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Sample records for giulio bevilacqua stefano

  1. 77 FR 60044 - Safety Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display, Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display...Stefano family wedding fireworks display. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on... Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display, Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY in the Federal Register (77...

  2. The Work by Giulio Ceradini in Explaining the Mechanism of Semilunar Cardiac Valve Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiani, Diana; Manni, Ermanno

    2011-01-01

    Using an excised pig heart preparation with tubes, a manometer, and a visualizing apparatus, Giulio Ceradini, an Italian physiologist working in the years of 1871-1872 in Carl Ludwig's famous laboratory in Leipzig, Germany, illustrated the mechanism of closure of the semilunar valves. He was the first to conceive that the closure of the heart…

  3. The Work by Giulio Ceradini in Explaining the Mechanism of Semilunar Cardiac Valve Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiani, Diana; Manni, Ermanno

    2011-01-01

    Using an excised pig heart preparation with tubes, a manometer, and a visualizing apparatus, Giulio Ceradini, an Italian physiologist working in the years of 1871-1872 in Carl Ludwig's famous laboratory in Leipzig, Germany, illustrated the mechanism of closure of the semilunar valves. He was the first to conceive that the closure of the heart…

  4. The Law of Unintended Consequences Revisited: The Case of Ricci v. DeStefano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard; Denhart, Matthew; Malesick, Michael; Templeton, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Deciding it necessary to review the earlier ruling of the Second Circuit court, on January 9, 2009 the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in the case "Ricci v. DeStefano." The case originates from New Haven, Connecticut where a group of firefighters argue that city officials violated their Title VII rights by dismissing the results of…

  5. Effect of storage and cooking on beta-carotene isomers in carrots ( Daucus carota L. cv. 'Stefano').

    PubMed

    Imsic, Michael; Winkler, Sonja; Tomkins, Bruce; Jones, Rod

    2010-04-28

    Carrots are one of the highest dietary sources of beta-carotene and are naturally high in the (all-E)-beta-carotene isomer, which has higher bioavailability, provitamin A activity, and antioxidant capacity compared to Z (cis) isomers. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of storage temperature, time, and cooking (boiling for 15 min) on the levels of carotene isomers in 'Stefano' carrots. Storing carrots at either 4 degrees C to simulate long-term storage or 20 degrees C to simulate marketing practices resulted in increases in (all-E)-beta-carotene of 20.3% after 3 days at 4 degrees C and 34.4% after 14 days at 20 degrees C, respectively. The levels of Z isomers in raw carrots were low with (13Z)-beta-carotene and (9Z)-beta-carotene accounting for less that 1.8% of the total beta-carotene present. Levels of (9Z)-beta-carotene decreased during storage at either temperature, whereas storage at 4 degrees C resulted in a 109% increase in (13Z)-beta-carotene after 56 days. Cooking significantly increased the levels of (13Z)-beta-carotene and (9Z)-beta-carotene and resulted in the production of (15Z)-beta-carotene, which was absent in raw carrots. Storage at 4 degrees C for 15 days or more prior to cooking reduced the susceptibility of (all-E)-beta-carotene to thermal isomerization during cooking, resulting in lower levels of all three Z-beta-carotene isomers being generated, while storage at 20 degrees C for up to 21 days resulted in significantly higher levels of (all-E)-beta-carotene before and after cooking but had no effect on Z-isomer production during cooking. Consequently, we conclude that, for the greatest health benefit, fresh carrots can be stored for up to 21 days at 20 degrees C or at 4 degrees C for up to 56 days without significant reduction in (all-E)-beta-carotene and should be consumed raw or boiled for less than 15 min to limit Z-beta-carotene isomer formation.

  6. Integration of the PSI technique and conventional ground-based methods for landslide characterization and monitoring: the case study of Santo Stefano d'Aveto; Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofani, Veronica; Pancioli, Valeria; Catani, Filippo; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    Santo Stefano village is located in the Northern Apennines (Italy) and is built up on an ancient landslide, defined as a complex phenomenon that is an earth rotational slide evolving into a flow. The landslide has an extension of 1,3 km2 and a volume of about 10 million of m3. The landslide can be defined as active and according to Cruden & Varnes (1996) nomenclature the velocity range from very slow to extremely slow. The landslide poses and high risk to the buildings and infrastructures causing extensive direct damages. The Santo Stefano d'Aveto village is located inside a glacial valley made mainly of ophliotic rocks, sandstones and marls and filled with glacial deposits. The landslide occurred in the glacial deposits composed of debris in a sandy-clayey matrix. Santo Stefano d'Aveto landslide has been monitored through radar interferometry, in particular with the PS-InSAR technique (Ferretti et al., 2001) and through ground-based instruments such as inclinometers and piezometers. The PS-InSAR analysis has been performed using ascending SAR scenes and descending SAR scenes from ERS-1/-2 (1992-2001), and ascending and descending SAR scenes from ENVISAT (2002-2008). All the datasets have been processed in the advanced mode APSA that means for each PS has been provided deformation time series relative to a reference date (zero). The target points within the Santo Stefano landslide have a high density. In general for all the analysed datasets it has been observed a decrease of velocity from upslope portion to the downslope one of the landslide. The maximum velocity recorded in the ERS dataset is around 38 mm/y, while the maximum velocity recorded in the ENVISAT dataset is around 20 mm/y. The APSA analysis has provided information about the temporal evolution of target points. Both the majority of ERS and ENVISAT time series have shown a seasonal trend related to the variation of the water table level, which rises during rainfall season and decreases during dry

  7. Critical Issues and Key Points from the Survey to the Creation of the Historical Building Information Model: the Case of Santo Stefano Basilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnetti, C.; Dubbini, M.; Ricci, P. C.; Rivola, R.; Giannini, M.; Capra, A.

    2017-05-01

    The new era of designing in architecture and civil engineering applications lies in the Building Information Modeling (BIM) approach, based on a 3D geometric model including a 3D database. This is easier for new constructions whereas, when dealing with existing buildings, the creation of the BIM is based on the accurate knowledge of the as-built construction. Such a condition is allowed by a 3D survey, often carried out with laser scanning technology or modern photogrammetry, which are able to guarantee an adequate points cloud in terms of resolution and completeness by balancing both time consuming and costs with respect to the request of final accuracy. The BIM approach for existing buildings and even more for historical buildings is not yet a well known and deeply discussed process. There are still several choices to be addressed in the process from the survey to the model and critical issues to be discussed in the modeling step, particularly when dealing with unconventional elements such as deformed geometries or historical elements. The paper describes a comprehensive workflow that goes through the survey and the modeling, allowing to focus on critical issues and key points to obtain a reliable BIM of an existing monument. The case study employed to illustrate the workflow is the Basilica of St. Stefano in Bologna (Italy), a large monumental complex with great religious, historical and architectural assets.

  8. 77 FR 46349 - Safety Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display, Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... 1983. (b) Notification. Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound will cause notifications to be made to the... Port (COTP) Sector Long Island Sound. ] DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the... Island Sound, (203) 468-4544, Joseph.L.Graun@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or...

  9. Exercises for mind and body: Giulio Mancini, collecting, and the beholding of landscape painting in the seventeenth century.

    PubMed

    Gage, Frances

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the intellectual foundations for the development of princely art collections, and of Italian picture galleries in particular, as spaces for combined physical and mental exercise and recreation. This study then establishes the relationship between the therapeutic function of picture galleries and the manner in which landscape paintings produced for princely collectors at this moment in Italy embodied ideals of both exercise and repose.

  10. Modelling and Accuracy in a Bim Environment for Planned Conservation: the Apartment of Troia of Giulio Romano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, A.; Scala, B.; Spezzoni, A.

    2017-02-01

    Modeling of Cultural Heritage in a BIM environment, and in general of existing buildings, requires special attention because there are two diametrically opposed possibilities. On the one hand the attempt is to realize a very complex and accurate model, in order to provide the most comprehensive representation of the architecture as possible. The opposite position leads to build a very schematic and symbolic model of as-built architecture. It is not easy to determine which is the right balance between these two attitudes because each architecture requires a personalized approach and not standards. It's, however, necessary to find rules to figure out which items are represented, what is the minimum level of detail to consider adequate and how to deal with alterations from simple and linear geometries. These two facing possibilities deal with different goals and tools. In the field of restoration or planned conservation, that is the most common approach for existing buildings, the attention focuses on the exceptions and particularities of each architecture: the important aspect is to understand and describe exactly each part as a singularity (as it is). In this context it is very difficult to find a standard or a common solution. The first possibility of modelling seems to be very close to this approach, but it clashes with two important aspects. A first problem concerns the modelling software. Usually commercial BIM modelling software doesn't allow to realize very complex and high detailed solutions. They prefer working with predefined families and try to categorize each element in standard solution. The possibility to build new families is expected, but it often requires a lot of time. The second difficulty is the real efficiency of such an accurate model. In fact, it could be very difficult to link external elements to the model or use it in many traditional BIM applications. In this paper, we suggest another possible approach that represents the first result of a research about the modelling of Cultural Heritage for BIM application. The proposed solution aims to give as much information as possible about the architecture, and, at the same time, to guarantee a higher efficiency. In this case we considered commercial BIM software like Revit or Archicad. They are the most widespread and well-known software BIM oriented and they also allow the use of their embedded database structure. The core of our solution is to describe the architecture not only by a 3D model but also by the representation of the reliability of the accuracy of the model itself. In this way we try to combine the necessity of working with commercial software, in which it is difficult to be very accurate, and the information about the real object. In historical complex architecture, for example, it is very difficult to find a straight and planar wall. It is quite difficult, or at least time consuming, to model that kind of wall with high accuracy. But it is possible to represent the real wall by a schematic wall with a false color map which describes where the 3D model is well fitting and where there are some differences. In this way we don't lose any information but, at the same time, we have a very usable BIM model.

  11. Julius Caesar Arantius (Giulio Cesare Aranzi, 1530-1589) and the hippocampus of the human brain: history behind the discovery.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Ambekar, Sudheer; Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2015-04-01

    Julius Caesar Arantius is one of the pioneer anatomists and surgeons of the 16th century who discovered the different anatomical structures of the human body. One of his prominent discoveries is the hippocampus. At that time, Arantius originated the term hippocampus, from the Greek word for seahorse (hippos ["horse"] and kampos ["sea monster"]). Arantius published his description of the hippocampus in 1587, in the first chapter of his work titled De Humano Foetu Liber. Numerous nomenclatures of this structure, including "white silkworm," "Ammon's horn," and "ram's horn" were proposed by different scholars at that time. However, the term hippocampus has become the most widely used in the literature.

  12. Discussion of "Soil Moisture Measurements: Comparison of Instrumentation Performances" by Ventura Francesca, Facini Osvaldo, Piana Stefano, and Rossi Pisa Paola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the peer review process, it sometimes happens that scientific papers are published that give misleading or incorrect conclusions. Scientists with the USDA-ARS Soil and Water Management Research Unit, Bushland, Texas, found that a paper on soil water sensors published in an engineering journa...

  13. Three-dimensional modeling in the study of subsidence in mining Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West) - Francesco Muntoni (1) Teresa Balvis (2) Paolo Bevilacqua (3) (1) Geological, Mining Park of Sardinia - Via Monteverdi, 16 09016 - Iglesias (2) freelance (3) Department of Engineering and Architecture - University of Trieste, Via Valerio 10 - Trieste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntoni, F.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subsidence and subsequent landslides in mining areas are very frequent, the study examines the proposed mining area of Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West), interested in the years between 1991 and 2003 by major subsidence phenomena and consequent events landslides. The valley of Acquaresi is particularly important, not only for its mines, but also for the aspect related to the geomorphological evolution morphotectonic in the context of Paleozoic lithologies, which have a rectangular structure parallel to the coastline. To make measurements and analysis of the evolution of human morphostructural and throughout the industry, it was considered appropriate to create a three-dimensional model that would allow a synoptic view with the different information available to the industry. E 'was created a model using the points listed extrapolated from the Regional Technical Map scale 1:10,000, the map at scale 1:2000 dell'IGEA and the values of a detailed survey of the study area, measured at a scale 1: 500. How MicroStation CAD software was used, with whom it is made of a TIN high detail taking into account then is, if possible, of quoted points, roads, major infrastructure, contour lines (lines-intermediate-auxiliary), buildings and lines coast. The model was supported and shaped (draping) image obtained by integrating the color orthophotos of the area in 1:10,000 scale of the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and photos to scale 1:2,000 made to run dall'IGEA spa at the last event of the landslide. The use of aerial photographs, a scale similar to that of cartography, has allowed us to achieve excellent results by superimposing the frames of the areas of interest on models made, with views that appear to be consistent with the technical papers, with a maximum error of less than that of the reference mapping. Moreover, to emphasize the tectonic lineations, morphological aspects and changes in landscape and environment, it was considered appropriate to use a three-dimensional model, thanks to software used in this trial, with a high detail 3D visualization. Starting from the Regional Technical Map has been possible to realize the DEM file, then perform an interpolation with a point layer containing elevation values recorded separately and then superimpose the orthophoto to 3D surface. It was also decided to use a terrain model DTM knitted irregular TIN compared to a regular grid pattern GRID, because the first best response to the need to have a shirt that exploited all possible points present and identifiable in the territory. With the use of a TIN was thus possible to insert also the points detected by the GPS in the country to verify the area of detachment of the landslide, thus being able to increase the detail in the area of observation. Getting a noticeable "jump" quality: moving from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional display. The model thus obtained has allowed a very good point of the area: they are easy to locate the outcrops of the different lithological structures, facilitating the study and evaluation for interventions of recovery.

  14. Theoretical Modeling for the X-ray Spectroscopy of Iron-bearing MgSiO3 under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2012-12-01

    The behaviors of iron (Fe) in MgSiO3 perovskite, including valence state, spin state, and chemical environments, at high pressures are of fundamental importance for more detailed understanding the properties of the Earth's lower mantle. The pressure induced spin transition of Fe-bearing MgO and MgSiO3 are detected often by using high-resolution K-edge X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) [1,2,3] and confirmed by theoretical simulations. [4,5] Since the Fe K-edge XES is associated to the 3p orbital, which is far from the valence orbitals (3d and 4s), it provides no information about its coordination environments. However, the Fe L-edge XES and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can directly present the distribution and intensity of Fe-3d character. To identify both the spin states and the coordination environments of iron-bearing MgSiO3, we systematically investigate the L-edge XAS, XES and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy of Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing MgSiO3 under high pressure by using the first-principles density functional method combined with the slater-transition method. Our results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ can be distinguished easily by taking the XPS spectra. The spin transition of Fe2+ and Fe3+ can also be clearly certified by XAS and XES. Interestingly, the broadness of L-edge XES of Fe changes depending on the iron position, meaning that its coordination environment might also be distinguishable by using high-resolution XES measurements. Research supported by the Ehime University G-COE program and KAKENHI. [1] James Badro, Guillaume Fiquet, FranÇois Guyot, Jean-Pascal Rueff, Viktor V. Struzhkin, György VankÓ, and Giulio Monaco. Science 300, 789 (2003), [2] James Badro, Jean-Pascal Rueff, György VankÓ, Giulio Monaco, Guillaume Fiquet, and FranÇois Guyot, Science 305, 383 (2004), [3] Jung-Fu Lin, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Steven D. Jacobsen, Michael Y. Hu, Paul Chow, Jennifer Kung, Haozhe Liu, Ho-kwang Mao, and Gussell J. Hemley, Nature 436, 377 (2005). [4

  15. Augmented Performance Environment for Enhancing Interagency Coordination in Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR) Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    1997; DiStefano & Maznevski, 2000; Rubinstein, 2003). In cases where cross-cultural interaction involves a history of exchange across groups, the...cross-cultural knowledge (e.g., DiStefano & Maznevski, 2000), but it is insufficient for enhancing multicultural collective task performance (e.g...Department of Defense. Directive 3000.05: Military Support for Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction Operations, Nov 2005. DiStefano

  16. Muscle Strength and Qualitative Jump-Landing Differences in Male and Female Military Cadets: The JUMP-ACL Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    trained raters using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) (Boling et al., 2005; DiStefano et al., 2009; Padua et al., 2009). The LESS is a clinical...contact; 3) toes out and knees flexed at initial contact ( DiStefano et al., 2009); 4) heelstrike landing and asymmetric footstrike landing (Boden...extremity kinematics, kinetics and energy absorption during landing. Clinical Biomechanics 18, 662-669. DiStefano , L.J., Padua, D.A., DiStefano , M.J. and

  17. In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents Source Areas with Enhanced Mass Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    and Boyd, 1988; Freedman and Gossett, 1989; DiStefano et al., 1991; deBruin et al., 1992; DiStefano et al., 1992; Ballapragada et al., 1997; Fennell...A.J.B. Zehnder. 1992. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 58, 1996-2000. DiStefano , T.D., J.M. Gossett, S.H. Zinder. 1991. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 57...2287-2292. DiStefano , T.D., J.M. Gossett, S.H. Zinder. 1992. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 58, 3622-3629. Fathepure, B., S.A. Boyd. 1988. FEMS Microbiol

  18. Issues in Strategic Thought: From Clausewitz to Al-Qaida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    of the mid-1700s, to the Zeppelin airships in the early 1900s, governments and individual innovators alike recognized the potential of flight for...power with the ability to affect the conduct and outcome of war. 218 Wikipedia, “ Airship ...accessed October 5, 2012, http://en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/ Airship #Early_pioneers. 68 GIULIO DOUHET Born in Caserta, Italy in 1869, Giulio Douhet was

  19. Air Force’s Combat Aircraft: A Future Holding into the Past

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-07

    command of the air by bombing the enemy air arm into extinction would doom its enemy to perpetual bombardment.22 The Germans needed control of the...2002), 218. 22 Giulio Douhet and Dino Farrari, The Command of the Air (Washington D.C.: Air Force History and Museums Program, 1998), 3. 8...Force, 2009. Douhet, Giulio and Dino Farrari. The Command of the Air. Washington, DC: Air Force History and Museums Program, 1998. Drew

  20. The Fight for the Strategic Arsenal: Why the Navy and the Air Force Continue to Struggle for Relevance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-17

    fall into irrelevance and extinction . The capabilities of naval aviation had been demonstrated in the Pacific Theater of World War II, and the future...York: Manchester University Press, 1993), 176. 4Giulio Douhet, The Command of the Air, trans. Dino Ferrari (New York: Coward-McCann, 1942), 25, 34...Framework for Review. Washington: Congressional Research Service, 1995. Douhet, Giulio. The Command of the Air. Translated by Dino Ferrari. New York

  1. Strategic Paralysis: An Airpower Theory for the Present

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    further resistance is felt to be hopeless leading only to national extinction , and that any terms not absolutely unendurable are accepted by the vanquished...Airwar�, 1991, TMs [photocopy], 28. 87 Douhet, Giulio, The Command of the Air, trans. Dino Ferrari, (Washington D. C.: U.S. Government Printing Office...Army Doctrine 1919- 1939. Connecticut: The Shoe String Press, 1985. Douhet, Giulio. The Command of the Air. Translated by Dino Ferrari. Washington D

  2. NRL Fact Book

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    Security Administration 1222.3 Mr. J.T. Miller Head, Special Security Section 1223 Ms. J. Gray Head, Special Security Office 1223.1 Ms. M. Knight Head... Rickard Head, Radio/Infrared/Optical Sensors Branch 7210 Dr. R. Bevilacqua Head, Remote Sensing Physics Branch 7220 Dr. R.J. Holyer* Head, Remote

  3. Estimation of Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Direction From Polarimetric Radiometry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    project is to formulate algebraic solutions for the quantities of interest, based on analytical models which have been developed using numerical... Grossman , W.L. Jones, D. Spencer, G. Golba, J. Cleveland, L. Choy, R.M. Bevilacqua, and P.S. Chang, “The WindSat spaceborne polarimetric microwave

  4. Macintoshed Libraries 2.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Bill, Ed.; Valauskas, Edward J., Ed.

    This annual collection contains 18 papers about the use of Macintosh computers in libraries. Papers include: "The Macintosh as a Wayfinding Tool for Professional Conferences: The LITA '88 HyperCard Stack" (Ann F. Bevilacqua); "Enhancing Library Services with the Macintosh" (Naomi C. Broering); "Scanning Technologies in…

  5. Development of Laboratory Testing Apparatus and Fatigue Analysis for Tracked Vehicle Rubber Backer Pads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    University Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5343 Daren DiStefano Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Western Michigan University Kalamazoo...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Daniel Kujawski; Daren DiStefano ; William Bradford 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  6. Conceptualizing Multicultural Perspective Taking Skills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    motivating others, providing and maintaining vision, and teamwork are important (Adler, 2002; Conner, 2000; Connerley & Pedersen, 2004; Maznevski & DiStefano ...Quarterly, 25, 226-251. Maznevski, M., & DiStefano , J. (2000). Global leaders are team players: developing global leaders through membership on global

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as a Mediator of Neurotoxin-Induced Dopamine Neuron Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    nigra. J. Neurosci. 17, 2030–2039. Martin D. P., Schmidt R. E., DiStefano P., Lowry O., Carter J. and Johnson E. (1988) Inhibitors of protein synthesis...1994;124:537–546. 49. Martin DP, Schmidt RE, DiStefano P, Lowry O, Carter J, Johnson E. Inhibitors of protein synthesis and RNA synthesis prevent neuronal

  8. Neurotrophic Response to CNS Degeneration or Injury: Effects of Aging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    the striatum (Yurek and Fletcher-Turner, 2000, 2001). The most likely source is provided by anterograde transport from cortex (Altar and DiStefano ...Neurol. 461, 250–261. Altar, C.A., DiStefano , P.S., 1998. Neurotrophin trafficking by anterograde transport. Trends Neurosci. 21, 433–437. Altar, C.A

  9. Comment on «Tidal notches in the Mediterranean Sea: A comprehensive analysis» by Fabrizio Antonioli, Valeria Lo Presti, Alessio Rovere, Luigi Ferranti, Marco Anzidei, Stefano Furlani, Giuseppe Mastronuzzi, Paolo E. Orru, Giovanni Scicchitano, Gianmaria Sannino, Cecilia R. Spampinato, Rossella Pagliarulo, Giacomo Deiana, Eleonora de Sabata, Paolo Sansò, Matteo Vacchi and Antonio Vecchio. Quaternary Science Reviews 119 (2015) 66-84

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelpidou, Niki; Pirazzoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper of Antonioli et al. (2015) presents observations of 73 sites with erosion notches, which are called tidal notches, which in fact appear to be of various genetic origins, because a combination of several physical chemical and biological processes of formation is considered including, in addition to intertidal bioerosion, also carbonate rock solution, wetting and drying and wave abrasion that would produce different types of notches. Among the erosion notches, some «roof notches», in which the notch lacks a floor, are distinguished. For these isolated roofs, we would tend to ascribe erosion to dissolution by a freshwater spring undercutting a limestone cliff at sea level. Accompanying a rise in sea level, dissolution by freshwater will tend to continuously displace the roof of the notch upwards, while the base of the notch, dissolved, will tend to be missing. For such isolated roof of a solution notch, protruding above the waterline, the term «visor» has been proposed by Evelpidou et al. (2011).

  10. A Search for Episodic Increases in Upper Atmospheric Water Vapor as Evidence of an Extraterrestrial Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    the GRILLE IR solar occultation data (Girard et al. 1988), the JPL and Penn State ground-based microwave radiometer data (Bevilacqua et 14 CV m 0> CL...radiometer data compared favorably with the JPL, ATMOS. and GRILLE data sets as well as with the results of the study of seasonal variations of...the atmosphere is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at the altitudes of interest and the Rayleigh-Jeans approximation of the Planck function is

  11. NRL 2003 Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Review contents artic les features NRL’s Involved! 3 Our People Are Making a Difference 7 InfraLynx 8 Scientists Helping America... biochemistry , molecular biology, and physics. Specialized areas include a 600-ft2 Class-1000 clean room; an advanced electron microscope facility; and a...Wolfgang-Martin Boerner POAM III Observations of Artic Ozone Loss for the 1999/2000 Winter Karl Hoppel, Richard Bevilacqua, Gerald Nedoluha, Carole Deniel

  12. Mesospheric water vapor measurements from Penn State - Monthly mean observations (1984-1987)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Olivero, John J.; Croskey, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Mesospheric water vapor measurements obtained by ground-based microwave spectroscopy between November 1984 and July 1987 are examined. Monthly mean water vapor profiles are used to establish annual and interannual variability. The results suggest that the seasonal variation of upper mesospheric water vapor is dominated by an annual component with low mixing ratios in winter and high mixing ratios in summer. The results are compared with those reported by Bevilacqua et al. (1987).

  13. Role of TMS1 Silencing in the Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells to Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Merriam, S., Lora, J.M., Briskin, M., DiStefano , P.S. & Bertin, J. (2002). FEBS Lett, 530, 73-8. Guan, X., Sagara, J., Yokoyama, T., Koganehira, Y...Lora, J.M., Briskin, M., Jurman, M., Cao, J., DiStefano , P.S. & Bertin, J. (2002). JBiol Chem, 277, 11570-5. Mariathasan, S., Newton, K., Monack...J.M., Geddes, B.J., Briskin, M., DiStefano , P.S. & Bertin, J. (2002). J Biol Chem, 277, 29874-80. Yeh, W.-C., Shahinian, A., Speiser, D., Kraunus, J

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Bcl10-Mediated NF-kB Signal Transduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-08

    Robison, P. S. DiStefano , and E. S. Alnemri. 2000. CARD9 is a novel caspase recruitment domain-containing protein that interacts with BCL10/CLAP and... DiStefano , and E. S. Alnemri. 2001. CARD11 and CARD14 are novel caspase recruitment domain (CARD)/membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family...McAllister-Lucas, L. Wang, P. S. DiStefano , G. Nunez, J. Bertin, and X. Lin. 2002. A requirement for CARMA1 in TCR-induced NF-kappa B activation. Nat

  15. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0582 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Giulio Maria... disease : a review. Prog. Brain Res. 161, 303-16. Zhao W, Ho L, Varghese M, Yemul S , Dams-O’Connor K, Gordon W, Knable L, Freire D, Haroutunian V... disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Giulio Maria Pasinetti MD., PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY

  16. For Firefighters, Another Danger: the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiovascular system that firefighters face, said Dr. Stefanos Kales, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School. The ... closer attention to this group's unique needs, added Kales, who wrote an editorial about the study. Both ...

  17. MILITARY AIRCRAFT: Cannibalizations Adversely Affect Personnel and Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-22

    757) 552-8111 or William Meredith at (202) 512-4275. Individuals making key contributions to this statement included Harry Taylor, Hugh Brady, Douglas Mills, Janine Cantin, and Stefano Petrucci . Army (702067)

  18. [Hugo von Ziemssen poster award 2015].

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Prize winner: Herr Dr. Stefano Bordignon, for the poster presentation "The SCAR-AF study: electroanatomial scar distribution and left atrial conduction delay in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation".

  19. The Management of Ethnic-Cultural Diversity in Western Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-20

    Face aux Discriminations (Paris: Robert Laffont, 2007), 43 -72. 24 Stefano Ales and Pietro Crociani, Uniformi, Cultura e Societa` - Storia...Taken from: Stefano Ales and Pietro Crociani, Uniformi, Cultura e Societa` - Storia dell’Esercito Italiano attraverso l’evoluzione del costume...nazionale, 42. 29 Ales and Crociani, Uniformi, Cultura e Societa`, 122. 30 Amedeo Guillet (February 7, 1909 – June 16, 2010) was an officer of the

  20. Italy, the European Union, and Mediterranean Migrants: Opportunity from Crisis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    refugees become a long-term challenge, or a short-term flare up of circumstance? The answer to this question is fairly straightforward: once refugees...an- aging-europe/. 352 Ibid. 353 Stefano Solare , “How Immigrants Are Saving the Italian Economy and Pensions,” Open Migration, March 6, 2016...isis.html. 92 Solare , Stefano. “How Immigrants Are Saving the Italian Economy and Pensions.” Open Migration. March 6, 2016. http://openmigration.org

  1. Defending the Joint Force: Lessons Learned from Joint Base Balad

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    the enemy’s aerial power by destroying his nests and eggs on the ground than to hunt his flying birds in the air.”1 This concept is reflected in Air...in defending its own assets and those of the joint force.  1. Giulio Douhet, The Command of the Air, trans. Dino Ferrari (1942; new imprint

  2. Adaptation of a Population of Fundulus heteroclitus to a Creosote-Contaminated Environment: Mechanisms, Genetic Consequences and Fitness Trade-Offs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology, Part C (in press). Wassenberg, D.M., and R.T. Di Giulio. 2004a. Synergistic embryotoxicity of polycyclic...heterocycles, carbazole and dibenzothiophene, on in vivo and in vitro CYP1A activity and PAH-derived embryotoxicity . Environmental Toxicology and

  3. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  4. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  5. The Four Forces Airpower Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    William Mitchell, Giulio Douhet, and John Warden, sets a foundation for how airpower advocates have developed ideas, concepts, and theory about...10 John Warden...contributed many ideas that carried airpower towards its critical roles in future wars. John Warden Colonel (ret.) John A. Warden, came to prominence in the

  6. Ten Propositions Regarding Spacepower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Giulio Douhet, The Command of the Air, trans. Dino Ferrari (Washington, D.C.: Air Force Museums and History Program, 1998), 15-29. 24 nature of...Hammond, Grant T. �Paths to Extinction ,� White Papers 4 Special Studies. Maxwell AFB, AL: Air University Press, 1996 Hays, Peter L. James M. Smith

  7. Weighing the Evidence for Psychotherapy Equivalence: Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmacott, Robin; Hunsley, John

    2007-01-01

    In the past two decades, numerous meta-analyses have been published that examine the question of psychotherapy equivalence. Hunsley and Di Giulio (2002) critically reviewed this literature and concluded that there was abundant evidence that the Dodo bird verdict of equivalence across psychotherapies is false. In this article, we summarize and…

  8. The Merli-Missiroli-Pozzi Two-Slit Electron-Interference Experiment.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rodolfo

    In 2002 readers of Physics World voted Young's double-slit experiment with single electrons as "the most beautiful experiment in physics" of all time. Pier Giorgio Merli, Gian Franco Missiroli, and Giulio Pozzi carried out this experiment in a collaboration between the Italian Research Council and the University of Bologna almost three decades earlier. I examine their experiment, place it in historical context, and discuss its philosophical implications.

  9. The Merli-Missiroli-Pozzi Two-Slit Electron-Interference Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Rodolfo

    2012-06-01

    In 2002 readers of Physics World voted Young's double-slit experiment with single electrons as "the most beautiful experiment in physics" of all time. Pier Giorgio Merli, Gian Franco Missiroli, and Giulio Pozzi carried out this experiment in a collaboration between the Italian Research Council and the University of Bologna almost three decades earlier. I examine their experiment, place it in historical context, and discuss its philosophical implications.

  10. Does FMFM 1-1 Provide Adequate Guidance to Understand Campaign Planning?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    and Donald Snow, Making Strate y (Alabama, Air University Press, Maxwell Air Force Base, 1988) p. 163. 6. Ibid. 7. Ibid., pp. 163 & 164. 8. Jester ...and trans . by Michael Howard and Peter Paret. On War. Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 1976. Creveld, Martin Van. Command in War. Cambridge...Government Printing Office, 1970. Douhet, Giulio. and trans . by Dino Ferrari. The Command of The Air. Office of the Air Force History, Washington, D.C

  11. Airpower in an Age of Limited War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    evolution of airpower theory through the works of Giulio Douhet, Alexander P. de Seversky, Bernard Brodie, and John Warden to trace the progression from...fully evolved shortly after its inception, or is it because the evolution of airpower theory has lagged behind evolving capabilities? Alternatively...theory but for the emergence of limited wars in Korea, Vietnam, and other places. To further complicate the evolution of airpower theory, in recent years

  12. Exact Recovery of Chaotic Systems from Highly Corrupted Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    grant #1255631 and AFOSR YIP grant #FA9550-13-1-0125. References [AGP14] Vitor Araujo , Stefano Galatolo, and Maria José Pacifico. Statistical properties...attractor. In Annales Henri Poincaré, pages 1–30. Springer, 2015. [AMV15] V Araujo , I Melbourne, and P Varandas. Rapid mixing for the Lorenz attractor and

  13. Race towards Freedom: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Tradition of Fugitive Black Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinson, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    This essay centers the defense of black educational possibility in the work of historian, pioneering sociologist, and scholar, W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963) as a conduit igniting what critical social theorists Stefano Harney and Fred Moten (2013) call Fugitive Black Study. The critical appreciation of Du Bois forces us to consider the weight of…

  14. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Rosanne

    2003-01-01

    We have made remarkable progress in the study of luminous supersoft X-ray sources during the past year. We have begun to discover a population of ultraluminous SSSs (e.g., in NGC 300 [Kong & Di Stefano 20031 as well as in Ml0l [Di Stefano & Kong 2003]), which may be accreting intermediate-mass (50-100 solar mass) black holes. This work follows from an algorithm we have developed (Di Stefano & Kong 2003) to identify SSSs in external galaxies, selecting them from among each galaxy s total population of X-ray sources. We have applied the algorithm to approximately one dozen galaxies and will make it public after it has been published in its entirety. Through our own application of the algorithm, we have discovered SSSs in every galaxy, mapping their spatial distribution, to obtain important clues to their fundamental natures. We have discovered that there is a large population of X-ray sources which are slightly hotter (100-250 eV) than standard SSSs. Some of these may be accreting BHs with masses between roughly 50 anf 100 solar masses. To explore this possibility, we are working on theoretical models for the formation and evolution of such systems (Di Stefano 2003).

  15. Investigating Transactions among Motives, Emotional Regulation Related to Testing, and Test Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Aultman, Lori Price; Schutz, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships among achievement motives, emotional regulation, and emotions. They collected data from 425 college undergraduates (110 men, 315 women) and used several scales, including the Achievement Motives Scales (K. Hagtvet & L. Zou, 2000), the Emotional Regulation During Testing Scale (P. A. Schutz, C. DiStefano,…

  16. Tell Me So I Can Hear You: A Developmental Approach to Feedback for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Blum-DeStefano, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In "Tell Me So I Can Hear You", Eleanor Drago-Severson and Jessica Blum-DeStefano show how education leaders can learn to deliver feedback in a way that strengthens relationships as well as performance and builds the capacity for growth. Drawing on constructive-developmental theory, the authors describe four stages of adult growth and…

  17. The Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-18

    College, 190 Prospect Ave., Elmhurst, IL 60126, USA 101 Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA...York40,101, Idit Zehavi45, Stefano Zibetti12, and Daniel B. Zucker17 1 Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA 2 Fermi

  18. 0945+34 Supernova 1995al in NGC 3021

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Janet A.

    1995-11-01

    Stefano Pesci and Piero Mazza of Milan, Italy discover Supernova 1995al in NGC 3021, reports Mirko Villi. Object position is at RA 09h 50m 55.97s DEC +33deg 33m 09.4s (2000). Brightness estimates put the Supernova at 13.2 magnitude. R Coronea Borealis continues to fade. Z Ursae Minoris also continues to fade.

  19. The Effects of Computer-Aided Antero-Posterior Forehead Movement on Ratings of Facial Attractiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Dental Corps United States Navy A manuscript submitted to the faculty of the Comprehensive Dentistry Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental ...Biology June 2015 Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Bethesda, Maryland CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL...CAPT, DC, USN Dean, Naval Postgraduate Dental School ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Special Thanks To: • CAPT Marc Arena • CDR Sennay Stefanos • LCDR Jayson

  20. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Rosanne

    2003-01-01

    We have made remarkable progress in the study of luminous supersoft X-ray sources during the past year. We have begun to discover a population of ultraluminous SSSs (e.g., in NGC 300 [Kong & Di Stefano 20031 as well as in Ml0l [Di Stefano & Kong 2003]), which may be accreting intermediate-mass (50-100 solar mass) black holes. This work follows from an algorithm we have developed (Di Stefano & Kong 2003) to identify SSSs in external galaxies, selecting them from among each galaxy s total population of X-ray sources. We have applied the algorithm to approximately one dozen galaxies and will make it public after it has been published in its entirety. Through our own application of the algorithm, we have discovered SSSs in every galaxy, mapping their spatial distribution, to obtain important clues to their fundamental natures. We have discovered that there is a large population of X-ray sources which are slightly hotter (100-250 eV) than standard SSSs. Some of these may be accreting BHs with masses between roughly 50 anf 100 solar masses. To explore this possibility, we are working on theoretical models for the formation and evolution of such systems (Di Stefano 2003).

  1. Orthogonal Higher Order Factor Structure of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales--Fifth Edition for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    Orthogonal higher-order factor structure of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales-Fifth Edition (SB-5; Roid, 2003a) for child and adolescent samples is reported. Multiple criteria for factor extraction unanimously supported extraction of only one dimension and a unidimensional model. However, following results from DiStefano and Dombrowski (2006)…

  2. Improving Measurement of Workplace Sexual Identity Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Teresa S.; Anderson, Mary Z.; Croteau, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to advance measurement of sexual identity management for lesbian, gay, and bisexual workers. Psychometric properties of a revised version of the Workplace Sexual Identity Management Measure (WSIMM; Anderson, Croteau, Chung, & DiStefano, 2001) were examined on a sample of 64 predominantly White K-12 teachers.…

  3. Investigating Transactions among Motives, Emotional Regulation Related to Testing, and Test Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Aultman, Lori Price; Schutz, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships among achievement motives, emotional regulation, and emotions. They collected data from 425 college undergraduates (110 men, 315 women) and used several scales, including the Achievement Motives Scales (K. Hagtvet & L. Zou, 2000), the Emotional Regulation During Testing Scale (P. A. Schutz, C. DiStefano,…

  4. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  5. Investigating the Nature of Method Factors through Multiple Informants: Evidence for a Specific Factor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alessandri, Guido; Vecchione, Michele; Tisak, John; Barbaranelli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    When a self-report instrument includes a balanced number of positively and negatively worded items, factor analysts often use method factors to aid model fitting. The nature of these factors, often referred to as acquiescence, is still debated. Relying upon previous results (Alessandri et al., 2010; DiStefano & Motl, 2006, 2008; Rauch, Schweizer,…

  6. Increasing Mission Reliability Using Open-Loop Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    Jersey, 1986. 2. J. J. DiStefano, A. R. Stubberud, and I. J. Williams , Feedback and Control Systems - Schaum’s Outline, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1967. 3. Z...ATTN: SMCRI-ENM THE PENTAGON ROCK ISLAND, IL 61299-5000 WASHINGTON. D.C. 20310-0103 MIAC/ CINDAS ADMINISTRATOR PURDUE UNIVERSITY DEFENSE TECHNICAL INFO

  7. Soil moisture and potential measurements in NW Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Canone, Davide; Previati, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The vertical variability of soil moisture in the rootzone is a key factor and it is not taken into account in many hydrological models. Therefore it is here proposed a novel approach that is based on the inversion of a semianalytical solution of the equation governing the infiltration and the exfiltration processes. The inversion allows keeping the information contained in the vertical spatial variability. It has been monitored with TDR measurements down to 2 meters depth. Also, the hysteresis and dynamical effects are then taken into account, with water potential measurements, in order to correctly predict the water retention both in infiltration and in drainage/exfiltration transients. References M. Baudena, I. Bevilacqua, D. Canone, S. Ferraris, M. Previati, A. Provenzale (2012). Soil water dynamics at a midlatitude test site: Field measurements and box modeling approaches. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, vol. 414-415, p. 329-340, ISSN: 0022-1694, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.11.009

  8. Satellite and stem cells in muscle growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Fabien; Rudnicki, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The FASEB summer research conference on Skeletal Muscle Satellite and Stem Cells, organized by Thomas Rando, Giulio Cossu and Jeffrey Chamberlain, was held in Indian Wells, California, in July. An international array of researchers gathered to share numerous new insights into the cellular and molecular regulation of stem cells and satellite cells in skeletal muscle biology. The conference is unique in that it brings together investigators from diverse backgrounds, who work on the growth and repair of skeletal muscle in humans and model systems, in health and disease.

  9. Consciousness as a state of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max

    2015-07-01

    I examine the hypothesis that consciousness can be understood as a state of matter, "perceptronium", with distinctive information processing abilities. I explore five basic principles that may distinguish conscious matter from other physical systems such as solids, liquids and gases: the information, integration, independence, dynamics and utility principles. This approach generalizes Giulio Tononi's integrated information framework for neural-network-based consciousness to arbitrary quantum systems, and provides interesting links to error-correcting codes and condensed matter criticality, as well as an interesting connections between the emergence of consciousness and the emergence of time. (For more technical details, see arXiv:1401.1219).

  10. The size and shape of Dante's Purgatorio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnaghi-Delfino, Paola; Norando, Tullia

    2015-07-01

    Where is Mount Purgatory? How high is it? How large is the island upon which it was situated? In the previous century Rodolfo Benini and Ideale Capasso developed a series of hypothesis and calculations to find answers to these questions. Each used data derived from mathematics, astronomy, history of science and cartography, but they completely disagreed on the location and on the overall size and shape of the island. In this paper we review the main points of these two scholars, then we rework the calculations and estimates, according with a new astronomical hypothesis presented by Giulio Magli and Claudio Facciolo.

  11. CONSTRAINING THE SPIN-DOWN TIMESCALE OF THE WHITE DWARF PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiangcun; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Justham and Di Stefano et al. proposed that the white dwarf progenitor of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) may have to spin down before it can explode. As the white dwarf spin-down timescale is not well known theoretically, here we try to constrain it empirically (within the framework of this spin-down model) for progenitor systems that contain a giant donor and for which circumbinary material has been detected after the explosion: we obtain an upper limit of a few 10{sup 7}yr. Based on the study of Di Stefano and Kilic, this means that it is too early to rule out the existence of a surviving companion in SNR 0509–67.5.

  12. West Europe Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Army of Greece) Stefanos Papagiannis and Vasilis Venetsanopoulos. Also, former deputy of the United Democratic Left [ EDA ] Meletis Kaniaris, Thanasis...former EDA deputy), Andonis Skylakos (secretary of the Thessalia branch), Stratis Korakas (deputy), Khr. Katsanakos, Mikhail Spyridakis, Giannis...We had to sleep in 8 square meter, windowless rooms without ventilation, 8 of us packed together. The youth who was left in charge used insulting

  13. Prior-Free Multi-Unit Auctions with Ordered Bidders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    case, the Bayesian optimal auction awards items to the (at most k) bidders with the highest positive virtual valuations. The payment of a winning...Prior-Free Multi-Unit Auctions with Ordered Bidders∗ Sayan Bhattacharya† Elias Koutsoupias‡ Janardhan Kulkarni§ Stefano Leonardi¶ Tim Roughgarden...Xiaoming Xu∗∗ Abstract Prior-free auctions are robust auctions that assume no distribution over bidders’ valuations and provide worst-case (input-by

  14. Microwave Quantum Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-29

    target detection than the optical, due to the naturally -occurring bright thermal background in the microwave regime. We use an electro-opto...technologically-driven information task. So far, QI has only been demonstrated at optical wave- lengths [9, 14, 15], for which naturally -occurring back...background. The QI communication protocol from [8, 9] deals with this ∗ stefano.pirandola@york.ac.uk problem in a natural way by purposefully injecting am

  15. A Non-Cognitive Formal Approach to Knowledge Representation in Artificial Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Rewriting," Information and Control, 25: 10-19 (May 1974). Crespi-Reghizzi, Stefano and others. " Algebraic Properties of Operator Precedence Languages...McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1983. 7. Ginsburg, Seymour. Algebraic and Automata-Theoretic Properties of Formal Languages. New York: American Elsevier...Stanat, Donald F. and David F. McAllister. Discrete Mathematics in Computer Science. Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1977. 91. Rotman , B.and G.T

  16. Long-Term Performance Analysis of GIOVE Clocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Francisco Gonzalez, Stefano Binda European Space Agency, ESA- ESTEC , Noordwijk , The Netherlands pierre.waller@esa.int Daniel Rodriguez, Guillermo...ADDRESS(ES) European Space Agency, ESA- ESTEC , Noordwijk , The Netherlands 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME...European Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 13-16 April 2010, Noordwijk , The Netherlands. [6] J. Camparo, 2004, “Frequency Equilibration and the Light

  17. [The difficult start of nephrology in Rome].

    PubMed

    Cagli, V; Cinotti, G A

    2009-01-01

    Nephrology in Rome began in the 1960s with the arrival of Ernico Fiaschi in the wake of Cataldo Cassano at the Institute of Medical Pathology (later on Clinica Medica II). A group of doctors interested in nephrology was set up, with among them Giulio A. Cinotti, who was to become full professor of nephrology at the University of Rome ''La Sapienza'' in 1980. By the end of the 1960s, the renal transplant activity had become an important asset at the Institute of Surgical Pathology (later on Clinica Chirurgica II) thanks to Paride Stefanini. A chair of surgical nephrology was instituted at the Urology Clinics of Ulrico Bracci; the chair was first held by Nicola Cerulli, who developed an intensive hemodialysis program. Around the same time, the Center for the Research and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension and Kidney Diseases became operational at the hospitals of Rome (under the responsibility of Vito Cagli at the Policlinico Umberto I), while a nephrology and dialysis unit, directed by Giancarlo Ruggieri, was set up at the San Giacomo Hospital. Many nephrology-related ''cultural'' activities started to be undertaken thanks to the ''Gruppo Laziale di Nefrologia Medica e Chirurgica'' founded by Drs Cagli, Cerulli, and Cinotti. Two national congresses were organized by Giulio Cinotti in 1979 (Fiuggi) and 1992 (Rome).

  18. The relationship between Vesalius and the Borgarucci family.

    PubMed

    Van Hee, Robrecht

    2017-07-03

    Two of the four brothers Borgarucci were medical doctors and in one way or another, be it distantly, connected with the great master Vesalius. Giulio Borgarucci was a physician, who became a Calvinist and emigrated to England where he treated many noblemen and friends of Queen Elisabeth I. He was present at a conversation between the Italian writer and traveler Pietro Bizzari and the Venetian jeweler who witnessed Vesalius' death in Zakynthos. Prospero Borgarucci became professor of anatomy and surgery in Padua, some 20 years after Vesalius. He published several treatises on anatomy, pestilential disease, and materia medica. Prospero Borgarucci became physician to Queen Catherine de Medicis in France, and to Archduke Karl II of Habsburg in Graz. His most important work is the so-called Chirurgia Magna of Vesalius. Text and illustrations of this spurious Vesalian work point to the use of passages of the Epitome, surgical college notes and copied Vesalian images in Borgarucci's Chirurgia Magna.

  19. A Career in Manuscripts: Genres and Purposes of a Physician’s Writing in Rome, 1600–1630*

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Following the stellar career of papal physician Giulio Mancini, the article brings into focus learned doctors’ uses of, and relationships with, manu- scripts. Manuscripts were the main outcome of their practice — as letters of consultation to patients and colleagues, as consilia of various kinds, including for use in courts of law, and also in the form of key professional tools such as casebooks. Clues found in Mancini’s rich paper-trail shed light on material aspects of his professional writing and on the role that circulating knowledge in manuscript had in creating and sustaining medical networks. The article also argues that even in a domain as shaped by print as early modern medicine, physicians’ use of this medium should not be taken for granted; especially in courtly settings, scribal, as opposed to print, publishing provided them with an effective means of building the social relationships on which their careers depended. PMID:22298938

  20. The intercalatus nucleus of Staderini.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Rutilio Staderini was one of the leading Italian anatomists of the twentieth century, together with some scientists, such as Giulio Chiarugi, Giovanni Vitali, and others. He was also a member of a new generation of anatomists. They had continued the tradition of the most famous Italian scientists, which started from the Renaissance up until the nineteenth century. Although he carried out important studies of neuroanatomy and comparative anatomy, as well as embryology, his name is rarely remembered by most medical historians. His name is linked to the nucleus he discovered: the Staderini nucleus or intercalated nucleus, a collection of nerve cells in the medulla oblongata located lateral to the hypoglossal nucleus. This article focuses on the biography of the neuroanatomist as well as the nucleus that carries his name and his other research, especially on comparative anatomy and embryology.

  1. Great teachers of Gaspare Tagliacozzi (1546-1599).

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin; Arton, Jamie

    2015-09-18

    Gaspare Tagliacozzi successfully practised the art of plastic surgery in the sixteenth century and conducted a long series of precise observations on the basis of which he formulated detailed principles for rhinoplastic. He wrote the first complete description of nasal reconstruction using skin from the arm. Tagliacozzi's teachers at the University of Bologna during his student days remain largely unfamiliar, Giulio Cesare Aranzio, Ulisse Aldrovandi and Girolamo Cardano. Aldrovandi taught the 'ordinary', that is the principal course in natural philosophy. Aranzio taught the chief course in surgery and anatomy. Cardano taught a course in the theory of medicine. Their activity contributed to the slow move from Galenic teaching in medicine and the static acceptance of tradition in all science.

  2. The Art of Aerial Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    and context of the conflict to an extent that other forms of warfare gener­ ally do not. Notes 1. Giulio Douhet, The Command of the Air ( New   York ...difference between victory or defeat.  On occasion,  new   ideas and  tactics develop  in  the heat of battle. An example occurred during the post­D­day...not produced success or to select a  new  option appropriate to the circum­ stances encountered? There is no right answer, per se, to this dilemma

  3. Clues to prolific productivity among prominent scientists.

    PubMed

    Kantha, S S

    1992-10-01

    In a survey based on the biographical sketches, obituary notes and eulogies of notable scientists, eight were identified as belonging to an elite group, having authored more than 1000 research publications, which include books, monographs and patents. They were, in chronological order, Thomas Alva Edison, Paul Karrer, Margaret Mead, Giulio Natta, Hans Selye, Herbert C Brown, Tetsuji Kametani and Carl Djerassi. Among these, Karrer, Natta and Brown were Nobelists in chemistry. Four criteria which can be identified as clues to their prolific productivity are, 1) enthusiasm for compulsive work and eccentric life style, 2) physical and/or environmental handicap, 3) pioneering efforts in a new research field, and 4) selection of research area, predominantly organic chemistry.

  4. A Career in Manuscripts: Genres and Purposes of a Physician's Writing in Rome, 1600-1630.

    PubMed

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2011-07-01

    Following the stellar career of papal physician Giulio Mancini, the article brings into focus learned doctors' uses of, and relationships with, manu- scripts. Manuscripts were the main outcome of their practice - as letters of consultation to patients and colleagues, as consilia of various kinds, including for use in courts of law, and also in the form of key professional tools such as casebooks. Clues found in Mancini's rich paper-trail shed light on material aspects of his professional writing and on the role that circulating knowledge in manuscript had in creating and sustaining medical networks. The article also argues that even in a domain as shaped by print as early modern medicine, physicians' use of this medium should not be taken for granted; especially in courtly settings, scribal, as opposed to print, publishing provided them with an effective means of building the social relationships on which their careers depended.

  5. Glucocorticoid signaling drives epigenetic and transcription factors to induce key regulators of human parturition.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Chrousos, George P

    2015-10-27

    Glucocorticoids are thought to play an important role in parturition. Two recent articles by Di Stefano et al. in the Archives and Wang et al. in this issue of Science Signaling reveal novel mechanisms by which glucocorticoid signaling can drive the epigenetic and transcriptional machinery to induce molecules involved in parturition, including the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the autacoid hormone prostaglandin E2. These findings contribute to our understanding of how glucocorticoids may regulate human parturition. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Functional Genomics of Dopaminergic Neurons and Cellular Susceptibility in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0599 TITLE: Functional Genomics of Dopaminergic Neurons and Cellular Susceptibility in Parkinson’s Disease PRINCIPAL... Disease 5b. GRANTNUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0599 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Stefano Gustincich, Ph.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...vulnerability of selected classes of dopaminergic cells in Parkinson’s Disease (PD). During the first year of research we have established an in house cDNA

  7. Invading Sicily: A Tale of Branches and Sequels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Enna Nicosia Troina San Fratello Santo Stefano Reggio di Calabria Corleone Trapani MOUNT ETNA C A R O N I E M O U N T A I N S VizziniNiscemi Ragusa...have been an amphibious landing in Calabria , on the toe of Italy, behind Axis forces fleeing Sicily. Kesselring had no means of meeting such a threat...and con- fessed, “A secondary attack on Calabria would have enabled the Sicily landing to be developed into an overwhelming Allied victory.”16 But in

  8. Seven Murine Cell Lines with Properties of Macrophages,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    of this study; BALB-G-F, a fibroblast-like line derived from the same culture as BALB-G-M by cloning; L929 cells, a gift from Dr. Rolf Zinkernagel...less than 3% of cells ingested E under the same conditions. BW-J-T, NZW-D-T, BALB-G-T, BALB-G-F, L929 and TE-1 control cells were all nonphagocytic under...induced spreading. Exp. Cell Res. 79, 423, 1973. 30. Rabinovitch, M. and DeStefano, M. J. Use of the local anesthetic lidocaine for cell harvesting

  9. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering.

  10. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-08-19

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering.

  11. Inferring Denitrification From Twenty Years of Solar Occultation Measurements of Arctic PSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, J.; Bevilacqua, R.; Fromm, M.

    2003-12-01

    Recently, Fromm et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4366, doi:10.1029/2002JD002772, 2003] have reanalyzed the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM II and POAM III) and the NASA Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite PSC databases using a unified detection algorithm and methodology. This has yielded an internally consistent, nearly unbroken PSC climatology extending from 1979 to the present. A technique has been developed by Bevilacqua et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 107(D20), 8281, doi:10.1029/2001JD000477, 2002] to infer irreversible denitrification. This technique stems from the assumption that irreversible denitrification lowers the NAT saturation temperature which in turn lowers the temperature for PSC formation. This results in a decreased PSC frequency at a given temperature as the Arctic vortex season progresses. In this paper we apply this technique to the long-term Arctic PSC database provided by Fromm et al. to yield a proxy climatology of denitrification which extends back for more than 20 years. Results suggest that denitrification is a relatively common occurrence in cold Arctic winters.

  12. Collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laurie A.; Barker, John R.

    1996-07-01

    The collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (C4N2H4) in the electronic ground state by 19 collider gases was studied using the time-resolved infrared fluorescence (IRF) technique. The pyrazine was photoexcited with a 308 nm laser and its vibrational deactivation was monitored following rapid radiationless transitions to produce vibrationally excited molecules in the electronic ground state. The IRF data were analyzed by a simple approximate inversion method, as well as with full collisional master equation simulations. The average energies transferred in deactivating collisions (<ΔE>d) exhibit a near-linear dependence on vibrational energy at lower energies and less dependence at higher energies. The deactivation of ground state pyrazine was found to be similar to that of ground state benzene [J. R. Barker and B. M. Toselli, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 12, 305 (1990)], but it is strikingly different from the deactivation of triplet state pyrazine [T. J. Bevilacqua and R. B. Weisman, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 6316 (1993)].

  13. Pathology as the cornerstone of human tissue banking: European consensus expert group report.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, Pierre; Caboux, Elodie; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Bosman, Fref; Dassesse, Thibaut; Hoefler, Heinz; Janin, Anne; Langer, Rupert; Larsimont, Denis; Morente, Manuel; Riegman, Peter; Schirmacher, Peter; Stanta, Giorgio; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2009-09-01

    Aside from ethical considerations, the primary requirement for usage of human tissues in basic or translational research is the thorough characterization of tissues. The second, but equally essential, requirement is that tissues be collected, processed, annotated, and preserved in optimal conditions. These requirements put the pathologist at the center of tissue banking activities and of research aimed at discovering new biomarkers. Pathologists not only provide information identifying the specimen but also make decisions on what materials should be biobanked, on the preservation conditions, and on the timeline of events that precede preservation and storage. This central position calls for increased recognition of the role of the pathologist by the biomolecular community and places new demands on the pathologist's workload and scope of scientific activities. These questions were addressed by an Expert Group Meeting of the European Biological and Biomolecular Research Infrastructure (BBMRI). While detailed recommendations are published elsewhere (Bevilacqua et al., Virchows Archivs, 2010, in press), this article outlines the strategic and technological issues identified by the Expert Group and identifies ways forward for better integration of pathology in the current thrust for development of biomarker-based "personalized medicine."

  14. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-03-15

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Application of modeling and simulation to nuclear power plants, by Berry Gibson, IBM, and Rolf Gibbels, Dassault Systems; Steam generators with tight manufacturing procedures, by Ei Kadokami, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries; SG design based on operational experience and R and D, by Jun Tang, Babcock and Wilcox Canada; Confident to deliver reliable performance, by Bruce Bevilacqua, Westinghouse Nuclear; An evolutionary plant design, by Martin Parece, AREVA NP, Inc.; and, Designed for optimum production, by Danny Roderick, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. Industry Innovation articles include: Controlling alloy 600 degradation, by John Wilson, Exelon Nuclear Corporation; Condensate polishing innovation, by Lewis Crone, Dominion Millstone Power Station; Reducing deposits in steam generators, by the Electric Power Research Institute; and, Minimizing Radiological effluent releases, by the Electric Power Research Institute. The plant profile article is titled 2008 - a year of 'firsts' for AmerenUE's Callaway plant, by Rick Eastman, AmerenUE.

  15. Geochemistry of natural gas manifestions from the Upper Tiber Valley (central Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaselli, O.; Tassi, F.; Minissale, A.; Capaccioni, B.; Macro, G.; Evans, William C.

    1997-01-01

    Six natural gas manifestions from the upper Tiber Valley at Caprese Michelangela and Pieve S. Stefano (Arezzo) and at Umbertide (Pertugia) localities have been analysed for major, minor, trace gas compositions, as well as for ??13C in CO2 and CH4, ??15N in N2 and 3He/4He isotopic ratios. All gas emissions are CO2-rich (???94%), with N2 contents of 4-5%. Those from Caprese and Pieve S. Stefano have very peculiar compsitions when compared to other gases from northern-central Apennines. Apart from CO2, these gases show relatively high contents of He (with crustal isotopic ratios) and medium to high temperature-related gases such as CO, H2 and C6H6. Although located quite far from the geothermal areas in Tuscany, the application of several gas geothermetric techniques suggest for these gases deep equilibrium tempratures of about 300??C. Moreover, the ??13C in CO2 and CH4 (~.4.0% and -38.0%, respectively) and the ??13N values in N2 (+0.064 to +0.84%) would seem to imply a multiple deep source for these gases.

  16. Zebrafish Cardiotoxicity: The Effects of CYP1A Inhibition and AHR2 Knockdown Following Exposure to Weak Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Bryan William; Van Tiem Garner, Lindsey; Di Giulio, Richard Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Strong AHR agonists, such as certain polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), cause severe cardiac teratogenesis in fish embryos. Moderately strong AHR agonists, such as benzo[a]pyrene and β-naphthoflavone, have been shown to cause similar cardiotoxic effects when coupled with a cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) inhibitor, such as fluoranthene (FL). We sought to determine if weak AHR agonists, when combined with a CYP1A inhibitor (FL) or CYP1A morpholino gene knockdown, are capable of causing cardiac deformities similar to moderately strong AHR agonists (Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Billiard, Timme-Laragy et al. 2006; Van Tiem and Di Giulio 2011). The weak AHR agonists included the following: carbaryl, phenanthrene, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, indigo, and indirubin. The results showed a complex pattern of cardiotoxic response to weak agonist inhibitor exposure and morpholino-knockdown. Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos were first exposed to weak AHR agonists at equimolar concentrations. The agonists were assessed for their relative potency as inducers of CYP1 enzyme activity, measured by the ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) assay, and cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, and 3-methylindole induced the highest CYP1A activity in zebrafish. Experiments were then conducted to determine the individual cardiotoxicity of each compound. Next, zebrafish were co-exposed to each agonist (at concentrations below those determined to be cardiotoxic) and FL in combination to assess if CYP1A inhibition could induce cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, and phenanthrene significantly increased pericardial edema relative to controls when combined with FL. To further evaluate the

  17. Zebrafish cardiotoxicity: the effects of CYP1A inhibition and AHR2 knockdown following exposure to weak aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel R; Clark, Bryan W; Garner, Lindsey V T; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2015-06-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Strong AHR agonists, such as certain polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), cause severe cardiac teratogenesis in fish embryos. Moderately strong AHR agonists, such as benzo[a]pyrene and β-naphthoflavone, have been shown to cause similar cardiotoxic effects when coupled with a cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) inhibitor, such as fluoranthene (FL). We sought to determine if weak AHR agonists, when combined with a CYP1A inhibitor (FL) or CYP1A morpholino gene knockdown, are capable of causing cardiac deformities similar to moderately strong AHR agonists (Wassenberg and Di Giulio Environ Health Perspect 112(17):1658-1664, 2004a; Wassenberg and Di Giulio Res 58(2-5):163-168, 2004b; Billiard et al. Toxicol Sci 92(2):526-536, 2006; Van Tiem and Di Giulio Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 254(3):280-287, 2011). The weak AHR agonists included the following: carbaryl, phenanthrene, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, indigo, and indirubin. Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos were first exposed to weak AHR agonists at equimolar concentrations. The agonists were assessed for their relative potency as inducers of CYP1 enzyme activity, measured by the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay, and cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, and 3-methylindole induced the highest CYP1A activity in zebrafish. Experiments were then conducted to determine the individual cardiotoxicity of each compound. Next, zebrafish were coexposed to each agonist (at concentrations below those determined to be cardiotoxic) and FL in combination to assess if CYP1A inhibition could induce cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, and phenanthrene significantly increased pericardial edema relative to controls when combined with FL. To further evaluate the interaction

  18. Involvement of Phospholipase Cγ1 in Mouse Egg Activation Induced by a Truncated Form of the C-kit Tyrosine Kinase Present in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Sette, Claudio; Bevilacqua, Arturo; Geremia, Raffaele; Rossi, Pellegrino

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection of a truncated form of the c-kit tyrosine kinase present in mouse spermatozoa (tr-kit) activates mouse eggs parthenogenetically, and tr-kit– induced egg activation is inhibited by preincubation with an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC) (Sette, C., A. Bevilacqua, A. Bianchini, F. Mangia, R. Geremia, and P. Rossi. 1997. Development [Camb.]. 124:2267–2274). Co-injection of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins containing the src-homology (SH) domains of the γ1 isoform of PLC (PLCγ1) competitively inhibits tr-kit– induced egg activation. A GST fusion protein containing the SH3 domain of PLCγ1 inhibits egg activation as efficiently as the whole SH region, while a GST fusion protein containing the two SH2 domains is much less effective. A GST fusion protein containing the SH3 domain of the Grb2 adaptor protein does not inhibit tr-kit–induced egg activation, showing that the effect of the SH3 domain of PLCγ1 is specific. Tr-kit–induced egg activation is also suppressed by co-injection of antibodies raised against the PLCγ1 SH domains, but not against the PLCγ1 COOH-terminal region. In transfected COS cells, coexpression of PLCγ1 and tr-kit increases diacylglycerol and inositol phosphate production, and the phosphotyrosine content of PLCγ1 with respect to cells expressing PLCγ1 alone. These data indicate that tr-kit activates PLCγ1, and that the SH3 domain of PLCγ1 is essential for tr-kit–induced egg activation. PMID:9722617

  19. Upscaling of soil moisture measurements in NW Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Canone, Davide; Previati, Maurizio; Brunod, Christian; Ratto, Sara; Cauduro, Marco

    2015-04-01

    There is large mismatch in spatial scale between the climate and meteorological model grid, and the scale of soil and vegetation measurements. Remote sensing data can help to fit the model scale, but they cannot provide rootzone data. In this work some soil moisture datasets are analysed for the sake of providing larger scale estimation of soil moisture and water and energy fluxes. The first dataset refers to a plain site near Torino, where measurements are taken since 1997 (Baudena et al., 2012), and a mountain site close to the town. The second one is a dataset in the mountains of Valle d'Aosta (Brocca et al., 2013), where 4 years of data are available. The use of digital elevation models and vegetation maps is shown in this work. Some soil processes (e.g. Whalley et al., 2012) are usually disregarded, but in this work their possible impact is considered. References L. Brocca, A. Tarpanelli, T. Moramarco, F. Melone, S.M. Ratto, M. Cauduro, S. Ferraris, N. Berni, F. Ponziani, W. Wagner, T. Melzer (2013). Soil Moisture Estimation in Alpine Catchments through Modeling and Satellite Observations VADOSE ZONE JOURNAL, vol. 8-2, p. 1-10, doi:10.2136/vzj2012.0102 M. Baudena, I. Bevilacqua, D. Canone, S. Ferraris, M. Previati, A. Provenzale (2012). Soil water dynamics at a midlatitude test site: Field measurements and box modeling approaches. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, vol. 414-415, p. 329-340, ISSN: 0022-1694, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.11.009 W.R. Whalley, G.P. Matthews, S. Ferraris (2012). The effect of compaction and shear deformation of saturated soil on hydraulic conductivity. SOIL & TILLAGE RESEARCH, vol. 125, p. 23-29, ISSN: 0167-1987

  20. Carbon fibre versus metal framework in full-arch immediate loading rehabilitations of the maxilla - a cohort clinical study.

    PubMed

    Pera, F; Pesce, P; Solimano, F; Tealdo, T; Pera, P; Menini, M

    2017-05-01

    Frameworks made of carbon fibre-reinforced composites (CFRC) seem to be a viable alternative to traditional metal frameworks in implant prosthodontics. CFRC provide stiffness, rigidity and optimal biocompatibility. The aim of the present prospective study was to compare carbon fibre frameworks versus metal frameworks used to rigidly splint implants in full-arch immediate loading rehabilitations. Forty-two patients (test group) were rehabilitated with full-arch immediate loading rehabilitations of the upper jaw (total: 170 implants) following the Columbus Bridge Protocol with four to six implants with distal tilted implants. All patients were treated with resin screw-retained full-arch prostheses endowed with carbon fibre frameworks. The mean follow-up was 22 months (range: 18-24). Differences in the absolute change of bone resorption over time between the two implant sides (mesial and distal) were assessed performing a Mann-Whitney U-test. The outcomes were statistically compared with those of patients rehabilitated following the same protocol but using metal frameworks (control group: 34 patients with 163 implants - data reported in Tealdo, Menini, Bevilacqua, Pera, Pesce, Signori, Pera, Int J Prosthodont, 27, 2014, 207). Ten implants failed in the control group (6·1%); none failed in the test group (P = 0·002). A statistically significant difference in the absolute change of bone resorption around the implants was found between the two groups (P = 0·004), with greater mean peri-implant bone resorption in the control group (1 mm) compared to the test group (0·8 mm). Carbon fibre frameworks may be considered as a viable alternative to the metal ones and showed less marginal bone loss around implants and a greater implant survival rate during the observation period. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Perceived Sleep Quality, Mood States, and Their Relationship With Performance Among Brazilian Elite Athletes During a Competitive Period.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Ricardo; Bevilacqua, Guilherme G; Andrade, Alexandro

    2017-04-01

    Brandt, R, Bevilacqua, GG, and Andrade, A. Perceived sleep quality, mood states, and their relationship with performance among Brazilian elite athletes during a competitive period. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1033-1039, 2017-We described the perceived sleep quality and mood states of elite athletes during a competitive period, and clarified their relationship to athletes' sport performance. Participants were 576 Brazilian elite athletes (404 men and 172 women) of individual and team sports. Mood states were evaluated using the Brunel Mood Scale, whereas perceived sleep quality was evaluated using a single question ("How would you evaluate the quality of your sleep in the last few days?"). Evaluations of mood state and sleep quality were performed up to 60 minutes before national and international sports competitions began. Descriptive and inferential statistics (including logistic regression) were used to evaluate the relationship of sleep quality and mood states with performance (i.e., winning or losing). Athletes typically had good sleep quality and mood states similar to the Iceberg profile (i.e., high vigor and low tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and mental confusion). The Wald test revealed that sleep, anger, tension, and vigor predicted athletes' performance. Specifically, poor sleep quality and low vigor and anger decreased the odds of winning, whereas higher tension increased these odds. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test indicated that the results were sufficiently generalizable. Overall, we observed a significant relationship between sleep and mood states, which in turn both significantly influenced athletes' sports performance. Thus, coaching staff and athletes should monitor athletes' sleep quality before competitions to ensure athletes are in the optimal condition for performance.

  2. A catalytic metal ion interacts with the cleavage site G•U wobble in the HDV ribozyme†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Gong, Bo; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Carey, Paul R.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    The HDV ribozyme self-cleaves by a chemical mechanism involving general acid-base catalysis to generate a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate and a 5′-hydroxyl termini. Biochemical studies from several laboratories have implicated C75 as the general acid and hydrated magnesium as the general base. We have previously shown that C75 has a pKa shifted > 2 pH units toward neutrality [Gong, B., Chen, J. H., Chase, E., Chadalavada, D. M., Yajima, R., Golden, B. L., Bevilacqua, P. C., and Carey, P. R. (2007) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13335–13342.], while in crystal structures, it is well-positioned for proton transfer. However no crystallographic evidence for a hydrated magnesium poised to serve as a general base in the reaction has been observed in high-resolution crystal structures of various reaction states and mutants. Herein, we use solution kinetic experiments and parallel Raman crystallographic studies to examine the effects of pH on rate and Mg2+-binding properties of wild-type and 7-deazaguanosine mutants of the HDV ribozyme. These data suggest that a previously-unobserved hydrated magnesium ion interacts with the N7 of the cleavage site G•U wobble base pair. Integrating this metal ion binding site with the available crystal structures provides a new three-dimensional model for the active site of the ribozyme that accommodates all available biochemical data and appears competent for catalysis. The position of this metal is consistent with a role of a magnesium-bound hydroxide as a general base as dictated by biochemical data. PMID:19178151

  3. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell- dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence. PMID:1704376

  4. The non-monophyletic origin of the tRNA molecule and the origin of genes only after the evolutionary stage of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA).

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2006-06-07

    A model has been proposed suggesting that the tRNA molecule must have originated by direct duplication of an RNA hairpin structure [Di Giulio, M., 1992. On the origin of the transfer RNA molecule. J. Theor. Biol. 159, 199-214]. A non-monophyletic origin of this molecule has also been theorized [Di Giulio, M., 1999. The non-monophyletic origin of tRNA molecule. J. Theor. Biol. 197, 403-414]. In other words, the tRNA genes evolved only after the evolutionary stage of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) through the assembly of two minigenes codifying for different RNA hairpin structures, which is what the exon theory of genes suggests when it is applied to the model of tRNA origin. Recent observations strongly corroborate this theorization because it has been found that some tRNA genes are completely separate in two minigenes codifying for the 5' and 3' halves of this molecule [Randau, L., et al., 2005a. Nanoarchaeum equitans creates functional tRNAs from separate genes for their 5'- and 3'-halves. Nature 433, 537-541]. In this paper it is shown that these tRNA genes codifying for the 5' and 3' halves of this molecule are the ancestral form from which the tRNA genes continuously codifying for the complete tRNA molecule are thought to have evolved. This, together with the very existence of completely separate tRNA genes codifying for their 5' and 3' halves, proves a non-monophyletic origin for tRNA genes, as a monophyletic origin would exclude the existence of these genes which have, on the contrary, been observed. Here the polyphyletic origin of genes codifying for proteins is also suggested and discussed. Moreover, a hypothesis is advanced to suggest that the LUCA might have had a fragmented genome made up of RNA and the possibility that 'Paleokaryotes' may exist is outlined. Finally, the characteristic of the indivisibility of homology that these polyphyletic origins seem to remove at the sequence level is discussed.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP-DR1) catalogs (Lutz+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

    2013-11-01

    PACS catalogs built by the PEP team, with key contributions by Stefano Berta, Benjamin Magnelli, Paola Popesso, Dieter Lutz, Francesca Pozzi, Bruno Altieri, Herve Aussel, Hoseong Hwang, Emeric Le Floc'h, Georgios Magdis, Raanan Nordon, Albrecht Poglitsch, Laurie Riguccini, Amelie Saintonge, Li Shao. For more details, please refer to Lutz et al. (2011A&A...532A..90L) and to the PDF documentation associated to the release. Data and catalogs can be retrieved from the web page http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php See the PDF documentation associated to the PEP DR1 release, http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_global.pdf and http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_SPIRE.pdf for more details. (69 data files).

  6. Bayesian Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Michael P.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David

    2009-12-01

    Preface; Part I. Methods: 1. Foundations and algorithms John Skilling; 2. Simple applications of Bayesian methods D. S. Sivia and Steve Rawlings; 3. Parameter estimation using Monte Carlo sampling Antony Lewis and Sarah Bridle; 4. Model selection and multi-model interference Andrew R. Liddle, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 5. Bayesian experimental design and model selection forecasting Roberto Trotta, Martin Kunz, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 6. Signal separation in cosmology M. P. Hobson, M. A. J. Ashdown and V. Stolyarov; Part II. Applications: 7. Bayesian source extraction M. P. Hobson, Graça Rocha and R. Savage; 8. Flux measurement Daniel Mortlock; 9. Gravitational wave astronomy Neil Cornish; 10. Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background data Andrew H. Jaffe; 11. Bayesian multilevel modelling of cosmological populations Thomas J. Loredo and Martin A. Hendry; 12. A Bayesian approach to galaxy evolution studies Stefano Andreon; 13. Photometric redshift estimation: methods and applications Ofer Lahav, Filipe B. Abdalla and Manda Banerji; Index.

  7. The Detection of ULF-ELF Emissions from Moving Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    Stefanos & Aquacharm 100273-4 10-03 Calibrate 100373-1 Nopal Tellus 100373-2 Monmouth 100373-3 10-04 Electrode Test 100473-1 Hess Trader 100473-2 David P...Atlantic Prestige 100773-2 Nopal Trader 100773-3 42 -- - - - - - - --- -- -’o,----~-- ~ j C’, CN mI C’) CY) CI) Ce) Ce) C’) CY) C14c. .I I C) C) C CY...Stainless Trader 2.32 2.02 1.76 Nopal Trader .81 .70 .61 Tumi 1.49 1.30 1.13 Gulfcrest 1.25 1.09 .95 Inger 2.70 2.35 2.04 Texas Sun 1.61 1.40 1.22

  8. Bayesian Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Michael P.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David

    2014-02-01

    Preface; Part I. Methods: 1. Foundations and algorithms John Skilling; 2. Simple applications of Bayesian methods D. S. Sivia and Steve Rawlings; 3. Parameter estimation using Monte Carlo sampling Antony Lewis and Sarah Bridle; 4. Model selection and multi-model interference Andrew R. Liddle, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 5. Bayesian experimental design and model selection forecasting Roberto Trotta, Martin Kunz, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 6. Signal separation in cosmology M. P. Hobson, M. A. J. Ashdown and V. Stolyarov; Part II. Applications: 7. Bayesian source extraction M. P. Hobson, Graça Rocha and R. Savage; 8. Flux measurement Daniel Mortlock; 9. Gravitational wave astronomy Neil Cornish; 10. Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background data Andrew H. Jaffe; 11. Bayesian multilevel modelling of cosmological populations Thomas J. Loredo and Martin A. Hendry; 12. A Bayesian approach to galaxy evolution studies Stefano Andreon; 13. Photometric redshift estimation: methods and applications Ofer Lahav, Filipe B. Abdalla and Manda Banerji; Index.

  9. The association between soft drink consumption and caries risk among low-income African-American children is not clear.

    PubMed

    Petti, Stefano

    2010-06-01

    Cariogenicity of soft drinks, milk and fruit juice in low-income African-American children: a longitudinal study. Lim S, Sohn W, Burt BA, et al. J Am Dent Assoc 2008;139(7):959-67. Stefano Petti, DMD PURPOSE/QUESTION: (1) to identify the patterns of intake of soft drinks, 100% fruit juice, and milk among low-income African-American children aged between 3 and 5 years at baseline over a 2-year period; and (2) to investigate whether these patterns were associated with caries incidence during the 2-year follow-up. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Bethesda, MD; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Delta Dental Fund of Michigan, USA. Cohort study Level 3: Other evidence Not applicable.

  10. Phosphorus in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Paytan, A.

    2012-10-01

    IsoPhos 2012: Development of Isotopic Tracers for a Better Understandingof the Phosphorus Cycle;Monte Verità, Switzerland, 24-29 June 2012 IsoPhos 2012, a conference dedicated to cutting-edge research on phosphorus, was held in the Centro Stefano Franscini of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (ETH Zurich). It gathered 63 scientists, 11 of whom were graduate students, from 16 countries and different areas of expertise, including Earth sciences, oceanography, paleontology, microbiology, soil and plant sciences, and hydrology. The conference focused on the use of stable oxygen isotopes in phosphate. New developments in preparation and analytical techniques have made the application of this tracer viable for fields other than paleoclimatology. However, new challenges with respect to sample preparation, standardization, its use in conjunction with other tracers, and the effect of biochemical processes have arisen.

  11. Supersoft X-ray source CAL 83 in an optical-high, X-ray off state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, .; Schwarz, R.; Sala, G.; Ness, J.-U.; Mennickent, R.

    2008-01-01

    Between Dec. 20 and 27, 2007, the optical (B&R) brightness of CAL 83 jumped up by 0.5 mag, and stayed at that level since then. With the anti- correlation in mind of optical and X-ray flux as indicated by MACHO data and earlier Chandra and XMM observations (Greiner & DiStefano 2002, A&A 387, 944), we performed a 4.7 ksec Swift ToO observation on January 2, 2008, between 0:00--6:00 UT. As expected, we find no X-ray emission from CAL 83, with a 2-sigma upper limit of 6.1*10-4 cts/s in the <1.0 keV band.

  12. Inverse Bremsstrahlung and High Harmonic Generation in Clusters and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Chris

    2006-05-01

    Clusters exposed to radiation from an intense VUV free-electron laser have been observed to absorb copious amounts of energy, which has been somewhat of a surprise. Different models by competing theory groups have proposed more than one mechanism for the energy absorption. We have studied the effect of incorporating a realistic atomic screening potential on the free-free or inverse bremsstrahlung absorption rate, and found important differences that emerge, compared to simpler hydrogenic models that are frequently adopted. In a separate project to be discussed at the meeting, some of the physical issues involved in high-harmonic generation from diatomic and polyatomic molecules will be assessed. These include the importance of treating the electron scattering from the molecular ion at a nonperturbative level of approximation, as well as the possible role of Jahn-Teller physics when the molecule possesses a high degree of symmetry. This theoretical project involves collaborative contributions from Zachary Walters, Stefano Tonzani, and Robin Santra.

  13. New insights on the petrology of submarine volcanics from the Western Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, A. M.; Perinelli, C.; Bianchini, G.; Natali, C.; Martorelli, E.; Chiocci, F. L.

    2016-11-01

    The Pontine Islands form a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea. It consists of two edifices, the islands of Ponza, Palmarola and Zannone and the islands of Ventotene and Santo Stefano, respectively. The Archipelago developed during two main volcanic cycles in the Plio-Pleistocene: 1) the Pliocene episode erupted subalkaline, silica-rich volcanic units, which constitute the dominant products in the western edifice (Ponza and Zannone Islands); 2) the Pleistocene episode erupted more alkaline products, represented by evolved rocks (trachytes to peralkaline rhyolites) in the islands of Ponza and Palmarola and by basic to intermediate rocks in the eastern edifice (Ventotene and Santo Stefano Islands). In this paper we present new geochemical and petrological data from submarine rock samples collected in two oceanographic cruises and a scuba diving survey. The main result is the recovery of relatively undifferentiated lithotypes that provide further insights on the magmatic spectrum existing in the Pontine Archipelago, allowing modelling of the whole suite of rocks by fractional crystallization processes. New major and trace element data and thermodynamic constrains (by the software PELE) indicate the existence of three distinct evolutionary trends corresponding to a HK calcalkaline series in the Pliocene, followed by a transitional and then by a shoshonite series in the Pleistocene. In particular, the transitional series, so far overlooked in the literature, is required in order to explain the genesis of several peralkaline felsic rocks recognized in the Archipelago. On the whole, the new geochemical data i) confirm the orogenic signature of the suites, ii) allow to rule out an anatectic origin for both subalkaline and peralkaline rhyolites and iii) indicate highly heterogeneous mantle sources, due to crustal components variously recycled in the mantle via subduction.

  14. Free-electron lasers for strategic defense: the benefits of scientific open scientific exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1986-02-24

    A dominant theme of the Fifth International Seminar on Nuclear War, held at Erice, Sicily, (August 19-24, 1985), was the appeal for openness in science and in technological research. In his address to the seminar, Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Andreotti cited the remarkable achievements at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), as an inspiring example of the benefits of scientific collaboration across national borders - science without frontiers. Dr. Edward Teller eloquently argued that, ''thanks to a nearly complete lack of official secrecy, computer technology has fluorished in the free societies of the United States, Japan, and Western Europe.'' The superiority of this technology, vis-a-vis its status in the Soviet bloc, has enhanced both the national security and the economic vitality of the United States and its allies. A further example of the success of science without secrecy can be found in another technology of major importance to the goals of America's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). The technology of note is the free electron-l'Ser (FEL).

  15. Theodor Billroth's vision and Karl Ziegler's action: commemoration of the 40th day of death and the 50th anniversary of conferment of Nobel Prize for Chemistry of Karl Ziegler.

    PubMed

    Kapischke, Matthias; Pries, Alexandra

    2014-02-01

    Alloplastic materials are broadly used in modern surgery. Until the middle of the 20th century, metal materials and especially silver were used because of their antimicrobial properties. With the development of a new catalytic process for the production of high-density polyethylene and polypropylene materials, a new era of prosthesis was introduced. These polymers are integral part of our everyday operations surgery, especially in hernia repair. The famous surgeon Billroth mentioned to his pupil Czerny in 1878: "If we could artificially produce tissues of the density and toughness of fascia and tendon, the secret of the radical cure of hernia would be discovered". The polypropylene developed by Karl Ziegler gave the surgeon a material for daily practice, which in its properties (nearly) achieved Billroth's initial vision. In 1963 the Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded to Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta in Stockholm. Furthermore, August 11, 2013 will be the 40th anniversary of Karl Ziegler's death. This manuscript honors both days.

  16. PREFACE: Physics and Mathematics of Nonlinear Phenomena 2013 (PMNP2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelchenko, B. G.; Landolfi, G.; Martina, L.; Vitolo, R.

    2014-03-01

    Modern theory of nonlinear integrable equations is nowdays an important and effective tool of study for numerous nonlinear phenomena in various branches of physics from hydrodynamics and optics to quantum filed theory and gravity. It includes the study of nonlinear partial differential and discrete equations, regular and singular behaviour of their solutions, Hamitonian and bi- Hamitonian structures, their symmetries, associated deformations of algebraic and geometrical structures with applications to various models in physics and mathematics. The PMNP 2013 conference focused on recent advances and developments in Continuous and discrete, classical and quantum integrable systems Hamiltonian, critical and geometric structures of nonlinear integrable equations Integrable systems in quantum field theory and matrix models Models of nonlinear phenomena in physics Applications of nonlinear integrable systems in physics The Scientific Committee of the conference was formed by Francesco Calogero (University of Rome `La Sapienza', Italy) Boris A Dubrovin (SISSA, Italy) Yuji Kodama (Ohio State University, USA) Franco Magri (University of Milan `Bicocca', Italy) Vladimir E Zakharov (University of Arizona, USA, and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) The Organizing Committee: Boris G Konopelchenko, Giulio Landolfi, Luigi Martina, Department of Mathematics and Physics `E De Giorgi' and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, and Raffaele Vitolo, Department of Mathematics and Physics `E De Giorgi'. A list of sponsors, speakers, talks, participants and the conference photograph are given in the PDF. Conference photograph

  17. The origins of psychology in Italy: Themes and authors that emerge through a content analysis of the Rivista di Filosofia Scientifica [Journal of Scientific Philosophy].

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Chiara; Lombardo, Giovanni Pietro

    2012-08-01

    This article examines the scientific-cultural context of the second half of the 1800s, during which psychological science emerged in Italy. The article explores the contribution made by the emergence of the primary research traditions of that period, namely, physiological anthropology and phreniatry, by means of a methodology that combines content analysis with a classical historiographical study of the period. Themes and authors deriving from the various disciplines in the human and natural sciences were identified through a content analysis of the Rivista di Filosofia Scientifica [Journal of Scientific Philosophy], a periodical that is representative of Italian positivism. The analysis highlights the epistemological perspective held by scholars who, distancing themselves from the mechanistic reductionism of the proponents of positivism, integrated a naturalistic and evolutionary conceptualization with the neo-Kantian critique. A clearly delineated naturalistic and differential perspective of scientific research that brought about the birth of psychology as an experimental discipline in Italy in the 1900s emerges from the analysis, including psychology and psychopathology as studied by the phreniatrists Gabriele Buccola, Enrico Morselli, and Eugenio Tanzi; Tito Vignoli and Giuseppe Sergi's work in comparative anthropology; Giulio Fano's approach and contribution to physiology; and Enrico Ferri's contribution to criminology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The italian communist party and the "lysenko affair" (1948-1955).

    PubMed

    Cassata, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the impact of the VASKhNIL conference upon the cultural policy of the Italian Communist Party (PCI) and Italian communist biology, with particular attention to the period between 1948 and 1951. News of the Moscow session did not appear in the Italian news media until October, 1948, and for the next three years party biologists struggled over whether to translate the official transcript of the proceedings, The Situation in Biological Science, into Italian. This struggle reveals the complex efforts of the PCI to confirm the ideological and political connection with the Soviet Union, without completely alienating significant milieus of the democratic and antifascist culture in Italy. The apparent impossibility of doing both is indicated by the fact that the project was finally abandoned in March-April, 1951. The article is divided into three sections, each focused on different actors and their response to Lysenkoism. The first section outlines the features of the PCI's pro-Lysenko campaign, with particular regard to the intellectual militancy and organizational commitment of Emilio Sereni, head of PCI's Cultural Commission between 1948 and 1951. The second section analyzes the reaction of the three most important figures in Italian communist biology during this period, Massimiliano Aloisi, Franco Graziosi and Emanuele Padoa. The third section interprets the decision not to publish a translation of The Situation in Biological Science as a consequence of the conflicts between PCI cultural program and the editorial policy of the left-wing publishing house Giulio Einaudi Editore.

  19. A brief historical survey of "Peyronie's disease".

    PubMed

    Musitelli, Sergio; Bossi, Maurizio; Jallous, Hussein

    2008-07-01

    Historians of medicine and urology, sexology, and andrology in particular maintain that many other physicians, surgeons, anatomists, and pathologists have already described "Peyronie's disease" some centuries before the author after whom it has been called, François Gigot de La Peyronie (1678-1747). To perform a brief historical survey of Peyronie's disease. Methods. A literature review was performed. The main surgeons and anatomists who previously observed and described penile curvature prior to François Gigot de La Peyronie are Theodoricus Borgognoni (1205-1298), Guilielmus of Saliceto (circa 1210-1276), Gabriele Falloppio (or Falloppia) (1523-1562), Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), Giulio Cesare Aranzi (or Aranzio) (1530-1589), Claas Pieterzoon Tulp (Nicholaus Tulpius) (1593-1674), and Anton Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731), who was said to have left the first "postmortem" illustration of the disease in a copperplate engraving in 1691. The original texts could easily prove that none of the alleged "precursors" of La Peyronie did ever describe, treat, and cure real cases of Peyronie's disease, and that to award them this merit was somewhat far-fetched, with only Guilielmus of Saliceto and Falloppio possibly excepted.

  20. The Influence of Ziegler-Natta and Metallocene Catalysts on Polyolefin Structure, Properties, and Processing Ability

    PubMed Central

    Shamiri, Ahmad; Chakrabarti, Mohammed H.; Jahan, Shah; Hussain, Mohd Azlan; Kaminsky, Walter; Aravind, Purushothaman V.; Yehye, Wageeh A.

    2014-01-01

    50 years ago, Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta were awarded the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the catalytic polymerization of ethylene and propylene using titanium compounds and aluminum-alkyls as co-catalysts. Polyolefins have grown to become one of the biggest of all produced polymers. New metallocene/methylaluminoxane (MAO) catalysts open the possibility to synthesize polymers with highly defined microstructure, tacticity, and steroregularity, as well as long-chain branched, or blocky copolymers with excellent properties. This improvement in polymerization is possible due to the single active sites available on the metallocene catalysts in contrast to their traditional counterparts. Moreover, these catalysts, half titanocenes/MAO, zirconocenes, and other single site catalysts can control various important parameters, such as co-monomer distribution, molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, molecular architecture, stereo-specificity, degree of linearity, and branching of the polymer. However, in most cases research in this area has reduced academia as olefin polymerization has seen significant advancements in the industries. Therefore, this paper aims to further motivate interest in polyolefin research in academia by highlighting promising and open areas for the future. PMID:28788120

  1. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed Central

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-01-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable. PMID:20002228

  2. Free-electron lasers for strategic defense: The benefits of scientific open scientific exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, W. A.

    1986-02-01

    A dominant theme of the Fifth International Seminar on Nuclear War, held at Erice, Sicily, (August 19-24, 1985), was the appeal for openness in science and in technological research. In his address to the seminar, Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Andreotti cited the remarkable achievements at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), as an inspiring example of the benefits of scientific collaboration across national borders - science without frontiers. Dr. Edward Teller eloquently argued that, thanks to a nearly complete lack of official secrecy, computer technology has flourished in the free societies of the United States, Japan, and Western Europe. The superiority of this technology, vis-a-vis its status in the Soviet bloc, has enhanced both the national security and the economic vitality of the United States and its allies. A further example of the success of science without secrecy can be found in another technology of major importance to the goals of America's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). The technology of note is the free electron laser (FEL).

  3. Treatment of kidney diseases in the thermal springs of Pithecusa during the XVIII Century.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Elisabetta; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Ricciardi, Biagio

    2016-02-01

    The island of Pithecusa (Ischia) is a volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea in the north end of the Gulf of Naples at about 30 kilometers from the same city. Pithecusa is very popular for its hot springs which even the ancients used. This report aims to analyze the renal therapeutic benefits of the Pithacusa thermal mineral spring through a review of two different manuscripts: i) "Di Napoli il seno cratero"(The gulf of Naples) of Domenico Antonio Parrino (1642-1708) and ii) "De' rimedi naturali che sono nell'isola di Pithecusa oggi detta Ischia"(On the natural cures of the island of Pithecusa known today as Ischia)of Giulio Iasolino (1583-1622). These two manuscripts published during the 18th century and both manuscripts highlight the thermal virtues of the thermal springs of Pithecusa. In the past natural remedies were important in the treatment of different diseases including that of thermal springs dating back to ancient Rome. Thermal springs were used to treat spasms, skin diseases, hair loss and various renal ailments. Both manuscripts describe the thermal springs in Ischia and their therapeutic benefits in medical diseases.

  4. On the Time of the Intellect: The Interpretation of De Anima 3.6 (43ob 7-20) in Renaissance and Early Modern Italian Philosophy.

    PubMed

    Dubouclez, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that an original debate over the relationship between time and the intellect took place in Northern Italy in the second half of the sixteenth century, which was part of a broader reflection on the temporality of human mental acts. While human intellectual activity was said to be 'above time' during the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars such as Marcantonio Genua (1491-1563), Giulio Castellani (1528-1586), Antonio Montecatini (1537-1599) and Francesco Piccolomini (1520-1604), greatly influenced by the Simplician and Alexandrist interpretations of Aristotle's works, proposed alterna- tive conceptions based on the interpretation of De anima 3.6 (430b 7-20) according to which intellectual acts happen in a both 'undivided' and 'divisible time'. In order to explain Aristotle's puzzling claim, they were led to conceive of intellectual activity as a process similar to sensation, corresponding to a certain lapse of time (Castellani), an instant (Montecatini), or a mix of instantaneousness and concrete duration (Piccolomini), depending on their theoretical options.

  5. Youth leadership program for changing self-image and attitude toward people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronen; Roth, Dana; York, Alan; Neikrug, Shimshon

    2012-01-01

    Society has a negative attitude toward people with intellectual disabilities or psychiatric disabilities. It is well documented that they are subjected to prejudice, stigma, and negative attitudes (Di Giulio, 2003; Finger, 1994). Professional literature indicates that information about disabilities and encounters with persons with disabilities can change negative attitudes (Carter, Hughes, Copeland, & Breen, 2001; Krajewski & Flaherty, 2000). This study accompanied 164 9th-grade students from various junior high schools throughout Israel. Half of the students participated in an integration program for changing attitudes toward persons with disabilities, and the other half served as the control group. The research examined the existence and the degree of relationship between participation in the program, changes in attitudes toward people with disabilities, and self-image. The research findings pointed to a positive change in attitudes of the participants of the program in comparison with the control group, resulting mainly from personal contact with people with disabilities. No relationship was found between levels of self-image of the research group and attitudes toward people with disabilities.

  6. Origin of the cannula for tracheotomy during the middle ages and Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Brunetto, Giacoma M; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to trace the historical origin of the inserted cannula during tracheotomy. Tracheotomy is mentioned in most ancient medical texts, but the origin of cannula insertion into the windpipe is unclear. We reviewed the incunabula and Renaissance texts reporting the utilization of surgical cannulas and tracheotomy. The incunabula disclosed extended use of surgical cannulas during the middle ages and Renaissance. Although tracheotomy was advocated in acutely suffocating patients for a disease of the throat termed squinantia or angina, the first report of the procedure was found only at the end of the middle ages and a second during the middle Renaissance. The introduction of cannula use in tracheotomy was supported by a semantic misinterpretation by Antonio Musa Brasavola. The historical origin for tracheotomy in the middle ages and Renaissance is conflicting. Antonio Brasavola wrongly interpreted Avicenna's oral cannula introduced into the windpipe for angina. This misinterpretation allowed Giulio Casserio to draw the first curved cannula introduced for used during tracheotomy.

  7. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-02-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable.

  8. Medical competence, anatomy and the polity in seventeenth-century Rome

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    At the centre of this article are two physicians active in Rome between 1600 and 1630 who combined medical practice with broader involvement in the dynamic cultural, economic and political scene of the centre of the Catholic world. The city's distinctive and very influential social landscape magnified issues of career-building and allows us to recapture physicians’ different strategies of self-fashioning at a time of major social and religious reorganization. At one level, reconstructing Johannes Faber and Giulio Mancini's medical education, arrival in Rome and overlapping but different career trajectories contributes to research on physicians’ identity in early modern Italian states. Most remarkable are their access to different segments of Roman society, including a dynamic art market, and their diplomatic and political role, claimed as well as real. But following these physicians from hospitals to courts, including that of the Pope, and from tribunals to the university and analysing the wide range of their writing – from medico-legal consilia to political essays and reports of anatomical investigations – also enriches our view of medical practice, which included, but went beyond, the bedside. Furthermore, their activities demand that we reassess the complex place of anatomical investigations in a courtly society, and start recovering the fundamental role played by hospitals – those quintessential Catholic institutions – as sites of routine dissections for both medical teaching and research. (pp. 551–567) PMID:21949463

  9. A unique story in neonatal research: the development of a porcine surfactant.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Halliday, Henry L; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant deficiency was identified as the cause of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) as long ago as 1959. Trials of surfactant replacement in the 1960s were unsuccessful because the preparations used contained only phospholipids and they were administered inefficiently by nebulization. In the 1970s Bengt Robertson and Göran Enhörning showed that natural surfactant, containing both phospholipids and proteins, could ameliorate the signs of RDS in immature rabbits. In the 1980s Bengt Robertson and Tore Curstedt developed a porcine surfactant, Curosurf (named after their surnames), which was effective in immature animals and was used in a pilot clinical trial beginning in 1983. Subsequent randomized clinical trials were planned a year later by Bengt Robertson, Tore Curstedt and Henry Halliday, and the first trial was begun in 1985. This showed that Curosurf reduced pulmonary air leaks and neonatal mortality in preterm infants with severe RDS. A second trial, coordinated by Christian Speer, demonstrated that multiple doses of Curosurf were more effective than a single dose. Subsequent trials conducted by the Collaborative European Multicenter Study Group, which included among others Guilio Bevilacqua, Janna Koppe, Ola Saugstad, Nils Svenningsen and Jean-Pierre Relier, showed that early treatment was more effective than later administration and that infants treated at birth had similar neurodevelopmental status to untreated controls at a corrected age of 2 years. Members of the Collaborative European Multicenter Study Group in Denmark and Sweden performed studies to demonstrate the benefits of a combination of surfactant treatment and early continuous positive airway pressure. Curosurf has also been compared with several synthetic and natural surfactants, and at a dose of 200 mg/kg Curosurf has been shown to be superior to either Survanta or Curosurf used at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Recently, new-generation synthetic surfactants containing both phospholipids and

  10. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    symbolize cosmic harmony. But here it is the earth, "nature", the ground beneath our feet that is moving. It speaks to us not of harmony, but of our fragility. For the oldest earthquakes considered, Seismic Symphonies drew on SISMOS archives, the INGV project for recovery, high resolution digital reproduction and distribution of the seismograms of earthquakes of the Euro-Mediterranean area from 1895 to 1984. After the first exposure to the Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa in Venice, the organ was later exhibited in Taiwan, the Taipei Biennial, with seismograms provided from the Taiwanese Central Weather Bureau, and at the EACC Castello in Spain, with seismograms of Spanish earthquakes provided by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional.

  11. Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

    2001-02-16

    Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year with significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation has made this the international guidance tool it was intended to be. The lead authors would also like to thank the following individuals for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook: Marcy Beck, Elisa Derby, Diana Dhunke, Ted Gartner, and Julie Osborn of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as well as Anthony Ma of Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards-setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the programs

  12. A probabilistic spatial-temporal model for vent opening clustering at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Isaia, R.; Flandoli, F.; Neri, A.; Quaranta, D.

    2014-12-01

    Campi Flegrei (CF) is a densely urbanized caldera with a very high volcanic risk. Its more recent volcanic activity was characterized in the last 15 kyrs by more than 70 explosive events of variable scale and vent location. The sequence of eruptive events at CF is remarkably inhomogeneous, both in space and time. Eruptions concentred over periods from a few centuries to a few millennia, and were alternated by periods of quiescence lasting up to several millennia. As a consequence, activity has been subdivided into three distinct epochs, i.e. Epoch I, 15 - 9.5 kyrs, Epoch II, 8.6 - 8.2 kyrs, and Epoch III, 4.8 - 3.7 kyrs BP [e.g. Orsi et al., 2004; Smith et al., 2011]. The eruptive record also shows the presence of clusters of events in space-time, i.e. the opening of a new vent in a particular location and at a specific time seems to increase the probability of another vent opening in the nearby area and in the next decades-centuries (self-exciting effect). Probabilistic vent opening mapping conditional the occurrence of a new event and able to account for some of the intrinsic uncertainties affecting the system, has been investigated in some recent studies [e.g. Selva et al. 2011, Bevilacqua et al. 2014, in preparation], but a spatial-temporal model of the sequence of volcanic activity remains an open issue. Hence we have developed a time-space mathematical model that takes into account both the self-exciting behaviour of the system and the significant uncertainty affecting the eruptive record. Based on the past eruptive record of the volcano, the model allows to simulate sequences of future events as well as to better understand the spatial and temporal evolution of the system. In addition, based on the assumption that the last eruptive event occurred in 1538 AD (Monte Nuovo eruption) is the first event of a new epoch of activity, the model can estimate the probability of new vent opening at CF in the next decades.

  13. Modelling wet and dry spells for daily rainfall data series: an application to irrigation management in North-West Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Agnese, Carmelo; Baiamonte, Giorgio; Cat Berro, Daniele; Mercalli, Luca

    2016-04-01

    rainfall events for Italian Sub-Alpine and Mediterranean areas". Adv. Sci. Res., 1, 1-7, 2012, doi:10.5194/asr-1-1-2012 Agnese C., Baiamonte G., Cammalleri C. (2014)."Modelling the occurrence of rainy days under a typical Mediterranean climate". Adv. Water Res., 64, 62-76 Canone D., Previati M., Bevilacqua I., Salvai L., Ferraris S. (2015) "Field measurements based model for surface irrigation efficiency assessment". Agric. Water Manag., vol. 156(1) pp. 30-42, doi:10.1016/j.agwat.2015.03.01 Chatfield C., Wet and dry spells. Weather 1966; 21:308-10.

  14. Hot Alps (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, F.; Minelli, L.; Pignatelli, A.; Gilardi, M.

    2013-12-01

    heat flow values ranging from 90 to 150 mW/m2, if k values of 1.5 to 2.5 W/m°K (respectively) are assumed (the latter is average k value of the crust assumed for other world provinces, such as California). A ~150 mW/m2 heat flow value turns out to be similar to that observed in Tuscany and the Tyrrhenian Sea back-arc basin, as well as to values documented for active rifts and young oceans. Di Stefano et al. (2009) documented P wave velocities around 8 km/sec in the upper mantle of the Alps, suggesting the lack of shallow asthenosphere. Thus high heat flow of the Alps must be produced by radiogenic crust, instead of asthenospheric upwelling. A 600°C isotherm at ~10 km depth implies widespread melting at mid-lower crustal depths, considering the 60 km crustal thickness of the Alps. This is consistent with the very low P-wave velocities observed at 20-40 km depth beneath the chain by Di Stefano et al. (2009). When extrapolated to other orogens of the geological past, the thermal regime of the Alps may explain the extensive occurrence of intrusives exposed in eroded pre-Alpine orogens and cratons. Reference: Di Stefano, R., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, doi:10.1029/2008JB005641.

  15. Assessment of flooding in urbanized ungauged basins: a case study in the Upper Tiber area, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moramarco, T.; Melone, F.; Singh, V. P.

    2005-06-01

    The reliability of a procedure for investigation of flooding into an ungauged river reach close to an urban area is investigated. The approach is based on the application of a semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model for a gauged basin, including the flood-prone area, and that furnishes the inlet flow conditions for a two-dimensional hydraulic model, whose computational domain is the urban area. The flood event, which occurred in October 1998 in the Upper Tiber river basin and caused significant damage in the town of Pieve S. Stefano, was used to test the approach. The built-up area, often inundated, is included in the gauged basin of the Montedoglio dam (275 km2), for which the rainfall-runoff model was adapted and calibrated through three flood events without over-bank flow. With the selected set of parameters, the hydrological model was found reasonably accurate in simulating the discharge hydrograph of the three events, whereas the flood event of October 1998 was simulated poorly, with an error in peak discharge and time to peak of -58% and 20%, respectively. This discrepancy was ascribed to the combined effect of the rainfall spatial variability and a partial obstruction of the bridge located in Pieve S. Stefano. In fact, taking account of the last hypothesis, the hydraulic model reproduced with a fair accuracy the observed flooded urban area. Moreover, incorporating into the hydrological model the flow resulting from a sudden cleaning of the obstruction, which was simulated by a shock-capturing one-dimensional hydraulic model, the discharge hydrograph at the basin outlet was well represented if the rainfall was supposed to have occurred in the region near the main channel. This was simulated by reducing considerably the dynamic parameter, the lag time, of the instantaneous unit hydrograph for each homogeneous element into which the basin is divided. The error in peak discharge and time to peak decreased by a few percent. A sensitivity analysis of both the

  16. Transuranium radionuclide pollution in the waters of the La Maddalena National Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Aumento, F; Le Donne, K; Eroe, K

    2005-01-01

    Following the grounding and subsequent explosion, in October 2003, of a nuclear submarine in the waters of the La Maddalena National Marine Park, fears arose of possible radioactive leakages. However, isotopic analyses on algae showed that the gamma-ray emitting artificial radionuclides that one might expect to leak from a damaged nuclear reactor (such as U-235, I-131, Cs-137) were absent, and that U-238/U-234 activities were in equilibrium with values typical of sea water; this excluded any direct anthropogenic contamination as a result of the accident. We used alpha autoradiographic techniques to detect possible traces of transuranium radionuclides; 160 samples of algae, granites, sea urchins, gastropods, limpets, cuttlefish and jellyfish were collected from the area, as well as from other Mediterranean coastlines and the Baltic Sea. All samples were autoradiographed, and selected samples further analysed by alpha spectrometry. There were no alpha track concentrations above background levels in our control Mediterranean specimens. In the samples from the La Maddalena and Baltic areas two different track distributions were observed: --those homogeneously distributed over the surfaces examined; --groups (10 to over 500) of radially distributed alpha tracks (forming "star" bursts, or "hot spots") emanating from point sources. By comparing radionuclide activities measured by alpha spectroscopy with alpha track densities, we extrapolated Pu activities for all samples. About 74% of algae had Pu activities of less than 1 Bq/kg and 0.25 Bq/kg, 16% had accumulated Pu to levels between 1 and 2 Bq/kg, and a very few specimens had concentrations between 2 and 6 Bq/kg. Plots showed that alpha tracks and stars concentrate around the northern and eastern margins of the Rada (Basin) di Santo Stefano, sites facing the nuclear submarine base on the eastern shore of the island of Santo Stefano. What is the source of these nuclides: last century's atmospheric nuclear testing

  17. Preliminary results of trace elements mobility in soils and plants from the active hydrothermal area of Nisyros island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; Calabrese, Sergio; Milazzo, Silvia; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Tassi, Franco; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Trace elements, i.e. chemical constituents of rocks with concentration <1000 ppm, play a structural role in the organisms and use proteins as a carrier to their target site. Their toxicity depends on their concentration, speciation and reactions with other elements. In volcanic environments, significant amounts of trace elements discharged from gas emissions, contribute to produce air particulate. Nisyros Island is a stratovolcano located at the South Aegean active Volcanic Arc. Intense hydrothermal activity characterise the Lakki caldera. In particular, the fumaroles located in the craters of Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos Dome and the area comprising Phlegeton, Polyvotes Micros and Polyvotes Megalos discharge hydrothermal fluids rich in H2O (91- 99%), SO2 and H2S. Their temperatures are almost 100o C and H2S is highly abundant accounting for 8-26 % of the released dry gas phase. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field trip on Nisyros island, 39 samples of top soils and 31 of endemic plants (Cistus Creticus and Salvifolius and Erica Arborea and Manipuliflora) were collected in the caldera area, with the aim to investigate the distribution of concentrations of trace elements related to the contribution of deep originated fluids. Moreover, one sample of plant and soil was collected outside the caldera as local background, for comparison. All the soil samples were powdered avoiding metal contamination and they were extracted twice, using HNO3 + HCl for one extraction (closed microwave digestion) and ultrapure de- ionized water for the other one (leaching extraction). The leaves of plants were gently isolated, dried and powdered for acid microwave extraction (HNO3 + H2O2). All the solutions were analysed for major and trace elements contents by using ionic chromatography (IC) and inductively plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES). The preliminary results showed high enrichment of many trace elements both in plant and soils respect to the local background, in

  18. The role of reward pathways in the development of drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Wise, R A

    1987-01-01

    In commenting on the discovery of "opiate" receptors, Goldstein (1976) said: "It seemed unlikely, a priori, that such highly stereospecific receptors should have been developed by nature to interact with alkaloids from the opium poppy" (p. 1081). Endogenous opioid peptides and opioid receptor systems have now been identified in invertebrates that are unlikely to have had ancestors exposed to opium poppies (Kavaliers et al., 1983; Kream et al., 1980; Leung and Stefano, 1984; Stefano et al., 1980). Moreover, endogenous opioids play a role in stress-induced feeding in the slug (Kavaliers and Hirst, 1986) just as they play a role in stress-induced feeding in rodents (Lowy et al., 1980; Morley and Levine, 1980). If we are to understand the actions of opiates and other drugs of abuse we must understand them in terms of their abilities to interact with neural systems that evolved in the service of primitive biological functions, long before any serious incidence of addiction itself. The most primitive axes of the biological substrates of behavior are the axes of approach and withdrawal. Addictive drugs appear to be able to activate the mechanisms of approach, which is termed "positive reinforcement" and to inhibit the mechanisms of withdrawal, which is termed "negative reinforcement." Anatomically distinct sets of pathways have evolved to serve these two forms of reward. Activation of the medial forebrain bundle and associated structures serves positive reinforcement and induces forward locomotion. Approach and forward locomotion are the unconditioned responses to positive reinforcing stimuli such as food and sex partners, and approach to environmental objects and positive reinforcement is induced by electrical stimulation of this structure. The locomotor stimulating effects and the positive reinforcing effects of opiates and psychomotor stimulants result from their activation of this mechanism; stimulants activate the mechanism at the level of dopaminergic synapses of

  19. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  20. Safeguard of Cultural Heritage: Evaluation of Ground Motion at Palazzo Te (Mantova, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, R.; Tento, A.; Benetti, S.; Pisani, C.; Mastromarino, C.; Riva, P.; Marcellini, A.

    2011-12-01

    Built on the first half of the XVI century, under Federico II Gonzaga, Duke of Mantova, Palazzo Te is one of the most relevant Italian monuments and it belongs to the UNESCO World Heritage List; the Camera dei Giganti (Chamber of the Giants) hosts a famous XVI century Giulio Romano fresco. Palazzo Te raises concerns in particular for the statics of the Fruttiere external wall and for some fissures that cross the above mentioned fresco. Therefore a monitoring survey has been undertaken to detect and qualify the vibrations caused by earthquakes and anthropic activity. Palazzo Te is situated in a low seismicity area, nevertheless even weak earthquakes could result in significant damage due to the poor soil conditions. A seismic station deployed inside the Palazzo Te recorded, on July 17, 2011, 2 cm/sec2 PGA for the ML 4.7 earthquake located at approx 51 km distance: some light damage has been observed. As far as vibrations due to anthropic origin, the station has evidenced that the major threat is due to the trains at the nearby railway: inside the Palazzo Te PGA reached 5 cm/sec2. The seismic survey led to the following considerations: 1. even low magnitude earthquakes can be a threat, given the intrinsic vulnerability of some parts of the Palazzo Te; 2. the main and possibly unique significant dangerous vibrations of anthropic origin come from the trains running nearby; 3. the response spectra evidenced that the earthquake had a consistent energy content till T0=2 seconds, while the spectrum of the trains decay abruptly at around 10 Hz. In contrast the train response spectrum is significantly higher in the high frequency range. In conclusion, despite the relatively low hazard, seismic risk is still relevant, because of the poor soil conditions coupled with the high vulnerability. The train vibrations are not a threat for the Palazzo Te structure but can cause some concerns to the frescoes.

  1. Camillo Golgi's scientific biography.

    PubMed

    Mazzarello, P

    1999-08-01

    Born in Corteno, a tiny village in the province of Brescia, Camillo Golgi studied at the University of Pavia where he graduated in medicine in 1865 under the guidance of the psychiatrist Cesare Lombroso who sparked his vocation to study the brain. Golgi then began to learn histological techniques under the direction of the pathologist Giulio Bizzozero. In 1872 he moved to Abbiategrasso as chief of a hospital for chronic diseases. In a rudimentary laboratory he developed the silver-bichromate staining technique, the 'black reaction', which was a breakthrough for nervous tissue structure research. While in Abbiategrasso Golgi demonstrated the branching of the axons, and observed striatal and cortical lesions in a case of chorea. He returned to Pavia as Professor of Histology and General Pathology, and made a series of important discoveries that still bear his name: the Golgi tendon organ, the Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscles, another Golgi method to stain nerve cells based on the use of potassium dichromate and mercuric chloride, the canaliculi of the parietal cells of the gastric glands (Muller-Golgi tubules), the Golgi-Rezzonico myelin's annular apparatus (or Golgi-Rezzonico horny funnels), the cycle of malarian parasites (Golgi cycle), the relationship between recurrent malarian fever bouts and the multiplication of the Plasmodium in the blood (Golgi law), the relationship between the vascular pole of the Malpighian glomerulus and the distal tubule, the Golgi's pericellular nets and finally, and most importantly, the cytoplasmic 'internal reticular apparatus' (Golgi apparatus). In 1906 Golgi was awarded the Nobel prize for Medicine or Physiology. He died in Pavia on 21 January 1921.

  2. Clues to tRNA Evolution from the Distribution of Class II tRNAs and Serine Codons in the Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Harold S

    2016-02-24

    We have previously proposed that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA and glycine was the first amino acid incorporated into the genetic code. The next two amino acids incorporated would have been the other two small hydrophilic amino acids serine and aspartic acid, which occurred through the duplication of the tRNA(Gly) sequence, followed by mutation of its anticodon by single C to U transition mutations, possibly through spontaneous deamination. Interestingly, however, tRNA(Ser) has a different structure than most other tRNAs, possessing a long variable arm; because of this tRNA(Ser) is classified as a class II tRNA. Also, serine codons are found not only in the bottom right-hand corner of the genetic code table next to those for glycine and aspartic acid, but also in the top row of the table, next to those for two of the most hydrophobic amino acids, leucine and phenylalanine. In the following, I propose that the class II tRNA structure of tRNA(Ser) and the arrangement of serine codons in the genetic code provide clues to the early evolution of tRNA and the genetic code. In addition, I address Di Giulio's recent criticism of our proposal that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA, and discuss how early peptides produced from a restricted amino acid alphabet of glycine, serine and aspartic acid might have possessed proteolytic activity, which is possibly important for the early recycling of amino acid monomers.

  3. Site characterization in central Italy: the case of the Amatrice (IT.AMT) accelerometric station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Pacor, Francesca; Bordoni, Paola; Mancini, Marco; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Milana, Giuliano; GeoRAN-INGV working Group

    2017-04-01

    GeoRAN - INGV working group: G. P. Cavinato, G. Cosentino, S. Giallini, F. Polpetta, R. Razzano, M. Simionato, P. Sirianni (1); S. Amoroso, A. Bucci, E. D'Alema, M. D'Amico, F. Cara, S. Carannante, R. Cogliano, G. Cultrera, G. Di Giulio, D. Di Naccio, D. Famiani, C. Felicetta, A. Fodarella, G. Franceschina, G. Lanzano, S. Lovati, L. Luzi, C. Mascandola, M. Massa, A. Mercuri, D. Picaredda, M. Pischiutta, S. Pucillo, R. Puglia, G. Riccio, M. Vassallo (2) During the Mw 6.0 Amatrice earthquake, which struck Central Italy on the 24th August 2016, the accelerometric station AMT, located at about 10km from the epicentre recorded the highest values of the ground motion (Peak Ground Acceleration of the east component reached 0.87 g). To understand the role played by the site effects in the ground motion observed at AMT, we performed a detailed geological - geotechnical characterization of the site. First, geological field investigations were carried out and used to define a detailed geological cross-section intercepting AMT station. Then, aiming at constraining the Vs model, a continuous coring borehole was drilled close to the AMT site and a down-hole test was consequently executed in order to define the shear-wave velocity profile. In addition, MASW and several noise measurements were realized for better constraining the model and evaluating any eventual geological variability along the cross-section. Finally, numerical analyses of seismic site response were carried out using both 1D and 2D approaches including linear equivalent models. In parallel, several analysis were also performed on seismic records, to infer empirical amplification functions, used to compare the results of the numerical simulations This study was partially supported by the Italian Department of Civil Protection (DPC) of the Presidency of Council of Ministers. The INGV-CNR IGAG collaboration made possible the realization of this multidisciplinary study, which includes detailed seismological

  4. From Matter to Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imari Walker, Sara; Davies, Paul C. W.; Ellis, George F. R.

    2017-02-01

    1. Introduction Sara Imari Walker, Paul C. W. Davies and F. R. Ellis; Part I. Physics and Life: 2. The 'hard problem' of life Sara Imari Walker and Paul C. W. Davies; 3. Beyond initial conditions and laws of motion: constructor theory of information and life Chiara Marletto; Part II. Bio from Bit: 4. (How) did information emerge? Anne-Marie Grisogono; 5. On the emerging codes for chemical evolution Jillian E. Smith-Carpenter, Sha Li, Jay T. Goodwin, Anil K. Mehta and David G. Lynn; 6. Digital and analogue information in organisms Denis Noble; 7. From entropy to information: biased typewriters and the origin of life Christoph Adami and Thomas Labar; Part III. Life's Hidden Information: 8. Cryptographic nature David Krakauer; 9. Noise and function Steven Weinstein and Theodore Pavlic; 10. The many faces of state space compression David Wolpert, Eric Libby, Joshua Grochow and Simon DeDeo; 11. Causality, information and biological computation: an algorithmic software approach to life, disease and the immune system Hector Zenil, Angelika Schmidt and Jesper Tegnér; Part IV. Complexity and Causality: 12. Life's information hierarchy Jessica Flack; 13. Living through downward causation: from molecules to ecosystems Keith D. Farnsworth, George F. R. Ellis and Luc Jaeger; 14. Automata and animats: from dynamics to cause-effect structures Larissa Albantakis and Giulio Tononi; 15. Biological information, causality and specificity - an intimate relationship Karola Stotz and Paul Griffiths; Part V. From Matter to Mind: 16. Major transitions in political order Simon DeDeo; 17. Bits from biology for computational intelligence Michael Wibral, Joseph Lizier and Viola Priesemann; 18. Machine learning and the questions it raises G. Andrew D. Briggs and Dawid Potgieter.

  5. [The stigmata of St Franics and other Saints charismatics: between miracle and scientific answer].

    PubMed

    Muzur, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Departing from the definition of the stigmata as the wounds which, temporarely or permanently, manifest in some cases of extasy following a selected model of suffering (Jesus, Mohammed etc.), the present paper analyzes the phenomenology of stigmatization on several most famous historical and actual examples: Francis of Assisi, as the first stigmatized at all; Catherine of Siena, the only one beside Francis whose stigmata have been recognized by the Church as supernatural; Rita of Cascia (14th c.); Marie de Mörl (1812-1868) from Tirol; the Belgian Louise Lateau (1850-1883); Izabele Hendricks (1844-1874), who died from bleeding; Gemma Galgani (1878-1903), who presented stigmata and the traces of flagellation; the Bavarian Therese Neumann (1898-1962), of whom probabely the most has been written; the popular mendicant father Pio from Pietrelcina (1887-1968); Giulio Massa (b. 1970) from Montecorvino near Salerno, already known as the "Father Pio of the 21st century," who speeks out in Aramaic during extasy; and the first Croatian stigmatized, Zlatko Sudac (b. 1971). Considering some older and more recent interpretations of the stigmata, a more precise definition of that phenomenon is suggested. Acording to it, the stigmata might be considered spontaneous, isolated cases of the localized deautonomization of influence upon superficial blood vessels, mediated by altered consciousness. Pointed out are the potential enormous benefits which medicine might provide by finding out the regularity and methods by which that phenomenon would be initiated in a controlled way, at full consciousness, without external help and at any place on the body.

  6. [Polycyclic aromatic hidrocarbons deposition in the Milazzo-Valle del Mela (Sicily Region, Southern Italy) high-risk area following an oil refinery fire].

    PubMed

    Grechi, Daniele; Biggeri, Annibale

    2016-01-01

    On September 2014, a fire began within an oil refinery involving a storage tank containing several hundreds of thousands cubic meters of virgin naphtha. Mayors of neighbouring municipalities asked the Epidemiology and Prevention Society "Giulio A. Maccacaro" to carry out an environmental survey in order to evaluate what was the nature and how dangerous was suspended dust deposited by the fumes. In the following days, after fire had been extinguished we conducted a sample survey on the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and metals in particulate deposited on the soil on a radius of five kilometres from the refinery and we engaged the exposed population. The Milazzo-Valle del Mela (Sicily Region, Southern Italy) high-risk area includes several industrial plants; among them, an oil refinery and a fuel powered energy plant. As reference area we selected the Sarroch municipality (Sardinia Region, Southern Italy), in the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is geographically comparable, where a large oil refinery is located and where an environmental campaign with measurement of PAH and metals in particulate matter was ongoing. Qualitatively, metal composition of particulate matter resulted similar in the Sarroch and Milazzo samples. Instead, a large excess of PAH was documented in the Milazzo samples as compared to the Sarroch ones. In conclusion, the results of the analysis of the samples of particulate matter deposited in the Milazzo area in the days immediately following the oil refinery fire showed a high quantity of PAH, carcinogenic substances which pose major hazard to population health. The greater fall-out was registered in the proximity of the burnt storage tank and the West neighbourhood, and at lesser extent in the Southern neighbourhood. As a consequence, there was a population exposure to carcinogenic substances which could have reached the food chain.

  7. Elastic, not plastic species: Frozen plasticity theory and the origin of adaptive evolution in sexually reproducing organisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Darwin's evolutionary theory could easily explain the evolution of adaptive traits (organs and behavioral patterns) in asexual but not in sexual organisms. Two models, the selfish gene theory and frozen plasticity theory were suggested to explain evolution of adaptive traits in sexual organisms in past 30 years. Results The frozen plasticity theory suggests that sexual species can evolve new adaptations only when their members are genetically uniform, i.e. only after a portion of the population of the original species had split off, balanced on the edge of extinction for several generations, and then undergone rapid expansion. After a short period of time, estimated on the basis of paleontological data to correspond to 1-2% of the duration of the species, polymorphism accumulates in the gene pool due to frequency-dependent selection; and thus, in each generation, new mutations occur in the presence of different alleles and therefore change their selection coefficients from generation to generation. The species ceases to behave in an evolutionarily plastic manner and becomes evolutionarily elastic on a microevolutionary time-scale and evolutionarily frozen on a macroevolutionary time-scale. It then exists in this state until such changes accumulate in the environment that the species becomes extinct. Conclusion Frozen plasticity theory, which includes the Darwinian model of evolution as a special case - the evolution of species in a plastic state, not only offers plenty of new predictions to be tested, but also provides explanations for a much broader spectrum of known biological phenomena than classic evolutionary theories. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Rob Knight, Fyodor Kondrashov and Massimo Di Giulio (nominated by David H. Ardell). PMID:20067646

  8. The Hermann Weyl Prize - Laudatio for Guilio Chiribella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Olmo, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    The Hermann Weyl Prize was created in 2000 by the Standing Committee of the International Group Theory Colloquium. The purpose of the Weyl Prize is to provide recognition for young scientists (younger than 35) who have performed original work of significant scientific quality in the area of understanding physics through symmetries. The Hermann Weyl Prize consists of a certificate citing the accomplishments of the recipient, prize money of $500 and an allowance towards the attendance of the bi-annual International Group Theory Colloquium at which the award is presented. The previous winners of the award were: Edward Frenkel (2002), Nikita A Nekrasov (2004), Boyko Bakalov (2006) and Mohammad M Sheikh-Jabbari (2008). The Selection Committee of the Weyl Prize 2010 consisted of S T Ali (Concordia University), E Corrigan (Durham Univeristy), P Kulish (St Petersburg Mathematical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences), R Mosseri (CNRS Paris) and M A del Olmo (University of Valladolid, chairman). This committee has made the following announcement: The Weyl Prize for the year 2010 was awarded to Dr Giulio Chiribella, in recognition of his pioneering work on the application of group theoretical methods in Quantum Information Theory. In particular, for providing a general solution to the problem of optimal estimation of symmertry transformations based on the notion of quantum entanglement between representation and multiplicity spaces, for the derivation of optimal protocols for the alignment of quantum reference frames, for the characterization of extreme quantum measurements in finite dimensions, for the proof of equivalence between asymptotic cloning and state estimation and for the proof of the optimality of measure-and-reprepare for quantum learning of unitary transformations. The Laudatio of Guilio Chiribella, delivered by M A del Olmo, is included in the PDF.

  9. Elastic, not plastic species: frozen plasticity theory and the origin of adaptive evolution in sexually reproducing organisms.

    PubMed

    Flegr, Jaroslav

    2010-01-13

    Darwin's evolutionary theory could easily explain the evolution of adaptive traits (organs and behavioral patterns) in asexual but not in sexual organisms. Two models, the selfish gene theory and frozen plasticity theory were suggested to explain evolution of adaptive traits in sexual organisms in past 30 years. The frozen plasticity theory suggests that sexual species can evolve new adaptations only when their members are genetically uniform, i.e. only after a portion of the population of the original species had split off, balanced on the edge of extinction for several generations, and then undergone rapid expansion. After a short period of time, estimated on the basis of paleontological data to correspond to 1-2% of the duration of the species, polymorphism accumulates in the gene pool due to frequency-dependent selection; and thus, in each generation, new mutations occur in the presence of different alleles and therefore change their selection coefficients from generation to generation. The species ceases to behave in an evolutionarily plastic manner and becomes evolutionarily elastic on a microevolutionary time-scale and evolutionarily frozen on a macroevolutionary time-scale. It then exists in this state until such changes accumulate in the environment that the species becomes extinct. Frozen plasticity theory, which includes the Darwinian model of evolution as a special case--the evolution of species in a plastic state, not only offers plenty of new predictions to be tested, but also provides explanations for a much broader spectrum of known biological phenomena than classic evolutionary theories. This article was reviewed by Rob Knight, Fyodor Kondrashov and Massimo Di Giulio (nominated by David H. Ardell).

  10. Estimation of percentage breast tissue density: comparison between digital mammography (2D full field digital mammography) and digital breast tomosynthesis according to different BI-RADS categories

    PubMed Central

    Cavagnetto, F; Calabrese, M; Houssami, N

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare breast density estimated from two-dimensional full-field digital mammography (2D FFDM) and from digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) according to different Breast Imaging–Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories, using automated software. Methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed patient consent were obtained. DBT and 2D FFDM were performed in the same patients to allow within-patient comparison. A total of 160 consecutive patients (mean age: 50±14 years; mean body mass index: 22±3) were included to create paired data sets of 40 patients for each BI-RADS category. Automatic software (MedDensity©, developed by Giulio Tagliafico) was used to compare the percentage breast density between DBT and 2D FFDM. The estimated breast percentage density obtained using DBT and 2D FFDM was examined for correlation with the radiologists' visual BI-RADS density classification. Results: The 2D FFDM differed from DBT by 16.0% in BI-RADS Category 1, by 11.9% in Category 2, by 3.5% in Category 3 and by 18.1% in Category 4. These differences were highly significant (p<0.0001). There was a good correlation between the BI-RADS categories and the density evaluated using 2D FFDM and DBT (r=0.56, p<0.01 and r=0.48, p<0.01, respectively). Conclusion: Using DBT, breast density values were lower than those obtained using 2D FFDM, with a non-linear relationship across the BI-RADS categories. These data are relevant for clinical practice and research studies using density in determining the risk. Advances in knowledge: On DBT, breast density values were lower than with 2D FFDM, with a non-linear relationship across the classical BI-RADS categories. PMID:24029631

  11. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011.

  12. Workshop session on pros and cons for different target materials/corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.; Mansur, L.K.; Dai, Y.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Two of the originally planned workshop sessions, indicated by the titles on each side of the {open_quotes}/{close_quotes} in the above title were combined. The session was structured into four areas in which target material attributes were considered: nuclear properties; physical properties; compatibility; and liquid metal engineering/safety. Short presentations were either volunteered by participants or requested by the session organizers to help establish a background and stimulate discussion. G. Bauer, J. Takeda, T. Gabriel and S. Wender covered the first two areas; J. DiStefano, Y. Dai and Y. Orlov made presentations in the third area. O. Lielausis and R. Dressler spoke on the fourth area. L.K. Mansur served as moderator for the combined session. Although there was much discussion and some differences of opinion, the overall recommendations, considering all available factors, as distilled by this session`s organizers, are as follows. Choose Hg as the prime candidate target material to which most resources should be devoted. A strong alternate candidate is considered to exist in Pb-Bi eutectic. Other candidate materials such as Pb, Pb-Mg eutectic and Bi are weaker choices for various reasons, with Bi being the weakest.

  13. Transgender individuals' workplace experiences: the applicability of sexual minority measures and models.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Melanie E; Velez, Brandon; DeBlaere, Cirleen; Moradi, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored whether 3 existing measures of workplace constructs germane to the experiences of sexual minority people could be modified to improve their applicability with transgender individuals. To this end, the Workplace Heterosexist Experiences Questionnaire (WHEQ; C. R. Waldo, 1999); the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Climate Inventory (LGBTCI; B. J. Liddle, D. A. Luzzo, A. L. Hauenstein, & K. Schuck, 2004); and the Workplace Sexual Identity Management Measure (WSIMM; M. Z. Anderson, J. M. Croteau, Y. B. Chung, & T. M. DiStefano, 2001) were modified to explicitly address the experiences of transgender individuals. Data from a sample of 263 transgender individuals were used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the modified measures. Analyses of the structures of the modified measures (Transgender Forms [TF]) suggested an alternative 2-factor structure for the WHEQ-TF, but provided support for the previously observed unidimensional structure for the LGBTCI-TF, and a slightly modified 3-factor structure for the WSIMM-TF. Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients for scale or subscale items across the 3 measures were acceptable. Criterion-related validity was evident in theoretically consistent patterns of correlations between scores on the 3 modified measures and scores on indicators of job satisfaction and outness. These data provide preliminary support for transgender-specific versions of measures of 3 key constructs in the sexual minority vocational behavior research.

  14. Collective synchronization of divisions in Drosophila development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergassola, Massimo

    Mitoses in the early development of most metazoans are rapid and synchronized across the entire embryo. While diffusion is too slow, in vitro experiments have shown that waves of the cell-cycle regulator Cdk1 can transfer information rapidly across hundreds of microns. However, the signaling dynamics and the physical properties of chemical waves during embryonic development remain unclear. We develop FRET biosensors for the activity of Cdk1 and the checkpoint kinase Chk1 in Drosophila embryos and exploit them to measure waves in vivo. We demonstrate that Cdk1 chemical waves control mitotic waves and that their speed is regulated by the activity of Cdk1 during the S-phase (and not mitosis). We quantify the progressive slowdown of the waves with developmental cycles and identify its underlying control mechanism by the DNA replication checkpoint through the Chk1/Wee1 pathway. The global dynamics of the mitotic signaling network illustrates a novel control principle: the S-phase activity of Cdk1 regulates the speed of the mitotic wave, while the Cdk1 positive feedback ensures an invariantly rapid onset of mitosis. Mathematical modeling captures the speed of the waves and predicts a fundamental distinction between the S-phase Cdk1 trigger waves and the mitotic phase waves, which is illustrated by embryonic ablation experiments. In collaboration with Victoria Deneke1, Anna Melbinger2, and Stefano Di Talia1 1 Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center 2 Department of Physics, University of California San Diego.

  15. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  16. Aquatic and terrestrial optical measurements - laser induced fluorescence technique (ATOM-LIFT): Summer 1997 field measurement campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, James E., III; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Kim, Moon S.; Bazzani, Marco; Corp, Lawrence A.

    1998-07-01

    A joint IROE-CNR, NASA/GSFC, and USDA/ARS measurement campaign was conducted in Italy for a three week period in July, 1997. The campaign was split into two parts: the first part for aquatic vegetation studies and the second part for terrestrial vegetation studies. The main objective of the campaign was to study optical properties of intact plant material as it relates to photosynthetic activity of living vegetation. The aquatic studies were carried out at an aquarium-laboratory in the seashore city of Livorno on the West coast of Italy. The investigations involved an important sea grass species that is native to the Mediterranean Sea. The terrestrial studies were carried out Northeast of the Town of St. Stefano di Cadore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were taken in a wooded site at an Italian Department of Forestry Station on species of natural alpine vegetation. Instrumentation available for the studies were the Italian Fluorescence Light Detection And Ranging (FLIDAR) System, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), the Perkin Elmer Spectrofluorometer and LI-COR 6400 infrared gas exchange analyzer for photosynthesis measurements. Preliminary evaluations, analysis, and summaries were made by personnel from both Italian and United Sates groups on data collected during the measurement campaign. The joint Italian/American data collection effort with Aquatic and Terrestrial Optical Measurements produced a range of data for characterizing the relationships between fluorescence and the photosynthetic potentials of vegetative scenes.

  17. Fifth anniversary of the first element of the International Spac

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-03

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Richard Kuhns, NASA Node 2/10A Mission Integration Engineer, International Space Station and Payload Processing, discusses the Node 2 with members of the media. From left are Stefano Masiello, Alenia Spazio; Steve Shannon, Node 2 Mission Manager, The Boeing Co.; and Kuhns. The installation of NASA's Node 2 denotes the U.S. Core Complete stage of International Space Station assembly and, among other functions, will provide a passageway between four Station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, the European Columbus Laboratory and the Centrifuge Accommodation Module. Reporters were invited to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the launch of the first element of the Station with a tour of the SSPF and had the opportunity to see Space Station hardware that is being processed for deployment once the Space Shuttles return to flight. NASA and Boeing mission managers were on hand to talk about the various hardware elements currently being processed for flight.

  18. Multi-scale simulations of space problems with iPIC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bettarini, Lapo; Markidis, Stefano

    The implicit Particle-in-Cell method for the computer simulation of space plasma, and its im-plementation in a three-dimensional parallel code, called iPIC3D, are presented. The implicit integration in time of the Vlasov-Maxwell system removes the numerical stability constraints and enables kinetic plasma simulations at magnetohydrodynamics scales. Simulations of mag-netic reconnection in plasma are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithm. In particular we will show a number of simulations done for large scale 3D systems using the physical mass ratio for Hydrogen. Most notably one simulation treats kinetically a box of tens of Earth radii in each direction and was conducted using about 16000 processors of the Pleiades NASA computer. The work is conducted in collaboration with the MMS-IDS theory team from University of Colorado (M. Goldman, D. Newman and L. Andersson). Reference: Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Available online 17 October 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  19. Enigmatic X-Ray Sources Point to Possible New Black Hole Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Mysterious, powerful X-ray sources found in nearby galaxies may represent a new class of objects, according to data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These sources, which are not as hot as typical neutron-star or black-hole X- ray sources, could be a large new population of black holes with masses several hundred times that of the sun. "The challenge raised by the discovery of these sources is to understand how they produce so much X-ray power at temperatures of a few million degrees," said Rosanne Di Stefano from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and Tufts University in Medford, Mass. Di Stefano is lead author of a series of papers published in or submitted to The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Until a few years ago, astronomers only knew of two sizes of black holes: stellar black holes, with masses about 10 times the sun, and supermassive black holes located at the centers of galaxies, with masses ranging from millions to billions times the sun. Recent evidence suggests a class of "intermediate- mass" black holes may also exist. M83 M83 Searching for quasisoft sources may be a new way to identify those X-ray sources most likely to be intermediate-mass black holes," said Albert Kong of the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and a member of the team. The enigmatic objects found by the Chandra team are called "quasisoft" sources, because they have a temperature in the range of 1 million to 4 million degrees Celsius. On the one hand this temperature range is below the 10 million to 100 million-degree gas associated with "hard" X-ray sources, such as neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes. On the other hand the quasisoft-source temperatures are hotter than the several hundred-thousand-degree gas associated with "supersoft" X-ray sources due to white dwarfs. M51 M51 Di Stefano and her colleagues determined the temperatures of individual X-ray emitting objects in four galaxies by measuring their X

  20. Archaeometry of sicilian glazed pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, R.; Bultrini, G.; Fragalà, I.; Giarrusso, R.; Iliopoulos, I.; Montana, G.

    Petrographic and chemical analyses of the ``ceramic body'' of 114 majolica artefacts manufactured in Sicily over a wide time range (16th--19th century) are presented. All the analysed samples, which belong to museums and private collections, were previously attributed to Sicilian workshops based on stylistic features evaluated by expert historians of art. Unambiguous identification of the production sites of majolica handicrafts in Sicily remains, however, open to question when this relies only on purely stylistic considerations. To this end compositional and/or textural markers have been searched for in the ``ceramic body'' of the majolica artefacts in order to differentiate between the centres of manufacture which were active in Sicily in previous centuries. The study of thin sections has allowed the characterization of the raw materials as well as the microscopic ``fabric'' of manufacture from four of the more relevant Sicilian production sites, namely: Caltagirone, Sciacca, Palermo and Santo Stefano di Camastra. Chemical data, including minor and trace elements, have been submitted to computer assisted multivariate statistical techniques. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) have defined compositional ``ceramic reference groups'' and, consequently, have enabled a more realistic discrimination of provenance. These data have documented several imports of majolica from Naples, while the same artefacts were previously attributed to Sicilian workshops, based on stylistic considerations .

  1. Investigation and control of a Norovirus outbreak of probable waterborne transmission through a municipal groundwater system.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Purpari, Giuseppa; Costantino, Claudio; Rotolo, Valentina; Spoto, Vittorio; Geraci, Gaetano; Bosco, Girolama; Petralia, Agata; Guercio, Annalisa; Macaluso, Giusi; Calamusa, Giuseppe; De Grazia, Simona; Ruggeri, Franco M; Vitale, Francesco; Maida, Carmelo M; Mammina, Caterina

    2014-09-01

    During March 2011 an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in Santo Stefano di Quisquina, Agrigento, Sicily, Italy. Within two weeks 156 cases were identified among the 4,965 people living in the municipality. An epidemiological investigation was conducted to characterize the outbreak and target the control measures. A case was defined as a person developing diarrhea or vomiting during February 27-March 13, 2011. Stool specimens were collected from 12 cases. Norovirus (NoV) genotype GII.4 variant New Orleans 2009 was identified in stool samples from 11 of 12 cases tested (91.7%). Epidemiological investigations suggested a possible association with municipal drinking water consumption. Water samples from the public water system were tested for NoV and a variety of genotypes were detected during the first 3 months of surveillance, including GII.4 strains belonging to different variants from that involved in the gastroenteritis outbreak. Contamination of the well and springs supplying the public water network was eventually thought to be the source of the NoV contamination.

  2. Proton conductivity in ampullae of Lorenzini jelly

    PubMed Central

    Josberger, Erik E.; Hassanzadeh, Pegah; Deng, Yingxin; Sohn, Joel; Rego, Michael J.; Amemiya, Chris T.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In 1678, Stefano Lorenzini first described a network of organs of unknown function in the torpedo ray—the ampullae of Lorenzini (AoL). An individual ampulla consists of a pore on the skin that is open to the environment, a canal containing a jelly and leading to an alveolus with a series of electrosensing cells. The role of the AoL remained a mystery for almost 300 years until research demonstrated that skates, sharks, and rays detect very weak electric fields produced by a potential prey. The AoL jelly likely contributes to this electrosensing function, yet the exact details of this contribution remain unclear. We measure the proton conductivity of the AoL jelly extracted from skates and sharks. The room-temperature proton conductivity of the AoL jelly is very high at 2 ± 1 mS/cm. This conductivity is only 40-fold lower than the current state-of-the-art proton-conducting polymer Nafion, and it is the highest reported for a biological material so far. We suggest that keratan sulfate, identified previously in the AoL jelly and confirmed here, may contribute to the high proton conductivity of the AoL jelly with its sulfate groups—acid groups and proton donors. We hope that the observed high proton conductivity of the AoL jelly may contribute to future studies of the AoL function. PMID:27386543

  3. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  4. 1343+61 Supernova 1996bk in NGC 5308

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Janet A.

    1996-10-01

    We have been informed by Stefano Pesci, Milan, Italy, the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (IAU Circular 6491), and Guy Hurst (The Astronomer Electronic Circular 1133) of the visual discovery by Pesci and Piero Mazza, Milan, Italy, of a supernova in NGC 5308 at magnitude 14.5-15.0 on October 12.79 UT; Pesci reports that it is "quite separated from the nucleus." No object was seen at this location by Pesci on August 15. The supernova was confirmed visually by M. Schwartz, Cascade Mountains, OR, by CCD on Oct 13.3 UT. P. Garnavich and R. Kirshner, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, report that spectra obtained on Oct 15.1 UT by J. Huchra and L. Macri with the 1.5-m Tillinghast telescope confirm the supernova in NGC 5308 as a type-Ia supernova about a week past maximum. They also report that, according to CCD images taken with the Whipple Observatory 1.2-m telescope, the supernova is 10.5" south and 17.9" west of the galaxy center, and at the time of exposure was magnitude V = 15 (IAU Circular 6491). Observations should be reported to the AAVSO International Database as SN 1996BK.

  5. Global Magnetospheric Simulations: coupling with ionospheric and solar wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Amaya, Jorge; Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Vapirev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    We present results on the global fully kinetic model of the magnetosphere of the Earth. The simulations are based on the iPic3D code [1] that treats kinetically all plasma species solving implicitly the equations of motion for electrons and ions, coupled with the Maxwell equations. We present results of our simulations and discuss the coupling at the inner boundary near the Earth with models of the ionosphere and at the outer boundary with models of the arriving solar wind. The results are part of the activities of the Swiff FP7 project: www.swiff.eu [1] Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin, Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Volume 80, Issue 7, March 2010, Pages 1509-1519, ISSN 0378-4754, 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038 [2] Giovanni Lapenta, Particle simulations of space weather, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 231, Issue 3, 1 February 2012, Pages 795-821, ISSN 0021-9991, 10.1016/j.jcp.2011.03.035.

  6. Controversies on Hodgkin's disease and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Hematopathology Study Group of the Società Italiana di Anatomia Patologica.

    PubMed

    Pileri, S

    1994-01-01

    Just one year ago the Italian Society of Pathology (S.I.A.P.) created a Study Group which included members of the most active Italian hematopathology teams. Prof. Pasquale Calapso was asked to chair the Group and Prof. Stefano Pileri to take care of secretarial duties. The aim of the Group is to spread hematopathologic knowledge among young pathologists and to promote activities that can contribute to updating Italian pathologists on topics of both speculative and diagnostic interest. The first Workshop of the S.I.A.P. Hematopathology Group was held at the Palazzo dei Congressi in Bologna, November 20, 1993. About 150 pathologists from all over Italy took part in the meeting, which consisted of two sections devoted to: a) discussion of the boundaries between Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and b) a case seminar illustrating the impact of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of bone-marrow biopsy. The first section included 5 presentations and a Round Table chaired by Prof. Luciano Fiore-Donati. Below, the contributors to this section summarize the content of their presentations, which were aimed at answering specific questions the Organizers had put to them.

  7. Light Microsopy Module, International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Brown, Daniel F.; O'Toole, Martin A.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Abbot-Hearn, Amber Ashley; Atherton, Arthur Johnson; Beltram, Alexander; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2015, if all goes as planned, five experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with a manual sample base -3 (ACE-M-3), [2] the Advanced Colloids Experiment with a Heated Base -1 (ACE-H-1), [3] (ACE-H-2), [4] the Advanced Plant Experiment -03 (APEX-03), and [5] the Microchannel Diffusion Experiment (MDE). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] New York University: Paul Chaikin, Andrew Hollingsworth, and Stefano Sacanna, [2] University of Pennsylvania: Arjun Yodh and Matthew Gratale, [3] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al., [4] from the University of Florida and CASIS: Anna-Lisa Paul and Rob Ferl, and [5] from the Methodist Hospital Research Institute from CASIS: Alessandro Grattoni and Giancarlo Canavese.

  8. Fluorescence responses and photosynthetic rates of sunlit and shaded leaves of Italian alpine forest species: Summer 1997 ATOM-LIFT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Bazzani, Marco; McMurtrey, James E., III; Corp, Lawrence A.; Sandu, R.; Tirelli, Daniele

    1998-07-01

    Terrestrial vegetation studies were carried out in the Italian Northeastern Alps in Val Visdende. The measurement site was 15 Kilometers Northeast of the town of St. Stefano di Calore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were acquired on a wooded site at the Italian Department of Forestry Station on species native to the Italian Alps. The species included spruce (Picea abies) and alder (Alnus incana) trees. Characterization was also made of the fluorescence responses of several under-story species such as Dactylorhiza fuchsii of the Orchidaceae family, Caltha palustris and Ranunculus ficaria of the Ranuncolcee family, and Trifolium pratense and Trifolium repens of the Leguminosae family. Terrestrial vegetation monitoring was conducted with the Italian FLIDAR remote sensing instrument mounted in a mobile van, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), and the Spectron SE-590 for optical properties. Photosynthetic CO2 gas exchange rates we made with LI-COR 6400 infrared gas analyzer. Pigments from the samples were extracted and analyzed with a Perkin Elmer Lamda 7 Spectrometer to determine pigment concentrations. Fluorescence responses were collected from vegetation samples grown under different ambient light regimes of sun-lit versus shaded. The vegetation showed different fluorescence characteristics. A fluorescence algorithm, (F740/F680)/F550, and rate of photosynthesis showed a strong linear relationship.

  9. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  10. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    the meeting was that all plenary talks presented the state-of-the-art and were at the same time educational and exciting, promoting the multidisciplinary aspects of the research, and thus were inspirational for young scientists considering work in these fields. The plenary talks, each lasting 1 hour, were given by distinguished world experts and some young 'rising stars': Richard Ward, Ulf Leonhardt, Jens Eisert, Michael Berry, Shahn Majid, Arndt von Haeseler, Michio Jimbo, Katrin Wendland, Raymond Goldstein, Mark Trodden, Maria Vozmediano and Giulio Chiribella. The public lecture was given by Francesco Iachello and was open to participants and other people from the Newcastle-Durham region. In addition, talks of 30 minutes duration each and including more technical content, were given in four parallel sessions. Each parallel session had a designated time for informal interaction with the speakers, discussions of new directions of research and for forming new collaborations. The poster session, in a room where posters were exhibited for the duration of the conference, was easily accessible, and had a friendly and relaxed atmosphere, encouraging discussions of work and exchanges of new ideas. To secure a high quality scientific programme, all contributions were reviewed. Another interesting feature of the conference was the Open Forum on the Friday afternoon, which was lively and well attended. It took the form of a question and answer session with a panel chaired by Allan Solomon, with the following members: Gerald Goldin, Jean-Pierre Gazeau, Mark Trodden and Giulio Chiribella. The focus was on new directions of research, novel applications and the further development of group theory, education, training and career opportunities for young researchers. The participants were asked to submit questions in advance; examples are: "What is the role of symmetries and conservation principles in deducing underlying physics from experimental data?" and "What are the most

  11. Characterization of Surface Water and Groundwater Quality in the Lower Tano River Basin Using Statistical and Isotopic Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edjah, Adwoba; Stenni, Barbara; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Clara; Dreossi, Giuliano; Tetteh Akiti, Thomas; Yidana, Sandow

    2017-04-01

    Adwoba Kua- Manza Edjaha, Barbara Stennib,c,Giuliano Dreossib, Giulio Cozzic, Clara Turetta c,T.T Akitid ,Sandow Yidanae a,eDepartment of Earth Science, University of Ghana Legon, Ghana West Africa bDepartment of Enviromental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, Ca Foscari University of Venice, Italy cInstitute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes, CNR, Venice, Italy dDepartment of Nuclear Application and Techniques, Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences University of Ghana Legon This research is part of a PhD research work "Hydrogeological Assessment of the Lower Tano river basin for sustainable economic usage, Ghana, West - Africa". In this study, the researcher investigated surface water and groundwater quality in the Lower Tano river basin. This assessment was based on some selected sampling sites associated with mining activities, and the development of oil and gas. Statistical approach was applied to characterize the quality of surface water and groundwater. Also, water stable isotopes, which is a natural tracer of the hydrological cycle was used to investigate the origin of groundwater recharge in the basin. The study revealed that Pb and Ni values of the surface water and groundwater samples exceeded the WHO standards for drinking water. In addition, water quality index (WQI), based on physicochemical parameters(EC, TDS, pH) and major ions(Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, HCO3-,NO3-, CL-, SO42-, K+) exhibited good quality water for 60% of the sampled surface water and groundwater. Other statistical techniques, such as Heavy metal pollution index (HPI), degree of contamination (Cd), and heavy metal evaluation index (HEI), based on trace element parameters in the water samples, reveal that 90% of the surface water and groundwater samples belong to high level of pollution. Principal component analysis (PCA) also suggests that the water quality in the basin is likely affected by rock - water interaction and anthropogenic activities (sea water intrusion). This

  12. Kombucha might be promising probiotics for consumption on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, Natalia; Foing, Bernard H.

    The sanitization at permanently manned lunar bases and consuming germ-free food in a concert with effect of lunar stressors may result in crews disorders, including inflammatory and atopic states and decrease of resistance to indigenous pathogens which present in human organism in suppressed state. The administration of live microbial supplements with presumptive health benefits on human physiology might be reasonable solution to prevent disbacteriosis. Many of microbial species are associated with the fermentation of dairy products, however, they have a short self-life and so far unpractical to be used at lunar habitation. The popular "Tea mushroom" or "Kombucha Tea" is a probiotics proven by FDA that many people are now taking in health promoting diets to detoxify and revitalize the organism (Danielian, 1993; Sreeramulu et al., 2001). Kombucha is composed by symbiotic bacteria and yeasts, surrounded by a permeable membrane. The Kombucha culture is a tiny biochemical factory, producing organic acids, amino acids, enzymes, polyphenols, antibiotic substances, vitamins, enzymes as well as some other products beneficial for human health. Within the ages the Kombucha Tea has been consumed by practically all nations in Far East and now in Eastern Europe and America due to probiotic properties, and within this period the Kombucha microbial ecosystem has been selected to be remarkably adaptive to culturing conditions and resistant to adverse factors. Metagenomic approaches in a study of microbial ecosystems will allow to reconstruct the Kombucha microbiome and to elucidate unknown species and genes on the base of bioinformatics programs. Compared with Kombucha wild type, metabolically engineered strains, expected to exhibit broader substrate specificity, utilizing sugars from waste material which will be used for Kombucha fermentation. References 1. Danielian L.T. (1993) Tea fungus. Publ. House "Armenia", 112 pp. 2. Palmer C., Bik E.M., DiGiulio D.B., Relman D.A., Brown P

  13. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  14. First in-situ single-crystal structure refinement of a garnet included in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Fabrizio; Nimis, Paolo; Longo, Micaela; Kopylova, Maya; de Stefano, Andrea; Marzoli, Andrea; Fedortchouk, Yana; Manghnani, Murli; Harris, Jeff W.

    2010-05-01

    = 86° and refined anisotropically the crystal structure obtaining an agreement factor (R) lower than 2%. Such very high quality data allowed us to refine the occupancies on the X, Y and Z crystallographic sites providing 17.6, 12.9 and 14.0 electrons (errors below 0.1 electrons), respectively. Average bond lengths for X-O, Y-O and Z-O were respectively, 2.313(2), 1.902(2) and 1.634(2) Å. These values indicate a Y site totally occupied by Al and a Z site totally occupied by Si, which suggests that the chemistry of the garnet belongs to the Cr-poor eclogitic or websteritic paragenesis. As Jericho diamonds < 3 mm comprise 90% eclogitic stones and 7% websteritic (De Stefano et al., 2009) there is a high probability that the garnet studied in this work is from an eclogitic source. A similar approach is being adopted for olivines from Siberian diamonds and the preliminary results will be discussed. References De Stefano et al. (2009) Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 158, 295-315. Kunz et al. (2002) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 198, 485-493. Angel et al. (2000) Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry, 41, p. 559-596.

  15. PREFACE: International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruccio, Giuseppe; Sanvito, Stefano; Hoffmann, Germar; Wiesendanger, Roland; Rowan, Alan

    2011-03-01

    Conference banner The International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010), was organized by partners of the EU-project SpiDME and held in the historical city of Lecce, Italy from 23-27 May 2010, at the Ecotekne Campus, University of Salento. The conference provided an international forum to discuss recent progress and future trends in the field. In particular, the aim was to bring together the community of more conventional spin-transport, with that of molecular and nano-magnetism. The main topics of TSN-2010 were: MATERIALSSPIN-PHYSICS AND THEORY - Molecular Magnets- Spin injection - Magnetic nanoparticles and nanowires- Domain walls, spin torque and vortex dynamics - Magnetic semiconductors- Numerical modeling of organic nanomagnetism - Multiferroics and transition metal oxides APPLICATIONSADVANCES IN CHARACTERIZATION - Magnetic Multilayers- Magneto-optical characterization and spin manipulation - Spin-photonics- Intrinsic spin transport mechanism in organics - Molecular and nano-spintronics- Organometallic molecules on surfaces - Spin-based quantum computation- Single molecular magnets on surfaces - Magnetism for sensing and nanomedicine- Nanoscale characterization and spin-sensitive SPM The scientific programme started on Monday 24 May and ended on Thursday 27 May. The Nobel Laureate A Fert attended the conference giving a plenary talk and the programme also featured invited presentations by (in alphabetical order): M Aeschlimann, M Affronte, N Atodiresei, P A Bobbert, A Dediu, N Kioussis, L W Molenkamp, J Moodera, V Prigodin, M Ruben, R Sessoli, R Tan, and H Wende. TSN2010 had 150 attendees who came from around the globe to present their latest research in 100 oral presentations. Contributed talks were selected by the program committee, composed of Giuseppe Maruccio, Ross Rinaldi, Valentina Arima, Fabio Della Sala, Maurizio Martino (Universitá del Salento, NNL Institute Nanoscience-CNR, Lecce, Italy), Stefano Sanvito (Trinity College

  16. LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Tom Abel, Stanford University Odylio Aguiar, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Tal Alexander, Wizemann Institute Peter Bender, University of Colorado Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Robert Byer, Stanford University Manuela Campanelli, University of Texas Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Neil Cornish, Montana State University Michael Cruise, University of Birmingham Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Karsten Danzmann, University of Hannover Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Gerhard Heinzel, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik Craig Hogan, University of Washington Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Scott Hughes, MIT Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Alberto Lobo, ICE-CSIC and IEEC Avi Loeb, Harvard University Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Peter Michelson, Stanford University Guido Mueller, University of Florida Sterl Phinney, Caltech Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Ke-Xun Sun, Stanford University Kip Thorne, Caltech Michele Vallisneri, NASA/JPL Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Rai Weiss, MIT Nick White, NASA/Goddard Local Organising Committee (LOC) Sasha Buchman (Stanford University) Robert Byer (Stanford University) Sara Charbonneau-Lefort (Stanford University) Nancy Christianson (Stanford University) John Conklin (Stanford University) Dan DeBra (Stanford University) Jan Goebel (Stanford University) Vivian Drew (Stanford University) Ke-Xun Sun (Stanford University) Lucy Zhou (Stanford University) Andrea Zoellner (Stanford University)

  17. "Treatises on Earthquakes" in late Renaissance (16th-17th cent), at the roots of historical seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albini, P.

    2009-04-01

    It was soon after the damaging November 1570 earthquake at Ferrara, Northern Italy, that the academic Stefano Breventano from Pavia, a small town in Northern Italy as well, started to compose his "Treatise on the earthquake". Completed by September 1576, this 250-page manuscript was to remain unpublished for centuries. The critical edition recently appeared (Albini, 2007) was a due tribute to the remarkable amount of information put together by Breventano, an otherwise "obscure" literate who, before getting involved with earthquakes, had published a history of the antiquities and remarkable events at his hometown Pavia (1570). Indeed, he was not the first Renaissance author to pursue the goal of checking into the historical sources of the previous centuries in search of earthquakes and other natural phenomena. What is outstanding in his "Treatise" is that he suceeded in retrieving information on more than two hundred earthquakes, along two thousand years, between 504 B.C. and 1575 A.D., covering the whole Euro-Mediterranean region, and the West Indies in early 16th century. Breventano's essay is here presented, together with a comparison between his style and amount of information with those included in the work by the contemporary British author Stephen Batman, "The Doome warning all men to the Judgement" (1581). A later treatise is presented also, the work by Marcello Bonito (1690) "Terra Tremante [Trembling Earth]", which could easily be defined as a worldwide list of earthquakes. In structure and content, Bonito's work goes along the same lines of Breventano, and could be considered a precursor of today descriptive catalogues, because of his outstandingly modern approach that paved the way to modern historical seismology.

  18. Novel antifouling agent zinc pyrithione: determination, acute toxicity, and bioaccumulation in marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Marcheselli, Marco; Rustichelli, Cecilia; Mauri, Marina

    2010-11-01

    Antifouling biocide zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) and its biological fate have received little attention because this compound was assumed not to be persistent in marine ecosystems. An analytical procedure was developed that has proved to be efficient and very sensitive in extracting ZnPT and its main secondary products, Zn and ionized pyrithione (PT(-)), from both seawater and biological samples, namely in the gills and digestive gland of the bioindicator species Mytilus galloprovincialis. Short-term experiments were carried out to investigate ZnPT toxicity and bioaccumulation. The effects on survival and tissue bioaccumulation of ZnPT and its secondary products were studied on adult mussels from a natural population, collected in the harbor area of Porto Santo Stefano (Italy) and exposed to sublethal doses of the biocide for up to 7 d. Zinc pyrithione was shown to be persistent in the experimental seawater in the short term. A basal level of ZnPT and ionized PT(-) was detected in the mussels, indicating that ZnPT availability in the sampling site is already high enough to induce a detectable accumulation in individuals of the native population. Zinc pyrithione rapidly accumulated in the tissues of the exposed mussels, proportionately to both exposure concentration and time, identifying the gills and digestive gland as important targets in the biological pathway of the contaminants. Even though the 7-d median lethal concentration (LC50) = 8.27 µM established here appears high with respect to reported ZnPT environmental concentrations, the results indicate that this biocide could represent a threat for marine organisms in coastal environments and that further investigations on its biological effects at sublethal doses are needed.

  19. Postfire seedling dynamics and performance in Pinus halepensis Mill. populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalakou, Evangelia N.; Thanos, Costas A.

    2010-09-01

    Postfire dynamics of Aleppo pine seedling density, survival and growth were assessed in five burned forests of Attica, Greece (Stamata, Villia, Avlona, Kapandriti and Agios Stefanos) through the establishment of permanent experimental plots. All emerging seedlings were tagged and their survival and growth monitored at regular intervals. Seedling density dynamics show an initial, steep increase (to maximum values 2.9-4.6 seedlings m -2) followed by a gradual decrease that levels off at the second and third postfire year (1.3-3.0 seedlings m -2); similarly, postfire seedling survival more or less stabilised at 30-50%, 2-3 years after fire. On the basis of density and mortality trends as well as relevant bibliographic data, it is predicted that very dense, mature forests (10.000 trees ha -1 or more) will be reinstated within 15-20 years. During the first 5-7 postfire years, seedling/sapling annual height followed linear trends with various yearly rates, ranging mostly between 8 and 15 cm (and 27-30 cm in two exceptional, fast growing cases). Within an individual growth season, seedling height dynamics were found to follow sigmoid curves with growth increment peaks in mid-spring. The time (on a monthly basis) of seedling emergence did not affect seedling growth or survival. On the other hand, for the first time under natural conditions, it has been shown that cotyledon number per seedling, an indirect measure of both seed size and initial photosynthetic capacity, significantly affected seedling survival but not growth. Seedlings bearing a higher number of cotyledons, presumably derived from larger seeds, showed greater survival at the end of the first postfire year than seedlings with fewer cotyledons. A postfire selective pressure, favouring large seed size, is postulated to counteract with a contrasting one, which favours small seed size, expressed during fire-free conditions.

  20. Costs and deaths of landslides in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Ubydul; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Landslides cause human and large economic losses worldwide and also in Europe. However, the quantification of associated costs and deaths is highly underestimated and still incomplete, thus the estimation of landslide costs and risk is still rather ambitious. Hence, in this study a spatio-temporal analysis of fatal landslides is presented for 27 European countries from 1995-2014. These landslides are mainly concentrated in mountainous areas. A total of 1370 fatalities are reported resulting from 476 landslides. The highest fatalities with 335 are observed in Turkey. In general, an increasing trend of fatal landslides is recognized starting in 2008. The latter is almost certainly triggered by an increase in natural extreme events such as storms (i.e. heavy rainfall) and floods. The highest annual economic loss is observed in Italy with 3.9 billion Euro per year. In contrast, in Germany the annual total loss is only about 0.3 billion Euro. The results of this study serves as an initial baseline information for further risk studies integrating landslide locations, local land use data, cost data, and will therefore certainly support the studied countries to better protect their citizens and assets. Acknowledgements We would like to acknowledge the valuable contributions by Paula F. da Silva, Peter Andersen, Jürgen Pilz, Ali Ardalan, Sergey R. Chalov, Jean-Philippe Malet, Mateja Jemec Auflič, Norina Andres, Eleftheria Poyiadji, Pedro C. Lamas, Wenyi Zhang, Igor Pesevski, Halldór G. Pétursson, Tayfun Kurt, Nikolai Dobrev, Juan Carlos García Davalillo, Matina Halkia, Stefano Ferri, George Gaprindashvili, Johanna Engström and David Keellings.

  1. PREFACE: International Symposium on Geohazards and Geomechanics (ISGG2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utili, S.

    2015-09-01

    further enquiries or information on the conference proceedings please contact the organizer, Dr Stefano Utili, University of Warwick, s.utili@warwick.ac.uk.

  2. Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Atzori, Simone; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Tolomei, Cristiano; Antonioli, Andrea; Trasatti, Elisa; Zoffoli, Simona; Coletta, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data Stefano Salvi (1), Simone Atzori (1), Giuseppe Pezzo (1), John Peter Merryman Boncori (1), Cristiano Tolomei (1), Andrea Antonioli (1), Elisa Trasatti (1), Simona Zoffoli (2), Alessandro Coletta (2) (1): Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Centro Nazionale Terremoti, via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy (2): Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Unità Osservazione della Terra, Viale Liegi 26, 00198, Roma, Italy The increased availability of Earth Observation optical and SAR data occurred in the last few years, has stimulated new applications in many different fields. The foreseen launch of new space platforms as the Sentinel satellites, providing good monitoring frequencies and free worldwide access to data is expected to increase the number of scientific and commercial activities exploiting EO data. In the sector of natural hazards the EO data have already demonstrated to be indispensable for the generation of information products for the prevention, and emergency management phases. In particular, the Italian Space Agency has promoted and funded, together with INGV, the development of dedicated infrastructures for the generation of advanced information products supporting different phases of the seismic and volcanic risk management cycles. These products were based mainly on SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed 4-satellite constellation, and on optical data from commercial and scientific platforms, integrated with data from ground monitoring networks. During the last few years, such infrastructures have been tested under operational conditions and the products distributed to the Italian Civil Protection authority for validation and assessment. Here, with reference to the earthquake emergency management, we will present the infrastructure, the rapid mapping information products and some examples of activities during the latest seismic crises.

  3. COMMITTEES: LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Karsten Danzmann, AEI/University of Hannover Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Alberto Lobo (Chair), ICE-CSIC and IEEC Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Peter Bender, University of Colorado Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Neil Cornish, Montana State University Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Craig Hogan, University of Washington Scott Hughes, MIT Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Sterl Phinney, Caltech Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Kip Thorne, Caltech Roger Blandford, Stanford University Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Carlos F Sopuerta,ICE-CSIC and IEEC Enrique Garcia-Berro, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Jay Marx, LIGO Laboratory Stephen Merkowitz, NASA/Goddard Benoit Mours, Laboratoire d'Annec Gijs Nelemans, IMAPP, Nijmegen Enric Verdaguer, University of Barcelona Clifford M Will, Washington University, St Louis Local Organising Committee (LOC) Anna Bertolín (IEEC) Priscilla Cañizares (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Carlos F Sopuerta (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Ivan Lloro (ICE-CSIC and IEEC),Chair Alberto Lobo (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Nacho Mateos (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Pilar Montes (IEEC) Miquel Nofrarias (IEEC) Juan Ramos-Castro (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) Josep Sanjuán (IEEC)

  4. ESA on RAINEWS24: A Case Study of Television Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.

    2005-12-01

    In May 2000, ESRIN, the Italian establishment of the European Space Agency (ESA), started a collaboration with the television channel Rainews24. Rainews24 is the "allnews" channel of Italian public television (RAI) and is now about 10 years old. It transmits 24 hours a day and is the most watched all-news satellite channel in Italy. Each Thursday an ESA representative (Stefano Sandrelli) is interviewed by a professional RAI journalist in a 5-6 minute long slot that follows the 5 pm news bulletin. The broadcast is repeated late at night or in the early hours of Thursday and Friday. Interviews are strictly linked to the weekly news and are prepared on the morning of the same day by the ESA representative in collaboration with a RAI journalist. The subject is chosen from the most topical news items of the week: video, images and animations are provided by the ESA television service and by press agencies (Reuters etc.). The interviews are largely informal and resemble a dialogue rather than an academic discussion "from space". Even though they focus on ESA activities, they are not advertisements: space science and research is dealt with as a human activity, so both the positive and negative aspects of space exploration and exploitation may emerge. Although this outreach activity began as an experiment, the ESA interviews have become a fixed feature. As a result of five years of uninterrupted collaboration, over 200 interviews have been recorded, with about 30% of the interviews dedicated to pure astronomy. A welcome positive feature is that the interviews are seen by Rainews24 as an open source of daily news.

  5. Ocular flora and their antibiotic susceptibility in patients having cataract surgery in Italy.

    PubMed

    Papa, Vincenzo; Blanco, Anna Rita; Santocono, Marcello

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the ocular flora in a consecutive group of patients having cataract surgery and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of isolates to several ophthalmic antibiotics. Hospital Di Stefano, Catania, Italy. Observational case series. Conjunctival and eyelid cultures from patients were obtained 14 days before surgery and, if positive, repeated the day of the surgery. Antimicrobial susceptibility for aminoglycosides (netilmicin and tobramycin), fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin), chloramphenicol, and azithromycin was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Susceptibility was also tested for oxacillin, cefuroxime, and vancomycin. All positive patients received a 2-day preoperative course of 3 mg/mL netilmicin ophthalmic solution 4 times a day. The recovery rate of microorganisms after antibiotic treatment compared with baseline was calculated. One hundred twenty consecutive patients were included in the study. Cultures were positive in 72.5% of patients; 131 isolates, mainly gram-positive, were identified. Staphylococcus epidermidis (58.0%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.3%) were the most frequently isolated microorganisms. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci accounted for 3.8% of S epidermidis and 20.0% of S aureus. A high in vitro susceptibility (>90%) for all isolates, including multiresistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, was obtained for netilmicin, vancomycin, and cefuroxime. The recovery rate of isolates before surgery was reduced by 93.9% (P < .001). Conjunctival and lid margin isolates were sensitive to netilmicin, vancomycin, and cefuroxime. Microorganisms were less susceptible to other ophthalmic antibiotics, with the exception of moxifloxacin. A 2-day preoperative course with topical netilmicin reduced most bacteria identified on the conjunctiva and eyelids. Dr. Papa and Ms. Blanco are employees of Società Industria Farmaceutica Italiana SpA. Dr. Santocono has no financial or

  6. The Search for Optical Counterparts to Supersoft X-ray Sources near the Nucleus of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoles, Sarah; Patel, B.; Di Stefano, R.; Liu, J.; Barmby, P.; Primini, F.

    2006-12-01

    Members of a subclass of X-ray sources called supersoft sources (SSSs) have luminosities greater than 1036 erg/s, soft broadband spectra, and emit little or no emission above 1 keV. Their physical natures are likely to be varied , and optical identification is key to understanding the kinds of sources that comprise SSSs. Approximately 1000 SSSs are thought to be located within the bulge of M31, and an analysis by DiStefano in 2004 idenified twenty-one near its galactic nucleus. Using archival HST data, we searched for optical counterparts for these SSSs. Although we were not able to identify a definite counterpart for any of these sources, we used color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to analyze the photometric properties of the candidates and compare them to the properties of the optical sources within three arcseconds of the SSSs. Isochrones of varying metallicities were overlaid on these CMDs to determine the age and nature of the optical sources. In addition to this analysis, we created CMDs for all of the HST data from this region of M31, which provided the most thorough photometric analysis of its nuclear area. At least three of the SSSs_r1-25, r2-12, and r2-61_live in a population of highly luminous red stars, and they are most likely symbiotic binaries whose red giant donor stars emit in the optical wavelengths. The process used to identify these optical counterparts can be applied to any search for the optical identification of SSSs. Research made possible by the NSF REU program and SAO.

  7. Scanning internal photoemission studies of sodium-contaminated metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouthillier, T. M.; Young, L.; Tsoi, H. Y.

    1983-02-01

    Following DiStefano and also Williams and Woods we have used scanning internal photoemission to map barrier inhomogeneities in sodium-contaminated Al/SiO2/Si Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor capacitors. A computer controlled system was used with a He/Cd laser. A well-known and striking result of the previous work is that peaks tend to be found in the internal photoemission. In some cases these peaks have been attributed to the segregation of an initially uniform sodium ion distribution into clusters of a few μm diameter. This clustering occurred during a low temperature anneal under positive gate bias. The mechanism for the supposed segregation is of considerable interest. One possibility is that the segregation maps pre-existing inhomogeneities either in the silicon substrate or in the oxide. Another mechanism, proposed by Williams and Woods, involves the image force lowering of the potential energy of the sodium ions. The lowering is increased as the induced electron charge density in the silicon increases with progressive clustering. This positive feedback was proposed to lead to instability. A thermodynamic development of the model by Wojtowcz led to the concept of two-dimensional phase transitions in the sodium distribution. In the present work we report the result that peaks can be produced by a low temperature anneal with the sodium either at the Al/SiO2 interface or drifted to the Si/SiO2 interface. In the first case, the sodium must be drifted to the silicon side before the peaks appear. This may show that nucleation centers are produced by the anneal and mapped by the sodium. Alternatively, if un-nucleated segregation occurs it must be a function of sodium in SiO2 rather than of sodium near the Si/SiO2 interface. Correlation with weak spot breakdown was again observed and the effects of using HCl oxides were studied.

  8. Designing a Gamma-Ray Telescope on a Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Major space-based observatories are imperative in astronomy, but they take a long time to plan, build, and launch and they arent cheap. A new study examines an interesting compromise: a low-cost, space-based gamma-ray detector that we could use while we wait for the next big observatory to launch.Coverage and sensitivity of past and future missions for the X-ray to gamma-ray energy range (click for a better look!). The only past mission to explore the 1 MeV region was COMPTEL, on board CGRO. e-ASTROGAM is a proposed future space mission that would explore this range. [Lucchetta et al. 2017]A Gap in CoverageIn the last few decades, weve significantly expanded our X-ray and gamma-ray viewof the sky. One part of the electromagnetic spectrum remains poorly explored, however: the approximate transition point between X-rays and gamma rays near 1 MeV.Space-based gamma-ray telescopes have been proposed for the future to better explore this energy range. But these major observatories have costs of around half a billion Euros and will take roughly a decade to build and launch. Is there a way to get eyes on this energy range sooner?Scaling Down with CubeSatA team of scientists led by Giulio Lucchetta (University of Padova and INFN Padova, Italy) has proposed an intriguing solution for the more immediate future: a nano-satellite telescope based on the CubeSat standard.Structure of the proposed gamma-ray detector, in a 2U CubeSat design. [Lucchetta et al. 2017]A CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite design that can be easily deployed in space, either from the International Space Station or by hitching a ride as a secondary payload on a large rocket. The size of a CubeSat is a standardized unit of measurement: a single CubeSat unit, or 1U, is a mere 10x10x10 cm and a maximum of 1.33 kg in weight.The gamma-ray telescope proposed by Lucchetta and collaborators would use a 2U standard for the instrument, so the instrument would be only 10x10x20 cm in size! The design for the

  9. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  10. Multinuclear group 4 catalysis: olefin polymerization pathways modified by strong metal-metal cooperative effects.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Jennifer P; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J

    2014-08-19

    Polyolefins are produced today catalytically on a vast scale, and the manufactured polymers find use in everything from artificial limbs and food/medical packaging to automotive and electrical components and lubricants. Although polyolefin monomers are typically cheap (e.g., ethylene, propylene, α-olefins), the resulting polymer properties can be dramatically tuned by the particular polymerization catalyst employed, and reflect a rich interplay of macromolecular chemistry, materials science, and physics. For example, linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), produced by copolymerization of ethylene with linear α-olefin comonomers such as 1-butene, 1-hexene, or 1-octene, has small but significant levels of short alkyl branches (C2, C4, C6) along the polyethylene backbone, and is an important technology material due to outstanding rheological and mechanical properties. In 2013, the total world polyolefin production was approximately 211 million metric tons, of which about 11% was LLDPE. Historically, polyolefins were produced using ill-defined but highly active heterogeneous catalysts composed of supported groups 4 or 6 species (usually halides) activated by aluminum alkyls. In 1963, Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta received the Nobel Prize for these discoveries. Beginning in the late 1980s, a new generation of group 4 molecule-based homogeneous olefin polymerization catalysts emerged from discoveries by Walter Kaminsky, a team led by James Stevens at The Dow Chemical Company, this Laboratory at Northwestern University, and a host of talented groups in Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. These new "single-site" catalysts and their activating cocatalysts were far better defined and more rationally tunable in terms of structure, mechanism, thermodynamics, and catalyst activity and selectivity than ever before possible. An explosion of research advances led to new catalysts, cocatalysts, deeper mechanistic understanding of both the

  11. Do the Ligurian Alps know that the Mediterranean dried out 6 Ma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano, C.; Peavot, D.; Beucher, R.; Gaggero, L.; Stuart, F.

    2011-12-01

    led to deeper incision and faster retreat of Messinian knickpoints in the Ligurian Alps. Areas where rivers were short and discharge low, or where the shoreline had retreated by hundreds of km, as in the case of the Bormida, the knickpoints were probably flooded when the Mediterranean Sea re-filled at 5.3 Ma and therefore the present landscape does not record the MSC. Barbieri, C., Carrapa, B., Di Giulio, A., Wijbrans, J., Murrell, G. 2003, Provenance of Oligocene synorogenic sediments of the Ligurian Alps (NW Italy): inferences on belt age and cooling history: Int. Journ. Earth Sci. (Geol Rundsch), v. 92, p. 758-778. Foeken, J.P.T.; Bertotti, G.V.; Dunai, T.J.; The morphology of a Messinian valley and its hinterland (Ventimiglia, NW Italy): Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Ligurian Alps; Geological Journal 41: 465-480 (2006) Howard, A. & Kerby, G. 1983, Channel changes in badlands. Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 94: p. 739-752. Hsü, K., Cita, M., Ryan, W. 1973, Late Miocene desiccation of the Mediterranean: Nature, v. 242, p. 240-244. Ketcham, R. 2009, Apatite to Zircon, Inc. version 1.6.7, build 1.6.7.43.

  12. SEAC 2011 Stars and Stones: Voyages in Archaeoastronomy and Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, F.; Ribeiro, N.; Silva, F.; Campion, N.; Joaquinito, A.; Tirapicos, L.

    2015-05-01

    Culture was held in Évora, Portugal, from September 19th to 23th, 2011, and was attended by 85 participants from 29 countries. A total number of 71 talks and 4 posters were presented. Among them 20 invited lectures given by Michael Rappenglüück, José Manuel Malhão Pereira, Jarita Holbrook, Giulio Magli, Nicholas Campion, J. Kim Malville, David Pankenier, Alejandro Martín López, Ivan Sprajc, Mariusz Ziólkowski, Marciano da Silva, Lionel Sims, Emilia Pasztor, Frank Prendergast, Fernando Pimenta, A. César González-Garcia, Henrique Leitão, Shi Yunli and Stanislaw Iwaniszewski and 3 public lectures given by Luísa Pereira, Juan Belmonte Avilés and Clive Ruggles. Most of the contributions were submitted for publication and went through a peer-review process. The present volume is the result of this process, arranged in the same thematic sections as the Conference was organised.

  13. In memorium : Ugo Fano (1912-2001).

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.; Physics

    2001-05-01

    With the passing of Ugo Fano on 13 February 2001, the Radiation Research Society lost an influential founding member. A broader community dearly misses a great theoretical physicist. Ugo Fano was born a son of Rosa Cassin and Gino Fano (1871-1952), professor of mathematics at Turin, Italy, specializing in differential geometry. Having studied mathematics first at the University of Turin, the younger Fano turned to physics under the influence of his cousin, Giulio Racah (1909-1965), a physicist known for the powerful theory of angular momentum. Then Fano was fortunate to receive postdoctoral training from two giants in modern physics: Enrico Fermi at Rome in 1934-1936 and Werner Heisenberg at Leipzig in 1936-1937. Fano's American career began with pioneering work in 1940-1944 in what was later to be called radiation biology with M. Demerec and others at the Department of Genetics of the Carnegie Institution at Cold Spring Harbor. It is noteworthy that, after a seminar in Rome by P. Jordan on the effects of X rays on genetic material, Fermi had suggested to Fano that the biological action of radiation would be an important and suitable topic for study. Fano's papers in this period concerned chromosomal rearrangements, mutations, lethal effects, and genetic effects of X rays and neutrons on Drosophila melanogaster, as well as theoretical analysis of genetic data. His work also included the discovery of bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Escherichia coli, following up earlier studies by Salvador E. Luria. After a wartime effort at the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory in 1944-1945, Fano joined the staff of the National Bureau of Standards in 1946. Fano's two decades at NBS saw prolific and outstanding contributions to two major areas of research: radiation physics and the basic physics of atoms, molecules and condensed matter. Many of Fano's contributions to radiation physics are seminal to later developments. In 1946, he put forth the first general theory of the

  14. The abundance pattern of heavy elements in Sirius: Impact of modern observations (STIS) and improved Atomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay Cowley, Charles; Ayres, Thomas; Wahlgren, Glenn; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The abundance pattern of heavy elements in Sirius: Impact of modern observations (STIS) and improved atomic data. We determine abundances or upper limits for the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) from the ASTRAL project (Ayres 2010, ApJS, 187, 149). We have also used archival material from COPERNICUS (retrieved from the MAST) and from HST/GHRS, as well as the ground-based Furenlid, Westin, and Kurucz Sirius Atlas (FWK). The GHRS observations were described by Wahlgren, et al. (1993, Bull. AAS, 25, 1321). We also used the monumental study of Sirius by Klaus Kohl (1964, Zs. f. Ap. 60, 115, 1964, see also 1964, Das Spektrum des Sirius, 3100 - 8863A, Kiel thesis). Abundance determinations are based on the photospheric model of Landstreet (2011, A&A, 528, 132). The atomic data base is significantly improved since the pioneering work by Sadakane (1988, PASP, 100, 811; 1991, 103, 355). The basic source was VALD3 (http://vald.inasan.ru/~vald3/php/vald.php), supplemented for all species by the essential NIST bibliographic data base (http://physics.nist.gov/cgi-bin/ASBib1/TransProbBib.cgi). We determine abundances and upper limits by synthesizing short wavelength regions around strong lines. Virtually all of the abundance/upper limit results show excesses over the solar composition of between 1 and 2 dex. This result is in general agreement with overall results for metallic line stars, though we have no information on possible severe depletions for most elements. We conclude that the mechanisms causing abundance anomalies in Sirius have not acted to produce the extreme excesses of 4 or more dex (Pt, Hg), or deficiencies (Zn) seen in many HgMn stars.CRC thanks Stefano Bagnulo for the UVESPOP Sirius spectrum. Robert Kurucz was most helpful with older Sirius UV and visual spectra.

  15. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacteria associated with Silene paradoxa grown on metal-contaminated soils are selected and transferred to the next generation of plants as seed endophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocali, Stefano; Fabiani, Arturo; Chiellini, Carolina; Gori, Giulia; Gonnelli, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that bacteria are commonly associated to the plants, either on the outer surfaces (epiphytes) that inside the plant tissues (endophytes). These bacteria mainly derived from soil and reach the various organs of the plant throughout the root system. Despite recent works have shown that endophytic bacteria can have an important role in the physiology of the plant, little is known of their possible involvement in the resistance and tolerance mechanisms of plants to heavy metals. Furthermore, until now only limited research has been conducted to unravel the exact role and possible applications of seed endophytes. The aim of this work was to characterize the plant-associated bacterial communities present at both the rhizosphere and inside the seeds, roots and aerial parts of plants of Silene paradoxa, a plant highly well-adapted to extreme environments, such as metal-contaminated soils. Thus, soil samples and plants of S. paradoxa were collected from i) the landfill of a Cu mine at Fenice Capanne (Grosseto, Italy); ii) a serpentine soil (with a high Ni content) at Pieve Santo Stefano (Arezzo, Italy); iii) a limestone uncontaminated soil in Colle Val d'Elsa (Siena, Italy). Bacterial communities associated with the three different plant organs have been then characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes (microbiota). Bacteria were also isolated from seeds and soil and the colony forming units (CFU) was determined on plates containing different concentrations of Ni and Cu (5, 10 and 15 mM). The results showed a greater bacterial diversity among the three soils compared to plants. In particular, even though some phyla occurred in all the three soils (Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chlorflexi and Acidobacteria), in general the bacterial community structure of the three soils was quite different from each other. Interestingly, the endophytic composition within each plant compartment was observed to be strongly affected by the soil of

  16. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  17. [Science and life--the history of Marquis Alfonso Corti].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław

    2008-01-01

    Alfonso Corti was born at Gambarana, near Pavia in 1822. A famous friend of Corti's father, Antonio Scarpa, may have kindled his boyhood interest in anatomy and medicine. As a medical student he enrolled first at the University of Pavia. Corti's favorite study there was microanatomy with Bartolomeo Panizza and Mario Rusconi. In 1845, against paternal wishes, Corti moved to Vienna to complete his medical studies and to work in the anatomical institute of Joseph Hirtl. There he received the degree in medicine in 1847 under the supervision of professor Hyrtl, with a thesis on the bloodstream system of a reptile. He was then appointed by Hyrtl to be his Second Prosector. With the outbreak of the 1848 Revolution he left Vienna, and after brief military service in Italy made visits to eminent scientist in Bern, London and Paris. By the beginning of 1850 Corti had received the invitation of the anatomist Albert Kölliker and had moved to Würzburg, where he made friends with Virchow. At the Kölliker Laboratory he began to work on the mammalian auditory system. A short time Corti spent in Utrecht, where he visited Professors Schroeder van der Kolk and Pieter Harting. In Utrecht Corti learned to use methods to preserve several preparations of the cochlea. From Utrecht he returned to Würzburg to complete his study of at least 200 cochlea's' of man and different animals. His famous paper: "Recherches sur l'organe de l'ouïe des mammiferes" appeared in 1851 in Kölliker's journal "Zeitschrift für wissenschaftliche Zoologie". In the same year, after death of his father, he inherited father's title Marchese de San Stefano Belbo and estate and moved back to Italy. In 1855 Corti married the daughter from a neighboring estate, Maria Bettinzoli. His young wife presented him with a daughter Bianca, and a son Gaspare, but in 1861 she died, leaving him with the responsibility of rearing the children. Unfortunately he was gradually developing arthritis deformans. Corti's last 15

  18. Extreme QCD 2012 (xQCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    Acknowledgements This conference would not have been possible without the generous support from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the George Washington University INS and IMPACT institutes, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Vice-President for Research, and the Department of Physics. We thank them wholeheartedly. We are also very grateful for the support of our colleagues on the local organizing committee, Walter Freeman and Frank Lee, and on the International Advisory Committee: Simon Hands, Tetsuo Hatsuda, Frithjof Karsch, Maria Paola Lombardo, Tereza Mendes, Atsushi Nakamura, Owe Philipsen, Claudia Ratti, Paul Romatschke, Misha Stephanov, and Nu Xu. List of participants Alexandru, Andrei George Washington University Bazavov, Alexei Brookhaven National Laboratory Bloch, Jacques University of Regensburg Braun-Munzinger, Peter EMMI, GSI Breto Rangel, Guillermo CMS/UC Davis D'Elia, Massimo University of Pisa, INFN Dexheimer, Veronica UFSC - Federal University of Santa Catarina Ding, Heng-Tong Brookhaven National Laboratory Dion, Alan Stony Brook University Dumitru, Adrian RBRC and Baruch College, CUNY Freeman, Walter George Washington University Gavai, Rajiv Tata Institute (TIFR), Mumbai Hanada, Masanori KEK Theory Center Hands, Simon Swansea University Hegde, Prasad Brookhaven National Laboratory Heinke, Craig University of Alberta Horvath, Ivan University of Kentucky Karsch, Frithjof Brookhaven National Laboratory Krieg, Stefan Wuppertal University Lattimer, James Stony Brook University Lee, Frank George Washington University Li, Anyi Institute for Nuclear Theory Liu, Keh-Fei University of Kentucky Lombardo, Maria Paola INFN - LNF Lottini, Stefano Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main Maezawa, Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory Miura, Kohtaroh Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati - INFN Monnai, Akihiko The University of Tokyo Mukherjee, Swagato Brookhaven National Laboratory Myers, Joyce University of Groningen Nakamura, Atsushi RIISE, Hiroshima

  19. Fractal Fragmentation triggered by meteor impact: The Ries Crater (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Perugini, Diego; Rossi, Stefano; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    FRACTAL FRAGMENTATION TRIGGERED BY METEOR IMPACT: THE RIES CRATER (GERMANY) Joali Paredes (1), Stefano Rossi (1), Diego Perugini (1), Ulrich Kueppers (2) 1. Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Italy 2. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Munich, Germany The Nördlinger Ries is a large circular depression in western Bavaria, Germany. The depression was caused by a meteor impact, which occurred about 14.3 million-14.5 million years ago. The original crater rim had an estimated diameter of 24 kilometers. Computer modeling of the impact event indicates that the impact or probably had diameters of about 1.5 kilometers and impacted the target area at an angle around 30 to 50 degrees from the surface in a west- southwest to east-northeast direction. The impact velocity is thought to have been about 20 km/s. The meteor impact generated extensive fragmentation of preexisting rocks. In addition, melting of these rocks also occurred. The impact melt was ejected at high speed provoking its extensive fragmentation. Quenched melt fragments are ubiquitous in the outcrops. Here we study melt fragment size distributions with the aim of understanding the style of melt fragmentation during ejection and to constrain the rheological properties of such melts. Digital images of suevite (i.e. the rock generated after deposition and diagenesis of ash and fragments produced by the meteor impact) were obtained using a high-resolution optical scanner. Successively, melt fragments were traced by image analysis and the images segmented in order to obtain binary images on which impact melt fragments are in black color, embedded on a white background. Hence, the size of fragments was determined by image analysis. Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to fragment size distributions of melt fragments in the Ries crater. Results indicate that melt fragments follow fractal distributions indicating that fragmentation of melt generated by the

  20. What's in the mud?: Water-rock-microbe interactions in thermal mudpots and springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, G. R.; Cox, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Limited aspects of mudpot geochemistry, mineralogy, and microbiology have been previously investigated in a total of 58 mudpots in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Kamchatka, Iceland, Italy, Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Nicaragua, and the Stefanos hydrothermal crater, Greece (Allen and Day, 1935; Raymahashay, 1968; Shevenell, 1987; Bradley, 2005; Prokofeva, 2006; Bortnikova, 2007; Kaasalainen, 2012; Szynkiewicz, 2012; Hynek, 2013; Pol, 2014; Kanellopoulos, 2016). The composition of 35 mudpots was analyzed for aqueous geochemistry of filtrate and solid phase characterization. Here mudpots are defined as thermal features with viscosities between 5 and 100 centipoise at the approximate temperature of the mudpot, which was measured by an Ofite hand cranked viscometer. Analogous samples of nearby hot springs provide comparisons between mudpots and non-viscous thermal features. Aqueous geochemistry from mudpots was obtained by a novel two-step filtration process consisting of gravity prefiltration by a 100 or 50 micron trace metal cleaned polyethylene bag filter followed by syringe filtration with 0.8/0.2 Supor membrane filters. This filtered sample water was preserved and analyzed for water isotopes, major anions and cations, dissolved organic carbon, and trace metals. Mudpot meter readings show dissolved oxygen values ranging from below the detection limit of 0.156 to 22.5uM, pH values ranging from 1.41 to 6.08, and temperatures ranging from 64.8 to 92.5°C. Mudpots and turbid hot springs exhibited an inverse relationship between dissolved rare earth element concentrations and dissolved calcium concentrations (where calcium concentrations > 0.4mM). Mudpots altered existing surficial geology to form clays, primarily kaolinite, montmorillionite, and alunite. This hydrothermal alteration leaches metals, allowing mudpots to concentrate metals. DNA was extracted from mudpot solids and amplified with eukaryotic, bacterial, archaeal, and universal primers, which yielded only

  1. HUBBLE UNCOVERS MYSTERY OBJECTS IN THE DENSE CORE OF A NEARBY STAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    light-years wide. The image was taken in June 1995 by the Burrell Schmidt telescope at the Case Western Reserve University's Warner and Swasey Observatory on Kitt Peak in Arizona. This release is issued jointly by NASA and ESA. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, Kailash Sahu, Stefano Casertano, Mario Livio, Ron Gilliland (Space Telescope Science Institute), Nino Panagia (European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute), Michael Albrow and Mike Potter (Space Telescope Science Institute) Credits for ground-based image: Nigel A.Sharp, REU program/AURA/NOAO/NSF

  2. Landscapes of Central Italy through Science, Poetry and Music. A perspective for educating to the planet sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, Olivia; Valentini, Laura

    2016-04-01

    aptly suited to represent natural forms whose history began millions of years ago. Lorenzo Carnevali, artist from Urbino, is the poet that has expressly dedicated verses to these places, in an effort to grab that balance which summarizes the History and Nature. The poems are performed by Maxx Brizigotti, eclectic actor and director, deeply linked to his territory. Music and verses are the soundtrack of videos made by Stefano Baiocchi that, by using beautiful images of these places, creatively interprets the science, art and history. Our purpose is to educate to a new perception of the place, starting from its beauty and arriving to a knowledge of its problems and weakness.

  3. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    groups. In particular, help was provided to students and scientists from non-EU countries. It is our great pleasure to thank those people and institutions whose help and support was crucial to the success of the meeting. We appreciate the enthusiastic support of our colleagues of the academic community, especially those from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and the Universities of Cagliari, Pisa, Torino and Mississippi. Financial support was provided by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, the Universities of Cagliari, Torino, Pisa and Mississippi. This was used largely to support participants, especially younger people. Special thanks go to Pietro Menotti (University of Pisa) and Stefano Sciuto (University of Torino) for their friendship and their universities' financial contributions. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge financial support from the Regione Autonoma della Sardegna and from Tiscali, the communications and Internet company, for providing free telephone cards. Technical support and local organisation was provided by the Sezione di Cagliari of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Warmest thanks go to our administrative and technical staff - Maria Assunta Lecca and Simona Renieri, for their untiring assistance, and to Palmasera Village and Hotel Smeraldo for their splendid hospitality. And finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting and were largely without support. The success of the meeting is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors January 2006 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Mariano Cadoni (Università and INFN Cagliari) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi) Jeanette E. Nelson (Università and INFN Torino) Advisory Committee Orfeu Bertolami (IST Lisboa, Portugal) Luca Bombelli (Univ. Mississippi) Steve Carlip (UC Davis, USA) Alessandro D'Adda (INFN Torino, Italy) Stanley Deser (Brandeis, USA

  4. Committees and organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    (Orsay) S Hamann (Bochum)R Varga (Košice) U Hannemann (Dresden)P Vavassori (San Sebastian) L Havela (Prague)W Wulfhekel (Karlsruhe) O Heczko (Prague)M Yamashita (Sendai) B Hernando (Oviedo)R Zdyb (Lublin) O Isnard (Grenoble)A Zhukov (San Sebastián) Z Kąkol (Kraków)A K Zvezdin (Moscow) N-T H Kim-Ngan (Kraków) International Advisory Committee (2011): Dominique Givord, President (Grenoble)Ludwig Schultz, Former President (Dresden) Manfred Albrecht (Chemnitz)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern) Agnés Barthélémy (Paris)Andrei Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) Roy Chantrell (York)Ron Jansen (Tsukuba) Russell Cowburn (London)Nicoleta Lupu (Iasi) Tomasz Dietl (Warszawa)Caroline A Ross (Cambridge, MA) Claudia Felser (Mainz)Stefano Sanvito (Dublin) Josef Fidler (Wien)Vladimir Sechovsky (Praha) Dino Fiorani (Roma)Roberta Sessoli (Firenze) Pietro Gambardella (Bellaterra)Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Alberto Guimarães (Rio de Janeiro)

  5. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    resonances in the boosted top regime were also provided. Finally, a set of dedicated talks on the interplay between the top sector and other hot subjects, like the Higgs and SUSY, were given both at the theory and experimental level. Furthermore, ad hoc student sessions were organized to allow younger colleagues to pose questions to the senior experts in the field and contribute with their more recent studies. The conference has been a definitive success, not just scientifically: about 130 participants from all over the world created a collegiate spirit which culminated in the social events at Winchester Hall below King Arthur's table; and in a cosy 16th century barn for the social dinner. The Local Organizing Committee would like to thank all participants, and in particular the speakers, for their high level contributions to TOP 2012 and for making this a very fruitful and pleasant time together. We conclude by wishing the Organizing Committee of TOP 2013 all the best for a successful conference. We look forward to seeing everyone in Germany in 2013. Giuseppe Salamanna Local Organizing Committee London, June 2013 Local Organising Committee Veronique Boisvert (Chair, Royal Holloway, University of London) Lucio Cerrito (Queen Mary, University of London) Akram Khan (Brunel University, London) Stefano Moretti (University of Southampton) Mark Owen (University of Manchester) Giuseppe Salamanna (Queen Mary, University of London) Christian Schwanenberger (University of Manchester) International Advisory Committee Roberto Tenchini (INFN, Pisa) Martine Bosman (IFAE, Barcelona) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Scott Willenbrock (University of Illinois, Urbana) Werner Bernreuther (RWTH, Aachen) Jorgen D'Hondt (VUB, Brussels) Antonio Onofre (LIP, University Minho) Fabio Maltoni (UCL, Louvain) Eric Laenen (NIKHEF) Fabrizio Margaroli (INFN, Roma 1) Juan Antonio Aguilar Saavedra (University of Granada) Yvonne Peters (University of Manchester) Roberto Chierici (CERN) Markus Cristinziani

  6. Measuring a Black Hole's Mass with Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    .A team of scientists led by Stefano Valenti (LCOGT, UC Santa Barbara) has published the first results from the AGN Key Project, a project which uses the LCOGT network to conduct several studies of AGN including reverberation mapping of both local and high-redshift objects. In these first results, the team reports the outcome of a 200-day observing campaign of the galaxy Arp 151, which has a highly variable active nucleus.The LCOGT observations successfully show a measurable lag between the continuum emission and the broad emission lines for Arp 151. They are also enough-resolved that a velocity can be measured from the broad emission lines, allowing the team to calculate the mass of the black hole enclosed. Valenti and collaborators announce a mass of 6.2 million solar masses consistent with previously measured masses for this system.The success of this test demonstrates the viability of this approach, as well as the powerful capabilities of robotic telescope networks for long-term AGN time domain campaigns.CitationS. Valenti et al 2015 ApJ 813 L36. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/813/2/L36

  7. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    ) in an old roman fresco in the church of S. Stefano Rotondo (Rome).

  8. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary

  9. Soil gas composition from the 2001-2002 fissure in the Lakki Plain (Nisyros Island, Greece): evidences for shallow hydrothermal fluid circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Stefania; Tassi, Franco; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Vaselli, Orlando; Caponi, Chiara; Ricci, Andrea; Raspanti, Alessio; Gallorini, Andrea; Cabassi, Jacopo; Vougioukalakis, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Nisyros volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) is currently classified in the "Very High Threat" category (Kinvig et al., 2010). Although the last volcanic activity, consisting of phreatic eruptions, occurred in the 19th century, Nisyros experienced an intense seismic activity during 1996-1998 accompanied by ground deformation and changes in the chemistry of fumarolic gases (Chiodini et al., 2002), pointing to a renewed unrest. Between November 2001 and December 2002, a NNE-oriented 600 m long fissure opened in the vegetated central part of the Lakki Plain. The fissure, 1-5 m wide and up to 15-20 m deep, showed neither vertical displacements nor gas release. No changes in the seismic and volcanic activity were observed during or after this event, which was interpreted as related to collapse of the upper caldera floor fine sediment cover (<50 m thick) induced by hydrothermal fluid circulation (Vougioukalakis and Fytikas, 2005). In June 2015, diffuse CO2 flux measurements, in combination with sampling and chemical analysis of the interstitial soil gases, were performed in (i) the fissure bottom, (ii) the adjacent vegetated areas in the Lakki Plain, (iii) the near hydrothermal craters (Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos domes), and (iv) sites located outside the caldera (blank values). The fissure showed neither temperature (<30 °C) nor CO2 fluxes (<10 gm-2d-1) anomalies with respect to the blank sites and the Lakki Plain, with values strikingly lower than those measured in the hydrothermal craters (up to 98 °C and 208 gm-2d-1, respectively). Contrarily, the CO2 concentrations in the interstitial soil gases from the fissure (up to 513 mmol/mol) were markedly higher than the background values and comparable with those measured in the craters (up to 841 mmol/mol). Relatively high H2S, H2 and CH4 contents in soil gases from the fissure confirm the hydrothermal origin of these soil gases. However, their CH4/CO2 ratio were lower than those measured in the soil gases from the craters

  10. New data on the structural setting of the Elimi Chain (South-western Tyrrhenian sea) from reprocessing of multichannel seismic profiles (MS grid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, F.; Sulli, A.; Catalano, R.; Valenti, V.

    2003-04-01

    deformed carbonate multilayer, dipping towards WNW, from 5.0 to 6.5 s/TWT, beneath the crystalline stack. It rests directly on top of its crystalline basement. In the Solunto High a tectonic body about 2.5 s/TWT thick, formed by crystalline units, is overlain by layered to hummocky Tertiary deposits 0.5 s/TWT. This tectonic edifice overthrusts the SMU. Along the WNW-ESE direction, showing lateral ramps. The SMU consist of Meso-Cenozoic imbricates about 2.0 s/TWT thick, lying on top of less deformed carbonate successions about 1.5 s/TWT thick. Correlation of seismic characters defines the crystalline body as pertaining to the KCU. In the Solunto High, seismic analysis and tectonics relationships reveal the occurrence of the KCU that overthrust the SMU. In this area, the Drepano Thrust front extends towards the east and connects the Elimi Chain to the Calabrian-Peloritani sector. References Beccaluva, L., Morlotti, E., Torelli, L., 1986. Notes on the geology of the Elimi chain area (soutwestern margin of the Tyrrhenian Sea). Mem. Soc. Geol. It. 27, 213-232. Catalano, R., Di Stefano, P., Sulli, A., Vitale, F.P., 1996. Paleogeography and structure of the central Mediterranean: Sicily and its offshore area. Tectonophysics 260, 291-323. Compagnoni, R., Morlotti, E., Torelli, L., 1989. Cristalline and sedimentary rocks from the scarps of the Sicily-Sardinia trough and Cornaglia Terrace ( Soutwestern Tyrrhenian Sea): paleogeographic and geodynamic implication. Chem. Geol. 77, 271-315. Sulli, A., 2000. Structural framework and crustal characteristics of the Sardinia Channel Alpine transect in the central Mediterranean. Tectonophysics 324, 321-336.

  11. Development of river sediment monitoring in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frančišković-Bilinski, Stanislav; Bilinski, Halka; Mlakar, Marina; Maldini, Krešimir

    2017-04-01

    have significant anthropogenic concentrations on several locations. With other studied elements situation is much better and anthropogenic influence is not so significant. Based on own research and experience and comparing them with existing sediment quality criteria worldwide, within the current phase of monitoring program it is aimed to propose threshold values for mentioned elements, what would be base for Croatian National legislative on sediment quality. [1] Prohić, E. and Juračić, M. (1989): Heavy metals in sediments - Problems concerning determination of the anthropogenic influence. Study in the Krka River Estuary, Eastern Adriatic Coast, Yugoslavia. Environmental Geology Water Science, 13(2), 145-151. [2] Franči\\vsković-Bilinski, S. (2005): Geochemistry of stream sediments in Kupa River drainage basin [In Croatian] / Doctoral thesis. University of Zagreb, Croatia. [3] Franči\\vsković-Bilinski, S., Bilinski, H., Maldini, K. (2015): Establishing of monitoring of river sediments in Croatia. Contaminated sediments: Environmental Chemistry, Ecotoxicology and Engineering - Program and Abstract Book, Congressi Stefano Franscini, Ascona, Switzerland, 73-73.

  12. Study of Electron Acceleration and Multiple Dipolarization Fronts in 3D kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Walker, Raymond; El-Alaoui, Mostafa

    2014-05-01

    . [1] Ashour-Abdalla, Maha, et al. "Observations and simulations of non-local acceleration of electrons in magnetotail magnetic reconnection events." Nature Physics 7.4 (2011): 360-365. [2] Markidis, Stefano, and Giovanni Lapenta. "Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D." Mathematics and Computers in Simulation 80.7 (2010): 1509-1519. [3] Baumann, G., Troels Haugbølle, and Å. Nordlund. "Kinetic Modeling of Particle Acceleration in a Solar Null-point Reconnection Region." The Astrophysical Journal 771.2 (2013): 93. [4] Daldorff, L. K. S., et al. "Coupling the BATS-R-US global MHD code with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPIC3D." Bulletin of the American Physical Society 58 (2013).

  13. Variability of DTM-derived, morphometric parameters versus cell size. An example of application in Calabria (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rago, Valeria; Caloiero, Paola; Pellegrino, Annamaria Daniela; Iovine, Giulio G. R.; Terranova, Oreste G.; Pascale, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    , G. Gullà, G. Iovine, O. Petrucci, P. Salvador Sanchis, M. Sorriso-Valvo, O. Terranova, D. Torri, V. Bagarello, C. Di Stefano, V. Ferro, G. Buttafuoco, G. Callegari, P. Porto, B. Betrò, A. Bodini, C. Brambilla (2010) - Relazione Finale Contratto Lotto 2 Pericolosità legata ai fenomeni di intensa erosione idrica areale e lineare- POR Calabria 2000-2006, Azione. 1.4c. Rapporto per Autorità di Bacino Regione Calabria. Iovine G., Greco R., Gariano S.L., Pellegrino A.D., Terranova O.G. (2014) - Shallow-landslide susceptibility in the Costa Viola mountain ridge (southern Calabria, Italy) with considerations on the role of causal factors. Natural Hazards, 73(1), pp.111-136. In: G. Iovine & D. Cohen (Eds.), Advanced methods in landslide modelling. Iovine G., Greco R., Gariano S.L., Iaquinta P., Pellegrino A.D., Terranova O.G. (2013) - Shallow-landslide susceptibility in the Costa Viola mountain ridge (Italia). In: Landslide Science and Practice, Claudio Margottini, Paolo Canuti, Kyoji Sassa (Editors), Volume 3: Spatial Analysis and Modelling, pp.81-87. Proc. Second World Landslide Forum, 3-7 October 2011, Rome.

  14. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    describes how canonical helicity can determine the result of reconnection and merging of multiple magnetic flux ropes, John Finn et al focus on diagnosing flux rope reconnection using quasi-separatrix layers, and Stefano Markidis et al investigate how a single flux rope can become unstable and begin to fall apart. With these many examples of different magnetized plasma structures, which can all be called magnetic flux ropes, the question still stands: just what is it that makes a volume of magnetized plasma a magnetic flux rope? There may not be a strict definition of a magnetic flux rope that everyone can agree on. Nonetheless, the ingredient common to all magnetic flux ropes is that the magnetic field lines that thread nearby plasma elements at one location along the flux rope must wind around and not diverge away from each other over a sufficiently long distance to look like a piece of an ordinary rope. In a way, it is similar to turbulence—you know it when you see it. The figures and illustrations included in this special issue provide plenty of examples of observed, measured, modeled and imagined magnetic flux ropes for you, the reader, to develop an appreciation of what different members of our research community mean by a magnetic flux rope. If you have never studied magnetic flux ropes, we hope that this special issue inspires you to look into their many mysteries. If magnetic flux ropes are already an integral part of your research, we hope the diversity of perspectives presented herein refresh your interest in the underlying plasma physics of whichever kind of magnetic flux rope you happen to be working with. References [1] Russell C T, Priest E R and Lee L-C 1990 Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes AGU Geophysical Monograph Series vol 58 (Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union)

  15. The ICTP Regional System Model (RESM) to simulate the monsoon in the South Asia CORDEX domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sante, Fabio; Coppola, Erika; Farneti, Riccardo; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    . The impact of a simplified low-resolution hydrological model (HD model) and the physical based high-resolution hydrological model (CHyM model) is also assessed in the fully coupled RESM simulations. References: 1) Fu, X., Wang, B. and Li, T., 2002: Impacts of air-sea coupling on the simulation of mean Asian summer monsoon in the ECHAM4 model, Mon. Wea. Rev., 130, 2889-2904. 2) Fu, X., Wang, B., Waliser, D. E. and Tao, L., 2007: Impact of atmosphere-ocean coupling on the predictability of monsoon interseasonal oscillations, J. Atmos. Sci., 64,157-174. 3) Ratnam J. Venkata, Filippo Giorgi, Akshara Kaginalkar, Stefano Cozzini, 2008b: Simulation of Indian Monsoon using RegCM3 - ROMS regional coupled model, Climate Dynamics, 1432-0894. 4) Seo, H, Xie SP, Murtgudde R, Jochum M, Miller AJ. 2009. Seasonal effects of Indian Ocean freshwater forcing in a regional coupled model. Journal of Climate. 22:6577-6596. 5) Giorgi, F., et al. 2012: RegCM4: Model description and preliminary tests over multiple CORDEX domains, Clim. Res., 53(1), 7-29. 6) Marshall, J., C. Hill, L. Perelman, and A. Adcroft, 1997: Hydrostatic, quasi-hydrostatic, and nonhydrostatic ocean modeling. J. Geophysical Res., 102(C3), 5733-5752. 7) Hagemann, S., Dumenil, L., 1998: Application of a grid-scale lateral discharge model in the BALTEX region. MPI-Report No. 278 8) Coppola, E., Tomasetti, B., Mariotti, L., Verdecchia, M., Visconti, G., 2007: Cellular automata algorithms for drainage network extraction and rainfall data assimilation. Hydrol Sci J 2007;52(3). 9) Giorgi F., Jones C. Asrar G., 2009: Addressing climate information needs at the regional level: the CORDEX framework. WMO Bull 58:175-183

  16. Relation between the occurence of major glaciations of Antarctica and Greenland and the atmospheric CO2: a modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, S.; Ramstein, G.; Donnadieu, Y.; Dumas, C.; Ritz, C.; Waldman, R.

    2009-12-01

    decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations during the Paleogene." Science 309(5734): 600-603. 5. Kürschner, W., van der Burgh, J., Visscher, and H., Dilcher, D.: Oak leaves as biosensors of late Neogene and early Pleistocene paleoatmospheric CO2 concentrations, Mar. Micropaleontol., 27, 299¿312, 1996. 6. Bonelli Stefano, Donnadieu Yannick, Ramstein Gilles, Dumas Christophe, Effect of the Drake Passage on the Cenozoic glaciation of Antarctica, PNAS 7. DeConto, R. M., D. Pollard, et al. (2008). "Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation." Nature 455(7337): 652-656 8. Sijp, W. P., M. H. England, and J.R. Toggweiler, 2009: Effect of ocean gateway changes under greenhouse warmth, J. Climate. 9. Lunt, D. J., G. L. Foster, et al. (2008). "Late Pliocene Greenland glaciation controlled by a decline in atmospheric CO2 levels." Nature 454(7208): 1102-U41.

  17. Chandra Catches Cannibal Galaxy in the Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory image of Perseus A provides new insight into how this supergiant galaxy has grown by cannibalizing other galaxies and gas in the vicinity. For the first time astronomers see an X-ray shadow cast by a smaller galaxy as its gas is being stripped away by the enormous galaxy. The research was reported by Professor Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, England on June 7 at the 196th National Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, in Rochester, NY. Other members of the research team are Jeremy Sanders, Stefano Ettori, Steve Allen, Carolin Crawford, Kazushi Iwasawa, and Roderick Johnstone of the Institute of Astronomy, Gregory Taylor on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM, and Patrick Ogle of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Perseus A, or NGC 1275, is in the center of a large galaxy cluster 320 million light years from Earth. The cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies and enough gas to make thousands more, is one of the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe. Over the eons, Perseus A has accumulated hundreds of billions of stars to become one of the most massive known galaxies as gas and galaxies have been pulled inward by gravity. The Chandra observation shows a region of hot gas that extends over several hundred thousand light years. The gas in the outer portion of the cluster has a temperature of 70 million degrees. The cluster gas cools gradually and settles toward the center of the cluster. A galaxy with "only" about 20 billion stars is falling into Perseus A (located at two o'clock from the center of the image) and appears as a small dark patch due to absorption of X rays by cool gas in the infalling galaxy. Another larger hole seen further out is thought to be due to a bubble of high-energy particles ejected in an explosion from Perseus A hundreds of millions of years ago. These outbursts are presumably fueled by matter releasing tremendous

  18. Integrating ArcGIS Online with GEOSS Data Access Broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchi, Roberto; Hogeweg, Marten

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) seeks to address 9 societal benefit areas for Earth observations to address: disasters, health, energy, climate, agriculture, ecosystems, biodiversity, water, and weather. As governments and their partners continue to monitor the face of the Earth, the collection, storage, analysis, and sharing of these observations remain fragmented, incomplete, or redundant. Major observational gaps also remain (particularly as we seek to look beneath the surface of the land and the water). As such, GEO's credo is that "decision makers need a global, coordinated, comprehensive, and sustained system of observing systems." Not surprisingly, one of the largest block of issues facing GEOSS is in the area of data: the access to data (including the building services to make the data more accessible), inadequate data integration and interoperability, error and uncertainty of observations, spatial and temporal gaps in observations, and the related issues of user involvement and capacity building. This is especially for people who stand to gain the most benefit from the datasets, but don't have the resources or knowledge to use them. Esri has millions of GIS and imagery users in hundreds of thousands of organizations around the world that work in the aforementioned 9 GEO societal benefit areas. Esri is therefore proud to have entered into a partnership with GEOSS, more specifically by way of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Esri and the Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) Laboratory of Prof. Stefano Nativi at the CNR (National Research Council of Italy) Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research. Esri is working with the ESSI Lab to integrate ArcGIS Online by way of the ArcGIS Online API into the GEOSS Data Access Broker (DAB), resulting in the discoverability of all public content from ArcGIS Online through many of the search portals that participate in this network (e.g., DataOne, CEOS, CUAHSI, OneGeology, IOOS

  19. Entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Bierbach, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    's 20 trading partner countries, for a time frame from 1995 to 2013. The calculations -implemented for each country and each crop- display a network that illustrates the gravity of virtual water trade. It is then possible for us to model the entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field, via the statistical examination of its spatial fragmentation or continuity for each traded crop and for each water footprint type. Hence, with the distribution's entropy we may conduct a targeted analysis on the comparative advantages of the Egyptian agriculture. Keywords: entropy, virtual water trade, gravity model, agricultural trade, water footprint, water subsidies, comparative advantage References 1. Antonelli, Marta and Martina Sartori (2014), Unfolding the potential of the Virtual Water concept. What is still under debate?, MPRA Paper No. 60501, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60501/ 2. Fracasso, Andrea (2014), A gravity model of virtual water trade, Ecological Economics, Vol. 108, p. 215-228 3. Fracasso, Andrea; Martina Sartori and Stefano Schiavo (2014), Determinants of virtual water flows in the Mediterranean, MPRA Paper No. 60500, https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60500/ 4. Yang, H. et al. (2006), Virtual water trade: An assessment of water use efficiency in the international food trade, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 10, p. 443-454

  20. Demographic modelling approach for assessment of environmental conditions which control the population of the invasive Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Mediterranean Seas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiganova, Tamara; Nival, Paul; Carlotti, Francois; Alekseenko, Elena

    2017-04-01

    , demographic model (MBd) was validated for the Black Sea ecosystem basing on the unique database of long-term field data of ctenophores (including M.l. and B.o.), mesozooplankton, ichtyoplankton, bacteria in the Black Sea (1992-present). Then comparative analysis of the ecosystem conditions for the productive Black Sea and oligrotrophic areas of the north-western Mediterranean Sea favorable for M.l. blooms have been performed using the developed modelling approach. References : Ghabooli Sara, Shiganova Tamara A., Elizabeta Briski, Stefano Piraino, Veronica Fuentes, Delphine Thibault-Botha, Dror L. Angel, Melania E. Cristescu, Hugh J. MacIsaac (2013) Invasion pathway of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Mediterranean Sea. PLOS ONE. Open Access PLOS ONE | www.plosone.org 9 November 2013 | Volume 8 | Issue 11 | e81067: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0081067 Impact factor 3,534 Shiganova Tamara A., Louis Legendre, Alexander S. Kazmin, Paul Nival 2014. Interactions between invasive ctenophores in the Black Sea: assessment of control mechanisms based on long-term observations. Marine ecology Prog.Ser. Vol. 507: 111-123 doi: 10.3354/meps10806.

  1. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    sensorimotor cortex. Specifically for each unit decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (in mM), there was a predicted -10.86 (95% confidence intervals -16.786 to -4.482) decrease in grip strength (kg force) (P < 0.001) and -8.74 (95% confidence intervals -13.943 to -3.015) decrease in muscle strength (P < 0.006). This study suggests that reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid levels reflect pathological abnormalities that may play a role in determining physical disability. These abnormalities may include decreases in the pre- and postsynaptic components of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission and in the density of inhibitory neurons. Additionally, the reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration may contribute to the neurodegenerative process, resulting in increased firing of axons, with consequent increased energy demands, which may lead to neuroaxonal degeneration and loss of the compensatory mechanisms that maintain motor function. This study supports the idea that modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission may be an important target for neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis.See De Stefano and Giorgio (doi:10.1093/brain/awv213) for a scientific commentary on this article. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    concentration in the sensorimotor cortex. Specifically for each unit decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (in mM), there was a predicted −10.86 (95% confidence intervals −16.786 to −4.482) decrease in grip strength (kg force) (P < 0.001) and −8.74 (95% confidence intervals −13.943 to −3.015) decrease in muscle strength (P < 0.006). This study suggests that reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid levels reflect pathological abnormalities that may play a role in determining physical disability. These abnormalities may include decreases in the pre- and postsynaptic components of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission and in the density of inhibitory neurons. Additionally, the reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration may contribute to the neurodegenerative process, resulting in increased firing of axons, with consequent increased energy demands, which may lead to neuroaxonal degeneration and loss of the compensatory mechanisms that maintain motor function. This study supports the idea that modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission may be an important target for neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis. See De Stefano and Giorgio (doi:10.1093/brain/awv213) for a scientific commentary on this article. PMID:26304151

  3. The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings: a critical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.

    The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings: a critical analysis S. Sandrelli INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Milano, Italy (stefano.sandrelli@brera.inaf.it / Fax: 02 72001600 / Phone: +39 02 72320337) "The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings" is a live astronomical role-playing game for kids aged 10 -13. Its goal is to introduce them to some of the main topics of the Solar System: a) the role of gravity; b) the distribution of mass & light; c) the effects of rotation; d) the distribution of water. The game was held both at the Perugia (2004) and the Genova Science Festival (2005), obtaining great success. Teams of about 6-8 members are introduced to Mr Schioppanelli, the astro-detective of the town (the name is a pun: it reminds Schiaparelli, the famous italian astronomer, and it is a slang expression meaning "ring-breaker"). Mr Schioppanelli has his office in an "gastronomical astronomical observatory", known as The Red Giant Pizzeria. Schioppanelli informs the kids that a mysterious Centaur succeded in stealing the rings of Saturn. The partecipants are appointed astro-detectives in-charge and asked to find the rings by browsing around the Solar System, which is scaled so as to fit the town historical centre or a pedestrian area, going from the Sun to Saturn or beyond, depending on the actual area at disposal. Great care must be taken allowing children playing only in a car-free area of the town. At the right scaled distances, the partecipants meet characters playing as the various planets. The kids can talk to them after solving a riddle, obtaining useful informations. A special characters play as a comet, timely going in and out of the inner solar system. The teams can also talk to some shepherd-moons of the rings. They easily discover that the rings were totally destroyed by the Centaur: a real disaster! They are also suggested to gather the necessary ingredients (gravity, light, rotation, inclination, dust and

  4. A Burst to See

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    , able to record the event with unprecedented temporal resolution.. "These very early detections (just seconds after the beginning of the burst) showed the object to be so bright that it would have been visible just with the unaided eye," says Stefano Covino, from the REM team. "It was astonishing to see how rapidly the source varied during the observations," adds Sergey Karpov, of the TORTORA team. Astronomers use the so-called magnitude scale, an inverse scale where fainter objects have larger magnitudes. In dark sites, the most acute of human eyes can distinguish sources as faint as magnitude 6. GRB 080319B was slightly brighter than this limit, although for just less than a minute. The 8.2-metre ESO Very Large Telescope also reacted to the gamma-ray burst, thanks to a special procedure known as the rapid-response mode (see ESO 17/07), which allows automatic observations with no human intervention. The high-resolution spectrograph UVES could collect exquisite data starting only 10 minutes after the burst, following requests by Fabrizio Fiore and his team. Another team then used also UVES to determine the distance of the burst. "Despite its stunning brightness, the burst exploded in a galaxy 7.5 billion light years away," says Paul Vreeswijk, who led the second team. "It was therefore not only apparently bright, but also intrinsically very luminous. Indeed, it reached the brightest optical luminosity ever recorded for any astronomical object. For comparison, should the burst have exploded in our Galaxy, it would have lit up the night sky for several minutes as if it were daytime."

  5. The Double Firing Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  6. Geological and geophysical activities at Spallanzani Science Department (Liceo Scientifico Statale "Lazzaro Spallanzani" - Tivoli, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favale, T.; De Angelis, F.; De Filippis, L.

    2012-04-01

    The high school Liceo Scientifico "Lazzaro Spallanzani" at Tivoli (Rome) has been fully involved in the study of geological and geophysical features of the town of Tivoli and the surrounding area in the last twelve years. Objective of this activity is to promote the knowledge of the local territory from the geological point of view. Main activities: • School year 2001-2002: Setting up inside the school building of a Geological Museum focusing on "Geological Evolution of Latium, Central Italy" (in collaboration with colleagues M. Mancini, and A. Pierangeli). • March, 15, 2001: Conference of Environmental Geology. Lecturer: Prof. Raniero Massoli Novelli, L'Aquila University and Società Italiana di Geologia Ambientale. • School years 2001-2002 and 2002-2003: Earth Sciences course for students "Brittle deformation and tectonic stress in Tivoli area". • November, 2003: Conference of Geology, GIS and Remote Sensing. Lecturers: Prof. Maurizio Parotto and Dr Alessandro Cecili (Roma Tre University, Rome), and Dr Stefano Pignotti (Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sulla Montagna, Rome). • November, 2003, 2004 and 2005: GIS DAY, organized in collaboration with ESRI Italia. • School year 2006-2007: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on travertine formation). • School year 2010-2011: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli. Geology, Hydrogeology and Microbiology of the basin, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on thermal springs and spa). In the period 2009-2010 a seismic station with three channels, currently working, was designed and built in our school by the science teachers Felice De Angelis and Tomaso Favale. Our seismic station (code name LTTV) is part of Italian Experimental Seismic Network (IESN) with identification code IZ (international database IRIS-ISC). The three drums are online in real time on websites http

  7. EDITORIAL: Ice in the environment: connections to atmospheric chemistry Ice in the environment: connections to atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Hastings, Meredith G.

    2008-12-01

    understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of ice: the role of a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) or quasi-brine layer (QBL) at the ice surface. The studies presented here advance our understanding of the complex interactions of snow and ice with important reactive components in our atmosphere. It has become clear in recent years that the polar regions do not act as an ultimate sink for many compounds—the release of halogens and reactive nitrogen oxides from ice and snow are examples of this. Two notable implications arise from these findings (i) the impact of anthropogenic pollutants in our environment may extend further than we fully appreciate with current global atmospheric chemistry models and (ii) our interpretation of chemical records in ice cores requires that we fundamentally understand and quantify air-snow and air-ice interactions. Additionally, laboratory studies are elucidating the details of heterogeneous reactions that are prevalent on ice and snow surfaces throughout the troposphere, and we are poised to make significant strides in the near future quantifying these effects on regional and global scales. We look forward to continued progress in this field in the coming years, and we will continue to work to connect those conducting modeling, field and laboratory studies. Focus on Connections between Atmospheric Chemistry and Snow and Ice Contents HONO emissions from snow surfaces Harry Beine, Agustín J Colussi, Antonio Amoroso, Giulio Esposito, Mauro Montagnoli and Michael R Hoffmann Heterogeneous ozonation kinetics of phenanthrene at the air-ice interface T F Kahan and D J Donaldson Release of gas-phase halogens from sodium halide substrates: heterogeneous oxidation of frozen solutions and desiccated salts by hydroxyl radicals S J Sjostedt and J P D Abbatt Uptake of acetone, ethanol and benzene to snow and ice: effects of surface area and temperature J P D Abbatt, T Bartels-Rausch, M Ullerstam and T J Ye Interaction of gaseous elemental mercury with snow surfaces

  8. EDITORIAL The 17th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2011-02-01

    -correlation function for graphs with and without time-reversal symmetry: the open system case Michał Ławniczak, Szymon Bauch, Oleh Hul and Leszek Sirko Independent nonclassical tests for states and measurements in the same experiment Alfredo Luis and Ángel Rivas On the classical capacity of quantum Gaussian channels Cosmo Lupo, Stefano Pirandola, Paolo Aniello and Stefano Mancini Entropic inequalities for center-of-mass tomograms Margarita A Man'ko Semiclassical dynamics for an ion confined within a nonlinear electromagnetic trap Bogdan M Mihalcea Zeno-like phenomena in STIRAP processes B Militello, M Scala, A Messina and N V Vitanov A beam splitter with second-order nonlinearity modeled as a nonlinear coupler V Peřinová, A Lukš and J Křepelka Energy-level shifts of a uniformly accelerated atom between two reflecting plates L Rizzuto and S Spagnolo Cross-Kerr nonlinearities in an optically dressed periodic medium K Słowik, A Raczyński, J Zaremba, S Zielińska-Kaniasty, M Artoni and G C La Rocca An approximate effective beamsplitter interaction between light and atomic ensembles Richard Tatham, David Menzies and Natalia Korolkova Stochastic simulation of long-time nonadiabatic dynamics Daniel A Uken, Alessandro Sergi and Francesco Petruccione

  9. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    H KAVATSYUK, MyroslavKVI, University of Groningen KHRAMOV, EvgenyJoint Institute for Nuclear Research KISTENEV, EdouardBrookhaven National Laboratory KUO, Chia MingNCU KWON, YoungilYonsei University LAKTINEH, ImadIPNL LECOQ, PaulCERN LI, ChengUniversity of Science and Technology of China LI, NingboNanJing Normal University & IHEP LI, WeidongIHEP LI, WeiguoIHEP LIU, ChunxiuIHEP LIU, LijiaoUniversity of Bergen, Norway LIVAN, MicheleDipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, University di Pavia , Italy LU, JunguangIHEP LUBRANO, PasqualeINFN Sezione di Perugia MACHIKHILIYAN, IrinaLAPP, Annecy, France MAVROMANOLAKIS, GeorgiosCERN MILLER, David WSLAC and Stanford University NECESAL, PetrInstitute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i. NEMECEK, StanislavFZU AVCR Praha NIESS, ValentinLPC, Clermont (CNRS/IN2P3) NOVOTNY, Rainer W2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen, Germany OBERLACK, HorstMPI für Physik, Munich PARA, AdamFermilab PARAMATTI, RiccardoINFN Rome & CERN PEPE, MonicaINFN Perugia POSPELOV, GennadyMax-Planck-Institut für Physik REPOND, JoseArgonne National Laboratory ROSSETTI, ValerioIFAE - Barcelona SCHACHT, PeterMPI/Munich SEFKOW, FelixDESY SFYRLA, AnnaCERN SGUAZZONI, GiacomoINFN Section of Florence SIMON, FrankMax-Planck-Institute for Physics SIMONYAN, MargarNiels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University SPADARO, TommasoLNF INFN SUN, XileiIHEP TAKESHITA, TohruShinshu University TANG, ZeboUniversity of Science and Technology of China TAPAN, IlhanUludag University THEOFILATOS, KonstantinosETH Zurich THOMSON, MarkUniversity of Cambridge TOKUNO, HisaoDepartment of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Engineering TRONCON, ClaraINFN UOZUMI SatoruKyungpook National University USAI, GiulioUniversity of Texas at Arlington VAZQUEZ GOMEZ, RicardoUniversitat de Barcelona VIDEAU, HenriLLR - Ecole polytechnique VOLOBOUEV, IgorTexas Tech University WAN, RenzhuoIOPP-CCNU, Wuhan, China & IPHC-CNRS, Strasbourg, France WANG, ZhengIHEP WANG, ZhigangIHEP WENZEL, HansFermilab WIGMANS, RichardTexas Tech

  10. Galaxy Cluster Smashes Distance Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    he most distant galaxy cluster yet has been discovered by combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and optical and infrared telescopes. The cluster is located about 10.2 billion light years away, and is observed as it was when the Universe was only about a quarter of its present age. The galaxy cluster, known as JKCS041, beats the previous record holder by about a billion light years. Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe. Finding such a large structure at this very early epoch can reveal important information about how the Universe evolved at this crucial stage. JKCS041 is found at the cusp of when scientists think galaxy clusters can exist in the early Universe based on how long it should take for them to assemble. Therefore, studying its characteristics - such as composition, mass, and temperature - will reveal more about how the Universe took shape. "This object is close to the distance limit expected for a galaxy cluster," said Stefano Andreon of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Milan, Italy. "We don't think gravity can work fast enough to make galaxy clusters much earlier." Distant galaxy clusters are often detected first with optical and infrared observations that reveal their component galaxies dominated by old, red stars. JKCS041 was originally detected in 2006 in a survey from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The distance to the cluster was then determined from optical and infrared observations from UKIRT, the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope in Hawaii and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Infrared observations are important because the optical light from the galaxies at large distances is shifted into infrared wavelengths because of the expansion of the universe. The Chandra data were the final - but crucial - piece of evidence as they showed that JKCS041 was, indeed, a genuine galaxy cluster. The extended X-ray emission seen by Chandra shows that hot gas has been detected

  11. The Secret Lives Of Galaxies Unveiled In Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    team's results. The Chandra results are found in papers led by Koekemoer and Stefano Cristiani of the Trieste Astronomical Observatory. Hubble's findings came from papers led by Giavalisco, Mark Dickinson, and Harry Ferguson of the STScI. The image and additional information are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/2003/18/

  12. The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference.

    PubMed

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N

    2012-07-18

    interface tension of flat and curved interfaces from Monte Carlo simulationsA Tröster and K Binder Phase diagrams of particles with dissimilar patches: X-junctions and Y-junctionsJ M Tavares and P I C Teixeira The unbearable heaviness of colloids: facts, surprises, and puzzles in sedimentationRoberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro and Eleonora Secchi Exploring water and other liquids at negative pressureFrédéric Caupin, Arnaud Arvengas, Kristina Davitt, Mouna El Mekki Azouzi, Kirill I Shmulovich, Claire Ramboz, David A Sessoms and Abraham D Stroock The configurational space of colloidal patchy polymers with heterogeneous sequencesIvan Coluzza and Christoph Dellago Repeated sorption of water in SBA-15 investigated by means of in situ small-angle x-ray scatteringM Erko, D Wallacher, G H Findenegg and O Paris Transition of the hydration state of a surfactant accompanying structural transitions of self-assembled aggregatesM Hishida and K Tanaka The effects of topology on the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of network-forming materialsMark Wilson Surface tension of an electrolyte-air interface: a Monte Carlo studyAlexandre Diehl, Alexandre P dos Santos and Yan Levin Water and other tetrahedral liquids: order, anomalies and solvationB Shadrack Jabes, Divya Nayar, Debdas Dhabal, Valeria Molinero and Charusita Chakravarty Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water modelsSami Tazi, Alexandru Boţan, Mathieu Salanne, Virginie Marry, Pierre Turq and Benjamin Rotenberg Phase behaviour of colloidal assemblies on 2D corrugated substratesSamir El Shawish, Emmanuel Trizac and Jure Dobnikar Structural properties of dendrimer-colloid mixturesDominic A Lenz, Ronald Blaak and Christos N Likos Fluid-fluid demixing of off-critical colloid-polymer systems confined between parallel platesE A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Simulations of nematic homopolymer melts using particle-based models with interactions expressed through collective variablesKostas Ch

  13. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    , Iannaccone Giovanni, La Rocca Mario, Saccorotti Gilberto, Cattaneo Marco, De Mar- tin Martina , Colasanti Gianfranco, Moretti Milena, Marcello Silvestri, Edoardo Gian- domenico, Raffaele Stefano, Graziano Boniolo, Maria Rosaria Tondi, Maistrello Mar- iano, Gomez Antonio, Piccareda Carlo, Paolo Di Bartolomeo, Marco Romanelli, So- phie Peyrat, Christophe Larroque, Claude Pambrun, Tony Monfret, Stephane Gaffet, Mark Noble, Sylvain Nguyen 2

  14. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    skills. Engaging the public and finding unconventional ways to communicate results turn out to be real assets in improving the quality of presentation of current research to peers, as well as to the general public. In this volume, we collect part of the contributions that have been presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, medical physics and applied physics. Given the recent experimental achievements in particle physics and cosmology, several contributions were focused on the latest results obtained in these fields, presenting the impact of experiments such as LHC and Planck to the community of young researchers and forecasting the future goals in these areas of research. Particular interest was aroused by the session fully dedicated to applied Physics and conservation of cultural assets. Besides the intrinsic scientific value of the discussed topics, the increasing relative weight of the applied Physics session is a demonstration of the benefits that fundamental science brings to the community. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini31@gmail.com) Telespazio A Finmeccanica Thales Company Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and Fudan University Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Marco Di Stefano (distefan@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Maria Longobardi (marialongobardi@gmail.com) Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva Matteo Martinelli (martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and Institut fur Theoretische Physik Alice Miceli (alice.miceli@uniroma2.it) Physics Department, University of Rome Tor Vergata Marina Migliaccio (mm858@ast.cam.ac.uk) Institute of Astronomy and

  15. The Quiet Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    . "Since the masses and energies involved are smaller than in every known gamma-ray burst related supernova, we think that the collapse of the star gave rise to a weak jet, and that the presence of the Helium layer made it even more difficult for the jet to remain collimated, so that when it emerged from the stellar surface the signal was weak," says Massimo Della Valle, co-author. "The scenario we propose implies that gamma-ray burst-like inner engine activity exists in all supernovae that form a black hole," adds co-author Stefano Valenti. "As our X-ray and gamma-ray instruments become more advanced, we are slowly uncovering the very diverse properties of stellar explosions," explains Guido Chincarini, co-author and the Principal Investigator of the Italian research on gamma-ray bursts. "The bright gamma-ray bursts were the easiest to discover, and now we are seeing variations on a theme that link these special events to more normal ones." These are however very important discoveries, as they continue to paint a picture of how massive star end their lives, producing dense objects, and injecting new chemical elements back into the gas from which new stars will be formed.

  16. Physics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houselt, A.; Schäfer, J.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Claessen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pashkin, C A Kuntscher, S G Ebbinghaus, M Hanfland, F Lissner, Th Schleid and M Dressel Photoemission spectroscopy and the unusually robust one-dimensional physics of lithium purple bronzeL Dudy, J D Denlinger, J W Allen, F Wang, J He, D Hitchcock, A Sekiyama and S Suga Luttinger liquid behaviour of Li0.9Mo6O17 studied by scanning tunnelling microscopyT Podlich, M Klinke, B Nansseu, M Waelsch, R Bienert, J He, R Jin, D Mandrus and R Matzdorf Mn-silicide nanostructures aligned on massively parallel silicon nano-ribbonsPaola De Padova, Carlo Ottaviani, Fabio Ronci, Stefano Colonna, Bruno Olivieri, Claudio Quaresima, Antonio Cricenti, Maria E Dávila, Franz Hennies, Annette Pietzsch, Nina Shariati and Guy Le Lay Iridium silicide nanowires on Si(001) surfacesNuri Oncel and Dylan Nicholls Structure and growth of quasi-one-dimensional YSi2 nanophases on Si(100)V Iancu, P R C Kent, S Hus, H Hu, C G Zeng and H H Weitering Metallic rare-earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfacesMario Dähne and Martina Wanke One-dimensional collective excitations in Ag atomic wires grown on Si(557)U Krieg, C Brand, C Tegenkamp and H Pfnür Interfering Bloch waves in a 1D electron systemR Heimbuch, A van Houselt, M Farmanbar, G Brocks and H J W Zandvliet Au-induced quantum chains on Ge(001)—symmetries, long-range order and the conduction pathC Blumenstein, S Meyer, S Mietke, J Schäfer, A Bostwick, E Rotenberg, R Matzdorf and R Claessen

  17. PREFACE: The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N.

    2012-07-01

    interface tension of flat and curved interfaces from Monte Carlo simulationsA Tröster and K Binder Phase diagrams of particles with dissimilar patches: X-junctions and Y-junctionsJ M Tavares and P I C Teixeira The unbearable heaviness of colloids: facts, surprises, and puzzles in sedimentationRoberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro and Eleonora Secchi Exploring water and other liquids at negative pressureFrédéric Caupin, Arnaud Arvengas, Kristina Davitt, Mouna El Mekki Azouzi, Kirill I Shmulovich, Claire Ramboz, David A Sessoms and Abraham D Stroock The configurational space of colloidal patchy polymers with heterogeneous sequencesIvan Coluzza and Christoph Dellago Repeated sorption of water in SBA-15 investigated by means of in situ small-angle x-ray scatteringM Erko, D Wallacher, G H Findenegg and O Paris Transition of the hydration state of a surfactant accompanying structural transitions of self-assembled aggregatesM Hishida and K Tanaka The effects of topology on the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of network-forming materialsMark Wilson Surface tension of an electrolyte-air interface: a Monte Carlo studyAlexandre Diehl, Alexandre P dos Santos and Yan Levin Water and other tetrahedral liquids: order, anomalies and solvationB Shadrack Jabes, Divya Nayar, Debdas Dhabal, Valeria Molinero and Charusita Chakravarty Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water modelsSami Tazi, Alexandru Boţan, Mathieu Salanne, Virginie Marry, Pierre Turq and Benjamin Rotenberg Phase behaviour of colloidal assemblies on 2D corrugated substratesSamir El Shawish, Emmanuel Trizac and Jure Dobnikar Structural properties of dendrimer-colloid mixturesDominic A Lenz, Ronald Blaak and Christos N Likos Fluid-fluid demixing of off-critical colloid-polymer systems confined between parallel platesE A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Simulations of nematic homopolymer melts using particle-based models with interactions expressed through collective variablesKostas Ch

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Information and Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisert, Jens; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-02-01

    in an optical lattice J Schachenmayer, G Pupillo and A J Daley Implementing quantum gates using the ferromagnetic spin-J XXZ chain with kink boundary conditions Tom Michoel, Jaideep Mulherkar and Bruno Nachtergaele Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems Salvatore M Giampaolo and Fabrizio Illuminati QUANTUM MEMORIES AND TOPOLOGICAL ORDER Thermodynamic stability criteria for a quantum memory based on stabilizer and subsystem codes Stefano Chesi, Daniel Loss, Sergey Bravyi and Barbara M Terhal Topological color codes and two-body quantum lattice Hamiltonians M Kargarian, H Bombin and M A Martin-Delgado RENORMALIZATION Local renormalization method for random systems O Gittsovich, R Hübener, E Rico and H J Briegel

  19. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    Collaborative Tools. We would like to thank Brookhaven Science Associates, New York University, Blue Nest Events, the International Advisory Committee, the Program Committee and the Local Organizing Committee members for all their support and assistance. We also would like to acknowledge the support provided by the following sponsors: ACEOLE, Data Direct Networks, Dell, the European Middleware Initiative and Nexsan. Special thanks to the Program Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing the conference proceedings. The next CHEP conference will be held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands on 14-18 October 2013. Conference Chair Michael Ernst (BNL) Program Committee Daniele Bonacorsi, University of Bologna, Italy Simone Campana, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Canal, Fermilab, United States Sylvain Chapeland, CERN, Switzerland Dirk Düllmann, CERN, Switzerland Johannes Elmsheuser, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany Maria Girone, CERN, Switzerland Steven Goldfarb, University of Michigan, United States Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, United States Benedikt Hegner, CERN, Switzerland Andreas Heiss, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany Peter Hristov, CERN, Switzerland Tony Johnson, SLAC, United States David Lange, LLNL, United States Adam Lyon, Fermilab, United States Remigius Mommsen, Fermilab, United States Axel Naumann, CERN, Switzerland Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Rolf Seuster, TRIUMF, Canada Local Organizing Committee Maureen Anderson, John De Stefano, Mariette Faulkner, Ognian Novakov, Ofer Rind, Tony Wong (BNL) Kyle Cranmer (NYU) International Advisory Committee Mohammad Al-Turany, GSI, Germany Lothar Bauerdick, Fermilab, United States Ian Bird, CERN, Switzerland Dominique Boutigny, IN2P3, France Federico Carminati, CERN, Switzerland Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics, China Peter Clarke, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom Sridhara Dasu, University of

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    Control of quantum phenomena has grown from a dream to a burgeoning field encompassing wide-ranging experimental and theoretical activities. Theoretical research in this area primarily concerns identification of the principles for controlling quantum phenomena, the exploration of new experimental applications and the development of associated operational algorithms to guide such experiments. Recent experiments with adaptive feedback control span many applications including selective excitation, wave packet engineering and control in the presence of complex environments. Practical procedures are also being developed to execute real-time feedback control considering the resultant back action on the quantum system. This focus issue includes papers covering many of the latest advances in the field. Focus on Quantum Control Contents Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future Constantin Brif, Raj Chakrabarti and Herschel Rabitz Biologically inspired molecular machines driven by light. Optimal control of a unidirectional rotor Guillermo Pérez-Hernández, Adam Pelzer, Leticia González and Tamar Seideman Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses Yukiyoshi Ohtsuki Efficient coherent control by sequences of pulses of finite duration Götz S Uhrig and Stefano Pasini Control by decoherence: weak field control of an excited state objective Gil Katz, Mark A Ratner and Ronnie Kosloff Multi-qubit compensation sequences Y Tomita, J T Merrill and K R Brown Environment-invariant measure of distance between evolutions of an open quantum system Matthew D Grace, Jason Dominy, Robert L Kosut, Constantin Brif and Herschel Rabitz Simplified quantum process tomography M P A Branderhorst, J Nunn, I A Walmsley and R L Kosut Achieving 'perfect' molecular discrimination via coherent control and stimulated emission Stephen D Clow, Uvo C Holscher and Thomas C Weinacht A convenient method to simulate and visually

  1. Active faulting Vs other surface displacing complex geomorphic phenomena. Case studies from a tectonically active area, Abruzzi Region, central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Sardo, Lorenzo; Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Galadini, Fabrizio; Lancia, Michele; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Pezzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    How can be univocally inferred the genesis of a linear surface scarp as the result of an active and capable fault (FAC) in tectonically active regions? Or, conversely, how it is possible to exclude that a scarp is the result of a capable fault activation? Trying to unravel this open questions, we show two ambiguous case studies about the problem of the identification of active and capable faults in a tectonically active area just based on the presence of supposed fault scarps at surface. The selected cases are located in the area comprised between the Middle Aterno Valley Fault (MAVF) and the Campo Imperatore Plain (Abruzzi Region, central Apennines), nearby the epicentral area of the April 6th, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. In particular, the two case studies analysed are located in a region characterized by a widespread Quaternary faults and by several linear scarps: the case studies of (i) Prata D'Ansidonia area and (ii) Santo Stefano di Sessanio area. To assess the origin and the state of activity of the investigated geomorphic features, we applied a classical geological and geomorphological approach, based on the analysis of the available literature, the interpretation of the aerial photographs, field surveying and classical paleoseismological approach, the latter consisting in digging excavations across the analysed scarps. These analysis were then integrated by morphometrical analyses. As for case (i), we focused on determining the geomorphic "meaning" of linear scarps carved onto fluvial-deltaic conglomerates (dated to the Early Pleistocene; Bertini and Bosi, 1993), up to 3 meters high and up to 1,5 km long, that border a narrow, elongated and flat-bottom depressions, filled by colluvial deposits. These features groove the paleo-landsurface of Valle Daria (Bosi and Bertini, 1970), wide landsurface located between Barisciano and Prata D'Ansidonia. Entwining paleoseismological trenching with geophysical analyses (GPR, ERT and microgravimetrical prospections), it

  2. COASTALT Project's contribution to the development and dissemination of coastal altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    , Machiel Bos, Valborg Byfield, Marco Caparrini, Peter Challenor, Paolo Cipollini, Henrique Coelho, Salvatore Dinardo, M. Joana Fernandes, Scott Gleason, Jesus Gómez-Enri, Christine Gommenginger, Clara Lázaro, Bruno M. Lucas, Cristina Martin-Puig, Laura Moreno, Alexandra Nunes, Nelson Pires, Graham Quartly, Andrea Scozzari, Helen Snaith, Mikis Tsimplis, Stefano Vignudelli, Luke J. West, Judith Wolf, Phil Woodworth

  3. 3D displacements maps of the L'Aquila earthquake by applying SISTEM method to GPS and ENVISAT and ALOS DInSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmino, Francesco; Anzidei, Marco; Briole, Pierre; de Michele, Marcello; Elias, Panagiotis; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spata, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    Italian earthquakes from 461 B.C. to 1997, Ann. Geofis., 43, 609- 868. Chiarabba, C., L. Jovane, and R. Di Stefano (2005), A new view of Italian seismicity using 20 years of instrumental recordings, Tectonophysics, 395, 251-268, doi:10.1016/j.tecto.2004.09.013. EMERGEO Working Group (2009), Field geological survey in the epicentral area of the Abruzzi (central Italy) seismic sequence of April 6th, 2009, in Quaderni di Geofisica, vol. 70, Ist. Naz. Di Geofis. e Vulcanol., Rome. Guglielmino F., Nunnari G., Puglisi G., Spata A. (2009), Simultaneous and Integrated Strain Tensor Estimation from geodetic and satellite deformation Measurements (SISTEM) to obtain threedimensional displacements maps. Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) (2009), The L'Aquila seismic sequence— April 2009, Ist. Naz. di Geofis. e Vulcanol., Rome. (Available at http://portale.ingv.it/).

  4. PREFACE: International Conference on the Use of X-ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Nasser; El-Khatib, Sami

    2012-07-01

    The International Conference on the Use of X-Ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH11) was held on 7 and 8 December 2011 at the American University of Sharjah (AUS) in the United Arab Emirates. The conference was organized in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National X-ray Fluorescence Laboratory (NXFL). The conference was inaugurated by Dr Peter Heath, Chancellor of the American University of Shrjah and attended by Mr Kwaku Aning, deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy and Ambassador Hamad Al-Kaabi, Ambassador of the UAE to the International Atomic Energy university officials, faculty and students. The conference covered a variety of topics including the use of x-ray and micro beam x-ray analysis, synchrotron based techniques, ion beam and neutron based techniques, optical imaging and mass spectroscopy and chromatography techniques as well as best conservation practices. XTACH11 provided an excellent forum for scientists in the region to interact, exchange ideas and to initiate collaborations with each other as well as with the international community. It showcased some of the latest technical developments in the field of non-destructive testing for the diagnosis and conservation of cultural heritage materials. In addition to the presentations by the invited speakers (Rene van Grieken and K Janssens, University of Antwerp, Belgium; Thomas Calligaro, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France; Stefano Ridolfi, Ars Mensurae, Rome, Italy, and Andrzej Markowicz, IAEA, Austria), a total of 25 other research papers were also presented and discussed. Scientists from many countries participated in the conference: Austria, Belgium, Egypt, Italy, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen. The conference concluded with a Discussion Panel. Thomas Calligaro (Centre de Recherché et de

  5. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  6. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  7. Into the Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    distant, evolved galaxies and also about the existence of associations of distant galaxies. A first clear example is the concentration of galaxies that appear uniformly yellow in PR Photo 06b/00 , apparently tracing a group of galaxies that was already assembled when the Universe was only 6 billion years old. A confirmation of the distance of a few of these galaxies has already been obtained by means of spectral observations in the framework of an ESO Large Programme , entitled "A Stringent Test on the Formation of Early Type and Massive Galaxies" and carried out by another group of astronomers [2]. A further clear example of a concentration of distant galaxies is seen in the upper right part of PR Photo 06b/00 . The very red colours of several galaxies in this sky area indicate that they are even more distant, "evolved" galaxies, already present when the Universe was only 1/3 of the current age. Notes [1] The European team consists of Emanuele Giallongo (Principal Investigator), Adriano Fontana , Nicola Menci and Francesco Poli (all at Rome Observatory), Stephane Arnouts and Sandro D'Odorico (European Southern Observatory, Garching), Stefano Cristiani (ST European Coordinating Facility, Garching) and Paolo Saracco (Milan Observatory). The data analysis was performed at the Milan ( P. Saracco ) and Rome ( A. Fontana , F. Poli ) Observatories. [2] This programme is conducted Andrea Cimatti (Principal Investigator) and Emanuele Daddi (both at Arcetri Observatory), Tom Broadhurst , Sandro D'Odorico , Roberto Gilmozzi and Alvio Renzini (European Southern Observatory), Stefano Cristiani (ST European Coordinating Facility, Garching), Adriano Fontana , Emanuele Giallongo , Nicola Menci and Francesco Poli (Rome Observatory), Marco Mignoli , Lucia Pozzetti and Giovanni Zamorani (Bologna Observatory) and Paolo Saracco (Milan Observatory). Technical note : The K-band image ( PR Photo 06a/00 ) is the result of 510 min of integration time with ISAAC at VLT ANTU. The 3-sigma magnitude

  8. PREFACE: A tribute to Virginio Bortolani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2007-08-01

    , Fabrizio Nizzoli and Giorgio Santoro of the older generation, then Anna Franchini and Elisa Molinari, finally Carlo Cavazzoni, Stefano Martinelli, Andrea Vannossi and Roberto Zivieri who are still in their thirties. They were all attracted and benefited from Bortolani's stimulating, open and constructive personality. The same qualities and his expertise in surface physics and lattice dynamics motivated a number of outstanding scientists to collaborate with him and often write joint papers during his long career: G Boato, V Celli, G Chiarotti, T B Grimley, A A Maradudin, D L Mills, J P Toennies, E Tosatti, R F Wallis are a few examples. Finally I would like to recall two more distinctive features of Virginio Bortolani, which stem from his honest character and balanced personality. First, since quite a few years he showed no more interest in powerful positions, both at his University, where he was also Director of the Physics Department from 1993 to 1999, and in the Italian physics community. And he often left such positions to those colleagues he carefully looked after at the beginning of their career. Currently he is the only honorary director of PhD studies in physics at Modena University, and editor of Surface Science Reports. In this way he teaches us that there is a specific time for a specific role in life, and that the arrow of time cannot be reversed. Still he enjoys research and he is very active, regularly publishing papers on vibrational friction and gas-surface dynamics as a result of the supervision of a small group and of a bunch of selected international collaborations. Second, in any occasion, but especially when he was in charge of an institution, of a meeting, or works in an editorial board, he was and he is never in favour of rough competitive research, aggressive presentations and intensive paper production. Bortolani's interests are otherwise: inner satisfaction, after truly understanding a physical problem or presenting clearly a difficult subject to

  9. Controlled by Distant Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    VLT Automatically Takes Detailed Spectra of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Only Minutes After Discovery A time-series of high-resolution spectra in the optical and ultraviolet has twice been obtained just a few minutes after the detection of a gamma-ray bust explosion in a distant galaxy. The international team of astronomers responsible for these observations derived new conclusive evidence about the nature of the surroundings of these powerful explosions linked to the death of massive stars. At 11:08 pm on 17 April 2006, an alarm rang in the Control Room of ESO's Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile. Fortunately, it did not announce any catastrophe on the mountain, nor with one of the world's largest telescopes. Instead, it signalled the doom of a massive star, 9.3 billion light-years away, whose final scream of agony - a powerful burst of gamma rays - had been recorded by the Swift satellite only two minutes earlier. The alarm was triggered by the activation of the VLT Rapid Response Mode, a novel system that allows for robotic observations without any human intervention, except for the alignment of the spectrograph slit. ESO PR Photo 17a/07 ESO PR Photo 17a/07 Triggered by an Explosion Starting less than 10 minutes after the Swift detection, a series of spectra of increasing integration times (3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 minutes) were taken with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), mounted on Kueyen, the second Unit Telescope of the VLT. "With the Rapid Response Mode, the VLT is directly controlled by a distant explosion," said ESO astronomer Paul Vreeswijk, who requested the observations and is lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "All I really had to do, once I was informed of the gamma-ray burst detection, was to phone the staff astronomers at the Paranal Observatory, Stefano Bagnulo and Stan Stefl, to check that everything was fine." The first spectrum of this time series was the quickest ever taken of a gamma-ray burst afterglow

  10. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    function of time (the light curve). The small size of the telescope is compensated by its rapidity of slewing, which allowed astronomers to begin observations very soon after each GRB's detection (39 and 41 seconds after the alert, respectively), and to monitor the very early stages of their light curve. The two gamma-ray bursts were located 9.3 and 11.5 billion light-years away, respectively. ESO PR Photo 26b/07 ESO PR Photo 26b/07 Light Curve of a Gamma-ray Burst For both events, the afterglow light curve initially rose, then reached a peak, and eventually started to decline, as is typical of GRB afterglows. The peak is, however, only rarely detected. Its determination is very important, since it allows a direct measurement of the expansion velocity of the explosion of the material. For both bursts, the velocity turns out to be very close to the speed of light, precisely 99.9997% of this value. Scientists use a special number, called the Lorentz factor, to express these high velocities. Objects moving much slower than light have a Lorentz factor of about 1, while for the two GRBs it is about 400. "Matter is thus moving with a speed that is only different from that of light by three parts in a million," says Stefano Covino, co-author of the study. "While single particles in the Universe can be accelerated to still larger velocities - i.e. much larger Lorentz factors - one has to realise that in the present cases, it is the equivalent of about 200 times the mass of the Earth that acquired this incredible speed." "You certainly wouldn't like to be in the way," adds team member Susanna Vergani. The measurement of the Lorentz factor is an important step in understanding gamma-ray burst explosions. This is in fact one of the fundamental parameters of the theory which tries to explain these gigantic explosions, and up to now it was only poorly determined. "The next question is which kind of 'engine' can accelerate matter to such enormous speeds," says Covino. More Information

  11. Deep Sky Diving with the ESO New Technology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    Caption to ESO PR Photo 01/98 and access to two versions of the photo The frames were computer processed and combined to yield a colour view of the corresponding sky field ( ESO Press Photo 01/98 ). This is indeed a very deep look into the southern sky. The astronomers have found that the limiting magnitude (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) is beyond 27 in the blue and red frames and only slightly brighter in the two others. Magnitude 27 corresponds to a brightness that is 250 million times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye. Although not as deep as the Hubble Deep Field due to the shorter exposure time and brighter sky background (caused by light emission in the upper layers of the terrestrial atmosphere), this new set of data is among the best ground-based observations of this type ever obtained. Galaxies down to a magnitude of roughly 25 will soon be targets of detailed spectroscopic observations with the VLT. They will provide a measure of their basic physical parameters like redshift, luminosity and mass. How to access the new data This scientific program aims at the study of the photometric redshift distribution of the faint galaxies [2] and of gravitational lensing effects (cosmic mirages). It has been decided to make the complete data set available to the wide scientific community and it is expected that many astronomers all over the world will want to perform their own investigations by means of this unique observational material. A full description of the project is available on the ESO Web at http://www.eso.org/ndf/. Here you will find a comprehensive explanation of the scientific background, details about the observations and the data reduction, as well as easy access to the corresponding data files. Notes: [1] The group consists of Sandro D'Odorico (Principal Investigator, ESO) and Jacqueline Bergeron (ESO), Hans-Martin Adorf (ESO), Stephane Charlot (IAP, Paris, France), David Clements (IAS, Orsay, France), Stefano Cristiani (Univ. of

  12. The Dark Side of Nature: the Crime was Almost Perfect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), Guido Chincarini (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera & Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy), Nino Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute, USA), Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Dino Fugazza, Sergio Campana, Stefano Covino, and Paolo D'Avanzo (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Italy), Daniele Malesani (SISSA/ISAS, Italy and Dark Cosmology Centre, Copenhagen), Vincenzo Testa, L. Angelo Antonelli, Silvia Piranomonte, and Luigi Stella (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vanessa Mangano (INAF/IASF Palermo, Italy), Kevin Hurley (University of California, Berkeley, USA), I. Felix Mirabel (ESO), and Leonardo J. Pellizza (Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio). The Danish-led team is composed of Johan P. U. Fynbo, Darach Watson, Christina C. Thöne, Tamara M. Davis, Jens Hjorth, José Mará Castro Cerón, Brian L. Jensen, Maximilian D. Stritzinger, and Dong Xu (Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Jesper Sollerman (Dark Cosmology Centre and Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Sweden), Uffe G. Jørgensen, Tobias C. Hinse, and Kristian G. Woller (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen), Joshua S. Bloom, Daniel Kocevski, Daniel Perley (Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, USA), Páll Jakobsson (Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, UK), John F. Graham and Andrew S. Fruchter (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, USA), David Bersier (Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, UK), Lisa Kewley (University of Hawaii, Institute of Astronomy, USA), Arnaud Cassan and Marta Zub (Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany), Suzanne Foley (School of Physics, University College Dublin, Ireland), Javier Gorosabel (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain), Keith D. Horne (SUPA Physics/Astronomy, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK), Sylvio

  13. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    . Improved beam quality of a high power Yb: YAG laser (oral paper) / Dennis G. Harris ... [et al.]. Intracavity adaptive optics optimization of an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (oral paper) / Petra Welp, Ulrich Wittrock. New results in high power lasers beam correction (oral paper) / Alexis Kudryashov ... [et al.]. Adaptive optical systems for the Shenguang-III prototype facility (oral paper) / Zeping Yang ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics control of solid-state lasers (poster paper) / Walter Lubeigt ... [et al.]. Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for multimode beam reshaping (poster paper) / Inna V. Ilyina, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova. New algorithm of combining for spatial coherent beams (poster paper) / Ruofu Yang ... [et al.]. Intracavity mode control of a solid-state laser using a 19-element deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ping Yang ... [et al.] -- pt. 6. Adaptive optics in communication and atmospheric compensation. Fourier image sharpness sensor for laser communications (oral paper) / Kristin N. Walker and Robert K. Tyson. Fast closed-loop adaptive optics system for imaging through strong turbulence layers (oral paper) / Ivo Buske and Wolfgang Riede. Correction of wavefront aberrations and optical communication using aperture synthesis (oral paper) / R. J. Eastwood ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system for a small telescope (oral paper) / G. Vdovin, M. Loktev and O. Soloviev. Fast correction of atmospheric turbulence using a membrane deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ivan Capraro, Stefano Bonora, Paolo Villoresi. Atmospheric turbulence measurements over a 3km horizontal path with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Ruth Mackey, K. Murphy and Chris Dainty. Field-oriented wavefront sensor for laser guide stars (poster paper) / Lidija Bolbasova, Alexander Goncharov and Vladimir Lukin.

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    distribution network in Vienna M Peev, C Pacher, R Alléaume, C Barreiro, J Bouda, W Boxleitner, T Debuisschert, E Diamanti, M Dianati, J F Dynes, S Fasel, S Fossier, M Fürst, J-D Gautier, O Gay, N Gisin, P Grangier, A Happe, Y Hasani, M Hentschel, H Hübel, G Humer, T Länger, M Legré, R Lieger, J Lodewyck, T Lorünser, N Lütkenhaus, A Marhold, T Matyus, O Maurhart, L Monat, S Nauerth, J-B Page, A Poppe, E Querasser, G Ribordy, S Robyr, L Salvail, A W Sharpe, A J Shields, D Stucki, M Suda, C Tamas, T Themel, R T Thew, Y Thoma, A Treiber, P Trinkler, R Tualle-Brouri, F Vannel, N Walenta, H Weier, H Weinfurter, I Wimberger, Z L Yuan, H Zbinden and A Zeilinger Stable quantum key distribution with active polarization control based on time-division multiplexing J Chen, G Wu, L Xu, X Gu, E Wu and H Zeng Controlling passively quenched single photon detectors by bright light Vadim Makarov Information leakage via side channels in freespace BB84 quantum cryptography Sebastian Nauerth, Martin Fürst, Tobias Schmitt-Manderbach, Henning Weier and Harald Weinfurter Standardization of quantum key distribution and the ETSI standardization initiative ISG-QKD Thomas Länger and Gaby Lenhart Entangled quantum key distribution with a biased basis choice Chris Erven, Xiongfeng Ma, Raymond Laflamme and Gregor Weihs Finite-key analysis for practical implementations of quantum key distribution Raymond Y Q Cai and Valerio Scarani Field test of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution prototype S Fossier, E Diamanti, T Debuisschert, A Villing, R Tualle-Brouri and P Grangier Physics and application of photon number resolving detectors based on superconducting parallel nanowires F Marsili, D Bitauld, A Gaggero, S Jahanmirinejad, R Leoni, F Mattioli and A Fiore Device-independent quantum key distribution secure against collective attacks Stefano Pironio, Antonio Acín, Nicolas Brunner, Nicolas Gisin, Serge Massar and Valerio Scarani 1310 nm differential-phase-shift QKD system using

  15. ESO Astronomers Detect a Galaxy at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-09-01

    between 4.0 and 4.7, whose spectrum is considerably depressed in the B and V bands by redshifted hydrogen absorption [4]. This is a strong indication that it is indeed this galaxy that causes the hydrogen absorption seen in the quasar spectrum. Definitive confirmation can only come from a spectrum of the galaxy, but this is not possible with existing telescopes due to its faintness, and the strong light from the nearby quasar would make such an observation even more difficult. The same galaxy has been independently detected [5] at the Keck 10-metre telescope (Mauna Kea, Hawaii) in the infrared K-band (wavelength 2.3 micron) by George Djorgovski (Palomar Observatory, USA). When compared with the accurate photometry by the ESO team, the fact that the galaxy is also visible at that wavelength indicates that it is intrinsically moderately luminous. From the evolutionary models for primeval galaxies, it appears that its age is about 100 million years. Future Observations This exciting result now opens a new window on the epoch of galaxy formation and paves the way for future investigations of primeval galaxies. The present team of astronomers is continuing this type of work towards fainter magnitudes and in other quasar fields. Some of the faintest images in the observed field (see the photo) probably belong to galaxies at the same or even higher redshifts. A detailed study of such objects will be one of the important tasks of the ESO Very Large Telescope. For this, the FORS instrument will be very well suited and it will become possible to measure the colours of galaxies down to magnitudes near R = 27. Spectra of the ``brighter'' ones, like the galaxy described here, can then also be obtained. Notes: [1] The team is headed by Sandro D'Odorico (ESO-Garching) and includes Stefano Cristiani (Department of Astronomy, University of Padova, Italy), as well as Adriano Fontana and Emanuele Giallongo (Astronomical Observatory, Rome, Italy). [2] In astronomy, the redshift denotes the

  16. Discovery of a Satellite around a Near-Earth Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    In the course of the major observational programme of asteroids by the Institute of Planetary Exploration of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) [1] in Berlin, two of the staff astronomers, Stefano Mottola and Gerhard Hahn , have discovered a small satellite (moon) orbiting the asteroid (3671) Dionysus. The new measurements were obtained with the DLR CCD Camera attached at the 60-cm Bochum telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. This is only the second known case of an asteroid with a moon. Moons and planets Until recently, natural satellites were only known around the major planets . The Moon orbits the Earth, there are two tiny moons around Mars, each of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune has many more, and even the smallest and outermost, Pluto, is accompanied by one [2]. However, the new discovery now strengthens the belief of many astronomers that some, perhaps even a substantial number of the many thousands of minor planets (asteroids) in the solar system may also possess their own moons. The first discovery of a satellite orbiting an asteroid was made by the NASA Galileo spacecraft, whose imagery, obtained during a fly-by of asteroid (253) Ida in August 1993, unveiled a small moon that has since been given the name Dactyl. (3671) Dionysus: an Earth-crossing asteroid In the framework of the DLR asteroid monitoring programme, image sequences are acquired to measure an asteroid's brightness variations caused by the changing amount of sunlight reflected from the asteroid's illuminated surface as it spins, due to its irregular shape. The brightness variations may be used to derive the asteroid's rotational properties, such as speed of rotation and spin axis orientation. Asteroid Dionysus [3] was put on the observing list because it belongs to a special class of asteroids, the members of which occasionally come very close to the Earth and have a small, but non-negligible chance of colliding with our planet. Most of

  17. Comet or Asteroid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-11-01

    When is a minor object in the solar system a comet? And when is it an asteroid? Until recently, there was little doubt. Any object that was found to display a tail or appeared diffuse was a comet of ice and dust grains, and any that didn't, was an asteroid of solid rock. Moreover, comets normally move in rather elongated orbits, while most asteroids follow near-circular orbits close to the main plane of the solar system in which the major planets move. However, astronomers have recently discovered some `intermediate' objects which seem to possess properties that are typical for both categories. For instance, a strange object (P/1996 N2 - Elst-Pizarro) was found last year at ESO ( ESO Press Photo 36/96 ) which showed a cometary tail, while moving in a typical asteroidal orbit. At about the same time, American scientists found another (1996 PW) that moved in a very elongated comet-type orbit but was completely devoid of a tail. Now, a group of European scientists, by means of observations carried out at the ESO La Silla observatory, have found yet another object that at first appeared to be one more comet/asteroid example. However, continued and more detailed observations aimed at revealing its true nature have shown that it is most probably a comet . Consequently, it has received the provisional cometary designation P/1997 T3 . The Uppsala-DLR Trojan Survey Some time ago, Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist (Astronomical Observatory, Uppsala, Sweden), in collaboration with Gerhard Hahn, Stefano Mottola, Magnus Lundström and Uri Carsenty (DLR, Institute of Planetary Exploration, Berlin, Germany), started to study the distribution of asteroids near Jupiter. They were particularly interested in those that move in orbits similar to that of Jupiter and which are located `ahead' of Jupiter in the so-called `Jovian L4 Lagrangian point'. Together with those `behind' Jupiter, these asteroids have been given the names of Greek and Trojan Heroes who participated in the famous Trojan war

  18. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012).

    PubMed

    Foffi, G; Pastore, A; Piazza, F; Temussi, P A

    2013-08-02

    conference held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding

  19. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding through an

  20. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    wave space experiment, the European Space Agency's Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) that will be launched in about 10 years' time, will be sufficiently sensitive to be able to reveal this radiation from RX J0806.3+1527 with a high degree of confidence. Such an observational feat would open an entirely new window on the universe. More information The results described in this Press Release were announced in IAU Circular 7835 and will shortly appear in print in the European research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics Letters ("RX J0806.3+1527: a double degenerate binary with the shortest known orbital period (321 s)" by G.L. Israel and co-authors), cf. astro-ph/0203043. The 5-min optical modulation was detected independently by another group led by G. Ramsay, cf. astro-ph/0203053. Note [1]: The team consists of GianLuca Israel and Luigi Stella at the Astronomical Observatory of Rome (Italy), Stefano Covino and Sergio Campana at the Astronomical Observatory of Brera (Milan, Italy), Wolfgang Hummel, Gianni Marconi and Gero Rupprecht at the European Southern Observatory, Immo Appenzeller and Otmar Stahl at the University of Heidelberg (Germany), Wolfgang Gassler and Karl-Heinz Mantel at the University of Munich (Germany), Christopher Mauche at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Ulisse Munari at the Astronomical Observatory of Padua (Italy), Ignacio Negueruela at the Astronomical Observatory of Strasbourg (France), Harald Nicklas at the University of Göttingen (Germany), and Richard Smart at the Astronomical Observatory of Turin (Italy). [2]: See the research article by Israel et al. (1999, Astronomy &A, Vol. 349, p. L1). Contact GianLuca Israel Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Italy Tel.: +39 06 9428 6437 email: gianluca@ulysses.mporzio.astro.it Technical information about the photos PR Photo 10a/02 is reproduced from FORS1-exposures, obtained in November 1999 in the U- and R-bands, and both lasting 300 sec. The field measures 2.0 x 1.5 arcmin 2. PR

  1. Chandra and the VLT Jointly Investigate the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    representative of this elusive class of objects (referred to as ' Type II Quasars ') which are believed to account for approximately 90% of the black-hole-powered quasars in the distant Universe. The 'sum' of the identified Chandra X-ray sources in the CDFS was found to match both the intensity and the spectral properties of the observed X-ray background. This important result is a significant step forward towards the definitive resolution of this long-standing cosmological problem. Naturally, ESO astronomer Piero Rosati and his colleagues are thrilled: " It is clearly the combination of the new and detailed Chandra X-ray observations and the enormous light-gathering power of the VLT that has been instrumental to this success. " However, he says, " the identification of the remaining Chandra X-ray sources will be the next challenge for the VLT since they are extremely faint. This is because they are either heavily obscured by dust or because they are extremely distant ". More Information This Press Release is issued simultaneously with a NASA Press Release (see also the Harvard site ). Some of the first results are described in a research paper ("First Results from the X-ray and Optical Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South" available on the web at astro-ph/0007240. More information about science results from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory may be found at: http://asc.harvard.edu/. The optical survey of CDFS at ESO with the Wide-Field Imager is described in connection with PR Photos 46a-b/99 ('100,000 galaxies at a glance'). An image of the Chandra Deep Field South is available at the ESO website on the EIS Image Gallery webpage. . Notes [1]: The Chandra Team is lead by Riccardo Giacconi (Association of Universities Inc. [AUI], Washington, USA) and includes: Piero Rosati , Jacqueline Bergeron , Roberto Gilmozzi , Vincenzo Mainieri , Peter Shaver (European Southern Observatory [ESO]), Paolo Tozzi , Mario Nonino , Stefano Borgani (Osservatorio Astronomico, Trieste, Italy), Guenther

  2. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    /Saclay Irfu/SPP FRANCAVILLA, Paolo IFAE Barcelona GATAULLIN, Marat California Institute of Technology GATTO, Corrado INFN-Napoli GAUDIO, Gabriella INFN-Pavia GERMANI, Stefano INFN-Perugia Goldenzweig, Pablo University of Rochester GRAF, Norman SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory GROOM, Don Lawrence Berkeley Lab GUARDINCERRI, Elena Los Alamos National Laboratory HAUPTMAN, John Iowa State University HENRIQUES, Ana CERN HUANG, Jin Los Alamos National Laboratory HU, Tao IHEP-Beijing, CAS JIANG, Xiaodong Los Alamos National Laboratory JUI, Charles University of Utah KAPUSTINSKY, Jon Los Alamos National Laboratory KIBILKO, Mark SE Technical Sales, Inc. KIRSCHENMANN, Henning University of Hamburg KISTENEV, Edouard Brookhaven National Laboratory KLIMEK, Pawel Stockholm Universitet KROEGER, Robert University of Mississippi LECOQ, Paul CERN LEE, Sehwook Texas Tech University LEE, Sung-Won Texas Tech University LIVAN, Michele Pavia University LUTZ, Benjamin DESY MAGILL, Stephen Argonne National Laboratory MATHIS, Mark College of William and Mary MATTHEWS, John University of Utah MENKE, Sven Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik MOULSON, Matthew INFN-Frascati NAGEL, Martin Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik NAKAMURA, Isamu KEK NEMECEK, Stanislav FZU AVCR Praha NESSI-TEDALDI, Francesca ETH Zurich NOVOTNY, Rainer 2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen OREGLIA, Mark University of Chicago PERLOFF, Alexx Texas A&M University PETYT, David Rutherford Appleton Laboratory RAHMAT, Rahmat University of Mississippi RAMILLI, Marco Hamburg Universitaet ROSIER LEES, Sylvie LAPP- IN2P3-CNRS RUTHERFOORD, John University of Arizona SAKUMA, Tai Texas A&M University SANTIAGO CERQUEIRA, Augusto Federal University of Juiz de Fora SARRA, Ivano INFN-Frascati SEIDEL, Sally University of New Mexico SEIFERT, Frank TU Dresden, Germany SHAMIM, Mansoora University of Oregon SIMON, Frank Max-Planck-Institute for Physics STAFFAN, Paul Wiener Plein and Baus, Corp Dr. STAROVOITOV, Pavel DESY TABARELLI DE FATIS, Tommaso

  3. Sakurai's Object: a Once-In Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    and the following investigations at La Silla were undertaken by a small team of ESO astronomers, including Hilmar Duerbeck, Waltraut Seitter and Stefano Benetti. Which type of nova ? Before the first spectra from ESO became available, the object was suspected to be a very slow nova , that is a small and compact `white dwarf' star in a binary system which experiences a hydrogen nuclear explosion below its surface. During a nova outburst of this type, the spectrum of the exploding star contains bright emission lines of hydrogen and other chemical elements, superimposed on a rapidly weakening, almost featureless spectrum. But Sakurai's object showed nothing the like. Instead, the spectrum displayed a multitude of narrow absorption lines. The otherwise almost omnipresent lines of hydrogen, the most abundant chemical element in the Universe, were comparatively weak. Spectra of higher resolution, taken at the ESO 1.5-metre telescope the following night, revealed the characteristics of a fairly cool, chemically peculiar star with absorption lines of neutral helium, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen and singly ionized lines of carbon and silicon. This spectrum is reproduced as ESO Press Photo 20/96 , accompanying this Press Release. Another immediate action relating to the new bright star was to search for its pre-outburst state. For this, the ESO/SERC Atlas of the Southern Sky was used; this is the most detailed photographic atlas in the south and was produced in the 1970's during a joint project with the ESO (La Silla) and UK (Siding Spring, Australia) Schmidt telescopes. At the location of Sakurai's object, three very faint stars were found as well as a minute trace of a possible nebulosity. The combination of the long phase of maximum light, the hydrogen-poor and carbon-rich outburst spectrum, and the hint of a nebulosity confirmed the suspicion of the ESO astronomers that this star had experienced its `Final Helium Flash' , the explosive, very last phase of nuclear burning in

  4. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Colloid-polymer mixtures and depletion interactions Phase stability of a reversible supramolecular polymer solution mixed with nanospheres Remco Tuinier When depletion goes critical Roberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro, Alberto Parola and Jader Colombo Tuning the demixing of colloid-polymer systems through the dispersing solvent E A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures S M Liddle, T Narayanan and W C K Poon Colloidal dynamics and crystallization Crystallization and aging in hard-sphere glasses C Valeriani, E Sanz, E Zaccarelli, W C K Poon, M E Cates and P N Pusey Real-time monitoring of complex moduli from micro-rheology Taiki Yanagishima, Daan Frenkel, Jurij Kotar and Erika Eiser Brownian motion of a self-propelled particle B ten Hagen, S van Teeffelen and H Löwen Crystallization in suspensions of hard spheres: a Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation study T Schilling, S Dorosz, H J Schöpe and G Opletal Structural signature of slow dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in two-dimensional colloidal liquids: glassy structural order Takeshi Kawasaki and Hajime Tanaka

  5. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    Rahman Frictional temperature rise in a sliding physisorbed monolayer of Kr/grapheneM Walker, C Jaye, J Krim and Milton W Cole How to modify the van der Waals and Casimir forces without change of the dielectric permittivityG L Klimchitskaya, U Mohideen and V M Mostepanenko Spectroscopic characterization of van der Waals interactions in a metal organic framework with unsaturated metal centers: MOF-74-MgNour Nijem, Pieremanuele Canepa, Lingzhu Kong, Haohan Wu, Jing Li, Timo Thonhauser and Yves J Chabal A theoretical study of the hydrogen-storage potential of (H2)4CH4 in metal organic framework materials and carbon nanotubesQ Li and T Thonhauser The influence of dispersion interactions on the hydrogen adsorption properties of expanded graphiteYungok Ihm, Valentino R Cooper, Lujian Peng and James R Morris A DFT-D study of structural and energetic properties of TiO2 modificationsJonas Moellmann, Stephan Ehrlich, Ralf Tonner and Stefan Grimme Spherical-shell model for the van der Waals coefficients between fullerenes and/or nearly spherical nanoclustersJohn P Perdew, Jianmin Tao, Pan Hao, Adrienn Ruzsinszky, Gábor I Csonka and J M Pitarke Dynamical screening of the van der Waals interaction between graphene layersY J Dappe, P G Bolcatto, J Ortega and F Flores Structural evolution of amino acid crystals under stress from a non-empirical density functionalRiccardo Sabatini, Emine Küçükbenli, Brian Kolb, T Thonhauser and Stefano de Gironcoli Physisorption of nucleobases on graphene: a comparative van der Waals studyDuy Le, Abdelkader Kara, Elsebeth Schröder, Per Hyldgaard and Talat S Rahman The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfacesDe-Li Chen, W A Al-Saidi and J Karl Johnson Desorption of n-alkanes from graphene: a van der Waals density functional studyElisa Londero, Emma K Karlson, Marcus Landahl, Dimitri Ostrovskii, Jonatan D Rydberg and Elsebeth Schröder Benchmarking van der Waals density functionals with experimental data

  6. Southern Fireworks above ESO Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    corresponding intensity. The sinusoidal curve shows the best fit to the data points (with error bars); the resulting degree of polarization is 1.7 ± 0.2 percent. A group of Italian astronomers led by Stefano Covino of the Observatory of Brera in Milan, have observed for the first time polarization (some degree of alignment of the electric fields of emitted photons) from the optical afterglow of a gamma-ray burst, see their dedicated webpage at http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~lazzati/GRB990510/. This yielded a polarization at a level of 1.7 ± 0.2 percent for the optical afterglow of GRB 990510, some 18 hours after the gamma-ray burst event; the magnitude was R = 19.1 at the time of this VLT observation. Independently, the Dutch astronomers Vreeswijk, Galama and Rol measured polarization of the order of 2 percent with another data set from the VLT ANTU and FORS1 obtained during the same night. This important result was made possible by the very large light-gathering power of the 8.2-m VLT-ANTU mirror and the FORS1 imaging polarimeter. Albeit small, the detected degree of polarization is highly significant; it is also one of the most precise measurements of polarization ever made in an object as faint as this one. Most importantly, it provides the strongest evidence to date that the afterglow radiation of gamma-ray bursts is, at least in part, produced by the synchrotron process , i.e. by relativistic electrons spiralling in a magnetized region. This type of process is able to imprint some linear polarization on the produced radiation, if the magnetic field is not completely chaotic. The spectrum ESO PR Photo 22f/99 ESO PR Photo 22f/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 485 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 969 pix - 288k] Caption to PR Photo 22f/99 : A spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 990510, obtained with VLT ANTU and the multi-mode FORS1 instrument during the night of May 10-11, 1999. Some of the redshifted absorption lines are identified and the stronger bands from the terrestrial

  7. UVES Analyses the Universe: A First Portfolio of Most Promising Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    that the complex consists of two components (clouds), separated by ~ 83 km/sec, at z = 2.1795 and at z = 2.1804. The Voigt profile fitting gives a total column density of N(HI) = 1.3 x 10 16 cm -2 and accurate values for the column densities of SiIV, SiII, CIV, SiIII and CII. The SiIV/CIV ratio, an indicator of the temperature of the ionizing background for the z = 2.1795 component gives ~ 0.23 which is similar to what has been found in higher-z systems, suggesting little evolution in the shape of the spectrum of the ionizing background . But now, the high UV efficiency of UVES opens new research possibilities in this field. Already in the commissioning phase, several QSOs at redshifts around 2 were extensively observed. The analysis of these test data has been completed and the results about the forest and the metal absorption systems now provide the first detailed information about the Intergalactic Medium in this redshift range. Various examples of these results are shown in PR Photos 09f-h/00 . The specific implications are explained in the associated captions. The first analysis of the data shown here has been carried out by Taesun Kim and Sandro D'Odorico (ESO Garching) and Stefano Cristiani (ST/ECF, Garching). The corresponding research paper is in preparation. G. UVES Takes a Deep Look at the Intergalactic Gas in the Direction of the Hubble Space Telescope Deep Field South The Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) is a region of the sky in which the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided the extremely deep images at wavelengths from the UV to the infrared. The photometric information on the galaxies in this field, complemented by low-resolution spectroscopy on the brightest ones, is being used to reconstruct the distribution of luminous matter with redshift. The HDF-South field is centered on the V = 17.5 quasar J2233-606 with emission redshift z = 2.238. The absorption spectrum of the quasar can be used to extract the properties of the intergalactic gas in the