramatically with increasing total conductance. La+3 causes rapid ceramide channel disassembly in a manner indicative of large conducting structures. These channels have a propensity to contract by a defined size (often multiples of 4 nS) indicating the formation of cylindrical channels with preferred diameters rather than a continuum of sizes. The results are consistent with ceramides forming barrel-stave channels whose size can change by loss or insertion of multiple ceramide columns. PMID:12944273

  6. Primary enlarged craniotomy in organized chronic subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Callovini, Giorgio Maria; Bolognini, Andrea; Callovini, Gemma; Gammone, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance--mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the "long standing" of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH.

  7. Biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are heterogeneous structures composed of bacterial cells surrounded by a matrix and attached to solid surfaces. The bacteria here are 100 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antimicrobials than corresponding planktonic cells. Biofilms can be difficult to eradicate when they cause biofilm-related diseases, e.g., implant infections, cystic fibrosis, urinary tract infections, and periodontal diseases. A number of phenotypic features of the biofilm can be involved in biofilm-specific tolerance and resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. The current review deals with both phenotypic and molecular mechanisms of biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

  8. [Candida biofilm-related infections].

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, José Luis; Cantón, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The number of biomedical devices (intravascular catheters, heart valves, joint replacements, etc.) that are implanted in our hospitals has increased exponentially in recent years. Candida species are pathogens which are becoming more significant in these kinds of infections. Candida has two forms of development: planktonic and in biofilms. A biofilm is a community of microorganisms which adhere to a surface and are enclosed by an extracellular matrix. This form of development confers a high resistance to the antimicrobial agents. This is the reason why antibiotic treatments usually fail and biomedical devices may have to be removed in most cases. Unspecific adhesion mechanisms, the adhesion-receptor systems, and an intercellular communication system called quorum sensing play an essential role in the development of Candida biofilms. In general, the azoles have poor activity against Candida biofilms, while echinocandins and polyenes show a greater activity. New therapeutic strategies need to be developed due to the high morbidity and mortality and high economic costs associated with these infections. Most studies to date have focused on bacterial biofilms. The knowledge of the formation of Candida biofilms and their composition is essential to develop new preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  9. Validation of a Cariogenic Biofilm Model to Evaluate the Effect of Fluoride on Enamel and Root Dentine Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Due to gingival recession both enamel and root dentine are at risk of developing caries. Both tissues are exposed to a similar environment, however there is not a validated model to evaluate the effect of fluoride on these dental substrates simultaneously. Hence, this study aimed to validate a caries model to evaluate the effect of fluoride to prevent demineralization on enamel and root-dentine. Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on saliva-coated bovine enamel and root dentine slabs (n = 12 per group) mounted in the same well of culture plates. The biofilms were exposed 8×/day to 10% sucrose and treated 2×/day with fluoridated solutions containing 0, 150, 450, or 1,350 ppm F; thus, simulating the use of low to high fluoride concentration toothpastes. The pH values of the culture medium was monitored 2×/day as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. After 96 h, biofilms were collected for fluoride concentration analysis. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) was calculated for slabs. The fluoride uptake by the enamel and dentine was also determined. The model showed a dose-response because the biofilm and fluoride uptake increased and %SHL decreased at increasing fluoride concentrations (p < 0.05). Fluoride in the biofilm formed on dentine and fluoride uptake by dentine were higher than those for enamel. With the same fluoride concentration treatment, the percentage of reduction of demineralization was lower for dentine than for enamel. In conclusion, the model was validated in terms of a dose-response effect of fluoride on enamel and root dentine. Furthermore, the findings support the clinical data, suggesting that higher fluoride concentrations are necessary to control caries of root dentine than of enamel. PMID:26731743

  10. Aortic Annulus Enlargement: Early and Long-Terms Results

    PubMed Central

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Dibra, Laureta; Beca, Vera; Kuci, Saimir; Refatllari, Ali

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) is a common occurrence in aortic valve surgery. Even the discussions about the impact of this phenomenon on the results of aortic valve surgery, the management of this problem remain one of the main topics in this kind of surgery. One of the ways of a solution is aortic annulus enlargement. The main topic of this study is to evaluate the early and longterm results of this technique in our country. METHODS: During the period January 2010 –January 2015, 641 patients performed aortic valve surgery. In ten patients we performed aortic annulus enlargement according to Manouguian technique to avoid severe patient-prothesis mismatch. Operative mortality and perioperative complications (low cardiac output, pulmonary complications, etc..) were considered the indicators of the early results. Survival, clinical presentation according to NYHA, quality of life were the indicators to evaluate long-term results. Preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic data were also used to evaluate our results. We collected the data from hospital registrations and periodical clinical visit and echographic examination after hospital discharge. RESULTS: In our group, 6 of 10 patients were diagnosed with stenotic aortic valve, two patients had aortic valve regurgitation and two mixed valve pathology. Four patients had concomitant cardiac surgery procedure, mitral or CABG. In all cases, aortic valve pathology was the primary diagnose. In the preoperative echocardiographic examination mean transvalvular gradient was 54.3 ± 6.42. We had no death during early or late postoperative period. Only one patient had pulmonary complications and long time of respiratory assistance because of his pulmonary pathology. The same patient had low cardiac output and wound infection. Early after surgery mean transprostethic gradient was 16.2 ± 3.44 and late postoperative was 15.9 ± 4.3. No patient had the severe patient-prothesis mismatch. Mean follow-up was 49 ± 20

  11. Anthranilate deteriorates the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and antagonizes the biofilm-enhancing indole effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Park, Ha-Young; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2015-04-01

    Anthranilate and indole are alternative degradation products of tryptophan, depending on the bacterial species. While indole enhances the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we found that anthranilate, the tryptophan degradation product of P. aeruginosa, had an opposite effect on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, in which anthranilate deteriorated the mushroom structure of biofilm. The anthranilate effect on biofilm formation was differentially exerted depending on the developmental stage and the presence of shear force. Anthranilate slightly accelerated the initial attachment of P. aeruginosa at the early stage of biofilm development and appeared to build more biofilm without shear force. But anthranilate weakened the biofilm structure in the late stage, deteriorating the mushroom structure of biofilms with shear force to make a flat biofilm. To investigate the interplay of anthranilate with indole in biofilm formation, biofilms were cotreated with anthranilate and indole, and the results showed that anthranilate antagonized the biofilm-enhancing effect of indole. Anthranilate was able to deteriorate the preformed biofilm. The effect of anthranilate and indole on biofilm formation was quorum sensing independent. AntR, a regulator of anthranilate-degrading metabolism was synergistically activated by cotreatment with anthranilate and indole, suggesting that indole might enhance biofilm formation by facilitating the degradation of anthranilate. Anthranilate slightly but significantly affected the cyclic diguaniylate (c-di-GMP) level and transcription of major extracellular polysaccharide (Psl, Pel, and alginate) operons. These results suggest that anthranilate may be a promising antibiofilm agent and antagonize the effect of indole on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

  12. Effect of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Indurkar, Maya Sanjeev; Verma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to prevent gingivitis and its progression into periodontitis. In this present study, the efficacy of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel was assessed and compared on plaque induced gingivitis. Aim: To evaluate the effect of ozonated oil on plaque induced gingivitis and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine gel. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects, aged from 18 to 65 years, with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Aurangabad, for this study. They were divided randomly into the test or ozonated oil group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine gel group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva thrice a day for 3 weeks with ozonated oil (test), and chlorhexidine gel (control). Plaque index and gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects at baseline and after 3 weeks. Results: Ozonated oil (Group I) and chlorhexidine gel (Group II) groups showed statistically significant differences with respect to plaque index and gingival index, from the baseline to 3 weeks (P < 0.001 in both). But the difference between Group I and Group II, at the end of the study period, was not statistically significant with respect to the plaque index and gingival index. Conclusions: The ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel, both can be used as an effective agent in maintaining and improving gingival health. PMID:27041835

  13. Cetylpyridinium chloride mouth rinses alleviate experimental gingivitis by inhibiting dental plaque maturation

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fei; He, Tao; Huang, Shi; Bo, Cun-Pei; Li, Zhen; Chang, Jin-Lan; Liu, Ji-Quan; Charbonneau, Duane; Xu, Jian; Li, Rui; Ling, Jun-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Oral rinses containing chemotherapeutic agents, such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), can alleviate plaque-induced gingival infections, but how oral microbiota respond to these treatments in human population remains poorly understood. Via a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial of 91 subjects, the impact of CPC-containing oral rinses on supragingival plaque was investigated in experimental gingivitis, where the subjects, after a 21-day period of dental prophylaxis to achieve healthy gingivae, received either CPC rinses or water for 21 days. Within-subject temporal dynamics of plaque microbiota and symptoms of gingivitis were profiled via 16S ribosomal DNA gene pyrosequencing and assessment with the Mazza gingival index. Cetylpyridinium chloride conferred gingival benefits, as progression of gingival inflammation resulting from a lack of dental hygiene was significantly slower in the mouth rinse group than in the water group due to inhibition of 17 gingivitis-enriched bacterial genera. Tracking of plaque α and β diversity revealed that CPC treatment prevents acquisition of new taxa that would otherwise accumulate but maintains the original biodiversity of healthy plaques. Furthermore, CPC rinses reduced the size, local connectivity and microbiota-wide connectivity of the bacterial correlation network, particularly for nodes representing gingivitis-enriched taxa. The findings of this study provide mechanistic insights into the impact of oral rinses on the progression and maturation of dental plaque in the natural human population. PMID:27680288

  14. Use of an electrosurgical scalpel in gingival overgrowth associated with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Francisco Javier Rodríguez; Pérez, A Sanchez; Villaescusa, M J Moya

    2008-11-01

    We present a case of gingival overgrowth, with aesthetic repercussions, associated with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Treatment consisted of electric gingivectomy. We noted that it is necessary to carefully monitor hemorrhaging during surgery as well as to provide a correct differential diagnosis to distinguish this syndrome from other illnesses that involve gingival growth.

  15. Idiopathic Gingival Hyperplasia: A Case Report with a 17-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bien; Muenzer, Joseph; Roberts, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a patient with idiopathic gingival hyperplasia and an undiagnosed genetic disorder that demonstrated static encephalopathy, mental retardation, developmental delay, seizures, hypotonia, and severe gingival hypertrophy. The clinical dental management and attempts to obtain a genetic diagnosis are described. PMID:22567452

  16. Prevalence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis in a Saudi adult population

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Majdy M.; Azzeghaiby, Saleh N.; Hammad, Mohammad M.; Kujan, Omar B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis among a Saudi adult population in Riyadh region. Methods: Three hundred and eighty-five eligible participants in this cross-sectional study were recruited from routine dental patients attending the oral diagnosis clinic at Al-Farabi College in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from June 2013 to December 2013. A clinical examination was performed by 2 dentists to measure the gingival and plaque indices of Löe and Silness for each participant. Results: The prevalence of gingivitis was 100% among adult subjects aged between 18-40 years old. Moreover, the mean gingival index was 1.68±0.31, which indicates a moderate gingival inflammation. In fact, males showed more severe signs of gingival inflammation compared with females (p=0.001). In addition, the mean plaque index was 0.875±0.49, which indicates a good plaque status of the participants. Interestingly, the age was not related either to the gingival inflammation (p=0.13), or to the amount of plaque accumulation (p=0.17). However, males were more affected than females (p=0.005). Conclusion: The results of this study show that plaque accumulation is strongly associated with high prevalence of moderate to severe gingivitis among Saudi subjects. PMID:25399215

  17. Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in North American farmed silver fox (Vulpes vulpes)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jo-Anna B.J.; Hudson, Robert C.; Marshall, H. Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis is a progressive growth of gingival tissues in foxes resulting in dental encapsulation. It is an autosomal recessive condition displaying a gender-biased penetrance, with an association with superior fur quality. This disease has been primarily described in European farmed foxes. Here we document its emergence in Canada. PMID:25829563

  18. Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in North American farmed silver fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Hudson, Robert C; Marshall, H Dawn

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis is a progressive growth of gingival tissues in foxes resulting in dental encapsulation. It is an autosomal recessive condition displaying a gender-biased penetrance, with an association with superior fur quality. This disease has been primarily described in European farmed foxes. Here we document its emergence in Canada.

  19. Venous cystic adventitial disease presenting as an enlarging groin mass.

    PubMed

    Scott, Mark F; Gavin, Timothy; Levin, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Venous cystic adventitial disease is an exceedingly rare vascular disorder, with 12 cases reported in the past decade. A 60-year-old woman presented with a painful, palpable groin mass without leg swelling. She was initially thought to have a nonreducible inguinal hernia. A computed tomography scan was obtained that revealed a cystic mass involving the right common femoral vein. Previous imaging revealed that the mass had enlarged over time. In the operating room, the cyst wall was excised without compromising vein integrity. The patient had an uneventful recovery and her pain resolved. We review the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition. We believe that the rapid evolution of this lesion suggests that an unknown inciting factor triggers its onset and growth.

  20. Acute respiratory failure in a rapidly enlarging benign cervical goitre.

    PubMed

    Garingarao, Carlo Jan; Añonuevo-Cruz, Cecille; Gasacao, Ryan

    2013-07-22

    Benign goitres have the potential to reach massive sizes if neglected, but most have a protracted course that may or may not present with compressive symptoms. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goitre resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency total thyroidectomy were performed, revealing massive thyroid nodules with minimal intrathoracic extension and tracheal erosion. Despite a course and clinical findings suggestive of malignant disease, histopathology was consistent with a benign multinodular goitre. Several cases of benign goitres necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Airway compromise was attributed to a significant intrathoracic component, or inciting events such as thyroid haemorrhage, pregnancy, radioiodine uptake or major surgery. Obstructive symptoms may not correlate well with objective measures of upper airway obstruction such as radiographs or flow volume loops.

  1. Measurements of enlarged blood pump models using Laser Doppler Anemometer.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier study (Chua et al., 1998, 1999a), a 5:1 enlarged model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump (Akamatsu et al., 1995) with five different impeller blade profiles was designed and constructed. Their respective flow characteristics with respect to (1) the three different blade profile designs: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed were investigated. Among the five impeller designs, the results obtained suggested that impellers A and C designs should be adopted if higher head is required. Impellers A and C therefore were selected for the flow in between their blades to be measured using Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA), so as to have a better understanding of the flow physics with respect to the design parameters.

  2. Bilateral extraocular muscles enlargement from Kimura's disease of the orbit

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Allan Christian Pieroni; Moritz, Rodrigo B; Aldred, Vera L.; Monteiro, Mário Luiz Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) is a rare chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology, characterized by subcutaneous nodules, mainly in the head and neck region, frequently associated with regional lymphadenopathy. Orbital involvement is infrequent and when it occurs, usually affects the eyelid or the lacrimal gland. We report a case of a 44-year-old man that presented with bilateral slowly progressive proptosis that was initially misdiagnosed as Graves’ Ophthalmopathy. 15 months of worsening proptosis and the development of facial and temporal swelling led to further investigation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed enlargement of all recti muscles and diffuse orbital infiltration. An orbital biopsy was performed and was consistent with the diagnosis of KD. Long term oral corticosteroid showed marked improvement of proptosis and facial swelling. This case serves to emphasize that KD should be included in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory diseases of the orbit, even when characterized by predominant involvement of the extraocular muscles. PMID:24088630

  3. An unusual myopathy: speckled muscle fibers due to enlarged mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jeffree, Rosalind L; Wills, Edward J; Harper, Clive

    2007-07-01

    We report a 52-year-old woman who presented with a 6-month history of proximal muscle weakness, elevated serum creatine kinase, and myopathic pattern on electromyography (EMG). Histology of the muscle shows a speckled pattern due to clustering of enlarged mitochondria. The pathology resembles that of selenium deficiency. The patient was found to have borderline low serum selenium and also low vitamin D and thyroid-stimulating hormone. The cause of this unusual myopathy is probably multifactorial. This case is important because the unusual pathological picture represents a potentially treatable myopathy. In addition, we hope that publication of the complex clinical and biochemical abnormalities of this case, in conjunction with other case reports, may facilitate future elucidation of muscle mitochondrial function and dysfunction.

  4. Hemorrhage from an enlarged emphysematous bulla during commercial air travel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Li, Min-Hui; Yan, Horng-Chin; Wu, Chin-Pyng

    2006-12-01

    Pulmonary bullae are a common late complication in patients with emphysema. Non-communicating emphysematous bullae may expand during air travel when the ambient pressure is reduced, resulting in various forms of barotrauma including pneumothorax and air embolism. We report a 62-yr-old man with emphysema who developed hemoptysis during international commercial air travel. CT scan of the chest obtained after the travel showed air-fluid level in an enlarged bulla. He underwent resection of the bulla and had a full recovery. This is a unique presentation of stretch injury of a bulla as a form of pulmonary barotrauma occurring during commercial air travel. With the most recent ruling by the Federal Aviation Administration to allow patients with advanced chronic obstructive lung disease to travel by air with their own supplemental oxygen devices, physicians need to be aware of this type of pulmonary barotrauma and properly advise such patients who are planning to travel by air.

  5. OCT Minimum Intensity as a Predictor of Geographic Atrophy Enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Stetson, Paul F.; Yehoshua, Zohar; Garcia Filho, Carlos Alexandre A.; Portella Nunes, Renata; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined whether the minimum intensity (MI) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) A-scans within the retina can predict locations of growth at the margin of geographic atrophy (GA) and the growth rate outside the margin. Methods. The OCT scans were analyzed at baseline and 52 weeks. Expert graders manually segmented OCT images of GA. The 52-week follow-up scans were registered to the baseline scan coordinates for comparison. The OCT MI values were studied within a 180-μm margin around the boundary of GA at baseline. Baseline MI values were compared in areas of progression and nonprogression of the GA, and sensitivity and specificity were assessed for prediction of growth at the margin. Average MI values in the margins were compared to overall growth rates to evaluate the prediction of growth outside the margins. Results. A statistically significant increase in MI (P < 0.05) was seen in areas of growth in 21/24 cases (88%), and 22/24 cases (92%) when the foveal subfield was excluded. Locations of growth within the margins at 52 weeks were predicted with 61% sensitivity and 61% specificity. The MI values correlated significantly with overall growth rate, and high and low growth rate subjects were identified with 80% sensitivity and 64% specificity. Conclusions. The MI may be increased at the margins of GA lesions before enlargement, which may indicate disruption or atrophy of the photoreceptors in these areas before GA becomes apparent. Increased MI may help predict areas of enlargement of GA, and may relate to overall growth rate and be a useful screening tool for GA. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00935883.) PMID:24408973

  6. Azithromycin kills invasive Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D

    2013-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans invades periodontal pocket epithelium and is therefore difficult to eliminate by periodontal scaling and root planing. It is susceptible to azithromycin, which is taken up by many types of mammalian cells. This led us to hypothesize that azithromycin accumulation by gingival epithelium could enhance the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans. [(3)H]azithromycin transport by Smulow-Glickman gingival epithelial cells and SCC-25 oral epithelial cells was characterized. To test our hypothesis, we infected cultured Smulow-Glickman cell monolayers with A. actinomycetemcomitans (Y4 or SUNY 465 strain) for 2 h, treated them with gentamicin to eliminate extracellular bacteria, and then incubated them with azithromycin for 1 to 4 h. Viable intracellular bacteria were released, plated, and enumerated. Azithromycin transport by both cell lines exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was competitively inhibited by l-carnitine and several other organic cations. Cell incubation in medium containing 5 μg/ml azithromycin yielded steady-state intracellular concentrations of 144 μg/ml in SCC-25 cells and 118 μg/ml in Smulow-Glickman cells. Azithromycin induced dose- and time-dependent intraepithelial killing of both A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Treatment of infected Smulow-Glickman cells with 0.125 μg/ml azithromycin killed approximately 29% of the intraepithelial CFU of both strains within 4 h, while treatment with 8 μg/ml azithromycin killed ≥82% of the CFU of both strains (P < 0.05). Addition of carnitine inhibited the killing of intracellular bacteria by azithromycin (P < 0.05). Thus, human gingival epithelial cells actively accumulate azithromycin through a transport system that facilitates the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans and is shared with organic cations.

  7. The Efficacy of Green Tea Chewing Gum on Gingival Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Behfarnia, Parichehr; Aslani, Ahmad; Jamshidian, Foroogh; Noohi, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem According to previous studies, the components of green tea extracts can inhibit the growth of a wide range of gram-pos-itive and -negative bacterial species and might be useful in controlling oral infections. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the effect of green tea chewing gum on the rate of plaque and gingival inflammation in subjects with gingivitis. Materials and Method In this double-blind randomize controlled clinical trial, 45 patients with generalized marginal gingivitis were selected and divided into two groups of green tea (23) and placebo (22) chewing gum. The patients chewed two gums for 15 minutes daily for three weeks. Sulcus bleeding index (SBI) and approximal plaque index (API) were studied at the baseline, 7 and 21 days later. Saliva sampling was conducted before and after 21 days for evaluation of IL-1β. The results were analyzed and compared by using repeated measures ANOVA, paired t test, and independent two-sample t test (α=0.05). Result The results showed that chewing gum significantly affected the SBI and API (p< 0.001). Paired t test showed that the two groups were significantly different regarding the mean changes of SBI and API at different periods of 1-7, 1-21, and 7-21 (p< 0.001). Concerning IL-1β, the repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the effect of chewing gum was significant (p<0.001). Moreover, paired t-test represented no significant difference between the mean changes of IL-1β within 1-21 day (p= 0.086). Conclusion The green tea chewing gum improved the SBI and API and effectively reduced the level of IL-1β. PMID:27284561

  8. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab K

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular device-related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis-associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens-related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms.

  9. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  10. Killing of Serratia marcescens biofilms with chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Ray, Christopher; Shenoy, Anukul T; Orihuela, Carlos J; González-Juarbe, Norberto

    2017-03-29

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium with proven resistance to multiple antibiotics and causative of catheter-associated infections. Bacterial colonization of catheters mainly involves the formation of biofilm. The objectives of this study were to explore the susceptibility of S. marcescens biofilms to high doses of common antibiotics and non-antimicrobial agents. Biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens were treated with ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol at doses corresponding to 10, 100 and 1000 times their planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, biofilms were also treated with chemical compounds such as polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid. S. marcescens demonstrated susceptibility to ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol in its planktonic form, however, only chloramphenicol reduced both biofilm biomass and biofilm viability. Polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid had minimal to no effect on either planktonic and biofilm grown S. marcescens. Our results suggest that supratherapeutic doses of chloramphenicol can be used effectively against established S. marcescens biofilms.

  11. Bradykinin promotes TLR2 expression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is implicated in the sensation of pain, vasodilation, increases in vascular permeability and pathogenic processes associated with inflammation. Studies have shown that BK promotes the intracellular movement of calcium in human gingival fibroblasts by binding to the B2 receptor. In this study we investigated the effect of BK on regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) expression. Our results show that BK stimulates TLR2 receptor transcription and translation by activation of protein kinase C as well as AKT. Our study contributes important information on the regulation and expression of molecules that promote chronic inflammatory processes, which lead to periodontitis and consequently to loss of the dental organ.

  12. Gingival metastasis from primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Wedgwood, D; Rusen, D; Balk, S

    1979-03-01

    A case of primary hepatocellular carcinoma metastatic to the gingiva is described. Hepatocellular carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy, generally occurring in a cirrhotic liver, which rarely metastasizes to the maxillofacial area. Of eight such cases in the English-language literature, the present case is the fourth involving metastasis to the gingiva. Hepatocellular carcinoma would seem to metastasize with equal frequency to the gingiva and to the mandibular bone. In the case described, histologic examination of the gingival lesion definitively established the diagnosis following somewhat equivocal results of needle biopsy of the liver.

  13. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinct dental, skeletal and developmental abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joseph; Guelmann, Marcio; Barak, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old child with hereditary gingival fibromatosis, supernumerary tooth, chest deformities, auricular cartilage deformation, joint laxity and undescended testes is described. The exact mode of inheritance is unclear; a new mutation pattern is possible. These features resemble but differ from the previously reported Laband syndrome. The dental treatment consisted of surgical removal of the fibrous tissue and conservative restorative treatment under general anesthesia. The dental practitioner should be alert for developmental abnormalities such as supernumerary teeth and delayed tooth eruption. A comprehensive medical history and physical systemic evaluation is essential to rule out other systemic abnormalities. Genetic consultation is mandatory for future family planing.

  14. Conservative restorations combined with gingival zenith contour technique.

    PubMed

    Rigolin Ferreira, Fernando José; Vasconcellos, Andréa Araújo; Miranda, Milton Edson; Santini, Eduardo; Bocabella, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The symmetry, shape, contour, and size of teeth play an important role in the esthetics of the anterior maxillary region of the mouth. However, abnormalities in symmetry and contour can considerably influence the esthetic parameters. Consequently, rehabilitation performed in this region can be challenging and, frequently, multidisciplinary treatment planning that includes esthetics, function, structure, and biologic aspects is paramount. The high demand for esthetic rehabilitations has, therefore, allowed the effective use of minimally invasive techniques to obtain results that mimic natural teeth. This article presents a case report in which both esthetic and functional rehabilitation were obtained by recontouring the gingival zenith followed by placing ultraconservative porcelain veneers.

  15. Gingival recession: its causes and types, and the importance of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jati, Ana Suzy; Furquim, Laurindo Zanco; Consolaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    abstract Gingival recession has direct causes and predisposing factors. Orthodontic treatment is able to prevent recession and even contribute to its treatment, with or without periodontal approach, depending on the type and severity of gingival tissue damage. There is no evidence on the fact that orthodontic treatment alone might induce gingival recession, although it might lead the affected teeth (usually mandibular incisors or maxillary canines) to be involved in situations that act as predisposing factors, allowing direct causes to act and, therefore, trigger recession, especially when the buccal bone plate is very thin or presents with dehiscence. Several aspects regarding the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival recession have been addressed, and so has the importance of the periosteum to the mechanism of gingival recession formation. Clinical as well as experimental trials on the subject would help to clarify this matter, of which understanding is not very deep in the related literature. PMID:27409650

  16. Clinical evaluation of three new gingival retraction systems: a research report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Prithviraj, D R; Gupta, Deepti; Shruti, D P

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of 3 new gingival retraction systems; Stay-put, Magic foam cord and expasyl, on the basis of their relative ease of handling, time taken for placement, hemorrhage control and the amount of gingival retraction. Thirty subjects were selected requiring fixed prosthesis. The 3 gingival retraction systems were used on the prepared abutments randomly. The time taken for placement of each retraction system was recorded. The vertical gingival retraction was measured before and after retraction using flexible measuring strip with 0.5 mm grading. The horizontal retraction was measured on polyether impressions made before the retraction and after retraction. Based on the results, magic foam cord retraction system can be considered more effective gingival retraction system among the three retraction systems used in the study.

  17. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  18. Effects of vancomycin, daptomycin, and tigecycline on coagulase-negative staphylococcus biofilm and bacterial viability within biofilm: an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Barcin; Gunay, Necati; Ertugrul, Bulent M; Sakarya, Serhan

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria may hide in a hydrated polysaccharide matrix known as a biofilm. The structure of the bacterial biofilm renders phagocytosis difficult and increases antibiotic resistance. We hypothesized that repeated doses of antibiotics have an effect on bacteria within the biofilm and that it could inhibit or eradicate biofilm formation. Two clinical biofilm-positive coagulase-negative staphylococcus isolates were evaluated. The effects of antibiotics on preformed and nascent biofilm and on bacterial eradication within the biofilm were determined using different doses of vancomycin, daptomycin, and tigecycline for different durations in an in vitro biofilm model. Vancomycin neither penetrated the biofilm nor had any microbicidal effect on bacteria within the biofilm. Daptomycin had a microbicidal effect on bacteria within the biofilm but had no effect on biofilm inhibition and eradication (independent from dose and treatment time). Tigecycline inhibited and eradicated biofilm formation and had a microbicidal effect on bacteria within the biofilm. In conclusion, (i) biofilm formation appeared to be a major barrier to vancomycin activity, (ii) daptomycin had an antimicrobial effect on the bacteria within the biofilm but not on the biofilm burden, and (iii) tigecycline had effects both on bacteria within the biofilm and on biofilm burden. Thus, both tigecycline and daptomycin might be promising candidates for the treatment of biofilm infections.

  19. Biofilms and biofilm reactors. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the formation and characterization of biofilms. Biofilms occur in fermentation, wastewater treatment, packed-bed reactors, fluidized-bed reactors, medical prostheses, fouling, biomass reactors, waste supply systems, and other aquatic systems. Topics include microorganism makeup of biofilms, controlling biofilm formation, biological and chemical properties, model studies, kinetic studies, and biofilm identification and detection. (Contains a minimum of 209 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Clinical and bacteriological study of the effect of Nd:YAG laser in gingivitis therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; Mavrantoni, Androniki; Miron, Mariana I.

    2000-06-01

    The relationship between dental plaque and gingivitis was verified. Nonspecific gingivitis is an inflammatory process, frequently caused by enzymes and toxins liberate by bacteria form dental plaque. Loose plaque has come under a great deal of investigation because of its role in attachment loss. The current methods used in the treatment of non specific gingivitis encompass the use of antibiotics and conventional surgical techniques. Treating gingivitis with laser energy may further reduce the gingival inflammation and decrease the wound healing time. The lack of correlation between the quantity of dental plaque and the intensity of gingivitis determined us to study the effect of Nd:YAG pulsed laser in reduction of gingival inflammation and wound healing. The aim of this work is to evaluate clinically the anti- inflammatory and wound healing effect of pulsed Nd:YAG laser and to compare the appearance and the levels of the bacteria in the supergingival and subgingival plaque in adolescents with tooth crowding after Nd:YAG laser. The experimental procedure consisted of a clinical and bacteriological study which was undertaken in 20 patients presenting moderate gingivitis. A group of 10 patients was the subject of a bacteriological study and the other group of 10 was used for clinical and histological examination. For each group the clinical criteria of evaluation were: the gingival index, papillary bleeding index, spontaneous aches. Each patient was tested before and after laser exposure or conventional therapy for bacteriological analyses. The results prove that early gingivitis exposure to laser registers a decrease of bacterial colony number and absence of loss of attachment as compared to the application of the conventional treatment. Clinical study has shown that the combination of scaling and root planning with laser therapy is enough to provide improvement in clinical indices and reduction in the number of bacterial colonies.

  1. Association of gingival biotype with the results of scaling and root planing

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Yeon-Woo; Chang, Hee-Yung; Yun, Woo-Hyuk; Jeong, Seong-Nyum; Pi, Sung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The concept of gingival biotype has been used as a predictor of periodontal therapy outcomes since the 1980s. In the present study, prospective and controlled experiments were performed to compare periodontal pocket depth (PPD) reduction and gingival shrinkage (GSH) after scaling and root planing (SRP) according to gingival biotype. Methods Twenty-five patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis participated in the present study. The PPD and GSH of the labial side of the maxillary anterior teeth (from the right canine to the left canine) were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after SRP. Changes in the PPD following SRP were classified into 4 groups according to the gingival thickness and initial PPD. Two more groups representing normal gingival crevices were added in evaluation of the GSH. The results were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test. Results In the end, 16 patients participated in the present study. With regard to PPD reduction, there were no significant differences according to gingival biotype (P>0.05). Likewise, sites with a PPD of over 3 mm failed to show any significant differences in the GSH (P>0.05). However, among the sites with a PPD of under 3 mm, those with the thin gingival biotype showed more GSH (P<0.05). Conclusions PPD changes after SRP were not affected by gingival biotype with either shallow or deep periodontal pockets. GSH also showed equal outcomes in all the groups without normal gingival crevices. The results of SRP seem not to differ according to gingival biotype. PMID:24455441

  2. Acoustic vibration can enhance bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark F; Edwards, Thomas; Hobbs, Glyn; Shepherd, Joanna; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    This paper explores the use of low-frequency-low-amplitude acoustic vibration on biofilm formation. Biofilm development is thought to be governed by a diverse range of environmental signals and much effort has gone into researching the effects of environmental factors including; nutrient availability, pH and temperature on the growth of biofilms. Many biofilm-forming organisms have evolved to thrive in mechanically challenging environments, for example soil yet, the effects of the physical environment on biofilm formation has been largely ignored. Exposure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to vibration at 100, 800 and 1600 Hz for 48 h, resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation compared with the control, with the greatest growth seen at 800 Hz vibration. The results also show that this increase in biofilm formation is accompanied with an increase in P. aeruginosa cell number. Acoustic vibration was also found to regulate the spatial distribution of biofilm formation in a frequency-dependent manner. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to acoustic vibration also resulted in enhanced biofilm formation with the greatest level of biofilm being formed following 48 h exposure at 1600 Hz. These results show that acoustic vibration can be used to control biofilm formation and therefore presents a novel and potentially cost effective means to manipulate the development and yield of biofilms in a range of important industrial and medical processes.

  3. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms persist after chlorhexidine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mikiyo; Noiri, Yuichiro; Kuboniwa, Masae; Yamamoto, Reiko; Asahi, Yoko; Maezono, Hazuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2013-06-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) gluconate effectively reduces the viability of biofilm-forming bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. However, it is impossible to completely remove biofilms. The goal of the present study was to assess the potential pathogenicity of residual P. gingivalis biofilms in vitro after treatment with CHX gluconate. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser imaging revealed that treatment with CHX gluconate disrupted individual biofilm-forming P. gingivalis cells but did not destroy the biofilms. The volumes of the protein and carbohydrate constituents in the residual biofilms were not significantly different from those of the controls. The physical resistance of the residual biofilms to ultrasonication was significantly higher than that of controls. The volume of P. gingivalis adherent to the residual biofilms was higher than that to saliva-coated wells. These findings suggest that although CHX gluconate caused disruption of biofilm-forming cells, the constituents derived from disrupted cells were maintained in the biofilms, which sustained their external structures. Moreover, the residual biofilms could serve as a scaffold for the formation of new biofilms.

  5. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P.; Cleary, Ian A.; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C.albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance. PMID:20012895

  6. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms.

    PubMed

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P; Cleary, Ian A; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-05-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans, there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance.

  7. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espeso, D. R.; Carpio, A.; Einarsson, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste, and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Föppl-Von Kármán equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to reproduce wrinkled structures often formed by biofilms on air-agar interfaces, as well as spatial distributions of differentiated cells commonly observed with B. subtilis.

  8. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Y.; Byrne, H.; Osborne, J.; Pitt-Francis, J.; Gavaghan, D.; Quintard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport.

  9. Bacteriology of Human Experimental Gingivitis: Effect of Plaque Age

    PubMed Central

    Syed, S. A.; Loesche, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five subjects with previously excellent hygiene and healthy gingiva developed heavy plaque accumulations and bleeding or nonbleeding gingivitis about certain papilla after 21 days of no oral hygiene. Gingival marginal plaque about a single papilla was collected at 0, 1, 2, and 3 weeks of no oral hygiene in each subject. The plaque was dispersed, serially diluted, and plated on MM10 sucrose agar in an oxygen-free atmosphere. From 50 to 100 colonies from a single high-dilution plate were characterized for each sample. Over 8,500 isolates were partially characterized and placed into one of 29 taxonomic species or groups. The flora was predominantly gram-positive at all time periods. Streptococcal species dominated in the 0- and 1-week-old plaques, i.e. 62 and 43% of the colonyforming units (CFU), but dropped to 26 to 32% of the CFU in the 2- and 3-week-old plaques. Actinomyces species dominated in the older plaques, i.e., 40 to 50% of the CFU. Actinomyces israelii was the most prominent species in the older plaques. Veillonella accounted for 15 to 20% of the CFU at all time periods. Although the other gram-negative species increased with time, collectively they averaged less than 5% of the CFU at week 3. The shift from a Streptococcus-dominated plaque to an Actinomyces-dominated plaque was the most striking microbial change observed as the plaque aged. PMID:711336

  10. Retractions of the gingival margins evaluated by holographic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Manole, Marius; de Sabata, Aldo; Rusu, Laura-Cristina; Stratul, Stefan; Dudea, Diana; Dughir, Ciprian; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2015-05-01

    The periodontal disease is one of the most common pathological states of the teeth and gums system. The issue is that its evaluation is a subjective one, i.e. it is based on the skills of the dental medical doctor. As for any clinical condition, a quantitative evaluation and monitoring in time of the retraction of the gingival margins is desired. This phenomenon was evaluated in this study with a holographic method by using a He-Ne laser with a power of 13 mW. The holographic system we have utilized - adapted for dentistry applications - is described. Several patients were considered in a comparative study of their state of health - regarding their oral cavity. The impressions of the maxillary dental arch were taken from a patient during his/her first visit and after a period of six months. The hologram of the first model was superposed on the model cast after the second visit. The retractions of the gingival margins could be thus evaluated three-dimensionally in every point of interest. An evaluation of the retraction has thus been made. Conclusions can thus be drawn for the clinical evaluation of the health of the teeth and gums system of each patient.

  11. Desquamative gingivitis as only presenting sign of mucous membrane pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Veena; Paul, Ajish; Babu, Kennedy; Madhan, Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Desquamative gingivitis (DG) is a clinical condition in which the gingiva appears reddish, glazed, and friable with loss of superficial epithelium. DG is considered a clinical manifestation of many gingival diseases and hence not identified as a diagnosis itself. Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disorder of mucous membrane characterized by subepithelial bullae formation. MMP can affect the mucous membranes of oral cavity, conjunctiva, nasopharynx, larynx, esophagus, genitourinary tract, and anus and vary in its severity. The most commonly affected sites are oral cavity and conjunctiva. Since DG may be the early sign or only presenting sign of these conditions, most of the times, dental surgeon plays a key role in the diagnosis and prevention of the systemic complications of these diseases. We report a case of a 41-year-old male patient presented with DG. Histopathological examination revealed subepithelial clefting suggestive of MMP. The patient was treated with topical application of triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% 3–4 times a day for 1 month. PMID:27563211

  12. Gingival wound healing: an essential response disturbed by aging?

    PubMed

    Smith, P C; Cáceres, M; Martínez, C; Oyarzún, A; Martínez, J

    2015-03-01

    Gingival wound healing comprises a series of sequential responses that allow the closure of breaches in the masticatory mucosa. This process is of critical importance to prevent the invasion of microbes or other agents into tissues, avoiding the establishment of a chronic infection. Wound healing may also play an important role during cell and tissue reaction to long-term injury, as it may occur during inflammatory responses and cancer. Recent experimental data have shown that gingival wound healing is severely affected by the aging process. These defects may alter distinct phases of the wound-healing process, including epithelial migration, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and molecular defects that may explain these deficiencies include several biological responses such as an increased inflammatory response, altered integrin signaling, reduced growth factor activity, decreased cell proliferation, diminished angiogenesis, reduced collagen synthesis, augmented collagen remodeling, and deterioration of the proliferative and differentiation potential of stem cells. In this review, we explore the cellular and molecular basis of these defects and their possible clinical implications.

  13. CEMP1 Induces Transformation in Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Mercedes; Imaz-Rosshandler, Ivan; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Arzate, Higinio; Mercado-Celis, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) is a key regulator of cementogenesis. CEMP1 promotes cell attachment, differentiation, deposition rate, composition, and morphology of hydroxyapatite crystals formed by human cementoblastic cells. Its expression is restricted to cementoblasts and progenitor cell subpopulations present in the periodontal ligament. CEMP1 transfection into non-osteogenic cells such as adult human gingival fibroblasts results in differentiation of these cells into a “mineralizing” cell phenotype. Other studies have shown evidence that CEMP1 could have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of bone defects and regeneration of other mineralized tissues. To better understand CEMP1’s biological effects in vitro we investigated the consequences of its expression in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) growing in non-mineralizing media by comparing gene expression profiles. We identified several mRNAs whose expression is modified by CEMP1 induction in HGF cells. Enrichment analysis showed that several of these newly expressed genes are involved in oncogenesis. Our results suggest that CEMP1 causes the transformation of HGF and NIH3T3 cells. CEMP1 is overexpressed in cancer cell lines. We also determined that the region spanning the CEMP1 locus is commonly amplified in a variety of cancers, and finally we found significant overexpression of CEMP1 in leukemia, cervix, breast, prostate and lung cancer. Our findings suggest that CEMP1 exerts modulation of a number of cellular genes, cellular development, cellular growth, cell death, and cell cycle, and molecules associated with cancer. PMID:26011628

  14. Microarray Analysis of Microbiota of Gingival Lesions in Noma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huyghe, Antoine; François, Patrice; Mombelli, Andrea; Tangomo, Manuela; Girard, Myriam; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Bolivar, Ignacio; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Noma (cancrum oris) is a gangrenous disease of unknown etiology affecting the maxillo-facial region of young children in extremely limited resource countries. In an attempt to better understand the microbiological events occurring during this disease, we used phylogenetic and low-density microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the gingival flora of acute noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG) lesions, and compared them to healthy control subjects of the same geographical and social background. Our observations raise doubts about Fusobacterium necrophorum, a previously suspected causative agent of noma, as this species was not associated with noma lesions. Various oral pathogens were more abundant in noma lesions, notably Atopobium spp., Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus anginosus. On the other hand, pathogens associated with periodontal diseases such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacteriales were more abundant in healthy controls. Importantly, the overall loss of bacterial diversity observed in noma samples as well as its homology to that of ANG microbiota supports the hypothesis that ANG might be the immediate step preceding noma. PMID:24086784

  15. Biofilm growth on rugose surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D.; Einarsson, B.; Carpio, A.

    2012-12-01

    A stochastic model is used to assess the effect of external parameters on the development of submerged biofilms on smooth and rough surfaces. The model includes basic cellular mechanisms, such as division and spreading, together with an elementary description of the interaction with the surrounding flow and probabilistic rules for extracellular polymeric substance matrix generation, cell decay, and adhesion. Insight into the interplay of competing mechanisms such as the flow or the nutrient concentration change is gained. Erosion and growth processes combined produce biofilm structures moving downstream. A rich variety of patterns are generated: shrinking biofilms, patches, ripplelike structures traveling downstream, fingers, mounds, streamerlike patterns, flat layers, and porous and dendritic structures. The observed regimes depend on the carbon source and the type of bacteria.

  16. Bacterial biofilm formation under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Cassanto, J M; Barnes, M B; Koo, J H

    2001-02-20

    Although biofilm formation is widely documented on Earth, it has not been demonstrated in the absence of gravity. To explore this possibility, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suspended in sterile buffer, was flown in a commercial payload on space shuttle flight STS-95. During earth orbit, biofilm formation was induced by exposing the bacteria to sterile media through a 0.2-microm (pore size) polycarbonate membrane. Examination of these membranes by confocal microscopy revealed biofilms to be present and that these biofilms could persist in spite of vigorous agitation. These results represent the first report of biofilm formation under microgravity conditions.

  17. Biofilm lifestyle of Candida: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, C J; Jin, L; Samaranayake, L P

    2008-10-01

    Candida is the major fungal pathogen of humans causing a variety of afflictions ranging from superficial mucosal diseases to deep seated mycoses. Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor in the pathogenicity of Candida, and Candida biofilms are difficult to eradicate especially because of their very high antifungal resistance. Consequently, research into the pathogenicity of Candida has focused on the prevention and management of biofilm development, their architecture, and antifungal resistance. Although studies have shed some light, molecular mechanisms that govern biofilm formation and pathogenicity still await full clarification. This review outlines the key features of what is currently known of Candida biofilm development, regulation and antifungal resistance and, their proteomics.

  18. [Connective tissue growth factors, CTGF and Cyr61 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth--an animal model].

    PubMed

    Ciobanică, Mihaela; Cianga, Corina; Căruntu, Irina-Draga; Grigore, Georgiana; Cianga, P

    2008-01-01

    Human gingival overgrowth may occur as a side effect of chronic administration of some therapeutic agents. The mechanisms responsible for the gingival tissues lesions, fibrosis and inflamation, involve an impaired balance between the production and the degradation of type I collagen. It has been demonstrated that CCN2/CTGF, a connective tissue growth factor, is highly expressed in the gingival tissues and positively correlated with the degree of fibrosis in the drug-induced gingival overgrowth. The aim of this study was to identify the presence and localization of CCN2/CTGF and CCN1/Cyr61, members of the same molecular family, in gingival tissues of cyclosporin A- and nifedipine-treated rats, by immunohistochemistry. Staining was evaluated with light microscope and the results show cellular and extracellular CTGF in nifedipin gingival overgrowth tissues with intensity of labeling higher compared to the CsA gingival overgrowth tissues or the controls. The staining for Cyr61 shows its intracellular localization with no diference of labeling intensity between drug-induced gingival overgrowth and normal tissues. Also, we were interested in the gingival TGF-â expression in those animals. We didn't find any commercial anti-rat TGF antibody and our anti-human antibody shows no cross-reactivity with rat tissues. The data from our study sustain the involvement of CTGF and Cyr61 as growth factors in the gingival tissues and the CTGF association with drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  19. A new technique for enlargement and reconstruction of digital sensor imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, W. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    A new image enlargement and reconstruction routine, the digital image enlarging balanced reconstruction algorithm (DIEBRA), is described. Using a highly modified form of 'balanced' two-dimensional polynomial interpolation, this program enlarges digital imagery, creating synthetic high spatial resolution images. Statistical analysis shows the DIEBRA-generated imagery to be significantly closer to true high spatial resolution imagery at all frequencies than imagery generated by a cubic convolutional reconstruction filter.

  20. The roles of biofilm matrix polysaccharide Psl in mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Luyan; Wang, Shiwei; Wang, Di; Parsek, Matthew R; Wozniak, Daniel J

    2012-07-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes life-threatening, persistent infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Persistence is attributed to the ability of these bacteria to form structured communities (biofilms). Biofilms rely on an extracellular polymeric substances matrix to maintain structure. Psl exopolysaccharide is a key matrix component of nonmucoid biofilms, yet the role of Psl in mucoid biofilms is unknown. In this report, using a variety of mutants in a mucoid P. aeruginosa background, we found that deletion of Psl-encoding genes dramatically decreased their biofilm formation ability, indicating that Psl is also a critical matrix component of mucoid biofilms. Our data also suggest that the overproduction of alginate leads to mucoid biofilms, which occupy more space, whereas Psl-dependent biofilms are densely packed. These data suggest that Psl polysaccharide may have significant contributions in biofilm persistence in patients with CF and may be helpful for designing therapies for P. aeruginosa CF infection.

  1. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus A J; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2008-04-02

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  2. Biofilm Induced Tolerance towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus A. J.; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms. PMID:18382672

  3. Microsensors and microscale gradients in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Babauta, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the limiting factors and mechanisms of biofilm processes requires the direct measurement of microscale gradients using the appropriate tools. Microscale measurements can provide mechanistic information that cannot be obtained from bulk-scale measurements. Among the most used and trusted tools in microscale biofilm research are microsensors. The goal of this chapter is to introduce microsensor technology along with several examples to illustrate microscale processes in biofilms that are usually absent in bulk. We define a microsensor for biofilm research as a needle-type sensor with tip diameter of a few microns and a length up to several hundred microns. Microsensors can be used noninvasively to monitor in situ biofilm processes. Both optical and electrochemical microsensors can be used for biofilm applications. Because of newly discovered biofilm processes, the design and use of microsensors require customization and carefully designed experiments. In this chapter we present several examples describing the use of microsensors (1) in environmental biofilms, (2) in medical biofilms, and (3) in biofilms for energy and bioproducts. Microsensors can be the most useful if the measured profiles are integrated into the study of overall biofilm processes.

  4. A technique of aortic annulus enlargement with a Freestyle stentless bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bical, Olivier M; Nutu, Ovidiu; Deleuze, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    We describe our surgical technique to manage a small aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement. Starting with the posterior annular enlargement incision described by Manouguian, a stentless porcine aortic root, with excision of the left and right porcine coronary segments and conservation of the mural wall (Freestyle MS design, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN ), was used. The Freestyle bioprosthesis enlarges the aortic annulus using a direct suture of the valve on the enlarged annulus, and the aorta is closed by a direct suture of the mural wall of the bioprosthesis. Therefore, the aortic annulus enlargement is made only using the aortic bioprosthesis, without other material.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effect of vitamin D on gingivitis: a dose response randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vishwanath P; Rao, C Bhasker; Naiak, Vijaya; Prasad, K V V

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, a daily Oral Vitamin D supplementation was given in dose of 2000 IU for Group A, 1000 IU for Group B , 500 IU for Group C and placebo for Group D over 3 months period to assess the anti-inflammatory effect of vitamin D on gingivitis at various doses. The changes in gingival scores were measured at the period of 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd month. Gingivitis score changed in direct proportion to the dose of vitamin D supplementation. Group A mean gingival scores were 2.4 (baseline); 1.7 (1 st month), 0.8 (2 nd month) and 0.3 (3 rd month). The group B the mean baseline gingival score from 2.3 reduced to 2.0 (month), 1.1 (two months) and 0.5 (third month). Group C had baseline gingival scores of 2.2 and 1.9 (1 st month), 1.4 (2 nd month) and 0.8 (last visit). Comparing baseline gingivitis scores with later visit score by Wilcoxon paired test, the anti-inflammatory effect was significantly seen in group A after one month itself, group B at two months and group C at 3 rd month after oral vitamin D supplementation. However, Group D did not show any significant anti-inflammatory effect.

  6. The Clinical Effectiveness of Post-Brushing Rinsing in Reducing Plaque and Gingivitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Gupta, Ritu; Jankiram, Chandrasheker; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna; Vashishtha, Vaibhav; Malhi, Ravneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental plaque is the major etiological factor associated with the development of gingivitis. Hence, maintenance of oral hygiene is very essential. Aim To systematically review the literature on the effects of a post toothbrushing rinsing on plaque and parameters of gingival inflammation. Materials and Methods A literature review was performed in PubMed Central and Cochrane library, embase, google scholar were searched up to February 2015 to identify appropriate studies. The primary outcome measure was plaque and gingival inflammation reduction. Results Out of the total 56 titles appeared, 08articles fulfilled the criteria and were selected for the review. One article which was hand searched and one article which was through e-mail was included. A statistically significant reduction in overall plaque and gingivitis was noted when different mouth rinses were compared to the control (p<0.05). It was seen that chlorhexidine is the best antiplaque and antigingivitis agent but due to its side effects after continuous use, was not indicated for long term use. Probiotic was superior to chlorhexidine in terms of reduction of gingival inflammation. Conclusion There are relatively few studies evaluating the association between post toothbrushing rinsing and gingivitis. A clear effect was observed, indicating that different mouthrinses (chlorhexidine, probiotic, herbal, essential oil mouthrinse) when used as an adjunct to mechanical means of oral hygiene, provides an additional benefit with regard to plaque and gingivitis reduction as compared to a placebo or control. PMID:27437376

  7. The Role of Gingival Melanin Pigmentation in Inflammation of Gingiva, Based on Genetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Hossam A; Syed, Sadatullah; Soliman, Abdel Nasser MM

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of melanin pigment and inflammatory process within gingival tissues based on clinical and genetic analysis by differential display technique and DNA sequencing. Materials and Methods: Seventy gingival biopsy specimens were taken from individuals with melanin pigmentation as well as healthy and inflamed gingiva. Specimens were examined by differential display technique using six different arbitrary primers. Cloning, sequencing and sequence analysis for six different genes were performed. Results: Gingival specimens with hyperpigmentation (clinical melanin score = 3) showed presence of both, down- and up-regulatory genes when compared with the gingival specimen with clinical melanin score 0. These genes may have a role in curtailing the progress of gingival inflammation associated with melanin hyperpigmentation. Conclusion: Melanin hyper pigmentation may possess a defensive role against progress of gingival inflammation How to cite this article:Eid HA, Syed S, Soliman AN. The Role of Gingival Melanin Pigmentation in Inflammation of Gingiva, Based on Genetic Analysis. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):1-7. PMID:24155612

  8. Treatment of gingival recessions by guided tissue regeneration and coronally advanced flap.

    PubMed

    Banihashemrad, Ali; Aghassizadeh, Ershad; Radvar, Mehrdad

    2009-01-01

    Gingival recession refers to the denudation of root surface caused by apical migration of the gingival margin as a result of destruction of the covering gingival tissue of the affected area. It is among the most frequent problems presented by periodontal patients and may have different etiologies and sequels. So far, several techniques have been devised and tested to treat gingival recession. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a GTR resorbable collagen membrane in conjunction with coronally advanced flap (CAF) as compared to CAF alone in the treatment of Miller's Class I & II gingival recessions. Seven patients took part in the study, each providing either two or four facial recessions of 3 mm. to 6 mm., totaling 11 pairs of gingival recessions. The two paired sites within each patient were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments mentioned above. Prior to and six months after treatments, the following clinical parameters were measured and recorded: recession depth; probing pocket depth; clinical attachment level; width of keratinized gingiva; and width of recession. After six months, recession depth showed a mean reduction of 67.88% and 57.42% in the "GTR + CAF" and "CAF alone" groups, respectively. The mean difference between the groups was 1+/-0.33 mm (P=0.03). The results of this study indicate that Miller's Class I & II gingival recessions are amenable to treatment using the GTR technique with satisfactory outcome.

  9. Effects of herbal and non-herbal toothpastes on plaque and gingivitis: A clinical comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Tatikonda, Aravind; Debnath, Surangama; Chauhan, Vivek Singh; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Taranath, M; Sharma, Akanksha Manmohan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presence of plaque may be the culprit for dental caries, gingivitis, periodontal problems, and halitosis. Many mechanical aids are practiced worldwide to remove or control plaque, including tooth brushes, dental floss, mouth rinses, and dentifrices. The objective of this clinical study was to investigate the effectiveness of herbal toothpaste (Dabur Red) in controlling plaque and gingivitis, as compared to conventional (non-herbal) dentifrice (Pepsodent). Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 subjects aged 35–43 years with established gingivitis and at least 20 natural teeth, and having a probing depth <3 mm were investigated. After the washout period, plaque and gingival index (PI and GI, respectively) scores were assessed at days 0 and 30. Differences between groups were compared with Mann–Whitney U test and the mean scores of PI and GI by Wilcoxon test. Statistical difference between the weights of dentifrices tubes on days 0 and 30 was evaluated by Student's t-test. Results: At the end of 30 days of the study, there was statistically significant difference between both the groups for plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion: After 30 days of trial, both test and control groups showed effective reduction of plaque and gingivitis, which was statistically significant. No adverse reactions to dentifrices products were observed during the trial. It was concluded that herbal dentifrice was as effective as non-herbal dentifrices in the control of plaque and gingivitis. PMID:25558453

  10. In vivo phospholipid biosynthesis in cotton cotyledons during glyoxysome enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Trelease, R.N. )

    1990-05-01

    The surface are of cottonseed glyoxysomes increases about 4 fold within 36 h after imbibition. Membrane phospholipid must become available to glyoxysomes to accommodate expansion. Incubation of cotyledons (18-h-old) in 14C-choline (1 h) resulted in at least 85% recovery of 14C-phosphatidylcholine (PC) in membranes comigrating on sucrose gradients (20-59% w/w) with antimycin A-insensitive cytochrome c reductase (CCR) activity and choline- and ethanolaminephosphotransferase (CPT and EPT) activities (ER at about 24% w/w sucrose). Chase experiments with 3.4 M choline chloride for 2, 12, or 24 h led to increasing proportions of 14C-PC (36% after 24 h) recovery in mitochondria. No transfer of 14C-PC to enlarging glyoxysomes was detected. Incubations in 14C-ethanolamine yielded ER labeling after only 30 min. 14C-PE chased into mitochondria membranes more rapidly than PC (45% after 12 h), and no 14C-PE chased into glyoxysome membranes. Evidence for synthesis of 14C-PC from 14C-PE was found after 12 h chase with 1 M ethanolamine hydrochloride. Our results indicate that ER is the primary site of PC and PE synthesis in vivo and that ER contributes newly synthesized PC and PE to mitochondrial membranes but not to expanding glyoxysomal membranes. This is different from membrane biogenesis of glyoxysomes proliferating in castor bean endosperm.

  11. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and embryonic brain enlargement in the chick.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Pastor, J F; Represa, J J; Barbosa, E

    1993-07-01

    Previous studies of the early development of the neural tube have shown the existence of an intraneural fluid, which causes a positive pressure inside this primordium, and seems to play a key role in the early development of the central nervous system. In the present study we investigated the composition and synthesis of this intraneural fluid. By using a sequential method, which includes fixation with glutaraldehyde plus cetylpyridinium chloride, opening the neural cavity after critical point drying and scanning electron microscopy analysis, we found a water-soluble extracellular matrix that filled up the brain vesicles of chick embryos at the earliest stages of the neural tube. An ultrastructural study of the neural epithelium during these stages revealed the existence of a secretion process in the neural cells toward the apical side, the future neural cavity. An immunocytochemical study to assess the nature of the secreted material has shown that the intraneural matrix contains chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, which appeared homogeneously distributed throughout the neural cavity. Our findings demonstrate that the intraneural liquid is a fluid of complex composition and includes chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan as an osmotically active molecule. This suggests a morphogenetic role for the proteoglycan during early brain enlargement. The neural ectoderm is a polarized epithelium from early developmental stages and secretes the intraneural matrix.

  12. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  13. Hydrodynamic drag constrains head enlargement for mouthbrooding in cichlids.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Potes, Nuno Zavattieri; Adriaens, Dominique

    2015-08-06

    Presumably as an adaptation for mouthbrooding, many cichlid fish species have evolved a prominent sexual dimorphism in the adult head. Since the head of fishes serves as a bow during locomotion, an evolutionary increase in head volume to brood more eggs can trade-off with the hydrodynamic efficiency of swimming. Here, the differences between males and females in three-dimensional shape and size of the external head surfaces and the effect thereof on drag force during locomotion was analysed for the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a maternal mouthbrooder. To do so, three-dimensional body surface reconstructions from laser scans and computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed. After scaling the scanned specimens to post-cranial body volume, in order to theoretically equalize propulsive power, the external volume of the head of females was 27% larger than that of males (head length + 14%; head width + 9%). These differences resulted in an approximate 15% increase in drag force. Yet, hydrodynamics imposed important constraints on the adaptation for mouthbrooding as a much more drastic drop in swimming efficiency seems avoided by mainly enlarging the head along the swimming direction.

  14. Interface fluctuations for deposition on enlarging flat substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, I. S. S.; Takeuchi, K. A.; Ferreira, S. C.; Oliveira, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate solid-on-solid models that belong to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class on substrates that expand laterally at a constant rate by duplication of columns. Despite the null global curvature, we show that all investigated models have asymptotic height distributions and spatial covariances in agreement with those expected for the KPZ subclass for curved surfaces. In 1 + 1 dimensions, the height distribution and covariance are given by the GUE Tracy-Widom distribution and the Airy2 process instead of the GOE and Airy1 foreseen for flat interfaces. These results imply that when the KPZ class splits into curved and flat subclasses, as conventionally considered, the expanding substrate may play a role equivalent to, or perhaps more important than, the global curvature. Moreover, the translational invariance of the interfaces evolving on growing domains allowed us to accurately determine, in 2 + 1 dimensions, the analog of the GUE Tracy-Widom distribution for height distribution and that of the Airy2 process for spatial covariance. Temporal covariance is also calculated and shown to be universal in each dimension and in each of the two subclasses. A logarithmic correction associated with the duplication of columns is observed and theoretically elucidated. Finally, crossover between regimes with fixed-size and enlarging substrates is also investigated.

  15. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  16. [Biofilm formation by Legionella spp. in experiment].

    PubMed

    Karpova, T I; Dronina, Iu E; Alekseeva, N V; Romanova, Iu M; Tartakovskiĭ, I S

    2008-01-01

    Ability of biofilm formation was studied in 28 strains belonging to 12 species of Legionella. Optimal conditions for formation of biofilms were ascertained using reference strain Legionella pneumophila Philadelphia 1. Comparative assessment of the ability of Legionella spp. to form biofilms was performed by cultivation in proteosopepton broth (for 96 hours) and in water (for up to 2 weeks). Highest rates of biofilm formation were observed for strains of L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae. Between L. pneumophila strains the most prominent ability to form biofilms was observed in newly isolated strains BLR-05 and TOTAL 1. Opportunity to use different ability of Legionella species to biofilm formation as a epidemiologically significant marker and for modeling of biofilms of Legionella in association with other microorganisms was discussed.

  17. Biofilm formation by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Timmaraju, Venkata Arun; Theophilus, Priyanka A S; Balasubramanian, Kunthavai; Shakih, Shafiq; Luecke, David F; Sapi, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are microbial communities held together by an extracellular polymeric substance matrix predominantly composed of polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. We had previously shown that Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the causative organism of Lyme disease in the United States is capable of forming biofilms in vitro. Here, we investigated biofilm formation by B. afzelii and B. garinii, which cause Lyme disease in Europe. Using various histochemistry and microscopy techniques, we show that B. afzelii and B. garinii form biofilms, which resemble biofilms formed by B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. High-resolution atomic force microscopy revealed similarities in the ultrastructural organization of the biofilms form by three Borrelia species. Histochemical experiments revealed a heterogeneous organization of exopolysaccharides among the three Borrelia species. These results suggest that biofilm formation might be a common trait of Borrelia genera physiology.

  18. Biofilms: an emergent form of bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Steinberg, Peter; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2016-08-11

    Bacterial biofilms are formed by communities that are embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Importantly, bacteria in biofilms exhibit a set of 'emergent properties' that differ substantially from free-living bacterial cells. In this Review, we consider the fundamental role of the biofilm matrix in establishing the emergent properties of biofilms, describing how the characteristic features of biofilms - such as social cooperation, resource capture and enhanced survival of exposure to antimicrobials - all rely on the structural and functional properties of the matrix. Finally, we highlight the value of an ecological perspective in the study of the emergent properties of biofilms, which enables an appreciation of the ecological success of biofilms as habitat formers and, more generally, as a bacterial lifestyle.

  19. Gene Transfer Efficiency in Gonococcal Biofilms: Role of Biofilm Age, Architecture, and Pilin Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kouzel, Nadzeya; Oldewurtel, Enno R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular DNA is an important structural component of many bacterial biofilms. It is unknown, however, to which extent external DNA is used to transfer genes by means of transformation. Here, we quantified the acquisition of multidrug resistance and visualized its spread under selective and nonselective conditions in biofilms formed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The density and architecture of the biofilms were controlled by microstructuring the substratum for bacterial adhesion. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between cocultured strains, each carrying a single resistance, occurred efficiently in early biofilms. The efficiency of gene transfer was higher in early biofilms than between planktonic cells. It was strongly reduced after 24 h and independent of biofilm density. Pilin antigenic variation caused a high fraction of nonpiliated bacteria but was not responsible for the reduced gene transfer at later stages. When selective pressure was applied to dense biofilms using antibiotics at their MIC, the double-resistant bacteria did not show a significant growth advantage. In loosely connected biofilms, the spreading of double-resistant clones was prominent. We conclude that multidrug resistance readily develops in early gonococcal biofilms through horizontal gene transfer. However, selection and spreading of the multiresistant clones are heavily suppressed in dense biofilms. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are considered ideal reaction chambers for horizontal gene transfer and development of multidrug resistances. The rate at which genes are exchanged within biofilms is unknown. Here, we quantified the acquisition of double-drug resistance by gene transfer between gonococci with single resistances. At early biofilm stages, the transfer efficiency was higher than for planktonic cells but then decreased with biofilm age. The surface topography affected the architecture of the biofilm. While the efficiency of gene transfer was independent of the

  20. Current and future trends for biofilm reactors for fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms in the environment can both cause detrimental and beneficial effects. However, their use in bioreactors provides many advantages including lesser tendencies to develop membrane fouling and lower required capital costs, their higher biomass density and operation stability, contribution to resistance of microorganisms, etc. Biofilm formation occurs naturally by the attachment of microbial cells to the support without use of any chemicals agent in biofilm reactors. Biofilm reactors have been studied and commercially used for waste water treatment and bench and pilot-scale production of value-added products in the past decades. It is important to understand the fundamentals of biofilm formation, physical and chemical properties of a biofilm matrix to run the biofilm reactor at optimum conditions. This review includes the principles of biofilm formation; properties of a biofilm matrix and their roles in the biofilm formation; factors that improve the biofilm formation, such as support materials; advantages and disadvantages of biofilm reactors; and industrial applications of biofilm reactors.

  1. Comparison of semilunar coronally repositioned flap with gingival massaging using an Ayurvedic product (irimedadi taila) in the treatment of class-I gingival recession: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Kumathalli, Kanteshwari; Sridhar, Raja; Maru, Rahul; Mangal, Brijesh; Kedia, Sameer; Shrihatti, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the comparison in terms of root coverage the effect of gingival massaging using an ayurvedic product and semilunar coronally repositioned flap (SCRF) to assess the treatment outcomes in the management of Miller’s class I gingival recessions over a-6 mo period. METHODS: The present study comprised of total of 90 sites of Miller’s class-I gingival recessions in the maxillary anteriors, the sites were divided into three groups each comprising 30 sites, Group I-were treated by massaging using a Placebo (Ghee) Group II-were treated by massaging using an ayurvedic product (irimedadi taila). Group III-were treated by SCRF. Clinical parameters assessed included recession height, recession width, probing pocket depth, width of attached gingiva, clinical attachment level and thickness of keratinized tissue. Clinical recordings were performed at baseline and 6 mo later. The results were analyzed to determine improvements in the clinical parameters. The comparison was done using Wilcoxon signed rank test. The overall differences in the clinical improvements between the three groups was done using Kruskal-Wallis test. The probability value (P-value) of less than 0.01 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS: Non-surgical periodontal therapy and gingival massaging improves facial gingival recessions and prevents further progression of mucogingival defects. Root coverage was achieved in both the experimental groups. The SCRF group proved to be superior in terms of all the clinical parameters. CONCLUSION: Root coverage is significantly better with semilunar coronally repositioned flap compared with the gingival massaging technique in the treatment of shallow maxillary Miller class I gingival recession defects. PMID:25325064

  2. Biofilm monitoring using complex permittivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; McGrath, Lucas K.; Dolan, Patricia L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-10-01

    There is strong interest in the detection and monitoring of bio-fouling. Bio-fouling problems are common in numerous water treatments systems, medical and dental apparatus and food processing equipment. Current bio-fouling control protocols are time consuming and costly. New early detection techniques to monitor bio-forming contaminates are means to enhanced efficiency. Understanding the unique dielectric properties of biofilm development, colony forming bacteria and nutrient background will provide a basis to the effectiveness of controlling or preventing biofilm growth. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements provide values of complex permittivity, {var_epsilon}*, of biofilm formation by applying a weak alternating electric field at various frequencies. The dielectric characteristic of the biofilm, {var_epsilon}{prime}, is the real component of {var_epsilon}* and measures the biofilm's unique ability to store energy. Graphically observed dependencies of {var_epsilon}{prime} to frequency indicate dielectric relaxation or dielectric dispersion behaviors that mark the particular stage of progression during the development of biofilms. In contrast, any frequency dependency of the imaginary component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime} the loss factor, is expressed as dielectric losses from the biofilm due to dipole relaxation. The tangent angle of these two component vectors is the ratio of the imaginary component to the real component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime}/{var_epsilon}{prime} and is referred to as the loss angle tangent (tan {delta}) or dielectric loss. Changes in tan {delta} are characteristic of changes in dielectric losses during various developmental stages of the films. Permittivity scans in the above figure are of biofilm growth from P. Fluorescens (10e7 CFU's at the start). Three trends are apparent from these scans, the first being a small drop in the imaginary permittivity over a 7 hours period, best seen in the Cole-Cole plot (a). The second trend is

  3. Growth of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms in the presence of n-butanol.

    PubMed

    Halan, Babu; Vassilev, Igor; Lang, Karsten; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2016-10-03

    Biocatalytic processes often encounter problems due to toxic reactants and products, which reduce biocatalyst viability. Thus, robust organisms capable of tolerating or adapting towards such compounds are of high importance. This study systematically investigated the physiological response of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms when exposed to n-butanol, one of the potential next generation biofuels as well as a toxic substance using microscopic and biochemical methods. Initially P. taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms did not show any observable growth in the presence of 3% butanol. Prolonged cultivation of 10 days led to biofilm adaptation, glucose and oxygen uptake doubled and consequently it was possible to quantify biomass. Complementing the medium with yeast extract and presumably reducing the metabolic burden caused by butanol exposure further increased the biomass yield. In course of cultivation cells reduced their size in the presence of n-butanol which results in an enlarged surface-to-volume ratio and thus increased nutrient uptake. Finally, biofilm enhanced its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production when exposed to n-butanol. The predominant response of these biofilms under n-butanol stress are higher energy demand, increased biomass yield upon medium complements, larger surface-to-volume ratio and enhanced EPS production. Although we observed a distinct increase in biomass in the presence of 3% butanol it was not possible to cultivate P. taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms at higher n-butanol concentrations. Thereby this study shows that biofilms are not per se tolerant against solvents, and need to adapt to toxic n-butanol concentrations.

  4. Rapid identification of bacterial biofilms and biofilm wound models using a multichannel nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Kong, Hao; Mout, Rubul; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Robinson, Sandra M; Rana, Subinoy; Zhang, Xinrong; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-12-23

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model.

  5. Dental plaque as a biofilm and new research on biofilm removal by power toothbrushes.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, Douglas J; Berg, Joel

    2002-07-01

    Dental researchers have only recently begun to regard dental plaque as a biofilm. Dental plaque biofilm is a complex, heterogeneous structure of bacteria cells, a sticky extracellular matrix, and fluid channels. The biofilm must be modeled accurately for laboratory studies to be meaningful. To that end, researchers have compared the sonicare toothbrush to the Braun Oral-B 3D Excel Plaque Remover for the removal of interproximal dental plaque biofilm in an in vitro model. This article defines the concept of biofilms in the oral cavity and reviews how biofilm modeling is showing differences in toothbrush performance.

  6. Use of chlorhexidine gluconate and povidone iodine mouthwashes in the treatment of acute ulcerative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Llewelyn, J

    1978-11-01

    A trial was conducted to compare the effectiveness of povidone iodine and chlorhexidine gluconate with buffered peroxyborate in the treatment of acute ulcerative gingivitis. After 20 patients had entered the trial and 11 had required additional therapy with metronidazole to control their symptoms, the study was terminated. Those patients receiving peroxyborate all showed a satisfactory improvement in clinical signs and symptoms. One patient each receiving povidone iodine or chlorhexidine reported a symptomatic improvement, although gingival ulceration was still apparent at 1 week. The remaining patients all required metronidazole therapy to control their symptoms. Povidone iodine and chlorhexidine gluconate therefore cannot be recommended for the treatment of acute ulcerative gingivitis.

  7. Gingival Cyst of the Adult: Report of an Inconspicuous Lesion Associated with Multiple Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brod, Juliana Mançano Melhado; Passador-Santos, Fabrício

    2017-01-01

    Gingival cyst of the adult is a rare slow growing and asymptomatic lesion that arises from the rests of the dental lamina. The present report describes the case of a miniscule adult gingival cyst in the lower anterior gingiva in a 51-year-old male with agenesis of lower premolars and lateral incisors. This paper contrasts the literature concerning the differentiation between the gingival cyst of the adult and the lateral periodontal cysts as well as the possible misguided concept that the former may be such rare an occurrence. PMID:28377825

  8. Gingival Embrasure Fill In Fixed Implant-Supported Prosthetics: A Review.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    After provisional or definitive cementation of fixed implant-supported prostheses, spontaneous gingival proliferation may occur to fill the cervical embrasure areas of the prosthesis. Adequate oral hygiene, osseous spacing between the supporting implants and attached or immovable soft tissue may be the conditions that allow this phenomenon. This proliferation embrasure fill eliminates interproximal gingival voids, that is, black triangles, and makes the outcome more esthetically acceptable. Since interproximal prosthetic deign and implant positioning may be the primary factors for the fill, the gingival fill may be, in fact, an epulis.

  9. Peripheral odontogenic fibroma: a rare gingival neoplasm with clinico-pathological differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jaiswal, Shradha; Sharma, Aanchal; Andhare, Vinod; Sabir, Husain

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare gingival neoplasm, characterised by relatively mature collagenous fibrous tissue and varying amounts of odontogenic epithelium. It can be described as a slow growing, firmly attached, solid and smooth gingival mass which may be present asymptomatically for years, which may cause displacement of adjacent teeth. The purpose of this article is to discuss a case of POdF, occurring in the maxillary anterior region, with detailed clinico-pathological differential diagnosis to clarify characteristic features of various gingival overgrowths to enhance easy identification.

  10. [Systemic immunological response in children with chronic gingivitis and gastro-intestinal pathology].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, E G

    2014-01-01

    Study of the immune system mechanisms in chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastrointestinal pathology was performed in 102 children (49 with chronic gastritis and duodenitis and 53 with no signs of gastrointestinal pathology). Forty-eight children with healthy periodontium constituted control group. Generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastroduodenal pathology is characterized by intense humoral response by simultaneous T-cell immunity suppression. Detection of high serum titers of circulating immune complexes in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis suggests a role of immune response in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease increases with concomitant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  11. The free gingival graft combined with the frenectomy: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Breault, L G; Fowler, E B; Moore, E A; Murray, D J

    1999-01-01

    Abnormal labial frena are capable of retracting gingival margins, creating diastemas, and limiting lip movement. When these frena are present, the traditional frenectomy alone generally is successful. However, when the frenulum is extensive, the possibility of coronal reformation exists. Several procedures have combined the frenectomy with either a lateral pedicle flap, free papilla graft, or free gingival (mucosal) graft taken from the palate. Three case reports demonstrate the continued efficacy of the traditional palatal free gingival graft when the patient has an extensive frenulum or an area of minimal esthetic concern is involved.

  12. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: II. Activity against periopathogenic biofilms and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Scott, R W; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Whereas periodontal disease is ultimately of bacterial etiology, from multispecies biofilms of gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms, much of the deleterious effects are caused by the resultant epithelial inflammatory response. Hence, development of a treatment that combines anti-biofilm antibiotic activity with anti-inflammatory activity would be of great utility. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins are naturally occurring peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum activity as well as a variety of immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, bacteria do not readily develop resistance to these agents. However, clinical studies have suggested that they do not represent optimal candidates for exogenous therapeutic agents. Small-molecule mimetics of these AMPs exhibit similar activities to the parent peptides, in addition to having low toxicity, high stability and low cost. To determine whether AMP mimetics have the potential for treatment of periodontal disease, we examined the activity of one mimetic, mPE, against biofilm cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Metabolic assays as well as culture and biomass measurement assays demonstrated that mPE exhibits potent activity against biofilm cultures of both species. Furthermore, as little as 2 μg ml(-1) mPE was sufficient to inhibit interleukin-1β-induced secretion of interleukin-8 in both gingival epithelial cells and THP-1 cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with a reduction in activation of nuclear factor-κB, suggesting that mPE can act both as an anti-biofilm agent in an anaerobic environment and as an anti-inflammatory agent in infected tissues.

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial activity that leads to the formation of biofilms on process equipment can accelerate corrosion, reduce heat transfer rates, and generally decrease process efficiencies. Additional concerns arise in the food and pharma industries where product quality and safety are a high priority. Pharmac...

  14. Competing adiabatic Thouless pumps in enlarged parameter spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Ryu, Shinsei; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-12-01

    The transfer of conserved charges through insulating matter via smooth deformations of the Hamiltonian is known as quantum adiabatic, or Thouless, pumping. Central to this phenomenon are Hamiltonians whose insulating gap is controlled by a multidimensional (usually two-dimensional) parameter space in which paths can be defined for adiabatic changes in the Hamiltonian, i.e., without closing the gap. Here, we extend the concept of Thouless pumps of band insulators by considering a larger, three-dimensional parameter space. We show that the connectivity of this parameter space is crucial for defining quantum pumps, demonstrating that, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional case, pumped quantities depend not only on the initial and final points of Hamiltonian evolution but also on the class of the chosen path and preserved symmetries. As such, we distinguish the scenarios of closed/open paths of Hamiltonian evolution, finding that different closed cycles can lead to the pumping of different quantum numbers, and that different open paths may point to distinct scenarios for surface physics. As explicit examples, we consider models similar to simple models used to describe topological insulators, but with doubled degrees of freedom compared to a minimal topological insulator model. The extra fermionic flavors from doubling allow for extra gapping terms/adiabatic parameters—besides the usual topological mass which preserves the topology-protecting discrete symmetries—generating an enlarged adiabatic parameter space. We consider cases in one and three spatial dimensions, and our results in three dimensions may be realized in the context of crystalline topological insulators, as we briefly discuss.

  15. Biofilm development in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor: effect of flow velocity on performance.

    PubMed

    Casey, E; Glennon, B; Hamer, G

    2000-02-20

    The effect of liquid flow velocity on biofilm development in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor was investigated both by mathematical modeling and by experiment, using Vibrio natriegens as a test organism and acetate as carbon substrate. It was shown that velocity influenced mass transfer in the diffusion boundary layer, the biomass detachment rate from the biofilm, and the maximum biofilm thickness attained. Values of the overall mass transfer coefficient of a tracer through the diffusion boundary layer, the biofilm, and the membrane were shown to be identical during different experiments at the maximum biofilm thickness. Comparison of the results with published values of this parameter in membrane attached biofilms showed a similar trend. Therefore, it was postulated that this result might indicate the mechanism that determines the maximum biofilm thickness in membrane attached biofilms. In a series of experiments, where conditions were set so that the active layer of the membrane attached biofilm was located close to the membrane biofilm interface, it was shown that the most critical effect on process performance was the effect of velocity on biofilm structure. Biofilm thickness and effective diffusivity influenced reaction and diffusion in a complex manner such that the yield of biomass on acetate was highly variable. Consideration of endogenous respiration in the mathematical model was validated by direct experimental measurements of yield coefficients. Good agreement between experimental measurements of acetate and oxygen uptake rates and their prediction by the mathematical model was achieved.

  16. Gel-Entrapped Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria as Models of Biofilm Infection Exhibit Growth in Dense Aggregates, Oxygen Limitation, Antibiotic Tolerance, and Heterogeneous Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Breana; Pitts, Betsey; Lauchnor, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    An experimental model that mimicked the structure and characteristics of in vivo biofilm infections, such as those occurring in the lung or in dermal wounds where no biomaterial surface is present, was developed. In these infections, microbial biofilm forms as cell aggregates interspersed in a layer of mucus or host matrix material. This structure was modeled by filling glass capillary tubes with an agarose gel that had been seeded with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and then incubating the gel biofilm in medium for up to 30 h. Confocal microscopy showed that the bacteria formed in discrete pockets distributed throughout the gel matrix. These aggregates enlarged over time and also developed a size gradient, with the clusters being larger near the nutrient- and oxygen-supplied interface and smaller at greater depths. Bacteria entrapped in gels for 24 h grew slowly (specific growth rate, 0.06 h−1) and were much less susceptible to oxacillin, minocycline, or ciprofloxacin than planktonic cells. Microelectrode measurements showed that the oxygen concentration decreased with depth into the gel biofilm, falling to values less than 3% of air saturation at depths of 500 μm. An anaerobiosis-responsive green fluorescent protein reporter gene for lactate dehydrogenase was induced in the region of the gel where the measured oxygen concentrations were low, confirming biologically relevant hypoxia. These results show that the gel biofilm model captures key features of biofilm infection in mucus or compromised tissue: formation of dense, distinct aggregates, reduced specific growth rates, local hypoxia, and antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27503656

  17. The gingival Stillman’s clefts: histopathology and cellular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cassini, Maria Antonietta; Cerroni, Loredana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Orlandi, Augusto; Pilloni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study Stillman’s cleft is a mucogingival triangular-shaped defect on the buccal surface of a root with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to examine the Stillman’s cleft obtained from excision during root coverage surgical procedures at an histopathological level. Materials and method Harvesting of cleft was obtained from two periodontally healthy patients with a scalpel and a bevel incision and then placed in a test tube with buffered solution to be processed for light microscopy. Results Microscopic analysis has shown that Stillman’s cleft presented a lichenoid hand-like inflammatory infiltration, while in the periodontal patient an inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia was identified. Conclusion Stillman’s cleft remains to be investigated as for the possible causes of such lesion of the gingival margin, although an inflammatory response seems to be evident and active from a strictly histopathological standpoint. PMID:26941897

  18. Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and the orthodontic patient: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Indiya; Watt, Eileen; Cross, David

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) can be a painful periodontal disease that can lead to loss of the interdental papillae. It is usually accompanied by systemic signs of fever, malaise and cervical and submandibular lymphadenopathy. It is caused by the profileration of anaerobic bacteria and has been linked to smoking and immunosuppression. This case series reports the occurrence of NUG in orthodontic patients and demonstrates that there is a varying scale of severity of the condition. Orthodontists should be aware of the clinical signs of NUG to ensure early detection and treatment of their patients in order to prevent irreversible loss of the interdental papillae and reduce the likelihood of recurrence. A treatment regime is suggested.

  19. Formulation of Bilayer Benzydamine HCl Patch Targeted For Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Sanghai, Piyush; Poddar, Sushilkumar

    2016-01-01

    In the present study bilayer patch of benzydamine HCl was developed using solvent casting method. Different substrates were attempted like Petri dish, glass-and-ring, and teflon-and-ring for selection of the proper option to formulate patch that should give easily peelable film with adequate mechanical properties. HPMC E15 LV was used in different concentrations for obtaining proper viscosity of solution for pouring on to surface and ring, that it should not leak from ring. The second layer was optimized by using different polymer like eudragit RSPO, eudragit RSPO + EC, and eudragit NE30 D for efficient layer bonding. The minimum release from backing membrane was established by diffusion study as compared to from drug loaded layer. The optimized batches were evaluated for folding endurance, weight variation, thickness, drug content, drug release, tensile strength, layer separation, mucoadhesion, moisture uptake, and layer bonding. The novel gingival patch of benzydamine HCl developed would be beneficial in optimizing the therapy. PMID:28127472

  20. Interdisciplinary Management of Gingivitis Artefacta Major: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pattnaik, Naina; Satpathy, Anurag; Mohanty, Rinkee; Nayak, Rashmita; Sahoo, Surjeet

    2015-01-01

    Cases described here discuss interdisciplinary (periodontal and behavioral) approach in the management of rare and difficult to diagnose self-inflicted injuries of gingiva such as gingivitis artefacta major. Self-inflicted injuries to the gingiva are rare and their management by periodontal therapy alone is inadequate. Proper management of this condition requires early detection and effective psychological treatment through behavioral therapy in addition to the treatment of dental lesion. Three male patients in their twenties presented with traumatic injuries of gingiva with history of self-injury and underlying emotional disturbances. Following basic periodontal intervention, their self-inflicting behavior was confirmed on psychiatric consultation. All of them underwent cognitive behavior therapy and were able to successfully curb their self-inflicting behavior prior to any definitive dental procedures. These cases illustrate the essentiality of behavioral intervention in addition to periodontal procedures in the management of such lesions. PMID:26664762

  1. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  2. A flow cytometric approach to quantify biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kerstens, Monique; Boulet, Gaëlle; Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Clais, Sofie; Lanckacker, Ellen; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Since biofilms are important in many clinical, industrial, and environmental settings, reliable methods to quantify these sessile microbial populations are crucial. Most of the currently available techniques do not allow the enumeration of the viable cell fraction within the biofilm and are often time consuming. This paper proposes flow cytometry (FCM) using the single-stain viability dye TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a fast and precise alternative. Mature biofilms of Candida albicans and Escherichia coli were used to optimize biofilm removal and dissociation, as a single-cell suspension is needed for accurate FCM enumeration. To assess the feasibility of FCM quantification of biofilms, E. coli and C. albicans biofilms were analyzed using FCM and crystal violet staining at different time points. A combination of scraping and rinsing proved to be the most efficient technique for biofilm removal. Sonicating for 10 min eliminated the remaining aggregates, resulting in a single-cell suspension. Repeated FCM measurements of biofilm samples revealed a good intraday precision of approximately 5 %. FCM quantification and the crystal violet assay yielded similar biofilm growth curves for both microorganisms, confirming the applicability of our technique. These results show that FCM using TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a single-stain viability dye is a valid fast alternative for the quantification of viable cells in a biofilm.

  3. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

  4. Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbes live as densely populated multicellular surface-attached biofilm communities embedded in self-generated, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). EPSs serve as a scaffold for cross-linking biofilm cells and support development of biofilm architecture and functions. Biofilms can have a clear negative impact on humans, where biofilms are a common denominator in many chronic diseases in which they prime development of destructive inflammatory conditions and the failure of our immune system to efficiently cope with them. Our current assortment of antimicrobial agents cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms. For industrial applications, the removal of biofilms within production machinery in the paper and hygienic food packaging industry, cooling water circuits, and drinking water manufacturing systems can be critical for the safety and efficacy of those processes. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process that involves microbial cell migration, cell-to-cell signaling and interactions, EPS synthesis, and cell-EPS interactions. Recent progress of fundamental biofilm research has shed light on novel chemical biology strategies for biofilm control. In this article, chemical biology strategies targeting the bacterial intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways will be discussed.

  5. HEMA but not TEGDMA induces autophagy in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Orsini, Giovanna; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Mazzotti, Maria C.; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Falconi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized resin-based materials are successfully used in restorative dentistry. Despite their growing popularity, one drawback is the release of monomers from the polymerized matrix due to an incomplete polymerization or degradation processes. Released monomers are responsible for several adverse effects in the surrounding biological tissues, inducing high levels of oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species are important signaling molecules that regulate many signal-trasduction pathways and play critical roles in cell survival, death, and immune defenses. Reactive oxygen species were recently shown to activate autophagy as a mechanism of cell survival and cell death. Although the toxicity induced by dental resin monomers is widely studied, the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are still unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the behavior of human gingival cells exposed to 2-hydroxy-ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to better elucidate the mechanisms of cell survival and cell death induced by resin monomers. Primary culture of human gingival cells were exposed to 3 mmol/L of HEMA or 3 mmol/L of TEGDMA for 24, 48, and 72 h. Morphological investigations were performed by transmission electron microscopy to analyze the ultrastructure of cells exposed to the monomers. The expression of protein markers for apoptosis (caspase – 3 and PARP) and autophagy (beclin – 1 and LC3B I/II) were analyzed by western blot to investigate the influence of dental resin monomers on mechanisms underlying cell death. Results showed that HEMA treatment clearly induced autophagy followed by apoptosis while the lack of any sign of autophagy activation is observed in HGFs exposed to TEGDMA. These data indicate that cells respond to monomer-induced stress by the differential induction of adaptive mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:26483703

  6. Interleukin-8 and beta-glucuronidase in gingival crevicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Chung, R M; Grbíc, J T; Lamster, I B

    1997-03-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) play a critical role in the host's response to the subgingival microflora. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent chemotactic and activating factor for PMN. In this study, the presence of IL-8 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was examined in relation to the PMN indicator beta-glucuronidase (beta G), as well as clinical parameters of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease. Data was obtained from 30 patients with periodontitis and 14 healthy controls. For the control group, GCF and clinical data were obtained only once. For the periodontitis patients, clinical data and GCF samples were collected prior to treatment, and GCF samples were again collected 2 weeks after scaling and root planing. Comparing control and periodontitis patients prior to treatment, IL-8 concentration was lower in the patients with periodontitis. Scaling and root planing resulted in either an increase or a decrease in total IL-8 and IL-8 concentration GCF. A reduction in total IL-8 or IL-8 concentration was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in beta G activity. An increase in total IL-8 or IL-8 concentration after scaling and root planing was associated with an increase in beta G activity in some patients and a reduction in beta G activity in other patients. The periodontitis patients who did not demonstrate a linkage between IL-8 and beta G activity in GCF were those individuals with the highest beta G activity prior to treatment. As elevated beta G activity in GCF has been associated with an increased risk for probing attachment loss, the absence of a direct relationship between IL-8 in GCF and PMN recruitment into the gingival crevice may characterize individuals at risk for progression of periodontitis.

  7. Hyaluronan Modulation Impacts Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ibberson, Carolyn B.; Parlet, Corey P.; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Crosby, Heidi A.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of chronic biofilm infections. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a large glycosaminoglycan abundant in mammalian tissues that has been shown to enhance biofilm formation in multiple Gram-positive pathogens. We observed that HA accumulated in an S. aureus biofilm infection using a murine implant-associated infection model and that HA levels increased in a mutant strain lacking hyaluronidase (HysA). S. aureus secretes HysA in order to cleave HA during infection. Through in vitro biofilm studies with HA, the hysA mutant was found to accumulate increased biofilm biomass compared to the wild type, and confocal microscopy showed that HA is incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Exogenous addition of purified HysA enzyme dispersed HA-containing biofilms, while catalytically inactive enzyme had no impact. Additionally, induction of hysA expression prevented biofilm formation and also dispersed an established biofilm in the presence of HA. These observations were corroborated in the implant model, where there was decreased dissemination from an hysA mutant biofilm infection compared to the S. aureus wild type. Histopathology demonstrated that infection with an hysA mutant caused significantly reduced distribution of tissue inflammation compared to wild-type infection. To extend these studies, the impact of HA and S. aureus HysA on biofilm-like aggregates found in joint infections was examined. We found that HA contributes to the formation of synovial fluid aggregates, and HysA can disrupt aggregate formation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that HA is a relevant component of the S. aureus biofilm matrix and HysA is important for dissemination from a biofilm infection. PMID:27068096

  8. Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Atsushi; Kizaki, Hayato; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-06-15

    Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined. The present study confirmed the body-enlarging effect in silkmoths fed an artificial diet instead of mulberry leaves used in the previous literature. Administration of honeybee royal jelly to silkmoth from early larval stage increased the size of female pupae and adult moths, but not larvae (at the late larval stage) or male pupae. We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera. Administration of royal jelly to G. bimaculatus from its early nymph stage enlarged both males and females at the mid-nymph and adult stages. In the cricket, the body parts were uniformly enlarged in both males and females; whereas the enlarged female silkmoths had swollen abdomens. Administration of royal jelly increased the number, but not the size, of eggs loaded in the abdomen of silkmoth females. In addition, fat body cells were enlarged by royal jelly in the silkmoth, but not in the cricket. These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species.

  9. Relation of electrocardiographic changes in pulmonary embolism to right ventricular enlargement.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Sabra, Michel J; Treadaway, Brent; Vijapura, Chirag; Warren, Robert; Joshi, Parth; Sadiq, Muhammad; Kofoed, J Thomas; Hughes, Patrick; Chabala, Stephen D; Keyes, Daniel C; Kakish, Edward; Hughes, Mary J

    2013-12-15

    The electrocardiographic (ECG) findings in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) and no previous cardiopulmonary disease are well documented; however, investigation of the relation of ECG abnormalities to right ventricular (RV) enlargement has been limited. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess further the relation of ECG changes in acute PE to RV cavity enlargement (dilation). The records of patients hospitalized from January 2009 to December 2012 with acute PE and no previous cardiopulmonary disease were reviewed. A total of 289 patients were included. RV cavity enlargement was present in 141 patients (49%). Normal ECG findings were less prevalent in patients with PE and RV enlargement than those with PE and no RV enlargement (35 of 141 [25%] vs 56 of 148 [38%]; p = 0.02). One or more of the traditional ECG manifestations of acute cor pulmonale (S1Q3T3, complete right bundle branch block, P pulmonale, or right axis deviation) was found in 18 of 141 patients (13%) with RV enlargement and 13 of 148 (8.8%) with a normal size RV (p = NS). None of the ECG abnormalities was sensitive for RV enlargement. The specificity of P and QRS abnormalities was high. The positive predictive values were ≤83% or had wide 95% confidence intervals. The negative predictive values ranged from 50% to 61%. In conclusion, ECG findings were not useful for the detection or exclusion of RV cavity enlargement in patients with acute PE.

  10. Merit Pay and Job Enlargement as Reforms: Incentives, Implementation, and Teacher Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, William A.

    1991-01-01

    Based on intensive case studies of two school districts, this study compared two teacher work reforms: merit pay and job enlargement. Interviews with 64 teachers and 53 administrators, supplemented by over 1,300 survey responses, indicate the efficacy of each approach and the potential advantages of job enlargement. (SLD)

  11. Leptin and Pro-Inflammatory Stimuli Synergistically Upregulate MMP-1 and MMP-3 Secretion in Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rachel C.; Skelton, Andrew J.; Todryk, Stephen M.; Rowan, Andrew D.; Preshaw, Philip M.; Taylor, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gingival fibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, yet the stimuli that regulate this response are not fully understood. The immunoregulatory adipokine leptin is detectable in the gingiva, human gingival fibroblasts express functional leptin receptor mRNA and leptin is known to regulate extracellular matrix remodelling responses in cardiac fibroblasts. We therefore hypothesised that leptin would enhance matrix metalloproteinase secretion in human gingival fibroblasts. Methods and Results We used in vitro cell culture to investigate leptin signalling and the effect of leptin on mRNA and protein expression in human gingival fibroblasts. We confirmed human gingival fibroblasts expressed cell surface leptin receptor, found leptin increased matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8 and -14 expression in human gingival fibroblasts compared to unstimulated cells, and observed that leptin stimulation activated MAPK, STAT1/3 and Akt signalling in human gingival fibroblasts. Furthermore, leptin synergised with IL-1 or the TLR2 agonist pam2CSK4 to markedly enhance matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3 production by human gingival fibroblasts. Signalling pathway inhibition demonstrated ERK was required for leptin-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in human gingival fibroblasts; whilst ERK, JNK, p38 and STAT3 were required for leptin+IL-1- and leptin+pam2CSK4-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression. A genome-wide expression array and gene ontology analysis confirmed genes differentially expressed in leptin+IL-1-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts (compared to unstimulated cells) were enriched for extracellular matrix organisation and disassembly, and revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-8 and -12 were also synergistically upregulated by leptin+IL-1 in human gingival fibroblasts. Conclusions We conclude that leptin selectively enhances the expression and secretion of certain matrix

  12. Mycobacterium biofilms: factors involved in development, dispersal, and therapeutic strategies against biofilm-relevant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaohong; Deng, Wanyan; Liu, Minqiang; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria can develop biofilm (BF), a multicellular structure largely combining bacteria and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The formation of biofilm results in an alternative existence in which microbes ensure their survival in adverse environments. Biofilm-relevant infections are more persistent, resistant to most antibiotics, and more recalcitrant to host immunity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, can develop biofilm, though whether M. tuberculosis can form biofilm within tuberculosis patients has yet to be determined. Here, we summarize the factors involved in the development and dispersal of mycobacterial biofilms, as well as underlying regulatory factors and inhibitors against biofilm to deepen our understanding of their development and to elucidate potential novel modes of action for future antibiotics. Key factors in biofilm formation identified as drug targets represent a novel and promising avenue for developing better antibiotics.

  13. Strawberry gingivitis as the first presenting sign of wegener's granulomatosis: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare multi-system disease characterized by the classic triad of necrotizing granulomas affecting the upper and lower respiratory tracts, disseminated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. Oral lesions as a presenting feature are only encountered in 2% of these cases. Hyperplastic gingival lesions or strawberry gingivitis, is a characteristic sign of Wegener's granulomatosis. The latter consists of reddish-purple exophytic gingival swellings with petechial haemorrhages thus resembling strawberries. Recognition of this feature is of utmost importance for timely diagnosis and definitive management of this potentially fatal disease. A case of strawberry gingivitis as the first presenting sign of Wegener's granulomatosis affecting a 50-year-old Malay male is reported here. The differential diagnosis of red lesions that may present in the gingiva is discussed. PMID:21813375

  14. “United Pedicle Flap” for management of multiple gingival recessions

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Aditi; Sivaraman, Karthik; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2016-01-01

    Numerous surgical procedures have evolved and are being modified with time to treat gingival recession by manipulating gingival or mucosal tissues in various ways. However, the decision to choose the most appropriate technique for a given recession site still remains a challenging task for clinicians. Mucogingival deformities such as shallow vestibule, frenal pull, or inadequate attached gingiva complicate the decision and limit the treatment options to an invasive procedure involving soft tissue grafts. The situation is further comprised if there is a nonavailability of adequate donor tissue and patients' unwillingness for procedures involving a second surgical site. In such situations, the recession either remains untreated or has poor treatment outcomes. This case report presents a modified pedicle graft technique for treatment of multiple gingival recessions with shallow vestibule and inadequate attached gingiva. The technique is a promising therapeutic alternative to invasive surgical procedures such as soft tissue grafts for treatment of multiple gingival recessions. PMID:27563212

  15. Effect of Frequency of Brushing Teeth on Plaque and Calculus Accumulation, and Gingivitis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Colin; Serfilippi, Laurie; Barnvos, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of brushing the teeth of beagle dogs in a randomized, controlled, blinded study design using a clearly-defined brushing technique was evaluated for 4 brushing frequencies: brushing daily, brushing every other day, brushing weekly and brushing every other week, compared with no brushing in a control group of dogs. All dogs were fed a standard dry kibble diet during the study. Standard plaque, calculus, and gingivitis indices were used to score the teeth. A 'clean tooth' model was used. No gingival or non-gingival lacerations or other signs of injury to oral tissues were found at the end of the 28 day trial period. Brushing more frequently had greater effectiveness in retarding accumulation of plaque and calculus, and reducing the severity of pre-existing gingivitis. Brushing daily or every other day produced statistically significant improved results compared with brushing weekly or every other week. Based on the results of this study, daily brushing is recommended.

  16. Use of platelet-rich fibrin membrane following treatment of gingival recession: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Sasha; Aleksic, Zoran; Klokkevold, Perry; Lekovic, Vojislav; Dimitrijevic, Bozidar; Kenney, E Barrie; Camargo, Paulo

    2012-04-01

    This 6-month randomized controlled clinical study primarily aimed to compare the results achieved by the use of a platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membrane or connective tissue graft (CTG) in the treatment of gingival recession and to evaluate the clinical impact of PRF on early wound healing and subjective patient discomfort. Use of a PRF membrane in gingival recession treatment provided acceptable clinical results, followed by enhanced wound healing and decreased subjective patient discomfort compared to CTG-treated gingival recessions. No difference could be found between PRF and CTG procedures in gingival recession therapy, except for a greater gain in keratinized tissue width obtained in the CTG group and enhanced wound healing associated with the PRF group.

  17. [THE MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES OF DIAGNOSTIC OF GINGIVITIS AND PERIODONTITIS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Iagodina, E V; Trefilova, Yu A; Ippolitov, E V

    2016-01-01

    The examination was carried out in the Moscow clinical infectious hospital No 2 concerning 102 patients with verified diagnosis "AIDS-infection" and seropositive according results of detection of anti-HIV-antibodies in blood serum. The study was organized to analyze rate ofcolonization of gums with virulent anaerobic bacteria in HIV-infected (polymerase chain reaction) and antibodies to HIV in gingival fluid (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is established that in HIV-infected patients, in scrape from gingival sulcus dominate anaerobic bacteria P. gigngivalis and A. ctinomycetemcomitans and in case of periodontitis--P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. The received data permits recommending the test-system "Multident-5" for polymerase chain reaction diagnostic. The reagents kit "Calypte®HIV-1/2"--for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gingival fluid. The results of polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have no impact of concomitant stomatological (periodontitis, gingivitis) and somatic pathology.

  18. Ten-year evaluation of conservative and surgical treatment of gingival recession. A case series study.

    PubMed

    Jorgić-Srdjak, K; Bosnjak, A; Plancak, D; Maricević, T

    2000-12-01

    In the last years the treatment of non-inflammatory periodontal diseases has greatly changed. Apico-coronal dimension of gingival tissue is not considered to be of utmost importance, but significance of tissue thickness over each tooth is stressed. Purpose of this study was to show results of conservative and surgical treatment of gingival recession. Sample consisted of two groups of subjects, which have been treated in one of stated ways during ten years. The data was obtained on the beginning and after ten years of recall. Both groups showed increased dimension of keratinized gingiva during observed time with decrease of gingival recession, plaque- and gingival index. It is considered that treatment should start with conservative measures with necessary motivation of the patients. If it does not show improvement, one should consider best surgical method available for each patient. Clinical results show success in both groups, meaning that treatment was properly decided on.

  19. In-dental office screening for diabetes mellitus using gingival crevicular blood

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M.V. Ramoji; Reddy, M. Vinay C.; Sunder, Shyam S; Kolasani, Balaram; Kiranmai, Garipineni; Kumar, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether during routine periodontal examination blood from gingival tissues can be used for determining glucose levels. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with gingivitis or periodontitis and bleeding on probing (BOP) were chosen. The following clinical periodontal parameters were noted: probing depth, BOP, gingival bleeding index, and periodontal disease index. Blood samples were collected from gingival crevicular blood (GCB) and capillary finger prick blood (CFB). These samples were analyzed using a glucose self-monitoring device. Results: Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out in the present study. Data were analyzed using a Pearson's correlation coefficient and Student's t-test. An r-value of 0.97 shows very strong correlation between CFB and GCB, which was statistically highly significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The authors conclude that GCB may serve as potential source of screening blood glucose during routine periodontal examination in populations with an unknown history of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25625073

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, a programmed bacterial life for fitness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-03-17

    Biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabits on surfaces and is encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environments and influence our life tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium, known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicates the eradication of the biofilm infection and leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss a history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms of its own or in association with other bacterial species (i.e., multi-species biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  1. Atomic force microscopy of bacteria from periodontal subgingival biofilm: Preliminary study results

    PubMed Central

    Germano, Francesco; Bramanti, Ennio; Arcuri, Claudio; Cecchetti, Francesco; Cicciù, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a technology that allows analysis of the nanoscale morphology of bacteria within biofilm and provides details that may be better useful for understanding the role of bacterial interactions in the periodontal disease. Material and Methods: Five patients with periodontal ≥5 mm pockets diagnosed as generalized periodontitis and five patients with slight gingivitis were selected for the investigation. Bacteria biofilms were collected and morphologically investigated by AFM application. Results: The investigation revealed how periodontitis bacteria are characterized by specific morphologic features of the cell wall. The major representative species of bacteria causing periodontal diseases have been reproduced by a three-dimensional reconstruction showing the bacteria surface details. Conclusions: The presence of complex glycocalyx structures, bacteriophage-like vesicles, spirochetes (classic and cystic morphology) and bacterial co-aggregation has been identified by the AFM analysis. The results suggest that AFM is a reliable technique for studying bacterial morphology and for examining microbial interactions in dental plaque. PMID:24883019

  2. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    PubMed

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems.

  3. Blockade of cyclophilin D rescues dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in gingival tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhuoli; Xiao, Anqi; Yu, Haiyang; Gan, Xueqi

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used for the suppression of inflammation in chronic inflammatory diseases. Excessive GCs usage is greatly associated with several side effects, including gingival ulceration, the downward migration of the epithelium, attachment loss and disruption of transeptal fibers. The mechanisms underlying GCs-induced impairments in gingival tissue remains poorly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with various oral diseases, such as chronic periodontitis, age-related alveolar bone loss and hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in gingival. Here, we reported an unexplored role of cyclophilin D (CypD), the major component of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), in dexamethasone (Dex)-induced oxidative stress accumulation and cell dysfunctions in gingival tissue. We demonstrated that the expression level of CypD significantly increased under Dex treatment. Blockade of CypD by pharmaceutical inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) significantly protected against Dex-induced oxidative stress accumulation in gingival tissue. And the protective effects of blocking CypD in Dex-induced gingival fibroblasts dysfunction were evidenced by rescued mitochondrial function and suppressed production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, blockade of CypD by pharmaceutical inhibitor CsA or gene knockdown also restored Dex-induced cell toxicity in HGF-1 cells, as shown by suppressed mitochondrial ROS production, increased CcO activity and decreased apoptosis. We also suggested a role of oxidative stress-mediated p38 signal transduction in this event, and antioxidant N-acety-l-cysteine (NAC) could obviously blunted Dex-induced oxidative stress. These findings provide new insights into the role of CypD-dependent mitochondrial pathway in the Dex-induced gingival injury, indicating that CypD may be potential therapeutic strategy for preventing Dex-induced oxidative stress and cell injury in gingival tissue. PMID:28273124

  4. A rare case of gingival fibromatosis associated with hypertrichosis and a dysmorphic face.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Parimala; Agrawal, Neeraj; Tyagi, Sanjeev; Kambalimath, Halaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Several forms of hypertrichosis have been described with and without gingival hyperplasia; some of them are recognized as genetic disorder and associated with syndromes. In all reported cases the most striking differences from other are the craniofacial features. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy with hypertrichosis associated with gingival hyperplasia and a characteristic, coarse face and we consider this case to be a distinctive entity.

  5. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy and Diode Laser as Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy on the Inflammatory Mediators Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Clinical Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Faraz; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The presence of bacterial biofilms is the major cause of gingivitis and periodontitis, their mechanical removal is not often enough. Therefore, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy can be effective as adjunctive treatment. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these treatments on the level of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), inflammatory mediators, and periodontal clinical status. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, three quadrants were studied in 12 patients with chronic periodontitis aged 30-60 years. The clinical parameters were recorded and GCF samples were taken. After the first phase of periodontal treatment, one of the three quadrants was determined as the control group, one was treated by diode laser, and one underwent photodynamic therapy. The clinical parameters were recorded 2 and 6 weeks later. The data were statistically analyzed by using Friedman, ANOVA, and LSD post-test. Results Significant reduction was observed over time in the level of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17), clinical attachment loss, and pocket depth in the three treatment groups (p< 0.000). The three treatment methods significantly reduced the IL-1β and IL-17 at the baseline, up to 2 weeks, and 2-6 weeks (p< 0.05). Diode laser and photodynamic therapy significantly decreased the average bleeding on probing over time (p< 0.000 and p< 0.002, respectively). Conclusion Laser and photodynamic therapy reduced the inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and IL-17) and improved the clinical symptoms. PMID:27602399

  6. Space Radar Image of Giza Egypt - with enlargement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the area west of the Nile River near Cairo, Egypt. The Nile River is the dark band along the right side of the image and it flows approximately due North from the bottom to the right. The boundary between dense urbanization and the desert can be clearly seen between the bright and dark areas in the center of the image. This boundary represents the approximate extent of yearly Nile flooding which played an important part in determining where people lived in ancient Egypt. This land usage pattern persists to this day. The pyramids at Giza appear as three bright triangles aligned with the image top just at the boundary of the urbanized area. They are also shown enlarged in the inset box in the top left of the image. The Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops in Greek) is the northern most of the three Giza pyramids. The side-looking radar illuminates the scene from the top, the two sides of the pyramids facing the radar reflect most of the energy back to the antenna and appear radar bright; the two sides away from the radar reflect less energy back and appear dark Two additional pyramids can be seen left of center in the lower portion of the image. The modern development in the desert on the left side of the image is the Sixth of October City, an area of factories and residences started by Anwar Sadat to relieve urban crowding. The image was taken on April 19, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered on latitude 29.72 degrees North latitude and 30.83 degrees East longitude. The area shown is approximately 20 kilometers by 30 kilometers. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is C

  7. [Biofilms and their significance in medical microbiology].

    PubMed

    Cernohorská, L; Votava, M

    2002-11-01

    Microorganisms are able to adhere to various surfaces and to form there a three-dimensional structure known as biofilm. In biofilms, microbial cells show characteristics and behaviours different from those of plankton cells. Intercellular signalizations of the quorum-sensing type regulate interaction between members of the biofilm. Bacteria embedded in the biofilm can escape and form well known planktonic forms, that are obviously only a part of the bacterial life cycle. Bacteria adhere also to medically important surfaces such as catheters, either urinary or intravenous ones, artificial heart valves, orthopedic implants and so on and contribute to device-related infections like cystitis, catheter-related sepsis, endocarditis etc. Once a biofilm has been established on a surface, the bacteria harboured inside are less exposed to the host's immune response and less susceptible to antibiotics. As an important cause of nosocomial infections the biofilm must remain in the centre of the microbiologist's attention.

  8. Sub-Optimal Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianyan; Duperthuy, Marylise; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm is an emerging clinical problem recognized in the treatment of infectious diseases within the last two decades. The appearance of microbial biofilm in clinical settings is steadily increasing due to several reasons including the increased use of quality of life-improving artificial devices. In contrast to infections caused by planktonic bacteria that respond relatively well to standard antibiotic therapy, biofilm-forming bacteria tend to cause chronic infections whereby infections persist despite seemingly adequate antibiotic therapy. This review briefly describes the responses of biofilm matrix components and biofilm-associated bacteria towards sub-lethal concentrations of antimicrobial agents, which may include the generation of genetic and phenotypic variabilities. Clinical implications of bacterial biofilms in relation to antibiotic treatments are also discussed. PMID:27338489

  9. Structure and function of bacterial biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Z.

    1998-12-31

    Two major problems are troubling researchers studying biofilms at microscale: lack of standard procedures and inadequacy of the existing theoretical framework to quantify the observations. As the lack of standard procedures can be, to an extent, mitigated by careful description of experimental protocols and exercising caution when comparing results generated in different laboratories, lack of a proper theoretical framework to interpret the results is a major factor inhibiting progress in understanding biofilm processes. This paper presents examples of microscale biofilm research projects related to the nature of intrabiofilm mass transport and to the nature of electrochemical interactions between biofilms and metals. The selection of topics intended to satisfy two goals (1) to stimulate interest and evoke appreciation for fundamental microscale biofilm research and (2) to demonstrate relevance of microscale biofilm research to Microbially Influenced Corrosion.

  10. Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Fila, Grzegorz; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses. PMID:23509680

  11. Synthesis and Activity of Biomimetic Biofilm Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are often associated with human bacterial infections, and the natural tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics challenges treatment. Compounds with antibiofilm activity could become useful adjuncts to antibiotic therapy. We used norspermidine, a natural trigger for biofilm disassembly in the developmental cycle of Bacillus subtilis, to develop guanidine and biguanide compounds with up to 20-fold increased potency in preventing biofilm formation and breaking down existing biofilms. These compounds also were active against pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus. An integrated approach involving structure–activity relationships, protonation constants, and crystal structure data on a focused synthetic library revealed that precise spacing of positively charged groups and the total charge at physiological pH distinguish potent biofilm inhibitors. PMID:23406351

  12. Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

    2014-12-01

    Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  13. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marín, Arnaldo

    2011-03-01

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems.

  14. Microbial biofilms on building stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppert, M.; Kemmling, A.; Kämper, M.

    2003-04-01

    Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestric ecosystems as well as on man-made material. The organisms take part in biogenic weathering on natural rocks as well as on building stone [1]. Though the presence of biofilms on stone monuments exposed to the outdoor environment is obvious, thin films also occur on monuments under controllable indoor environment conditions. Numerous biofilm organisms produce large volumes of extracellular polymer (EP), mainly polysaccharides. Hydrated, gel-like EP acts as glue between the organisms and the material surface and forms a protected environment for the microbial cells. The contact zone between EP and the material surface is the crucial reactive interface of the bio-organic cover and the underlying building material. At this interface, all hazardous compounds (e.g. organic acids), after diffusion transfer via EP, react with the material surface. Upon dehydration, volume of EP greatly decreases. The thin, varnish-like EP layer still protects the dormant cells from irreversible inactivation. Periodic shrinking and swelling of the EP induces mechanical stress on the stone surface, epecially when the polymer penetrates small pores and cavities in the underlying material surface. Thus, monitoring and structure/functional analysis of EP and EP production by organisms is important to understand biogenic weathering phenomena and building stone deterioration. The study presented here describes biofilms on the surfaces of building material in outdoor and indoor environments. The application of marker techniques and visualization of samples with light and electron microscopy illustrates the role of EP at microscale. EP forms the matrix that encloses microorganisms, dust particles and mineral grains in a rigid film. EP penetrates small pore spaces of the underlying substratum and may also facilitate subsequent penetration of the microorganisms into the material. EP seals the material surface and cements the superficial layer

  15. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis four rag locus genotypes in patients of orthodontic gingivitis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genotypes in 102 gingival crevicular fluid samples from 57 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 25 cases of periodontitis patients and 20 cases of periodontally healthy people through a 16S rRNA-based PCR and a multiplex PCR. The correlations between Porphyromona.gingivalis/rag locus and clinical indices were analyzed. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genes in periodontitis group was the highest among three groups and higher in orthodontic gingivitis than healthy people (p<0.01). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis/rag locus and gingival index. rag-3 and rag-4 were the predominant genotypes in the patients of orthodontic gingivitis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis in Shandong. Porphyromonas.gingivalis carrying rag-1 has the strong virulence and could be associated with severe periodontitis.

  16. Oral cleanliness and gingival health among Special Olympics athletes in Europe and Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez #, Carla; Kaschke, Imke; Perlman, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Background Special Olympics athletes, as well as the general population of people with intellectual disabilities, are expected to have poorer gingival health. The aim of the study is to explore the prevalence of gingival signs of inflammation and its relationship to oral cleanliness and age among Special Olympics athletes from Europe and Eurasia. Material and Methods A retrospective longitudinal study was performed with data collected through standardized oral from 15.941 athletes from annual Special Olympics events held in 49 countries, from Europe and Eurasia between 2007 and 2012. The data was analysed descriptively, with One-Way ANOVA test and Chi-Square test. Results The level of significance was predetermined at a p value < 0.05. A total of 7,754 athletes presented with gingival signs (48.64%). There were no significant differences (p= 0,095) in mean gingival signs between age groups, however the association between mouth cleaning and age, was statistically significant. Conclusions The data suggests that there is a high prevalence of gingival signs among individuals with special needs; over 50% in more than 20 countries. Therefore, there is a serious need for education and preventive programs for the patients, their parents and caregivers. Key words:Gingivitis, prevalence, hygiene, disability, Special Olympics. PMID:26241452

  17. Severe gingival recession caused by traumatic occlusion and mucogingival stress: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Kemal; Sari, Zafer; Orucoglu, Hasan; Duran, Ismet; Hakki, Sema S

    2008-04-01

    Gingival recession is displacement of the soft tissue margin apically leading to root surface exposure. Tooth malpositions, high muscle attachment, frenal pull have been associated with gingival tissue recession. Occlusal trauma is defined as injury resulting in tissue changes within the attachment apparatus as a result of occlusal forces. Trauma from occlusion may cause a shift in tooth position and the direction of the movement depends on the occlusal force. We present the clinical and radiological findings and the limitation of periodontal treatment of a severe gingival recession in a case with traumatic occlusion. A 16 years old male, systemically healthy and non-smoking patient presented to our clinic with severe gingival recession of mandibular canines and incisors. Clinical evaluation revealed extensive gingival recession on the vestibules of mandibular anterior segment. Patient has an Angle class III malocclusion and deep bite. To maintain the teeth until orthodontic therapy and maxillofacial surgery, mucogingival surgeries were performed to obtain attached gingiva to provide oral hygiene and reduce inflammation. After mucogingival surgeries, limited attached gingiva was gained in this case. Regular periodontal maintenance therapy was performed at 2 month intervals to preserve mandibular anterior teeth. Multidisciplinary approach should be performed in this kind of case for satisfactory results. Unless occlusal relationship was corrected, treatment of severe gingival recession will be problematic. For satisfactory periodontal treatment, early diagnosis of trauma from occlusion and its treatment is very important.

  18. Free Gingival Graft to Increase Keratinized Mucosa after Placing of Mandibular Fixed Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Marcantonio, Elcio

    2017-01-01

    Insufficiently keratinized tissue can be increased surgically by free gingival grafting. The presence or reconstruction of keratinized mucosa around the implant can facilitate restorative procedure and allow the maintenance of an oral hygiene routine without irritation or discomfort to the patient. The aim of this clinical case report is to describe an oral rehabilitation procedure of an edentulous patient with absence of keratinized mucosa in the interforaminal area, using a free gingival graft associated with a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis. The treatment included the manufacturing of a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis followed by a free gingival graft to increase the width of the mandibular keratinized mucosa. Free gingival graft was obtained from the palate and grafted on the buccal side of interforaminal area. The follow-up of 02 and 12 months after mucogingival surgery showed that the free gingival graft promoted peri-implant health, hygiene, and patient comfort. Clinical Significance. The free gingival graft is an effective treatment in increasing the width of mandibular keratinized mucosa on the buccal side of the interforaminal area and provided an improvement in maintaining the health of peri-implant tissues which allows for better oral hygiene. PMID:28293441

  19. Professional flossing as a diagnostic method for gingivitis in the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Mariath, Adriela Azevedo Souza; Bressani, Ana Eliza Lemes; Haas, Alex Nogueira; Araujo, Fernando Borba de; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate flossing as a diagnostic method for interproximal gingival bleeding in children. For this crossover study, 23 pre-schoolchildren presenting neither restorations nor approximal carious cavities and with at least 15% of gingival bleeding sites were selected. Examinations were performed at three different moments (3-4 days interval). Examinations comprised repeated measurements of two gingival indices with a 10-minute interval in the following sequences: the Ainamo & Bay Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) followed by the Carter & Barnes flossing index (CBI); CBI followed by GBI; and GBI followed by GBI. Data analysis was performed only for the interproximal sites, considering the GBI as the gold-standard. Agreement between indices, sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were estimated. Percentage agreements in sequences GBI-CBI, CBI-GBI and GBI-GBI were 70.3%, 76.4% and 84.5%, respectively. Validation of flossing in the first sequence (GBI-CBI) resulted in values of 0.61 (95%CI 0.53 - 0.68), 0.72 (95%CI 0.69 - 0.76), 0.33 (95%CI 0.28 - 0.39) and 0.89 (95%CI 0.86 - 0.92) respectively for SE, SP, PPV and NPV. It can be concluded that professional flossing is a useful tool in the diagnosis of interproximal gingival inflammatory status in children, especially in conditions of gingival health.

  20. Germ line gain of function with SOS1 mutation in hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Lee, Eun-Jin; Hart, P Suzanne; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Pallos, Debora; Hart, Thomas C

    2007-07-13

    Mutation of human SOS1 is responsible for hereditary gingival fibromatosis type 1, a benign overgrowth condition of the gingiva. Here, we investigated molecular mechanisms responsible for the increased rate of cell proliferation in gingival fibroblasts caused by mutant SOS1 in vitro. Using ectopic expression of wild-type and mutant SOS1 constructs, we found that truncated SOS1 could localize to the plasma membrane, without growth factor stimuli, leading to sustained activation of Ras/MAPK signaling. Additionally, we observed an increase in the magnitude and duration of ERK signaling in hereditary gingival fibromatosis gingival fibroblasts that was associated with phosphorylation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein and the up-regulation of cell cycle regulators, including cyclins C, D, and E and the E2F/DP transcription factors. These factors promote cell cycle progression from G(1) to S phase, and their up-regulation may underlie the increased gingival fibroblast proliferation observed. Selective depletion of wild-type and mutant SOS1 through small interfering RNA demonstrates the link between mutation of SOS1, ERK signaling, cell proliferation rate, and the expression levels of Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. These findings elucidate the mechanisms for gingival overgrowth mediated by SOS1 gene mutation in humans.