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Sample records for glabrata haemocytes effects

  1. Early Differential Gene Expression in Haemocytes from Resistant and Susceptible Biomphalaria glabrata Strains in Response to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E.; Emery, Aidan M.; Kane, Richard A.; Walker, Anthony J.; Mayer, Claus D.; Mitta, Guillaume; Coustau, Christine; Adema, Coen M.; Hanelt, Ben; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R.; Jones, Catherine S.

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of infection in the host snail Biomphalaria glabrata with the digenean parasite Schistosoma mansoni is determined by the initial molecular interplay occurring between them. The mechanisms by which schistosomes evade snail immune recognition to ensure survival are not fully understood, but one possibility is that the snail internal defence system is manipulated by the schistosome enabling the parasite to establish infection. This study provides novel insights into the nature of schistosome resistance and susceptibility in B. glabrata at the transcriptomic level by simultaneously comparing gene expression in haemocytes from parasite-exposed and control groups of both schistosome-resistant and schistosome-susceptible strains, 2 h post exposure to S. mansoni miracidia, using an novel 5K cDNA microarray. Differences in gene expression, including those for immune/stress response, signal transduction and matrix/adhesion genes were identified between the two snail strains and tests for asymmetric distributions of gene function also identified immune-related gene expression in resistant snails, but not in susceptible. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport, ubiquinone biosynthesis and electron carrier activity were consistently up-regulated in resistant snails but down-regulated in susceptible. This supports the hypothesis that schistosome-resistant snails recognize schistosomes and mount an appropriate defence response, while in schistosome-susceptible snails the parasite suppresses this defence response, early in infection. PMID:23300533

  2. Differences in the gene expression profiles of haemocytes from schistosome-susceptible and -resistant biomphalaria glabrata exposed to Schistosoma mansoni excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Zahida; Lockyer, Anne E; Davies, Angela J; Kirk, Ruth S; Emery, Aidan M; Rollinson, David; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Walker, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni uses the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as an intermediate host to reproduce asexually generating cercariae for infection of the human definitive host. Following invasion of the snail, the parasite develops from a miracidium to a mother sporocyst and releases excretory-secretory products (ESPs) that likely influence the outcome of host infection. To better understand molecular interactions between these ESPs and the host snail defence system, we determined gene expression profiles of haemocytes from S. mansoni-resistant or -susceptible strains of B. glabrata exposed in vitro to S. mansoni ESPs (20 μg/ml) for 1 h, using a 5K B. glabrata cDNA microarray. Ninety-eight genes were found differentially expressed between haemocytes from the two snail strains, 57 resistant specific and 41 susceptible specific, 60 of which had no known homologue in GenBank. Known differentially expressed resistant-snail genes included the nuclear factor kappa B subunit Relish, elongation factor 1α, 40S ribosomal protein S9, and matrilin; known susceptible-snail specific genes included cathepsins D and L, and theromacin. Comparative analysis with other gene expression studies revealed 38 of the 98 identified genes to be uniquely differentially expressed in haemocytes in the presence of ESPs, thus identifying for the first time schistosome ESPs as important molecules that influence global snail host-defence cell gene expression profiles. Such immunomodulation may benefit the schistosome, enabling its survival and successful development in the snail host.

  3. Resistance of Biomphalaria glabrata 13–16-R1 snails to Schistosoma mansoni PR1 is a function of haemocyte abundance and constitutive levels of specific transcripts in haemocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Maureen K.; Bender, Randal C.; Bayne, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing transmission of human intestinal schistosomiasis depends on the parasite’s access to susceptible snail intermediate hosts (often Biomphalaria glabrata). Transmission fails when parasite larvae enter resistant individuals in wild snail populations. The genetic basis for differences in snail susceptibility/resistance is being intensively investigated as a means to devise novel control strategies based on resistance genes. Reactive oxygen species produced by the snail’s defence cells (haemocytes) are effectors of resistance. We hypothesised that genes relevant to production and consumption of reactive oxygen species would be expressed differentially in the haemocytes of snail hosts with different susceptibility/resistance phenotypes. By restricting the genetic diversity of snails, we sought to facilitate identification of resistance genes. By inbreeding, we procured from a 13–16-R1 snail population with both susceptible and resistant individuals 52 lines of B. glabrata (expected homozygosity ~87.5%), and determined the phenotype of each in regard to susceptibility/resistance to Schistosoma mansoni. The inbred lines were found to have line-specific differences in numbers of spreading haemocytes; these were enumerated in both juvenile and adult snails. Lines with high cell numbers were invariably resistant to S. mansoni, whereas lines with lower cell numbers could be resistant or susceptible. Transcript levels in haemocytes were quantified for 18 potentially defence-related genes. Among snails with low cell numbers, the different susceptibility/resistance phenotypes correlated with differences in transcript levels for two redox-relevant genes: an inferred phagocyte oxidase component and a peroxiredoxin. Allograft inflammatory factor (potentially a regulator of leucocyte activation) was expressed at higher levels in resistant snails regardless of spread cell number. Having abundant spreading haemocytes is inferred to enable a snail to kill parasite

  4. Study of atrazine effects on Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, B; Renault, T; Bouilly, K; Lapegue, S; Thomas-Guyon, H

    2003-01-01

    Shellfish farming is an important economic activity around the world. This activity often takes place in areas subjected to various recurring pollutions. The recrudescent use of herbicides in agriculture including atrazine implies pollutant transfer towards aquatic environment in estuarine areas. Harmful effects of such substances on animals in marine environment, particularly on cultured bivalves, are poorly documented. Bivalve molluscs such as mussels and oysters have been postulated as ideal indicator organisms because of their way of life. They filter large volumes of seawater and may therefore accumulate and concentrate contaminants within their tissues. Moreover, development of techniques allowing effect analysis of such compounds on bivalve biology may lead to the development of diagnosis tools adapted to analyze pollutant transfer towards estuarine areas. In this context, influence of atrazine on defence mechanisms was analyzed in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas. Atrazine was tested in vitro and in vivo on oyster haemocytes, and its effects were analyzed by flow cytometry. Haemocyte viability, cell cycle and cellular activities were monitored. Atrazine induced no significant effect in oyster under tested conditions except for peroxidase activity.

  5. Effect of dichlorvos on haemocyte morphology in the male and female P. pictus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, K; Bahadur, J

    1989-01-01

    The effect of dichlorvos on the blood cells of P. pictus males and females was studied. The insecticide produced numerous changes in the haemocytes, such as changes in shape and size, displacement of the nucleus, bulging of the cytoplasm, formation of pseudopodia, vacuolation, shrinkage of the nucleus and karyorrhexis. The effect on all the types of haemocytes was not the same, however, some types being more susceptible than others and some not susceptible at all. The effect of the insecticide on the haemocytes was of only short duration and was followed by a return to normal.

  6. Effect of extraction-method, period of incubation and tidal emersion on the viability of haemocytes from oysters.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabiana T; Browne, Mark Anthony; Coleman, Ross A

    2013-09-15

    The impacts of pollution on marine organisms are often investigated using the viability of their haemocytes. Although this assay is routinely used in monitoring, field and laboratory experimentation, there has been less effort in further optimizing procedures to reduce artefacts and facilitate sampling over large geographic areas. Using the oyster Saccostrea glomerata as a model species, we investigated the effects of different techniques for extracting haemolymph, period of incubation with dye and emersion-time (e.g. tidal-state) on the viability of haemocytes. Collecting haemocytes with a syringe, through a drilled hole in the shell, increased the viability of haemocytes by almost 50%. While emersion-time and incubating haemocytes with the dye for up to 4 h did not affect viability. This simple in situ approach provides a less destructive method for extracting haemocytes, allowing their viability to be measured as part of large-scale experiments without jeopardizing the surrounding assemblage of animals and plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxic effects of acrylamide on survival, development and haemocytes of Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Szczerbina, T; Banach, Z; Tylko, G; Pyza, E

    2008-07-01

    The influence of acrylamide, a potentially toxic substance present in some types of food, on survival, postembryonic development and haemocytes, insect's blood cells, of the housefly was examined. Larvae were reared on media contaminated with acrylamide at concentrations of 82 microg/g, 164 microg/g or 246 microg/g. The length of larval and pupal stages as well as the survival of larvae and pupae was examined. To study the effects of acrylamide on haemocytes, the analysis of their index and morphology was performed in the third instar larva. The obtained data showed that the survival of larvae exposed to 82 microg/g and 164 microg/g concentrations of acrylamide decreased by 50% and 85%, respectively, whereas 246 microg/g concentration was lethal. In both groups of flies, larval and pupal stages were significantly lengthened by about 1.5 day in comparison with control. Moreover, acrylamide increased the number of prohaemocytes and intermediate cells while the number of plasmatocytes and granulocytes decreased. The size of plasmatocytes decreased in acrylamide-treated larvae when compared with these cells of control flies. The reduced survival of animals is probably due to affecting haemocytes involved in immune responses in insects. Moreover, the housefly's blood cells showed to be sensitive to toxin, which suggests their usefulness to test toxicity of substances present in food products.

  8. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  9. Toxic effects of new antifouling compounds on tunicate haemocytes I. Sea-nine 211 and chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Cima, Francesca; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Ballarin, Loriano

    2008-01-31

    After the definitive ban on tin-based antifouling substances, new organic compounds have recently been introduced in antifouling paint formulations, as either principal or booster biocides. In most cases, previous risk assessment of these biocides has been inadequate so that their possible effects on aquatic ecosystems is a matter of great concern. We studied the effects of two new organic biocides often associated in paint formulations, Sea-Nine 211 (4,5 dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazoline-3-one) and chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile), on haemocytes of the compound ascidian Botryllus schlosseri exposed for 60 min to various concentrations (from 0.1 to 10 microM) of the xenobiotics. This species had previously proved to be a good bioindicator of organotin compounds. Both compounds, at concentrations of 1 and 10 microM, altered the morphology of phagocytes, and these changes were closely related to disrupting effects on cytoskeletal components. At the same concentrations, phagocytosis, which requires cytoskeletal modifications for pseudopod formation, was severely hindered. Both compounds were able to induce apoptosis of Botryllus blood cells, probably as a consequence of severe oxidative stress related to the reported decrease of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) content. In the case of Sea-Nine 211, a substantial increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and a negative effect on Ca(2+)-ATPase activity may also be involved in the activation of the cell death machinery. Cytochrome-c-oxidase was also significantly inhibited by the two biocides, indicating perturbation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Isodynamic mixtures of Sea-Nine 211 and chlorothalonil were used to evaluate the occurrence of interactions between the two compounds. Results suggest the combined action of partial additivity when cell-spreading and cytochrome-c-oxidase activity were considered, and were indicative of antagonism in the case of the GSH depletion. On the whole, our

  10. Effects of the peptide mycotoxin destruxin E on insect haemocytes and on dynamics and efficiency of the multicellular immune reaction.

    PubMed

    Vey, Alain; Matha, Vladimir; Dumas, Christiane

    2002-07-01

    Destruxins (DTXs) are cyclic peptide toxins secreted by the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae. The effects of DTX E, the most active compound of this family on haemocytes, the immunocompetent insect cells, and on the dynamics and efficacy of the multicellular defense of insect hosts have been investigated. Ultrastructural alterations have been observed in circulating plasmatocytes and granular haemocytes, and in attached haemocytes of Galleria mellonella larvae treated with a toxic dose of DTX E (LC50). These changes appear as a consequence of disturbances induced in the cellular calcium balance. An effect on the cell surface of granulocytes was also noted in cells incubated with the toxin and FITC-Con A, even when the concentration of DTX was as low as 0.005 microg/ml. Morphological studies of haemocytic capsules formed in vivo revealed disturbances of the multicellular defense mechanism after toxin treatment However, an attempt to establish if these changes were significant was unsuccessful. In contrast, comparative assays regarding the effect of toxin treatment on the efficacy of the antifungal effect of encapsulation has given conclusive results. The germination of injected Aspergillus niger spores became slightly but significantly increased, and when the granuloma were incubated the fungus escaped more easily from the haemocytic envelope. These results are discussed in terms of significance of the contribution of DTXs to the fungal infection process. It is suggested that the fungal peptides may intervene during the disease by a true immune-inhibitory effect occurring at doses which do not cause paralysis or any general sign of toxicity (e.g., 0.8 microg/g of body weight).

  11. Effects of benzo(a)pyrene on differentially expressed genes and haemocyte parameters of the clam Venerupis philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Pan, Luqing; Gong, XiaoLi; Tao, Yanxia; Hu, Yanyan; Miao, Jingjing

    2014-03-01

    In this study a suppression subtractive hybridisation method was employed to identify differentially expressed genes of the clam Venerupis philippinarum exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Nineteen known transcripts and seven predicted proteins were found from the subtractive cDNA library of the clam, which could provide more sequence information for further study. Seven of the differentially expressed genes were selected for mRNA expression analysis. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of the selected cDNAs of clams was up-regulated to varying degrees by different concentration of BaP. They are suggested as potential molecular biomarkers for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution monitoring in aquatic ecosystems. In addition, haemocyte parameters were also measured, and a decrease of total haemocyte counts and suppression of antibacterial and bacteriolytic activities were detected in BaP-stressed clams. We suggest that the modulation of the expression of the selected genes caused by PAHs probably leads to the disturbance of the immune defense of the clam. Meanwhile, the adverse effects of PAHs on haemocyte parameters caused the suppression of the immune defense and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Therefore, it is inferred that PAHs pollutants could interact with components of the immune system and interferes with defense functions of the clam V. philippinarum.

  12. Effects of fluconazole on Candida glabrata biofilms and its relationship with ABC transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elza; Silva, Sónia; Rodrigues, Célia Fortuna; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata has emerged as the second most prevalent fungal pathogen and its ability to form biofilms has been considered one of the most important virulence factors, since biofilms present a high tolerance to antifungal agents used in fungal infection treatment. The mechanisms of biofilm tolerance to antifungal agents remain poorly understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fluconazole (FLU) on the formation and control of C. glabrata biofilms and its relation with the expression of genes encoding for ABC transporters, CDR1, SNQ2, and PDR1. For that, minimal inhibitory concentration values for seven C. glabrata strains were determined and the effect of FLU against C. glabrata biofilms was evaluated by total biomass quantification and viable cell enumeration. Matrices from biofilms were analyzed in terms of protein, carbohydrate and DNA content. ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed for quantitative real-time PCR. In addition to the high amounts of proteins and carbohydrates detected in the extracellular matrices in the presence of FLU, this work showed that the overexpression of efflux pumps is a possible mechanism of biofilm tolerance to FLU and this phenomenon alters the structure of C. glabrata biofilms by creating cell clusters.

  13. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  14. Effects of 17α-methyltestosterone on the reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Wendt, C L G; Borges, A C; Oliveira-Filho, E C; Miranda-Vilela, A L; Ferreira, M F N; Grisolia, C K

    2014-01-28

    17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) is a synthetic hormone used in fish hatcheries to induce male monosex. Snails hold promise as possible test models to assess chemicals acting on the endocrine system. Biomphalaria glabrata is an aquatic gastropod mollusk (Pulmonata, Planorbidae) that can be easily maintained in aquaria, predisposing the species for use in ecotoxicological testing. This study evaluated the reproductive effects of MT on B. glabrata by examining histological changes and its reproductive performance. Ten snails per group were exposed for 4 weeks to different concentrations of MT (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L). The total number of laid eggs, egg mass per group, size of type V oocytes, and production of spermatozoids were determined. Reproduction of B. glabrata was affected by MT. At the lowest concentration (0.01 mg/L), MT caused a statistically significant increase in the number of egg mass per snail compared with controls unexposed to MT. Histopathology analyses showed an increase in the sperm production at the higher MT concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. Chromatographic analyses of water samples showed that MT concentrations rapidly declined within a 96-h period. These results highlight the importance of giving more support to regulatory authorities, since MT is not registered for use on fish hatcheries in many countries around the world. Wastewater from fish farms discharged into aquatic ecosystems should be monitored for MT residues, since its presence could compromise the reproduction of other native snail species.

  15. Assessing the genotoxic effects of two lipid peroxidation products (4-oxo-2-nonenal and 4-hydroxy-hexenal) in haemocytes and midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Demir, Eşref; Marcos, Ricard

    2017-03-22

    Lipid peroxidation products can induce tissue damage and are implicated in diverse pathological conditions, including aging, atherosclerosis, brain disorders, cancer, lung and various liver disorders. Since in vivo studies produce relevant information, we have selected Drosophila melanogaster as a suitable in vivo model to characterise the potential risks associated to two lipid peroxidation products namely 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) and 4-hydroxy-hexenal (4-HHE). Toxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, and genotoxicity were the end-points evaluated. Haemocytes and midgut cells were the evaluated targets. Results showed that both compounds penetrate the intestine of the larvae, affecting midgut cells, and reaching haemocytes. Significant genotoxic effects, as determined by the comet assay, were observed in both selected cell targets in a concentration/time dependent manner. This study highlights the importance of D. melanogaster as a model organism in the study of the different biological effects caused by lipid peroxidation products entering via ingestion. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in haemocytes and midgut cells of D. melanogaster larvae for the two selected compounds.

  16. Generation of free radicals in haemocytes of mussels after exposure to low molecular weight PAH components: immune activation, oxidative and genotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Giannapas, Marios; Karnis, Loukas; Dailianis, Stefanos

    2012-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) constituents, such as phenanthrene (PH) and anthracene (AN), are considered toxic for marine organisms, including bivalve mollusks. The present study showed that the perturbation of health status in mussels, as well as their inability to survive in air (stress on stress response), following exposure to either PH or AN (at a final concentration of 0.1 mg/L respectively), and a mixture of them (ration 1:1, at a final concentration of 0.2 mg/L) for 7 days, is probably related with alterations occurred in their haemocytes. According to the present study, PH and AN, either alone or in a mixture, could induce elevated levels of superoxide anions ((•)O(2)(-)) within haemocytes of mussels, thus leading to immune susceptibility as indicated by the increased levels of cell death and the elevated levels of lysosomal membrane acid phosphatase (AcP) activity, probably occurred via its overproduction or its release into the cytosol after lysosomal membrane destabilisation. PAH-mediated oxidative and genotoxic effects, indicated by the increased levels of both lipid peroxidation (MDA content) and nuclear abnormalities (MN test) could be related with haemocytes' inability to overcome free radical generation, thus leading to attenuation of general health status, before other disturbances, such as death, occur.

  17. Himasthla elongata: effect of infection on expression of the LUSTR-like receptor mRNA in common periwinkle haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, A M; Klimovich, A V; Iakovleva, N V

    2009-09-01

    The first mollusc mRNA coding G-protein-coupled transmembrane receptor (GPcapital ES, CyrillicR), homologous to human receptors LUSTR 1 (GPR107) and LUSTR 2 (GPR108), was isolated from haemocytes of common periwinkle Littorina littorea. The analyses showed that the full-length cDNA is 1935 bp long and is predicted to encode a 614 amino acid protein (named Lit-LUSTR) with a calculated molecular mass of 69.6 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point 7.59. Pair-wise comparisons between Lit-LUSTR and LUSTR proteins from human or mouse have approximately 38% identity and 56% similarity. Lit-LUSTR clusters with LUSTR-A sub-family proteins and is a first characterization of proteins containing Lung7TM-R domain in Mollusca. Significant differences were found between the Lit-LUSTR mRNA levels in haemocytes of healthy periwinkles and those naturally infected with the echinostome trematode Himasthla elongata. Down regulated expression of the LUSTR-like receptor caused by infection illustrates modification of the haemocyte receptor system and may be attributed to the previously demonstrated greater numbers of "immature" haemocytes in the circulation of infected snails.

  18. Reversal of fluconazole resistance induced by a synergistic effect with Acca sellowiana in Candida glabrata strains.

    PubMed

    R M Machado, Gabriella da; Pippi, Bruna; Dalla Lana, Daiane Flores; Amaral, Ana Paula S; Teixeira, Mário Lettieri; Souza, Kellen C B de; Fuentefria, Alexandre M

    2016-11-01

    The increased incidence of non-albicans Candida (NAC) resistant to fluconazole (FLZ) makes it necessary to use new therapeutic alternatives. Acca sellowiana (O.berg) Burret (Myrtaceae) is a guava with several proven biological activities. The interaction with fluconazole can be a feasible alternative to overcome this resistance. This study evaluates the in vitro antifungal activity of fractions obtained from the lyophilized aqueous extract of the leaves of A. sellowiana against resistant strains of NAC. The antifungal activity of the fractions was evaluated at 500 μg/mL by microdilution method. Checkerboard assay was performed to determine the effect of the combination of the F2 fraction and antifungal at concentrations: MIC/4, MIC/2, MIC, MIC × 2 and MIC × 4. Candida glabrata showed the lowest MIC values (500-3.90 μg/mL) and the F2 active fraction was the most effective. The association of F2 with FLZ showed a strong synergistic effect (FICI ≤ 0.5) against 100% of C. glabrata resistant isolates. Moreover, the F2 active fraction has demonstrated that probably acts in the cell wall of these yeasts. There was no observed acute dermal toxicity of lyophilized aqueous extract of leaves of A. sellowiana on pig ear skin cells. The interaction between substances present in the F2 active fraction is possibly responsible for the antifungal activity presented by this fraction. This study is unprecedented and suggests that the combination of F2 active fraction and FLZ might be used as an alternative treatment for mucocutaneus infections caused by C. glabrata resistant.

  19. Fungicidal effect of photodynamic therapy against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Dovigo, Lívia Nordi; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-03-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown great promise for the inactivation of Candida species, its effectiveness against azole-resistant pathogens remains poorly documented. This in vitro study describes the association of Photogem® (Photogem, Moscow, Russia) with LED (light emitting diode) light for the photoinactivation of fluconazole-resistant (FR) and American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Suspensions of each Candida strain were treated with five Photogem® concentrations and exposed to four LED light fluences (14, 24, 34 or 50 min of illumination). After incubation (48 h at 37 °C), colonies were counted (CFU ml(-1)). Single-species biofilms were generated on cellulose membrane filters, treated with 25.0 mg l(-1) of Photogem® and illuminated at 37.5 J cm(-2). The biofilms were then disrupted and the viable yeast cells present were determined. Planktonic suspensions of FR strains were effectively killed after PDT. It was observed that the fungicidal effect of PDT was strain-dependent. Significant decreases in biofilm viability were observed for three strains of C. albicans and for two strains of C. glabrata. The results of this investigation demonstrated that although PDT was effective against Candida species, fluconazole-resistant strains showed reduced sensitivity to PDT. Moreover, single-species biofilms were less susceptible to PDT than their planktonic counterparts. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  1. Early genotoxic effects in gill cells and haemocytes of Dreissena polymorpha exposed to cadmium, B[a]P and a combination of B[a]P and Cd.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Arini, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2011-07-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd on the zebra mussel, an important freshwater sentinel organism, and to determine the stability of DNA damage in gill cells and haemocytes. The oxidative DNA damage and the co-genotoxicity of Cd in combination with B[a]P were investigated. We measured DNA damage in haemocytes and gill cells of zebra mussels exposed for 11 days to a constant concentration of Cd (10μg/L), B[a]P (10μg/L) or the two combined chemicals (10μg/L+1μg/L). Enzymatic dissociation of gills with dispase gave the lower percentage DNA in tail, compared with collagenase/dispase or collagenase. Bioaccumulation of cadmium in the soft tissues of mussels exposed to CdCl(2) or CdCl(2)+B[a]P increased in a time-dependent manner indicating that both exposures were effective. Cd (10μg/L) is genotoxic only during the first 3 days of exposure in gill cells, while in haemocytes the genotoxicity of Cd was observed later. B[a]P (10μg/L) induced an early increase of DNA damage in gill cells (after 10h and 1 day), while in both gill cells and haemocytes, B[a]P caused a marked increase of DNA damage after 3 days of exposure. The Cd+B[a]P mixture decreased the DNA-damaging effect of Cd and B[a]P in both cell types. Cd induced an increase of DNA damage in Fpg-treated slides, indicating that Cd contributed to oxidative DNA damage. Cadmium induced a cytogenetic effect in gill cells, assessed by the number of micronuclei, throughout the duration of the exposure, while B[a]P did not induce any cytogenetic effect. B[a]P, Cd and Cd+B[a]P induced a transient increase in the number of bi-nucleated cells. Our data clearly show that gills are more sensitive to Cd and B[a]P, which makes them more suitable for future bio-monitoring studies.

  2. Unexpected effects of azole transporter inhibitors on antifungal susceptibility in Candida glabrata and other pathogenic Candida species.

    PubMed

    Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Miyazaki, Taiga; Shimamura, Shintaro; Nakayama, Hironobu; Minematsu, Asuka; Yamauchi, Shunsuke; Takazono, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata is often resistant to azole antifungal agents. Drug efflux through azole transporters, such as Cdr1 and Cdr2, is a key mechanism of azole resistance and these genes are under the control of the transcription factor Pdr1. Recently, the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitor clorgyline was shown to inhibit the azole efflux pumps, leading to increased azole susceptibility in C. glabrata. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of clorgyline on susceptibility of C. glabrata to not only azoles, but also to micafungin and amphotericin B, using wild-type and several mutant strains. The addition of clorgyline to the culture media increased fluconazole susceptibility of a C. glabrata wild-type strain, whereas micafungin and amphotericin B susceptibilities were markedly decreased. These phenomena were also observed in other medically important Candida species, including Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. Expression levels of CDR1, CDR2 and PDR1 mRNAs and an amount of Cdr1 protein in the C. glabrata wild-type strain were highly increased in response to the treatment with clorgyline. However, loss of Cdr1, Cdr2, Pdr1, and a putative clorgyline target (Fms1), which is an ortholog of human MAO-A, or overexpression of CDR1 did not affect the decreased susceptibility to micafungin and amphotericin B in the presence of clorgyline. The presence of other azole efflux pump inhibitors including milbemycin A4 oxime and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone also decreased micafungin susceptibility in C. glabrata wild-type, Δcdr1, Δcdr2, and Δpdr1 strains. These findings suggest that azole efflux pump inhibitors increase azole susceptibility but concurrently induce decreased susceptibility to other classes of antifungals independent of azole transporter functions.

  3. Unexpected effects of azole transporter inhibitors on antifungal susceptibility in Candida glabrata and other pathogenic Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Shimamura, Shintaro; Nakayama, Hironobu; Minematsu, Asuka; Yamauchi, Shunsuke; Takazono, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata is often resistant to azole antifungal agents. Drug efflux through azole transporters, such as Cdr1 and Cdr2, is a key mechanism of azole resistance and these genes are under the control of the transcription factor Pdr1. Recently, the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitor clorgyline was shown to inhibit the azole efflux pumps, leading to increased azole susceptibility in C. glabrata. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of clorgyline on susceptibility of C. glabrata to not only azoles, but also to micafungin and amphotericin B, using wild-type and several mutant strains. The addition of clorgyline to the culture media increased fluconazole susceptibility of a C. glabrata wild-type strain, whereas micafungin and amphotericin B susceptibilities were markedly decreased. These phenomena were also observed in other medically important Candida species, including Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. Expression levels of CDR1, CDR2 and PDR1 mRNAs and an amount of Cdr1 protein in the C. glabrata wild-type strain were highly increased in response to the treatment with clorgyline. However, loss of Cdr1, Cdr2, Pdr1, and a putative clorgyline target (Fms1), which is an ortholog of human MAO-A, or overexpression of CDR1 did not affect the decreased susceptibility to micafungin and amphotericin B in the presence of clorgyline. The presence of other azole efflux pump inhibitors including milbemycin A4 oxime and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone also decreased micafungin susceptibility in C. glabrata wild-type, Δcdr1, Δcdr2, and Δpdr1 strains. These findings suggest that azole efflux pump inhibitors increase azole susceptibility but concurrently induce decreased susceptibility to other classes of antifungals independent of azole transporter functions. PMID:28700656

  4. Fungicidal effect of thymoquinone involves generation of oxidative stress in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Almshawit, Hala; Macreadie, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The antifungal effect of thymoquinone, a component of black seed essential oil, has been studied on different types of fungi. Its mechanism of action as an antifungal has not been described yet. This study demonstrates the fungicidal effect of thymoquinone on different Candida species with particular emphasis on C. glabrata planktonic cells and biofilms. Since cell death was induced via the generation of oxidative stress as evidenced by the abrogation of thymoquinone toxicity in cells incubated with antioxidants, a part of thymoquinone's mechanism of action includes a direct involvement as a pro-oxidant. This was further confirmed by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species, glutathione level reduction and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. The oxidative stress caused by thymoquinone was confirmed to be the cause of death and not a result of cell death.

  5. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  6. Comparative effects of micafungin, caspofungin, and anidulafungin against a difficult-to-treat fungal opportunistic pathogen, Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Spreghini, Elisabetta; Orlando, Fiorenza; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Giannini, Daniele; Manso, Esther; Barchiesi, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro and in vivo activities of micafungin, caspofungin, and anidulafungin against Candida glabrata. The MICs against 28 clinical isolates showed that the overall susceptibilities to caspofungin and to micafungin were not statistically different in the absence of human serum, whereas the isolates were less susceptible to micafungin than to caspofungin in its presence. Minimum fungicidal concentrations, as well as time-kill experiments, showed that caspofungin was more active than anidulafungin, while micafungin was superior to either caspofungin or anidulafungin without serum; its addition rendered caspofungin and micafungin equally effective. A murine model of systemic candidiasis against a C. glabrata-susceptible isolate was performed to study the effects of all three echinocandins, and kidney burden counts showed that caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin were active starting from 0.25, 1, and 5 mg/kg of body weight/day, respectively. Two echinocandin-resistant strains of C. glabrata were selected: C. glabrata 30, a laboratory strain harboring the mutation Fks2p-P667T, and C. glabrata 51, a clinical isolate harboring the mutation Fks2p-D666G. Micafungin activity was shown to be as effective as or more effective than that of caspofungin or anidulafungin in terms of MICs. In vivo studies against these resistant strains showed that micafungin was active starting from 1 mg/kg/day, while caspofungin was effective only when administrated at higher doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg/day. Although a trend toward colony reduction was observed with the highest doses of anidulafungin, a significant statistical difference was never reached.

  7. The effect of silver nanoparticles and nystatin on mixed biofilms of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans on acrylic.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Pires, Priscila; Monteiro, Douglas R; Negri, Melyssa; Gorup, Luiz F; Camargo, Emerson R; Barbosa, Débora B; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David W; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare biofilm formation by Candida glabrata and Candida albicans on acrylic, either individually or when combined (single and dual species) and then examine the antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles and nystatin on these biofilms. Candidal adhesion and biofilm assays were performed on acrylic surface in the presence of artificial saliva (AS) for 2 h and 48 h, respectively. Candida glabrata and C. albicans adherence was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFUs) recovered from the biofilms on CHROMagar(®) Candida. In addition, crystal violet (CV) staining was used as an indicator of biofilm biomass and to quantify biofilm formation ability. Pre-formed biofilms were treated either with silver nanoparticles or nystatin and the effect of these agents on the biofilms was evaluated after 24 h. Results showed that both species adhered to and formed biofilms on acrylic surfaces. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher number of CFUs was evident in C. glabrata biofilms compared with those formed by C. albicans. Comparing single and dual species biofilms, equivalent CFU numbers were evident for the individual species. Both silver nanoparticles and nystatin reduced biofilm biomass and the CFUs of single and dual species biofilms (P < 0.05). Silver nanoparticles had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater effect on reducing C. glabrata biofilm biomass compared with C. albicans. Similarly, nystatin was more effective in reducing the number of CFUs of dual species biofilms compared with those of single species (P < 0.05). In summary, C. glabrata and C. albicans can co-exist in biofilms without apparent antagonism, and both silver nanoparticles and nystatin exhibit inhibitory effects on biofilms of these species.

  8. In vitro and in vivo effects of 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11) depletion in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, H; Nakayama, N; Arisawa, M; Aoki, Y

    2001-11-01

    Sterol 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11) is the target enzyme of azole antifungals that are widely used for the treatment of fungal infections. Candida glabrata is known to be less susceptible to fluconazole than most Candida albicans strains, and the incidence of C. glabrata infection has been increasing mostly in conjunction with the use of azole antifungals. Recently, it has been reported that C. glabrata can rescue the defect of ergosterol biosynthesis by incorporating cholesterol from serum. To explore the effect of inactivating Erg11p in C. glabrata, we generated mutant strains in which the ERG11 gene was placed under the control of tetracycline-regulatable promoters. In these mutants, expression of the ERG11 gene can be repressed by doxycycline (DOX). All mutants showed a growth defect in the presence of DOX. The numbers of CFU of the mutants were lowered by only 1/10 with DOX treatment. In these mutants, accumulation of 4,14-dimethylzymosterol, which differs from an accumulated abnormal sterol detected in C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated with fluconazole, was observed by DOX treatment. Although such phenotypes were also observed in serum-containing media by DOX treatment, they were alleviated. Furthermore, the mutant could grow in DOX-treated mice without a severe reduction in the number of cells. Thus, depleting the expression of the ERG11 gene lowered the number of CFU by only 1/10 due to the accumulation of 4,14-demethylzymosterol in vitro, and it did not result in the defective growth of fungal cells in mice. These results suggested that Erg11p is not an ideal target molecule of antifungals for C. glabrata.

  9. Effects of azinphos-methyl exposure on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses in Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Verrengia Guerrero, Noemí R; Cochón, Adriana C

    2008-07-01

    Azinphos-methyl is an organophosphate insecticide used for pest control on a number of food crops in many parts of the world. The oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and pigmented and non-pigmented specimens of the gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata are freshwater invertebrates that have been recommended for contamination studies. Recently, it has been shown that L. variegatus worms exhibit a higher cholinesterase (ChE) activity and a greater sensitivity to in vivo ChE inhibition by azinphos-methyl than pigmented B. glabrata snails. The aims of the present study were (1) to investigate if, in addition to its anticholinesterase action, azinphos-methyl has also pro-oxidant activity in L. variegatus and B. glabrata, and (2) to examine if species that are highly susceptible to the neurotoxic effects of organophosphates also suffer a greater degree of oxidative stress. Therefore, total glutathione (t-GSH) levels and activities of cholinesterase (ChE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) were measured in the whole body soft tissue of organisms exposed for 48 and 96 h to a level of azinphos-methyl that produces 50% of inhibition on ChE. Results showed different patterns of antioxidant responses between the gastropods and the oligochaetes, and even between the two phenotypes of gastropods: (1) in exposed L. variegatus t-GSH levels increased and CAT and SOD activities decreased with respect to control organisms, (2) in pigmented gastropods, SOD decreased while CAT transiently diminished, and (3) in non-pigmented gastropods, SOD activity showed a biphasic response. GST and G6PDH were not altered by azinphos-methyl exposure. Of note, t-GSH levels were 4-fold times higher in L. variegatus than in both phenotypes of B. glabrata. This may suggest that GSH could play a more important role in antioxidant defense in L. variegatus than in B. glabrata.

  10. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chew, SY; Cheah, YK; Seow, HF; Sandai, D; Than, LTL

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Methods and Results Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Conclusions Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. PMID:25688886

  11. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates.

    PubMed

    Chew, S Y; Cheah, Y K; Seow, H F; Sandai, D; Than, L T L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. © 2015 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satwant; Baynes, Alice; Lockyer, Anne E; Routledge, Edwin J; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  13. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment. PMID:27448327

  14. Effects of Perennial Peanut (Arachis glabrata) Ground Cover on Nematode Communities in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Macchia, E. T.; McSorley, R.; Duncan, L. W.; Syvertsen, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata) ground cover on the nematode community in a citrus orchard were examined. Samples were taken from two different ground cover treatments (perennial peanut or bare ground) at each of three distances from the tree trunk. Richness, measured as total numbers of nematode genera per sample, and total numbers of nematodes were greatest in the perennial peanut treatment (P < 0.05). Abundance of many genera of bacterivores, fungivores, and omnivores were increased by the perennial peanut ground cover. Total numbers of plant parasites were greater in perennial peanut treatments on three of the five sampling dates (P < 0.05), mainly due to trends in numbers of Mesocriconema. Distance from a tree trunk and the interaction of ground cover treatments and proximity to a tree trunk were most influential for Belonolaimus and Hoplolaimus. Although differences among treatments were observed for nematode genera and trophic groups, ecological indices were not consistently sensitive to treatments. Among several ecological indices evaluated, richness was most often affected by ground cover treatment. PMID:19262779

  15. Effects of Perennial Peanut (Arachis glabrata) Ground Cover on Nematode Communities in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Macchia, E T; McSorley, R; Duncan, L W; Syvertsen, J S

    2003-12-01

    The effects of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata) ground cover on the nematode community in a citrus orchard were examined. Samples were taken from two different ground cover treatments (perennial peanut or bare ground) at each of three distances from the tree trunk. Richness, measured as total numbers of nematode genera per sample, and total numbers of nematodes were greatest in the perennial peanut treatment (P < 0.05). Abundance of many genera of bacterivores, fungivores, and omnivores were increased by the perennial peanut ground cover. Total numbers of plant parasites were greater in perennial peanut treatments on three of the five sampling dates (P < 0.05), mainly due to trends in numbers of Mesocriconema. Distance from a tree trunk and the interaction of ground cover treatments and proximity to a tree trunk were most influential for Belonolaimus and Hoplolaimus. Although differences among treatments were observed for nematode genera and trophic groups, ecological indices were not consistently sensitive to treatments. Among several ecological indices evaluated, richness was most often affected by ground cover treatment.

  16. Haemocytes of the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum: morphological characterisation and involvement in immune responses.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; Rova, Giulio; Marin, Maria Gabriella

    2007-10-01

    For the first time, morpho-functional characterisation of haemocytes from the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum was performed to identify circulating cell types and to study their involvement in immune responses. Haemocyte mean number was 5.5 (x 10(5)) cells/mL haemolymph. Two main haemocyte types were found in haemolymph: granulocytes (85%), about 10 microm in diameter and with evident cytoplasmic granules, and hyalinocytes (15%), 8 to 14 microm in diameter, with a few or no granules. Most of the cytoplasmic granules stained in vivo with Neutral Red, indicating that they were lysosomes. On the basis of haemocyte staining properties, granulocytes and hyalinocytes were further classified as basophils and acidophils. Acidophil hyalinocytes were the largest haemocyte type (about 14 microm in diameter) and had an eccentric nucleus and a large cytoplasmic vacuole. Both granulocytes and hyalinocytes (except acidophils) were able to phagocytise yeast cells, although the basal phagocytic index was very low (about 2%). It increased significantly (up to 26%) after pre-incubation of yeast in cell-free haemolymph, suggesting that haemolymph has opsonising properties. Haemocytes also produced superoxide anion. Moreover, both granulocytes and hyalinocytes (except acidophils) were positive for some important hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes. Lysozyme-like activity was recorded in both cell-free haemolymph and haemocyte lysate, although enzyme activity in cell lysate was significantly higher. Results indicate that haemocytes from C. glaucum are effective cells in immune responses.

  17. Effect of tyrosol on adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Arias, Laís Salomão; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2015-09-01

    The prevention of adhesion of Candida cells to acrylic surfaces can be regarded as an alternative to prevent denture stomatitis. The use of quorum sensing molecules, such as tyrosol, could potentially interfere with the adhesion process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of tyrosol on adhesion of single and mixed cultures of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic resin surfaces. Tyrosol was diluted in each yeast inoculum (10(7) cells/ml in artificial saliva) at 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM. Then, each dilution was added to wells of 24-well plates containing the acrylic specimens, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. After, the effect of tyrosol was determined by total biomass quantification, metabolic activity of the cells and colony-forming unit counting. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was used as a positive control. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak post hoc test (α = 0.05). The results of total biomass quantification and metabolic activity revealed that the tyrosol promoted significant reductions (ranging from 22.32 to 86.16%) on single C. albicans and mixed cultures. Moreover, tyrosol at 200 mM and CHG significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of adhered cells to the acrylic surface for single and mixed cultures of both species, with reductions ranging from 1.74 to 3.64-log10. In conclusion, tyrosol has an inhibitory effect on Candida adhesion to acrylic resin, and further investigations are warranted to clarify its potential against Candida infections.

  18. In vitro interactions between several species of harmful algae and haemocytes of bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Hégaret, Hélène; da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Wikfors, Gary H; Haberkorn, Hansy; Shumway, Sandra E; Soudant, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) can have both lethal and sublethal impacts on shellfish. To understand the possible roles of haemocytes in bivalve immune responses to HABs and how the algae are affected by these cells (haemocytes), in vitro tests between cultured harmful algal species and haemocytes of the northern quahog (= hard clam) Mercenaria mercenaria, the soft-shell clam Mya arenaria, the eastern and Pacific oysters Crassostrea virginica and Crassostrea gigas and the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum were carried out. Within their respective ranges of distribution, these shellfish species can experience blooms of several HAB species, including Prorocentrum minimum, Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium fundyense, Alexandrium minutum and Karenia spp.; thus, these algal species were chosen for testing. Possible differences in haemocyte variables attributable to harmful algae and also effects of haemolymph and haemocytes on the algae themselves were measured. Using microscopic and flow cytometric observations, changes were measured in haemocytes, including cell morphology, mortality, phagocytosis, adhesion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as changes in the physiology and the characteristics of the algal cells, including mortality, size, internal complexity and chlorophyll fluorescence. These experiments suggest different effects of the several species of harmful algae upon bivalve haemocytes. Some harmful algae act as immunostimulants, whereas others are immunosuppressive. P. minimum appears to activate haemocytes, but the other harmful algal species tested seem to cause a suppression of immune functions, generally consisting of decreases in phagocytosis, production of ROS and cell adhesion and besides cause an increase in the percentage of dead haemocytes, which could be attributable to the action of chemical toxins. Microalgal cells exposed to shellfish haemolymph generally showed evidence of algal degradation, e.g. loss of chlorophyll

  19. Environmentally realistic concentrations of the antibiotic Trimethoprim affect haemocyte parameters but not antioxidant enzyme activities in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; De Notaris, Chiara; Finos, Livio; Filippini, Raffaella; Piovan, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Several biomarkers were measured to evaluate the effects of Trimethoprim (TMP; 300, 600 and 900 ng/L) in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure for 1, 3 and 7 days. The actual TMP concentrations were also measured in the experimental tanks. The total haemocyte count significantly increased in 7 day-exposed clams, whereas alterations in haemocyte volume were observed after 1 and 3 days of exposure. Haemocyte proliferation was increased significantly in animals exposed for 1 and 7 days, whereas haemocyte lysate lysozyme activity decreased significantly after 1 and 3 days. In addition, TMP significantly increased haemolymph lactate dehydrogenase activity after 3 and 7 days. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, only a significant time-dependent effect on CAT activity was recorded. This study demonstrated that environmentally realistic concentrations of TMP affect haemocyte parameters in clams, suggesting that haemocytes are a useful cellular model for the assessment of the impact of TMP on bivalves. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Schistosoma mansoni infection on phagocytosis and killing of Proteus vulgaris in Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J S; Hunt, M D; Sullivan, J T

    1993-04-01

    With the use of a fluorescence microassay, in vitro phagocytosis and killing of Proteus vulgaris were measured in hemocytes of NIH albino Biomphalaria glabrata infected with Schistosoma mansoni for 1, 2, 3, or 4 wk. Although hemocytes of infected snails displayed decreased phagocytosis, relative to hemocytes of uninfected snails, at 4 wk postinfection (PI), they exhibited enhanced microbicidal activity at 3 wk PI. No microbicidal activity was detected in the plasma of either infected or uninfected snails.

  1. Combined effects of carbonate alkalinity and pH on survival, growth and haemocyte parameters of the Venus clam Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Lai, Qifang; Yao, Zongli; Lu, Jianxue; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Carbonate alkalinity (CA) and pH are considered to be two important stress factors that determine the response of aquatic animals to sudden transfers into saline-alkaline water. To evaluate the potential for aquaculture production of Venus clams (Cyclina sinensis) farmed in saline-alkaline water, the combined effects of CA (2.5 (control), 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 meq/l) and pH (8.0 (control), 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5) on survival rate was monitored every day for 10 days. Length gain rate (LGR) and weight gain rate (WGR) were also monitored for two months, and total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic rate (PR) and haemocyte mortality (HM) were measured for 3, 6, 12 and 24 days under the same water temperature (20 °C) and salinity (15‰) conditions. The results showed that survival rates in treatments of CA ≤ 20.0, combined with pH ≤ 9.0, were 100%. LGR and WGR in treatments of CA 2.5 & pH 8.0 (control), CA 2.5 & pH 8.5 and CA 10.0 & pH 8.0 exhibited the largest values (P > 0.05), while in other treatments, they showed a decreasing trend with an increase in either CA or pH or both (P < 0.05). Similarly, for THC, PR and HM, no significant differences were observed among the fast growth treatments during the entire experimental period (P > 0.05), however, in other treatments, they presented significant differences, especially on day 3 and 6 (P < 0.05), most notably with increases in CA or pH, but returned to control levels on day 12. In conclusion, in this study, a strong interaction between CA and pH was observed. Additionally, it was ascertained that the Venus clam C. sinensis can withstand the stress of CA 20.0 combined pH 9.0, although individuals grows slowly and may take approximately 12 days to recover to the unstressed condition.

  2. Oxygen radicals production and actin filament disruption in bivalve haemocytes treated with benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mendikute, Amagoia; Etxeberria, Ainhoa; Olabarrieta, Igor; Cajaraville, Miren P

    2002-01-01

    Haemocytes play an essential role in the internal defence of molluscs. It has been reported that organic xenobiotics commonly found as pollutants in the marine environment impair defence capabilities of haemocytes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton and on endocytosis in haemocytes and to see if these effects are related to generation of reactive oxygen species. Haemocytes were exposed in vitro to B(a)P (0.5-40 microg/ml) for 1 h. Cell viability (using 2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide or XTT assay) indicated that selected doses were sublethal. Uptake of neutral red was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner in B(a)P-treated haemocytes. Distribution of actin filaments, labeled with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin, was altered in haemocytes treated with 20 or 40 microg/ml B(a)P. These effects could be related to an increased production of superoxide anion during B(a)P metabolism, as detected by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assay in haemocytes treated with > or = 10 microg/ml B(a)P.

  3. Mutual modulation between norepinephrine and nitric oxide in haemocytes during the mollusc immune response.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiufen; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Yang, Chuanyan; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Tiantian; Song, Linsheng

    2014-11-07

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important immune molecules in innate immunity of invertebrates, and it can be regulated by norepinephrine in ascidian haemocytes. In the present study, the mutual modulation and underlying mechanism between norepinephrine and NO were explored in haemocytes of the scallop Chlamys farreri. After lipopolysaccharide stimulation, NO production increased to a significant level at 24 h, and norepinephrine concentration rose to remarkable levels at 3 h and 12~48 h. A significant decrease of NO production was observed in the haemocytes concomitantly stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and α-adrenoceptor agonist, while a dramatic increase of NO production was observed in the haemocytes incubated with lipopolysaccharide and β-adrenoceptor agonist. Meanwhile, the concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) decreased significantly in the haemocytes treated by lipopolysaccharide and α/β-adrenoceptor agonist, while the content of Ca(2+) was elevated in those triggered by lipopolysaccharide and β-adrenoceptor agonist. When the haemocytes was incubated with NO donor, norepinephrine concentration was significantly enhanced during 1~24 h. Collectively, these results suggested that norepinephrine exerted varied effects on NO production at different immune stages via a novel α/β-adrenoceptor-cAMP/Ca(2+) regulatory pattern, and NO might have a feedback effect on the synthesis of norepinephrine in the scallop haemocytes.

  4. Effects of aestivation and starvation on the neutral lipid and phospholipid content of Biomphalaria glabrata infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    White, Meredith M; Fried, Bernard; Sherma, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    The effects of aestivation or starvation on the neutral lipid and phospholipid content of Biomphalaria glabrata patently infected with Schistosoma mansoni were determined by high-performance thin-layer chromatography-densitometry. Infected-aestivated snails were maintained in a moist chamber at 24 +/- 1 C and a relative humidity of 98 +/- 1%. Infected-starved snails were maintained in artificial spring water (ASW) at 23 +/- 1 C without exogenous food. Infected snails (the controls) were maintained in ASW at 23 +/- 1 C and fed lettuce ad libitum. The 3 groups were maintained in the laboratory for 7 days, and then the lipids from the digestive gland-gonad complex (DGG) were extracted and analyzed by class. Infected-aestivated snails exhibited greater mortality rate and weight loss after 7 days than did the infected-starved snails. The steryl ester concentration in the infected-starved snails was significantly increased (P = 0.010) compared with the controls but not compared with infected-aestivated snails; the concentration of phosphatidylcholine in infected-aestivated snails was significantly decreased (P = 0.007) compared with the controls but not when compared with the infected-starved snails. Aestivation or starvation had a significant effect on the concentration of certain lipid classes in the DGG of B. glabrata infected with S. mansoni.

  5. OVICIDAL EFFECT OF PIPERACEAE SPECIES ON Biomphalaria glabrata, Schistosoma mansoni HOST

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Ludmila Nakamura; Lopes, Priscila Orechio de Moraes; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko; Nakano, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Schistosomiasis is a neglected disease with public health importance in tropical and subtropical regions. An alternative to the disease control is the use of molluscicides to eliminate or reduce the intermediate host snail population causing a reduction of transmission in endemic regions. In this study nine extracts from eight Piperaceae species were evaluated against Biomphalaria glabrata embryos at blastula stage. The extracts were evaluated in concentrations ranging from 100 to 10 mg/L. Piper crassinervium and Piper tuberculatum extracts were the most active (100% of mortality at 20 mg/L and 30 mg/L respectively). PMID:24213196

  6. Effects of glucose, vitamins, and DO concentrations on pyruvate fermentation using Torulopsis glabrata IFO 0005 with metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Q; Araki, M; Koide, Y; Shimizu, K

    2001-01-01

    The effects of glucose, vitamins, and DO concentrations on efficient pyruvic acid fermentation were investigated using Torulopsis glabrata IFO 0005, and a novel biphasic culture method was developed on the basis of the metabolic flux analysis. T. glabrata requires the four vitamins nicotinic acid (NA), thiamine hydrochloride (B(1)), pyridoxine hydrochloride, and biotin for cell growth. The deficiency of these vitamins plays an essential role in pyruvate fermentation. In the present study, we considered the effects of the first two vitamins on the pyruvate fermentation. On the basis of several batch and fed-batch experiments, it was found that, as a result of glucose inhibition of cell growth, the initial glucose concentration should be around 30-40 g/L, and the glucose concentration during fermentation should be controlled at high level around 30 g/L. On the basis of an analysis of carbon flux distribution, a biphasic fermentation method was developed where the cultivation started with a high DO (at 40-50% of air saturation) for efficient cell growth and then was reduced to 5-10% for efficient pyruvate production. Since a fair amount of ethanol was formed when the DO concentration was decreased, the addition of NA turned out to be effective in reducing the ethanol formation. This may be due to a relaxing of the requirement for NADH oxidation by the alcohol dehydrogenase pathway. Since B(1) affects both the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate decarboxylase, its initial concentration must be carefully determined by considering both the cell growth and pyruvate production phases.

  7. Effect of pH on In Vitro Susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 Antifungal Agents and Implications for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Danby, Claire S.; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC90 for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0. PMID:22232293

  8. Effect of pH on in vitro susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 antifungal agents and implications for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Danby, Claire S; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina; Sobel, Jack D

    2012-03-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC(90) for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0.

  9. Anti-biofilm effect of nanometer scale silver (NmSAg) coatings on glass and polystyrene surfaces against P. mirabilis, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains.

    PubMed

    Sahal, Gulcan; Nasseri, Behzad; Bilkay, Isil Seyis; Piskin, Erhan

    2015-12-18

    Nowadays, in order to terminate biofilm associated infections, coating of particular biomaterial surfaces with particular substances, via some nanotechnological tools, is being applied. Therefore, in the present study, investigation of anti-biofilm effects of nanometer scale silver (NmSAg) coatings on glass and polystyrene surfaces against clinical strains of Proteus mirabilis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis was aimed. In this study, glass and polystyrene slabs with 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm × 0.3 mm dimensions were cleaned by using surface plasma technology, covered with NmSAg by using a physical vapor deposition machine, and biofilm inhibition was determined by crystal violet binding assay. According to our results, 32 nm of silver layer on a glass slab decreased biofilm formation of P. mirabilis strain to a maximum amount of 88.1% and caused 20.9% inhibition in biofilm formation of C. glabrata strain. On the other hand, NmS coating of Ag on a polystyrene slab caused 34.4% and 20% inhibitions, respectively, in biofilm formations of C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains. Although biofilm inhibition of NmSAg layer on polystyrene slab was more (34.4%) than biofilm inhibition caused by NmSAg layer on glass slab (20.9%), C. glabrata strain's biofilm formation on uncoated glass slab was lower than both uncoated and NmSAg-coated polystyrene slabs. Our results show that glass surfaces with NmSAg coatings can be used as a new surface material of various indwelling devices on which P. mirabilis colonizations frequently occur and in order to avoid C. glabrata-associated biofilm infections, it is more useful to choose a surface material of glass rather than choosing a surface material of polystyrene.

  10. Risk Factors for Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ingi; Fishman, Neil O.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Weiner, Mark G.; Synnestvedt, Marie; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2010-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Candida glabrata have increased substantially. Candida glabrata is often associated with resistance to fluconazole therapy. However, to our knowledge, risk factors for fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs have not been studied. Methods A case-case-control study was conducted at 3 hospitals from January 1, 2003, to May 31, 2007. The 2 case groups included patients with fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥16 μg/mL) and patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs (minimum inhibitory concentration ≤8 μg/mL). Hospitalized patients without C glabrata BSIs were randomly selected for inclusion in the control group and were frequency matched to cases on the basis of time at risk. Two case-control studies were performed using this shared control group. The primary risk factor of interest, previous fluconazole use, was evaluated at multivariate analyses, adjusting for demographic data, comorbid conditions, and antimicrobial exposures. Results We included 76 patients with fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs, 68 patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs, and 512 control patients. Previous fluconazole use (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.3 [1.3–4.2]) and linezolid use (4.6 [2.2–9.3]) were independent risk factors for fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs; previous cefepime use (2.2 [1.2–3.9]) and metronidazole use (2.0 [1.1–3.5]) were independent risk factors for fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs. Conclusions Previous fluconazole use is a significant risk factor for health care–associated fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the effect of decreasing fluconazole use on rates of fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs. PMID:19237722

  11. Effects of pesticide compounds (chlorothalonil and mancozeb) and benzo[a]pyrene mixture on aryl hydrocarbon receptor, p53 and ubiquitin gene expression levels in haemocytes of soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria).

    PubMed

    Pariseau, Julie; McKenna, Patricia; Aboelkhair, Mohammed; Saint-Louis, Richard; Pelletier, Emilien; Davidson, T Jeffrey; Tremblay, Réjean; Berthe, Franck C J; Siah, Ahmed

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of the pesticides/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), p53 and ubiquitin mRNA level in haemocytes of Mya arenaria exposed to a mixture of chlorothalonil, mancozeb and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) for 48 and 72 h. AhR, p53 and ubiquitin gene expression levels were quantified using quantitative Real-time PCR. For robust and accurate quantification of transcripts, suitable housekeeping genes were selected from four sets of ribosomal and elongation factors transcripts previously sequenced from Mya arenaria using geNorm open source software. Quantitative Real-time PCR data exhibited a significantly high expression of AhR after 72 h of exposure (P ≤ 0.05). p53 gene expression seems to be up-regulated by the mixture after 48 h, however not significantly; but the level of p53 mRNA is down-regulated by the xenobiotics between 48 and 72 h after exposure. This study postulates that AhR mRNA levels could be used as an indicator of the exposure of clams' haemocytes to a mixture of xenobiotics such as chlorothalonil, mancozeb and BaP. However, further studies have to be pursued in order to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in the p53 signaling pathway.

  12. The Effectiveness of Voriconazole in Therapy of Candida glabrata's Biofilms Oral Infections and Its Influence on the Matrix Composition and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Célia F; Gonçalves, Bruna; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Silva, Sónia; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-08-01

    Candida glabrata is one of most prevalent yeast in fungal infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Its azole resistance results in a low therapeutic response, particularly when associated with biofilms. The main goal of this work was to study the effectiveness of voriconazole (Vcz) against C. glabrata biofilms oral pathologies, as esophageal or oropharyngeal candidiasis. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined in pre-formed 24-h-biofilms and ERG genes expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Protein quantification was performed using BCA(®) Kit, carbohydrate was estimated according to the Dubois assay and β-1,3 glucans concentration were determined using Glucatell(®) kit. Finally, ergosterol, Vcz, and fluconazole (Flu) concentrations within the biofilm matrices were determined by RP-HPLC. Results showed that C. glabrata biofilms were more susceptible to Vcz than to Flu and that ERG genes expression evidenced an overexpression of the three ERG genes in the presence of both azoles. The matrix content presented a remarked decrease in proteins and an increase in carbohydrates, namely β-1,3 glucans. Ergosterol was successfully detected and quantified in the biofilm matrices, with no differences in all the considered conditions. Vcz demonstrated better diffusion through the biofilms and better cell penetration capacities, than Flu, indicating that the structure of the drug molecule fully influences its dissemination through the biofilm matrices. This work showed that Vcz is notably more effective than Flu for the treatment of resistant C. glabrata oral biofilms, which demonstrates a clinical relevance in its future use for the treatment of oropharyngeal/esophageal candidiasis caused by this species.

  13. Effect of Helisoma duryi on the survival, growth, and cercarial production of Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata*

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Flemming; Christensen, Niels Ø.

    1977-01-01

    Biological control of the intermediate hosts of S. mansoni and S. haematobium by means of a competitor snail,Helisoma duryi, has been suggested. In the present laboratory study, information was obtained concerning the interspecific competition between H. duryi and B. glabrata. The results indicated that the growth rate, mortality rate, and cercarial production of S. mansoni-infected B. glabrata were highly influenced by H. duryi. These observations agree with results obtained in earlier experiments concerning the interspecific competition between H. duryi and S. mansoni-infected B. pfeifferi. The exact characteristics of the influencing factor have not yet been determined, but the observations indicated that H. duryi could possibly be used as a biological control agent. PMID:303959

  14. Effects of copper sulfate toxicity on cercariae and metacercariae of Echinostoma caproni and Echinostoma trivolvis and on the survival of Biomphalaria glabrata snails.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Aditya; Ponder, Elizabeth L; Fried, Bernard

    2004-12-01

    Copper in the form of copper sulfate (CuSO4) decreases the survival of Biomphalaria glabrata snails, but the effects of this molluscicide on Echinostoma caproni and Echinostoma trivolvis, 2 species of digeneans that use B. glabrata as intermediate hosts, are not known. Studies were done on the effects of various concentrations of CuSO4 in artificial spring water (ASW) on the survival and infectivity of E. caproni and E. trivolvis cercariae. Solutions containing 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01% CuSO4 were 100% lethal within 2 hr of exposure for both species. Time to 50% mortality in 0.001% CuSO4 was 8 hr for E. caproni and 16 hr for E. trivolvis; at 24 hr, the controls showed 50 and 65% mortality, respectively. Treatment of cercariae of both species for 0.5 hr in 0.001% CuSO4 had no effect on the ability of cercariae to form normal cysts in juvenile B. glabrata snails. However, treatment with 0.01% CuSO4 for 0.5 hr caused a significant reduction in the ability of cercariae of both species to encyst in snails. Treatment of encysted metacercariae of both species in 0.001% CuSO4 for I hr had no effect on subsequent excystation of these echinostomes in a trypsin-bile salts medium, whereas concentrations of 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01% CuSO4 and 1.0 and 0.1% CuSO4 decreased chemical excystation of E. caproni and E. trivolvis cysts, respectively. Survival studies on the effects of CuSO4 in Locke's solution on chemically excysted metacercariae of both species were also done. Excysted metacercariae of both species were killed by 2 hr in either 0.1 or 0.01% CuSO4 in Locke's solution. However, time to 50% mortality for both species of excysted metacercariae in 0.001% CuSO4 was approximately 5 hr. Time to 50% mortality for the controls was about 12 hr. Survival of juvenile B. glabrata snails was also examined. All B. glabrata snails were dead by 6 hr in 1 and 0.1% CuSO4 in ASW. Biomphalaria glabrata snails showed 50% mortality by about 6 hr in 0.01% CuSO4 and about 80% were still alive at 24 hr in

  15. Anticandidal effects of voriconazole and caspofungin, singly and in combination, against Candida glabrata, extracellularly and intracellularly in granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-activated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baltch, Aldona L; Bopp, Lawrence H; Smith, Raymond P; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B

    2008-12-01

    The antifungal effects of voriconazole and caspofungin, singly and in combination, were determined against Candida glabrata in time-kill curves in broth, in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in MDMs activated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Three strains of fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata were evaluated. For intracellular studies, MDM monolayers, with or without GM-CSF activation, were infected with C. glabrata and treated with voriconazole and caspofungin at 2.5x and 5x MIC, respectively, or at 1x MIC. Extracellular studies in broth were performed using drug concentrations from 0.1 to 10x MIC. Viable yeast were enumerated at 0, 24 and 48 h. Significantly greater killing of C. glabrata occurred with the drug combination than with either single drug, both intracellularly and extracellularly (P < 0.01). For voriconazole, the antifungal activity in MDM activated by GM-CSF was greater than that in unactivated MDM, regardless of antibiotic concentration or time of exposure. However, for caspofungin and for the two-drug combination, enhanced activity in GM-CSF-activated MDM depended on the drug concentration and time of exposure. Our data suggest that combinations of voriconazole and caspofungin may be efficacious for the treatment of serious C. glabrata infections. With single-drug therapy, especially voriconazole, GM-CSF activation of monocytes could be considered.

  16. Dectin-1 plays an important role in host defense against systemic Candida glabrata infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si Min; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Teng; Huang, Xin; Liu, Xiao Qi; Guo, Shi Yu; Zhao, Jing Jun; Wang, Chun Fang; Yan, Lan; Xu, Guo Tong; Jiang, Yuan Ying; An, Mao Mao

    2017-06-28

    Candida glabrata is the second most common pathogen of severe candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts, following C. albicans. Although C. glabrata and C. albicans belong to the same genus, they are phylogenetically distinct. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), acting as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), play critical roles in host defense against C. albicans infections. However, our understanding of the specific roles of CLRs in host defense against C. glabrata is limited. Here, we explored the potential roles of the C-type lectins Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 in host defense against C. glabrata. We found that both Dectin-1-deficient mice (Dectin-1(-/-)) and Dectin-2-deficient mice (Dectin-2(-/-)) are more susceptible to C. glabrata infection. Dectin-1confers host higher sensitivity for sensing C. glabrata infections, while the effect of Dectin-2 in the host defense against C. glabrata is infection dose dependent. Dectin-1 is required for host myeloid cells recognition, killing of C. glabrata, and development of subsequent Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated adaptive immune response. Significantly impaired inflammatory responses such as inflammatory cells recruitment and cytokines release that were induced by C. glabrata were manifested in Dectin-1-deficient mice. Together, our study demonstrates that Dectin-1 plays an important role in host defense against systemic Candida glabrata infections, indicating a previous unknown control mechanism for this particular type of infection in host. Our study, therefore, provides new insights into the host defense against C. glabrata.

  17. Physiological changes and molluscicidal effects of crude latex and Milin on Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Subhash C; Jagannadham, M V

    2008-04-01

    Euphorbian latex is commonly used as molluscicides and the Euphorbia milii latex was reported as most powerful molluscicidal agents. The physiological and lethal effects of the latex components of Euphorbia milii, on the intermediate host Biomphalaria spp., of the human liver parasite Schistosoma mansoni were described in this study. The standard methodologies for testing plant derived molluscicides formulated by World Health Organisation (WHO) were followed with some modifications. The young specimen of fresh water snails showed altered physiological and physical response towards latex components. The working concentration of non-proteinaceous fraction (up to 0.1%) of the latex reduced the active physiological behaviour but was non-lethal to young specimen of snails. However, proteinaceous fractions (0.1mg/l) of the latex were found lethal to snail population, and lethality was enhanced with small amount of the non-proteinaceous fraction (0.01%) of the latex. Milin, a serine protease(up to 0.1mg/l), isolated from the latex of Euphorbia milii significantly reduced the growth and feeding activity but was not lethal to young specimen of snails. With an addition of 0.01% of non-proteinaceous fractions to Milin, lethality result was similar to that of crude latex. Milin is likely to be responsible for alteration of normal physiological functions and lethality of snails, thus it may be used as a molluscicide to control transmission of the endemic disease schistosomiasis.

  18. Effects of the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl on the reproduction and cholinesterase activity of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Cacciatore, Luis C; Guerrero, Noemí R Verrengia; Cochón, Adriana C

    2011-07-01

    Azinphos-methyl is an organophosphate insecticide used for pest control on a number of food crops in many parts of the world. The snail Biomphalaria glabrata is a freshwater gastropod widely distributed in South America, Central America and Africa. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether azinphos-methyl causes alterations in the reproduction of B. glabrata. To this end, gastropod pigmented specimens were exposed to various concentrations of the insecticide (0.021, 0.5, 2.5, and 5 mg L(-1)) for either 2 or 14 d. Along 14 d, several reproduction parameters and cholinesterase (ChE) activity were evaluated. In each group, the number of egg masses, the number of eggs per mass, the number of hatchings, the time to hatching, and the survival of the offspring after one month of treatment was evaluated. The results showed that, depending on the concentration and time of exposure, azinphos-methyl induced alterations in the reproduction of B. glabrata. These alterations were mainly represented by a decrease in the number of egg masses, and, in some cases, by a lower number or even the total absence of hatchings. Thus, the gastropods exposed to 2.5 and 5 mg L(-1) of azinphos-methyl for 14 d showed ChE inhibitions higher than 35% along time and completely lost their ability to reproduce. On the other hand, exposure to high acute concentrations or exposure to low concentrations for 14 d resulted in ChE inhibition equal to or lower than 35% between 7 and 14 d of treatment and similar alterations in reproduction. These were represented by a decrease in the number of egg masses. At low pestice levels, the number of egg masses and the number of offspring resulted to be more sensitive biomarkers than ChE inhibition. It is concluded that the insecticide azinphos-methyl can cause a decline in the reproductive performance of B. glabrata. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818) and their elimination from this benthic aquatic snail.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo C; Filho, José Sousa; Novais, Luana A; Peternele, Wilson S; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Grisolia, Cesar K

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3) coated with meso-2, 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) stabilizer on the survival and reproduction of the aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata. The cumulative means of egg masses and eggs per individual in the control group at the end of 4 weeks were 18.8 and 326.7, respectively. These values at the concentration of 1 mg/L were 17.2 and 291.6; at 10 mg/L, they were 19.6 and 334.4 ,and at 100 mg/L, they were 14.3 and 311.1. Results showed no significant differences between the tested and the control groups at the level of p < 0.05. Exposure of embryos for 10 days showed absence of mortality, malformation, or hatching delay. X-ray microtomography confirmed the presence of nanoparticles in exposed individuals and showed the complete elimination of the nanoparticles after 30 days in clean water. In the studied conditions, it is clear that γ-Fe2O3 coated with stabilizing DMSA did not alter the fecundity or the fertility of the snail B. glabrata after 4 weeks of exposure, and accumulation was not present after 30 days in clean water.

  20. Nitric oxide production by haemocytes from Mytilus galloprovincialis shows seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Novas, Ana; Barcia, Ramiro; Ramos-Martínez, Juan Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been identified as an important physiological modulator, with evidence of its role as a signalling molecule throughout the whole phylogenetic scale. In marine molluscs, it intervenes in processes related to the immune function of haemocytes. The presented results indicate that basal NO production by haemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis shows seasonal variations, with summer values statistically higher than those of winter. The presence of IL-2 increased NO production in winter. In summer, incubating the haemocytes with TNF-alpha for 6h slightly increased NO production. LPS, TGF-beta1 or PDGF did not induce significant effects on NO production by the haemocytes. Immunoblotting experiments detected two proteins that bind to vertebrate iNOS and eNOS antibodies, with different seasonal expression: the protein that binds to anti-iNOS antibody was expressed throughout the year, whereas the anti-eNOS antibody bound with a protein that was only detected in winter. IL-2 is suggested to start a signalling system dependent on the seasonal presence of winter protein. Such a system would activate the enzyme, thus favouring the higher NO production detected in winter.

  1. Innovative application of classic and newer techniques for the characterization of haemocytes in the New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris).

    PubMed

    Grandiosa, Roffi; Mérien, Fabrice; Pillay, Krish; Alfaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Haemocytes play an important role in innate immune responses within invertebrate organisms. However, identification and quantification of different types of haemocytes can be extremely challenging, and has led to numerous inconsistencies and misinterpretations within the literature. As a step to rectify this issue, we present a comprehensive and detailed approach to characterize haemocytes using a combination of classical (cytochemical and phagocytosis assays with optical microscopy) and novel (flow cytometry with Sysmex XN-1000 and Muse(®) Cell analyser) techniques. The Sysmex XN-1000 is an innovative fluorescent flow cytometric analyser that can effectively detect, identify and count haemocytes, while the Muse(®) Cell analyser provides accurate and rapid haemocyte cell counts and viability. To illustrate this approach, we present the first report on morphological and functional features of New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris) haemocyte cells. Two types of haemocytes were identified in this study, including type I (monocyte-like) and type II (lymphocyte-like) cells. Granular cells, which have been reported in other molluscan species, were not detected in H. iris. Cell types were categorized based on shape, size, internal structures and function. The lymphocyte-like haemocytes were the most abundant hemocytes in the haemolymph samples, and they had large nuclei and basic cytoplasms. Monocyte-like cells generally were larger cells compared to lymphocyte-like cells, and had low nucleus-cytoplasm ratios. Monocyte-like cells showed higher phagocytic activity when encountering Zymosan A particles compared to lymphocyte-like cells. The present study provides a comprehensive and accurate new approach to identify and quantify haemocyte cells for future comparative studies on the immune system of abalone and other molluscan species.

  2. Occurrence of killer Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Helguera, O; Penas Alejandro, De Las; Irene, Castaño

    2012-01-01

    In this work we characterized the occurrence of killer activity in 64 Candida glabrata clinical isolates under different conditions. We found that only 6.25 % of the clinical isolates tested were positive for killer activity against a Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303 sensitive strain. Sensitivity of killer activity to different values of pH and temperatures was analyzed. We found that the killer activity presented by all isolates was resistant to every pH and temperature tested, although optimal activity was found at a range of pH values from 4 to 7 and at 37°C. We did not observe extrachromosomal genetic elements associated with killer activity in any of the positive C. glabrata isolates. The killer effect was due to a decrease in viability and DNA fragmentation in sensitive yeast. PMID:24031902

  3. Cold shock-induced norepinephrine triggers apoptosis of haemocytes via caspase-3 in the white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chyuan; Yeh, Maw-Sheng; Cheng, Winton

    2009-12-01

    The total haemocyte count (THC), haemolymph norepinephrine (NE) level, caspase-3 mRNA expression and activity levels, and apoptotic haemocyte rate were measured when shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (20-25 g) were transferred from 28 to 22 degrees C after 0, 2, and 7 days, and the caspase-3 mRNA expression and activity levels and the apoptotic cell rate of haemocytes, in vitro, were determined after incubation with 2 x 10(-8) M NE for 0, 30, 60, and 120 min at 27 +/- 1.0 degrees C. For shrimp transferred from 28 +/- 1.0 to 22 +/- 0.5 degrees C after 2 and 7 days, the THC decreased by 17.9% and 18.0%, but the NE concentration, caspase-3 transcription and activity levels, and apoptotic cell rate increased by 62.5% and 37.3%, 5100.0% and 446.6%, 148.6% and 152.0%, and 88.7% and 200.1%, respectively, compared to those of shrimp held at 28 +/- 0.5 degrees C which served as the control. Similar tendencies were observed for the apoptotic cell rate, and caspase-3 transcription and activity levels of haemocytes exposed to 2 x 10(-8) M NE in vitro. These results suggest that NE plays an important role in the apoptosis of haemocytes in L. vannamei under hypothermal stress, which causes depressive effects on immunological responses.

  4. A comparative study of haemocytes from resistant and susceptible Lymnaea natalensis snails exposed to Fasciola gigantica miracidia.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Kamelia A; El-Din, Abdel-hakim saad; Gad EL-KAarim, Rasha M

    2014-12-01

    Effect ot infection with Fasciola gigantica on total and differential haemocytes count of resistant and susceptible Lymnaea natalensis snails were studied. Exposure of L. natalensis resistant and susceptible strains to F. gigantica on miracidia caused gradual increase in the number of circulating haemocytes at the same time of exposure. In susceptible strain, the increase in the number of circulating haemocytes became significant at the second week post exposure being 2560 cell/ml (phaemocytes obtained from L. natalensis snails revealed that haemolymph contained three morphological types of haemocytes, designated as round small, round large (hyalinoctyes) and granulocytes spreading. Their average percentage was 12.3±5.5%, 81.0±4.6% and 6.7±2.1% of total cells respectively. Data indicated that by the second day post exposure infected snails had significantly higher percentage of granulocytes than controls.

  5. Candida glabrata: Review of Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Disease with Comparison to C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Fidel, Paul L.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Sobel, Jack D.

    1999-01-01

    Until recently, Candida glabrata was considered a relatively nonpathogenic commensal fungal organism of human mucosal tissues. However, with the increased use of immunosuppressive agents, mucosal and systemic infections caused by C. glabrata have increased significantly, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected population. A major obstacle in C. glabrata infections is their innate resistance to azole antimycotic therapy, which is very effective in treating infections caused by other Candida species. Candida glabrata, formerly known as Torulopsis glabrata, contrasts with other Candida species in its nondimorphic blastoconidial morphology and haploid genome. C. glabrata currently ranks second or third as the causative agent of superficial (oral, esophageal, vaginal, or urinary) or systemic candidal infections, which are often nosocomial. Currently, however, there are few recognized virulence factors of C. glabrata and little is known about the host defense mechanisms that protect against infection. Two established animal models (systemic and vaginal) have been established to study treatment, pathogenesis, and immunity. Treatment of C. glabrata infections can include azoles but often requires amphotericin B or flucytosine. This review summarizes all known clinical and experimental information about C. glabrata infections with comparisons to C. albicans as a means of contrasting the two species commonly observed and emphasizing the many recognized differences. PMID:9880475

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of posaconazole against Candida glabrata in a murine model of vaginitis.

    PubMed

    González, Gloria M; Elizondo, Mariana; Garza-González, Elvira; González, J Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of mucosal infections caused by Candida glabrata has increased significantly. Candida glabrata infections are often resistant to many azole antifungal agents, especially fluconazole. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacies of posaconazole (PSC) and fluconazole (FLC) in the treatment of experimental C. glabrata vaginitis caused by isolates with different FLC susceptibilities. A battery of 36 vaginal isolates of C. glabrata was tested against PSC and FLC to determine their in vitro susceptibilities. The 48-h geometric mean MICs for all isolates tested were 0.156 and 4.238 μg ml(-1) for PSC and FLC respectively. Two strains of C. glabrata for which FLC MICs were different were selected for in vivo study. The treatment regimens for the vaginal murine infection model were PSC or FLC at 10 or 20 mg kg(-1) of body weight/day and 20 mg kg(-1) twice a day. Regimens with PSC at 20 mg kg(-1) once or twice a day were effective in reducing the load of both the FLC-susceptible and -resistant isolates of C. glabrata. FLC at 20 mg kg(-1) twice a day was effective in reducing the load of both the isolates of C. glabrata. PSC displayed a more effective in vivo activity than FLC in the treatment of murine C. glabrata vaginitis. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Effects of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (sod1) Genotype and Genetic Background on Growth, Reproduction and Defense in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Larson, Maureen K.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata to the trematode Schistosoma mansoni is correlated with allelic variation at copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (sod1). We tested whether there is a fitness cost associated with carrying the most resistant allele in three outbred laboratory populations of snails. These three populations were derived from the same base population, but differed in average resistance. Under controlled laboratory conditions we found no cost of carrying the most resistant allele in terms of fecundity, and a possible advantage in terms of growth and mortality. These results suggest that it might be possible to drive resistant alleles of sod1 into natural populations of the snail vector for the purpose of controlling transmission of S. mansoni. However, we did observe a strong effect of genetic background on the association between sod1 genotype and resistance. sod1 genotype explained substantial variance in resistance among individuals in the most resistant genetic background, but had little effect in the least resistant genetic background. Thus, epistatic interactions with other loci may be as important a consideration as costs of resistance in the use of sod1 for vector manipulation. PMID:22724037

  8. The neuroendocrine immunomodulatory axis-like pathway mediated by circulating haemocytes in pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhou, Zhi; Jiang, Qiufen; Yi, Qilin; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2017-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of host. In this study, a neuroendocrine immunomodulatory axis (NIA)-like pathway mediated by the nervous system and haemocytes was characterized in the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Once invaded pathogen was recognized by the host, the nervous system would temporally release neurotransmitters to modulate the immune response. Instead of acting passively, oyster haemocytes were able to mediate neuronal immunomodulation promptly by controlling the expression of specific neurotransmitter receptors on cell surface and modulating their binding sensitivities, thus regulating intracellular concentration of Ca2+. This neural immunomodulation mediated by the nervous system and haemocytes could influence cellular immunity in oyster by affecting mRNA expression level of TNF genes, and humoral immunity by affecting the activities of key immune-related enzymes. In summary, though simple in structure, the ‘nervous-haemocyte’ NIA-like pathway regulates both cellular and humoral immunity in oyster, meaning a world to the effective immune regulation of the NEI network. PMID:28077596

  9. HSP70 expression in Biomphalaria glabrata snails exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    da Silva Cantinha, Rebeca; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Oguiura, Nancy; de Bragança Pereira, Carlos Alberto; Rigolon, Marcela M; Nakano, Eliana

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the effects of the heavy metal cadmium on the stress protein HSP70 are investigated in freshwater mollusks Biomphalaria glabrata. Adult snails were exposed for 96h to CdCl2 at concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 0.7mgL(-1) (LC50/96h=0.34 (0.30-0.37). Time and concentration-dependent increases in the expression of HSP70 were observed at sub-lethal levels in the immunoblotting assay. Further, an increased survival to a lethal heat shock was observed in animals pre-exposed to a nonlethal concentration of cadmium, evidencing the induction of acquired tolerance. The present study demonstrated the inducibility of B. glabrata HSP70 by cadmium, a relevant environmental contaminant, at non-lethal levels, providing evidences that the assessment of HSP70 in B. glabrata can be regarded as a suitable biomarker for ecotoxicological studies.

  10. Seawater acidification induced immune function changes of haemocytes in Mytilus edulis: a comparative study of CO2 and HCl enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tianli; Tang, Xuexi; Jiang, Yongshun; Wang, You

    2017-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of CO2− or HCl-induced seawater acidification (pH 7.7 or 7.1; control: pH 8.1) on haemocytes of Mytilus edulis, and the changes in the structure and immune function were investigated during a 21-day experiment. The results demonstrated that seawater acidification had little effect on the cellular mortality and granulocyte proportion but damaged the granulocyte ultrastructure. Phagocytosis of haemocytes was also significantly inhibited in a clearly concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that the immune function was affected. Moreover, ROS production was significantly induced in both CO2 and HCl treatments, and four antioxidant components, GSH, GST, GR and GPx, had active responses to the acidification stress. Comparatively, CO2 had more severe destructive effects on haemocytes than HCl at the same pH level, indicating that CO2 stressed cells in other ways beyond the increasing H+ concentration. One possible explanation was that seawater acidification induced ROS overproduction, which damaged the ultrastructure of haemocytes and decreased phagocytosis. PMID:28165002

  11. Structure-Guided Development of Efficacious Antifungal Agents Targeting Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2008-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a lethal fungal pathogen resistant to many antifungal agents and has emerged as a critical target for drug discovery. Over the past several years, we have been developing a class of propargyl-linked antifolates as antimicrobials and hypothesized that these compounds could be effective inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from C. glabrata. We initially screened a small collection of these inhibitors and found modest levels of potency. Subsequently, we determined the crystal structure of C. glabrata DHFR bound to a representative inhibitor with data to 1.6 A resolution. Using this structure, we designed and synthesized second-generation inhibitors. These inhibitors bind the C. glabrata DHFR enzyme with subnanomolar potency, display greater than 2000-fold levels of selectivity over the human enzyme, and inhibit the growth of C. glabrata at levels observed with clinically employed therapeutics.

  12. Genetic Transformation of Candida glabrata by Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a method for the transformation by electroporation of the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata). The protocol can be used for transformations in single well or in 96-well microtiter plates. It has been extensively used to generate a genome-scale gene deletion library using the C. glabrata background recipient strain ATCC2001 (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774499

  13. Pinna nobilis: A big bivalve with big haemocytes?

    PubMed

    Matozzo, V; Pagano, M; Spinelli, A; Caicci, F; Faggio, C

    2016-08-01

    The fan mussel Pinna nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) is one of the biggest bivalves worldwide. Currently, no updated information is available in the literature concerning the morpho-functional aspects of haemocytes from this bivalve species. Consequently, in this study, we characterised P. nobilis haemocytes from both a morphological and functional point of view. The mean number of haemocytes was about 5 (×10(5)) cells mL haemolymph(-1), and the cell viability was about 92-100%. Two haemocyte types were distinguished under the light microscope: granulocytes (51.6%), with evident cytoplasmic granules, and hyalinocytes (48.4%), with a few granules. The granules of the granulocytes were mainly lysosomes, as indicated by the in vivo staining with Neutral Red. Haemocytes were further distinguished in basophils (83.75%), acidophils (14.75%) and neutrophils (1.5%). After adhesion to slides and fixation, the cell diameter was approximately 10 μm for granulocytes and 7 μm for hyalinocytes. The granulocytes and hyalinocytes were both positive to the Periodic Acid-Schiff reaction for carbohydrates. Only granulocytes were able to phagocytise yeast cells. The phagocytic index (6%) increased significantly up to twofold after preincubation of yeast in cell-free haemolymph, suggesting that haemolymph has opsonising properties. In addition, haemocytes produce superoxide anion and acid and alkaline phosphatases. Summarising, this preliminary study indicates that both the granulocytes and hyalinocytes circulate in the haemolymph of P. nobilis and that they are active immunocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does the antibiotic amoxicillin affect haemocyte parameters in non-target aquatic invertebrates? The clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis as model organisms.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; Bertin, Valeria; Battistara, Margherita; Guidolin, Angelica; Masiero, Luciano; Marisa, Ilaria; Orsetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is one of the most widely used antibiotics worldwide, and its levels in aquatic ecosystems are expected to be detectable. At present, information concerning the toxic effects of AMX on non-target aquatic organisms, such as bivalves, is scarce. Consequently, in this study, we investigated for the first time the effects of AMX on the haemocyte parameters of two bivalve species, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, which share the same habitat in the Lagoon of Venice, in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the two species. The bivalves were exposed to 100, 200 and 400 μg AMX/L for 1, 3 and 7 days, and the effects on the total haemocyte count (THC), the diameter and volume of the haemocytes, haemocyte proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in cell-free haemolymph, the haemolymph pH, and the formation of micronuclei were evaluated. The actual concentrations of AMX in the seawater samples from the experimental tanks were also measured. Overall, the obtained results demonstrated that AMX affected slightly the haemocyte parameters of bivalves. In addition, no clear differences in terms of sensitivity to AMX exposure were recorded between the two bivalve species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) modulates adhesive properties of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Tomičić, Zorica; Zupan, Jure; Matos, Tadeja; Raspor, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Following the widespread use of immunosuppressive therapy together with broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy, the frequency of mucosal and systemic infections caused by the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata has increased in the past decades. Due to the resistance of C. glabrata to existing azole drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) on C. glabrata adhesion at different temperatures, pH values, and in the presence of fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B. We also studied the adhesion of C. glabrata co-culture with Candida krusei, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two bacterial probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei The method used to assess adhesion was crystal violet staining. Our results showed that despite the nonadhesiveness of S. boulardii cells, this probiotic significantly affected the adherence ability of C. glabrata This effect was highly dependent on C. glabrata strain and was either antagonistic or synergistic. Regarding the extrinsic factors, temperature did not indicate any significant influence on this S. boulardii modulatory effect, while at high pH and at increased concentrations of antimycotics, S. boulardii did not manage to repress the adhesion of C. glabrata strains. The experiments of C. glabrata co-cultures with other species showed that the adhesiveness of two separate cultures could not be used to predict the adhesiveness of their co-culture. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Active JNK-dependent secretion of Drosophila Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase by loser cells recruits haemocytes during cell competition.

    PubMed

    Casas-Tintó, Sergio; Lolo, Fidel-Nicolás; Moreno, Eduardo

    2015-12-11

    Cell competition is a process by which the slow dividing cells (losers) are recognized and eliminated from growing tissues. Loser cells are extruded from the epithelium and engulfed by the haemocytes, the Drosophila macrophages. However, how macrophages identify the dying loser cells is unclear. Here we show that apoptotic loser cells secrete Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which is best known as a core component of the translational machinery. Secreted TyrRS is cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases generating MiniTyr and EMAP fragments. EMAP acts as a guiding cue for macrophage migration in the Drosophila larvae, as it attracts the haemocytes to the apoptotic loser cells. JNK signalling and Kish, a component of the secretory pathway, are autonomously required for the active secretion of TyrRS by the loser cells. Altogether, this mechanism guarantees effective removal of unfit cells from the growing tissue.

  17. Haemocytes control stem cell activity in the Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Ayyaz, Arshad; Li, Hongjie; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-06-01

    Coordination of stem cell activity with inflammatory responses is critical for regeneration and homeostasis of barrier epithelia. The temporal sequence of cell interactions during injury-induced regeneration is only beginning to be understood. Here we show that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are regulated by macrophage-like haemocytes during the early phase of regenerative responses of the Drosophila intestinal epithelium. On tissue damage, haemocytes are recruited to the intestine and secrete the BMP homologue DPP, inducing ISC proliferation by activating the type I receptor Saxophone and the Smad homologue SMOX. Activated ISCs then switch their response to DPP by inducing expression of Thickveins, a second type I receptor that has previously been shown to re-establish ISC quiescence by activating MAD. The interaction between haemocytes and ISCs promotes infection resistance, but also contributes to the development of intestinal dysplasia in ageing flies. We propose that similar interactions influence pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer in humans.

  18. Cytometric, morphologic and enzymatic characterisation of haemocytes in Anodonta cygnea.

    PubMed

    Soares-da-Silva, I M; Ribeiro, J; Valongo, C; Pinto, R; Vilanova, M; Bleher, R; Machado, J

    2002-07-01

    The haemocytes in bivalve mussels are involved in many processes such as lesion repair, shell repair, elimination of small particles and toxic substances. In Anodonta cygnea there are two categories of haemolymph cells, the granulocytes and hyalinocytes. Two groups of cells were identified by flow cytometry and morphological studies: one with larger size and granularity representing 75%, and another group of cells (25%) which were approximately half the size. The cytochemical reactions showed peroxidase activity in the larger cells and a weak prophenoloxidase activity in the smaller cells. These characteristics suggest that the most common haemocytes are granulocytes and hyalinocytes are less common. Enzymatic studies showed clear activities of few enzymes in different compartments of the mantle. Both haemocytes presented significant variations for alpha-manosidase and beta-glucurosidase activities depending on the acid or alkaline pH. Almost all were sensitive to the pH changes, mainly the beta-galactosidase in the haemolymph plasma. On the contrary, the same enzymatic analysis in the extrapallial elements showed more stabilised activities. The simulation of acidic and alkaline condition with the observation of significant morphological and enzymatic activity changes, allow us to speculate some functional role, mainly in the haemolymph elements. The granulocytes may be speculated to have intense involvement in the digestion of small residues with the formation of calcareous stores while the hyalinocytes are more responsible for the elimination of soluble cytotoxic compounds.

  19. Mercury induced haemocyte alterations in the terrestrial snail Cantareus apertus as novel biomarker.

    PubMed

    Leomanni, Alessandro; Schettino, Trifone; Calisi, Antonio; Lionetto, Maria Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the response of a suite of cellular and biochemical markers in the terrestrial snail Cantareus apertus exposed to mercury in view of future use as sensitive tool suitable for mercury polluted soil monitoring and assessment. Besides standardized biomarkers (metallothionein, acetylcholinesterase, and lysosomal membrane stability) novel cellular biomarkers on haemolymph cells were analyzed, including changes in the spread cells/round cells ratio and haemocyte morphometric alterations. The animals were exposed for 14 days to Lactuca sativa soaked for 1h in HgCl2 solutions (0.5 e 1 μM). The temporal dynamics of the responses were assessed by measurements at 3, 7 and 14 days. Following exposure to HgCl2 a significant alteration in the relative frequencies of round cells and spread cells was evident, with a time and dose-dependent increase of the frequencies of round cells with respect to spread cells. These changes were accompanied by cellular morphometric alterations. Concomitantly, a high correspondence between these cellular responses and metallothionein tissutal concentration, lysosomal membrane stability and inhibition of AChE was evident. The study highlights the usefulness of the terrestrial snail C. apertus as bioindicator organism for mercury pollution biomonitoring and, in particular, the use of haemocyte alterations as a suitable biomarker of pollutant effect to be included in a multibiomarker strategy.

  20. Morphological characterization and functional immune response of the carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus) haemocytes after bacterial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Prado-Alvarez, M; Romero, A; Balseiro, P; Dios, S; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2012-01-01

    The morphology and functionality of Ruditapes decussatus haemocytes have been characterized by light microscopy and flow cytometry, leading to the identification of three different cellular subpopulations. Granulocytes were the largest cells, the hyalinocytes were smaller and contained fewer granules and the intermediate cells showed a size similar to hyalinocytes and a higher number of granules. The phagocytosis of different particles and the associated production of oxygen radicals were measured by flow cytometric methods. Granulocytes were the most active cells, followed by the intermediate cells and hyalinocytes. The effect of stimulation of haemocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with a heat inactivated bacterial mixture or with the infection of Vibrio splendidus on the cell viability and the expression of selected immune-related genes were studied. While significant low levels of damaged cells were registered in LPS-stimulated cells, the treatment with dead bacteria or V. splendidus reduced cell viability 1 h, 3 h and 6 h after treatment. The stimulation of haemocytes with LPS and dead bacteria induced changes in the expression of defender against cell death (DAD-1), thrombin, prosaposin, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), factor B and C3 complement component.

  1. Protein expression profiling in haemocytes and plasma of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in response to infection with Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Boo, S; Villalba, A; Cao, A

    2016-11-01

    The protein expression profiling in clam haemocytes and plasma in response to Perkinsus olseni was addressed. Adult Manila clams from a P. olseni-free bed were experimentally challenged with parasite zoospores to analyse immune response. In another experiment, the effects of longer term infection were assessed in adult clams collected from a P. olseni-affected bed, by comparing moderate to very heavily infected clams with non-infected ones. Haemocyte and plasma proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis; spot patterns were qualitatively compared between treatments within each experiment and the spots indicating differential protein expression associated with P. olseni challenge or with field infection were processed for protein identification. Fifteen clam proteins (four in haemocytes and eleven in plasma) of which expression was markedly affected by P. olseni were identified. Some of the identified proteins have a well-known role in clam immune response against the parasite, such as lysozyme and lectins. Rho GTPase-activating protein 6 could be a marker of resistance against P. olseni, which should be further studied. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dose escalation studies with caspofungin against Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Domán, Marianna; Kovács, Renátó; Perlin, David S; Kardos, Gábor; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Juhász, Béla; Bozó, Aliz; Majoros, László

    2015-09-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as first-line agents against invasive fungal infections caused by Candida glabrata, which still carry a high mortality rate. Dose escalation of echinocandins has been suggested to improve the clinical outcome against C. glabrata. To address this possibility, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments with caspofungin against four WT C. glabrata clinical isolates, a drug-susceptible ATCC 90030 reference strain and two echinocandin-resistant strains with known FKS mutations. MIC values for the clinical isolates in RPMI 1640 were ≤ 0.03 mg l(-1 ) but increased to 0.125-0.25 mg l(-1 )in RPMI 1640+50% serum. In RPMI 1640+50% serum, the replication of C. glabrata was weaker than in RPMI 1640.Caspofungin in RPMI 1640 at 1 and 4 mg l(-1) showed a fungicidal effect within 7 h against three of the four clinical isolates but was only fungistatic at 16 and 32 mg l(-1) (paradoxically decreased killing activity). In RPMI 1640+50% serum, caspofungin at ≥ 1 mg l(-1) was rapidly fungicidal (within 3.31 h) against three of the four isolates. In a profoundly neutropenic murine model, all caspofungin doses (1, 2, 3, 5 and 20 mg kg(-1) daily) decreased the fungal tissue burdens significantly (P < 0.05-0.001) without statistical differences between doses, but the mean fungal tissue burdens never fell below 105 cells (g tissue)(-1). The echinocandin-resistant strains were highly virulent in animal models and all doses were ineffective. These results confirm the clinical experience that caspofungin dose escalation does not improve efficacy.

  3. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection.

  4. Structure and classification of haemocytes in the bivalve mollusc Meretrix meretrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Ren, Sulian; Wang, Dexiu; Song, Weibo

    2006-04-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out in order to characterize haemocytes in the bivalve molluse Meretrix meretrix. According to nucleus and cytoplasm characters, four types of haemocytes were recognized: agranular haemocytes, lymphoid haemocyte, large granular and small granular haemocytes. Agranular hamocyte is the main cell type, accounting for 75%. It is agranular with rich organelles in cytoplasm, including mitochondria, golgi body and endoplasmic reticulum. Glycogen deposits were usually found in this cell type. The number of lymphoid haemocyte accounts for 1% 2%. This cell type is agranular and shows a high ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm. A few organelles were found. High electrondense granules with diameters of 0.2 0.5 μm and rich organelles were found in small granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 15%. Rich granules of high electron-dense with diameters of 0.8 2.4 μm were found in large granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 10%, and the quantity of organelles is the least.

  5. Structure and classification of haemocytes in the bivalve mollusc Meretrix meretrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanyan, Zhang; Sulian, Ren; Dexiu, Wang; Weibo, Song

    2006-04-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out in order to characterize haemocytes in the bivalve molluse Meretrix meretrix. According to nucleus and cytoplasm characters, four types of haemocytes were recognized: agranular haemocytes, lymphoid haemocyte, large granular and small granular haemocytes. Agranular hamocyte is the main cell type, accounting for 75%. It is agranular with rich organelles in cytoplasm, including mitochondria, golgi body and endoplasmic reticulum. Glycogen deposits were usually found in this cell type. The number of lymphoid haemocyte accounts for 1%-2%. This cell type is agranular and shows a high ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm. A few organelles were found. High electrondense granules with diameters of 0.2-0.5 μm and rich organelles were found in small granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 15%. Rich granules of high electron-dense with diameters of 0.8-2.4 μm were found in large granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 10%, and the quantity of organelles is the least.

  6. Resistance reversal induced by a combination of fluconazole and tacrolimus (FK506) in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Zuozhong; Zhang, Caiqing; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing concern about Candida glabrata due to its high isolation frequency in candidiasis recently and notorious drug resistance to fluconazole. Drug combination is one effective approach to counteract drug resistance. This study aimed to test whether a combination of fluconazole and tacrolimus (FK506) had a synergistic effect on C. glabrata, and to seek the potential mechanisms underlying the synergistic effects. In vitro effects of fluconazole and FK506 against C. glabrata with different susceptibilities were investigated by a chequerboard method and a time-kill curve method. The mechanistic studies against the resistant C. glabrata were performed from two aspects: quantification of expression levels of fluconazole resistance genes (ERG11, CDR1, PDH1 and SNQ2) by real-time quantitative PCR and functional assays of drug efflux pumps. The addition of FK506 resulted in a decrease in the MIC of fluconazole from 32 to 8 µg ml(-1) against the dose-dependent susceptible C. glabrata, and from 256 to 16 µg ml(-1) against the resistant C. glabrata, respectively. The synergy was further confirmed by the time-kill assay. The expression levels of the ERG11 and SNQ2 genes were significantly downregulated after exposure to the drug combination, whereas that of the CDR1 gene was significantly upregulated, and no significant change in expression of PDH1 gene was observed. Flow cytometric assays showed that FK506 reduced the efflux of fluconazole. Tacrolimus enhanced the susceptibility of fluconazole against resistant C. glabrata by reducing the expression levels of the ERG11 and SNQ2 genes and inhibiting fluconazole efflux.

  7. The roles of serine protease, intracellular and extracellular phenoloxidase in activation of prophenoloxidase system, and characterization of phenoloxidase from shrimp haemocytes induced by lipopolysaccharide or dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Peng; Pan, Luqing; Xu, Wujie; Yue, Feng

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dopamine (DA) on the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system of Litopenaeus vannamei. LPS and DA were shown with a negative dose-dependent effect on hyalne cells (HC), semi-granular cells (SGC), large granular cells (LGC), and total haemocyte count (THC). When haemocytes were treated with LPS or DA, serine proteinase activity and intracellular phenoloxidase (PO) activity were significantly reduced, but extracellular PO activity increased significantly. These findings indicated that the reduction in haemocyte counts was mainly because of the degranulation and activation of the proPO system from semi-granule and large granule cells. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, and the TPK inhibitor, genistein, had an inhibitory effect on extracellular PO activity, while serine proteinase and intracellular PO activity increased. This suggests that the LPS and DA induce the activation of proPO in haemocytes via PKC and TPK-related signaling pathways, but serine proteinase may be activated only by PKC, as the genistein effects were not statistically significant. Electrophoresis analysis revealed that POs induced by LPS or DA have the same molecular mass and high diphenolase activity. Two PO bands at 526 kDa and 272 kDa were observed in PAGE, while in the haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), only a 272-kDa band was observed. This band was resolved after SDS-PAGE under non-reducing and reducing conditions into two groups of POs, 166 kDa and 126 kDa, and 78.1 kDa and 73.6 kDa, respectively, suggesting that PO in L. vannamei is an oligomer, which may have different compositions intra- and extracellularly.

  8. Comparison of haemocytic parameters among flat oyster Ostrea edulis stocks with different susceptibility to bonamiosis and the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Comesaña, Pilar; Casas, Sandra M; Cao, Asunción; Abollo, Elvira; Arzul, Isabelle; Morga, Benjamin; Villalba, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Farming of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis in Europe is severely constrained by the protozoan Bonamia ostreae. The introduction of the resistant species Crassostrea gigas has been a relief for the farmers, while the pilot programmes to select O. edulis strains resistant to bonamiosis performed in various countries can be seen as a promising strategy to minimise the effects of bonamiosis. However, the physiological bases of this differential susceptibility remain unknown. A search for an explanation of the intra and interspecific differences in oyster susceptibility to bonamiosis was accomplished by comparing some immune parameters among various O. edulis stocks and C. gigas. On December 2003, naïve and Bonamia-relatively resistant flat oysters from Ireland, Galician flat oysters and Pacific oysters C. gigas were deployed in a Galician area affected by bonamiosis; haemolymph samples were taken in February and May 2004. A new oyster deployment at the same place was carried out on June 2004 and haemolymph sampling was performed on April 2005. On November 2004, new sets of Irish flat oysters and C. gigas were deployed in Ireland and haemolymph sampling was performed in June 2005. Various haemocytic parameters were measured: total and differential haemocyte count, phagocytic ability, respiratory burst (superoxide anion [O(2)(-)] and hydrogen peroxide [H(2)O(2)]) and nitric oxide [NO] production. The comparison of the parameters was carried out at 3 levels: (1) between O. edulis and C. gigas, (2) among O. edulis stocks with different susceptibility to bonamiosis, and (3) between Bonamia-infected and non infected O. edulis. In addition, haemocyte-B. ostreaein vitro encounters were performed to analyse interspecific differences in the haemocytic respiratory burst, using flow cytometry. Significant differences associated with total and differential haemocyte count, and respiratory burst between O. edulis and C. gigas were detected, which could be linked to differences in

  9. [Evaluation of a rapid trehalase test for the identification of Candida glabrata].

    PubMed

    Kirdar, Sevin; Gültekin, Berna; Evcil, Gonca; Ozkütük, Aydan; Sener, Asli Gamze; Aydin, Neriman

    2009-04-01

    Candida species which cause local infections, may also lead to fatal systemic infections. The increasing incidence of non-albicans Candida, especially fluconazole susceptible or resistant dose-dependent C. glabrata, increased the importance of rapid and accurate species level identification for Candida. Rapid and correct identification of C. glabrata is essential for the initiation of the appropriate antifungal therapy. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the rapid trehalase test in the diagnosis of C. glabrata isolates. A total of 173 Candida strains isolated from various clinical specimens and identified according to germ tube test, growth on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and the colony morphologies on Mast-CHROMagar Candida medium (Mast Diagnostics, UK), were included to the study. The identification of non-albicans Candida species were also confirmed by API 20CAUX (BioMerieux, France) system. Accordingly 86 (50%) of the isolates were identified as C. glabrata, 48 (28%) C. albicans, 17 (10%) C. krusei, 13 (8%) C. tropicalis, 5 (3%) C. parapsilosis, 3 (2%) C. kefyr and 1 (1%) Cutilis. In order to detect the presence of trehalase enzyme in Condida strains, all isolates were grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing 4% glucose and then one yeast colony was emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Presence of glucose which emerged after the action of trehalase on trehalose, was detected by a commercial "urinary glucose detection dipstick" (Spinreacta, Spain). All C. glabrata strains yielded positive result by trehalase test. None C. glabrata isolates were found negative by trehalase test except for one strain of C. tropicalis. In this study, the trehalase test allowed identification of C. globrata with 100% sensitivity and 98.9% specificity. It was concluded that trehalase test is a rapid, cost-effective and simple test that can be used for the accurate identification of C. glabrata.

  10. MALDI-TOF typing highlights geographical and fluconazole resistance clusters in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Dhieb, C; Normand, A C; Al-Yasiri, M; Chaker, E; El Euch, D; Vranckx, K; Hendrickx, M; Sadfi, N; Piarroux, R; Ranque, S

    2015-06-01

    Utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra for Candida glabrata typing would be a cost-effective and easy-to-use alternative to classical DNA-based typing methods. This study aimed to use MALDI-TOF for the typing of C. glabrata clinical isolates from various geographical origins and test its capacity to differentiate between fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant strains.Both microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and MALDI-TOF mass spectra of 58 C. glabrata isolates originating from Marseilles (France) and Tunis (Tunisia) as well as collection strains from diverse geographic origins were analyzed. The same analysis was conducted on a subset of C. glabrata isolates that were either susceptible (MIC ≤ 8 mg/l) or resistant (MIC ≥ 64 mg/l) to fluconazole.According to the seminal results, both MALDI-TOF and MLP classifications could highlight C. glabrata population structures associated with either geographical dispersal barriers (p < 10(-5)) or the selection of antifungal drug resistance traits (<10(-5)).In conclusion, MALDI-TOF geographical clustering was congruent with MPL genotyping and highlighted a significant population genetic structure according to fluconazole susceptibility in C. glabrata. Furthermore, although MALDI-TOF and MLP resulted in distinct classifications, MALDI-TOF also classified the isolates with respect to their fluconazole susceptibility profile. Further prospective studies are required to evaluate the capacity of MALDI-TOF typing to investigate C. glabrata infection outbreaks and predict the antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical laboratory isolates.

  11. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  12. Potassium Uptake Mediated by Trk1 Is Crucial for Candida glabrata Growth and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Llopis-Torregrosa, Vicent; Hušeková, Barbora; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of potassium homeostasis is crucial for all types of cells, including Candida glabrata. Three types of plasma-membrane systems mediating potassium influx with different transport mechanisms have been described in yeasts: the Trk1 uniporter, the Hak cation-proton symporter and the Acu ATPase. The C. glabrata genome contains only one gene encoding putative system for potassium uptake, the Trk1 uniporter. Therefore, its importance in maintaining adequate levels of intracellular potassium appears to be critical for C. glabrata cells. In this study, we first confirmed the potassium-uptake activity of the identified gene’s product by heterologous expression in a suitable S. cerevisiae mutant, further we generated a corresponding deletion mutant in C. glabrata and analysed its phenotype in detail. The obtained results show a pleiotropic effect on the cell physiology when CgTRK1 is deleted, affecting not only the ability of trk1Δ to grow at low potassium concentrations, but also the tolerance to toxic alkali-metal cations and cationic drugs, as well as the membrane potential and intracellular pH. Taken together, our results find the sole potassium uptake system in C. glabrata cells to be a promising target in the search for its specific inhibitors and in developing new antifungal drugs. PMID:27058598

  13. A strategy to prevent the occurrence of Lactobacillus strains using lactate-tolerant yeast Candida glabrata in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Itsuki; Nakamura, Toshihide; Shima, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Contamination of Lactobacillus sp. in the fermentation broth of bioethanol production decreases ethanol production efficiency. Although the addition of lactate to the broth can effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sp., it also greatly reduces the fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this conflict, lactate-tolerant yeast strains were screened. Candida glabrata strain NFRI 3164 was found to exhibit both higher levels of lactate tolerance and fermentation ability. Co-cultivation of C. glabrata was performed with Lactobacillus brevis and Lb. fermentum, which were reported as major contaminating bacteria during bioethanol production, in culture medium containing 2% lactate. Under these culture conditions, the growth of Lactobacillus strains was greatly inhibited, but the ethanol production of C. glabrata was not significantly affected. Our data show the possibility of designing an effective fuel ethanol production process that eliminates contamination by Lactobacillus strains through the combined use of lactate addition and C. glabrata.

  14. Growth, biofilm formation, antifungal susceptibility and oxidative stress resistance of Candida glabrata are affected by different glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzu Shan; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Sandai, Doblin; Chong, Pei Pei; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2016-06-01

    Glucose is an important fuel source to support many living organisms. Its importance in the physiological fitness and pathogenicity of Candida glabrata, an emerging human fungal pathogen has not been extensively studied. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of glucose on the growth, biofilm formation, antifungal susceptibility and oxidative stress resistance of C. glabrata. In addition, its effect on the expression of a putative high affinity glucose sensor gene, SNF3 was also investigated. Glucose concentrations were found to exert effects on the physiological responses of C. glabrata. The growth rate of the species correlated positively to the amount of glucose. In addition, low glucose environments were found to induce C. glabrata to form biofilm and resist amphotericin B. Conversely, high glucose environments promoted oxidative stress resistance of C. glabrata. The expression of CgSNF3 was found to be significantly up-regulated in low glucose environments. The expression of SNF3 gene in clinical isolates was found to be higher compared to ATCC laboratory strains in low glucose concentrations, which may explain the better survivability of clinical isolates in the low glucose environment. These observations demonstrated the impact of glucose in directing the physiology and virulence fitness of C. glabrata through the possible modulation by SNF3 as a glucose sensor, which in turn aids the species to adapt, survive and thrive in hostile host environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Trichobilharzia regenti (Digenea: Schistosomatidae) on the Defence Activity of Radix lagotis (Lymnaeidae) Haemocytes

    PubMed Central

    Skála, Vladimír; Černíková, Alena; Jindrová, Zuzana; Kašný, Martin; Vostrý, Martin; Walker, Anthony J.; Horák, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Radix lagotis is an intermediate snail host of the nasal bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti. Changes in defence responses in infected snails that might be related to host-parasite compatibility are not known. This study therefore aimed to characterize R. lagotis haemocyte defence mechanisms and determine the extent to which they are modulated by T. regenti. Histological observations of R. lagotis infected with T. regenti revealed that early phases of infection were accompanied by haemocyte accumulation around the developing larvae 2–36 h post exposure (p.e.) to the parasite. At later time points, 44–92 h p.e., no haemocytes were observed around T. regenti. Additionally, microtubular aggregates likely corresponding to phagocytosed ciliary plates of T. regenti miracidia were observed within haemocytes by use of transmission electron microscopy. When the infection was in the patent phase, haemocyte phagocytic activity and hydrogen peroxide production were significantly reduced in infected R. lagotis when compared to uninfected counterparts, whereas haemocyte abundance increased in infected snails. At a molecular level, protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) were found to play an important role in regulating these defence reactions in R. lagotis. Moreover, haemocytes from snails with patent infection displayed lower PKC and ERK activity in cell adhesion assays when compared to those from uninfected snails, which may therefore be related to the reduced defence activities of these cells. These data provide the first integrated insight into the immunobiology of R. lagotis and demonstrate modulation of haemocyte-mediated responses in patent T. regenti infected snails. Given that immunomodulation occurs during patency, interference of snail-host defence by T. regenti might be important for the sustained production and/or release of infective cercariae. PMID:25372492

  16. Host haemocyte inactivation by an insect parasitoid: transient expression of a polydnavirus gene.

    PubMed

    Asgari, S; Hellers, M; Schmidt, O

    1996-10-01

    Polydnaviruses produced by the hymenopteran endoparasitoid Cotesia rubecula are deposited together with the egg into the lepidopteran host Pieris rapae and are apparently involved in the suppression of the host's defence system. Around 6 h post-parasitization host haemocytes change their surface properties, actin cytoskeleton structure and adhesion properties. Here we show that a single polydnavirus gene is expressed inside the caterpillar haemocytes in a transient fashion between 4 to 8 h post-parasitization.

  17. Influence of Trichobilharzia regenti (Digenea: Schistosomatidae) on the defence activity of Radix lagotis (Lymnaeidae) Haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skála, Vladimír; Černíková, Alena; Jindrová, Zuzana; Kašný, Martin; Vostrý, Martin; Walker, Anthony J; Horák, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Radix lagotis is an intermediate snail host of the nasal bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti. Changes in defence responses in infected snails that might be related to host-parasite compatibility are not known. This study therefore aimed to characterize R. lagotis haemocyte defence mechanisms and determine the extent to which they are modulated by T. regenti. Histological observations of R. lagotis infected with T. regenti revealed that early phases of infection were accompanied by haemocyte accumulation around the developing larvae 2-36 h post exposure (p.e.) to the parasite. At later time points, 44-92 h p.e., no haemocytes were observed around T. regenti. Additionally, microtubular aggregates likely corresponding to phagocytosed ciliary plates of T. regenti miracidia were observed within haemocytes by use of transmission electron microscopy. When the infection was in the patent phase, haemocyte phagocytic activity and hydrogen peroxide production were significantly reduced in infected R. lagotis when compared to uninfected counterparts, whereas haemocyte abundance increased in infected snails. At a molecular level, protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) were found to play an important role in regulating these defence reactions in R. lagotis. Moreover, haemocytes from snails with patent infection displayed lower PKC and ERK activity in cell adhesion assays when compared to those from uninfected snails, which may therefore be related to the reduced defence activities of these cells. These data provide the first integrated insight into the immunobiology of R. lagotis and demonstrate modulation of haemocyte-mediated responses in patent T. regenti infected snails. Given that immunomodulation occurs during patency, interference of snail-host defence by T. regenti might be important for the sustained production and/or release of infective cercariae.

  18. The snail (Biomphalaria glabrata) genome project.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Nithya; Knight, Matty

    2006-04-01

    In 2001, ideas for a snail genome project were discussed at the American Society of Parasitologists meeting (New Mexico) and a snail genome consortium was subsequently established (the first consortium meeting was held in 2005). A proposal for sequencing the snail genome was submitted to the National Human Genome Research Institute, and Biomphalaria glabrata was prioritized as a non-mammalian sequencing target in 2004. The sequencing of the genome of this medically important snail is now underway.

  19. Histidine degradation via an aminotransferase increases the nutritional flexibility of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Brunke, Sascha; Seider, Katja; Richter, Martin Ernst; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Ramachandra, Shruthi; Kiehntopf, Michael; Brock, Matthias; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    The ability to acquire nutrients during infections is an important attribute in microbial pathogenesis. Amino acids are a valuable source of nitrogen if they can be degraded by the infecting organism. In this work, we analyzed histidine utilization in the fungal pathogen of humans Candida glabrata. Hemiascomycete fungi, like C. glabrata or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possess no gene coding for a histidine ammonia-lyase, which catalyzes the first step of a major histidine degradation pathway in most other organisms. We show that C. glabrata instead initializes histidine degradation via the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8. Although ARO8 is also present in S. cerevisiae and is induced by extracellular histidine, the yeast cannot use histidine as its sole nitrogen source, possibly due to growth inhibition by a downstream degradation product. Furthermore, C. glabrata relies only on Aro8 for phenylalanine and tryptophan utilization, since ARO8, but not its homologue ARO9, was transcriptionally activated in the presence of these amino acids. Accordingly, an ARO9 deletion had no effect on growth with aromatic amino acids. In contrast, in S. cerevisiae, ARO9 is strongly induced by tryptophan and is known to support growth on aromatic amino acids. Differences in the genomic structure of the ARO9 gene between C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae indicate a possible disruption in the regulatory upstream region. Thus, we show that, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata has adapted to use histidine as a sole source of nitrogen and that the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8, but not Aro9, is the enzyme required for this process.

  20. Differential expression of small RNA pathway genes associated with the Biomphalaria glabrata/Schistosoma mansoni interaction.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Fábio Ribeiro; Silva, Luciana Maria; Jeremias, Wander de Jesus; Babá, Élio Hideo; Caldeira, Roberta Lima; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Gomes, Matheus de Souza

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that approximately 240 million people in 78 countries require treatment for schistosomiasis, an endemic disease caused by trematodes of the genus Schistosoma. In Brazil, Schistosoma mansoni is the only species representative of the genus whose passage through an invertebrate host, snails of the genus Biomphalaria, is obligatory before infecting a mammalian host, including humans. The availability of the genome and transcriptome of B. glabrata makes studying the regulation of gene expression, particularly the regulation of miRNA and piRNA processing pathway genes, possible. This might assist in better understanding the biology of B. glabrata as well as its relationship to the parasite S. mansoni. Some aspects of this interaction are still poorly explored, including the participation of non-coding small RNAs, such as miRNAs and piRNAs, with lengths varying from 18 to 30 nucleotides in mature form, which are potent regulators of gene expression. Using bioinformatics tools and quantitative PCR, we characterized and validated the miRNA and piRNA processing pathway genes in B. glabrata. In silico analyses showed that genes involved in miRNA and piRNA pathways were highly conserved in protein domain distribution, catalytic site residue conservation and phylogenetic analysis. Our study showed differential expression of putative Argonaute, Drosha, Piwi, Exportin-5 and Tudor genes at different snail developmental stages and during infection with S. mansoni, suggesting that the machinery is required for miRNA and piRNA processing in B. glabrata at all stages. These data suggested that the silencing pathway mediated by miRNAs and piRNAs can interfere in snail biology throughout the life cycle of the snail, thereby influencing the B. glabrata/S. mansoni interaction. Further studies are needed to confirm the participation of the small RNA processing pathway proteins in the parasite/host relationship, mainly the effective

  1. The separation and characterisation of haemocytes from the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Pipe, R K; Farley, S R; Coles, J A

    1997-09-01

    The separation of haemocytes from the mussel Mytilus edulis was carried out on continuous Percoll gradients. The haemocytes separated into three distinct layers, the first comprised 97% basophilic cells, the third comprised 84% eosinophilic cells and the middle layer was a mixture of eosinophilic and basophilic cells. Enzyme cytochemistry demonstrated arylsulphatase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase associated with the haemocytes from the third layer. Lectin-binding studies showed differential binding of lectins to the separated cells. The ultrastructural morphology demonstrated that the first layer of cells was composed predominantly of small agranular cells with a high nucleus to cytoplasm ratio. The second layer comprised a mixture of cells with the majority being granular cells with small granules. The third layer was almost exclusively composed of granular cells with small and large granules. Assays to assess the function of the different cells demonstrated that respiratory burst activity, measured as the reduction of cytochrome-c, was carried out almost entirely by the eosinophilic haemocytes. Similarly, levels of phagocytosis, measured as uptake of Escherichia coli, were much higher in the eosinophilic haemocytes. Of the potential mitogenic factors investigated, concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen showed some evidence of inducing haemocyte proliferation.

  2. Cyclic AMP affects the haemocyte responses of larval Galleria mellonella to selected antigens.

    PubMed

    Marin, David; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2005-05-01

    Signal transduction of the innate immediate responses of insect haemocytes to foreign matter is rarely considered. Herein using a combination of adenylate cyclase inhibitors and activators and phosphodiesterase inhibitors we determined that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at high levels normally impairs non-self response. Haemocyte contact with glass and bacteria lowered cAMP in vitro. Inactive phosphodiesterases, including type 4, impaired haemocyte reactions in vitro. Using the drugs in vivo to modulate adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases altered the total and types of haemocytes. Adenylate cyclase inhibitors and etazolate (a type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor) alone produced changes in the haemograms similar to those caused by Bacillus subtilis. Sequential injections of an enzyme modulator followed by B. subtilis impaired bacterial removal due (1) in the case of enzyme inhibitors, to the removal of haemocytes prior to bacterial challenge and (2) in the case of forskolin and IBMX to the shut-down of the haemocytes. Activating adenylate cyclase or inhibiting phosphodiesterase impaired bacterial removal when co-injecting the compounds and bacteria.

  3. Candida glabrata infection in gastric carcinoma patient mimicking cutaneous histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Gugic, Dijana; Cleary, Timothy; Vincek, Vladimir

    2008-02-28

    Candida glabrata is the second most common Candida species detected among hospitalized patients in USA. In tissue C. glabrata present as yeasts, 3-5 microns in size, which are difficult to visualize on H&E stained slides but can be detected on Grocott methenamine silver (GMS) stained slides. The presence of yeasts only, without any hyphal elements, makes C. glabrata difficult to distinguish from Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts that are of similar size. Mycology culture is the method of choice for definitive identification of C. glabrata. Rapid identification is necessary, as mortality rate due to C. glabrata infection in immunocompromised patients is particularly high. We herein report a patient with inoperable gastric carcinoma, who developed cutaneous and septic form of C. glabrata infection.

  4. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activity in response to different immune stimuli in haemocytes of the common periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, Nadya V; Gorbushin, Alexander M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-09-01

    The modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in haemocytes of the common periwinkle (Littorina littorea) in response to immune challenges by lipopolysaccharide from Echerichia coli (LPS), mannan from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secretory-excretory products (SEP) of trematodes Himasthla elongata (Echinostomatidae) or after the treatment with phorbol ester (PMA) has been studied by Western blotting using affinity purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Exposure of the cells in suspension to PMA, LPS and mannan triggered an activation of p38 and ERK2. The JNK-mediated cascade was modulated differently by the elicitors examined. PMA treatment caused a transient activation of the JNK54 isoform, LPS exposure resulted in a decrease in activity of JNK46, and mannan had no effect on JNK phosphorylation status. Incubation of periwinkle haemocytes in culture medium containing trematode SEP did not affect the activity of any MAPK.

  5. Sulfated galactans isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri target the envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus and protect against viral infection in shrimp haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2014-05-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating an underlying mechanism of the antiviral activity of the sulfated galactans (SG) isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in haemocytes of the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Primary culture of haemocytes from Penaeus monodon was performed and inoculated with WSSV, after which the cytopathic effect (CPE), cell viability and viral load were determined. Haemocytes treated with WSSV-SG pre-mix showed decreased CPE, viral load and cell mortality from the viral infection. Solid-phase virus-binding assays revealed that SG bound to WSSV in a dose-related manner. Far Western blotting analysis indicated that SG bound to VP 26 and VP 28 proteins of WSSV. In contrast to the native SG, desulfated SG did not reduce CPE and cell mortality, and showed low binding activity with WSSV. The current study suggests that SG from Gracilaria fisheri elicits its anti-WSSV activity by binding to viral proteins that are important for the process of viral attachment to the host cells. It is anticipated that the sulfate groups of SG are important for viral binding.

  6. Candida glabrata survives and replicates in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Duarte, Ana Rosa; Castrejón-Jiménez, Nayeli Shantal; Baltierra-Uribe, Shantal Lizbeth; Pérez-Rangel, Sofia Judith; Carapia-Minero, Natalee; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; López-Santiago, Rubén; Rodríguez-Tovar, Aída Verónica; García-Pérez, Blanca Estela

    2016-06-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic pathogen that is considered the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans Many characteristics of its mechanisms of pathogenicity remain unknown. Recent studies have focused on determining the events that underlie interactions between C. glabrata and immune cells, but the relationship between this yeast and osteoblasts has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms of interaction between human osteoblasts and C. glabrata, and to identify the roles played by some of the molecules that are produced by these cells in response to infection. We show that C. glabrata adheres to and is internalized by human osteoblasts. Adhesion is independent of opsonization, and internalization depends on the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that C. glabrata survives and replicates in osteoblasts and that this intracellular behavior is related to the level of production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. Opsonized C. glabrata stimulates the production of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 cytokines. Adhesion and internalization of the pathogen and the innate immune response of osteoblasts require viable C. glabrata These results suggest that C. glabrata modulates immunological mechanisms in osteoblasts to survive inside the cell.

  7. Interaction between the intermediate host of Schistosomiasis in Brazil Biomphalaria glabrata (Planorbidae) and a possible competitor Melanoides tuberculata (Thiaridae): I. Laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Giovanelli, Alexandre; Vieira, Marcus Vinícius; Coelho da Silva, Cesar Luiz Pinto Ayres

    2002-04-01

    The biological control of Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, is one the accepted options to fight schistosomiasis. One of the most promising candidates to control B. glabrata is the snail Melanoides tuberculata, a potential competitor. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two species are not clear. Our objective is to determine if M. tuberculata indeed compete with B. glabrata, using two laboratory experiments. In Experiment 1, we tested the effect of the presence of M. tuberculata on the fecundity and mortality rates of B. glabrata. In Experiment 2, we tested if there was a direct or indirect interaction between the two species. In Experiment 1, M. tuberculata was eliminated after the peak in reproductive activity of B. glabrata. In Experiment 2, B. glabrata produced more egg masses when raised with M. tuberculata. The conditions leading to this unexpected positive effect of M. tuberculata on the fecundity of B. glabrata need further clarification, but emphasize that detailed studies of the interaction between these species in the conditions of the local environment should be considered.

  8. Interactions of Spodoptera littoralis haemocytes following injection with the entomopathogenic fungi: Beauveria bassiana and Nomuraea rileyi.

    PubMed

    Meshrif, Wesam S; Rohlfs, Marko; Hegazi, Mohamed A M; Barakat, Emad M S; Seif, Amal I; Shehata, Magdi G

    2011-12-01

    This study compared the cellular interactions of Spodopteralittoralis haemocytes with two virulence-different entomopathogenic fungi: Beauveriabassiana and Nomuraearileyi. Using light and transmission microscopy, five types of haemocytes namely, prohaemocytes (PRs), plasmatocytes (PLs), granulocytes (GRs), spherule cells (SPs) and oenocytoids (OEs) were identified in the 6th instar larvae. PRs and PLs were found in the haemopoietic tissue. Intra-haemocoelic injection of blastospores induced ultrastructural alterations in the cytoplasm and nuclei of circulating haemocytes of treated larvae. Different responses were observed in the populations of haemocyte types following injection with the tested fungi. The most important changes were the decrease of the numers of GRs accompanied with increase in SPs at 12-48h following injection with B. bassiana, whereas, a decrease of PLs with a commitment increase inSPs and OEs were observed at most time intervals after injection with N. rileyi. Both fungi provoked a decrease of the total number of haemocytes at 48h followed by an increase at 72h post-injection. In vivo assay showed that the GRs and PLs actively phagocytised fungal blastospores. There was a time-dependent decrease and increase in the phagocytosis activity after injection of B. bassiana and N. Rileyi, respectively. In B. bassiana-injected insects, the numbers nodules increased significantly at 6-48h in comparison with the controls post-injection. In N. rileyi-injected insects, nodules increased significantly only at 72h post-injection. No cellular encapsulation was observed in any of the examined insects.

  9. Cresolase, catecholase and laccase activities in haemocytes of the red swamp crayfish.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, W; Dankert, J R

    2000-01-01

    Phenoloxidase activity in crayfish haemocyte lysates and extracts of haemocyte membranes were studied using native PAGE and SDS-PAGE gels and staining for cresolase, catecholase and laccase activities. The activation of the proenzyme, prophenoloxidase to phenoloxidase, in native PAGE was demonstrated following exposure to SDS. By staining samples separated in SDS-PAGE followed by renaturation, a high molecular mass phenoloxidase activity was identified in both the soluble and membrane fractions of haemocyte preparations. The membrane-associated activity appeared at only relatively high molecular mass (> 300 kDa), and could easily be eluted from membranes using detergents or NaCl. Further, this membrane-associated activity has a catecholase activity but not the cresolase activity seen in the soluble preparations. In addition, several other phenoloxidase enzymes were identified with different relative mobilities (250, 80, 72 and 10 kDa). Crayfish haemocytes also contained laccase activity, thought to be restricted to cuticle sclerotisation in the integument. Laccase activity in haemocytes might aid in the formation of capsule used to contain pathogens.

  10. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Ruben T.; Cunha, Diana V.; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B.; Schröder, Markus S.; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2016-01-01

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata. CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer. PMID:27815348

  11. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Ruben T; Cunha, Diana V; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B; Schröder, Markus S; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2017-01-05

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer. Copyright © 2017 Bernardo et al.

  12. Flucytosine Antagonism of Azole Activity versus Candida glabrata: Role of Transcription Factor Pdr1 and Multidrug Transporter Cdr1

    PubMed Central

    Steier, Zoë; Vermitsky, John-Paul; Toner, Geoffrey; Gygax, Scott E.; Edlind, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Infections with the opportunistic yeast Candida glabrata have increased dramatically in recent years. Antifungal therapy of yeast infections commonly employs azoles, such as fluconazole (FLC), but C. glabrata frequently develops resistance to these inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis. The pyrimidine analog flucytosine (5-fluorocytosine [5FC]) is highly active versus C. glabrata but is now rarely used clinically due to similar concerns over resistance and, a related concern, the toxicity associated with high doses used to counter resistance. Azole-5FC combination therapy would potentially address these concerns; however, previous studies suggest that 5FC may antagonize azole activity versus C. glabrata. Here, we report that 5FC at subinhibitory concentrations antagonized the activity of FLC 4- to 16-fold versus 8 of 8 C. glabrata isolates tested. 5FC antagonized the activity of other azoles similarly but had only indifferent effects in combination with unrelated antifungals. Since azole resistance in C. glabrata results from transcription factor Pdr1-dependent upregulation of the multidrug transporter gene CDR1, we reasoned that 5FC antagonism might be similarly mediated. Indeed, 5FC-FLC antagonism was abrogated in pdr1Δ and cdr1Δ strains. In further support of this hypothesis, 5FC exposure induced CDR1 expression 6-fold, and this upregulation was Pdr1 dependent. In contrast to azoles, 5FC is not a Cdr1 substrate and so its activation of Pdr1 was unexpected. We observed, however, that 5FC exposure readily induced petite mutants, which exhibit Pdr1-dependent CDR1 upregulation. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in Pdr1 activation is the likely basis for 5FC antagonism of azole activity versus C. glabrata. PMID:23979762

  13. Exogenous folates stimulate growth and budding of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Macreadie, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Folate, vitamin B9, is well recognized as being essential for cell growth. The utilization of folate is common to all cells, but the source of it may be quite different. For example, mammalian cells depend on exogenous uptake of folates, while plants and microbes can synthesize them. There has been little consideration of uptake of folate in microbial cells, and studies on the effects of folates in mammalian cells, where conditions are restricted. This study shows that exogenous folates (folic acid or folinic acid), causes Candida glabrata cells suspended in water alone to undergo two cycles of cell division and to form multiple buds. The effect was limited to cells in the stationary phase and more profound in quiescent cells. These data indicate a novel response of yeast to folates that may increase the utility of yeast as a model to study folate transport and signaling. PMID:28357288

  14. Remote Control of Intestinal Stem Cell Activity by Haemocytes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sveta; Li, Xiaoxue; Collas, Esther Jeanne; Boquete, Jean-Phillipe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is a key signaling pathway in the regulation of development and immunity in metazoans. In contrast to the multiple combinatorial JAK/STAT pathways in mammals, only one canonical JAK/STAT pathway exists in Drosophila. It is activated by three secreted proteins of the Unpaired family (Upd): Upd1, Upd2 and Upd3. Although many studies have established a link between JAK/STAT activation and tissue damage, the mode of activation and the precise function of this pathway in the Drosophila systemic immune response remain unclear. In this study, we used mutations in upd2 and upd3 to investigate the role of the JAK/STAT pathway in the systemic immune response. Our study shows that haemocytes express the three upd genes and that injury markedly induces the expression of upd3 by the JNK pathway in haemocytes, which in turn activates the JAK/STAT pathway in the fat body and the gut. Surprisingly, release of Upd3 from haemocytes upon injury can remotely stimulate stem cell proliferation and the expression of Drosomycin-like genes in the intestine. Our results also suggest that a certain level of intestinal epithelium renewal is required for optimal survival to septic injury. While haemocyte-derived Upd promotes intestinal stem cell activation and survival upon septic injury, haemocytes are dispensable for epithelium renewal upon oral bacterial infection. Our study also indicates that intestinal epithelium renewal is sensitive to insults from both the lumen and the haemocoel. It also reveals that release of Upds by haemocytes coordinates the wound-healing program in multiple tissues, including the gut, an organ whose integrity is critical to fly survival. PMID:27231872

  15. Genetic Drivers of Multidrug Resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Kelley R.; Jimenez Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Both the incidence of invasive fungal infections and rates of multidrug resistance associated with fungal pathogen Candida glabrata have increased in recent years. In this perspective, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the capacity of C. glabrata to rapidly develop resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and echinocandins. We will focus on the extensive genetic diversity among clinical isolates of C. glabrata, which likely enables this yeast to survive multiple stressors, such as immune pressure and antifungal exposure. In particular, over half of C. glabrata clinical strains collected from U.S. and non-U.S. sites have mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, leading to a mutator phenotype and increased frequencies of drug-resistant mutants in vitro. Furthermore, recent studies and data presented here document extensive chromosomal rearrangements among C. glabrata strains, resulting in a large number of distinct karyotypes within a single species. By analyzing clonal, serial isolates derived from individual patients treated with antifungal drugs, we were able to document chromosomal changes occurring in C. glabrata in vivo during the course of antifungal treatment. Interestingly, we also show that both MSH2 genotypes and chromosomal patterns cluster consistently into specific strain types, indicating that C. glabrata has a complex population structure where genomic variants arise, perhaps during the process of adaptation to environmental changes, and persist over time. PMID:28018323

  16. Recurrent arthritis by Candida glabrata, a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Erami, Mahzad; Afzali, Hasan; Heravi, Mansoureh Momen; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Moazeni, Maryam; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Hosseinpour, Leila

    2014-06-01

    Infectious arthritis due to Candida glabrata is very rare. A 40-year-old Iranian man had developed a painful swelling on the left knee since a year ago. A surgery (meniscectomy) was performed on his knee. However, in follow-up visit after 2 months, the patient's condition was deteriorated. Direct examination of synovial fluid with Gram and hematoxylin-eosin stains were negative for any bacterial or fungal infection or crystal elements; however, inoculation into BACTEC™ Mycosis IC/F and Plus Aerobic/F culture bottles led to the isolation of a yeast strain. The macroscopic examination on CHROMagar™ Candida medium combined with microscopical examination on CMT80 agar made a presumptive identification of the isolate to be considered as C. glabrata, and it was later on confirmed by ITS sequencing. Initial empirical treatment was started with intravenous amphotericin B for 4 weeks followed by oral itraconazole which was unsuccessful. Prescription of an oral 150-mg tablet of fluconazole was considered for a 2-month course. All symptoms completely declined, and no recurrence of infection was detected. Antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST) was performed for this isolate, and the result showed sensitivity to both amphotericin B and itraconazole and less susceptibility to fluconazole while clinical recovery was achieved by fluconazole. In any suspected clinical case caused by infectious agents, application of an effective fungal diagnostic test should be considered to avoid complications due to misdiagnosis. The correlation of AFST result with real in vivo therapeutic responses can be strain or patient dependent, and this should be considered for a successive treatment.

  17. Production of indole pigments by Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Peter; Wenzel, Maja; Krämer, Hans-Joachim; Kindler, Bernhard L J; Spiteller, Peter; Haase, Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    When provided as the sole nitrogen source tryptophan induces the production of several indole alkaloids, e.g., pityriacitrin, malasseziaindole, pityriaanhydride and pityriarubin with proven biological activity in the lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur. So far these pigments seem to have been unique and only produced by highly specialized basidiomycetal yeasts of the genus Malassezia. Having surprisingly observed a brown pigmented Candida glabrata isolate as a contaminant on such a pigment inducing culture plate, we systematically analyzed whether this ascomycetal yeast can also synthesize the respective pigments. Therefore, 30 Candida glabrata strains, including the ex-type strain CBS 138, were cultured for 2 weeks on a pigment-inducing medium containing L-tryptophan. This culture medium along with the resultant biomass was then extracted with ethyl acetate. The extracted pigments were separated into six fractions by column chromatography. Each of these fractions was subjected to thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on silica gel and yielded identical pigment bands comparable to those observed with M. furfur. In the case of strain CBS 138, the individual TLC zones were further purified by HPLC and structural analysis of the pure metabolites was performed by mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), thereby proving the presence of pityriacitrin, malassezia indole, pityriaanhydride and pityriarubin C. Since lineage divergence of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota occurred approximately 600 million years ago, our findings demonstrate that the complex underlying biochemical pathway has not been exclusively evolved in the highly adapted basidiomycetes yeast M. furfur, but instead seems to be rather fundamental and archaic. Therefore, further investigations on the potential biological properties and the genetic regulation of these metabolites are needed to elucidate their hitherto unknown functions.

  18. DNA damage in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae) spiders exposed to food contaminated with cadmium.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Monika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Wilczek, Piotr; Skowronek, Magdalena; Mędrzak, Monika

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of Cd on haemocytes and midgut gland cells of web-building spiders, Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae), exposed to the metal under laboratory conditions. Analyzes were conducted on adult females and males, fed for four weeks with cadmium-contaminated Drosophila hydei flies, grown on a medium suplemented with 0.25 mM CdCl2. The comet assay, providing a quantitative measure of DNA strand breaks, was used to evaluate the DNA damage caused by the metal. Cadmium content was measured in whole spider bodies by the AAS method. Metal body burden was significantly lower in females (0.25 µgg(-1) dry weight) than in males (3.03 µgg(-1) dry weight), suggesting that females may have more effective mechanisms controlling the uptake of metal, via the digestive tract, or its elimination from the body. Irrespectively of sex, spiders fed prey contaminated with cadmium showed significantly higher values of comet parameters: tail DNA (TDNA), tail length (TL) and olive tail moment (OTM), in comparison with the control. In midgut gland cells, the level of DNA damage was higher for males than females, while in haemocytes the genotoxic effect of cadmium was greater in females. The obtained results indicate that in spiders cadmium displays strong genotoxic effects and may cause DNA damage even at low concentrations, however the severity of damage seems to be sex- and internal organ-dependent. The comet assay can be considered a sensitive tool for measuring the deleterious effect of cadmium on DNA integrity in spiders.

  19. Candida glabrata: new tools and technologies—expanding the toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsueh-lui; Haynes, Ken

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a noticeable rise in fungal infections related to non-albicans Candida species, including Candida glabrata which has both intrinsic resistance to and commonly acquired resistance to azole antifungals. Phylogenetically, C. glabrata is more closely related to the mostly non-pathogenic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to other Candida species. Despite C. glabrata's designation as a pathogen by Wickham in 1957, relatively little is known about its mechanism of virulence. Over the past few years, technology to analyse the molecular basis of infection has developed rapidly, and here we briefly review the major advances in tools and technologies available to explore and investigate the virulence of C. glabrata that have occurred over the past decade. PMID:26205243

  20. The pro-apoptotic action of the peptide hormone Neb-colloostatin on insect haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Czarniewska, E; Mrówczynska, L; Kuczer, M; Rosinski, G

    2012-12-15

    The gonadoinhibitory peptide hormone Neb-colloostatin was first isolated from ovaries of the flesh fly Neobellieria bullata. This 19-mer peptide is thought to be a cleaved product of a collagen-like precursor molecule that is formed during remodelling of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we report that upon injection of picomolar and nanomolar doses, this peptide exerts a pro-apoptotic action on haemocytes of Tenebrio molitor adults, as visualized by changes in morphology and viability. The F-actin cytoskeleton was found to aggregate into distinctive patches. This may be responsible for the observed inhibition of adhesion of haemocytes and for the stimulation of filopodia formation. However, Neb-colloostatin injection did not induce the formation of autophagic vacuoles. Our results suggest that physiological concentrations of Neb-colloostatin play an important role in controlling the quantity and activity of haemocytes in insect haemolymph. They also suggest that during periods in which Neb-colloostatin is released, this peptide may cause a weakening of the insects' immune system. This is the first report that exposure to a peptide hormone causes apoptosis in insect haemocytes.

  1. Candida glabrata candidemia: An emerging threat in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Gupta, Anu; Varma, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candidemia is an important nosocomial blood stream infection in critically ill patients. Although several studies have addressed candidemia, very few have reviewed the impact of Candida glabrata candidemia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Materials and Methods: The medical records of ICU patients between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. The epidemiology, clinical features and mortality related risk factors among our adult ICU patients were seen. Results: Among 144 episodes of candidemia, C. glabrata (n = 26; 18.05%) was the third most common species isolated. The incidence of C. glabrata candidemia was 0.21/1000 ICU admissions. The most common risk factors were prior exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics (100%), central venous catheter (100%), mechanical ventilation (76.9%), diabetes mellitus (50%), age >65 years (46.15%). Urine (23%) was the most common source of C. glabrata candidemia. Overall in hospital 30 days mortality rate due to C. glabrata fungemia was 53.8%. Patients who were treated with fluconazole showed better outcome than patients treated with amphotericin B. Renal failure requiring hemodialysis was the significantly associated with mortality in our study. Conclusion: Candida glabrata was the 3rd most common Candida causing candidemia in our ICUs with a incidence of 0.21/1000 ICU admissions. The outcome of ICU acquired C. glabrata candidemia was poor with 30 days mortality rate of 53.8%. Renal failure requiring hemodialysis was the only risk factor associated with mortality. Further studies are required to identify the other risk factors associated with mortality in C. glabrata candidemia. PMID:25810610

  2. Candida glabrata's recurrent infections: biofilm formation during Amphotericin B treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, C F; Silva, S; Azeredo, J; Henriques, M

    2016-08-01

    Candida species are responsible for recurrent human infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients, due to their high vulnerability. Candida glabrata has a major role in systemic candidiasis and Amphotericin B (AmB), a polyene only used in hospitals, is frequently used to treat this disease. Lately, however, clinical evidences of Candida recurrent infections during these treatments are being described, probably due to biofilm (re)formation during this therapy. Thus, this work aims at inferring if C. glabrata biofilms are still being formed during AmB treatment. For that, C. glabrata biofilms were formed in the presence of AmB and analysed by dry weight. Matrix composition was analysed quantifying carbohydrates and, specifically, β-1,3 glucans. Results demonstrated that, although in a lesser extent, C. glabrata is able to develop biofilms in the presence of AmB, with a thick extracellular matrix, with an increase on carbohydrates, especially β-1,3 glucans. Therefore, it is confirmed that complex biofilms of C. glabrata can be formed during an AmB treatment. This study shows new insights regarding recurrent candidiasis. The authors demonstrated that Amphotericin B did not totally prevent the development of biofilms during Candida glabrata's infection treatment and that the change in the biofilm matrices may have a high responsibility for the fail in the treatment of systemic candidiasis. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. New Mechanisms of Flucytosine Resistance in C. glabrata Unveiled by a Chemogenomics Analysis in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Ponte, Andreia; Pais, Pedro; Santos, Rui; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Yaguchi, Takashi; Chibana, Hiroji; Teixeira, Miguel Cacho

    2015-01-01

    5-Flucytosine is currently used as an antifungal drug in combination therapy, but fungal pathogens are rapidly able to develop resistance against this drug, compromising its therapeutic action. The understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is crucial to deal with this problem. In this work, the S. cerevisiae deletion mutant collection was screened for increased resistance to flucytosine. Through this chemogenomics analysis, 183 genes were found to confer resistance to this antifungal agent. Consistent with its known effect in DNA, RNA and protein synthesis, the most significant Gene Ontology terms over-represented in the list of 5-flucytosine resistance determinants are related to DNA repair, RNA and protein metabolism. Additional functional classes include carbohydrate and nitrogen—particularly arginine—metabolism, lipid metabolism and cell wall remodeling. Based on the results obtained for S. cerevisiae as a model system, further studies were conducted in the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata. Arginine supplementation was found to relieve the inhibitory effect exerted by 5-flucytosine in C. glabrata. Lyticase susceptibility was found to increase within the first 30min of 5-flucytosine exposure, suggesting this antifungal drug to act as a cell wall damaging agent. Upon exponential growth resumption in the presence of 5-flucytosine, the cell wall exhibited higher resistance to lyticase, suggesting that cell wall remodeling occurs in response to 5-flucytosine. Additionally, the aquaglyceroporin encoding genes CgFPS1 and CgFPS2, from C. glabrata, were identified as determinants of 5-flucytosine resistance. CgFPS1 and CgFPS2 were found to mediate 5-flucytosine resistance, by decreasing 5-flucytosine accumulation in C. glabrata cells. PMID:26267134

  4. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm in vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50 of CAS and FLU against single Candida spp.and mixed Candida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicans and C. glabrata mixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages of Candida biofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU of Candida glabrata were demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent.

  5. Molluscicidal activity of some marine substances against the snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca, Planorbidae).

    PubMed

    Miyasato, P A; Kawano, T; Freitas, J C; Berlinck, R G S; Nakano, E; Tallarico, L F

    2012-05-01

    Freshwater snails of the genus Biomphalaria play a major role as intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, the etiologic agent of schistosomiasis. While Biomphalaria spp. control by molluscicides is one of the main strategies to reduce the snail population in infected areas, there are few effective molluscicides commercially available. Natural products may be considered as potentially useful and safe molluscicides. We have evaluated the molluscicidal activity of 12 extracts from ten marine organisms on adult and embryonic stages of Biomphalaria glabrata. Only extracts of the red algae Liagora farinosa and of the sponge Amphimedon viridis presented molluscicidal activity. Lethal concentration (LC)(50) values obtained were 120 μg/mL for L. farinosa CH(2)Cl(2) extract (apolar fraction) and 20 μg/mL for A. viridis extract and halitoxin. The polar alga fraction and halitoxin had no effect on B. glabrata embryos. The algae apolar fraction was active on B. glabrata in all embryonic development stages, with LC(50) values for blastulae at 42 μg/mL, gastrulae at 124 μg/mL, trochophore at 180 μg/mL, and veliger at 222 μg/mL. This is the first report of extracts from marine organisms which presented molluscicidal activity.

  6. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol against Candida glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Han, Sunghwa; Yong, Dongeun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    The formation of Candida biofilms has important clinical ramifications, because these biofilms exhibit increased resistance to conventional antifungal therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol on biofilms produced by non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC) species, including C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis. NCAC biofilms were generated in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates and quantified using the XTT (2, 3 - bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) reduction assay. The NCAC biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature growth phases were treated with 0.5-512 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol for 24 h. The ranges of sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of xanthorrhizol against C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms were 8-32 μg/ml, 8-16 μg/ml, and 8-64 μg/ml, respectively. Xanthorrhizol affected cell density that had an indirect effect on the biofilm OD(490). The compound eradicated the viable cells of the C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the adherent growth phase at 16 μg/ml and that of C. guilliermondii at 8 μg/ml. Treatment with 128 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol reduced the OD(490) of C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the mature growth phase by 77.8%, 88.5%, and 64.5%, respectively. These results indicate that xanthorrhizol exhibits potent activity against NCAC biofilms in vitro. Therefore, xanthorrhizol has potential therapeutic value in treating biofilm-associated NCAC infections and should be further evaluated in vivo.

  7. Increase of dietary vitamin C improves haemocyte respiratory burst response and growth of juvenile grass shrimp, Penaeus monodon, fed with high dietary copper.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Hsien; Shiau, Shi-Yen

    2003-04-01

    Effects of dietary vitamin C (l-ascorbyl-2-monophosphate-Mg, C2MP-Mg) on growth, tissue copper (Cu) accumulation, and haemocyte superoxide anion production of juvenile grass shrimp, Penaeus monodon, fed with either adequate or high (8 x adequate) dietary Cu were studied. Three experimental diets were used: basal diet supplemented with adequate levels of both C2MP-Mg (40 mg kg diet(-1)) and Cu (20mg kg diet(-1)) (NC-NCu); basal diet supplemented with adequate C2MP-Mg and high Cu (8 x adequate) (NC-HCu); and basal diet supplemented with high C2MP-Mg (5 x adequate) and high Cu (HC-HCu). These were each fed to triplicate groups of shrimp (mean initial weight: 0.29+/-0.01 g) for 8 weeks. Highest (P< 0.01) weight gain, feed efficiency (FE) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were observed in shrimp fed NC-NCu diet, intermediate in shrimp fed HC-HCu diet, and lowest in shrimp fed NC-HCu diet. Cu concentrations in hepatopancreas, muscle and haemolymph were highest in shrimp fed NC-HCu diet, followed by shrimp fed HC-HCu diet, and lowest for shrimp fed NC-NCu diet. Survival, total haemocyte count (THC) and intracellular superoxide anion (O-2) production were higher in shrimp fed NC-NCu diet than shrimp fed NC-HCu diet, whereas hepatosomatic index (HSI) was higher in shrimp fed NC-HCu diet than shrimp fed NC-NCu diet. However, all these parameters were similar in shrimp fed NC-NCu diet and shrimp fed HC-HCu diet. These data suggest that increase of dietary vitamin C improved haemocyte respiratory burst response and growth and prevented tissue Cu accumulation in P. monodon fed with high dietary Cu.

  8. Rapid identification of Candida glabrata by using a dipstick to detect trehalase-generated glucose.

    PubMed

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schnitzler, N; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    1999-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a yeast frequently isolated from human specimens. Based upon its well-known ability to rapidly hydrolyze trehalose, we have developed a novel and cost-effective test incubating one yeast colony emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer (0.1 M [pH 5. 0]) containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Trehalase-generated glucose is detected with a commercially available dipstick (range, 1.0 to 50 g/liter). For evaluation, consecutive clinical isolates and several reference strains of C. glabrata (n = 160), C. albicans (n = 120), and other yeast species with potential ability for utilization of trehalose (C. dubliniensis, n = 11; C. famata, n = 15; C. guilliermondii, n = 5; C. lusitaniae, n = 16; C. parapsilosis, n = 20; C. tropicalis, n = 34; C. viswanathii, n = 5; Pichia angusta, n = 2; C. zeylanoides, n = 2; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, n = 16; C. neoformans, n = 7) were tested. Identification of C. glabrata is achieved within 3 h, with a specificity of 99.1% and a sensitivity of 98.8% when grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 4% glucose.

  9. Preliminary study on haemocyte response to white spot syndrome virus infection in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    van de Braak, C B T; Botterblom, M H A; Huisman, E A; Rombout, J H W M; van der Knaap, W P W

    2002-08-29

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been a major cause of shrimp mortality in aquaculture in the past decade. In contrast to extensive studies on the morphology and genome structure of the virus, little work has been done on the defence reaction of the host after WSSV infection. Therefore, we examined the haemocyte response to experimental WSSV infection in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Haemolymph sampling and histology showed a significant decline in free, circulating haemocytes after WSSV infection. A combination of in situ hybridisation with a specific DNA probe for WSSV and immuno-histochemistry with a specific antibody against haemocyte granules in tissue sections indicated that haemocytes left the circulation and migrated to tissues where many virus-infected cells were present. However, no subsequent haemocyte response to the virus-infected cells was detected. The number of granular cells decreased in the haematopoietic tissue of infected shrimp. In addition, a fibrous-like immuno-reactive layer appears in the outer stromal matrix of tubule walls in the lymphoid organ of infected shrimp. The role of haemocytes in shrimp defence after viral infection is discussed.

  10. Steinernema carpocapsae DD136: metabolites limit the non-self adhesion responses of haemocytes of two lepidopteran larvae, Galleria mellonella (F. Pyralidae) and Malacosoma disstria (F. Lasiocampidae).

    PubMed

    Walter, Tita N; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2008-10-01

    Live adult and juvenile entomopathogenic Steinernema carpocapsae DD136 (P. Nematoda) were not subjected to adhesion by haemocytes of lepidopteran insect larvae of Galleria mellonella or Malacosoma disstriain vitro or in vivo. In vitro freeze-killed nematodes exhibited haemocyte attachment, the intensity increasing with time. Accumulation of haemocytes on the dead nematodes was associated with host phenoloxidase activity; live nematodes and their exudates did not activate the enzyme whereas dead nematodes but not their exudate did activate phenoloxidase. Live-nematode exudate inhibited granular cell and some plasmatocyte adhesion to slides, increased granular cell but not plasmatocyte dissociation from preformed haemocyte monolayers and in vivo elevated total haemocyte counts and changed the floating haemocyte types while impairing bacterial removal from the haemolymph. Dead-nematode exudate did not affect these parameters thus immunosuppressant activity by live nematodes may represent the release of inhibitors not associated with their cuticle. The third stage juveniles released the inhibitors.

  11. Oral mucositis caused by Candida glabrata biofilms: failure of the concomitant use of fluconazole and ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Célia F.; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Candida glabrata is becoming one of the most prevalent pathogenic yeasts in cases of oral diseases. Mucositis is an recurrent oral infection in immunocompromised patients, and the actual guidelines recommend the use of fluconazole (Flu) for many cases. However, the azole resistance by C. glabrata is renowned, causing a reduced therapeutic response, especially when it occurs in biofilms. In this study, we performed an in vitro evaluation of an alternative pharmacotherapy for C. glabrata biofilm infections, combining ascorbic acid (AA) with Flu. AA is recognized for degrading β-glucans, an important compound of the biofilm matrices, which prevent drug diffusion. Materials and Methods: Routine clinical 30 or 40 mg/l doses of Flu were applied to C. glabrata biofilms simultaneously with 200 or 300 mg/l of AA. Results: The results showed that this combination effectively promoted the degradation of the biofilm network, but unfortunately, also stimulated the growth of the yeasts population due to release of several glucose monomers during β-glucans hydrolysis. Discussion: AA lead to the hydrolysis of the β-glucans of the matrix, liberating glucose molecules which are used as carbon souce by the yeasts, thus suppressing the desired antifungal effect of the drug combination with Flu. Conclusions: Unlike to what happens in treatment of bacterial infection, AA should not be used together with Flu in the treating oral mucositis caused by Candida. PMID:28357061

  12. Oral mucositis caused by Candida glabrata biofilms: failure of the concomitant use of fluconazole and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Célia F; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Candida glabrata is becoming one of the most prevalent pathogenic yeasts in cases of oral diseases. Mucositis is an recurrent oral infection in immunocompromised patients, and the actual guidelines recommend the use of fluconazole (Flu) for many cases. However, the azole resistance by C. glabrata is renowned, causing a reduced therapeutic response, especially when it occurs in biofilms. In this study, we performed an in vitro evaluation of an alternative pharmacotherapy for C. glabrata biofilm infections, combining ascorbic acid (AA) with Flu. AA is recognized for degrading β-glucans, an important compound of the biofilm matrices, which prevent drug diffusion. Routine clinical 30 or 40 mg/l doses of Flu were applied to C. glabrata biofilms simultaneously with 200 or 300 mg/l of AA. The results showed that this combination effectively promoted the degradation of the biofilm network, but unfortunately, also stimulated the growth of the yeasts population due to release of several glucose monomers during β-glucans hydrolysis. AA lead to the hydrolysis of the β-glucans of the matrix, liberating glucose molecules which are used as carbon souce by the yeasts, thus suppressing the desired antifungal effect of the drug combination with Flu. Unlike to what happens in treatment of bacterial infection, AA should not be used together with Flu in the treating oral mucositis caused by Candida.

  13. Phenoloxidase activity in larval and juvenile homogenates and adult plasma and haemocytes of bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Luna-González, Antonio; Maeda-Martínez, Alfonso N; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Robles-Mungaray, Miguel

    2003-10-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) activity was studied in larval and juvenile homogenates and in the plasma and haemocytes of adult Crassostrea gigas, Argopecten ventricosus, Nodipecten subnodosus, and Atrina maura. Samples were tested for the presence of PO activity by incubation with the substrate L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine using trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, laminarin, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to elicit activation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) system. PO activity was not detected in larval homogenate. In juvenile homogenate, PO activity was found only in C. gigas and N. subnodosus. PO activity was present in adult samples and was enhanced by elicitors in the plasma of all species tested, but in haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS) of only N. subnodosus. Activation of proPO by laminarin was suppressed by a protease inhibitor cocktail (P-2714) in plasma and HLS of all species tested.

  14. Candida glabrata olecranon bursitis treated with bursectomy and intravenous caspofungin.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Keenan, Kendra E; Trachtenberg, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons are becoming more involved in the care of patients with septic arthritis and bursitis caused by yeast species. This case report involves a middle-aged immunocompromised female who developed a Candida glabrata septic olecranon bursitis that developed after she received a corticosteroid injection in the olecranon bursa for presumed aseptic bursitis. Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is the second most frequently isolated Candida species from the bloodstream in the United States. Increased use of fluconazole and other azole antifungal agents as a prophylactic treatment for recurrent Candida albicans infections in immunocompromised individuals is one reason why there appears to be increased resistance of C. glabrata and other nonalbicans Candida (NAC) species to fluconazole. In this patient, this infection was treated with surgery (bursectomy) and intravenous caspofungin, an echinocandin. This rare infectious etiology coupled with this intravenous antifungal treatment makes this case novel among cases of olecranon bursitis caused by yeasts.

  15. Osteomyelitis Caused by Candida glabrata in the Distal Phalanx

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Naohito; Sairyo, Koichi; Yoshioka, Shinji; Yamano, Masahiro; Henmi, Tatsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis caused by Candida glabrata is rare and its optimal treatment is unknown. Here we report a case of osteomyelitis caused by C. glabrata in the distal phalanx in a 54-year-old woman. Despite partial resection of the nail and administering a 1-month course of antibiotics for paronychia, the local swelling remained and an osteolytic lesion was found. C. glabrata osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx was later diagnosed after curettage. Thereafter, the patient was treated with antifungal agents for 3 months. The infection eventually resolved, and radiological healing of the osteolytic lesion was achieved. Antifungal susceptibility testing should be performed in the case of osteomyelitis caused by nonalbicans Candida species, due to their resistance to fluconazole. PMID:25215255

  16. Stress response in Candida glabrata: pieces of a fragmented picture.

    PubMed

    Jandric, Zeljkica; Schüller, Christoph

    2011-12-01

    Candida glabrata is closely related to yeast but obviously adapted to human commensalism. Communication with the environment is important to adjust allocation of resources between protection and proliferation in order to adapt to different situations in and outside of the host. Gene transcription regulated by environmental conditions is a major response strategy of simple fungal organisms. Differences to yeast include an extended repertoire of adhesive genes, and high drug, starvation and stress resistance. These properties largely do not originate from novel virulence genes but rather from adaptations of the transcriptional wiring. C. glabrata signaling pathways providing stress protection are adopted to meet conditions possibly encountered in a host-pathogen confrontation. The view on C. glabrata is getting clearer and points to a simple strategy combining resilience and a few adaptations.

  17. Two unlike cousins: Candida albicans and C. glabrata infection strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. glabrata are the two most common pathogenic yeasts of humans, yet they are phylogenetically, genetically and phenotypically very different. In this review, we compare and contrast the strategies of C. albicans and C. glabrata to attach to and invade into the host, obtain nutrients and evade the host immune response. Although their strategies share some basic concepts, they differ greatly in their outcome. While C. albicans follows an aggressive strategy to subvert the host response and to obtain nutrients for its survival, C. glabrata seems to have evolved a strategy which is based on stealth, evasion and persistence, without causing severe damage in murine models. However, both fungi are successful as commensals and as pathogens of humans. Understanding these strategies will help in finding novel ways to fight Candida, and fungal infections in general. PMID:23253282

  18. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. A modified method to detect the phagocytic ability of eosinophilic and basophilic haemocytes in the oyster Crassostrea plicatula.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Dong; Lai, Qifang; Sun, Min; Quan, Weimin; Zhou, Kai

    2014-09-01

    The immune defence system of bivalve species largely depends on haemocytes. Haemocytes are generally classified as hyalinocytes (H) or granulocytes (G), and each cell type is further sub-classified as eosinophilic (E) or basophilic (B) haemocytes. Until recently, research on eosinophilic and basophilic haemocytes has primarily focused on their morphologies, dye affinities and intracellular components. Few studies have investigated their phagocytic ability because of the absence of appropriate experimental methods. In this study, we introduce a modified method suitable to detect the phagocytic ability of eosinophilic and basophilic haemocytes. This modified method involves neutral red staining by employing fluorescent microspheres as the phagocytosed medium. Specifically, haemocytes are incubated with fluorescent microspheres and then stained with neutral red. Next, the stained haemocytes are fixed by acetone and are counterstained by propidium iodide. Finally, the haemocytes are observed under a multifunctional microscope to analyse the phagocytic ability by counting the number of eosinophilic or basophilic haemocytes involved in phagocytosis (calculation for phagocytic rate, PR) and the number of phagocytosed microspheres by each eosinophilic or basophilic haemocyte (calculation for phagocytic index, PI). By employing this modified method in the oyster Crassostrea plicatula, we found that the PRs of G and H were very similar to the data obtained by another method, flow cytometry, indicating that this modified method has high accuracy. Additionally, we also found that the PR and PI in E-G were 70.9 ± 7.3% and 1.0 ± 0.2, respectively, which were both significantly higher than those in B-G (53.1 ± 6.4% and 0.7 ± 0.1). The PR and PI in E-H were 16.3 ± 2.8% and 0.2 ± 0.1, respectively, while in B-H, the PR and PI were 13.3 ± 3.6% and 0.2 ± 0.1, respectively, with no significant difference observed. Based on this result, eosinophilic granulocytes are more active

  20. [Agglutination and phagocytosis of foreign abiotic particles by bluebottle Calliphora vicina haemocytes in vivo. II. Influence of the previous septic immune induction on haemocytic activity].

    PubMed

    Kind, T V

    2010-01-01

    The rate of Calliphora vicina haemocytic defense reaction to foreign particles injection depends on the larval age and on the previous bacterial immunization. Immunization of crop-empting larvae induces an evident increase in particles phagocytosis by juvenile plasmatocytes in 24 h after injection. Both the hemogram and the pattern of cellular defense reaction change significantly after crop-empting. Immunized larvae start intensive adhesion of foreign particles to plasmatocytes surface and formation of great aggregations of plasmatocytes (morules) no longer than in 34 min after injection. The period of particle-haemocyte adhesion is short-termed and no more than after 30 min cell aggregates dissociate and adhered charcoal particles pass to thrombocydoidal agglutinates. Unimmunized control larvae of the same age have shown no adhesion and morules formation. In immunized wadering and diapausing larvae, formation of capsules consisting of central thrombocydoidal agglutinate filled with alien particles and adherent plasmatocytes I is intensified. In contrast to moru-les, this capsule formation is not accompanied by charcoal particles adhesion to plasmatocytes. Immunization of mature larvae of C. vicina shown no prominent influence on both the rate of phagocytosis and the hyaline cells differentiation. It might be supposed that the receptors system is complex and the immunization both the mechanisms of foreigners recognition (adhesion, morulation and incapsulation) and the far more lately occurring phagocytosis.

  1. Evaluation of the molluscicidal potential of hydroalcoholic extracts of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linnaeus, 1753 on Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Pereira Filho, Adalberto Alves; França, Clícia Rosane Costa; Oliveira, Dorlam's da Silva; Mendes, Renato Juvino de Aragão; Gonçalves, José de Ribamar Santos; Rosa, Ivone Garros

    2014-01-01

    The action of extracts from the stem, leaves, and fruit of Jatropha gossypiifolia on Biomphalaria glabrata was studied by analyzing survival, feeding capacity and oviposition ability. The extracts were obtained by macerating the plant parts in 92% ethanol, which were then evaporated until a dry residue was obtained and phytochemically studied. The molluscicidal activity on B. glabrata was investigated using the procedures recommended by WHO (1965). The amount of food ingested and oviposition were measured during each experiment. The extract of leaves from J. gossypiifolia was shown to be a strong molluscicidal agent, causing 100% mortality of B. glabrata, even in the lowest concentration tested, of 25 ppm. Regarding the fruit extract, there was variation in the mortality, depending on the concentration used (100, 75, 50 and 25 ppm). The snails that were in contact with the fruit extract had significant reduction in feeding and number of embryos in comparison to the control. The stem extract did not present molluscicidal activity nor had any influence on the feeding and oviposition abilities of B. glabrata, in the concentrations tested. In conclusion, the extracts of leaves and fruits of J. gossypiifolia investigated in this work show molluscicidal effect and may be sources of useful compounds for the schistosomiasis control.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE MOLLUSCICIDAL POTENTIAL OF HYDROALCOHOLIC EXTRACTS OF Jatropha gossypiifolia Linnaeus, 1753 ON Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Adalberto Alves; França, Clícia Rosane Costa; Oliveira, Dorlam's da Silva; Mendes, Renato Juvino de Aragão; Gonçalves, José de Ribamar Santos; Rosa, Ivone Garros

    2014-01-01

    The action of extracts from the stem, leaves, and fruit of Jatropha gossypiifolia on Biomphalaria glabrata was studied by analyzing survival, feeding capacity and oviposition ability. The extracts were obtained by macerating the plant parts in 92% ethanol, which were then evaporated until a dry residue was obtained and phytochemically studied. The molluscicidal activity on B. glabrata was investigated using the procedures recommended by WHO (1965). The amount of food ingested and oviposition were measured during each experiment. The extract of leaves from J. gossypiifolia was shown to be a strong molluscicidal agent, causing 100% mortality of B. glabrata, even in the lowest concentration tested, of 25 ppm. Regarding the fruit extract, there was variation in the mortality, depending on the concentration used (100, 75, 50 and 25 ppm). The snails that were in contact with the fruit extract had significant reduction in feeding and number of embryos in comparison to the control. The stem extract did not present molluscicidal activity nor had any influence on the feeding and oviposition abilities of B. glabrata, in the concentrations tested. In conclusion, the extracts of leaves and fruits of J. gossypiifolia investigated in this work show molluscicidal effect and may be sources of useful compounds for the schistosomiasis control. PMID:25351545

  3. The EPA2 adhesin encoding gene is responsive to oxidative stress in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Cepeda, Jacqueline; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Arreola-Gómez, Jorge; Pérez-Cornejo, Gloria Patricia; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Yudith; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Candida glabrata has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen in both mucosal and bloodstream infections. C. glabrata contains 67 adhesin-like glycosylphosphatidylinositol-cell-wall proteins (GPI-CWPs), which are classified into seven groups and the largest is the Epa family. Epa proteins are very diverse and their expression is differentially regulated. Like many of the EPA genes, EPA2 is localized in a subtelomeric region where it is subject to chromatin-based transcriptional silencing and its role remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that EPA2 gene is induced specifically in vitro in the presence of oxidative stress generated by H2O2. This induction is dependent on both Yap1 and Skn7, whereas Msn4 represses EPA2 expression. Interestingly, EPA2 is not induced during phagocytosis, but its expression can be identified in the liver in a murine model of systemic infection. Epa2 has no effect on the virulence of C. glabrata. The work presented herein provides a foundation for future studies to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) by which EPA2 of C. glabrata can be induced in the presence of oxidative stress in a region subject to subtelomeric silencing.

  4. The roles of haemocytes and the lymphoid organ in the clearance of injected Vibrio bacteria in Penaeus monodon shrimp.

    PubMed

    van de Braak, C B T; Botterblom, M H A; Taverne, N; van Muiswinkel, W B; Rombout, J H W M; van der Knaap, W P W

    2002-10-01

    In order to study the reaction of Penaeus monodon haemocytes, live Vibrio anguillarum bacteria were injected and the shrimp were periodically sampled. Immuno-double staining analysis with specific antisera against the haemocyte granules and bacteria showed that large numbers of haemocytes encapsulated the bacteria at the site of injection. A rapid decrease of live circulating bacteria was detected in the haemolymph. Bacterial clearance in the haemolymph was induced by humoral factors, as observed by agglutinated bacteria, and followed by uptake in different places in the body. Bacteria mainly accumulated in the lymphoid organ (LO), where they, or their degradation products, could be detected for at least 7 days after injection. The LO consists of folded tubules with a central haemal lumen and a wall, layered with cells. The haemolymph, including the antigens, seemed to migrate from the central tubular lumen through the wall, where the bacteria are arrested and their degradation is started. Electron microscopy of the LO revealed the presence of many phagocytic cells that morphologically resemble small-granular haemocytes. It is proposed that haemocytes settle in the tubule walls before they phagocytose. Immunostaining suggests that many of the haemocytes degranulate in the LO, producing a layer of fibrous material in the outer tubule wall. These findings might contribute to the reduced haemocyte concentration in the haemolymph of diseased animals or following injection of foreign material. It is proposed that the LO is a filter for virtually all foreign material encountered in the haemolymph. Observations from the present study are similar to clearance mechanisms in the hepatic haemolymph vessel in most decapod crustaceans that do not possess a LO. The experimental shrimp appeared to contain many LO spheroids, where bacterial antigens were finally observed as well. It is proposed that the spheroids have a degradation function for both bacterial and viral material

  5. Molecular analysis of Vitex species using candidate DNA barcoding and PCR-RFLP of the matK gene for authentication of Vitex glabrata.

    PubMed

    Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo; Sukrong, Suchada

    2013-01-01

    Several species of the Vitex genus, family Lamiaceae, are used in folk medicine for a variety of remedies. V. glabrata is unique among Vitex species because its main effect is sexual enhancement. However, crude drugs derived from different Vitex species might not be easily distinguishable, which could lead to their misidentification and misuse. Therefore, the accurate authentication of V. glabrata is critical for its effective medicinal use. In this study, the matK gene and the psbA-trnH intergenic spacer candidate DNA barcodes were sequenced and analyzed to identify five different Vitex species that are medicinally used in Thailand: V. negundo, V. trifolia, V. rotundifolia, V. limonifolia, and V. glabrata. Each region was successfully amplified from the leaves of the five species using a single set of primers, and the sequences determined. The size difference in PCR products of psbA-trnH and PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the matK gene sequences were used to differentiate V. glabrata from other Vitex species. These results indicate both the matK gene and the psbA-trnH intergenic spacer as candidate DNA barcodes of Vitex species and suggest that the difference of psbA-trnH PCR products and PCR-RFLP analysis based on the matK gene are effective for the authentication of V. glabrata.

  6. Candida krusei and Candida glabrata reduce the filamentation of Candida albicans by downregulating expression of HWP1 gene.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Freire, Fernanda; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2017-07-01

    Pathogenicity of Candida albicans is associated with its capacity switch from yeast-like to hyphal growth. The hyphal form is capable to penetrate the epithelial surfaces and to damage the host tissues. Therefore, many investigations have focused on mechanisms that control the morphological transitions of C. albicans. Recently, certain studies have showed that non-albicans Candida species can reduce the capacity of C. albicans to form biofilms and to develop candidiasis in animal models. Then, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Candida krusei and Candida glabrata on the morphogenesis of C. albicans. Firstly, the capacity of reference and clinical strains of C. albicans in forming hyphae was tested in vitro. After that, the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein 1) gene was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assay. For both reference and clinical strains, a significant inhibition of the hyphae formation was observed when C. albicans was incubated in the presence of C. krusei or C. glabrata compared to the control group composed only by C. albicans. In addition, the culture mixed of C. albicans-C. krusei or C. albicans-C. glabrata reduced significantly the expression of HWP1 gene of C. albicans in relation to single cultures of this specie. In both filamentation and gene expression assays, C. krusei showed the higher inhibitory activity on the morphogenesis of C. albicans compared to C. glabrata. C. krusei and C. glabrata are capable to reduce the filamentation of C. albicans and consequently decrease the expression of the HWP1 gene.

  7. Ulcerative Vaginitis Due to Torulopsis Glabrata: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Clark, John F. J.; Faggett, Timothy; Peters, Barbara; Sampson, Calvin C.

    1978-01-01

    A patient with ulcerative vaginitis is presented. The differential diagnosis included malignant ulcer, chancroid, and granuloma venereum. Torulopsis glabrata vaginitis, which was subsequently proven, responded successfully to clotrimazole suppositories. Predisposing and related factors and isolation and identification procedures are discussed. PMID:569709

  8. Genome structure and dynamics of the yeast pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Khadija M; Kokošar, Janez; Guo, Xiaoxian; Gu, Zhenglong; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-01-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is the second most frequent cause of Candida infections. However, from the phylogenetic point of view, C. glabrata is much closer to Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to Candida albicans. Apparently, this yeast has relatively recently changed its life style and become a successful opportunistic pathogen. Recently, several C. glabrata sister species, among them clinical and environmental isolates, have had their genomes characterized. Also, hundreds of C. glabrata clinical isolates have been characterized for their genomes. These isolates display enormous genomic plasticity. The number and size of chromosomes vary drastically, as well as intra- and interchromosomal segmental duplications occur frequently. The observed genome alterations could affect phenotypic properties and thus help to adapt to the highly variable and harsh habitats this yeast finds in different human patients and their tissues. Further genome sequencing of pathogenic isolates will provide a valuable tool to understand the mechanisms behind genome dynamics and help to elucidate the genes contributing to the virulence potential. PMID:24528571

  9. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  10. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  11. Protein kinase A activity and protein phosphorylation in the haemocytes of immune-challenged Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Jakubowicz, Teresa

    2007-09-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) activity was detected in the haemocytes of greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella larvae using a specific peptide substrate--kemptide. The enzyme was activated in vitro by 1 microM concentration of cAMP, 8-Br-cAMP, 8-Chl-cAMP and BzcMP, whereas in the case of cGMP 10 microM concentration was necessary. Immune challenge of G. mellonella larvae with bacteria led to changes in haemocyte PKA activity. Gram-positive M. luteus was a better inducer of PKA activity than Gram-negative E. coli. The kinetics of activity changes was dependent on the bacteria used and considerably differed from that observed in water-treated insects. Inhibition of PKA activity by cell-permeable, specific inhibitor, Rp-8-Br-cAMPS, induced changes in haemocyte morphology resembling those caused by live bacteria. Four potential PKA substrates of 155 kDa, 44 kDa, 40 kDa and 22 kDa were recognized in the haemocytes of naive larvae by phospho-motif antibodies for PKA phosphorylation consensus site. The modification level of 40 kDa protein changed after water treatment and immune challenge of G. mellonella larvae, whereas that of 155 kDa protein changed only after E. coli and LPS injections. Additionally, in the haemocytes of bacteria- and LPS-challenged insects a transient phosphorylation of 36 kDa protein was detected.

  12. Treatment of disseminated Torulopsis glabrata infection with DO870 and amphotericin B.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, B A; Bocanegra, R; Colombo, A L; Graybill, J R

    1994-01-01

    Torulopsis glabrata, an opportunist pathogen in immunosuppressed patients, is resistant to many antifungal agents, and there are no established treatment regimens for this organism. The mouse model was used to evaluate treatment with DO870, amphotericin B, fluconazole, and their combination. Mice were immunosuppressed with 5 mg of gold sodium thiomalate given intraperitoneally 1 day prior to intravenous infection with 10(8) T. glabrata cells. Treatment with a new antifungal triazole, DO870, at doses ranging from 1 to 50 mg/kg of body weight administered per os either daily or on alternate days; fluconazole at 100 mg/kg twice a day per os; or amphotericin B at 3 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally was begun 1 day after infection. Treatment for 5 days was followed by sacrifice 2 days later for determining CFU counts in spleen and kidney tissue. For a fluconazole-sensitive isolate (MIC of DO870, < 1.25 micrograms/ml), DO870 at 5 mg/kg/day significantly reduced counts in kidney and spleen tissue (P < 0.05), amphotericin B was modestly effective, and the combination of DO870 (25 mg/kg) and amphotericin B (3 mg/kg) was markedly more effective than either drug alone (P < 0.01). Three additional isolates were resistant in vitro to DO870 (MIC, 4 micrograms/ml). No reduction in CFU in kidney or spleen tissue was observed with DO870 when compared with counts in control tissue. DO870 is effective in vivo against at least some isolates of T. glabrata and when combined with amphotericin B can exert additive effects. PMID:7979293

  13. Assessment of toxicity of Moringa oleifera flower extract to Biomphalaria glabrata, Schistosoma mansoni and Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Filho, Cláudio A A; Albuquerque, Lidiane P; Silva, Luanna R S; Silva, Patrícia C B; Coelho, Luana C B B; Navarro, Daniela M A F; Albuquerque, Monica C P A; Melo, Ana Maria M A; Napoleão, Thiago H; Pontual, Emmanuel V; Paiva, Patrícia M G

    2015-08-01

    This study reports the effect of an aqueous extract from Moringa oleifera Lam. flowers on Biomphalaria glabrata embryos and adults and on Schistosoma mansoni adult worms. The extract contains tannins, saponins, flavones, flavonols, xanthones, and trypsin inhibitor activity. The toxicity of the extract on Artemia salina larvae was also investigated to determine the safety of its use for schistosomiasis control. After incubation for 24h, the flower extract significantly (p<0.05) delayed the development of B. glabrata embryos and promoted mortality of adult snails (LC50: 2.37±0.5mgmL(-1)). Furthermore, treatment with the extract disrupted the development of embryos generated by snails, with most of them remaining in the blastula stage while control embryos were already in the gastrula stage. Flower extract killed A. salina larvae with a LC50 value (0.2±0.015mgmL(-1)) lower than that determined for snails. A small reduction (17%) in molluscicidal activity was detected when flower extract (2.37mgmL(-1)) was exposed to tropical environmental conditions (UVI index ranging from 1 to 14, temperature from 25 to 30°C, and 65% relative humidity). Toxicity to A. salina was also reduced (LC50 value of 0.28±0.01mgmL(-1)). In conclusion, M. oleifera flower extract had deleterious effects on B. glabrata adults and embryos. However, unrestricted use to control schistosomiasis should be avoided due to the toxicity of this extract on A. salina.

  14. Haemocyte population and ultrastructural changes during the immune response of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus to microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Brayner, F A; Araújo, H R C; Santos, S S; Cavalcanti, M G S; Alves, L C; Souza, J R B; Peixoto, C A

    2007-03-01

    Haemocytes circulating in the haemolymph protect insects against pathogens that enter the haemocoel. Changes in haemocyte morphology and differences in haemocyte counts during the immune response of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) to microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold) (Spirurida: Onchocercidae) were investigated in the present study. The mean number of total haemocytes was significantly elevated in infected mosquitoes (P<0.001), reaching a peak on the third day post-infection. Differential counts show that mean numbers of prohaemocytes, plasmatocytes, granular cells and oenocytoids increased significantly after infection with microfilariae granulocytes compared to the control and näive groups of Cx. quinquefasciatus (P<0.05). Changes in proportional counts of haemocytes were also analysed in haemolymph perfusates of Cx. quinquefasciatus infected with W. bancrofti. On the first day post-infection, infected mosquitoes showed an increase in the proportion of prohaemocytes (18.8% compared to 9.6% for the control) and of oenocytoids (7.1% compared to 4.7% control); however, they exhibited lower levels of plasmatocytes (36.6% compared to 42.1% control) and granular cells (36.1% compared to 41.4% control). On day 14 post-infection, similar changes were observed for these haemocyte types, except that the proportion of granular cells was significantly greater than the control (41.2% compared to 31.3% control). Although an enhancement of prohaemocyte numbers was observed, this cellular type did not show any ultrastructural alteration. On the other hand, granular cells, plasmatocytes and oenocytoids presented morphological alterations indicative of innate immunological activation in mosquitoes infected with W. bancrofti.

  15. High Resistance to Oxidative Stress in the Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata Is Mediated by a Single Catalase, Cta1p, and Is Controlled by the Transcription Factors Yap1p, Skn7p, Msn2p, and Msn4p▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Briones-Martin-del-Campo, Marcela; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Riego-Ruiz, Lina; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We characterized the oxidative stress response of Candida glabrata to better understand the virulence of this fungal pathogen. C. glabrata could withstand higher concentrations of H2O2 than Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even Candida albicans. Stationary-phase cells were extremely resistant to oxidative stress, and this resistance was dependent on the concerted roles of stress-related transcription factors Yap1p, Skn7p, and Msn4p. We showed that growing cells of C. glabrata were able to adapt to high levels of H2O2 and that this adaptive response was dependent on Yap1p and Skn7p and partially on the general stress transcription factors Msn2p and Msn4p. C. glabrata has a single catalase gene, CTA1, which was absolutely required for resistance to H2O2 in vitro. However, in a mouse model of systemic infection, a strain lacking CTA1 showed no effect on virulence. PMID:18375620

  16. High resistance to oxidative stress in the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is mediated by a single catalase, Cta1p, and is controlled by the transcription factors Yap1p, Skn7p, Msn2p, and Msn4p.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Briones-Martin-del-Campo, Marcela; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Riego-Ruiz, Lina; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2008-05-01

    We characterized the oxidative stress response of Candida glabrata to better understand the virulence of this fungal pathogen. C. glabrata could withstand higher concentrations of H(2)O(2) than Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even Candida albicans. Stationary-phase cells were extremely resistant to oxidative stress, and this resistance was dependent on the concerted roles of stress-related transcription factors Yap1p, Skn7p, and Msn4p. We showed that growing cells of C. glabrata were able to adapt to high levels of H(2)O(2) and that this adaptive response was dependent on Yap1p and Skn7p and partially on the general stress transcription factors Msn2p and Msn4p. C. glabrata has a single catalase gene, CTA1, which was absolutely required for resistance to H(2)O(2) in vitro. However, in a mouse model of systemic infection, a strain lacking CTA1 showed no effect on virulence.

  17. Usnic Acid Potassium Salt: An Alternative for the Control of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Vera L. M.; Pereira, Eugênia C.; Falcão, Emerson P. S.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the most important vector of schistosomiasis due to its wide geographical distribution, high infection rate and efficient disease transmission. Among the methods of schistosomiasis control, the World Health Organization recommends the use of synthetic molluscicides, such as niclosamide. However, different substances of natural origin have been tested as alternatives for the control or eradication of mollusks. The literature describes the antitumor, antimicrobial and antiviral properties of usnic acid as well as other important activities of common interest between medicine and the environment. However, usnic acid has a low degree of water solubility, which can be a limiting factor for its use, especially in aquatic environments, since the organic solvents commonly used to solubilize this substance can have toxic effects on aquatic biota. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the potassium salt of usnic acid (potassium usnate) with regard to molluscicidal activity and toxicity to brine shrimp (Artemia salina). To obtain potassium usnate, usnic acid was extracted with diethyl ether isolated and purified from the lichen Cladonia substellata. Biological assays were performed with embryos and adult snails of B. glabrata exposed for 24 h to the usnate solution solubilized in dechlorinated water at 2.5; 5 and 10 µg/ml for embryos, 0.5; 0.9; 1;5 and 10 µg/ml for mollusks and 0.5; 1; 5; 10 µg/ml for A. salina. The lowest lethal concentration for the embryos and adult snails was 10 and 1 µg/ml, respectively. No toxicity to A. salina was found. The results show that modified usnic acid has increased solubility (100%) without losing its biological activity and may be a viable alternative for the control of B. glabrata. PMID:25375098

  18. Reversing the resistance phenotype of the Biomphalaria glabrata snail host Schistosoma mansoni infection by temperature modulation.

    PubMed

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Knight, Matty

    2012-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails that display either resistant or susceptible phenotypes to the parasitic trematode, Schistosoma mansoni provide an invaluable resource towards elucidating the molecular basis of the snail-host/schistosome relationship. Previously, we showed that induction of stress genes either after heat-shock or parasite infection was a major feature distinguishing juvenile susceptible snails from their resistant counterparts. In order to examine this apparent association between heat stress and snail susceptibility, we investigated the effect of temperature modulation in the resistant snail stock, BS-90. Here, we show that, incubated for up to 4 hrs at 32°C prior to infection, these resistant snails became susceptible to infection, i.e. shedding cercariae at 5 weeks post exposure (PE) while unstressed resistant snails, as expected, remained resistant. This suggests that susceptibility to infection by this resistant snail phenotype is temperature-sensitive (ts). Additionally, resistant snails treated with the Hsp 90 specific inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA) after heat stress, were no longer susceptible to infection, retaining their resistant phenotype. Consistently, susceptible snail phenotypes treated with 100 mM GA before parasite exposure also remained uninfected. These results provide direct evidence for the induction of stress genes (heat shock proteins; Hsp 70, Hsp 90 and the reverse transcriptase [RT] domain of the nimbus non-LTR retrotransposon) in B. glabrata susceptibility to S. mansoni infection and characterize the resistant BS-90 snails as a temperature-sensitive phenotype. This study of reversing snail susceptibility phenotypes to S. mansoni provides an opportunity to directly track molecular pathway(s) that underlie the B. glabrata snail's ability to either sustain or destroy the S. mansoni parasite.

  19. Propensity Score Analysis of the Role of Initial Antifungal Therapy in the Outcome of Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, M.; Aguado, J. M.; Merino, P.; Lora-Pablos, D.; Martín-Dávila, P.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata isolates have reduced in vitro susceptibility to azoles, which raises concerns about the clinical effectiveness of fluconazole for treating bloodstream infection (BSI) by this Candida species. We aimed to evaluate whether the choice of initial antifungal treatment (fluconazole versus echinocandins or liposomal amphotericin B [L-AmB]-based regimens) has an impact on the outcome of C. glabrata BSI. We analyzed data from a prospective, multicenter, population-based surveillance program on candidemia conducted in 5 metropolitan areas of Spain (May 2010 to April 2011). Adult patients with an episode of C. glabrata BSI were included. The main outcomes were 14-day mortality and treatment failure (14-day mortality and/or persistent C. glabrata BSI for ≥48 h despite antifungal initiation). The impact of using fluconazole as initial antifungal treatment on the patients' prognosis was assessed by logistic regression analysis with the addition of a propensity score approach. A total of 94 patients with C. glabrata BSI were identified. Of these, 34 had received fluconazole and 35 had received an echinocandin/L-AmB-based regimen. Patients in the echinocandin/L-AmB group had poorer baseline clinical status than did those in the fluconazole group. Patients in the fluconazole group were more frequently (55.9% versus 28.6%) and much earlier (median time, 3 versus 7 days) switched to another antifungal regimen. Overall, 14-day mortality was 13% (9/69) and treatment failure 34.8% (24/69), with no significant differences between the groups. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for baseline characteristics by propensity score, fluconazole use was not associated with an unfavorable evolution (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for 14-day mortality, 1.16, with 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.22 to 6.17; adjusted OR for treatment failure, 0.83, with 95% CI of 0.27 to 2.61). In conclusion, initial fluconazole treatment was not associated with a poorer outcome than that

  20. Compartmentalizing metabolic pathway in Candida glabrata for acetoin production.

    PubMed

    Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Acetoin, a valuable compound, has high potential as a biochemical building block. In this study, subcellular metabolic engineering was applied to engineer the mitochondrion of Candida glabrata for acetoin production. With the aid of mitochondrial targeting sequences, a heterologous acetoin pathway was targeted into the mitochondria to increase the enzyme concentrations and level of intermediate, followed by coupling with the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) to increase the availability of mitochondrial pyruvate. As a result, the strain comprising the combination of the mitochondrial pathway and MPC could yield approximately 3.26 g/L of acetoin, which was about 59.8% higher than that produced by the cytoplasmic pathway. These results provided a new insight into the metabolic engineering of C. glabrata for acetoin production, and offered a potential platform to improve the performance of engineered pathways. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Mechanisms of Azole Resistance in Petite Mutants of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Sophie; Bergès, Thierry; Poupard, Pascal; Vauzelle-Moreau, Carole; Renier, Gilles; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We previously showed that resistant colonies of Candida glabrata inside the azole inhibition zones had respiratory deficiency due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Here, we analyzed the mechanisms of azole resistance in petite mutants of C. glabrata obtained by exposure to fluconazole or induced by ethidium bromide. The respiratory deficiency of these mutants was confirmed by oxygraphy and flow cytometric analysis with rhodamine 123, and its mitochondrial origin was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy and restriction endonuclease analysis of the mitochondrial DNA. Flow cytometry with rhodamine 6G suggested an increased drug efflux in mutant cells, which was further supported by Northern blot analysis of the expression of the C. glabrata CDR1 (CgCDR1) and CgCDR2 genes, encoding efflux pumps. Conversely, the expression of CgERG11, which encodes the azole target, was not affected by petite mutations, and no differences were seen in the sequence of this gene between parent isolates and mutants. Moreover, sterol analysis showed similar overall amount of sterols in parent and mutant cells, but quantitative modifications were observed in the mutants, with almost undetectable biosynthesis intermediates. Further analysis performed after separation of free sterols from steryl esters revealed a defect in sterol esterification in mutant cells, with free ergosterol representing 92% of the overall sterol content. Thus, resistance or decreased susceptibility to azoles in petite mutants of C. glabrata is associated with increased expression of CgCDR1 and, to a lesser extent, of CgCDR2. In addition, the marked increase in free ergosterol content would explain their increased susceptibility to polyenes. PMID:15105136

  2. Mechanisms of azole resistance in petite mutants of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Brun, Sophie; Bergès, Thierry; Poupard, Pascal; Vauzelle-Moreau, Carole; Renier, Gilles; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2004-05-01

    We previously showed that resistant colonies of Candida glabrata inside the azole inhibition zones had respiratory deficiency due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Here, we analyzed the mechanisms of azole resistance in petite mutants of C. glabrata obtained by exposure to fluconazole or induced by ethidium bromide. The respiratory deficiency of these mutants was confirmed by oxygraphy and flow cytometric analysis with rhodamine 123, and its mitochondrial origin was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy and restriction endonuclease analysis of the mitochondrial DNA. Flow cytometry with rhodamine 6G suggested an increased drug efflux in mutant cells, which was further supported by Northern blot analysis of the expression of the C. glabrata CDR1 (CgCDR1) and CgCDR2 genes, encoding efflux pumps. Conversely, the expression of CgERG11, which encodes the azole target, was not affected by petite mutations, and no differences were seen in the sequence of this gene between parent isolates and mutants. Moreover, sterol analysis showed similar overall amount of sterols in parent and mutant cells, but quantitative modifications were observed in the mutants, with almost undetectable biosynthesis intermediates. Further analysis performed after separation of free sterols from steryl esters revealed a defect in sterol esterification in mutant cells, with free ergosterol representing 92% of the overall sterol content. Thus, resistance or decreased susceptibility to azoles in petite mutants of C. glabrata is associated with increased expression of CgCDR1 and, to a lesser extent, of CgCDR2. In addition, the marked increase in free ergosterol content would explain their increased susceptibility to polyenes.

  3. Separation of haemocyte subpopulations in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis by immunomagnetic bead using monoclonal antibody against granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jing; Chang, Yanhong; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Zhan, Wenbin

    2017-01-01

    In our previous work, two monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against granulocytes of shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) had been produced, in this paper, haemocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) using the Mabs. Then immunomagnetic bead (IMB) method was applied for separation hyalinocytes and granulocytes using the Mabs. The separated hyalinocytes and granulocytes were analyzed by FCM, indirect immunofluorescence assay, Giemsa staining and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed the proportion of hyalinocytes in haemolymph of F. chinensis was 15.14 ± 1.22%, and that of granulocytes was 75.43 ± 2.31%. After two times separation by IMB, the purity rate of hyalinocytes and granulocytes was 96.27 ± 1.06% and 98.13 ± 0.86%, respectively. The hyalinocytes possessed 0.60-0.85 in nucleus/cytoplasm (N/C) ratio and had few granule in cytoplasm, whereas the separated granulocytes with N/C ratio of 0.12-0.36 and high electronic density of double membrane granules. The results reported the separation of haemocyte subpopulations using Mabs in shrimp for the first time, and the hyalinocytes and granulocytes isolated by IMB could be used for their differential protein analysis.

  4. Discriminative power of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis using the microbial identification system (MIS) for Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schmidt, S; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    2000-12-01

    Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is frequently isolated in cases of fungal infection and commonly shows acquired or innate fluconazole resistance. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an emerging opportunistic yeast pathogen, causes serious systemic infections in immunocompromised, and vaginitis and superficial infections in immunocompetent patients. For both species reliable identification in the routine laboratory is mandatory, but species identification of strains, e.g. trehalose-negative C. glabrata, may be difficult. Therefore, gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of whole cell fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles, that is independent of assimilation profiles of strains and suitable for reliable and rapid identification of clinically important yeasts, was applied. However, frequent misidentification of C. glabrata as S. cerevisiae has been reported when using the Yeast Clinical Database of MIS. Accuracy of MIS identification may be strongly influenced by the amounts of cell mass analyzed. Therefore, the present study compared the MIS results of these two yeasts achieved with different cell masses. Primarily we optimized, especially with respect to cost-effectiveness, the recommended streaking technique yielding a maximal recovery of 90-130 mg of cell mass from one plate, enabling testing of poor growing strains of C. glabrata. For all C. glabrata strains tested (n = 10) the highest identification scores (SI [Similarity Index] range 0.525-0.963, median 0.832) were achieved with 30 to 45 mg of cell mass. Only 5 of 10 S. cerevisiae strains revealed good library comparisons (SI > or = 0.5) when using 30 mg of cell mass, whereas with 45 mg all strains but two revealed this SI-level. For S. cerevisiae a higher amount of cell mass processed (up to 90 mg) was correlated with better identification scores (SI range using 90 mg: 0.464-0.870, median, 0.737). Several passages prior to FAME analysis of C. glabrata strains on recommended media revealed narrowing of SI ranges, but

  5. Posaconazole Activity against Candida glabrata after Exposure to Caspofungin or Amphotericin B▿

    PubMed Central

    Spreghini, Elisabetta; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Milici, Maria Eleonora; Scalise, Giorgio; Barchiesi, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of sequential therapy with caspofungin (CAS) or amphotericin B (AMB) followed by posaconazole (POS) against Candida glabrata. The susceptibilities to POS of yeast cells pre-exposed to CAS or AMB were identical to those of untreated cells as shown by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth dilution, cell viability, and disk diffusion methods. We then investigated the activity of sequential regimens in an experimental model of disseminated candidiasis. CAS given at 1 mg/kg/day for 2 days followed by POS at either 15 or 30 mg/kg/day significantly reduced the counts compared to the controls, but this treatment was not superior to the use of CAS alone. Also, sequential regimens with AMB given at 1 mg/kg/day for 2 days followed by POS (AMB/POS) were effective at reducing the fungal burden against the controls. In addition, AMB/POS with both doses of the triazole were significantly more effective than AMB alone. Overall, our data showed that there is no therapeutic advantage in using CAS followed by POS, whereas an induction therapy with AMB followed by a maintenance regimen with POS might be a suitable strategy in managing C. glabrata infections. PMID:18056279

  6. Barbatic Acid Offers a New Possibility for Control of Biomphalaria Glabrata and Schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mônica Cristina Barroso; Silva, Monique Costa; Silva, Hianna Arely Milca Fagundes; Silva, Luanna Ribeiro Santos; Albuquerque, Mônica Camelo Pessoa de Azevedo; Aires, André Lima; Falcão, Emerson Peter da Silva; Pereira, Eugênia C; de Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça Albuquerque; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2017-03-31

    This study evaluated the biological activity of an ether extract and barbatic acid (BAR) from Cladia aggregata on embryos and adult mollusks of Biomphalaria glabrata, cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni and the microcrustacean Artemia salina. The ether extract and BAR were obtained by successive extractions with diethyl ether. The obtained extracts were analyzed using thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the ether extract exerted embryotoxic effects at 50 and 100 µg/mL and molluscicidal effects at 20 and 25 µg/mL. BAR exhibited no embryotoxicity, and its molluscicidal concentration was equal to that of the ether extract. However, after 60 min of exposure, 1 µg/mL BAR presented cercaricidal activity against the parasite S. mansoni at the second larval stage. Neither substance induced toxicity against A. salina. These results indicate the potential molluscicidal activities of the ether extract and BAR against B. glabrata and S. mansoni cercariae. In addition to these effects, there was a lack of toxicity against the aquatic environment and no damage to the biota, indicating the potential of these products for large-scale control and/or eradication of schistosomiasis.

  7. Expression of Candida glabrata adhesins following exposure to chemical preservatives

    PubMed Central

    Mundy, Renee Domergue; Cormack, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    In Candida glabrata, an opportunistic yeast pathogen, adherence to host cells is mediated in part by the Epa family of adhesins, which are encoded largely at subtelomeric loci where they are subject to transcriptional silencing. In analyzing the regulation of the subtelomeric EPA6 gene, we found that its transcription is highly induced after exposure to methylparaben, propylparaben or sorbate. These weak acid-related chemicals are widely used as antifungal preservatives in many consumer goods, including over-the-counter (OTC) vaginal products. Culture of C. glabrata in a variety of vaginal products induced expression of EPA6, leading to increased adherence to cultured human cells as well as primary human vaginal epithelial cells. We present evidence that paraben/sorbate-induction of EPA6 expression involves both preservative stress and growth under hypoxic conditions. We further show that activation of EPA6 transcription depends on the Flo8 and Mss11 transcription factors and does not require the classical weak acid transcription factors War1 or Msn2/Msn4. We conclude that exposure of C. glabrata to commonly used preservatives can alter expression of virulence-related genes. PMID:19426114

  8. Intracellular survival of Candida glabrata in macrophages: immune evasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Seider, Katja; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a successful human opportunistic pathogen which causes superficial but also life-threatening systemic infections. During infection, C. glabrata has to cope with cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages, which belong to the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Candida glabrata is able to survive and even replicate inside macrophages while causing surprisingly low damage and cytokine release. Here, we present an overview of recent studies dealing with the interaction of C. glabrata with macrophages, from phagocytosis to intracellular growth and escape. We review the strategies of C. glabrata that permit intracellular survival and replication, including poor host cell activation, modification of phagosome maturation and phagosome pH, adaptation to antimicrobial activities, and mechanisms to overcome the nutrient limitations within the phagosome. In summary, these studies suggest that survival within macrophages may be an immune evasion and persistence strategy of C. glabrata during infection.

  9. Antiestrogenic constituents of the Thai medicinal plants Capparis flavicans and Vitex glabrata.

    PubMed

    Luecha, Prathan; Umehara, Kaoru; Miyase, Toshio; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Antiestrogenic compounds were investigated from Thai indigenous plants for galactogogues since estrogen is reported to suppress lactation in breastfeeding women. The aerial parts of the Thai medicinal plant Capparis flavicans, which has traditionally been used to promote lactation, gave the new compound capparoside A (1), along with 28 known compounds. The leaves of Vitex glabrata belong to the same genus as the chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus), which is used traditionally to support lactation, and afforded the new compounds khainaoside A (14), khainaoside B (15), and khainaoside C (16), together with six known compounds. The isolates were tested for their biological activity using the estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Syringaresinol (3) and principin (6), from C. flavicans, and khainaoside A (14) showed the most potent inhibitory effects on estrogen-enhanced cell proliferation among all compounds isolated. These results suggest that the lactation-promoting properties of C. flavicans might be related to the inhibitory effect on excess estrogen of women who experience insufficient breastfeeding and highlight the possibility of using V. glabrata leaves for their antiestrogenic properties.

  10. Humoral and Haemocytic Responses of Litopenaeus vannamei to Cd Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Covarrubias, Juan C.; Velarde-Montes, Germán J.; García-de la Parra, Luz M.; Soto-Jiménez, Martín F.; Frías-Espericueta, Martín G.

    2014-01-01

    White shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, subadults were exposed to four dilutions of the 96 h cadmium LC50 reported for postlarvae (PL12) of this species, and the effects were evaluated after 5, 48, and 96 h of exposure. While treatments did not affect survival and hemolymph clotting time increased with time, but not as a response to Cd exposure, the intensity of other responses was related to concentration, to time of exposure, and to their interaction. Hemocyanin decreased with time in all metal concentrations but increased in the control treatment, and an almost similar trend was observed with hemocyte numbers. As an initial response, phenoloxidase activity decreased with all metal concentrations, but it increased later to values similar or higher than the control treatment. PMID:24967441

  11. Myticin, a novel cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from haemocytes and plasma of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Mitta, G; Hubert, F; Noël, T; Roch, P

    1999-10-01

    We report here the isolation of two isoforms of a novel cysteine-rich peptide from haemocytes (isoform A of 4.438 Da and B of 4.562 Da) and plasma (isoform A) of the mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. The two molecules display antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas only isoform B is active against the fungus Fusarium oxysporum and a gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli D31. Complete peptide sequences were determined by a combination of Edman degradation, mass spectrometry and cDNA cloning using a haemocyte cDNA library. The mature molecules, named myticins, comprise 40 residues with four intramolecular disulfide bridges and a cysteine array in the primary structure different to that of the previously characterized cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides. Sequence analysis of the cloned cDNAs revealed that myticin precursors consist of 96 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 20 amino acids, the antimicrobial peptide sequence and a 36-residue C-terminal extension. This structure suggests that myticins are synthesized as preproproteins and then processed by various proteolytic events before storage of the active peptide in the haemocytes. Myticin precursors are expressed mainly in the haemocytes as revealed by Northern blot analysis.

  12. Cytotoxic and cytokine inducing properties of Candida glabrata in single and mixed oral infection models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lulu; Kashleva, Helena; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection, with Candida albicans being the most prevalent etiologic agent and Candida glabrata emerging as an important pathogen. C. glabrata is frequently co-isolated with C. albicans from oral lesions. Although C. albicans has been shown to trigger significant cytokine responses and cell damage, C. glabrata has not been systematically studied yet. The purpose of this study was to characterize the ability of C. glabrata to induce proinflammatory cytokine responses and host damage as a single infecting organism and in combination with C. albicans, using in vitro models of the oral mucosa. In monolayer oral epithelial cell cultures, C. glabrata failed to induce a significant interleukin-1α and interleukin-8 cytokine response and showed lower cytotoxicity, compared to C. albicans. However, C. glabrata triggered a significantly higher granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor response than C. albicans. C. glabrata strains showed a strain-dependent tissue damaging ability and a superficial invasion of the mucosal compartment in a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model of the human oral mucosa and submucosa. In the 3-D system, co-infection failed to promote host damage beyond the levels of infection with C. albicans alone. These studies indicate that C. glabrata induces cytokines in human oral epithelium in a strain-specific manner, but its tissue/cell damaging ability, compared to C. albicans, is low. Synergy between C. glabrata and C. albicans in cytokine induction and host damage was not observed with the strains tested. PMID:17306958

  13. Inhibition of cholinesterases and carboxylesterases of two invertebrate species, Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus, by the carbamate pesticide carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Guerrero, Noemi R Verrengia; Cochón, Adriana C

    2010-01-31

    In this study, the effects of sublethal concentrations of the carbamate carbaryl on the cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CES) activities present in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and in the pigmented Biomphalaria glabrata gastropod were investigated. The results showed that ChE activity from both species was inhibited by in vivo and in vitro exposure to carbaryl, with EC(50) and IC(50) values approximately 20 times lower for the oligochaete than for the gastropod. On the other hand, the recovery process in uncontaminated media was more efficient in oligochaetes than in snails. Thus, in only 2h the oligochaetes showed no inhibition with respect to control values whereas the snails did not reach control values even after 48h of being in pesticide-free water. CES activity was investigated in whole body soft tissue homogenates using three different substrates: p-nitrophenyl butyrate, 1-naphthyl acetate (NA) and 2-NA. In addition, the presence of multiple CES isozymes in L. variegatus and B. glabrata extracts, with activity towards 1- and 2-NA, was confirmed by native polyacrylamide electrophoresis. In both species, the activities measured using the naphthyl substrates were higher than the activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate. In addition, B. glabrata showed a higher CES activity than L. variegatus independently of the substrate used. In L. variegatus, in vivo CES activity towards the different substrates was less sensitive to carbaryl inhibition than ChE activity. In contrast, in B. glabrata, CES activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate was inhibited at lower insecticide concentrations than ChE. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the sensitivity of non-target freshwater invertebrate Type B-esterases towards pesticides.

  14. Intestinal resident yeast Candida glabrata requires Cyb2p-mediated lactate assimilation to adapt in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Keigo; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Uno, Jun; Sasamoto, Kaname; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kinjo, Yuki; Chibana, Hiroji

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal resident Candida glabrata opportunistically infects humans. However few genetic factors for adaptation in the intestine are identified in this fungus. Here we describe the C. glabrata CYB2 gene encoding lactate dehydrogenase as an adaptation factor for survival in the intestine. CYB2 was identified as a virulence factor by a silkworm infection study. To determine the function of CYB2, we analysed in vitro phenotypes of the mutant Δcyb2. The Δcyb2 mutant grew well in glucose medium under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, was not supersensitive to nitric oxide which has fungicidal-effect in phagocytes, and had normal levels of general virulence factors protease, lipase and adherence activities. A previous report suggested that Cyb2p is responsible for lactate assimilation. Additionally, it was speculated that lactate assimilation was required for Candida virulence because Candida must synthesize glucose via gluconeogenesis under glucose-limited conditions such as in the host. Indeed, the Δcyb2 mutant could not grow on lactate medium in which lactate is the sole carbon source in the absence of glucose, indicating that Cyb2p plays a role in lactate assimilation. We hypothesized that Cyb2p-mediated lactate assimilation is necessary for proliferation in the intestinal tract, as the intestine is rich in lactate produced by bacteria flora, but not glucose. The Δcyb2 mutant showed 100-fold decreased adaptation and few cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can adapt in mouse ceca. Interestingly, C. glabrata could assimilate lactate under hypoxic conditions, dependent on CYB2, but not yeast S. cerevisiae. Because accessible oxygen is limited in the intestine, the ability for lactate assimilation in hypoxic conditions may provide an advantage for a pathogenic yeast. From those results, we conclude that Cyb2p-mediated lactate assimilation is an intestinal adaptation factor of C. glabrata.

  15. Bird attributes, plant characteristics, and seed dispersal of Pera glabrata (Schott, 1858), (Euphorbiaceae) in a disturbed cerrado area.

    PubMed

    Francisco, M R; Lunardi, V O; Galetti, M

    2007-11-01

    Several plant characteristics, such as fruit production, nutrient reward, secondary compounds, and fruit color display, affect fruit choice by birds. On the other hand, several bird attributes affect their efficiency as dispersers. Here we investigate the ornithochoric seed dispersal of Pera glabrata Schott (Euphorbiaceae) in a cerrado fragment in southeastern Brazil. A set of bird attributes, such as frequency of visits, number of diaspores eaten, time spent foraging, methods of taking and handling the diaspores and agonistic interactions were analyzed in order to infer about the potential of each species to act as a seed disperser. Birds were the unique seed dispersers of these oil-rich diaspores. We observed 414 bird visits during 60 hours of focal observations in five trees from December 1999 to January 2000. Twenty bird species from seven families ate the diaspores of P. glabrata, but only 14 species were considered potential seed dispersers because they swallowed the diaspores, increasing the probabilities for the seeds to be defecated and/or regurgitated away from the parent trees. The main potential seed dispersers were: Turdus leucomelas (Muscicapidae), Dacnis cayana (Emberizidae), Colaptes melanochloros (Picidae) and Elaenia spp. (Tyrannidae). We did not find any significant seasonal change in the number of visits on the fruiting trees throughout the day. We also did not find any relation between the number of visits per tree and fruit production. The most effective seed dispersers of P. glabrata were generalist birds, which have a high visiting rate, high fruit consumption rate, and spend short periods on the plants. The large number of species recorded as potential seed dispersers of P. glabrata, being most of them very abundant even in Brazilian disturbed areas, may guarantee seed dispersal of this plant in small fragments and regenerating areas.

  16. Nuclear morphometry and ploidy of normal and neoplastic haemocytes in mussels

    PubMed Central

    Carella, Francesca; De Vico, Gionata; Landini, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) in bivalves has been reported in association with mass mortality events in various species of molluscs. The aim of this work was to quantify the nuclear morphometry and DNA content of neoplastic cells of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis affected by HN using nuclear densitometry in Feulgen-stained preparations. The results were also compared with a population of normal mussel haemocytes. We captured 256 images of 3 different neoplasia stages and 120 images of normal haemocytes; thus, a total of 120,166 nuclei were analysed. We extracted 21 morphological parameters from normal and neoplastic nuclei. Eighteen of these parameters were different (P<0.05). Among those (expressed in pixel units—inter-pixel distance of 0.45 micrometres—as: normal vs. neoplastic) nuclear area (117.1±94.1 vs. 423.1±226.9), perimeter (44.9±14.0 vs. 79.0±21.3) and (IOD) integrated optical density (13.47±34.5 vs. 177.1±150.8) were relevant features to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. Those differences allowed identifying two distinctive populations of neoplastic nuclei, occasionally in the same individuals at a given phase of the disease. Moreover, neoplastic haemocytes in less extended lesions showed a ploidy value of 6.2 n along with the presence of a second population of circulating cells with a DNA content of 10.7n. In samples with moderate disease only one peak at 7n was observed. Finally, in more severe conditions, a further ploidy peak of 7.8n was recorded, accompanied by a shallow but broad peak of 31n. This latter extreme value is thought to be due to the presence of giant multinucleated cells where individual nuclei overlap in space and cannot be discerned individually. Computer-based imaging allowed the direct visualization of the cell populations and simultaneous collection of ploidy data as well as morphological features of nuclei. PMID:28282459

  17. Nuclear morphometry and ploidy of normal and neoplastic haemocytes in mussels.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; De Vico, Gionata; Landini, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) in bivalves has been reported in association with mass mortality events in various species of molluscs. The aim of this work was to quantify the nuclear morphometry and DNA content of neoplastic cells of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis affected by HN using nuclear densitometry in Feulgen-stained preparations. The results were also compared with a population of normal mussel haemocytes. We captured 256 images of 3 different neoplasia stages and 120 images of normal haemocytes; thus, a total of 120,166 nuclei were analysed. We extracted 21 morphological parameters from normal and neoplastic nuclei. Eighteen of these parameters were different (P<0.05). Among those (expressed in pixel units-inter-pixel distance of 0.45 micrometres-as: normal vs. neoplastic) nuclear area (117.1±94.1 vs. 423.1±226.9), perimeter (44.9±14.0 vs. 79.0±21.3) and (IOD) integrated optical density (13.47±34.5 vs. 177.1±150.8) were relevant features to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. Those differences allowed identifying two distinctive populations of neoplastic nuclei, occasionally in the same individuals at a given phase of the disease. Moreover, neoplastic haemocytes in less extended lesions showed a ploidy value of 6.2 n along with the presence of a second population of circulating cells with a DNA content of 10.7n. In samples with moderate disease only one peak at 7n was observed. Finally, in more severe conditions, a further ploidy peak of 7.8n was recorded, accompanied by a shallow but broad peak of 31n. This latter extreme value is thought to be due to the presence of giant multinucleated cells where individual nuclei overlap in space and cannot be discerned individually. Computer-based imaging allowed the direct visualization of the cell populations and simultaneous collection of ploidy data as well as morphological features of nuclei.

  18. A galectin from Eriocheir sinensis functions as pattern recognition receptor enhancing microbe agglutination and haemocytes encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Huang, Mengmeng; Yi, Qilin; Guo, Ying; Gai, Yunchao; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Galectins are a family of β-galactoside binding lectins that function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immune system of both vertebrates and invertebrates. The cDNA of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis galectin (designated as EsGal) was cloned via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis. The full-length cDNA of EsGal was 999 bp. Its open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 218 amino acids containing a GLECT/Gal-bind_lectin domain and a proline/glycine rich low complexity region. The deduced amino acid sequence and domain organization of EsGal were highly similar to those of crustacean galectins. The mRNA transcripts of EsGal were found to be constitutively expressed in a wide range of tissues and mainly in hepatopancreas, gill and haemocytes. The mRNA expression level of EsGal increased rapidly and significantly after crabs were stimulated by different microbes. The recombinant EsGal (rEsGal) could bind various pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and glucan (GLU), and exhibited strong activity to agglutinate Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguillarum, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Pichia pastoris, and such agglutinating activity could be inhibited by both d-galactose and α-lactose. The in vitro encapsulation assay revealed that rEsGal could enhance the encapsulation of haemocytes towards agarose beads. These results collectively suggested that EsGal played crucial roles in the immune recognition and elimination of pathogens and contributed to the innate immune response against various microbes in crabs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Haemocoel injection of PirA1B1 to Galleria mellonella larvae leads to disruption of the haemocyte immune functions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens produces a number of insecticidal proteins to kill its larval prey. In this study, we cloned the gene coding for a binary toxin PirA1B1 and purified the recombinant protein using affinity chromatography combined with desalination technology. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the recombinant protein against the haemocytes of Galleria mellonella larvae was investigated. We found that the protein had haemocoel insecticidal activity against G. mellonella with an LD50 of 131.5 ng/larva. Intrahaemocoelic injection of PirA1B1 into G. mellonella resulted in significant decreases in haemocyte number and phagocytic ability. In in vitro experiments, PirA1B1 inhibited the spreading behaviour of the haemocytes of G. mellonella larvae and even caused haemocyte degeneration. Fluorescence microscope analysis and visualization of haemocyte F-actin stained with phalloidin-FITC showed that the PirA1B1 toxin disrupted the organization of the haemocyte cytoskeleton. Our results demonstrated that the PirA1B1 toxin disarmed the insect cellular immune system. PMID:27734915

  20. Haemocoel injection of PirA1B1 to Galleria mellonella larvae leads to disruption of the haemocyte immune functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong

    2016-10-13

    The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens produces a number of insecticidal proteins to kill its larval prey. In this study, we cloned the gene coding for a binary toxin PirA1B1 and purified the recombinant protein using affinity chromatography combined with desalination technology. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the recombinant protein against the haemocytes of Galleria mellonella larvae was investigated. We found that the protein had haemocoel insecticidal activity against G. mellonella with an LD50 of 131.5 ng/larva. Intrahaemocoelic injection of PirA1B1 into G. mellonella resulted in significant decreases in haemocyte number and phagocytic ability. In in vitro experiments, PirA1B1 inhibited the spreading behaviour of the haemocytes of G. mellonella larvae and even caused haemocyte degeneration. Fluorescence microscope analysis and visualization of haemocyte F-actin stained with phalloidin-FITC showed that the PirA1B1 toxin disrupted the organization of the haemocyte cytoskeleton. Our results demonstrated that the PirA1B1 toxin disarmed the insect cellular immune system.

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Candida glabrata for Diacetyl Production

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Xu, Nan; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Candida glabrata, an efficient pyruvate-producing strain, was metabolically engineered for the production of the food ingredient diacetyl. A diacetyl biosynthetic pathway was reconstructed based on genetic modifications and medium optimization. The former included (i) channeling carbon flux into the diacetyl biosynthetic pathway by amplification of acetolactate synthase, (ii) elimination of the branched pathway of α-acetolactate by deleting the ILV5 gene, and (iii) restriction of diacetyl degradation by deleting the BDH gene. The resultant strain showed an almost 1∶1 co-production of α-acetolactate and diacetyl (0.95 g L−1). Furthermore, addition of Fe3+ to the medium enhanced the conversion of α-acetolactate to diacetyl and resulted in a two-fold increase in diacetyl production (2.1 g L−1). In addition, increased carbon flux was further channeled into diacetyl biosynthetic pathway and a titer of 4.7 g L−1 of diacetyl was achieved by altering the vitamin level in the flask culture. Thus, this study illustrates that C. glabrata could be tailored as an attractive platform for enhanced biosynthesis of beneficial products from pyruvate by metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:24614328

  2. Glycan microarray analysis of Candida glabrata adhesin ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Margaret L; Frieman, Matthew; Smith, David; Alvarez, Richard A; Cummings, Richard D; Cormack, Brendan P

    2008-05-01

    The Candida glabrata genome encodes at least 23 members of the EPA (epithelial adhesin) family responsible for mediating adherence to host cells. To better understand the mechanism by which the Epa proteins contribute to pathogenesis, we have used glycan microarray analysis to characterize their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains surface-expressing the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of the Epa proteins, we found that the three Epa family members functionally identified as adhesins in Candida glabrata (Epa1, Epa6 and Epa7) bind to ligands containing a terminal galactose residue. However, the specificity of the three proteins for glycans within this class varies, with Epa6 having a broader specificity range than Epa1 or Epa7. This result is intriguing given the close homology between Epa6 and Epa7, which are 92% identical at the amino acid level. We have mapped a five-amino-acid region within the N-terminal ligand-binding domain that accounts for the difference in specificity of Epa6 and Epa7 and show that these residues contribute to adherence to both epithelial and endothelial cell lines in vitro.

  3. Occurrence of the haemocyte parasite Bonamia sp. in flat oysters Ostrea puelchana farmed in San Antonio Bay (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Kroeck, Marina A; Montes, Jaime

    2005-02-28

    Culture of native flat oysters Ostrea puelchana d'Orbigny in San Antonio Bay (San Matías Gulf, Argentina) began in 1995. After elevated mortality (33%) occurred in September 1996, 18 mo after immersion, histopathological analysis and evaluation of parasitic prevalence was carried out. In October 1997, after 31 mo of cultivation, cumulative mortality was 80%, and in December of the same year, when individuals reached marketable size, mortality was 95% and culture was discontinued. The present study describes the haemocytic parasitism that affected O. puelchana, and suggests that a Bonamia sp. was the etiological agent. This parasite should be considered as a different species from Bonamia sp. detected in Australia and New Zealand until more studies are made to determine the correct taxonomy. This work constitutes the first record of this haemocyte parasite in flat oysters from the Argentinean coast.

  4. Sulfated galactans from Gracilaria fisheri bind to shrimp haemocyte membrane proteins and stimulate the expression of immune genes.

    PubMed

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfated galactans (SG) from Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri) exhibit immunostimulant activity in shrimp. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that SG stimulates signaling molecules of the immune response of shrimp by binding to receptors on the host cell membrane. Accordingly, we evaluated the ability of SG to bind to shrimp haemocytes and showed that SG bound to the shrimp haemocyte membrane (SHM), potentially to specific receptors. Furthermore, this binding was associated with an activation of immune response genes of shrimp. Data from confocal laser scanning micrographs revealed that FITC-labeled SG bound to haemocytes. Far western blot analysis demonstrated that SHM peptides, with molecular sizes of 13, 14, 15, 17, and 25 kDa, were associated with SG. Peptide sequence analysis of the isolated bands using LC-MS/MS and NCBI blast search revealed the identity of the 13, 14, and 17 kDa peptides as lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP). SG induced the expression of immune related genes and downstream signaling mediators of LGBP including IMD, IKKs, NF-κB, antimicrobial peptides (crustin and PEN-4), the antiviral immunity (dicer), and proPO system (proPO-I and proPO-II). A LGBP neutralizing assay with anti-LGBP antibody indicated a decrease in SG-induced expression of LGBP downstream signaling mediators and the immune related genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the SG-stimulated immune activity in haemocytes is mediated, in part, through the LGBP, and IMD-NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Repeated applications of photodynamic therapy on Candida glabrata biofilms formed in acrylic resin polymerized.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo Freitas, Lírian Silva; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have been suggested that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used as an adjuvant treatment for denture stomatitis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of multiple sessions of PDT on Candida glabrata biofilms in specimens of polymerized acrylic resin formed after 5 days. Subsequently, four applications of PDT were performed on biofilms in 24-h intervals (days 6-9). Also, we evaluated two types of PDT, including application of laser and methylene blue or light-emitting diode (LED) and erythrosine. The control groups were treated with physiological solution. The effects of PDT on biofilm were evaluated after the first and fourth application of PDT. The biofilm analysis was performed by counting the colony-forming units. The results showed that between the days 6 and 9, the biofilms not treated by PDT had an increase of 5.53 to 6.05 log (p = 0.0271). Regarding the treatments, after one application of PDT, the biofilms decreased from 5.53 to 0.89 log. When it was done four applications, the microbial reduction ranged from 6.05 log to 0.11 log. We observed that one application of PDT with laser or LED caused a reduction of 3.36 and 4.64 compared to the control groups, respectively (p = 0.1708). When it was done four applications of PDT, the reductions achieved were 1.57 for laser and 5.94 for LED (p = 0.0001). It was concluded that repeated applications of PDT on C. glabrata biofilms showed higher antimicrobial activity compared to single application. PDT mediated by LED and erythrosine was more efficient than the PDT mediated by laser and methylene blue.

  6. Clinical and economic outcomes of decreased fluconazole susceptibility in patients with Candida glabrata bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ingi; Morales, Knashawn H.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Fishman, Neil O.; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-01-01

    Background The impact of reduced fluconazole susceptibility on clinical and economic outcomes in patients with Candida glabrata bloodstream infections (BSI) is unknown. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate 30-day inpatient mortality and postculture hospital charges in patients with C glabrata BSI with decreased fluconazole susceptibility (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥ 16 μg/mL) versus fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSI (MIC ≤ 8 μg/mL). These analyses were adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, and time at risk. Secondary analyses limited the C glabrata group with decreased fluconazole susceptibility to MIC ≥ 64 μg/mL. Results There were 45 (31%) deaths among 144 enrolled patients: 19 deaths (25%) among 76 patients with C glabrata BSI with decreased fluconazole susceptibility and 26 deaths (38%) among 68 patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSI. Decreased fluconazole susceptibility was not independently associated with increased 30-day inpatient mortality (adjusted odds ratio, .60; 95% confidence interval (CI): .26-1.35; P = 0.22) or hospital charges (multiplicative change in hospital charges, .93; 95% CI: .60-1.43; P = 0.73). Older age was associated with increased mortality and increased time at risk was associated with increased hospital charges. Conclusion Crude mortality rates remain high in patients with C glabrata BSI. However, decreased fluconazole susceptibility was not associated with increased mortality or hospital charges. PMID:20542354

  7. Iron-depletion promotes mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial integrity in pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Minoru; Tanabe, Koichi; Nakayama, Hironobu; Ueno, Keigo; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Umeyama, Takashi; Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata, a haploid budding yeast, is the cause of severe systemic infections in immune-compromised hosts. The amount of free iron supplied to C. glabrata cells during systemic infections is severely limited by iron-chelating proteins such as transferrin. Thus, the iron-deficiency response in C. glabrata cells is thought to play important roles in their survival inside the host's body. In this study, we found that mitophagy was induced under iron-depleted conditions, and that the disruption of a gene homologous to ATG32, which is responsible for mitophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, blocked mitophagy in C. glabrata. The mitophagic activity in C. glabrata cells was not detected on short-period exposure to nitrogen-starved conditions, which is a mitophagy-inducing condition used in S. cerevisiae. The mitophagy-deficient atg32Δ mutant of C. glabrata also exhibited decreased longevity under iron-deficient conditions. The mitochondrial membrane potential in Cgatg32Δ cells was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells under iron-depleted conditions. In a mouse model of disseminated infection, the Cgatg32Δ strain resulted in significantly decreased kidney and spleen fungal burdens compared with the wild-type strain. These results indicate that mitophagy in C. glabrata occurs in an iron-poor host tissue environment, and it may contribute to the longevity of cells, mitochondrial quality control, and pathogenesis. PMID:27347716

  8. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Adema, Coen M; Luo, Mei-Zhong; Hanelt, Ben; Hertel, Lynn A; Marshall, Jennifer J; Zhang, Si-Ming; DeJong, Randall J; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kudrna, David; Wing, Rod A; Soderlund, Cari; Knight, Matty; Lewis, Fred A; Caldeira, Roberta Lima; Jannotti-Passos, Liana K; Carvalho, Omar dos Santos; Loker, Eric S

    2006-09-01

    To provide a novel resource for analysis of the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, members of the international Biomphalaria glabrata Genome Initiative (http://biology.unm.edu/biomphalaria-genome.html), working with the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) and supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), produced a high quality bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The BB02 strain B. glabrata, a field isolate (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil) that is susceptible to several strains of Schistosoma mansoni, was selfed for two generations to reduce haplotype diversity in the offspring. High molecular weight DNA was isolated from ovotestes of 40 snails, partially digested with HindIII, and ligated into pAGIBAC1 vector. The resulting B. glabrata BAC library (BG_BBa) consists of 61824 clones (136.3 kb average insert size) and provides 9.05 x coverage of the 931 Mb genome. Probing with single/low copy number genes from B. glabrata and fingerprinting of selected BAC clones indicated that the BAC library sufficiently represents the gene complement. BAC end sequence data (514 reads, 299860 nt) indicated that the genome of B. glabrata contains ~ 63% AT, and disclosed several novel genes, transposable elements, and groups of high frequency sequence elements. This BG_BBa BAC library, available from AGI at cost to the research community, gains in relevance because BB02 strain B. glabrata is targeted whole genome sequencing by NHGRI.

  9. A Drosophila haemocyte-specific protein, hemolectin, similar to human von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Goto, A; Kumagai, T; Kumagai, C; Hirose, J; Narita, H; Mori, H; Kadowaki, T; Beck, K; Kitagawa, Y

    2001-01-01

    We identified a novel Drosophila protein of approximately 400 kDa, hemolectin (d-Hml), secreted from haemocyte-derived Kc167 cells. Its 11.7 kbp cDNA contains an open reading frame of 3843 amino acid residues, with conserved domains in von Willebrand factor (VWF), coagulation factor V/VIII and complement factors. The d-hml gene is located on the third chromosome (position 70C1-5) and consists of 26 exons. The major part of d-Hml consists of well-known motifs with the organization: CP1-EG1-CP2-EG2-CP3-VD1-VD2-VD'-VD3-VC1-VD"-VD"'-FC1-FC2-VC2-LA1-VD4-VD5-VC3-VB1-VB2-VC4-VC5-CK1 (CP, complement-control protein domain; EG, epidermal-growth-factor-like domain; VB, VC, VD, VWF type B-, C- and D-like domains; VD', VD", VD"', truncated C-terminal VDs; FC, coagulation factor V/VIII type C domain; LA, low-density-lipoprotein-receptor class A domain; CK, cysteine knot domain). The organization of VD1-VD2-VD'-VD3, essential for VWF to be processed by furin, to bind to coagulation factor VIII and to form interchain disulphide linkages, is conserved. The 400 kDa form of d-Hml was sensitive to acidic cleavage near the boundary between VD2 and VD', where the cleavage site of pro-VWF is located. Agarose-gel electrophoresis of metabolically radiolabelled d-Hml suggested that it is secreted from Kc167 cells mainly as dimers. Resembling VWF, 7.9% (305 residues) of cysteine residues on the d-Hml sequence had well-conserved positions in each motif. Coinciding with the development of phagocytic haemocytes, d-hml transcript was detected in late embryos and larvae. Its low-level expression in adult flies was induced by injury at any position on the body. PMID:11563973

  10. Two echinocandin-resistant Candida glabrata FKS mutants from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Serisha D; Magobo, Rindidzani E; Zulu, Thokozile G; Maphanga, Tsidiso G; Luthuli, Nkosinathi; Lowman, Warren; Govender, Nelesh P

    2016-03-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as first-line agents to treat invasive infections caused by Candida glabrata since this organism is inherently less susceptible to azoles. However, resistance to echinocandins has been described in C. glabrata due to amino acid changes in the hotspot regions of the FKS1 and FKS2 genes. In this report, we describe the first two South African C. glabrata isolates with echinocandin resistance mediated by mutations in the FKS2 gene. Both isolates were cultured from urine specimens from private-sector patients.

  11. Evaluation of Polymorphic Locus Sequence Typing for Candida glabrata Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Shiffrin, Eric; Shelton, Celeste; Healey, Kelley; Vermitsky, John-Paul; Edlind, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic yeast Candida glabrata is increasingly refractory to antifungal treatment or prophylaxis and relatedly is increasingly implicated in health care-associated infections. To elucidate the epidemiology of these infections, strain typing is required. Sequence-based typing provides multiple advantages over length-based methods, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); however, conventional multilocus sequence typing (targeting 6 conserved loci) and whole-genome sequencing are impractical for routine use. A commercial sequence-based typing service for C. glabrata that targets polymorphic tandem repeat-containing loci has recently been developed. These CgMT-J and CgMT-M services were evaluated with 56 epidemiologically unrelated isolates, 4 to 7 fluconazole-susceptible or fluconazole-resistant isolates from each of 5 center A patients, 5 matched pairs of fluconazole-susceptible/resistant isolates from center B patients, and 7 isolates from a center C patient who responded to then failed caspofungin therapy. CgMT-J and CgMT-M generated congruent results, resolving isolates into 24 and 20 alleles, respectively. Isolates from all but one of the center A patients shared the same otherwise rare alleles, suggesting nosocomial transmission. Unexpectedly, Pdr1 sequencing showed that resistance arose independently in each patient. Similarly, most isolates from center B also clustered together; however, this may reflect a dominant clone since their alleles were shared by multiple unrelated isolates. Although distinguishable by their echinocandin susceptibilities, all isolates from the center C patient shared alleles, in agreement with the previously reported relatedness of these isolates based on PFGE. Finally, we show how phylogenetic clusters can be used to provide surrogate parents to analyze the mutational basis for antifungal resistance. PMID:26842706

  12. Biological consequences of petite mutations in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Brun, Sophie; Dalle, Frédéric; Saulnier, Patrick; Renier, Gilles; Bonnin, Alain; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2005-08-01

    To define the pathogenicity of respiration-deficient mutants of Candida glabrata, which present a reduced susceptibility to azoles, that are easily induced in vitro by exposure to these drugs or to ethidium bromide and that may be selected in vivo in patients receiving fluconazole. Two wild-type isolates of C. glabrata were compared with their respective fluconazole- or ethidium bromide-induced petite mutants, regarding the carbohydrate and protein composition of the cell wall, as well as their surface physical properties, and also their adherence abilities and virulence in mice. Flow cytometric analysis of cell wall carbohydrates using several fluorescent lectins showed an increased binding of mutant cells to concanavalin A compared with their parent isolates, suggesting a greater availability or an increased amount of glucose-mannose residues at the cell surface in petite mutants. Likewise, some quantitative differences between parent and mutant isolates were shown by SDS-PAGE in protein extracts from blastoconidia. Regarding the surface physical properties, no significant differences were seen in the electrophoretic mobility determined by microelectrophoresis, but the two-phase partitioning method revealed a lower cell surface hydrophobicity for petite mutants. Moreover, mutant cells exhibited significant overexpression of CgEPA1 as revealed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, but the adherence capacities to Caco-2 cells, a human enterocyte line, were not significantly different. Finally, in agreement with their slower growth, petite mutants were less virulent than parent isolates in a murine model of systemic infection. This low virulence in mice suggests that petite mutants could be disregarded clinically although they may arise during fluconazole therapy.

  13. Notch cooperates with Lozenge/Runx to lock haemocytes into a differentiation programme

    PubMed Central

    Terriente-Felix, Ana; Li, Jinghua; Collins, Stephanie; Mulligan, Amy; Reekie, Ian; Bernard, Fred; Krejci, Alena; Bray, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The diverse functions of Notch signalling imply that it must elicit context-specific programmes of gene expression. With the aim of investigating how Notch drives cells to differentiate, we have used a genome-wide approach to identify direct Notch targets in Drosophila haemocytes (blood cells), where Notch promotes crystal cell differentiation. Many of the identified Notch-regulated enhancers contain Runx and GATA motifs, and we demonstrate that binding of the Runx protein Lozenge (Lz) is required for enhancers to be competent to respond to Notch. Functional studies of targets, such as klumpfuss (ERG/WT1 family) and pebbled/hindsight (RREB1 homologue), show that Notch acts both to prevent the cells adopting alternate cell fates and to promote morphological characteristics associated with crystal cell differentiation. Inappropriate activity of Klumpfuss perturbs the differentiation programme, resulting in melanotic tumours. Thus, by acting as a master regulator, Lz directs Notch to activate selectively a combination of target genes that correctly locks cells into the differentiation programme. PMID:23325760

  14. Opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata circulates between humans and yellow-legged gulls.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasiri, Mohammed Hashim; Normand, Anne-Cécile; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Lachaud, Laurence; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Piarroux, Renaud; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Ranque, Stéphane

    2016-10-26

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata is a component of the mycobiota of both humans and yellow-legged gulls that is prone to develop fluconazole resistance. Whether gulls are a reservoir of the yeast and facilitate the dissemination of human C. glabrata strains remains an open question. In this study, MLVA genotyping highlighted the lack of genetic structure of 190 C. glabrata strains isolated from either patients in three hospitals or fecal samples collected from gull breeding colonies located in five distinct areas along the French Mediterranean littoral. Fluconazole-resistant isolates were evenly distributed between both gull and human populations. These findings demonstrate that gulls are a reservoir of this species and facilitate the diffusion of C. glabrata and indirect transmission to human or animal hosts via environmental contamination. This eco-epidemiological view, which can be applied to other vertebrate host species, broadens our perspective regarding the reservoirs and dissemination patterns of antifungal-resistant human pathogenic yeast.

  15. Opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata circulates between humans and yellow-legged gulls

    PubMed Central

    Al-Yasiri, Mohammed Hashim; Normand, Anne-Cécile; L’Ollivier, Coralie; Lachaud, Laurence; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Piarroux, Renaud; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Ranque, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata is a component of the mycobiota of both humans and yellow-legged gulls that is prone to develop fluconazole resistance. Whether gulls are a reservoir of the yeast and facilitate the dissemination of human C. glabrata strains remains an open question. In this study, MLVA genotyping highlighted the lack of genetic structure of 190 C. glabrata strains isolated from either patients in three hospitals or fecal samples collected from gull breeding colonies located in five distinct areas along the French Mediterranean littoral. Fluconazole-resistant isolates were evenly distributed between both gull and human populations. These findings demonstrate that gulls are a reservoir of this species and facilitate the diffusion of C. glabrata and indirect transmission to human or animal hosts via environmental contamination. This eco-epidemiological view, which can be applied to other vertebrate host species, broadens our perspective regarding the reservoirs and dissemination patterns of antifungal-resistant human pathogenic yeast. PMID:27782182

  16. Phylogenetic and Transcripts Profiling of Glucose Sensing Related Genes in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tzu Shan; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Sandai, Doblin; Chong, Pei Pei; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2015-01-01

    Background: The sensing mechanism of glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well studied. However, such information is scarcely found in other yeast species such as Candida glabrata. Objectives: This study aimed to identify the glucose sensing pathway related genes of C. glabrata and to analyze the regulation pattern of these genes in response to different surrounding glucose concentrations through the quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Materials and Methods: Phylogenetic analysis was carried out on predicted amino acid sequences of C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae to compare their degree of similarity. In addition, the growth of C. glabrata in response to different amounts of glucose (0%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1% and 2%) was evaluated via the spot dilution assay on prepared agar medium. Besides, the SNF3 and RGT2, which act as putative glucose sensors, and the RGT1 and MIG1, which act as putative transcriptional regulators and selected downstream hexose transporters (HXTs), were analysed through qRT-PCR analysis for the gene expression level under different glucose concentrations. Results: Comparative analysis of predicted amino acids in the phylogenetic tree showed high similarity between C. glabrata and S cerevisiae. Besides, C. glabrata demonstrated the capability to grow in glucose levels as low as 0.01% in the spot dilution assay. In qRT-PCR analysis, differential expressions were observed in selected genes when C. glabrata was subjected to different glucose concentrations. Conclusions: The constructed phylogenetic tree suggests the close evolutionary relationship between C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae. The capability of C. glabrata to grow in extremely low glucose environments and the differential expression of selected glucose-sensing related genes suggested the possible role of these genes in modulating the growth of C. glabrata in response to different glucose concentrations. This study helps deepen our understanding of the glucose sensing

  17. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Iosue, Christine L; Attanasio, Nicholas; Shaik, Noor F; Neal, Erin M; Leone, Sarah G; Cali, Brian J; Peel, Michael T; Grannas, Amanda M; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine.

  18. Large-scale Phenotypic Profiling of Gene Deletion Mutants in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method enabling the phenotypic profiling of genome-scale deletion collections of fungal mutants to detect phenotypes for various stress conditions. These stress conditions include among many others antifungal drug susceptibility, temperature-induced and osmotic as well as heavy metal or oxidative stress. The protocol was extensively used to phenotype a collection of gene deletion mutants in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774498

  19. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Noor F.; Neal, Erin M.; Leone, Sarah G.; Cali, Brian J.; Peel, Michael T.; Grannas, Amanda M.; Wykoff, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  20. Dissection of Ire1 Functions Reveals Stress Response Mechanisms Uniquely Evolved in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Taiga; Nakayama, Hironobu; Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Proper protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is vital in all eukaryotes. When misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, the transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1 initiates splicing of HAC1 mRNA to generate the bZIP transcription factor Hac1, which subsequently activates its target genes to increase the protein-folding capacity of the ER. This cellular machinery, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), is believed to be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in eukaryotes. In this study, we comprehensively characterized mutant phenotypes of IRE1 and other related genes in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Unexpectedly, Ire1 was required for the ER stress response independently of Hac1 in this fungus. C. glabrata Ire1 did not cleave mRNAs encoding Hac1 and other bZIP transcription factors identified in the C. glabrata genome. Microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional response to ER stress is not mediated by Ire1, but instead is dependent largely on calcineurin signaling and partially on the Slt2 MAPK pathway. The loss of Ire1 alone did not confer increased antifungal susceptibility in C. glabrata contrary to UPR-defective mutants in other fungi. Taken together, our results suggest that the canonical Ire1-Hac1 UPR is not conserved in C. glabrata. It is known in metazoans that active Ire1 nonspecifically cleaves and degrades a subset of ER-localized mRNAs to reduce the ER load. Intriguingly, this cellular response could occur in an Ire1 nuclease-dependent fashion in C. glabrata. We also uncovered the attenuated virulence of the C. glabrata Δire1 mutant in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. This study has unveiled the unique evolution of ER stress response mechanisms in C. glabrata. PMID:23382685

  1. Oxidative stress response to menadione and cumene hydroperoxide in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Castaño, Irene; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2009-07-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that can cause severe invasive infections and can evade phagocytic cell clearance. We are interested in understanding the virulence of this fungal pathogen, in particular its oxidative stress response. Here we investigated C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans responses to two different oxidants: menadione and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP). In log-phase, in the presence of menadione, C. glabrata requires Cta1p (catalase), while in a stationary phase (SP), Cta1p is dispensable. In addition, C. glabrata is less resistant to menadione than C. albicans in SP. The S. cerevisiae laboratory reference strain is less resistant to menadione than C. glabrata and C. albicans; however S. cerevisiaeclinical isolates (CIs) are more resistant than the lab reference strain. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae CIs showed an increased catalase activity. Interestingly, in SP C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae are more resistant to CHP than C. albicans and Cta1p plays no apparent role in detoxifying this oxidant.

  2. The oxidative stress response of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Briones-Martin-Del-Campo, Marcela; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Juarez-Cepeda, Jacqueline; Gutierrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved different strategies to respond to oxidative stress generated as a by-product of aerobic respiration and thus maintain the redox homeostasis within the cell. In particular, fungal pathogens are exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) when they interact with the phagocytic cells of the host which are the first line of defense against fungal infections. These pathogens have co-opted the enzymatic (catalases, superoxide dismutases (SODs), and peroxidases) and non-enzymatic (glutathione) mechanisms used to maintain the redox homeostasis within the cell, to resist oxidative stress and ensure survival within the host. Several virulence factors have been related to the response to oxidative stress in pathogenic fungi. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) is the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans (C. albicans). C. glabrata has a well defined oxidative stress response (OSR), which include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. C. glabrata OSR is controlled by the well-conserved transcription factors Yap1, Skn7, Msn2 and Msn4. In this review, we describe the OSR of C. glabrata, what is known about its core elements, its regulation and how C. glabrata interacts with the host. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus on insect phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Au, C; Dean, P; Reynolds, S E; ffrench-Constant, R H

    2004-01-01

    Photorhabdus are insect pathogenic bacteria that replicate within the insect haemocoel following release from their entomopathogenic nematode symbionts. To investigate how they escape the cellular immune response we examined the effects of two strains of Photorhabdus, W14 and K122, on Manduca sexta phagocytes (haemocytes), in vitro and in vivo. Following injection of Esherichia coli into Manduca larvae, these non-pathogenic bacteria are rapidly cleared from the haemolymph and the number of free haemocytes transiently increases. In contrast, following injection of either strain of pathogenic Photorhabdus, the bacteria grow rapidly while the number of haemocytes decreases dramatically. In vitro incubation of haemocytes with either Photorhabdus supernatant reduced haemocyte viability, and the W14 supernatant caused distinct changes in the actin cytoskeleton morphology of different haemocyte cell types. In phagocytosis assays both Photorhabdus strains can inhibit their own phagocytosis whether the bacterial cells are alive or dead. Further, the supernatant of W14 also contains a factor capable of inhibiting the phagocytosis of labelled E. coli. Together these results suggest that Photorhabdus evades the cellular immune response by killing haemocytes and suppressing phagocytosis by mechanisms that differ between strains.

  4. Haematopoiesis in molluscs: a review of haemocyte development and function in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Pila, EA; Sullivan, JT; Wu, XZ; Fang, J; Rudko, SP; Gordy, MA; Hanington, PC

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoiesis is a process that is responsible for generating sufficient numbers of blood cells in the circulation and in tissues. It is central to maintenance of homeostasis within an animal, and is critical for defense against infection. While haematopoiesis is common to all animals possessing a circulatory system, the specific mechanisms and ultimate products of haematopoietic events vary greatly. Our understanding of this process in non-vertebrate organisms is primarily derived from those species that serve as developmental and immunological models, with sparse investigations having been carried out in other organisms spanning the metazoa. As research into the regulation of immune and blood cell development advances, we have begun to gain insight into haematopoietic events in a wider array of animals, including the molluscs. What began in the early 1900’s as observational studies on the morphological characteristics of circulating immune cells has now advanced to mechanistic investigations of the cytokines, growth factors, receptors, signalling pathways, and patterns of gene expression that regulate molluscan haemocyte development. Emerging is a picture of an incredible diversity of developmental processes and outcomes that parallels the biological diversity observed within the different classes of the phylum Mollusca. However, our understanding of haematopoiesis in molluscs stems primarily from the three most-studied classes, the Gastropoda, Cephalopoda and Bivalvia. While these represent perhaps the molluscs of greatest economic and medical importance, the fact that our information is limited to only 3 of the 9 extant classes in the phylum highlights the need for further investigation in this area. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that defines haematopoiesis and its products in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves. PMID:26592965

  5. Haematopoiesis in molluscs: A review of haemocyte development and function in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

    PubMed

    Pila, E A; Sullivan, J T; Wu, X Z; Fang, J; Rudko, S P; Gordy, M A; Hanington, P C

    2016-05-01

    Haematopoiesis is a process that is responsible for generating sufficient numbers of blood cells in the circulation and in tissues. It is central to maintenance of homeostasis within an animal, and is critical for defense against infection. While haematopoiesis is common to all animals possessing a circulatory system, the specific mechanisms and ultimate products of haematopoietic events vary greatly. Our understanding of this process in non-vertebrate organisms is primarily derived from those species that serve as developmental and immunological models, with sparse investigations having been carried out in other organisms spanning the metazoa. As research into the regulation of immune and blood cell development advances, we have begun to gain insight into haematopoietic events in a wider array of animals, including the molluscs. What began in the early 1900's as observational studies on the morphological characteristics of circulating immune cells has now advanced to mechanistic investigations of the cytokines, growth factors, receptors, signalling pathways, and patterns of gene expression that regulate molluscan haemocyte development. Emerging is a picture of an incredible diversity of developmental processes and outcomes that parallels the biological diversity observed within the different classes of the phylum Mollusca. However, our understanding of haematopoiesis in molluscs stems primarily from the three most-studied classes, the Gastropoda, Cephalopoda and Bivalvia. While these represent perhaps the molluscs of greatest economic and medical importance, the fact that our information is limited to only 3 of the 9 extant classes in the phylum highlights the need for further investigation in this area. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that defines haematopoiesis and its products in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

  6. Schistosome infectivity in the snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, is partially dependent on the expression of Grctm6, a Guadeloupe Resistance Complex protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Hanington, Patrick C.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases. Despite effective chemotherapeutic treatments, this disease continues to afflict hundreds of millions of people. Understanding the natural intermediate snail hosts of schistosome parasites is vital to the suppression of this disease. A recently identified genomic region in Caribbean Biomphalaria glabrata snails strongly influences their resistance to infection by Schistosoma mansoni. This region contains novel genes having structural similarity to known pathogen recognition proteins. Here we elaborate on the probable structure and role of one of these genes, grctm6. We characterised the expression of Grctm6 in a population of Caribbean snails, and performed a siRNA knockdown of Grctm6. We show that this protein is not only expressed in B. glabrata hemolymph, but that it also has a role in modulating the number of S. mansoni cercariae released by infected snails, making it a possible target for the biological control of schistosomiasis. PMID:28158185

  7. Implications of water hardness in ecotoxicological assessments for water quality regulatory purposes: a case study with the aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, E C; Caixeta, N R; Simplício, N C S; Sousa, S R; Aragão, T P; Muniz, D H F

    2014-02-01

    Water hardness is a property depending on the presence of alkaline earth metals, mainly calcium and magnesium. Among the strategies for water quality monitoring, ecotoxicological assays are performed to minimize impacts and classify water bodies. For these laboratory evaluations parameters are previously defined in the guidelines, including water hardness for both cultivation and testing medium. The present work was performed to evaluate the effects of different levels of water hardness on the survival and reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and discuss the influence of natural water hardness on the results of ecotoxicological tests with these environmental samples. Comparing the groups it was possible to observe that those maintained in waters with least hardness had lower reproductive success, while the groups maintained in highest hardness showed better reproduction. These data show that waters with low hardness make the reproduction of the snail B. glabrata unfeasible, and this reveal a problem for ecotoxicity assays using natural water samples.

  8. The Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata Does Not Depend on Surface Ferric Reductases for Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Gerwien, Franziska; Safyan, Abu; Wisgott, Stephanie; Brunke, Sascha; Kasper, Lydia; Hube, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Iron acquisition is a crucial virulence determinant for many bacteria and fungi, including the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata. While the diverse strategies used by C. albicans for obtaining iron from the host are well-described, much less is known about the acquisition of this micronutrient from host sources by C. glabrata – a distant relative of C. albicans with closer evolutionary ties to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which nonetheless causes severe clinical symptoms in humans. Here we show that C. glabrata is much more restricted than C. albicans in using host iron sources, lacking, for example, the ability to grow on transferrin and hemin/hemoglobin. Instead, C. glabrata is able to use ferritin and non-protein-bound iron (FeCl3) as iron sources in a pH-dependent manner. As in other fungal pathogens, iron-dependent growth requires the reductive high affinity (HA) iron uptake system. Typically highly conserved, this uptake mechanism normally relies on initial ferric reduction by cell-surface ferric reductases. The C. glabrata genome contains only three such putative ferric reductases, which were found to be dispensable for iron-dependent growth. In addition and in contrast to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, we also detected no surface ferric reductase activity in C. glabrata. Instead, extracellular ferric reduction was found in this and the two other fungal species, which was largely dependent on an excreted low-molecular weight, non-protein ferric reductant. We therefore propose an iron acquisition strategy of C. glabrata which differs from other pathogenic fungi, such as C. albicans, in that it depends on a limited set of host iron sources and that it lacks the need for surface ferric reductases. Extracellular ferric reduction by a secreted molecule possibly compensates for the loss of surface ferric reductase activity in the HA iron uptake system. PMID:28642757

  9. Antidiarrheal Thymol Derivatives from Ageratina glabrata. Structure and Absolute Configuration of 10-Benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxythymol Isobutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Brito, Celia; Vázquez-Heredia, Valeria J; Calzada, Fernando; Yépez-Mulia, Lilian; Calderón, José S; Hernández-Ortega, Simón; Esquivel, Baldomero; García-Hernández, Normand; Quijano, Leovigildo

    2016-09-12

    Chemical investigation of the leaves from Ageratina glabrata yielded four new thymol derivatives, namely: 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-dehydro-6-hydroxythymol isobutyrate (4), 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-dehydrothymol (5), 10-benzoyloxythymol (6) and 10-benzoyloxy-6,8-dihydroxy-9-isobutyryl-oxythymol (7). In addition, (8S)-10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxythymol isobutyrate (1), together with other two already known thymol derivatives identified as 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-methoxythymol isobutyrate (2) and 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (3) were also obtained. In this paper, we report the structures and complete assignments of the ¹H and (13)C-NMR data of compounds 1-7, and the absolute configuration for compound 1, unambiguously established by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and evaluation of the Flack parameter. The in vitro antiprotozoal assay showed that compound 1 and its derivative 1a were the most potent antiamoebic and antigiardial compounds. Both compounds showed selectivity and good antiamoebic activity comparable to emetine and metronidazole, respectively, two antiprotozoal drugs used as positive controls. In relation to anti-propulsive effect, compound 1 and 1a showed inhibitory activity, with activities comparable to quercetin and compound 9, two natural antipropulsive compounds used as positive controls. These data suggest that compound 1 may play an important role in antidiarrheal properties of Ageratina glabrata.

  10. SNF3 as High Affinity Glucose Sensor and Its Function in Supporting the Viability of Candida glabrata under Glucose-Limited Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tzu Shan; Chew, Shu Yih; Rangasamy, Premmala; Mohd Desa, Mohd N.; Sandai, Doblin; Chong, Pei Pei; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an emerging human fungal pathogen that has efficacious nutrient sensing and responsiveness ability. It can be seen through its ability to thrive in diverse range of nutrient limited-human anatomical sites. Therefore, nutrient sensing particularly glucose sensing is thought to be crucial in contributing to the development and fitness of the pathogen. This study aimed to elucidate the role of SNF3 (Sucrose Non Fermenting 3) as a glucose sensor and its possible role in contributing to the fitness and survivability of C. glabrata in glucose-limited environment. The SNF3 knockout strain was constructed and subjected to different glucose concentrations to evaluate its growth, biofilm formation, amphotericin B susceptibility, ex vivo survivability and effects on the transcriptional profiling of the sugar receptor repressor (SRR) pathway-related genes. The CgSNF3Δ strain showed a retarded growth in low glucose environments (0.01 and 0.1%) in both fermentation and respiration-preferred conditions but grew well in high glucose concentration environments (1 and 2%). It was also found to be more susceptible to amphotericin B in low glucose environment (0.1%) and macrophage engulfment but showed no difference in the biofilm formation capability. The deletion of SNF3 also resulted in the down-regulation of about half of hexose transporters genes (four out of nine). Overall, the deletion of SNF3 causes significant reduction in the ability of C. glabrata to sense limited surrounding glucose and consequently disrupts its competency to transport and perform the uptake of this critical nutrient. This study highlighted the role of SNF3 as a high affinity glucose sensor and its role in aiding the survivability of C. glabrata particularly in glucose limited environment. PMID:26648919

  11. Evaluation of the mitochondrial system in the gonad-digestive gland complex of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca, Gastropoda) after infection by Echinostoma paraensei (Trematoda, Echinostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Santos, Anderson Teixeira; Garcia, Juberlan da Silva; Maldonado, Arnaldo; da-Silva, Wagner Seixas; Rodrigues, Maria de Lurdes de Azevedo; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2016-05-01

    The effect of infection by Echinostoma paraensei on the mitochondrial physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata was investigated after exposure to 50 miracidia. The snails were dissected one, two, three and four weeks after infection for collection and mechanical permeabilization of the gonad-digestive gland (DGG) complex. The results obtained indicate that prepatent infection by this echinostomatid fluke significantly suppresses the phosphorylation state (respiratory state 3) and basal oxygen consumption of B. glabrata, demonstrating that the infection reduces the ability of the intermediate host to carry out aerobic oxidative reactions. Additionally, relevant variations related to the uncoupled mitochondrial (state 3u) of B. glabrata infected by E. paraensei were observed. Four weeks after exposure, a significant reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption after addition of ADP (3.68±0.26pmol O2/mg proteins) was observed in the infected snails in comparison with the respective control group (5.14±0.25). In the uncoupled state, the infected snails consumed about 62% less oxygen than the infected snails (7.87±0.84pmol O2/mg proteins) in the same period. These results demonstrate a reduction in oxidative decarboxylation rate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and faster anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates in the infected snails. The possible mechanisms that explain this new metabolic condition in the infected organisms are discussed.

  12. The known and unknown sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in haemocytes of marine bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jauzein, Cécile; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) are naturally produced in all cells and organisms. Modifications of standard conditions alter reactive species generation and may result in oxidative stress. Because of the degradation of marine ecosystems, massive aquaculture productions, global change and pathogenic infections, oxidative stress is highly prevalent in marine bivalve molluscs. Haemocytes of bivalve molluscs produce ROS and RNS as part of their basal metabolism as well as in response to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. However, sources and pathways of reactive species production are currently poorly deciphered in marine bivalves, potentially leading to misinterpretations. Although sources and pathways of ROS and RNS productions are highly conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, some uncommon pathways seem to only exist in marine bivalves. To understand the biology and pathobiology of ROS and RNS in haemocytes of marine bivalves, it is necessary to characterise their sources and pathways of production. The aims of the present review are to discuss the currently known and unknown intracellular sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in marine bivalve molluscs, in light of terrestrial vertebrates, and to expose principal pitfalls usually encountered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Systematic Phenotyping of a Large-Scale Candida glabrata Deletion Collection Reveals Novel Antifungal Tolerance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes. PMID:24945925

  14. GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked aspartyl proteases regulate vacuole homoeostasis in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Bairwa, Gaurav; Rasheed, Mubashshir; Taigwal, Ritu; Sahoo, Rosalin; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-03-01

    A family of 11 GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked cell surface-associated aspartyl proteases (yapsins) in the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is required for cell wall remodelling, pH homoeostasis, survival in macrophages and virulence in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. In the present paper, we report new roles for yapsins in C. glabrata physiology and implicate them for the first time in the regulation of vacuole homoeostasis. In the present study we show that a C. glabrata mutant lacking all 11 yapsins, Cgyps1-11∆, possesses an enlarged vacuole and displays vma- (vacuolar membrane ATPase)-like phenotypes with elevated metal ion susceptibility in an alkaline pH medium and diminished Vma activity. The results of the present study also demonstrate a singular role for CgYps1 (C. glabrata yapsin 1) in the maintenance of ion homoeostasis under normal and calcineurin-inhibited conditions. Elevated polyphosphate levels and diminished cellular CPY (carboxypeptidase Y) activity in the Cgyps1-11∆ mutant highlight the yapsin requirement for a properly functioning vacuole. Lastly, a gross perturbation of cellular homoeostasis in the Cgyps1-11∆ mutant, even in the absence of external stressors, characterized by reduced levels of ATP and stress metabolites, elevated ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels, cell surface abnormalities, and a constitutively activated PKC (protein kinase C) signalling pathway underscore diverse physiological functions of yapsins in C. glabrata.

  15. Inactivation of Transcription Factor Gene ACE2 in the Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata Results in Hypervirulence

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Mohammed; Calcagno, Ana-Maria; Findon, Helen; Bignell, Elaine; Jones, Michael D.; Warn, Peter; Hopkins, Philip; Denning, David W.; Butler, Geraldine; Rogers, Thomas; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A.; Haynes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    During an infection, the coordinated orchestration of many factors by the invading organism is required for disease to be initiated and to progress. The elucidation of the processes involved is critical to the development of a clear understanding of host-pathogen interactions. For Candida species, the inactivation of many fungal attributes has been shown to result in attenuation. Here we demonstrate that the Candida glabrata homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor gene ACE2 encodes a function that mediates virulence in a novel way. Inactivation of C. glabrata ACE2 does not result in attenuation but, conversely, in a strain that is hypervirulent in a murine model of invasive candidiasis. C. glabrata ace2 null mutants cause systemic infections characterized by fungal escape from the vasculature, tissue penetration, proliferation in vivo, and considerable overstimulation of the proinflammatory arm of the innate immune response. Compared to the case with wild-type fungi, mortality occurs much earlier in mice infected with C. glabrata ace2 cells, and furthermore, 200-fold lower doses are required to induce uniformly fatal infections. These data demonstrate that C. glabrata ACE2 encodes a function that plays a critical role in mediating the host-Candida interaction. It is the first virulence-moderating gene to be described for a Candida species. PMID:15075283

  16. Differentially expressed proteins in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yongxin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to identify the differences presented in the proteome of fluconazole-susceptible isolates of Candida glabrata compared to those with fluconazole-resistant ones. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was applied to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. glabrata. Eight proteins including aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, translation elongation factor 3, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, ribosomal protein L5, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, pyruvate kinase, G-beta like protein, and F1F0-ATPase alpha subunit were found to be more abundantly represented, while four proteins including vitamin B12-(cobalamin)-independent isozyme of methionine synthase, microtubule-associated protein, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and aldose reductase were found to be less abundantly represented in fluconazole-resistant strains versus those with fluconazole-susceptible ones. These differentially expressed proteins were primarily associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis. Proteins associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis may play a role in the development of fluconazole resistance in the clinical isolates of C. glabrata. Multiple different mechanisms are involved in the development of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata. These findings provide a scientific basis for discovering new genes and mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata.

  17. Intracellular pH homeostasis in Candida glabrata in infection-associated conditions.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Azmat; Lopes, Maria Inês; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2013-04-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which is a growing concern for immunocompromised patients. It is ranked as the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans. For pathogenic yeasts, intracellular pH (pHi) has been implicated in proliferation, dimorphic switching and virulence. We expressed the pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein variant ratiometric pHluorin in the cytosol of C. glabrata to study pHi dynamics in living cells. We evaluated the response of pHi to the various growth and stress conditions encountered during interaction with the host and during antifungal treatment. C. glabrata maintained a pHi higher than that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in all growth conditions. The pHi of S. cerevisiae cells appeared better controlled than the pHi in C. glabrata when the cells were exposed to food and fermentation-associated conditions. C. glabrata in turn maintained its pHi better when exposed to host-associated conditions.

  18. Sorbic acid stress activates the Candida glabrata high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jandric, Zeljkica; Gregori, Christa; Klopf, Eva; Radolf, Martin; Schüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Weak organic acids such as sorbic acid are important food preservatives and powerful fungistatic agents. These compounds accumulate in the cytosol and disturb the cellular pH and energy homeostasis. Candida glabrata is in many aspects similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, with regard to confrontation to sorbic acid, two of the principal response pathways behave differently in C. glabrata. In yeast, sorbic acid stress causes activation of many genes via the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4. The C. glabrata homologs CgMsn2 and CgMsn4 are apparently not activated by sorbic acid. In contrast, in C. glabrata the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is activated by sorbic acid. Here we show that the MAP kinase of the HOG pathway, CgHog1, becomes phosphorylated and has a function for weak acid stress resistance. Transcript profiling of weak acid treated C. glabrata cells suggests a broad and very similar response pattern of cells lacking CgHog1 compared to wild type which is over lapping with but distinct from S. cerevisiae. The PDR12 gene was the highest induced gene in both species and it required CgHog1 for full expression. Our results support flexibility of the response cues for general stress signaling pathways, even between closely related yeasts, and functional extension of a specific response pathway. PMID:24324463

  19. Genome engineering in the yeast pathogen Candida glabrata using the CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Enkler, Ludovic; Richer, Delphine; Marchand, Anthony L.; Ferrandon, Dominique; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Among Candida species, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata has become the second most common causative agent of candidiasis in the world and a major public health concern. Yet, few molecular tools and resources are available to explore the biology of C. glabrata and to better understand its virulence during infection. In this study, we describe a robust experimental strategy to generate loss-of-function mutants in C. glabrata. The procedure is based on the development of three main tools: (i) a recombinant strain of C. glabrata constitutively expressing the CRISPR-Cas9 system, (ii) an online program facilitating the selection of the most efficient guide RNAs for a given C. glabrata gene, and (iii) the identification of mutant strains by the Surveyor technique and sequencing. As a proof-of-concept, we have tested the virulence of some mutants in vivo in a Drosophila melanogaster infection model. Our results suggest that yps11 and a previously uncharacterized serine/threonine kinase are involved, directly or indirectly, in the ability of the pathogenic yeast to infect this model host organism. PMID:27767081

  20. Susceptibility of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to concomitant infection with Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Guerino, L R; Carvalho, J F; Magalhães, L A; Zanotti-Magalhães, E M

    2016-09-26

    The easy adaptation of Angiostrongylus costaricensis, nematode responsible for abdominal angiostrongyliasis to several species of terrestrial and freshwater molluscs and the differences observed in the interactions of trematodes with their intermediate hosts have induced us to study the concomitant infection of Biomphalaria glabrata with Schistosoma mansoni and A. costaricensis. Prior exposure of B. glabrata to A. costaricensis (with an interval of 48 hours), favored the development of S. mansoni, observing higher infection rate, increased release of cercariae and increased survival of molluscs, when compared to molluscs exposed only to S. mansoni. Prior exposure of B. glabrata to A. costaricensis and then to S. mansoni also enabled the development of A. costaricensis since in the ninth week of infection, higher amount of A. costaricensis L3 larvae was recovered (12 larvae / mollusc) while for molluscs exposed only to A. costaricensis, the number of larvae recovered was lower (8 larvae / mollusc). However, pre-exposure of B. glabrata to S. mansoni (with an interval of 24 hours), and subsequently exposure to A. costaricensis proved to be very harmful to B. glabrata, causing extensive mortality of molluscs, reduced pre-patent period to release cercariae and greater recovery of L3 A. costaricensis larvae.

  1. A Novel Bacterial Pathogen of Biomphalaria glabrata: A Potential Weapon for Schistosomiasis Control?

    PubMed Central

    Duval, David; Galinier, Richard; Mouahid, Gabriel; Toulza, Eve; Allienne, Jean François; Portela, Julien; Calvayrac, Christophe; Rognon, Anne; Arancibia, Nathalie; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is the second-most widespread tropical parasitic disease after malaria. Various research strategies and treatment programs for achieving the objective of eradicating schistosomiasis within a decade have been recommended and supported by the World Health Organization. One of these approaches is based on the control of snail vectors in endemic areas. Previous field studies have shown that competitor or predator introduction can reduce snail numbers, but no systematic investigation has ever been conducted to identify snail microbial pathogens and evaluate their molluscicidal effects. Methodology/Principal findings In populations of Biomphalaria glabrata snails experiencing high mortalities, white nodules were visible on snail bodies. Infectious agents were isolated from such nodules. Only one type of bacteria, identified as a new species of Paenibacillus named Candidatus Paenibacillus glabratella, was found, and was shown to be closely related to P. alvei through 16S and Rpob DNA analysis. Histopathological examination showed extensive bacterial infiltration leading to overall tissue disorganization. Exposure of healthy snails to Paenibacillus-infected snails caused massive mortality. Moreover, eggs laid by infected snails were also infected, decreasing hatching but without apparent effects on spawning. Embryonic lethality was correlated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in eggs. Conclusions/Significance This is the first account of a novel Paenibacillus strain, Ca. Paenibacillus glabratella, as a snail microbial pathogen. Since this strain affects both adult and embryonic stages and causes significant mortality, it may hold promise as a biocontrol agent to limit schistosomiasis transmission in the field. PMID:25719489

  2. [Hymenolepis nana var. fraterna (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) in Leucophaea maderae (Dictyoptera: Blattidae): the host-parasite conflict after experimental inhibition of haemocytic reaction (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pesson, B; Leger, N

    1978-01-01

    Development of non-encapsulated cysticercoids of Hymenolepis nana var. fraterna, in the haemocoele of Leucophaea maderae occured after the inhibition of the haemocytic reaction by irradiation or injection of a soluble antigen of Hymenolepis nana. Fine structure of the tegument of free larvae is observed and the mechanism of a possible defence of the parasite by the microvillar coat, discussed.

  3. Reproductive activity alterations on the Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii latex.

    PubMed

    Mello-Silva, Clélia Christina; Vilar, Mônica Magno; Bezerra, José Clecildo Barreto; Vasconcellos, Maurício Carvalho de; Pinheiro, Jairo; Rodrigues, Maria de Lurdes de A

    2007-09-01

    The reproductive activity of Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii latex was evaluated. Parameters related to fecundity and fertility were observed. The snails were exposed to the LD50 (1 mg/l) of crude latex. At the first week post exposure (p.e.), the egg laying was reduced. After the fourth week p.e., an increase of the number of eggs/snail occurred. The results showed a marked reduction in the hatching of the snails, revealing an interference of latex exposure with the reproductive process of B. glabrata of E. splendens var. hislopii. The LD50 of the latex may be used as an alternative method to control the size of the populations of B. glabrata in field.

  4. Engineering of carboligase activity reaction in Candida glabrata for acetoin production.

    PubMed

    Li, Shubo; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Utilization of Candida glabrata overproducing pyruvate is a promising strategy for high-level acetoin production. Based on the known regulatory and metabolic information, acetaldehyde and thiamine were fed to identify the key nodes of carboligase activity reaction (CAR) pathway and provide a direction for engineering C. glabrata. Accordingly, alcohol dehydrogenase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and butanediol dehydrogenase were selected to be manipulated for strengthening the CAR pathway. Following the rational metabolic engineering, the engineered strain exhibited increased acetoin biosynthesis (2.24 g/L). In addition, through in silico simulation and redox balance analysis, NADH was identified as the key factor restricting higher acetoin production. Correspondingly, after introduction of NADH oxidase, the final acetoin production was further increased to 7.33 g/L. By combining the rational metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, the acetoin-producing C. glabrata was improved stepwise, opening a novel pathway for rational development of microorganisms for bioproduction. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. New Eugenol Glucoside-based Derivative Shows Fungistatic and Fungicidal Activity against Opportunistic Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thiago Belarmino; Brito, Keila Mercês de Oliveira; Silva, Naiara Chaves; Rocha, Raissa Prado; de Sousa, Grasiely Faria; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil; Dias, Amanda Latércia Tranches; Veloso, Marcia Paranho; Carvalho, Diogo Teixeira; Dias, Danielle Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    A new series of glucosides modified in their saccharide units were synthesized, evaluated against Candida sp., and compared to prototype 1, an eugenol tetracetyl glucoside previously synthesized and shown to be active against Candida glabrata. Among the new glucosides, benzyl derivative 5 was the most promising, showing fungistatic activity at IC50 18.1 μm against Candida glabrata (threefold higher than fluconazole) and fungicidal activity with a low IC90 value of 36.2 μm. Moreover, the cytotoxic activity of compound 5 (CC50 : 580.9 μm), tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggests its potential as an agent to treat Candida glabrata infections, with a selectivity index of 32. The new eugenol glucoside 5 may be considered as a novel structural pattern in the development of new anti-Candida drugs.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Candida glabrata Isolates 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, and 3B

    PubMed Central

    Håvelsrud, Othilde Elise

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six Candida glabrata isolates. The isolates were taken from blood samples from patients after recurrent C. glabrata infection. Two isolates were taken from each of three patients a minimum 3 months apart. PMID:28280017

  7. Kinetic analysis of internalization of white spot syndrome virus by haemocyte subpopulations of penaeid shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone), and the outcome for virus and cell.

    PubMed

    Tuan, V V; De Gryse, G M A; Thuong, K V; Bossier, P; Nauwynck, H J

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the innate antiviral defence of shrimp haemocytes. In this context, the haemocytes of penaeid shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone) were separated by iodixanol density gradient centrifugation into five subpopulations (sub): sub 1 (hyalinocytes), sub 2 and 3 (prohyalinocytes), sub 4 (semigranulocytes) and sub 5 (granulocytes) and exposed to beads, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and ultraviolet (UV)-killed WSSV. In a first experiment, the uptake of beads, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and UV-killed WSSV by these different haemocyte subpopulations was investigated using confocal microscopy. Only haemocytes of sub 1, 4 and 5 were internalizing beads, WSSV and UV-killed WSSV. Beads were engulfed by a much larger percentage of cells (91.2 in sub 1; 84.1 in sub 4 and 58.1 in sub 5) compared to WSSV (9.6 in sub 1; 10.5 in sub 4 and 7.9 in sub 5) and UV-killed WSSV (12.9 in sub 1; 13.3 in sub 4; and 11.8 in sub 5). In a second experiment, it was shown that upon internalization, WSS virions lost their envelope most probably by fusion with the cellular membrane of the endosome (starting between 30 and 60 min post-inoculation) and that afterwards the capsid started to become disintegrated (from 360 min post-inoculation). Expression of new viral proteins was not observed. Incubation of haemocyte subpopulations with WSSV but not with UV-killed WSSV and polystyrene beads resulted in a significant drop in haemocyte viability. To find the underlying mechanism, a third experiment was performed in which haemocyte subpopulations were exposed to a short WSSV DNA fragment (VP19) and CpG ODNs. These small DNA fragments induced cell death. In conclusion, WSSV is efficiently internalized by hyalinocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes, after which the virus loses its envelope; as soon as the capsids start to disintegrate, cell death is activated, which in part may be explained by the exposure of viral DNA to cellular-sensing molecules.

  8. Influence of Candida krusei and Candida glabrata on Candida albicans gene expression in in vitro biofilms.

    PubMed

    Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Ribeiro, Felipe Camargo; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the interactions between the species Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in monotypic and mixed biofilm models formed in vitro as well as the relative expression of the ALS1, ALS3, HWP1, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, SAP5, PLB2 and LIP9 genes. Mixed (C. albicans/C. krusei and C. albicans/C. glabrata) and monotypic biofilms were cultured for 0, 12 and 24h. Gene expression was analyzed in the same biofilm model in which the number of CFU/mL was counted. The C. albicans CFU/mL values were lower at the 12 and 24h time points in the mixed biofilms compared with the monotypic biofilms, and decreases of 56.23% and 64.4% in C. albicans were observed when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. In the presence of C. krusei, the expression of the ALS3, HWP1, BCR1, EFG1 and TEC1 genes of C. albicans was completely inhibited, indicating both transcriptome and the phenotypic antagonism between these two species, but genes related to the secretion of enzymes were stimulated. In the presence of C. glabrata, C. albicans showed a similar gene expression profile to that obtained in association with C. krusei, though it was altered to a lesser degree. We conclude that C. krusei and C. glabrata may alter or inhibit the mechanisms involved in the in vitro adherence and formation of C. albicans biofilms, influencing the pathogenicity of this species and suggesting a competitive interaction with C. krusei and C. glabrata in biofilm formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary trials against Biomphalaria glabrata of a new molluscicide formulation: geletin granules containing Bayluscide wettable powder.

    PubMed

    Upatham, E S; Sturrock, R F

    1977-03-01

    Tests were conducted with gelatin granules containing Bayluscide (niclosamide) w.p., 23-3% w/w a.i. Granules rendered a simulated field habitat (banana drain) lethal to Biomphalaria glabrata for 40 days when applied at a rate calculated to give 5 mg/1 in the water. At this dose, Bayluscide e.c. was effective for 8-12 days. Granules exposed to various combinations of natural or simulated tropical climatic factors for up to 56 days gave variable kills of snails, apparently unrelated to the factors tested. The rate at which the molluscicide was released from the granules was affected by climatic factors: high temperatures and low humidities slowed the rate, probably by hardening the granules; rainfall and high humidities accelerated the rate, probably by softening or disintegrating the granules. There was no apparent loss of molluscicidal activity in granules exposed for 56 days to various combinations of climatic factors. The results suggest that this formulation may be applied during droughts to temporary habitats when these are dry and accessible. The molluscicide would then be released at the unpredictable start of the next wet season and kill any snails which survive the drought by aestivation.

  10. The susceptibility of Biomphalaria glabrata throughout its life-history to N-tritylmorpholine

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, C. B. C.; Tieze-Dagevos, J. W.; Larman, V. N.

    1967-01-01

    This study was undertaken as part of a detailed investigation of the molluscicidal properties of N-tritylmorpholine (Frescon, WL 8008). It is shown that the stage of development of Biomphalaria glabrata has a pronounced influence on its susceptibility to N-tritylmorpholine. As the snails grow from hatching to a diameter of 3 mm, the LC50 falls from 0.04 ppm to 0.02 ppm, but further growth results in a progressive increase in LC50 until, at a shell diameter of 20 mm, it is 0.17 ppm. N-Tritylmorpholine is much less toxic to snail eggs when used in short exposures. However, young embryos in capsules treated with 5 ppm for 24 hours developed abnormally and died without hatching. Older embryos developed normally but died after hatching. This delayed effect is attributed to contact, during hatching, with N-tritylmorpholine which is associated with the jelly. The difference in susceptibility between snails and eggs is attributed to a slow rate of penetration of the egg membrane. ImagesFIG. 5 PMID:5300047

  11. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida(TM) by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits overlapping with C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produ...

  12. Demographic responses to multi-generation cadmium exposure in two strains of the freshwater gastropod, Biomphalaria glabrata.

    SciTech Connect

    Salice, Christopher J.; Miller, Thomas J.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2008-08-20

    A life table response experiment (LTRE) was used to quantify the population-level effects of continuous, multi-generation cadmium exposure on two strains of the freshwater gastropod, Biomphalaria glabrata; the parasite resistant BS90 and parasite susceptible NMRI strains. Snails were exposed to waterborne cadmium for three consecutive generations. Survival, growth and reproduction were measured empirically and incorporated into a stage-based, deterministic population model. Cadmium significantly affected hatching success, time to maturity and juvenile and adult survival in both strains. There were significant effects of generation on fecundity, hatching success time to maturity and juvenile survival in NMRI and time to maturity and adult survival in BS90. Cadmium significantly affected the population growth rate, lambda (λ), in BS90. Cadmium, generation and the cadmium x generation interaction had significant effects on λ in NMRI. At the high cadmium exposure, λ for NMRI showed a decrease from generation 1 to generation 2 followed by and increase from generation 2 to 3. Lambda in high cadmium BS90 steadily decreased over the three generations while NMRI at this same concentration was similar to the controls. The results indicated that strain-specific differences in response to multi-generation cadmium exposure are evident in B. glabrata. Moreover, effects seen in the first generation are not necessarily indicative of effects in subsequent generations. Changes in λ over the course of the three-generation exposure suggest that acclimation and/or adaptation to cadmium may have occurred, particularly in NMRI at the high cadmium exposure level.

  13. Evaluation of phagocytic activity and nitric oxide generation by molluscan haemocytes as biomarkers of inorganic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2009-12-01

    The natural habitats of the freshwater bivalve Lamellidens marginalis face the risk of contamination by the toxic metalloid arsenic. Haemocyte-mediated non-self phagocytosis and generation of nitric oxide (NO) as reactive nitrogen intermediate were examined to establish the reliability of the parameters as biomarkers of sodium arsenite-induced stress on the animal at sublethal concentrations. The studies suggest imposition of a remarkable immune compromise/immune suppression on the animal by the natural contaminant. The animal expressed partial recovery in its phagocytic potential and NO generation over a period of 30 days. Quantitation of phagocytic efficiency and intrahaemocyte NO generation indicates the possibility of the parameters be accepted as cellular biomarkers to estimate and characterize the vulnerability of the freshwater organisms to sodium arsenite-induced stress.

  14. Inactivation of Candida glabrata by a humid DC argon discharge afterglow: dominant contributions of short-lived aqueous active species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Liu, Hongbin; Lu, Weiping; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Le; Wang, Xia; Zhu, Qunlin; Zeng, Xue; Yi, Ping

    2017-05-01

    Plasma medicine applications are currently attracting significant interest all over the world. Bactericidal treatments of Candida glabrata cultured in saline suspension are performed in this study by a room-temperature reactive afterglow of a DC-driven argon discharge. Water vapor was added to the discharge to study the inactivation contributions of reactive hydrolytic species including OH and H2O2 transporting along the gas flow to the treated solutions. The inactivation results indicate that the dominant roles in the bactericidal treatments are played by the short-lived aqueous active species, but not the stable species like H2O2aq (aq indicates an aqueous species). Further analysis shows that the ·OHaq radicals play an important role in the inactivation process. The ·OHaq radicals in the suspension are mostly produced from the direct dissolution of the OH species in the reactive afterglow. With the increase of added water vapor content, the ·OHaq production increases and enhances the inactivation efficiency of C. glabrata. Furthermore, it is found that the ambient air diffusion shows essential effects on the bactericidal activity of the remote humid argon discharge. Higher bactericidal effects can be obtained in open-space treatments compared to in a controlled Ar + H2O gas atmosphere. Key active air-byproduct species are believed to be generated in the suspension during the treatments and contributing to the inactivation process. Based on chemical analysis, the peroxynitrous acid ONOOHaq is considered as the key antimicrobial air-byproduct species. These results indicate the important dependence of plasma biomedical effects on the processing environment, which finally relates to the critical contributions of the key reactive species formed therein.

  15. Proposal to conserve the name Celtis glabrata Steven ex Planch. (Cannabaceae) with a conserved type

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The name Celtis glabrata is technically illegitimate and has nomenclatural priority over U. glabra and should be replaced under the international rules of botanical nomenclature. The replacement name Celtis planchoniana, proposed in 1997 but seldom adopted to date, is not the correct name for this s...

  16. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Keenan, Kendra E.; Updike, Wanda S.; Oliver, Marquam R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement). His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1) placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained), and (2) chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis). To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:25431708

  17. Enhancement of acetoin production in Candida glabrata by in silico-aided metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Shubo; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-13

    Acetoin is a promising chemical compound that can potentially serve as a high value-added platform for a broad range of applications. Many industrial biotechnological processes are moving towards the use of yeast as a platform. The multi-auxotrophic yeast, Candida glabrata, can accumulate a large amount of pyruvate, but produces only trace amounts of acetoin. Here, we attempted to engineer C. glabrata to redirect the carbon flux of pyruvate to increase acetoin production. Based on an in silico strategy, a synthetic, composite metabolic pathway involving two distinct enzymes, acetolactate synthase (ALS) and acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC), was constructed, leading to the accumulation of acetoin in C. glabrata. Further genetic modifications were introduced to increase the carbon flux of the heterologous pathway, increasing the production of acetoin to 2.08 g/L. Additionally, nicotinic acid was employed to regulate the intracellular NADH level, and a higher production of acetoin (3.67 g/L) was obtained at the expense of 2,3-butanediol production under conditions of a lower NADH/NAD+ ratio. With the aid of in silico metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, C. glabrata was designed and constructed to improve acetoin production.

  18. Enhancement of acetoin production in Candida glabrata by in silico-aided metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetoin is a promising chemical compound that can potentially serve as a high value-added platform for a broad range of applications. Many industrial biotechnological processes are moving towards the use of yeast as a platform. The multi-auxotrophic yeast, Candida glabrata, can accumulate a large amount of pyruvate, but produces only trace amounts of acetoin. Here, we attempted to engineer C. glabrata to redirect the carbon flux of pyruvate to increase acetoin production. Results Based on an in silico strategy, a synthetic, composite metabolic pathway involving two distinct enzymes, acetolactate synthase (ALS) and acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC), was constructed, leading to the accumulation of acetoin in C. glabrata. Further genetic modifications were introduced to increase the carbon flux of the heterologous pathway, increasing the production of acetoin to 2.08 g/L. Additionally, nicotinic acid was employed to regulate the intracellular NADH level, and a higher production of acetoin (3.67 g/L) was obtained at the expense of 2,3-butanediol production under conditions of a lower NADH/NAD+ ratio. Conclusion With the aid of in silico metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, C. glabrata was designed and constructed to improve acetoin production. PMID:24725668

  19. Proteomic analysis of cytosolic proteins associated with petite mutations in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Loureiro Y Penha, C V; Kubitschek, P H B; Larcher, G; Perales, J; Rodriguez León, I; Lopes-Bezerra, L M; Bouchara, J P

    2010-12-01

    The incidence of superficial or deep-seated infections due to Candida glabrata has increased markedly, probably because of the low intrinsic susceptibility of this microorganism to azole antifungals and its relatively high propensity to acquire azole resistance. To determine changes in the C. glabrata proteome associated with petite mutations, cytosolic extracts from an azole-resistant petite mutant of C. glabrata induced by exposure to ethidium bromide, and from its azole-susceptible parent isolate were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins of interest were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting or sequence tagging using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Tryptic peptides from a total of 160 Coomassie-positive spots were analyzed for each strain. Sixty-five different proteins were identified in the cytosolic extracts of the parent strain and 58 in the petite mutant. Among the proteins identified, 10 were higher in the mutant strain, whereas 23 were lower compared to the parent strain. The results revealed a significant decrease in the enzymes associated with the metabolic rate of mutant cells such as aconitase, transaldolase, and pyruvate kinase, and changes in the levels of specific heat shock proteins. Moreover, transketolase, aconitase and catalase activity measurements decreased significantly in the ethidium bromide-induced petite mutant. These data may be useful for designing experiments to obtain a better understanding of the nuclear response to impairment of mitochondrial function associated with this mutation in C. glabrata.

  20. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  1. Comparative toxicity of Euphorbia milii latex and synthetic molluscicides to Biomphalaria glabrata embryos.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo C; Geraldino, Barbara R; Coelho, Deise R; De-Carvalho, Rosângela R; Paumgartten, Francisco J R

    2010-09-01

    Plant molluscicides have been regarded as possible alternatives to the costly and environmentally hazardous molluscicides currently available. This study was undertaken to compare the developmental toxicity of a plant molluscicide (Euphorbia milii latex, LAT) with that of three synthetic molluscicidal compounds. Biomphalaria glabrata egg masses (0-15 h after spawning) were exposed to molluscicides for 96 h and thereafter examined up to the 14th day after spawning. Embryo deaths, abnormal embryo development (malformations) and the day of hatching were recorded. Although exhibiting a weak ovicidal effect, LAT markedly impaired the development of snail embryos at concentrations 1000 microg L(-1) and produced anomalies (EC(50)=2040 microg L(-1)) such as abnormal shells, hydropic embryos, cephalic and non-specific malformations. Embryolethal potencies of molluscicides were as follows: triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH; LC(50)=0.30 microg L(-1))>niclosamide (NCL; LC(50)=70 microg L(-1))>copper sulphate (CuSO(4); LC(50)=2190 microg L(-1)) > LAT (LC(50)=34030 microg L(-1)). A few malformations were recorded in embryos exposed to concentrations of TPTH within the range of lethal concentrations, while almost no anomalies were noted among those treated with NCL or CuSO(4). A hatching delay (hatching on day 10 after spawning or later) was observed among LAT-exposed embryos. The effects of NCL, TPTH and CuSO4 on hatching were to some extent masked by their marked embryolethality. The no-observed effect concentrations (NOEC) for embryotoxicity were as follows: TPTH, 0.1 microg L(-1); NCL, 25.0 microg L(-1); CuSO(4), 500.0 microg L(-1) and LAT, 500.0 microg L(-1). Results from this study suggest that, although LAT was not acutely embryolethal after a short-term exposure, it markedly disrupted snail development. The marked embryotoxicity of E. milii possibly contributes to its effectiveness as a molluscicide.

  2. The promotion of cytoskeleton integration and redox in the haemocyte of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei after the successive stimulation of recombinant VP28.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Sun, Xin; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Tao; Yi, Qilin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Song, Linsheng

    2014-07-01

    Cellular Component category, the enriched GO terms were myosin VII complex, myosin V complex, myosin VI complex and myosin II complex. Furthermore, the most abundant GO term was oxidation-reduction process, followed by single-organism transport, neurogenesis and translation for 214 genes only responsive to successive VP28 stimulation. These results collectively indicated that the successive VP28 stimulation could modulate cytoskeleton integration and redox to promote the phagocytosis activity of shrimp haemocytes, which might protect effectively for shrimp against WSSV infection.

  3. In Vitro Activities of Six Antifungal Drugs Against Candida glabrata Isolates: An Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Amirrajab, Nasrin; Badali, Hamid; Didehdar, Mojtaba; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Lotfi, Nazanin; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida glabrata is a pathogenic yeast with several unique biological features and associated with an increased incidence rate of candidiasis. It exhibits a great degree of variation in its pathogenicity and antifungal susceptibility. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the following six antifungal drugs against clinical C. glabrata strains: amphotericin B (AmB), ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FCZ), itraconazole (ITZ), voriconazole (VCZ), and caspofungin (CASP). Materials and Methods Forty clinical C. glabrata strains were investigated using DNA sequencing. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined as described in clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4). Results The sequence analysis of the isolate confirmed as C. glabrata and deposited on NCBI GenBank under the accession number no. KT763084-KT763123. The geometric mean MICs against all the tested strains were as follows, in increasing order: CASP (0.17 g/mL), VCZ (0.67 g/mL), AmB (1.1 g/mL), ITZ (1.82 g/mL), KTZ (1.85 g/mL), and FCZ (6.7 g/mL). The resistance rates of the isolates to CASP, FCZ, ITZ, VZ, KTZ, and AmB were 5%, 10%, 72.5%, 37.5%, 47.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions These findings confirm that CASP, compared to the other antifungals, is the potent agent for treating candidiasis caused by C. glabrata. However, the clinical efficacy of these novel antifungals remains to be determined. PMID:27540459

  4. Gln3 is a main regulator of nitrogen assimilation in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delos Santos, Francisco J; Riego-Ruiz, Lina

    2016-08-01

    After Candida albicans, the yeast Candida glabrata ranks second as an aetiological agent of candidaemia and is the most frequently encountered non-Candida albicans species in patients with invasive candidiasis. Transcriptome analysis in C. albicans, C. glabrata and Cryptoccocus neoformans has revealed that, when engulfed by macrophages, these yeasts upregulate genes involved in nutrient acquisition, including nitrogen transporters such as the general amino acid permease Gap1, the dicarboxylic amino acid permease Dip5, the basic amino acid permease Can1 and the ammonium permeases Mep1 and Mep2. Nitrogen assimilation has been well studied in model species of fungi, such as Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, little is known about nitrogen assimilation in C. glabrata. In the present study, we report a major role for Gln3 in the assimilation of glutamine, ammonium and proline. Ure2 also has a role in nitrogen assimilation, but it is only observable in ammonium and glutamine. In addition, Gat1 has a minor role, which is only observable in the absence of Ure2 and Gln3. Gln3 is absolutely necessary for full ammonium uptake from media. We have also shown that MEP2 gene expression in C. glabrata is completely dependent on Gln3, whereas GAP1 regulation is mainly exerted by Gln3, with the exception of proline where Gat1 has a minor role. In addition, in C. glabrata Ure2 appears to be a negative regulator of these NCR-sensitive genes, similarly to what has been described in S. cerevisiae. Our data place Gln3 as a key regulator of nitrogen assimilation.

  5. Controlled Chaos of Polymorphic Mucins in a Metazoan Parasite (Schistosoma mansoni) Interacting with Its Invertebrate Host (Biomphalaria glabrata)

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Emmanuel; Grunau, Christoph; Pierce, Raymond J.; Hirai, Hirohisa; Gourbal, Benjamin; Galinier, Richard; Emans, Rémi; Cesari, Italo M.; Cosseau, Céline; Mitta, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    Invertebrates were long thought to possess only a simple, effective and hence non-adaptive defence system against microbial and parasitic attacks. However, recent studies have shown that invertebrate immunity also relies on immune receptors that diversify (e.g. in echinoderms, insects and mollusks (Biomphalaria glabrata)). Apparently, individual or population-based polymorphism-generating mechanisms exists that permit the survival of invertebrate species exposed to parasites. Consequently, the generally accepted arms race hypothesis predicts that molecular diversity and polymorphism also exist in parasites of invertebrates. We investigated the diversity and polymorphism of parasite molecules (Schistosoma mansoni Polymorphic Mucins, SmPoMucs) that are key factors for the compatibility of schistosomes interacting with their host, the mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata. We have elucidated the complex cascade of mechanisms acting both at the genomic level and during expression that confer polymorphism to SmPoMuc. We show that SmPoMuc is coded by a multi-gene family whose members frequently recombine. We show that these genes are transcribed in an individual-specific manner, and that for each gene, multiple splice variants exist. Finally, we reveal the impact of this polymorphism on the SmPoMuc glycosylation status. Our data support the view that S. mansoni has evolved a complex hierarchical system that efficiently generates a high degree of polymorphism—a “controlled chaos”—based on a relatively low number of genes. This contrasts with protozoan parasites that generate antigenic variation from large sets of genes such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum. Our data support the view that the interaction between parasites and their invertebrate hosts are far more complex than previously thought. While most studies in this matter have focused on invertebrate host diversification, we clearly show that diversifying mechanisms also exist on

  6. Procambarin: a glycine-rich peptide found in the haemocytes of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii and its response to white spot syndrome virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong

    2013-08-01

    We cloned a novel glycine-rich peptide, procambarin, from the haemocytes of unchallenged crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The mature peptide (155 residues) has a13.44 KDa molecular mass with a theoretical pI about 12.12. It is characterized by a high level of glycine (57.42%) and a threefold repeated motif GLKPNVGGGGGFGGG. Generally, it belongs to cationic glycine-rich peptide. The transcripts of this peptide were detected in many tissues. The haemocytes showed the highest expression of glycine-rich peptide mRNA, followed by the ovaries, antennal gland and intestine. The gill, hepatopancreas and heart showed little expression of this peptide and no expression was detected in the musculature. There is no intron in the ORF of it. The fluctuation of mRNA expression level of procambarin after WSSV challenge indicates that this peptide participates in the antiviral immune reaction.

  7. Enhancement of pyruvate production by Torulopsis glabrata using a two-stage oxygen supply control strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Hugenholtz, J; Chen, J; Lun, S-Y

    2002-10-01

    The effect of agitation speeds on the performance of producing pyruvate by a multi-vitamin auxotrophic yeast, Torulopsis glabrata, was investigated in batch fermentation. High pyruvate yield on glucose (0.797 g g(-1)) was achieved under high agitation speed (700 rpm), but the glucose consumption rate was rather low (1.14 g l(-1) h(-1)). Glucose consumption was enhanced under low agitation speed (500 rpm), but the pyruvate yield on glucose decreased to 0.483 g g(-1). Glycerol production was observed under low agitation speed and decreased with increasing agitation speed. Based on process analysis and carbon flux distribution calculation, a two-stage oxygen supply control strategy was proposed, in which the agitation speed was controlled at 700 rpm in the first 16 h and then switched to 500 rpm. This was experimentally proven to be successful. Relatively high concentration of pyruvate (69.4 g l(-1)), high pyruvate yield on glucose (0.636 g g(-1)), and high glucose consumption rate (1.95 g l(-1)h(-1)) were achieved by applying this strategy. The productivity (1.24 g l(-1) h(-1)) was improved by 36%, 23% and 31%, respectively, compared with fermentations in which agitation speeds were kept constant at 700 rpm, 600 rpm, and 500 rpm. Experimental results indicate that the difference between the performances for producing pyruvate under a favorable state of oxygen supply (dissolved oxygen concentration >50%) was caused by the different regeneration pathways of NADH generated from glycolysis.

  8. Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, in contrast to non-pathogenic strains, intervenes with the p38 MAPK pathway to avoid an abalone haemocyte immune response.

    PubMed

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Friedman, Carolyn S; Buzin, Florence; Cougard, Bertrand; Huchette, Sylvain; Koken, Marcel; Paillard, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a marine bacterial pathogen responsible for episodic abalone epidemics associated with massive mortalities in France, Japan, and Australia. The aim of this study was the understanding of a possible role of the p38 MAPK in abalone haemocyte responses towards this bacterium. First, the pathogenicity of different V. harveyi strains was compared in both immersion and injection trials, and clear differences were detected. The three strains, ORM4, 04/092, and 05/053, all isolated from moribund abalone, induced up to 80% mortalities in immersion or injection challenges (LD(50) (ORM4) = 2.5 x 10(2) CFU animal(-1)). The two strains, LMG 4044T and LMG 7890 were non-pathogenic towards abalone in immersion trials, and needed very high numbers for killing by intramuscular injections (LD(50) = 8.9 x 10(4) and 1.6 x 10(5) CFU animal(-1), respectively). To start unraveling the mechanism explaining these differences, the p38-MAPK, a keyplayer in antimicrobial immune response, was studied. The non-pathogenic strain, LMG 7890 can be eliminated by abalone haemocytes and induces haemocyte phagocytosis and high ROS production. With different concentrations of a p38-specific inhibitor, SB203580, p38 implication was shown. This inhibitor reduced phagocytosis and ROS induction leading to LMG 7890 proliferation. In the case of the pathogenic ORM4 which can not be eliminated by abalone haemocytes, no phagocytosis and ROS production was induced, and a retarded p38 activation was observed. Taken together, our results suggest that p38 MAPK modulation may be one of the ways of virulent V. harveyi to attack its host and escape abalone immune response.

  9. Novel intein-containing DNA specific primers for rapid identification of Candida glabrata using Real-Time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Satish; Ramesh, S

    2014-12-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human pathogen known to cause systemic and vaginal candidiasis. Rapid detection of Candida glabrata is indispensable for appropriate selection of antifungal drugs for chemotherapy. The study describes a unique intein-containing DNA fragment for specific detection of C. glabrata. The designed oligonucleotides detected C. glabrata (Ct mean: 24.75 ± 1.1 and Tm: 70.08 ± 0.23°C) in Real-Time PCR assays. The fluorescent signals were negative when the primers were tested for cross-species and cross-genera amplifications. In conclusion, our study recommends a novel primer set for developing a quick identification system which does not require laborious and time-consuming experimentations.

  10. The role of light and gravity in the experimental transmission of Echinostoma caproni (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) cercariae to the second intermediate host, Biomphalaria glabrata (Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Platt, Thomas R; Burnside, Lindsay; Bush, Elizabeth

    2009-06-01

    Trematode cercariae inhabit predictable environments and respond to trigger cues with genetically fixed releaser responses when foraging for the upstream host. The effect of light and gravity on the transmission of Echinostoma caproni cercariae to Biomphalaria glabrata was investigated experimentally. Transmission chambers were constructed of clear polyvinyl chloride pipe. Snails were constrained within the chamber to prevent movement, while permitting the cercariae to swim freely. A trial consisted of 2 infected B. glabrata shedding E. caproni cercariae placed at the center of the chamber, with 5 uninfected B. glabrata placed 10 cm on either side (or above and below) of the shedding snails as sentinels. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of infection sentinel snails in either experiment (light vs. dark or top vs. bottom); however, mean intensity was significantly higher in sentinel snails in the dark portion of the chamber (42.5 vs. 10.4; P = 0.001) and the top of the transmission chamber (66.1 vs. 38.0; P = 0.0003). There was a high correlation between the number of metacercariae collected from sentinel snails and the total number of infective units (metacercariae + unsuccessful cercariae): r = 0.992 (light vs. dark) and r = 0.957 (top vs. bottom), respectively, at cercariae densities estimated from 22 to 3,304/L. The results suggest that cercariae of E. caproni exhibit negative photo- and geotaxis in searching for a second intermediate host. Stereotypical releaser responses to environmental trigger cues (light and gravity) allow E. caproni cercariae to exploit flexible strategies for completing the life cycle consistent with the broad range second intermediate and definitive hosts used by E. caproni cercariae and adults, respectively.

  11. Time-to-reporting of blood culture positivity and central venous catheter-associated Candida glabrata fungemia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Stempel, Jessica M; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-07-01

    Among cancer patients with Candida glabrata (the Candida species with the slowest in-vitro growth) fungemia, time-to-positive blood culture reporting (TTR) was shorter in catheter-associated candidemia (mean±standard deviation: 67±35 h) than in candidemia from other sources (79±31, P<.01). TTR<48 h was 92% specific for catheter-associated C. glabrata fungemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 modulates haemocyte migration by targeting integrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs are important gene regulators at post-transcriptional level and can modulate diverse biological processes, including immune response. Dozens of species-specific miRNAs have been identified in oyster Crassostrea gigas while their functions remain largely unknown. In the present study, an oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 was found responsive to LPS stimulation and might target a total of 31 oyster genes possibly involved in cell communication, cellular localization and cellular response to stimulus. Besides, in gain-of-function assay of scaffold42648_5080 in vivo, the phagocytosis (30.90% in miRNA group verse 23.20% in miRNA control group), apoptosis (3.10% in miRNA group verse 5.30% in miRNA control group) and migration rate (13.88% in miRNA group verse 21.03% in miRNA control group) of oyster haemocytes were found significantly altered after the injection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics. Among the target genes, integrin-linked kinase (CgILK) was considered crucial in cell migration and its interaction with scaffold42648_5080 was then verified both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, a significant decrease of relative luciferase ratio was observed in CgILK 3'-UTR luciferase reporter assay after transfection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics (0.70-fold of that in blank group, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, when scaffold42648_5080 was overexpressed in vivo (5.41-fold of miRNA control group, p < 0.01), the expression of CgILK declined significantly to 0.25-fold of miRNA control group (p < 0.01). Comparatively, a significant decrease of the haemocyte migration rate (19.76% verse 34.82% in siEGFP control group, p < 0.01) was observed after knock-down of CgILK in vivo. The present study, as far as we know, for the first time revealed the immunomodulation role of an oyster species-specific miRNA, which might provide new insights into miRNA-mediated adaptation mechanism of oysters.

  13. Development of a Candida glabrata dominant nutritional transformation marker utilizing the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase gene (amdS).

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianmin; Blaylock, Morganne; Wickes, Cameron F; Welte, William; Mehrtash, Adrian; Wiederhold, Nathan; Wickes, Brian L

    2016-05-01

    The gene encoding Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase (amdS) was placed under control of Candida albicans ACT1 promoter and terminator sequences and then cloned into a plasmid containing C. glabrata ARS10,CEN8 or ARS10+CEN8 sequences. All plasmids transformed C. glabrata wild-type cells to acetamide+, with the ARS-only containing plasmid transforming cells at the highest frequencies (>1.0 × 10(4) transformants μg(-1)). Plasmids were rapidly lost under non-selective conditions with the frequency dependent on chromosomal element, thus recycling the acetamide- phenotype. The amdS plasmid was used to transform a set of clinical isolates resistant to a variety of antifungal drugs. All strains were successfully transformed to the acetamide+ phenotype at high frequency, confirming that this plasmid construct could be used as a simple dominant marker on virtually any strain. Gap repair experiments demonstrated that just as in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gap repair functions efficiently inC. glabrata, suggesting that C. glabrata has numerous similarities toS. cerevisiae with regard to ease of molecular manipulation. The amdS system is inexpensive and efficient, and combined with existing C. glabrata plasmid elements, confers a high transformation frequency for C. glabrata with a phenotype that can be easily recycled. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The dual role of candida glabrata drug:H+ antiporter CgAqr1 (ORF CAGL0J09944g) in antifungal drug and acetic acid resistance

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Henriques, André; Pires, Carla; Nunes, Joana; Ohno, Michiyo; Chibana, Hiroji; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic Candida species often have to cope with inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, in the acidic environment of the vaginal mucosa. Given that the ability of these yeast species to tolerate stress induced by weak acids and antifungal drugs appears to be a key factor in their persistence and virulence, it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the drug:H+ antiporter CgAqr1 (ORF CAGL0J09944g), from Candida glabrata, was identified as a determinant of resistance to acetic acid, and also to the antifungal agents flucytosine and, less significantly, clotrimazole. These antifungals were found to act synergistically with acetic acid against this pathogen. The action of CgAqr1 in this phenomenon was analyzed. Using a green fluorescent protein fusion, CgAqr1 was found to localize to the plasma membrane and to membrane vesicles when expressed in C. glabrata or, heterologously, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Given its ability to complement the susceptibility phenotype of its S. cerevisiae homolog, ScAqr1, CgAqr1 was proposed to play a similar role in mediating the extrusion of chemical compounds. Significantly, the expression of this gene was found to reduce the intracellular accumulation of 3H-flucytosine and, to a moderate extent, of 3H-clotrimazole, consistent with a direct role in antifungal drug efflux. Interestingly, no effect of CgAQR1 deletion could be found on the intracellular accumulation of 14C-acetic acid, suggesting that its role in acetic acid resistance may be indirect, presumably through the transport of a still unidentified physiological substrate. Although neither of the tested chemicals induces changes in CgAQR1 expression, pre-exposure to flucytosine or clotrimazole was found to make C. glabrata cells more sensitive to acetic acid stress. Results from this study show that CgAqr1 is an antifungal drug resistance determinant and raise the hypothesis that it may play a role in C. glabrata persistent colonization and

  15. The dual role of candida glabrata drug:H+ antiporter CgAqr1 (ORF CAGL0J09944g) in antifungal drug and acetic acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Catarina; Henriques, André; Pires, Carla; Nunes, Joana; Ohno, Michiyo; Chibana, Hiroji; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic Candida species often have to cope with inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, in the acidic environment of the vaginal mucosa. Given that the ability of these yeast species to tolerate stress induced by weak acids and antifungal drugs appears to be a key factor in their persistence and virulence, it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the drug:H(+) antiporter CgAqr1 (ORF CAGL0J09944g), from Candida glabrata, was identified as a determinant of resistance to acetic acid, and also to the antifungal agents flucytosine and, less significantly, clotrimazole. These antifungals were found to act synergistically with acetic acid against this pathogen. The action of CgAqr1 in this phenomenon was analyzed. Using a green fluorescent protein fusion, CgAqr1 was found to localize to the plasma membrane and to membrane vesicles when expressed in C. glabrata or, heterologously, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Given its ability to complement the susceptibility phenotype of its S. cerevisiae homolog, ScAqr1, CgAqr1 was proposed to play a similar role in mediating the extrusion of chemical compounds. Significantly, the expression of this gene was found to reduce the intracellular accumulation of (3)H-flucytosine and, to a moderate extent, of (3)H-clotrimazole, consistent with a direct role in antifungal drug efflux. Interestingly, no effect of CgAQR1 deletion could be found on the intracellular accumulation of (14)C-acetic acid, suggesting that its role in acetic acid resistance may be indirect, presumably through the transport of a still unidentified physiological substrate. Although neither of the tested chemicals induces changes in CgAQR1 expression, pre-exposure to flucytosine or clotrimazole was found to make C. glabrata cells more sensitive to acetic acid stress. Results from this study show that CgAqr1 is an antifungal drug resistance determinant and raise the hypothesis that it may play a role in C. glabrata persistent colonization

  16. The birth of a deadly yeast: tracing the evolutionary emergence of virulence traits in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Toni; Carreté, Laia

    2016-03-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen whose incidence has increased in the last two decades. Despite its name, this yeast is only distantly related to the model fungal pathogen C. albicans, and more closely related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts that underwent an ancient whole-genome duplication. Understanding what specific traits make C. glabrata a successful opportunistic pathogen within a clade of mostly innocuous yeasts, and how these compare to virulence traits in distant pathogens such as C. albicans is a focus of intense research. From an evolutionary perspective, uncovering how the ability to infect humans has emerged multiple, independent times in different lineages may reveal new disease mechanisms and provide us with the capacity to predict which genomic features in a clade may confer a higher potential to develop virulence against humans.

  17. ER stress response mechanisms in the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata and their roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Taiga; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis is critical for numerous aspects of cell physiology. Eukaryotic cells respond to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER (ER stress) by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR), an intracellular signaling pathway that adjusts the folding capacity of the ER. Recent studies of several pathogenic fungi have revealed that the UPR is important for antifungal resistance and virulence; therefore, the pathway has attracted much attention as a potential therapeutic target. While the UPR is highly conserved among eukaryotes, our group recently discovered that the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata lacks the typical fungal UPR, but possesses alternative mechanisms to cope with ER stress. This review summarizes how C. glabrata responds to ER stress and discusses the impacts of ER quality control systems on antifungal resistance and virulence. PMID:24335436

  18. The Planorbid Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Expresses a Hemocyanin-Like Sequence in the Albumen Gland

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Janeth J.; Adema, Coen M.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni, causative agent of human intestinal schistosomiasis in South America, relies importantly on the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as intermediate host to achieve development of cercariae that infect humans. The recommendation from the World Health Organization (WHO) to integrate snail control in efforts to counter schistosomiasis transmission provides impetus for in depth study of B. glabrata biology. Our analysis indicates that two distinct hemocyanin-like genes (hcl-1 and hcl-2) are present in B. glabrata, a snail that uses hemoglobin for oxygen transport. Characterization of BAC clones yielded the full length hcl-1 gene, which is comprised of three functional unit (FU) domains at the amino acid level. Database searches and in silico analyses identified the second hcl gene (hcl-2), composed of six FU domains. Both genes are unusual for lacking canonical residues and having fewer FU domains than typical molluscan hemocyanins that contain 7–8 FUs. Reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that Hcl-1 is expressed in a manner that correlates with reproductive maturity in the albumen gland (AG), an immune- and reproduction-relevant organ. Immune cross-reactivity with anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (α-KLH) antiserum and tandem-mass spectrometry validated the presence of Hcl-1 protein in the AG and egg mass fluid (EMF). The evolutionary conservation of hemocyanin-like sequences in B. glabrata in the presence of the oxygen carrier hemoglobin, combined with our results, suggest that the Hcl-1protein has a functional role in general and/or reproductive biology. Further investigations are needed to explore Hcl-1 as a potential target for snail control. PMID:28036345

  19. FKS2 Mutations Associated with Decreased Echinocandin Susceptibility of Candida glabrata following Anidulafungin Therapy ▿

    PubMed Central

    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Marcos Miranda, Isabel; Silva, Raquel M.; Pinto e Silva, Ana; Rocha, Rita; Amorim, António; Gonçalves Rodrigues, Acácio; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2011-01-01

    This is the first case report of Candida glabrata-disseminated candidiasis describing the acquisition of echinocandin resistance following anidulafungin treatment. The initial isolates recovered were susceptible to echinocandins. However, during 27 days of anidulafungin treatment, two resistant strains were isolated (from the blood and peritoneal fluid). The resistant peritoneal fluid isolate exhibited a Ser663Pro mutation in position 1987 of FKS2 HS1 (hot spot 1), whereas the resistant blood isolate displayed a phenylalanine deletion (Phe659). PMID:21149621

  20. CRS-MIS in Candida glabrata: sphingolipids modulate echinocandin-Fks interaction.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kelley R; Katiyar, Santosh K; Raj, Shriya; Edlind, Thomas D

    2012-10-01

    Infections with the azole-refractory yeast Candida glabrata are now commonly treated with the echinocandins caspofungin (CSF) or micafungin (MCF). True resistance (>  32-fold decreased susceptibility) to these lipopeptide inhibitors of cell wall synthesis is rare and strictly associated with mutations in integral membrane proteins Fks1 or Fks2. In contrast, mutants exhibiting 4- to 32-fold CSF reduced susceptibility (CRS) were readily selected in vitro, and surprisingly demonstrated 4- to 32-fold MCF increased susceptibility (MIS). Sequencing and gene deletion demonstrated that CRS-MIS is Fks-independent. To explore alternative mechanisms, we initially employed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and observed that CRS was conferred by multiple mutations (fen1Δ, sur4Δ, cka2Δ and tsc10-ts) disrupting sphingolipid biosynthesis. Following this lead, C. glabrata fen1Δ and cka2Δ deletants were constructed, and shown to exhibit CRS-MIS. Sphingolipid analysis of CRS-MIS laboratory mutants and clinical isolates demonstrated elevated dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and phytosphingosine (PHS) levels, and consistent with this sequencing revealed fen1, sur4, ifa38 and sur2 mutations. Moreover, exogenous DHS or PHS conferred a CRS-MIS phenotype on wild-type C. glabrata. Exogenous PHS failed, however, to suppress CRS-MIS in a sur2 mutant blocked in conversion of DHS to PHS, implying that accumulation of these intermediates confers CRS-MIS. We conclude that membrane sphingolipids modulate echinocandin-Fks interaction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Molluscicidal and ovicidal activities of plant extracts of the Piperaceae on Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Rapado, L N; Nakano, E; Ohlweiler, F P; Kato, M J; Yamaguchi, L F; Pereira, C A B; Kawano, T

    2011-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease caused by Schistosoma and occurs in 54 countries, mainly in South America, the Caribbean region, Africa and the eastern Mediterranean. Currently, 5 to 6 million Brazilian people are infected and 30,000 are under infection risk. Typical of poor regions, this disease is associated with the lack of basic sanitation and very frequently to the use of contaminated water in agriculture, housework and leisure. One of the most efficient methods of controlling the disease is application of molluscicides to eliminate or to reduce the population of the intermediate host snail Biomphalaria glabrata. Studies on molluscicidal activity of plant extracts have been stimulated by issues such as environmental preservation, high cost and recurrent resistance of snails to synthetic molluscicides. The aim of this study was to determine the molluscicide action of extracts from Piperaceae species on adult and embryonic stages of B. glabrata. Fifteen extracts from 13 Piperaceae species were obtained from stems, leaves and roots. Toxicity of extracts was evaluated against snails at two different concentrations (500 and 100 ppm) and those causing 100% mortality at 100 ppm concentration were selected to obtain the LC₉₀ (lethal concentration of 90% mortality). Piper aduncum, P. crassinervium, P. cuyabanum, P. diospyrifolium and P. hostmannianum gave 100% mortality of adult snails at concentrations ranging from 10 to 60 ppm. These extracts were also assayed on embryonic stages of B. glabrata and those from P. cuyabanum and P. hostmannianum showed 100% ovicidal action at 20 ppm.

  2. Candida glabrata endophthalmitis following penetrating keratoplasty in a patient with negative donor rim culture.

    PubMed

    Muzaliha, Mohd Nor; Adil, Hussein; Ibrahim, Mohtar; Shatriah, Ismail

    2010-06-11

    Candida glabrata endophthalmitis following keratoplasty is rare and almost always associated with positive donor rim culture. A 63-year-old patient, diagnosed Fuch's endothelial dystrophy in both eyes underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in his right eye. He had multiple underlying medical problems, which included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypoadrenalism on oral dexamethasone and fatty liver secondary to hypertrigliseridemia. He developed multiple suture abscesses, corneal haziness, retrocorneal white plaques and a level of hypopyon two weeks after an uneventful penetrating keratoplasty in his right eye. Cultures of the donor button and the transport media culture were negative. Candida glabrata was isolated successfully from the aqueous and vitreous taps. He was treated with a combination of topical, intracameral, intravitreal and intravenous Amphotericin B. His final visual acuity remained poor due to the haziness of the corneal button. Candida glabrata endophthalmitis following penetrating keratoplasty can occur in negative donor rim and transport media cultures. The growth of the organism is facilitated by the patient's immunocompromised status. Awareness by the ophthalmologists and appropriate choice of antibiotics are mandatory in this challenging condition.

  3. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of Fein-Penaeidin from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Shanthi, Sathappan; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Penaeidins are members of a special family of antimicrobial peptide existing in penaeid shrimp and play an important role in the immunological defense of shrimp. Here, we report a penaeidin sequence cloned from the Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaus indicus (Fein-Penaeidin). The Fein-Penaeidin open reading frame encodes a 77 amino acid peptide including a 19 amino acid signal peptide. The deduced amino acid sequences of Fein-Penaeidin include a proline rich N-terminal domain and a carboxyl-domain that contains six cysteine residues. Structural analysis revealed an alpha-helix in its secondary structure and the predicted 3D structure indicated two-disulphide bridges in the alpha-helix. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparison with other known peaneidin suggest the gene shows high similarity to that of penaeidin from Peneaus monodon (95%), F. indicus (80%) and Fenneropenaeus chinensis (74%). Fein-Penaeidin was examined in normal and microbial challenged shrimp and was found to be constitutively expressed in haemocytes, Heart, gills, muscles, intestine, hepatopancreas and eyestalk. Bacterial challenge resulted in mRNA up-regulation, inducing expression at 6 h post injection indicating the penaeidin involved in the innate immunity.

  4. Cytotoxicity assessment of four pharmaceutical compounds on the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) haemocytes, gill and digestive gland primary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Quinn, Brian; Binelli, Andrea; Provini, Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds are considered the new environmental pollutants but at present few studies have evaluated their ecotoxicity on aquatic invertebrates. This study was aimed to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity of four common drugs, namely atenolol (ATL), carbamazepine (CBZ), diclofenac (DCF) and gemfibrozil (GEM), on three different cell typologies from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha): haemocytes, gill and digestive gland cells. Results obtained by the Trypan blue exclusion test revealed that exposure to increasing concentrations (0.001; 0.01; 0.1; 1 and 10 mg L(-1)) of CBZ, DCF and GEM were able to significantly decrease the viability of each cell type, while the MTT (3(4,5-dimethyl-2thiazholyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) reduction assay highlighted only a slight reduction of mitochondrial activity of gill and digestive gland cells. Overall, DCF was the most cytotoxic drug for zebra mussel cells, followed by GEM, CBZ, while ATL has not a noteworthy toxic potential. Our preliminary results lay the groundwork for further in vitro evaluations, which will allow a better definition of the potential toxicity of these drugs.

  5. Cloning and expression analysis of a ubiquitin gene ( Ub L40 ) in the haemocytes of Crassostrea hongkongensis under bacterial challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dingkun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin, a highly conserved stress-related protein, is assigned multiple functions, such as DNA processing, protein degradation, and ribosome synthesis. The Crassostrea hongkongensis ubiquitin gene (designated ChUb L40 ) was cloned by a combination of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of ChUb L40 is 496 bp in length, consisting of a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 75 bp and an open reading frame of 387 bp encoding a ubiquitin fusion protein of 128 amino acids. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of ChUb L40 reveals that Ub L40 is highly conservative during evolution. The expression patterns of ChUb L40 gene in various tissues were examined by real-time PCR. The expression level of ChUb L40 in haemocytes is down-regulated at 4 h and gradually returned to its original level from 6 h to 24 h after Vibrio alginolyticus challenge. Our results suggest that ChUb L40 is ubiquitously expressed and plays an important role in immune defense against bacterial challenge.

  6. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida Medium by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits▿

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Justin A.; Chase, Nancy; Lee, Richard; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Merz, William G.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits that overlap those of C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida medium. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produced white colonies; the Pichia fermentans group and C. krusei did not. Many of these species are difficult to identify phenotypically; white colonies may signal the need for the use of molecular approaches. PMID:18685009

  7. Physiological changes in Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 (Pulmonata: Planorbidae) caused by sub-lethal concentrations of the latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii N.E.B (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Mello-Silva, Clélia Christina; Vasconcellos, Maurício Carvalho de; Pinheiro, Jairo; Rodrigues, Maria de Lurdes de Azevedo

    2006-02-01

    Molluscides have been used as one of the strategies to control schistosomiasis. Many plant extracts with molluscidal effects have been tested, but the action of the latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii is considered the most promising because it meets the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). The objective of this study was to determine the lethal dose and identify the effects of the different doses of latex of E. splendens var. hislopii on the physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to treatment for 24 h. The concentrations of glucose, uric acid and total proteins in the hemolymph and of glycogen in the digestive gland and cephalopodal mass were determined. The LD50 value was 1 mg/l. The highest escape index was found to be at a concentration of 0.6 mg/l. The results showed that the latex of E. splendens var. hislopii caused a sharp reduction in the reserves of glycogen in the digestive gland and elevation of the protein content in the hemolymph of B. glabrata.

  8. β-Glucan Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Neutrophils to Improve the Killing of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata Isolates from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim-Mendonça, Patricia de Souza; Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine da Silva Ribeiro; Negri, Melyssa; de Lima, Nayara Cristina Alves; Fiorini, Adriana; Hatanaka, Elaine; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is among the most prevalent vaginal diseases. Candida albicans is still the most prevalent species associated with this pathology, however, the prevalence of other Candida species, such as C. glabrata, is increasing. The pathogenesis of these infections has been intensely studied, nevertheless, no consensus has been reached on the pathogenicity of VVC. In addition, inappropriate treatment or the presence of resistant strains can lead to RVVC (vulvovaginal candidiasis recurrent). Immunomodulation therapy studies have become increasingly promising, including with the β-glucans. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated microbicidal activity, phagocytosis, intracellular oxidant species production, oxygen consumption, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the release of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1β, and IL-1Ra in neutrophils previously treated or not with β-glucan. In all of the assays, human neutrophils were challenged with C. albicans and C. glabrata isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis. β-glucan significantly increased oxidant species production, suggesting that β-glucan may be an efficient immunomodulator that triggers an increase in the microbicidal response of neutrophils for both of the species isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis. The effects of β-glucan appeared to be mainly related to the activation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of cytokine release. PMID:25229476

  9. Identification of protein components of egg masses indicates parental investment in immunoprotection of offspring by Biomphalaria glabrata (gastropoda, mollusca).

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Jennifer J M; Adema, Coen M; Stout, Barbara A; Mobarak, Charlotte D; Loker, Eric S

    2010-04-01

    The macromolecules contributed by the freshwater gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, to developing offspring inside egg masses are poorly known. SDS-PAGE fractionated egg mass fluids (EMF) of M line and BB02 B. glabrata were analyzed by MALDI-TOF (MS and tandem MS). A MASCOT database was assembled with EST data from B. glabrata and other molluscs to aid in sequence characterization. Of approximately 20 major EMF polypeptides, 16 were identified as defense-related, including protease inhibitors, a hemocyanin-like factor and tyrosinase (each with possible phenoloxidase activity), extracellular Cu-Zn SOD, two categories of C-type lectins, Gram-negative bacteria-binding protein (GNBP), aplysianin/achacin-like protein, as well as versions of lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bacterial permeability-increasing proteins (LBP/BPI) that differed from those previously described from hemocytes. Along with two sequences that were encoded by "unknown" ESTs, EMF also yielded a compound containing a vWF domain that is likely involved in defense and a polypeptide with homology to the Aplysia pheromone temptin. Further study of B. glabrata pheromones is warranted as these could be useful in efforts to control these schistosome-transmitting snails. Several of the EMF polypeptides were contained in the albumen gland, the organ that produces most EMF. Thus, parental investment of B. glabrata in immunoprotection of its offspring is indicated to be considerable.

  10. Identification of protein components of egg masses indicates parental investment in immunoprotection of offspring by Biomphalaria glabrata (Gastropoda, Mollusca)

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Jennifer J M; Adema, Coen M.; Stout, Barbara A.; Mobarak, Charlotte D; Loker, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    The macromolecules contributed by the freshwater gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, to developing offspring inside egg masses are poorly known. SDS-PAGE fractionated egg mass fluids (EMF) of M line and BB02 B. glabrata were analyzed by MALDI-TOF (MS and tandem MS). A MASCOT database was assembled with EST data from B. glabrata and other molluscs to aid in sequence characterization. Of approximately 20 major EMF polypeptides, 16 were identified as defense-related, including protease inhibitors, a hemocyanin-like factor and tyrosinase (each with possible phenoloxidase activity), extracellular Cu-Zn SOD, two categories of C-type lectins, Gram negative bacteria-binding protein (GNBP), aplysianin/achacin-like protein, as well as versions of lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bacterial permeability increasing proteins (LBP/BPI) that differed from those previously described from hemocytes. Along with two sequences that were encoded by “unknown” ESTs, EMF also yielded a compound containing a vWF domain that is likely involved in defense and a polypeptide with homology to the Aplysia pheromone temptin. Further study of B. glabrata pheromones is warranted as these could be useful in efforts to control these schistosome-transmitting snails. Several of the EMF polypeptides were contained in the albumen gland, the organ that produces most EMF. Thus parental investment of B. glabrata in immunoprotection of its offspring is indicated to be considerable. PMID:19995576

  11. Proteomic analysis of hyperadhesive Candida glabrata clinical isolates reveals a core wall proteome and differential incorporation of adhesins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Molero, Emilia; de Boer, Albert D; Dekker, Henk L; Moreno-Martínez, Ana; Kraneveld, Eef A; Ichsan; Chauhan, Neeraj; Weig, Michael; de Soet, Johannes J; de Koster, Chris G; Bader, Oliver; de Groot, Piet W J

    2015-12-01

    Attachment to human host tissues or abiotic medical devices is a key step in the development of infections by Candida glabrata. The genome of this pathogenic yeast codes for a large number of adhesins, but proteomic work using reference strains has shown incorporation of only few adhesins in the cell wall. By making inventories of the wall proteomes of hyperadhesive clinical isolates and reference strain CBS138 using mass spectrometry, we describe the cell wall proteome of C. glabrata and tested the hypothesis that hyperadhesive isolates display differential incorporation of adhesins. Two clinical strains (PEU382 and PEU427) were selected, which both were hyperadhesive to polystyrene and showed high surface hydrophobicity. Cell wall proteome analysis under biofilm-forming conditions identified a core proteome of about 20 proteins present in all C. glabrata strains. In addition, 12 adhesin-like wall proteins were identified in the hyperadherent strains, including six novel adhesins (Awp8-13) of which only Awp12 was also present in CBS138. We conclude that the hyperadhesive capacity of these two clinical C. glabrata isolates is correlated with increased and differential incorporation of cell wall adhesins. Future studies should elucidate the role of the identified proteins in the establishment of C. glabrata infections.

  12. An invertebrate-specific and immune-responsive microRNA augments oyster haemocyte phagocytosis by targeting CgIκB2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Rui; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway is an evolutionally conserved pathway in activating immune response, in which IκBs can repress the activation. In the present study, cgi-miR-2d, an invertebrate-specific microRNA, was proved to regulate CgIκB2 expression and haemocyte phagocytosis during bacterial infection in oyster Crassostrea gigas. The expression of cgi-miR-2d was significantly up-regulated after Vibrio splendidus challenge, while CgIκB2 transcripts decreased. Significant decreases in both luminescence and CgIκB2 3′UTR level was observed after transfection of cgi-miR-2d in CgIκB2 3′UTR luciferase reporter assay. CgIκB2 mRNA level decreased significantly (0.51-fold of control group, p < 0.05) in gain-of-function assay of cgi-miR-2d in vivo while it increased markedly (1.27-fold, p < 0.05) when cgi-miR-2d was repressed (0.10-fold, p < 0.01). A significant increase of haemocyte phagocytosis rate was observed in cgi-miR-2d overexpression group (p < 0.01), consistent with results in CgIκB2 knock-down group (p < 0.01). Moreover, the apoptosis rate of haemocytes was found significantly declined (28.57%, p < 0.01) in gain-of-function assay of cgi-miR-2d. Together, those results not only depicted the functional conservation of miR-2d family in anti-apoptosis of oysters but also highlighted its interaction with phagocytosis by modulating NF-κB pathway, which might dedicate critically to the well-balance of host immune response. PMID:27404434

  13. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) regulates TNF production and haemocyte phagocytosis in the immune response of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Liu, Zhaoqun; Yang, Bin; Jia, Yunke; Song, Xiaorui; Yi, Qilin; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-29

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a serine/threonine protein kinase firstly identified as a regulator of glycogen synthesis. Recently, it has been proved to be a key regulator of the immune reaction. In the present study, a GSK3 homolog gene (designated as EsGSK3) was cloned from Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis. The open reading frame (ORF) was 1824 bp, which encoded a predicted polypeptide of 607 amino acids. There was a conserved Serine/Threonine Kinase domain and a DNA binding domain found in EsGSK3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EsGSK3 was firstly clustered with GSK3-β from oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense in the invertebrate branch, while GSK3s from vertebrates formed the other distinct branch. EsGSK3 mRNA transcripts could be detected in all tested tissues of the crab including haepatopancreas, eyestalk, muscle, gonad, haemocytes and haematopoietic tissue with the highest expression level in haepatopancreas. And EsGSK3 protein was mostly detected in the cytoplasm of haemocyte by immunofluorescence analysis. The expression levels of EsGSK3 mRNA increased significantly at 6 h after Aeromonas hydrophila challenge (p < 0.05) in comparison with control group, and then gradually decreased to the initial level at 48 h (p > 0.05). The mRNA expression of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α factor (EsLITAF) was also induced by A. hydrophila challenge. However, the mRNA expression of EsLITAF and TNF-α production was significantly suppressed after EsGSK3 was blocked in vivo with specific inhibitor lithium, while the phagocytosis of crab haemocytes was significantly promoted. These results collectively demonstrated that EsGSK3 could regulate the innate immune responses of E. sinensis by promoting TNF-α production and inhibiting haemocyte phagocytosis.

  14. Cloning and expression of a heat shock protein (HSP) 90 gene in the haemocytes of Crassostrea hongkongensis under osmotic stress and bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dingkun; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-07-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a highly conserved and multi-functional molecular chaperone that plays an essential role in both cellular metabolism and stress response. Here, we report the cloning of the HSP90 homologue in Crassostrea hongkongensis (ChHSP90) through SSH in combination with RACE from cDNA of haemocytes. The full-length cDNA of ChHSP90 is 2459 bp in length, consisting of a 3', 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and an open reading frame of 2169 bp encoding 722 amino acids. The identity analysis of the amino acid sequence of HSP90 revealed that ChHSP90 is highly conserved. Distribution of ChHSP90 mRNA in gonad, heart, adductor muscle, mantle, gill, digestive gland, and haemocytes suggested that ChHSP90 is ubiquitously expressed. The mRNA levels of ChHSP90 under salinity and bacterial challenges were analyzed by real-time PCR. Under hypo-osmotic treatment, ChHSP90 mRNA in gonad, heart and haemocytes were significantly up-regulated on day 2 and onwards; while in gill, digestive gland and adductor muscle it was significantly down-regulated; the expression in mantle was decreased significantly on day 2 and 3 (P < 0.01), and then up-regulated on day 4 (P < 0.05). Under hyper-osmotic treatment, the mRNA level in gonad, heart, adductor muscle was increased on day 2 and onwards; in gill, it was firstly increased, and then gradually decreased, reaching a minimum on day 3. On day 4, the expression level in gill recovered to pre-treatment level; in mantle and digestive gland, the expression levels were decreased, reaching to the minimum on day 3. During Vibrio alginolyticus challenge, the mRNA level of ChHSP90 increased 3-fold at 4 h post-infection, returned to its pre-challenge level at 6 h post-infection, then was further up-regulated from 8 to 36 h post-infection. These experiments demonstrate that ChHSP90 mRNA is constitutively expressed in various tissues and apparently inducible in haemocytes under salinity and bacterial challenges, suggesting its important

  15. Construction of an Ostrea edulis database from genomic and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) obtained from Bonamia ostreae infected haemocytes: Development of an immune-enriched oligo-microarray.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Belén G; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cao, Asunción; Ramilo, Andrea; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Planas, Josep V; Villalba, Antonio; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-12-01

    The flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, is one of the main farmed oysters, not only in Europe but also in the United States and Canada. Bonamiosis due to the parasite Bonamia ostreae has been associated with high mortality episodes in this species. This parasite is an intracellular protozoan that infects haemocytes, the main cells involved in oyster defence. Due to the economical and ecological importance of flat oyster, genomic data are badly needed for genetic improvement of the species, but they are still very scarce. The objective of this study is to develop a sequence database, OedulisDB, with new genomic and transcriptomic resources, providing new data and convenient tools to improve our knowledge of the oyster's immune mechanisms. Transcriptomic and genomic sequences were obtained using 454 pyrosequencing and compiled into an O. edulis database, OedulisDB, consisting of two sets of 10,318 and 7159 unique sequences that represent the oyster's genome (WG) and de novo haemocyte transcriptome (HT), respectively. The flat oyster transcriptome was obtained from two strains (naïve and tolerant) challenged with B. ostreae, and from their corresponding non-challenged controls. Approximately 78.5% of 5619 HT unique sequences were successfully annotated by Blast search using public databases. A total of 984 sequences were identified as being related to immune response and several key immune genes were identified for the first time in flat oyster. Additionally, transcriptome information was used to design and validate the first oligo-microarray in flat oyster enriched with immune sequences from haemocytes. Our transcriptomic and genomic sequencing and subsequent annotation have largely increased the scarce resources available for this economically important species and have enabled us to develop an OedulisDB database and accompanying tools for gene expression analysis. This study represents the first attempt to characterize in depth the O. edulis haemocyte transcriptome in

  16. Schistosomiasis Control Using Piplartine against Biomphalaria glabrata at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Ludmila Nakamura; Pinheiro, Alessandro de Sá; Lopes, Priscila Orechio de Moraes Victor; Fokoue, Harold Hilarion; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; Marques, Joaquim Vogt; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Nakano, Eliana; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most significant diseases in tropical countries and affects almost 200 million people worldwide. The application of molluscicides to eliminate the parasite's intermediate host, Biomphalaria glabrata, from infected water supplies is one strategy currently being used to control the disease. Previous studies have shown a potent molluscicidal activity of crude extracts from Piper species, with extracts from Piper tuberculatum being among the most active. Methods and Findings The molluscicidal activity of P. tuberculatum was monitored on methanolic extracts from different organs (roots, leaves, fruit and stems). The compounds responsible for the molluscicidal activity were identified using 1H NMR and ESIMS data and multivariate analyses, including principal component analysis and partial least squares. These results indicated that the high molluscicidal activity displayed by root extracts (LC50 20.28 µg/ml) was due to the presence of piplartine, a well-known biologically-active amide. Piplartine was isolated from P. tuberculatum root extracts, and the molluscicidal activity of this compound on adults and embryos of B. glabrata was determined. The compound displayed potent activity against all developmental stages of B. glabrata. Next, the environmental toxicity of piplartine was evaluated using the microcrustacean Daphnia similis (LC50 7.32 µg/ml) and the fish Danio rerio (1.69 µg/ml). The toxicity to these organisms was less compared with the toxicity of niclosamide, a commercial molluscicide. Conclusions The development of a new, natural molluscicide is highly desirable, particularly because the commercially available molluscicide niclosamide is highly toxic to some organisms in the environment (LC50 0.25 µg/ml to D. similis and 0.12 µg/ml to D. rerio). Thus, piplartine is a potential candidate for a natural molluscicide that has been extracted from a tropical plant species and showed less toxic to environment. PMID

  17. Localization of serotonin in the nervous system of Biomphalaria glabrata, an intermediate host for schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Nadia; Vallejo, Deborah; Miller, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    The digenetic trematode Schistosoma mansoni that causes the form of schistosomiasis found in the Western Hemisphere requires the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as its primary intermediate host. It has been proposed that the transition from the free-living S. mansoni miracidium to parasitic mother sporocyst depends on uptake of biogenic amines, e.g. serotonin, from the snail host. However, little is known about potential sources of serotonin in B. glabrata tissues. This investigation examined the localization of serotonin-like immunoreactivity (5HTli) in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues of B. glabrata. Emphasis was placed on the cephalic and anterior pedal regions that are commonly the sites of S. mansoni miracidium penetration. The anterior foot and body wall were densely innervated by 5HTli fibers but no peripheral immunoreactive neuronal somata were detected. Within the CNS, clusters of 5HTli neurons were observed in the cerebral, pedal, left parietal, and visceral ganglia, suggesting that the peripheral serotonergic fibers originate from the CNS. Double-labeling experiments (biocytin backfill × serotonin immunoreactivity) of the tentacular nerve and the three major pedal nerves (Pd n. 10, Pd n. 11, and Pd n. 12) disclosed central neurons that project to the cephalopedal periphery. Overall, the central distribution of 5HTli neurons suggests that, as in other gastropods, serotonin regulates the locomotion, reproductive, and feeding systems of Biomphalaria. The projections to the foot and body wall indicate that serotonin may also participate in defensive, nociceptive, or inflammation responses. These observations identify potential sources of host-derived serotonin in this parasite-host system. Inc.

  18. In-vivo selection of an azole-resistant petite mutant of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Bouchara, J P; Zouhair, R; Le Boudouil, S; Renier, G; Filmon, R; Chabasse, D; Hallet, J N; Defontaine, A

    2000-11-01

    Two isolates of Candida glabrata from the same stool sample from a bone marrow transplant recipient treated with fluconazole, and designated 1084-L for large colonies on yeast extract-peptone-dextrose-agar and 1084-S for small colonies, were analysed. In-vitro susceptibility tests with a commercially available disk diffusion procedure showed that isolate 1084-L had a susceptibility pattern typical of wild-type strains of C. glabrata with sensitivity to polyenes and the presence of resistant colonies randomly distributed within the inhibition zones for all azole compounds except tioconazole. In contrast, isolate 1084-S, which was found by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA to be genetically closely related to isolate 1084-L, exhibited cross-resistance to the azole compounds except tioconazole. Determination of MICs by the E-test method confirmed these results, showing that isolate 1084-S had greater sensitivity to amphotericin B and complete resistance to ketoconazole and fluconazole. Growth on agar plates containing glucose or glycerol as the sole carbon source suggested that the resistant isolate had a respiratory deficiency, which was further demonstrated by flow cytometric analysis of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123-stained blastoconidia. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) established the mitochondrial origin of the respiratory deficiency. However, PCR amplification of the mtDNA with primers ML1 and ML6, as well as transmission electron microscopy, suggested a partial deletion of the mtDNA analogous to that described for rho- petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Together, these results provided evidence that the selection of azole-resistant petite mutants of C. glabrata may occur in vivo after fluconazole administration, which might explain, therefore, clinical failure of antifungal therapy.

  19. Expression vectors for C-terminal fusions with fluorescent proteins and epitope tags in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Candida glabrata is a haploid yeast considered the second most common of the Candida species found in nosocomial infections, accounting for approximately 18% of candidemias worldwide. Even though molecular biology methods are easily adapted to study this organism, there are not enough vectors that will allow probing the transcriptional and translational activity of any gene of interest in C. glabrata. In this work we have generated a set of expression vectors to systematically tag any gene of interest at the carboxy-terminus with three different fluorophores (CFP, YFP and mCherry) or three epitopes (HA, FLAG or cMyc) independently. This system offers the possibility to generate translational fusions in three versions: under the gene's own promoter integrated in its native locus in genome, on a replicative plasmid under its own promoter, or on a replicative plasmid under a strong promoter to overexpress the fusions. The expression of these translational fusions will allow determining the transcriptional and translational activity of the gene of interest as well as the intracellular localization of the protein. We have tested these expression vectors with two biosynthetic genes, HIS3 and TRP1. We detected fluorescence under the microscope and we were able to immunodetect the fusions using the three different versions of the system. These vectors permit coexpression of several different fusions simultaneously in the same cell, which will allow determining protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. This set of vectors adds a new toolbox to study expression and protein interactions in the fungal pathogen C. glabrata.

  20. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Diana V; Salazar, Sara B; Lopes, Maria M; Mira, Nuno P

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  1. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Diana V.; Salazar, Sara B.; Lopes, Maria M.; Mira, Nuno P.

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  2. Candida glabrata Pneumonia in a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Onur; Casim, Hasan; Cetinkaya, Erdogan; Mert, Ali; Benli, Ali Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality among infectious diseases. Streptococcus pneumoniae and viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia. Candidiasis in such patients has been associated with haemodialysis, fungal colonization, exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics, intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization, and immunocompromised patients. The most common cause of infection is C. albicans. The case presented here is of a 66-year-old male patient diagnosed with C. glabrata. The patient suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27882253

  3. Crz1p regulates pH homeostasis in Candida glabrata by altering membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongni; Lin, Xiaobao; Qi, Yanli; Liu, Hui; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2016-09-23

    The asexual facultative aerobic haploid yeast Candida glabrata is widely used in the industrial production of various organic acids. To elucidate the physiological function of the transcription factor CgCrz1p and its role in tolerance to acid stress we deleted or overexpressed the corresponding gene CgCRZ1 Deletion of CgCRZ1 resulted in a 60% decrease in dry cell weight (DCW) and a 50% drop in cell viability compared to the wild type at pH 2.0. Expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes was also significantly down-regulated. Consequently, the proportion of C18:1 fatty acids, ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, and ergosterol content decreased by 30%, 46%, and 30%, respectively. Additionally, membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity were reduced by 45%, 9%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of CgCrz1p increased C18:1 and ergosterol content by 16% and 40%, respectively. Overexpression also enhanced membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity by 31%, 6%, and 20%, respectively. Moreover, in the absence of pH buffering, DCW and pyruvate titer increased by 48% and 60%, respectively, compared to the wild type. Together, these results suggest that CgCrz1p regulates tolerance to acidic conditions by altering membrane lipid composition in C. glabrata IMPORTANCE: The present study provides an insight into the metabolism of Candida glabrata under acidic conditions, such as those encountered during industrial production of organic acids. We found that overexpression of the transcription factor CgCrz1p improved viability, biomass, and pyruvate yields at low pH. Analysis of plasma membrane lipid composition indicated that CgCrz1p might play an important role in its integrity and fluidity, and enhanced the pumping of protons in acidic environments. We propose that altering the structure of the cell membrane may provide a successful strategy for increasing C glabrata productivity at low pH.

  4. Time to positivity and detection of growth in anaerobic blood culture vials predict the presence of Candida glabrata in candidemia: a two-center European cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Kaasch, Achim J; Soriano, Alex; Torres, Jorge-Luis; Vergara, Andrea; Morata, Laura; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; De La Calle, Cristina; Alejo, Izaskun; Hernández, Cristina; Cardozo, Celia; Marco, Franscesc; Del Río, Ana; Almela, Manel; Mensa, Josep; Martínez, José Antonio

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the accuracy of exclusive or earlier growth in anaerobic vials to predict Candida glabrata in a large series of candidemic patients from two European hospitals using the Bactec 9240 system. Alternatively, C. glabrata can be predicted by a time to positivity cutoff value, which should be determined for each setting.

  5. Heteroresistance to Fluconazole Is a Continuously Distributed Phenotype among Candida glabrata Clinical Strains Associated with In Vivo Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Zimmerman, Offer; Finn, Talya; Amit, Sharon; Novikov, Anna; Wertheimer, Noa; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata causes persistent infections in patients treated with fluconazole and often acquires resistance following exposure to the drug. Here we found that clinical strains of C. glabrata exhibit cell-to-cell variation in drug response (heteroresistance). We used population analysis profiling (PAP) to assess fluconazole heteroresistance (FLCHR) and to ask if it is a binary trait or a continuous phenotype. Thirty (57.6%) of 52 fluconazole-sensitive clinical C. glabrata isolates met accepted dichotomous criteria for FLCHR. However, quantitative grading of FLCHR by using the area under the PAP curve (AUC) revealed a continuous distribution across a wide range of values, suggesting that all isolates exhibit some degree of heteroresistance. The AUC correlated with rhodamine 6G efflux and was associated with upregulation of the CDR1 and PDH1 genes, encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporters, implying that HetR populations exhibit higher levels of drug efflux. Highly FLCHR C. glabrata was recovered more frequently than nonheteroresistant C. glabrata from hematogenously infected immunocompetent mice following treatment with high-dose fluconazole (45.8% versus 15%, P = 0.029). Phylogenetic analysis revealed some phenotypic clustering but also variations in FLCHR within clonal groups, suggesting both genetic and epigenetic determinants of heteroresistance. Collectively, these results establish heteroresistance to fluconazole as a graded phenotype associated with ABC transporter upregulation and fluconazole efflux. Heteroresistance may explain the propensity of C. glabrata for persistent infection and the emergence of breakthrough resistance to fluconazole. PMID:27486188

  6. Comparison of Sterol Import under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions in Three Fungal Species, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zavrel, Martin; Hoot, Sam J.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol import has been characterized under various conditions in three distinct fungal species, the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and two human fungal pathogens Candida glabrata and Candida albicans, employing cholesterol, the sterol of higher eukaryotes, as well as its fungal equivalent, ergosterol. Import was confirmed by the detection of esterified cholesterol within the cells. Comparing the three fungal species, we observe sterol import under three different conditions. First, as previously well characterized, we observe sterol import under low oxygen levels in S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which is dependent on the transcription factor Upc2 and/or its orthologs or paralogs. Second, we observe sterol import under aerobic conditions exclusively in the two pathogenic fungi C. glabrata and C. albicans. Uptake emerges during post-exponential-growth phases, is independent of the characterized Upc2-pathway and is slower compared to the anaerobic uptake in S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. Third, we observe under normoxic conditions in C. glabrata that Upc2-dependent sterol import can be induced in the presence of fetal bovine serum together with fluconazole. In summary, C. glabrata imports sterols both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the limited aerobic uptake can be further stimulated by the presence of serum together with fluconazole. S. cerevisiae imports sterols only in anaerobic conditions, demonstrating aerobic sterol exclusion. Finally, C. albicans imports sterols exclusively aerobically in post-exponential-growth phases, independent of Upc2. For the first time, we provide direct evidence of sterol import into the human fungal pathogen C. albicans, which until now was believed to be incapable of active sterol import. PMID:23475705

  7. Time-Kill Assay and Etest Evaluation for Synergy with Polymyxin B and Fluconazole against Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ashcraft, Deborah; Kahn, Heather; Ismail, Abdulrahim

    2014-01-01

    Fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata is an emerging pathogen that causes fungemia. Polymyxin B, a last-resort antibiotic used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, has been found to possess in vitro fungicidal activity and showed synergy with fluconazole against a single strain of C. glabrata. Since both agents may be used simultaneously in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, this study was performed to test for possible synergy of this combination against 35 C. glabrata blood isolates, using 2 methods: a time-kill assay and an experimental MIC-MIC Etest method. Thirty-five genetically unique C. glabrata bloodstream isolates were collected from 2009 to 2011, identified using an API 20C system, and genotyped by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). MICs were determined by Etest and broth microdilution methods. Synergy testing was performed using a modified bacterial Etest synergy method and time-kill assay, with final results read at 24 h. The Etest method showed synergy against 19/35 (54%) isolates; the time-kill assay showed synergy against 21/35 (60%) isolates. Isolates not showing drug synergy had an indifferent status. Concordance between methods was 60%. In vitro synergy of polymyxin B and fluconazole against the majority of C. glabrata isolates was demonstrated by both methods. The bacterial Etest synergy method adapted well when used with C. glabrata. Etest was easier to perform than time-kill assay and may be found to be an acceptable alternative to time-kill assay with antifungals. PMID:25049251

  8. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that can reduce post-harvest proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L; Foster, Jamie L

    2013-08-15

    Studies of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) suggest its hay and haylage have greater levels of rumen undegraded protein (RUP) than other legume forages such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Greater RUP can result in more efficient nitrogen utilization by ruminant animals with positive economic and environmental effects. We sought to determine whether, like red clover (Trifolium pretense L.), perennial peanut contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that might be responsible for increased RUP. Perennial peanut extracts contain immunologically detectible PPO protein and high levels of PPO activity (>100 nkatal mg(-1) protein). Addition of caffeic acid (PPO substrate) to perennial peanut extracts depleted of endogenous substrates reduced proteolysis by 90%. Addition of phenolics prepared from perennial peanut leaves to extracts of either transgenic PPO-expressing or control (non-expressing) alfalfa showed peanut phenolics could reduce proteolysis >70% in a PPO-dependent manner. Two abundant likely PPO substrates are present in perennial peanut leaves including caftaric acid. Perennial peanut contains PPO and PPO substrates that together are capable of inhibiting post-harvest proteolysis, suggesting a possible mechanism for increased RUP in this forage. Research related to optimizing the PPO system in other forage crops will likely be applicable to perennial peanut. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Preclinical and clinical studies with latex from Ficus glabrata HBK, a traditional intestinal anthelminthic in the Amazonian area.

    PubMed

    Hansson, A; Veliz, G; Naquira, C; Amren, M; Arroyo, M; Arevalo, G

    1986-08-01

    Ficus glabrata latex has been a well-known anthelminthic remedy in the neotropical regions since ancient times. The latex has been commercially exploited for decades because of its content of the proteolytic enzyme-complex ficin. A safe dosage regimen with direct use of the latex has been elucidated to control intestinal helminthiasis in the Indian and non-Indian rural population. Helminthiasis was common in three Amazonian villages, field bases for the clinical study, with an overall prevalence of 92%. Specific prevalences were: Ascaris 68%, Strongyloides 42%, Trichuris 41%, Ancylostoma/Necator 26% and Taenia 1%. Variation in the biological activity of the latex was estimated by using a milk coagulating test. Pharmacological studies with live Ascaris demonstrated a lethal effect at concentrations down to 0.05% latex in physiological saline solution. A clinical trial on 181 persons has resulted in a recommended dosage of 1.0 cm3 of prepared latex/kg per day for 3 days to be repeated every 3 months.

  10. Interaction between non-specific electrostatic forces and humoral factors in haemocyte attachment and encapsulation in the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Emma C; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A; Ratcliffe, Norman A

    2006-04-01

    In invertebrates, encapsulation is the common immune defence reaction towards foreign bodies, including multicellular parasites, which enter the haemocoel and are too large to be phagocytosed. This immune response has been most extensively studied in insects, in which it is highly complex, involving a diversity of cellular and molecular processes, but little is known of this process in bivalve molluscs. Non-specific physicochemical properties are known to influence parasite-haemocyte interactions in many invertebrates, and these may provide the common basis of encapsulation on which highly specific biochemical interactions are imposed. The present study uses synthetic beads and thread to mimic inactive metacercarial cysts of trematodes, and thus investigates factors involved in the basic, non-specific mechanisms of cell attachment and encapsulation in the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule. Results showed that positively charged targets stimulated the most vigorous response, and further detailed experiments revealed that non-specific electrostatic forces and humoral plasma factors have a synergistic role in haemocyte attachment and the encapsulation response of C. edule.

  11. [Construction of SSH library from haemocyte of variously colored abalone challenged with bacteria and differential expression analysis of macrophage expressed protein].

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong-Lin; Xu, Dan-Dan; Qiao, Kun; Cai, Ling; Huang, Wei-Bin; Zhang, Nai; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2008-08-01

    Abalones are considered to be the most precious delicacy from the sea, and become very important commercial seafood in aquaculture worldwide. Variously colored abalone (Haliotis diversicolor Reeve, 1846) has been widely cultured on the southeast coast for more than twenty years. However, abalone culture frequently suffers from bacterial infection and mass mortality of reared abalones causes serious economic losses. Unfortunately, knowledge of the defense mechanism in this animal is still lacking. In this study, using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology, a forward SSH library was constructed from haemocytes of H. diversicolor, with the content of 1.37x10(6) pfu and the recombinant rate of 98.18%. After the recombinant plasmids were sequenced, partial cDNA of macrophage expressed protein (MEP) was recognized based on BLAST searches in NCBI, with the size of 1,551 bp, and continuously encoding 517 amino acids. Semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time PCR results showed that MEP cDNA was distinctly up-regulated in haemocytes of the bacterial-challenged group compared to the unchallenged group. The gene information obtained from this library will provide new insights into the immune mechanism of H. diversicolor and facilitate future study of target genes involved in the response to invading microorganisms.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by E. coli challenged haemocytes and regulates phagocytosis, in the medfly Ceratitis capitata. The active role of superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Arbi, Marina; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Lampropoulou, Maria; Marmaras, Vassilis J; Tsakas, Sotiris

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) participates as a second messenger in cell signaling. In this paper, the role of H(2)O(2) was investigated, in Escherichia coli phagocytosis by the haemocytes of the medfly Ceratitis capitata. Block of H(2)O(2) synthesis by specific enzymic inhibitors, namely N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) for NADPH oxidase and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) for SOD, resulted in the increase of E. coli phagocytosis. Immunoblot analysis, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, revealed the constitutive expression of SOD, in the medfly haemocytes. Phagocytosis increased by small interfering RNA (siRNA) for SOD, revealing the active involvement of SOD and H(2)O(2). Immunoblot analysis showed an increase of the ERK1/2 phosphorylation, in the presence of the above H(2)O(2) synthesis enzymic inhibitors. In addition, confocal microscopy showed no co-localization of SOD with β integrin subunit. It appears that SOD participates in the regulation of bacterial phagocytosis, due to involvement of the produced H(2)O(2) in the differential phosphorylation of MAP kinases.

  13. H+ channels in embryonic Biomphalaria glabrata cell membranes: Putative roles in snail host-schistosome interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Brandon J.; Bickham-Wright, Utibe; Yoshino, Timothy P.; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2017-01-01

    The human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni causes intestinal schistosomiasis, a widespread neglected tropical disease. Infection of freshwater snails Biomphalaria spp. is an essential step in the transmission of S. mansoni to humans, although the physiological interactions between the parasite and its obligate snail host that determine success or failure are still poorly understood. In the present study, the B. glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line, a widely used in vitro model for hemocyte-like activity, was used to investigate membrane properties, and assess the impact of larval transformation proteins (LTP) on identified ion channels. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from Bge cells demonstrated that a Zn2+-sensitive H+ channel serves as the dominant plasma membrane conductance. Moreover, treatment of Bge cells with Zn2+ significantly inhibited an otherwise robust production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus implicating H+ channels in the regulation of this immune function. A heat-sensitive component of LTP appears to target H+ channels, enhancing Bge cell H+ current over 2-fold. Both Bge cells and B. glabrata hemocytes express mRNA encoding a hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1)-like protein, although its function in hemocytes remains to be determined. This study is the first to identify and characterize an H+ channel in non-neuronal cells of freshwater molluscs. Importantly, the involvement of these channels in ROS production and their modulation by LTP suggest that these channels may function in immune defense responses against larval S. mansoni. PMID:28319196

  14. Cell wall composition and biofilm formation of azoles-susceptible and -resistant Candida glabrata strains.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Alberto; Vavala, Elisabetta; Marzano, Valeria; Leone, Claudia; Castagnola, Massimo; Iavarone, Federica; Angiolella, Letizia

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, three strains of Candida glabrata have been investigated to shed light on the mechanisms involved in azole resistance during adherence and biofilm formation. In particular, a clinical isolate, susceptible to azole-based drugs, DSY562 and two different resistant mutagenic strains deriving from DSY562, SFY114 and SFY115, have been analysed with different approaches for their cell wall composition and properties. A proteomic analysis revealed that the expression of six cell wall-related proteins and biofilm formation varied between the strains. The SFY114 and SFY115 strains resulted to be less hydrophobic than the susceptible parental counterpart DSY562, on the other hand they showed a higher amount in total cell wall polysaccharides fraction in the total cell wall. Accordingly to the results obtained from the hydrophobicity and adherence assays, in the resistant strain SFY115 the biofilm formation decreased compared to the parental strain DSY562. Finally, the total glucose amount in resistant SFY115 was about halved in comparison to other strains. Taken together all these data suggest that azole drugs may affect the cell wall composition of C. glabrata, in relation to the different pathogenic behaviours.

  15. Force nanoscopy of hydrophobic interactions in the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Alsteens, David; Kucharíková, Soňa; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2015-02-24

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which binds to surfaces mainly through the Epa family of cell adhesion proteins. While some Epa proteins mediate specific lectin-like interactions with human epithelial cells, others promote adhesion and biofilm formation on plastic surfaces via nonspecific interactions that are not yet elucidated. We report the measurement of hydrophobic forces engaged in Epa6-mediated cell adhesion by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we found that C. glabrata wild-type (WT) cells attach to hydrophobic surfaces via strongly adhesive macromolecular bonds, while mutant cells impaired in Epa6 expression are weakly adhesive. Nanoscale mapping of yeast cells using AFM tips functionalized with hydrophobic groups shows that Epa6 is massively exposed on WT cells and conveys strong hydrophobic properties to the cell surface. Our results demonstrate that Epa6 mediates strong hydrophobic interactions, thereby providing a molecular basis for the ability of this adhesin to drive biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces.

  16. Genetic differentiation, dispersal and mating system in the schistosome-transmitting freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Mavárez, J; Pointier, J-P; David, P; Delay, B; Jarne, P

    2002-10-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata is the main intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni in America and one of the most intensely studied species of freshwater snail, yet very little is known about its population biology. Here, we used seven highly polymorphic microsatellite loci to analyse genetic diversity in populations from three regions (Lesser Antilles, Venezuela and southern Brazil). Considerable genetic variation was detected, with an average (s.d.) H(0) = 0.32 (0.24). More diversity per population was found in the Valencia lake basin in Central Venezuela, which suggests an influence of dispersal (via inter-population connectivity) on the restoring of genetic diversity after the demographic bottlenecks recurrently experienced by populations. A marked population structure was detected and there seems to be a relationship between mean differentiation and genetic diversity within regions. There is also a significant isolation-by-distance pattern. The Lesser Antilles populations appear clearly differentiated from the rest, which suggests a single colonisation event followed by local radiation within these islands or multiple colonisation events from the same source area. Our results indicate that B. glabrata essentially cross-fertilises, with little variation in selfing rates among populations. However, significant deficits in heterozygotes and linkage disequilibria were detected in two Venezuelan populations suggesting a mixture of at least two different genetic entities, probably with differences in their respective mating systems.

  17. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) Mediated siRNA Gene Silencing in the Schistosoma mansoni Snail Host, Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Matty; Miller, Andre; Liu, Yijia; Scaria, Puthupparampil; Woodle, Martin; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn

    2011-01-01

    An in vivo, non-invasive technique for gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) in the snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, has been developed using cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) mediated delivery of long double-stranded (ds) and small interfering (si) RNA. Cellular delivery was evaluated and optimized by using a ‘mock’ fluorescent siRNA. Subsequently, we used the method to suppress expression of Cathepsin B (CathB) with either the corresponding siRNA or dsRNA of this transcript. In addition, the knockdown of peroxiredoxin (Prx) at both RNA and protein levels was achieved with the PEI-mediated soaking method. B. glabrata is an important snail host for the transmission of the parasitic digenean platyhelminth, Schistosoma mansoni that causes schistosomiasis in the neotropics. Progress is being made to realize the genome sequence of the snail and to uncover gene expression profiles and cellular pathways that enable the snail to either prevent or sustain an infection. Using PEI complexes, a convenient soaking method has been developed, enabling functional gene knockdown studies with either dsRNA or siRNA. The protocol developed offers a first whole organism method for host-parasite gene function studies needed to identify key mechanisms required for parasite development in the snail host, which ultimately are needed as points for disrupting this parasite mediated disease. PMID:21765961

  18. A family of variable immunoglobulin and lect in domain containing molecules in the snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Duval, David; Mouahid, Gabriel; Emans, Rémi; Allienne, Jean-François; Galinier, Richard; Genthon, Clémence; Dubois, Emeric; Pasquier, Louis Du; Adema, Coen M; Grunau, Christoph; Mitta, Guillaume; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Technical limitations have hindered comprehensive studies of highly variable immune response molecules that are thought to have evolved due to pathogen-mediated selection such as Fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) from Biomphalaria glabrata. FREPs combine upstream immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) domains with a C-terminal fibrinogen-related domain (FreD) and participate in reactions against trematode parasites. From RNAseq data we assembled a de novo reference transcriptome of B. glabrata to investigate the diversity of FREP transcripts. This study increased over two-fold the number of bonafide FREP subfamilies and revealed important sequence diversity within FREP12 subfamily. We also report the discovery of related molecules that feature one or two IgSF domains associated with different C-terminal lectin domains, named C-type lectin-related proteins (CREPs) and Galectin-related protein (GREP). Together, the highly similar FREPs, CREPs and GREP were designated VIgL (Variable Immunoglobulin and Lectin domain containing molecules). PMID:25451302

  19. Autoactivation by a Candida glabrata copper metalloregulatory transcription factor requires critical minor groove interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K A; Thiele, D J

    1996-01-01

    Rapid transcriptional autoactivation of the Candida glabrata AMT1 copper metalloregulatory transcription factor gene is essential for survival in the presence of high extracellular copper concentrations. Analysis of the interactions between purified recombinant AMT1 protein and the AMT1 promoter metal regulatory element was carried out by a combination of missing-nucleoside analysis, ethylation interference, site-directed mutagenesis, and quantitative in vitro DNA binding studies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that monomeric AMT1 binds the metal regulatory element with very high affinity and utilizes critical contacts in both the major and minor grooves. A single adenosine residue in the minor groove, conserved in all known yeast Cu metalloregulatory transcription factor DNA binding sites, plays a critical role in both AMT1 DNA binding in vitro and Cu-responsive AMT1 gene transcription in vivo. Furthermore, a mutation in the AMT1 Cu-activated DNA binding domain which converts a single arginine, found in a conserved minor groove binding domain, to lysine markedly reduces AMT1 DNA binding affinity in vitro and results in a severe defect in the ability of C. glabrata cells to mount a protective response against Cu toxicity. PMID:8552101

  20. Effects of temperature on cellular and biochemical parameters in the crab Carcinus aestuarii (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; Gallo, Chiara; Marin, Maria Gabriella

    2011-06-01

    The effects of temperature on cellular and biochemical parameters of the crab Carcinus aestuarii were evaluated. Crabs were kept for 7 days at 4, 17 (reference value) and 30 °C (salinity of 35 psu), and total haemocyte count (THC), haemocyte volume, haemocyte proliferation, phenoloxidase (PO) activity in both haemocyte lysate (HL) and cell-free haemolymph (CFH), CFH total protein and glucose levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in both gills and digestive gland were evaluated. The lowest and the highest temperature significantly decreased THC, whereas haemocyte volume and haemolymph glucose concentration did not differ significantly among experimental conditions. Haemolymph protein concentration significantly reduced in crabs maintained at 30 °C, when compared with that of animals kept at 4 and 17 °C. Haemocyte proliferation increased significantly in crabs kept at 4 and 30 °C, when compared with that of crabs held at 17 °C. Likewise, a significantly higher PO activity was recorded in CFH from crabs kept at 4 and 30 °C, than in control crabs. Conversely, PO activity did not vary significantly in HL. With regard to antioxidant enzyme activities, a significant decrease in CAT activity was observed in gills from crabs kept at 4 °C, when compared to that of crabs kept at 17 °C and 30 °C. Results obtained demonstrated that the highest and lowest temperature tested influenced crab biological responses, and indicated that C. aestuarii modulated its cellular and biochemical parameters (mainly haemocyte proliferation, CFH protein concentrations and CFH PO activity) in order to cope with temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rediae of echinostomatid and heterophyid trematodes suppress phagocytosis of haemocytes in Littorina littorea (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia).

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, Nadya V; Shaposhnikova, Tania G; Gorbushin, Alexander M

    2006-05-01

    A modulation of the phagocytic activity of hemocytes from the common periwinkle Littorina littorea by secretory-excretory products (SEP) released by trematode rediae during axenic in vitro cultivation was studied. The SEP released by the parasites Himasthla elongata (Echinostomatidae) and Cryptocotyle lingua (Heterophyidae) were found to inhibit the phagocytosis of zymozan particles by periwinkle hemocytes. The specificity of SEP effects was assessed: SEP of Himasthla militaris and Cryptocotyle concavum, two trematodes belonging to the same genera but infecting another closely related prosobranch snail Hydrobia ulvae, were also shown to be able to suppress L. littorea hemocytes phagocytic activity. However, no decrease in phagocytosis rate was observed when SEP of H. elongata and C. lingua were applied to monolayers of hemocytes from the bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis. SEP from H. elongata was fractionated; only those fractions containing proteins of molecular weight more than 50 kDa were shown to possess inhibitory activity. Different H. elongata SEP concentrations were tested in for their ability to suppress phagocytosis by L. littorea hemocytes. Even very low SEP concentrations were shown to retain their ability to decrease phagocytosis rate, the inhibitory effect being dose-dependent. Hemocytes derived from snails naturally infected with H. elongata were also found to have lower phagocytic ability as compared to healthy individuals.

  2. Interactions between St. Lucian Biomphalaria glabrata and Helisoma duryi, a possible competitor snail, in a semi-natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Christie, J D; Edward, J; Goolaman, K; James, B O; Simon, J; Dugat, P S; Treinen, R

    1981-12-01

    In artificial drains similar to those used in banana culture on St. Lucia, Helisoma duryi, the rams-horn snail, controlled Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of schistosomiasis on that island. Time required for elimination of B. glabrata depended on environmental temperature and numbers of H. duryi initially introduced in the drains. Best fit to the data was given by the equation for the logistic curve rather than by an equation for unlimited growth. Multiple regression analyses of natality and mortality rates of both species of snails indicated that populations of B. glabrata were regulated by temperature rather than by density-dependent means while numbers of H. duryi were strongly influenced by numbers of rams-horn snails already present in the drains. Fitting of snail shell growth to von Bertalanffy equations showed that H. duryi shell diameter was uninfluenced by environmental temperatures or presence of B. glabrata while growth of the intermediate host was strongly affected both by temperature and numbers of H. duryi.

  3. Current trends in candidemia and species distribution among adults: Candida glabrata surpasses C. albicans in diabetic patients and abdominal sources.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Riad; Johnson, Leonard B; Fakih, Mohamad G; Riederer, Kathleen; Briski, Laurence

    2016-07-12

    Candidemia rate and species distribution vary according to the type of patients, country of origin and antifungal prophylaxis use. To present current candidemia epidemiological trends. A retrospective examination of candidemia in adults (≥18 years-old) hospitalised from 2007 to 2015. Cases were identified through the microbiology laboratory. Candida species were distinguished based on colony morphology and VITEK-2 YBC cards, (bioMerieux, Durham, NC, USA). Patient characteristics, species distribution, source and outcome were assessed. We encountered 275 patients (294 episodes) with candidemia. The rate of candidemia dropped in 2010 (P = 0.003) without further decline. Nearly all cases (97.5%) were healthcare-associated. C. albicans (n = 118) and C. glabrata (n = 77) proportions varied without a discernable trend. C. glabrata was more common in diabetics [52.9% vs. 32.0% (non-diabetics); P = 0.004] and abdominal sources [53.3% vs. 35.5% (other sources); P = 0.03], especially gastric/duodenal foci [88.9% vs. 44.1% (other abdominal foci); P = 0.02]. All-cause 30-day mortality rate was 43.3% without changes over time or differences between C. albicans and C. glabrata. In conclusion, the candidemia rate remains stable after a decline in 2010. C. albicans remains the most common species but C. glabrata predominates in diabetics and abdominal sources. These findings suggest possible species-related differences in colonisation dynamics or pathogenicity. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from condiments against fluconazole-resistant and -sensitive Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Soares, I H; Loreto, É S; Rossato, L; Mario, D N; Venturini, T P; Baldissera, F; Santurio, J M; Alves, S H

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano), Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Salvia officinalis (sage), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Ocimum basilicum (basil) and Zingiber officinale (ginger) were assessed against Candida glabrata isolates. One group contained 30 fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata isolates, and the second group contained fluconazole-resistant isolates derived from the first group after the in vitro induction of fluconazole-resistance, for a total of 60 tested isolates. The broth microdilution methodology was used. Concentrations of 50μg/mL, 100μg/mL, 200μg/mL, 400μg/mL, 800μg/mL, 1600μg/mL and 3200μg/mL of the essential oils were used, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined. Thyme, sage, rosemary, basil and ginger essential oils showed no antifungal activity at the tested concentrations. Antimicrobial activity less than or equal to 3200μg/mL was observed for oregano, Mexican oregano and cinnamon essential oils. Both the oregano and Mexican oregano essential oils showed high levels of antifungal activity against the fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata group, whereas the cinnamon essential oil showed the best antifungal activity against the fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Candida glabrata species complex prevalence and antifungal susceptibility testing in a culture collection: First description of Candida nivariensis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morales-López, Soraya Eugenia; Taverna, Constanza G; Bosco-Borgeat, María Eugenia; Maldonado, Ivana; Vivot, Walter; Szusz, Wanda; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Córdoba, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    The presence of the cryptic species belonging to the Candida glabrata complex has not been studied in Argentina. We analyzed a collection of 117 clinical isolates of C. glabrata complex belonging to a National Culture Collection of Instituto Nacional de Microbiología "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán" from Argentina (40 isolates from blood samples, 18 from other normally sterile sites, 20 from vagina, 14 from urine, 7 from oral cavity, 3 from catheter, 1 from a stool sample and 14 isolates whose clinical origin was not recorded). The aims of this work were to determine the prevalence of the cryptic species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis and to evaluate the susceptibility profile of isolates against nine antifungal drugs. Identification was carried out by using classical phenotypic tests, CHROMagar™ Candida, PCR and MALDI-TOF. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin and anidulafungin were determined according to the EDef 7.3 (EUCAST) reference document. Of the 117 isolates, 114 were identified as C. glabrata and three as C. nivariensis by using PCR and MALDI-TOF. There were no major differences between C. nivariensis and C. glabrata susceptibility profiles. No resistant strains were found to echinocandins. We have found that the percentage of C. nivariensis in our culture collection was 2.56. This is the first description of C. nivariensis in Argentina, and data obtained could contribute to the knowledge of the epidemiology of this cryptic species.

  6. Ionotropic Receptors Identified within the Tentacle of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria glabrata, an Intermediate Host of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Di; Wang, Tianfang; Rotgans, Bronwyn A.; McManus, Donald P.; Cummins, Scott F.

    2016-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata (B. glabrata) is an air-breathing aquatic mollusc found in freshwater habitats across the Western Hemisphere. It is most well-known for its recognized capacity to act as a major intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the human blood fluke parasite. Ionotropic receptors (IRs), a variant family of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR), have an evolutionary ancient function in detecting odors to initiate chemosensory signaling. In this study, we applied an array of methods towards the goal of identifying IR-like family members in B. glabrata, ultimately revealing two types, the iGluR and IR. Sequence alignment showed that three ligand-binding residues are conserved in most Biomphalaria iGluR sequences, while the IRs did exhibit a variable pattern, lacking some or all known glutamate-interactingresidues, supporting their distinct classification from the iGluRs. We show that B. glabrata contains 7 putative IRs, some of which are expressed within its chemosensory organs. To further investigate a role for the more ancient IR25a type in chemoreception, we tested its spatial distribution pattern within the snail cephalic tentacle by in situ hybridization. The presence of IR25a within presumptive sensory neurons supports a role for this receptor in olfactory processing, contributing to our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in Biomphalaria olfactory processing. PMID:27253696

  7. New insights into the amphibious life of Biomphalaria glabrata and susceptibility of its egg masses to fungal infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Egg masses of an aquatic snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, matured, and juveniles subsequently eclosed and were mobile in a stable water film of transitory habitats simulated by two different simple test devices described here. The viability of eggs maintained in an unstable film due to low ambient mois...

  8. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Respiratory-deficient mutants of Torulopsis glabrata, a yeast with circular mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid of 6 mu m.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, R M; McArthur, C R; Clark-Walker, G D

    1976-01-01

    Purified mitochondria from the petite positive yeast Torulopsis glabrata contain a circular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with a length of 6 mum and a buoyant density of 1.686 g/cm3. This DNA is absent from ethidium bromide induced respiratory-deficient mutants. Images PMID:944184

  10. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oils from Leaves of Edible (Arachis hypogaea L.) and Perennial (Arachis glabrata Benth.) Peanut Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanuts or groundnuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) are a valuable oilseed crop, but other than the seed, the rest of the plant is of minimal value. Plant material including the leaves is used as mulch or as animal feed. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth) known as forage or rhizoma peanut produces...

  11. Fungicidal activity of copper-sputtered flexible surfaces under dark and actinic light against azole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Myriam K S; Rtimi, Sami; Kiwi, John; Pulgarin, César; Entenza, José M; Bizzini, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Candida spp. are able to survive on hospital surfaces and causes healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). Since surface cleaning and disinfecting interventions are not totally effective to eliminate Candida spp., new approaches should be devised. Copper (Cu) has widely recognized antifungal activity and the use of Cu-sputtered surfaces has recently been proposed to curb the spread of HCAIs. Moreover, the activity of Cu under the action of actinic light remains underexplored. We investigated the antifungal activity of Cu-sputtered polyester surfaces (Cu-PES) against azole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata under dark and low intensity visible light irradiation (4.65mW/cm(2)). The surface properties of Cu-PES photocatalysts were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Under dark, Cu-PES showed a fungicidal activity (≥3log10CFU reduction of the initial inoculum) against both C. albicans DSY296 and C. glabrata DSY565 leading to a reduction of the starting inoculum of 3.1 and 3.0log10CFU, respectively, within 60min of exposure. Under low intensity visible light irradiation, Cu-PES exhibited an accelerated fungicidal activity against both strains with a reduction of 3.0 and 3.4log10CFU, respectively, within 30min of exposure. This effect was likely due to the semiconductor Cu2O/CuO charge separation. The decrease in cell viability of the two Candida strains under dark and light conditions correlated with the progressive loss of membrane integrity. These results indicate that Cu-PES represent a promising strategy for decreasing the colonization of surfaces by yeasts and that actinic light can improve its self-disinfecting activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression Patterns of ABC Transporter Genes in Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Atefeh Abdollahi; Badali, Hamid; Shokohi, Tahereh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Amirrajab, Nasrin; Moazeni, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    Clinical management of fungal diseases is compromised by the emergence of antifungal drug resistance in fungi, which leads to elimination of available drug classes as treatment options. An understanding of antifungal resistance at molecular level is, therefore, essential for the development of strategies to combat the resistance. This study presents the assessment of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida glabrata isolates originated from Iran. Taking seven distinct fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates, real-time PCRs were performed to evaluate the alternations in the regulation of the genes involved in drug efflux including CgCDR1, CgCDR2, CgSNQ2, and CgERG11. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in CgPDR1 alleles were determined by DNA sequencing. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole was observed in 2.5 % of the isolates. In the present study, six amino acid substitutions were identified in CgPdr1, among which W297R, T588A, and F575L were previously reported, whereas D243N, H576Y, and P915R are novel. CgCDR1 overexpression was observed in 57.1 % of resistant isolates. However, CgCDR2 was not co-expressed with CgCDR1. CgSNQ2 was upregulated in 71.4 % of the cases. CgERG11 overexpression does not seem to be associated with azole resistance, except for isolates that exhibited azole cross-resistance. The pattern of efflux pump gene upregulation was associated with GOF mutations observed in CgPDR1. These results showed that drug efflux mediated by adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CgSNQ2 and CgCDR1, is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Iranian isolates of C. glabrata. Since some novel GOF mutations were found here, this study also calls for research aimed at investigating other new GOF mutations to reveal the comprehensive understanding about efflux-mediated resistance to azole antifungal agents.

  13. Haemocytes play a commensal rôle in the synthesis of the dihydroxybenzoate required as a precursor for sclerotization of the egg case (ootheca) in the cockroach Periplaneta americana (L).

    PubMed

    Whitehead, D L

    2011-06-01

    The secretions of the two colleterial glands give rise to the walls of the ootheca which, when hardened, serve to protect fertilised eggs in the cockroach P. americana. The larger left gland (LCG) secretes a β-D-glucoside of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, several proteins (oothecins), calcium oxalate crystals and a latent phenoloxidase enzyme. The smaller right gland (RCG) secretes a β-glucosidase. When the two secretions mix in the genital vestibulum, the glucoside is hydrolyzed to glucose and free dihydroxybenzoate, which is then oxidized by the phenoloxidase to the o-benzoquinone, which cross-links the oothecins Scanning and thin section electron microscopy (EM) showed haemocytes adhering to the LCG. The haemocytes were obtained by washing the gland with insect saline; and, when they were incubated with labelled tyrosine, they showed an enhanced ability to decarboxylate L-p-tyrosine to tyramine and then deaminate and oxidize tyramine to give p-hydroxyphenylacetate. After removal of adhering haemocytes, the LCG was no longer able to decarboxylate tyrosine. Injection of α-ecdysone into the abdomens of recently emerged adult females inhibited synthesis of a phenolic glucoside in the developing LCG but not of β-glucosidase produced by RCG. Furthermore, injecting inhibitors of the decarboxylase and monoamineoxidase enzymes partly closed down synthesis in vivo of the phenolic glucoside by LCG. Therefore, in the adult female cockroach, tyramine was converted to p-hydroxyphenylacetate in the haemocytes and then transferred to the gland where it was hydroxylated to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate, which gave rise to a dihydroxybenzoate. Evidence suggested that biosynthesis of the oothecal sclerotizing agent could be controlled by juvenile hormone (JH) acting on the LCG or on haemocytes adhering to the gland.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida glabrata in China (August 2009 to July 2014): A Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xin; Xiao, Meng; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, He; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Kang, Mei; Sun, Zi-Yong; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Li, Ruo-Yu; Lu, Juan; Liao, Kang; Hu, Tie-Shi; Ni, Yu-Xing; Zou, Gui-Ling; Zhang, Ge; Fan, Xin; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an increasingly important cause of invasive candidiasis. In China, relatively little is known of the molecular epidemiology of C. glabrata and of its antifungal susceptibility patterns. Here we studied 411 non-duplicate C. glabrata isolates from 411 patients at 11 hospitals participating in the National China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net program (CHIF-NET; 2010-2014). Genotyping was performed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) employing six genetic loci and by microsatellite analysis. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed using Sensititre YeastOne™ YO10 methodology. Of 411 isolates, 35 sequence types (ST) were identified by MLST and 79 different genotypes by microsatellite typing; the latter had higher discriminatory power than MLST in the molecular typing of C. glabrata. Using MLST, ST7 and ST3 were the most common STs (66.4 and 9.5% of all isolates, respectively) with 24 novel STs identified; the most common microsatellite types were T25 (30.4% of all isolates) and T31 (12.4%). Resistance to fluconazole (MIC > 32 μg/mL) was seen in 16.5% (68/411) of isolates whilst MICs of >0.5 μg/mL for voriconazole, >2 μg/mL for itraconazole and >2 μg/mL for posaconazole were seen for 28.7, 6.8, and 7.3% of isolates, respectively; 14.8% of all isolates cross-resistant/non-wide-type to fluconazole and voriconazole. Fluconazole resistant rates increased 3-fold over the 5-year period whilst that of isolates with non-WT MICs to voriconazole, 7-fold. All echinocandins exhibited >99% susceptibility rates against all isolates but notably one isolate exhibited multi-drug resistance to the azoles and echinocandins. The study has provided a global picture of the molecular epidemiology and drug resistance rates of C. glabrata in China during the period of the study. PMID:28588560

  15. Molecular Epidemiology and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida glabrata in China (August 2009 to July 2014): A Multi-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xin; Xiao, Meng; Chen, Sharon C-A; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, He; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Kang, Mei; Sun, Zi-Yong; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Li, Ruo-Yu; Lu, Juan; Liao, Kang; Hu, Tie-Shi; Ni, Yu-Xing; Zou, Gui-Ling; Zhang, Ge; Fan, Xin; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an increasingly important cause of invasive candidiasis. In China, relatively little is known of the molecular epidemiology of C. glabrata and of its antifungal susceptibility patterns. Here we studied 411 non-duplicate C. glabrata isolates from 411 patients at 11 hospitals participating in the National China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net program (CHIF-NET; 2010-2014). Genotyping was performed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) employing six genetic loci and by microsatellite analysis. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed using Sensititre YeastOne™ YO10 methodology. Of 411 isolates, 35 sequence types (ST) were identified by MLST and 79 different genotypes by microsatellite typing; the latter had higher discriminatory power than MLST in the molecular typing of C. glabrata. Using MLST, ST7 and ST3 were the most common STs (66.4 and 9.5% of all isolates, respectively) with 24 novel STs identified; the most common microsatellite types were T25 (30.4% of all isolates) and T31 (12.4%). Resistance to fluconazole (MIC > 32 μg/mL) was seen in 16.5% (68/411) of isolates whilst MICs of >0.5 μg/mL for voriconazole, >2 μg/mL for itraconazole and >2 μg/mL for posaconazole were seen for 28.7, 6.8, and 7.3% of isolates, respectively; 14.8% of all isolates cross-resistant/non-wide-type to fluconazole and voriconazole. Fluconazole resistant rates increased 3-fold over the 5-year period whilst that of isolates with non-WT MICs to voriconazole, 7-fold. All echinocandins exhibited >99% susceptibility rates against all isolates but notably one isolate exhibited multi-drug resistance to the azoles and echinocandins. The study has provided a global picture of the molecular epidemiology and drug resistance rates of C. glabrata in China during the period of the study.

  16. Differential transcriptomic responses of Biomphalaria glabrata (Gastropoda, Mollusca) to bacteria and metazoan parasites, Schistosoma mansoni and Echinostoma paraensei (Digenea, Platyhelminthes)

    PubMed Central

    Adema, Coen M; Hanington, Patrick C.; Lun, Cheng-Man; Rosenberg, George H.; Aragon, Anthony D; Stout, Barbara A; Richard, Mara L. Lennard; Gross, Paul S.; Loker, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    A 70-mer oligonucleotide-based microarray (1152 features) that emphasizes stress and immune responses factors was constructed to study transcriptomic responses of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata to different immune challenges. In addition to sequences with relevant putative ID and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation, the array features non-immune factors and unknown B. glabrata ESTs for functional gene discovery. The transcription profiles of B. glabrata (3 biological replicates, each a pool of 5 snails) were recorded at 12 hours post wounding, exposure to Gram negative or Gram positive bacteria (Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus, respectively), or infection with compatible trematode parasites (S. mansoni or E. paraensei, 20 miracidia/snail), relative to controls, using universal reference RNA. The data were subjected to Significance Analysis for Microarrays (SAM), with a false positive rate (FPR) ≤10%. Wounding yielded a modest differential expression profile (27 up/21 down) with affected features mostly dissimilar from other treatments. Partially overlapping, yet distinct expression profiles were recorded from snails challenged with E. coli (83 up/20 down) or M. luteus (120 up/42 down), mostly showing up-regulation of defense and stress-related features. Significantly altered expression of selected immune features indicates that B. glabrata detects and responds differently to compatible trematodes. Echinostoma paraensei infection was associated mostly with down regulation of many (immune-) transcripts (42 up/68 down), whereas S. mansoni exposure yielded a preponderance of up-regulated features (140 up/23 down), with only few known immune genes affected. These observations may reflect the divergent strategies developed by trematodes during their evolution as specialized pathogens of snails to negate host defense responses. Clearly, the immune defenses of B. glabrata distinguish and respond differently to various immune challenges. PMID:19962194

  17. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis.

  18. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  19. Altered Gene Expression in the Schistosome-Transmitting Snail Biomphalaria glabrata following Exposure to Niclosamide, the Active Ingredient in the Widely Used Molluscicide Bayluscide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Buddenborg, Sarah K.; Adema, Coen M.; Sullivan, John T.; Loker, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    In view of the call by the World Health Organization (WHO) for elimination of schistosomiasis as a public health problem by 2025, use of molluscicides in snail control to supplement chemotherapy–based control efforts is likely to increase in the coming years. The mechanisms of action of niclosamide, the active ingredient in the most widely used molluscicides, remain largely unknown. A better understanding of its toxicology at the molecular level will both improve our knowledge of snail biology and may offer valuable insights into the development of better chemical control methods for snails. We used a recently developed Biomphalaria glabrata oligonucleotide microarray (31K features) to investigate the effect of sublethal exposure to niclosamide on the transcriptional responses of the snail B. glabrata relative to untreated snails. Most of the genes highly upregulated following exposure of snails to niclosamide are involved in biotransformation of xenobiotics, including genes encoding cytochrome P450s (CYP), glutathione S-transferases (GST), and drug transporters, notably multi-drug resistance protein (efflux transporter) and solute linked carrier (influx transporter). Niclosamide also induced stress responses. Specifically, six heat shock protein (HSP) genes from three super-families (HSP20, HSP40 and HSP70) were upregulated. Genes encoding ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and coatomer, all of which are involved in vesicle trafficking in the Golgi of mammalian cells, were also upregulated. Lastly, a hemoglobin gene was downregulated, suggesting niclosamide may affect oxygen transport. Our results show that snails mount substantial responses to sublethal concentrations of niclosamide, at least some of which appear to be protective. The topic of how niclosamide’s lethality at higher concentrations is determined requires further study. Given that niclosamide has also been used as an anthelmintic drug for decades and has

  20. A nonsense mutation in the ERG6 gene leads to reduced susceptibility to polyenes in a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Tronchin, Guy; Larcher, Gérald; Ernoult, Emilie; Bergès, Thierry; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2008-10-01

    Unlike the molecular mechanisms that lead to azole drug resistance, the molecular mechanisms that lead to polyene resistance are poorly documented, especially in pathogenic yeasts. We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the reduced susceptibility to polyenes of a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata. Sterol content was analyzed by gas-phase chromatography, and we determined the sequences and levels of expression of several genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. We also investigated the effects of the mutation harbored by this isolate on the morphology and ultrastructure of the cell, cell viability, and vitality and susceptibility to cell wall-perturbing agents. The isolate had a lower ergosterol content in its membranes than the wild type, and the lower ergosterol content was found to be associated with a nonsense mutation in the ERG6 gene and induction of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Modifications of the cell wall were also seen, accompanied by increased susceptibility to cell wall-perturbing agents. Finally, this mutation, which resulted in a marked fitness cost, was associated with a higher rate of cell mortality. Wild-type properties were restored by complementation of the isolate with a centromeric plasmid containing a wild-type copy of the ERG6 gene. In conclusion, we have identified the molecular event responsible for decreased susceptibility to polyenes in a clinical isolate of C. glabrata. The nonsense mutation detected in the ERG6 gene of this isolate led to a decrease in ergosterol content. This isolate may constitute a useful tool for analysis of the relevance of protein trafficking in the phenomena of azole resistance and pseudohyphal growth.

  1. Phenotypic and Molecular Evaluation of Echinocandin Susceptibility of Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis Strains Isolated during 30 Years in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morales-López, Soraya; Dudiuk, Catiana; Vivot, Walter; Szusz, Wanda; Córdoba, Susana B; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2017-07-01

    The echinocandin susceptibilities of 122 Candida glabrata complex strains (including 5 Candida nivariensis and 3 Candida bracarensis strains) were evaluated by microdilution and compared with the results from a molecular tool able to detect FKS mutations. No echinocandin resistance was detected. The PCR results coincide with the MIC data in 99.25% of the cases (1 C. glabrata strain was misidentified as resistant) but were 20 h faster. C. nivariensis FKS genes were sequenced and showed differences with C. glabrataFKS genes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Effects of hypoxia on dopamine concentration and the immune response of White Shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fawen; Pan, Luqing; Jing, Futao

    2009-03-01

    Effects of hypoxia on the dopamine concentration and the immune response of White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were studied. The results showed that hypoxia had significant effects on the concentration of dopamine (DA) in the haemolymph, haemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, phagocytic activity of haemocytes and bacteriolytic and antibacterial activity in the haemolymph ( P<0.05). The concentration of the dopamine in haemolymph reached its maximum in the 3.0 and 1.5 mg L-1 DO groups at 12 h and 6 h, and then returned to normal after 24 h and 12 h, respectively. All immune parameters decreased with the reduction of dissolved oxygen. Total haemocyte count (THC), the hyaline cells and semi-granular cells in the 3.0 mg L-1 DO group became stable after 12 h, while granular cells did so after 24 h. The THC and different haemocyte count (DHC) in the 1.5 mg L-1 DO group became stable after 24 h. Phenoloxidase activity and bacteriolytic activity in the 3.0 and 1.5 mg L-1 DO groups reached their stable levels after 24 h and 12 h respectively, while phagocytic activity and antibacterial activity became stable after 24 and 12, and 36 and 24 h, respectively. It was also indicated that the changes of dopamine concentrations in haemolymph, haemocyte count and phenoloxidase activity were obviously related to the exposure time under hypoxic conditions.

  3. Gastric trichobezoar associated with perforated peptic ulcer and Candida glabrata infection

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Héctor Losada; Catalán, Cecilia Huenchullán; Demetrio, Rodrigo Arriagada; Rivas, Macarena Espinoza; Parraguez, Natalia Castagnoli; Alvarez, Martín Alanis

    2014-01-01

    Bezoars are accumulations of human or plant fiber located in the gastrointestinal tract of both humans and animals. Patients remain asymptomatic for several years, and the symptoms develop as these accumulations increase in size to the point of obstruction or perforation. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient at 10 d postpartum, who presented with acute abdomen associated with sepsis. Given the urgency of the clinical picture, at no point was the presence of a giant bezoar at gastric level suspected, specifically a trichobezoar. The emergency abdominal and pelvic ultrasound revealed only unspecific signs of perforated hollow viscus. Diagnosis was therefore made intraoperatively. A complete gastric trichobezoar was found with gastric perforation and secondary peritonitis. The peritoneal fluid culture revealed Candida glabrata. PMID:25516871

  4. Candida glabrata among Candida spp. from environmental health practitioners of a Brazilian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Catarina; de Oliveira Silva, Elisa; Gonçalves, Lindyanne Lemos; Nery, Jéssica Maria; Silva, Naiara Chaves; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the species Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida was evaluated in a Brazilian Tertiary Hospital from the environment and health practitioners. In a 12-month period we had a total positivity of 19.65% of Candida spp. The most recurring non-albicans Candida species was C. glabrata (37.62%), generally considered a species of low virulence, but with a higher mortality rate than C. albicans. Subsequently, C. parapsilosis (25.74%) and C. tropicalis (16.86%) were the second and third most commonly isolated species. Considering the total samples collected from the emergency room and from the inpatient and the pediatric sector, 19.10% were positive for Candida spp., with the predominance of non-albicans Candida species (89.42%). The high percentage of positivity occurred in the hands (24.32%) and the lab coats (21.88%) of the health care assistants. No sample of C. albicans presented a profile of resistance to the drugs. All the non-albicans Candida species presented a decreased susceptibility to miconazole and itraconazole, but they were susceptible to nystatin. Most of the isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and amphotericin B. As expected, a high resistance rate was observed in C. glabrata and C. krusei, which are intrinsically less susceptible to this antifungal agent. The contamination of environmental surfaces by Candida spp. through hand touching may facilitate the occurrence of Candida infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. In addition to that, the antifungal agents used should be carefully evaluated considering local epidemiologic trends in Candida spp. infections, so that therapeutic choices may be better guided. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  5. [System metabolic engineering strategies for 2,3-butandione production by Torulopsis glabrata].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Xu, Nan; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-04-04

    We regulated the carbon flux distribution of Torulopsis glabrata CCTCC M202019, an efficient pyruvate-producing microorganism, for improved 2, 3-butandione production. We overexpressed the acetolactate synthase (ALS) from Bacillus subtilis and then used the genome-scale metabolic model (GSMM) for T. glabrata (named iNX804) to evaluate the importance of deleting the ILV5 gene. In addition, the BDH gene was deleted to restrict the degradation of 2,3-butanedione. Overexpression of the ALS resulted in a 4.6-fold increase in ALS activity and increased the extracellular concentration of 2,3-butanedione to 0.57 g/L from 0.01 g/L. The deletion of the ILV5 gene was found to increase the 2,3-butanedione accumulation level by 28.1%, attributed to the disruption of L-valine and L-leucine biosynthetic pathway. With the deletion of the BDH gene, the enzyme activity levels of butanedione reductase and butanediol dehydrogenase were decreased by 74.4% and 76.1%, respectively. And the accumulations of 3-hydroxybutanone and 2,3-butanediol were decreased by 52.2% and 71.4%, respectively. The final 2,3-butanedione concentration was 0.95 g/L, which was 30.1% higher than that of the control strain. The GSMM based system metabolic engineering can be a functional strategy to redistribute the carbon flux from pyruvate node to 2,3-butanedione and achieve efficient accumulation of 2,3-butanedione.

  6. The Nuclear Receptors of Biomphalaria glabrata and Lottia gigantea: Implications for Developing New Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Satwant; Jobling, Susan; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Lockyer, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription regulators involved in an array of diverse physiological functions including key roles in endocrine and metabolic function. The aim of this study was to identify nuclear receptors in the fully sequenced genome of the gastropod snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni and compare these to known vertebrate NRs, with a view to assessing the snail's potential as a invertebrate model organism for endocrine function, both as a prospective new test organism and to elucidate the fundamental genetic and mechanistic causes of disease. For comparative purposes, the genome of a second gastropod, the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea was also investigated for nuclear receptors. Thirty-nine and thirty-three putative NRs were identified from the B. glabrata and L. gigantea genomes respectively, based on the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain and/or ligand-binding domain. Nuclear receptor transcript expression was confirmed and sequences were subjected to a comparative phylogenetic analysis, which demonstrated that these molluscs have representatives of all the major NR subfamilies (1-6). Many of the identified NRs are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, however differences exist, most notably, the absence of receptors of Group 3C, which includes some of the vertebrate endocrine hormone targets. The mollusc genomes also contain NR homologues that are present in insects and nematodes but not in vertebrates, such as Group 1J (HR48/DAF12/HR96). The identification of many shared receptors between humans and molluscs indicates the potential for molluscs as model organisms; however the absence of several steroid hormone receptors indicates snail endocrine systems are fundamentally different. PMID:25849443

  7. β-Aescin at subinhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) enhances susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to nystatin.

    PubMed

    Franiczek, Roman; Gleńsk, Michał; Krzyżanowska, Barbara; Włodarczyk, Maciej

    2015-11-01

    Aescin (escin) derived from the seeds of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) is a natural mixture of triterpene saponins exhibiting a wide variety of pharmacological properties, including antiinflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities. However, data concerning antifungal activities of these compounds are limited. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to α-aescin sodium, β-aescin crystalline and β-aescin sodium using the disk diffusion (DD) and broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Moreover, the influence of subinhibitory concentration (0.5×MIC) of β-aescins on the nystatin MIC was also studied. In general, the results obtained by the DD assay correlated well with those obtained by the BMD method. Both β-aescins effectively inhibited the growth of all 24 strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 8 to 32 μg/ml for β-aescin crystalline, whereas those of β-aescin sodium were slightly lower and ranged from 4 to 16 μg/ml. In contrast, α-aescin sodium was found to be completely ineffective against the strains studied. MIC values of nystatin were reduced 2-16-fold and 2-4-fold in the presence of subinhibitory concentration of β-aescin crystalline and β-aescin sodium, respectively. Results of the present study may suggest the additive interaction between β-aescin and nystatin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Determination of quercetin, plumbagin and total flavonoids in Drosera peltata Smith var. glabrata Y.Z.Ruan

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; He, Zhimin; He, Feng; Wan, Haitong

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drosera peltata Smith var. glabrata Y.Z.Ruan, a kind of wild carnivorous plants in the family Droseraceae, has been used for the treatment of rheumatism and bruises in Chinese folk. None of compounds in this herb has been quantified in the previous studies. Objective: To develop a validated and reliable HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of two bioactive constituents – quercetin and plumbagin, and establish a simple UV spectrophotometry method for the analysis of total flavonoids content. Materials and Methods: Chromatographic separation was performed by using a HPLC system consisting of an Agilent Eclipse XDB C18 column and a gradient elution system of acetonitrile and water (containing 0.1% phosphoric acid, V/V) within 20 minutes. Comparing with quercetin complex with Al(NO3)3, the total flavonoids were determined by UV spectrophotometry at 269 nm. Results: Both methods were validated for linearity (r2≥0.9994 for quercetin and plumbagin in the HPLC method, r2 = 0.9994 for quercetin in the UV spectrophotometry method), precision (The within-day and between-day variability was less than 0.738% and 1.64% for quercetin and plumbagin in the HPLC method, and was less than 1.67% for quercetin in the UV spectrophotometry method.) and recovery (The recoveries of the HPLC method were 96.7-100.4% and 97.4-100.4% for quercetin and plumbagin, respectively, and the recovery of the UV spectrophotometry method was 96.7-99.6% for quercetin.) Conclusion: The proposed methods are simple and accurate, and could be practiced to rapidly determine quercetin, plumbagin and total flavonoids in the herbal drug, which provide effective approaches for quality control. PMID:24082628

  9. Inhibition of cholinesterase activity by azinphos-methyl in two freshwater invertebrates: Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Guerrero, Noemi Verrengia; de D'Angelo, Ana María Pechén; Cochón, Adriana C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, some biochemical features and the extent of inhibition induced by the organophosphorous pesticide azinphos-methyl on the cholinesterase (ChE) activity present in whole soft tissue of two freshwater invertebrate species, the gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were investigated. Both invertebrate organisms presented marked differences in ChE activity, type of enzymes and subcellular location. Acetylthiocholine was the substrate preferred by B. glabrata ChE. The enzyme activity was located preferentially in the supernatant of 11,000 x g centrifugation and was inhibited by increasing concentrations of substrate but not by iso-OMPA. Results showed that there were progressive inhibitions of the enzyme activity, with values 21%, 59%, 72%, 76%, and 82% lower than the control at levels of 1, 10, 50, 100 and 1000 microM of eserine, respectively. In contrast, L. variegatus ChE activity was distributed both in the supernatant and pellet fractions, with values approximately 6 and 20 times higher than B. glabrata, respectively. Studies with butyrylthiocholine and iso-OMPA suggested that about 72% of the activity corresponded to butyrylcholinesterase. A strong enzyme inhibition (88-94%) was found at low eserine concentrations (1-10 microM). ChE activity from L. variegatus and B. glabrata was inhibited by in vivo exposure to azinphos-methyl suggesting that both species can form the oxon derivative of this pesticide. However, both invertebrate species showed a very different susceptibility to the insecticide. The NOEC and EIC50 values were 500 and 1000 times lower for L. variegatus than for B. glabrata, reflecting that the oligochaetes were much more sensitive organisms. A different pattern was also observed for the recovery of the enzymatic activity when the organisms were transferred to clean water. The recuperation process was faster for the oligochaetes than for the gastropods. Mortality was not observed in either of the

  10. Geographic variation in the frequency of isolation and fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibilities of Candida glabrata: an assessment from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Gibbs, David L; Newell, Vance A; Barton, Richard; Bijie, Hu; Bille, Jacques; Chang, Shan-Chwen; da Luz Martins, Maria; Duse, Adriano; Dzierzanowska, Danuta; Ellis, David; Finquelievich, Jorge; Gould, Ian; Gur, Deniz; Hoosen, Anwar; Lee, Kyungwon; Mallatova, Nada; Mallie, Michele; Peng, N G Kee; Petrikos, George; Santiago, Axel; Trupl, Jan; VanDen Abeele, Ann Marie; Wadula, Jeannette; Zaidi, Mussaret

    2010-06-01

    Geographic differences in frequency and azole resistance among Candida glabrata may impact empiric antifungal therapy choice. We examined geographic variation in isolation and azole susceptibility of C. glabrata. We examined 23 305 clinical isolates of C. glabrata during ARTEMIS DISK global surveillance. Susceptibility testing to fluconazole and voriconazole was assessed by disk diffusion, and the results were grouped by geographic location: North America (NA) (2470 isolates), Latin America (LA) (2039), Europe (EU) (12 439), Africa and the Middle East (AME) (728), and Asia-Pacific (AP) (5629). Overall, C. glabrata accounted for 11.6% of 201 653 isolates of Candida and varied as a proportion of all Candida isolated from 7.4% in LA to 21.1% in NA. Decreased susceptibility (S) to fluconazole was observed in all geographic regions and ranged from 62.8% in AME to 76.7% in LA. Variation in fluconazole susceptibility was observed within each region: AP (range, 50-100% S), AME (48-86.9%), EU (44.8-88%), LA (43-92%), and NA (74.5-91.6%). Voriconazole was more active than fluconazole (range, 82.3-84.2% S) with similar regional variation. Among 22 sentinel sites participating in ARTEMIS from 2001 through 2007 (84 140 total isolates, 8163 C. glabrata), the frequency of C. glabrata isolation increased in 14 sites and the frequency of fluconazole resistance (R) increased in 11 sites over the 7-year period of study. The sites with the highest cumulative rates of fluconazole R were in Poland (22% R), the Czech Republic (27% R), Venezuela (27% R), and Greece (33% R). C. glabrata was most often isolated from blood, normally sterile body fluids and urine. There is substantial geographic and institutional variation in both frequency of isolation and azole resistance among C. glabrata. Prompt species identification and fluconazole susceptibility testing are necessary to optimize therapy for invasive candidiasis.

  11. In Vitro Fungicidal Activities of Anidulafungin, Caspofungin, and Micafungin against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis Evaluated by Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin killing activities against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis were evaluated by the time-kill methodology. The concentrations assayed were 0.06, 0.125, and 0.5 μg/ml, which are achieved in serum. Anidulafungin and micafungin required between 13 and 26 h to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) against C. glabrata and C. bracarensis. All echinocandins were less active against C. nivariensis. PMID:25801575

  12. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  13. Recurrent episodes of Candidemia due to Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida albicans with acquired echinocandin resistance.

    PubMed

    Grosset, Marine; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Godet, Cendrine; Kauffmann-Lacroix, Catherine; Cazenave-Roblot, France

    2016-12-01

    Mixed fungal infection and acquired echinocandin resistance of Candida spp. remain infrequent. In this study we have reported the case of a patient hospitalized for tuberculosis who experienced multiple infections due to three common Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis). Furthermore, consecutive isolates from blood cultures and heart valve were found resistant to azoles (C. tropicalis) and to echinocandin with either novel (C. tropicalis) or previously described (C. albicans) missense mutations in the Fks gene.

  14. Differentiation of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei by FT-IR and chemometrics by CHROMagar™ Candida.

    PubMed

    Wohlmeister, Denise; Vianna, Débora Renz Barreto; Helfer, Virginia Etges; Calil, Luciane Noal; Buffon, Andréia; Fuentefria, Alexandre Meneghello; Corbellini, Valeriano Antonio; Pilger, Diogo André

    2017-10-01

    Pathogenic Candida species are detected in clinical infections. CHROMagar™ is a phenotypical method used to identify Candida species, although it has limitations, which indicates the need for more sensitive and specific techniques. Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) is an analytical vibrational technique used to identify patterns of metabolic fingerprint of biological matrixes, particularly whole microbial cell systems as Candida sp. in association of classificatory chemometrics algorithms. On the other hand, Soft Independent Modeling by Class Analogy (SIMCA) is one of the typical algorithms still little employed in microbiological classification. This study demonstrates the applicability of the FT-IR-technique by specular reflectance associated with SIMCA to discriminate Candida species isolated from vaginal discharges and grown on CHROMagar™. The differences in spectra of C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei were suitable for use in the discrimination of these species, which was observed by PCA. Then, a SIMCA model was constructed with standard samples of three species and using the spectral region of 1792-1561cm(-1). All samples (n=48) were properly classified based on the chromogenic method using CHROMagar™ Candida. In total, 93.4% (n=45) of the samples were correctly and unambiguously classified (Class I). Two samples of C. albicans were classified correctly, though these could have been C. glabrata (Class II). Also, one C. glabrata sample could have been classified as C. krusei (Class II). Concerning these three samples, one triplicate of each was included in Class II and two in Class I. Therefore, FT-IR associated with SIMCA can be used to identify samples of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei grown in CHROMagar™ Candida aiming to improve clinical applications of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Detailed comparison of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms under different conditions and their susceptibility to caspofungin and anidulafungin.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Sona; Tournu, Hélène; Lagrou, Katrien; Van Dijck, Patrick; Bujdáková, Helena

    2011-09-01

    Candida biofilm development can be influenced by diverse factors such as substrate, culture medium, carbohydrate source and pH. We have analysed biofilm formation of Candida albicans SC5314 and Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 wild-type strains in the presence of different media (RPMI 1640 versus YNB) and using different pH values (pH 5.6 or 7.0). We determined adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene, changes in the expression of adhesin genes during these processes and the susceptibility of mature biofilms to echinocandins. Biofilms formed on polystyrene by both Candida species proved to be influenced strongly by the composition of the medium rather than pH. C. albicans and C. glabrata formed thicker biofilms in RPMI 1640 medium, whereas in YNB medium, both species manifested adhesion rather than characteristic multilayer biofilm architecture. The stimulated biofilm formation in RPMI 1640 medium at pH 7.0 corroborated positively with increased expression of adhesin genes, essential to biofilm formation in vitro, including ALS3 and EAP1 in C. albicans and EPA6 in C. glabrata. The thicker biofilms grown in RPMI 1640 medium were more tolerant to caspofungin and anidulafungin than YNB-grown biofilms. We also observed that mature C. glabrata biofilms were less susceptible in RPMI 1640 medium to echinocandins than C. albicans biofilms. Environmental conditions, i.e. medium and pH, can significantly affect not only biofilm architecture, but also the expression profile of several genes involved during the different stages of biofilm development. In addition, growth conditions may also influence the antifungal-susceptibility profile of fungal populations within biofilm structures. Therefore, before designing any experimental biofilm set-up, it is important to consider the potential influence of external environmental factors on Candida biofilm development.

  16. Secretion of the acid trehalase encoded by the CgATH1 gene allows trehalose fermentation by Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Zilli, D M W; Lopes, R G; Alves, S L; Barros, L M; Miletti, L C; Stambuk, B U

    2015-10-01

    The emergent pathogen Candida glabrata differs from other yeasts because it assimilates only two sugars, glucose and the disaccharide trehalose. Since rapid identification tests are based on the ability of this yeast to rapidly hydrolyze trehalose, in this work a biochemical and molecular characterization of trehalose catabolism by this yeast was performed. Our results show that C. glabrata consumes and ferments trehalose, with parameters similar to those observed during glucose fermentation. The presence of glucose in the medium during exponential growth on trehalose revealed extracellular hydrolysis of the sugar by a cell surface acid trehalase with a pH optimum of 4.4. Approximately ∼30% of the total enzymatic activity is secreted into the medium during growth on trehalose or glycerol. The secreted enzyme shows an apparent molecular mass of 275 kDa in its native form, but denaturant gel electrophoresis revealed a protein with ∼130 kDa, which due to its migration pattern and strong binding to concanavalin A, indicates that it is probably a dimeric glycoprotein. The secreted acid trehalase shows high affinity and activity for trehalose, with Km and Vmax values of 3.4 mM and 80 U (mg protein)(-1), respectively. Cloning of the CgATH1 gene (CAGLOK05137g) from de C. glabrata genome, a gene showing high homology to fungal acid trehalases, allowed trehalose fermentation after heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  17. Evolutionary history and phylogeography of the schistosome-vector freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mavárez, J; Steiner, C; Pointier, J-P; Jarne, P

    2002-10-01

    The phylogeography of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata remains poorly known, although this species is the major vector of schistosomiasis in the New World. It was here investigated in South America and the Lesser Antilles, based on partial mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit (16S rDNA) and nuclear internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) gene sequences. Sampling included 17 populations from a large part of the current geographic range of the species (Brazil, Venezuela and Lesser Antilles). Substantial variability was detected, as well as a high amount of phylogenetically informative signal. The molecular phylogeny inferred splits B. glabrata into Northern and Southern clades separated by the Amazon river, and may even suggest a supra-specific status for B. glabrata. Brazilian populations were the most diverse and appeared basal to the other populations. Venezuelan haplotypes formed a single clade, albeit not strongly supported. Two Venezuelan haplotypes appear rather similar to Brazilian haplotypes. Similarly, Lesser Antilles haplotypes clustered in the same monophyletic clade, which suggests that the recent colonisation of the Antilles has a northern South American origin. However, the estimated divergence time between Antilles and Venezuelan sequences is extremely large (conservatively higher than 10(5) years). These results are discussed in the light of (i) phylogeographic patterns at South American scale, and (ii) recurrent introduction of molluscs, especially in the Antilles, as a consequence of human activities.

  18. Probing the Active Site of Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase with High Resolution Crystal Structures and the Synthesis of New Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a fungal strain resistant to many commonly administered antifungal agents, has become an emerging threat to human health. In previous work, we validated that the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, is a drug target in C. glabrata. Using a crystal structure of dihydrofolate reductase from C. glabrata bound to an initial lead compound, we designed a class of biphenyl antifolates that potently and selectively inhibit both the enzyme and the growth of the fungal culture. In this work, we explore the structure-activity relationships of this class of antifolates with four new high resolution crystal structures of enzyme:inhibitor complexes and the synthesis of four new inhibitors. The designed inhibitors are intended to probe key hydrophobic pockets visible in the crystal structure. The crystal structures and an evaluation of the new compounds reveal that methyl groups at the meta and para positions of the distal phenyl ring achieve the greatest number of interactions with the pathogenic enzyme and the greatest degree of selectivity over the human enzyme. Additionally, antifungal activity can be tuned with substitution patterns at the propargyl and para-phenyl positions.

  19. Circulating Biomphalaria glabrata hemocyte subpopulations possess shared schistosome glycans and receptors capable of binding larval glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Timothy P.; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Gonzalez, Laura A.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2013-01-01

    Host lectin-like recognition molecules may play an important role in innate resistance in Biomphalaria glabrata snails to larval schistosome infection, thus implicating parasite-expressed glycans as putative ligands for these lectin receptors. While host lectins may utilize specific glycan structures for parasite recognition, it also has been hypothesized that the parasite may use this system to evade immune detection by mimicking naturally-expressed host glycans, resulting in reduced immunorecognition capacity. By employing immunocytochemical (ICC) and Western blot assays using schistosome glycan-specific monoclonal antibodies (mABs) we sought to identify specific glycan epitopes (glycotopes) shared in common between larval S. mansoni and B. glabrata hemocytes, the primary immune effector cells in snails. Results confirmed the presence of selected larval glycotopes on subpopulations of hemocytes by ICC and association with numerous hemocyte proteins by Western blot analyses, including a trimannosyl core N-glycan (TriMan), and two fucosylated lacdiNAc (LDN) variants, F-LDN and F-LDN-F. Snail strain differences were seen in the prevalence of constitutively expressed F-LDN on hemocytes, and in the patterns of protein immunoreactivity with these mABs. In contrast, there was little to no hemocyte reactivity with mABs for Lewis X (LeX), LDN, LDN-F or LDN-DF. When intact hemocytes were exposed to larval transformation products (LTPs), distinct cell subpopulations displayed weak (LeX, LDN-DF) to moderate (LDN, LDN-F) glycotope reactivity by ICC, including snail strain differences in the prevalence of LDN-reactive cellular subsets. Far-Western blot analyses of the hemocytes following exposure to larval transformation proteins (LTPs) also revealed multiple mAB-reactive hemocyte protein bands for LeX, LDN, LDN-F, and LDN-DF. These results demonstrate the existence of complex patterns of shared larval glycan constitutively expressed on hemocytes and their proteins, as well as

  20. Global Analysis of the Evolution and Mechanism of Echinocandin Resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Babak, Sheena D.; Babak, Tomas; Diezmann, Stephanie; Hill, Jessica A.; Xie, Jinglin Lucy; Chen, Ying-Lien; Poutanen, Susan M.; Rennie, Robert P.; Heitman, Joseph; Cowen, Leah E.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance has a profound impact on human health. Candida glabrata is a leading human fungal pathogen that can rapidly evolve resistance to echinocandins, which target cell wall biosynthesis and are front-line therapeutics for Candida infections. Here, we provide the first global analysis of mutations accompanying the evolution of fungal drug resistance in a human host utilizing a series of C. glabrata isolates that evolved echinocandin resistance in a patient treated with the echinocandin caspofungin for recurring bloodstream candidemia. Whole genome sequencing identified a mutation in the drug target, FKS2, accompanying a major resistance increase, and 8 additional non-synonymous mutations. The FKS2-T1987C mutation was sufficient for echinocandin resistance, and associated with a fitness cost that was mitigated with further evolution, observed in vitro and in a murine model of systemic candidemia. A CDC6-A511G(K171E) mutation acquired before FKS2-T1987C(S663P), conferred a small resistance increase. Elevated dosage of CDC55, which acquired a C463T(P155S) mutation after FKS2-T1987C(S663P), ameliorated fitness. To discover strategies to abrogate echinocandin resistance, we focused on the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and downstream effector calcineurin. Genetic or pharmacological compromise of Hsp90 or calcineurin function reduced basal tolerance and resistance. Hsp90 and calcineurin were required for caspofungin-dependent FKS2 induction, providing a mechanism governing echinocandin resistance. A mitochondrial respiration-defective petite mutant in the series revealed that the petite phenotype does not confer echinocandin resistance, but renders strains refractory to synergy between echinocandins and Hsp90 or calcineurin inhibitors. The kidneys of mice infected with the petite mutant were sterile, while those infected with the HSP90-repressible strain had reduced fungal burden. We provide the first global view of mutations accompanying the

  1. Global analysis of the evolution and mechanism of echinocandin resistance in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Singh-Babak, Sheena D; Babak, Tomas; Diezmann, Stephanie; Hill, Jessica A; Xie, Jinglin Lucy; Chen, Ying-Lien; Poutanen, Susan M; Rennie, Robert P; Heitman, Joseph; Cowen, Leah E

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance has a profound impact on human health. Candida glabrata is a leading human fungal pathogen that can rapidly evolve resistance to echinocandins, which target cell wall biosynthesis and are front-line therapeutics for Candida infections. Here, we provide the first global analysis of mutations accompanying the evolution of fungal drug resistance in a human host utilizing a series of C. glabrata isolates that evolved echinocandin resistance in a patient treated with the echinocandin caspofungin for recurring bloodstream candidemia. Whole genome sequencing identified a mutation in the drug target, FKS2, accompanying a major resistance increase, and 8 additional non-synonymous mutations. The FKS2-T1987C mutation was sufficient for echinocandin resistance, and associated with a fitness cost that was mitigated with further evolution, observed in vitro and in a murine model of systemic candidemia. A CDC6-A511G(K171E) mutation acquired before FKS2-T1987C(S663P), conferred a small resistance increase. Elevated dosage of CDC55, which acquired a C463T(P155S) mutation after FKS2-T1987C(S663P), ameliorated fitness. To discover strategies to abrogate echinocandin resistance, we focused on the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and downstream effector calcineurin. Genetic or pharmacological compromise of Hsp90 or calcineurin function reduced basal tolerance and resistance. Hsp90 and calcineurin were required for caspofungin-dependent FKS2 induction, providing a mechanism governing echinocandin resistance. A mitochondrial respiration-defective petite mutant in the series revealed that the petite phenotype does not confer echinocandin resistance, but renders strains refractory to synergy between echinocandins and Hsp90 or calcineurin inhibitors. The kidneys of mice infected with the petite mutant were sterile, while those infected with the HSP90-repressible strain had reduced fungal burden. We provide the first global view of mutations accompanying the

  2. Circulating Biomphalaria glabrata hemocyte subpopulations possess shared schistosome glycans and receptors capable of binding larval glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Timothy P; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Gonzalez, Laura A; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2013-01-01

    Host lectin-like recognition molecules may play an important role in innate resistance in Biomphalaria glabrata snails to larval schistosome infection, thus implicating parasite-expressed glycans as putative ligands for these lectin receptors. While host lectins may utilize specific glycan structures for parasite recognition, it also has been hypothesized that the parasite may use this system to evade immune detection by mimicking naturally-expressed host glycans, resulting in reduced immunorecognition capacity. By employing immunocytochemical (ICC) and Western blot assays using schistosome glycan-specific monoclonal antibodies (mABs) we sought to identify specific glycan epitopes (glycotopes) shared in common between larval Schistosoma mansoni and B. glabrata hemocytes, the primary immune effector cells in snails. Results confirmed the presence of selected larval glycotopes on subpopulations of hemocytes by ICC and association with numerous hemocyte proteins by Western blot analyses, including a trimannosyl core N-glycan (TriMan), and two fucosylated lacdiNAc (LDN) variants, F-LDN and F-LDN-F. Snail strain differences were seen in the prevalence of constitutively expressed F-LDN on hemocytes, and in the patterns of protein immunoreactivity with these mABs. In contrast, there was little to no hemocyte reactivity with mABs for Lewis X (LeX), LDN, LDN-F or LDN-DF. When intact hemocytes were exposed to larval transformation products (LTPs), distinct cell subpopulations displayed weak (LeX, LDN-DF) to moderate (LDN, LDN-F) glycotope reactivity by ICC, including snail strain differences in the prevalence of LDN-reactive cellular subsets. Far-Western blot analyses of the hemocytes following exposure to larval transformation proteins (LTPs) also revealed multiple mAB-reactive hemocyte protein bands for LeX, LDN, LDN-F, and LDN-DF. These results demonstrate the existence of complex patterns of shared larval glycan constitutively expressed on hemocytes and their proteins

  3. Med15B Regulates Acid Stress Response and Tolerance in Candida glabrata by Altering Membrane Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanli; Liu, Hui; Yu, Jiayin; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Liming

    2017-09-15

    Candida glabrata is a promising producer of organic acids. To elucidate the physiological function of the Mediator tail subunit Med15B in the response to low-pH stress, we constructed a deletion strain, C. glabratamed15BΔ, and an overexpression strain, C. glabrata HTUΔ/CgMED15B Deletion of MED15B caused biomass production, glucose consumption rate, and cell viability to decrease by 28.3%, 31.7%, and 26.5%, respectively, compared with those of the parent (HTUΔ) strain at pH 2.0. Expression of lipid metabolism-related genes was significantly downregulated in the med15BΔ strain, whereas key genes of ergosterol biosynthesis showed abnormal upregulation. This caused the proportion of C18:1 fatty acids, the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA), and the total phospholipid content to decrease by 11.6%, 27.4%, and 37.6%, respectively. Cells failed to synthesize fecosterol and ergosterol, leading to the accumulation and a 60.3-fold increase in the concentration of zymosterol. Additionally, cells showed reductions of 69.2%, 11.6%, and 21.8% in membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of Med15B increased the C18:1 levels, total phospholipids, ergosterol content, and UFA/SFA by 18.6%, 143.5%, 94.5%, and 18.7%, respectively. Membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity also increased by 30.2%, 6.9%, and 51.8%, respectively. Furthermore, in the absence of pH buffering, dry weight of cells and pyruvate concentrations were 29.3% and 61.2% higher, respectively, than those of the parent strain. These results indicated that in C. glabrata, Med15B regulates tolerance toward low pH via transcriptional regulation of acid stress response genes and alteration in lipid composition.IMPORTANCE This study explored the role of the Mediator tail subunit Med15B in the metabolism of Candida glabrata under acidic conditions. Overexpression of MED15B enhanced yeast tolerance to low pH and improved biomass

  4. Development of the Statocyst in the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael; Hejl, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The development of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined from embryo to adult. Special emphasis was put on the growth of the statoconia in the statocysts. In the statocysts of embryonic snails (90-120 h after oviposition) there is not a single statolith but an average of 40-50 statoconia per statocyst. The number of statoconia increases to 385-400 when the snails reach a shell diameter of 4 mm and remains relatively constant thereafter, irrespective of shell size. Small statoconia are found in supporting cells, which suggests that the statoconia are produced within these cells. The average diameter of statoconia and the total mass of statoconia increase with increasing shell diameter. The average number of large statoconia (diameter greater than 7 micrometers) per statocyst continues to increase from 2 to 10 mm animals while the number of small ones (diameter less than 4 micrometers) initially rises and then decreases after 4 mm. These results demonstrate continuous growth of the statoconia in the cyst lumen of Biomphalaria. The single statoconia vibrate in a regular pattern in vivo, indicating beating of the statocyst cilia. The statoconia sink under the influence of gravity to load and stimulate receptor cells which are at the bottom. The length of cilia and the size of statocyst gradually increase as the animal grows. However, the increase in the volume of the statocyst is relatively small compared with the increase in body weight during normal development.

  5. Larvicidal Activity against Aedes aegypti and Molluscicidal Activity against Biomphalaria glabrata of Brazilian Marine Algae.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elíca Amara Cecília; de Carvalho, Cenira M; Ribeiro Junior, Karlos Antonio Lisboa; Lisboa Ribeiro, Thyago Fernando; de Barros, Lurdiana Dayse; de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; Prado Moura, Flávia de Barros; Goulart Sant'ana, Antônio Euzebio

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the biological activities of five benthic marine algae collected from Northeastern Region of Brazil. The tested activities included larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti, molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, and toxicity against Artemia salina. Extracts of Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta), Padina gymnospora, Sargassum vulgare (Phaeophyta), Hypnea musciformis, and Digenea simplex (Rhodophyta) were prepared using different solvents of increasing polarity, including dichloromethane, methanol, ethanol, and water. Of the extracts screened, the dichloromethane extracts of H. musciformis and P. gymnospora exhibited the highest activities and were subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation in hexane and chloroform. The chloroform fractions of the P. gymnospora and H. musciformis extracts showed molluscicidal activity at values below 40  μ g·mL(-1) (11.1460  μ g·mL(-1) and 25.8689  μ g·mL(-1), resp.), and the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora showed larvicidal activity at values below 40  μ g·mL(-1) (29.018  μ g·mL(-1) and 17.230  μ g·mL(-1), resp.). The crude extracts were not toxic to A. salina, whereas the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora (788.277  μ g·mL(-1) and 706.990  μ g·mL(-1)) showed moderate toxicity, indicating that the toxic compounds present in these algae are nonpolar.

  6. Parental transfer of the antimicrobial protein LBP/BPI protects Biomphalaria glabrata eggs against oomycete infections.

    PubMed

    Baron, Olga Lucia; van West, Pieter; Industri, Benoit; Ponchet, Michel; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Gourbal, Benjamin; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Coustau, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate females transfer antibodies via the placenta, colostrum and milk or via the egg yolk to protect their immunologically immature offspring against pathogens. This evolutionarily important transfer of immunity is poorly documented in invertebrates and basic questions remain regarding the nature and extent of parental protection of offspring. In this study, we show that a lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability increasing protein family member from the invertebrate Biomphalaria glabrata (BgLBP/BPI1) is massively loaded into the eggs of this freshwater snail. Native and recombinant proteins displayed conserved LPS-binding, antibacterial and membrane permeabilizing activities. A broad screening of various pathogens revealed a previously unknown biocidal activity of the protein against pathogenic water molds (oomycetes), which is conserved in human BPI. RNAi-dependent silencing of LBP/BPI in the parent snails resulted in a significant reduction of reproductive success and extensive death of eggs through oomycete infections. This work provides the first functional evidence that a LBP/BPI is involved in the parental immune protection of invertebrate offspring and reveals a novel and conserved biocidal activity for LBP/BPI family members.

  7. Development of the Statocyst in the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael; Hejl, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The development of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined from embryo to adult. Special emphasis was put on the growth of the statoconia in the statocysts. In the statocysts of embryonic snails (90-120 h after oviposition) there is not a single statolith but an average of 40-50 statoconia per statocyst. The number of statoconia increases to 385-400 when the snails reach a shell diameter of 4 mm and remains relatively constant thereafter, irrespective of shell size. Small statoconia are found in supporting cells, which suggests that the statoconia are produced within these cells. The average diameter of statoconia and the total mass of statoconia increase with increasing shell diameter. The average number of large statoconia (diameter greater than 7 micrometers) per statocyst continues to increase from 2 to 10 mm animals while the number of small ones (diameter less than 4 micrometers) initially rises and then decreases after 4 mm. These results demonstrate continuous growth of the statoconia in the cyst lumen of Biomphalaria. The single statoconia vibrate in a regular pattern in vivo, indicating beating of the statocyst cilia. The statoconia sink under the influence of gravity to load and stimulate receptor cells which are at the bottom. The length of cilia and the size of statocyst gradually increase as the animal grows. However, the increase in the volume of the statocyst is relatively small compared with the increase in body weight during normal development.

  8. Profile of organic acid concentrations in the digestive gland and hemolymph of Biomphalaria glabrata under estivation.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, J C; Kemper, A; Becker, W

    1999-01-01

    Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis it was possible to determine simultaneously the concentration of organic acids (pyruvate, lactate, succinate, fumarate, malate, acetate, propionate, acetoacetate, and ss-hydroxybutyrate) in the digestive gland and the extracellular concentration of these same acids in the hemolymph of estivating Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni. After a 7 day period of estivation, there was a significant increase in the tissue levels of lactate, succinate, malate and acetate compared to non-estivating snails. After 14 days of estivation, the levels of lactate and acetate were also significantly elevated. The hemolymph concentrations of pyruvate and acetate increased significantly after 7 days and acetate concentrations continued to be significantly increased up to 14 days of estivation. The other organic acids studied, such as ketone body acetoacetate and ss-hydroxybutyrate or the volatile acid propionate, did not accumulate. Their tissue concentrations, however, increased on the 7th day of estivation and reached normal levels within two weeks of estivation for some of them. One should take into consideration how the reduction in metabolism can be handled under aerobic conditions, and what role anaerobic pathways may play in both energy formation and redox balance processes.

  9. Structural basis for promiscuity and specificity during Candida glabrata invasion of host epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Diderrich, Rike; Veelders, Maik Stefan; Eulenburg, Georg; Kalugin, Vitali; Brückner, Stefan; Keller, Petra; Rupp, Steffen; Mösch, Hans-Ulrich; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The human pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata harbors more than 20 surface-exposed, epithelial adhesins (Epas) for host cell adhesion. The Epa family recognizes host glycans and discriminates between target tissues by their adhesin (A) domains, but a detailed structural basis for ligand-binding specificity of Epa proteins has been lacking so far. In this study, we provide high-resolution crystal structures of the Epa1A domain in complex with different carbohydrate ligands that reveal how host cell mucin-type O-glycans are recognized and allow a structure-guided classification of the Epa family into specific subtypes. Further detailed structural and functional characterization of subtype-switched Epa1 variants shows that specificity is governed by two inner loops, CBL1 and CBL2, involved in calcium binding as well as by three outer loops, L1, L2, and L3. In summary, our study provides the structural basis for promiscuity and specificity of Epa adhesins, which might further contribute to developing anti-adhesive antimycotics and combating Candida colonization. PMID:23035251

  10. Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwald, Anne G.; Arora, Gaurav; Ferrandino, Rocco; Gerace, Erica L.; Mohammednetej, Maedeh; Nosair, Waseem; Rattila, Shemona; Subic, Amanda Zirzow; Rolfes, Ronda

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an important human fungal pathogen whose incidence continues to rise. Because many clinical isolates are resistant to azole drugs, the drugs of choice to treat such infections are members of the echinocandin family, although there are increasing reports of resistance to these drugs as well. In efforts to better understand the genetic changes that lead to altered responses to echinocandins, we screened a transposon-insertion library of mutants for strains to identify genes that are important for cellular responses to caspofungin, a member of this drug family. We identified 16 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased tolerance, and 48 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased sensitivity compared to the wild-type parental strain. Four of the genes identified as causing sensitivity are orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes encoding proteins important for the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. In addition, several other genes are orthologs of the high affinity Ca2+ uptake system (HACS) complex genes. We analyzed disruption mutants representing all 64 genes under 33 different conditions, including the presence of cell wall disrupting agents and other drugs, a variety of salts, increased temperature, and altered pH. Further, we generated knockout mutants in different genes within the CWI pathway and the HACS complex, and found that they too exhibited phenotypes consistent with defects in cell wall construction. Our results indicate that small molecules that inhibit the CWI pathway, or that the HACS complex, may be an important means of increasing the efficacy of caspofungin. PMID:27449515

  11. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  12. Cyclodextrin-mediated self-associating chitosan micro-platelets act as a drug booster against Candida glabrata mucosal infection in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Grisin, Tiphany; Bories, Christian; Loiseau, Philippe M; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2017-03-15

    This study reports design and evaluation of chitosan-based microparticle activity against Candida glabrata in vitro and in vivo in immunocompetent mice model artificially maintained in oestrus state. Because their flattened shape, chitosan microparticles are called here micro-platelets. They were obtained by self-association of oleoyl chitosan and α-cyclodextrin in water. A mixture of amphotericin B-deoxycholate (Fungizone(®), AmB-DOC) and chitosan micro-platelets gelified with pluronic(®) F127 (20wt%) completely cured C. glabrata vaginal infection. Colony factor unit counting and mycological analysis of mice vaginal mucosa after Grocott-Gomori methenamine-silver staining confirmed the absence of C. glabrata. Furthermore, in vitro evaluations revealed that IC50 and MIC90 of AmB-DOC were decreased 1.8 and 1.4-times respectively when associated with chitosan micro-platelets. Neither native chitosan nor oleoyl chitosan allowed improvement in AmB-DOC anti-C. glabrata activity. This work demonstrates for the first time that a simple mixing of chitosan micro-platelets with AmB-DOC enhanced its anti-C. glabrata activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of the genotoxic potential along the Danube River by application of the comet assay on haemocytes of freshwater mussels: The Joint Danube Survey 3.

    PubMed

    Kolarević, Stoimir; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Kostić, Jovana; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Liška, Igor; Gačić, Zoran; Paunović, Momir; Knežević-Vukčević, Jelena; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-01-01

    In this study we assessed the level of genotoxic pollution along the Danube River by measuring the level of DNA damage in the haemocytes of freshwater mussels of Unio sp. (Unio pictorum/Unio tumidus) and Sinanodonta woodiana. The comet assay was used for the assessment of DNA damage. The research was performed on 34 out of 68 sites analysed within the Joint Danube Survey 3 - the world's biggest river research expedition of its kind in 2013. During research, 2285 river kilometres were covered with an average distance of 68 km between the sites. The complex data set on concentrations of various substances present in water, suspended particulate matter and sediment on investigated sites gave the opportunity to identify the groups of xenobiotics which mostly affect the studied biomarker - DNA damage. The highest levels of DNA damage were recorded in the section VI (Panonnian Plain), which is under the impact of untreated wastewater discharges. Both positive and negative influences of the large tributaries on the level of genotoxicity in the Danube River were evident. Significant correlation in response was detected between the studied species of freshwater mussels. The level of DNA damage in mussels correlated with concentrations of compounds from the group of hazardous priority substances (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), persistent organic pollutants (dioxins) and emerging pollutants (Oxazepam, Chloridazon-desphenyl).

  14. Comparative assessment of cardiac activity and DNA damage in haemocytes of the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in exposure to tributyltin chloride.

    PubMed

    Martinović, Rajko; Kolarević, Stoimir; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Kostić, Jovana; Jokanović, Sandra; Gačić, Zoran; Joksimović, Danijela; Đurović, Mirko; Kljajić, Zoran; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-10-01

    This study gives an insight in sensitivity of heart rate (Hr) of Mytilus galloprovincialis as a physiological biomarker. Impact of tributyltin chloride (TBT-Cl) on Hr was studied in parallel with evaluation of mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of TBT-Cl (10, 100 and 1000μg/L) within 96h treatment in static conditions. Mutagenic potential was assessed by SOS/umuC assay while genotoxicity was assessed in haemocytes of M. galloprovincialis by using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was used as a positive control. Hr variations detected in TBT-Cl treatments can be linked to data obtained in the genotoxicological assays indicating that Hr can be considered and used as a reliable physiological biomarker for detecting the presence of organotin compounds. However despite the observed genotoxic potential of B(a)P, a noteworthy Hr response was not observed which further questions the potential of Hr in the detection of different types of pollutants.

  15. An immune-enriched oligo-microarray analysis of gene expression in Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum) haemocytes after a Perkinsus olseni challenge.

    PubMed

    Romero, Alejandro; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Moreira, Rebeca; Milan, Massimo; Bargelloni, Luca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2015-03-01

    Parasites of the genus Perkinsus cause high mortality and economic losses in bivalves commonly produced in global aquaculture. Although the immune responses of oysters and clams naturally infected with Perkinsus marinus or Perkinsus olseni have been extensively studied, there is not much information on host response at the early stages of infection. In this study, we analysed how P. olseni influences the gene expression profiles of haemocytes from the Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum) using temporal experimental infections and an immune-enriched microarray. We identified an early phase of infection that was characterised by no mortality and by the increased expression of genes associated with pathogen recognition, production of nitrogen radicals and antimicrobial activity. Cellular processes such as inhibition of serine proteases and proliferation were also involved in this early response. This phase was followed by an intermediate stage, when the pathogen was most likely multiplying and infecting new areas of the body, and animals began to die. In this stage, many genes related to cell movement were over-expressed. Thirty days after infection metabolic pathway genes were the most affected. Apoptosis appears to be important during pathogenesis. Our results provide novel observations of the broader innate immune response triggered by P. olseni at different infection stages.

  16. Synergistic mutual potentiation of antifungal activity of Zuccagnia punctata Cav. and Larrea nitida Cav. extracts in clinical isolates of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Butassi, Estefanía; Svetaz, Laura A; Ivancovich, Juan J; Feresin, Gabriela E; Tapia, Alejandro; Zacchino, Susana A

    2015-06-01

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae) and Larrea nitida Cav. (Zygophyllaceae) are indistinctly or jointly used in traditional medicine for the treatment of fungal-related infections. Although their dichloromethane (DCM) extract have demonstrated moderate antifungal activities when tested on their own, antifungal properties of combinations of both plants have not been assessed previously. The aim of this study was to establish with statistical rigor whether Z. punctata (ZpE) and L. nitida DCM extract (LnE) interact synergistically against the clinically important fungi Candida albicans and Candida glabrata and to characterize the most synergistic combinations. For synergism assessment, the statistical-based Boik's design was applied. Eight ZpE-LnE fixed-ratio mixtures were prepared from four different months of 1 year and tested against Candida strains. Lϕ (Loewe index) of each mixture at different fractions affected (ϕ) allowed for the finding of the most synergistic combinations, which were characterized by HPLC fingerprint and by the quantitation of the selected marker compounds. Lϕ and confidence intervals were determined in vitro with the MixLow method, once the estimated parameters from the dose-response curves of independent extracts and mixtures, were obtained. Markers (four flavonoids for ZpE and three lignans for LnE) were quantified in each extract and their combinations, with a valid HPLC-UV method. The 3D-HPLC profiles of the most synergistic mixtures were obtained by HPLC-DAD. Three over four IC50ZpE/IC50LnE fixed-ratio mixtures displayed synergistic interactions at effect levels ϕ > 0.5 against C. albicans. The dosis of the most synergistic (Lϕ = 0.62) mixture was 65.96 µg/ml (ZpE = 28%; LnE = 72%) containing 8 and 36% of flavonoids and lignans respectively. On the other hand, one over four IC50ZpE/IC50LnE mixtures displays synergistic interactions at ϕ > 0.5 against C. glabrata. The dosis of the most synergistic (Lϕ = 0.67) mixture was 168

  17. The Structure of the Statocyst of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined by light and electron microscopy. The two statocysts are located on the dorsal-lateral side of the left and right pedal ganglion. The statocysts are spherical, fluid-filled capsules with a diameter of approximately 60 microns for young and 110 microns for adult snails. The wall of the cyst is composed of large receptor cells and many smaller supporting cells. The receptor cells bear cilia which are evenly distributed on the apical surface. The cilia have the typical 9+2 internal tubule configuration. Striate rootlets originate from the base of the basal body and run downward into the cytoplasm. Side-roots arise from one side of the basal body and a basal foot from the other. For each receptor cell, the basal foot always points to the periphery of the surface, indicating that the receptor cell is non-polarized. The receptor cells contain cytoplasmic organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, compact Golgi bodies and multivesicular bodies. Supporting cells bearing microvilli are interposed between the receptor cells. The junction complex between the supporting cells and the receptor cells is composed of adherens and septate junctions, while between supporting cells only the adherens junctions are present. The static nerve arises from the lateral side of the cyst and contains axons in which parallel neurotubules and mitochondria are found. The axons arise directly from the base of the receptor cells without synapse. In the cyst lumen there are unattached statoconia. The statoconia have a plate-like or concentric membranous ring structure. Based on the morphology, the function of the statocyst in Biomphalaria is discussed.

  18. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-15

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 {angstrom} apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5{beta}-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.

  19. Domain organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a bifunctional enzyme required for thiamin biosynthesis in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2010-11-16

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 Å apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5β-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.

  20. Investigation of the Function of Candida albicans Als3 by Heterologous Expression in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yue; Phan, Quynh T.; Luo, Guanpingsheng; Solis, Norma V.; Liu, Yaoping; Cormack, Brendan P.; Edwards, John E.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2013-01-01

    During hematogenously disseminated infection, blood-borne Candida albicans invades the endothelial cell lining of the vasculature to invade the deep tissues. Although the C. albicans Als3 invasin is critical for invasion and damage of endothelial cells in vitro, a C. albicans als3Δ/Δ mutant has normal virulence in the mouse model of disseminated infection. We hypothesized that the contribution of Als3 to virulence is obscured by the presence of additional C. albicans invasins. To elucidate the in vivo function of Als3, we heterologously expressed C. albicans ALS3 in Candida glabrata, a yeast that lacks a close ALS3 ortholog and has low virulence in mice. We found that following intravenous inoculation into mice, the ALS3-expressing strain preferentially trafficked to the brain, where it induced significantly elevated levels of myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and gamma interferon. Also, the ALS3-expressing strain had enhanced adherence to and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a potential mechanism for ALS3-mediated neurotropism. In addition, upon initiation of infection, the ALS3-expressing strain had increased trafficking to the cortex of the kidneys. With prolonged infection, this strain persisted in the kidneys at significantly higher levels than the control strain but did not induce an elevated inflammatory response. Finally, the ALS3-expressing strain had increased resistance to neutrophil killing in vitro. These results indicate that during disseminated infection, Als3 mediates initial trafficking to the brain and renal cortex and contributes to fungal persistence in the kidneys. PMID:23630968

  1. The Structure of the Statocyst of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined by light and electron microscopy. The two statocysts are located on the dorsal-lateral side of the left and right pedal ganglion. The statocysts are spherical, fluid-filled capsules with a diameter of approximately 60 microns for young and 110 microns for adult snails. The wall of the cyst is composed of large receptor cells and many smaller supporting cells. The receptor cells bear cilia which are evenly distributed on the apical surface. The cilia have the typical 9+2 internal tubule configuration. Striate rootlets originate from the base of the basal body and run downward into the cytoplasm. Side-roots arise from one side of the basal body and a basal foot from the other. For each receptor cell, the basal foot always points to the periphery of the surface, indicating that the receptor cell is non-polarized. The receptor cells contain cytoplasmic organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, compact Golgi bodies and multivesicular bodies. Supporting cells bearing microvilli are interposed between the receptor cells. The junction complex between the supporting cells and the receptor cells is composed of adherens and septate junctions, while between supporting cells only the adherens junctions are present. The static nerve arises from the lateral side of the cyst and contains axons in which parallel neurotubules and mitochondria are found. The axons arise directly from the base of the receptor cells without synapse. In the cyst lumen there are unattached statoconia. The statoconia have a plate-like or concentric membranous ring structure. Based on the morphology, the function of the statocyst in Biomphalaria is discussed.

  2. Nimbus (BgI): an active non-LTR retrotransposon of the Schistosoma mansoni snail host Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Nithya; Tettelin, Hervé; Miller, André; Hostetler, Jessica; Tallon, Luke; Knight, Matty

    2007-10-01

    The freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata is closely associated with the transmission of human schistosomiasis. An ecologically sound method has been proposed to control schistosomiasis using genetically modified snails to displace endemic, susceptible ones. To assess the viability of this form of biological control, studies towards understanding the molecular makeup of the snail relative to the presence of endogenous mobile genetic elements are being undertaken since they can be exploited for genetic transformation studies. We previously cloned a 1.95kb BamHI fragment in B. glabrata (BGR2) with sequence similarity to the human long interspersed nuclear element (LINE or L1). A contiguous, full-length sequence corresponding to BGR2, hereafter-named nimbus (BgI), has been identified from a B. glabrata bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Sequence analysis of the 65,764bp BAC insert contained one full-length, complete nimbus (BgI) element (element I), two full-length elements (elements II and III) containing deletions and flanked by target site duplications and 10 truncated copies. The intact nimbus (BgI) contained two open-reading frames (ORFs 1 and 2) encoding the characteristic hallmark domains found in non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons belonging to the I-clade; a nucleic acid binding protein in ORF1 and an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, reverse transcriptase and RNase H in ORF2. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that nimbus (BgI) is closely related to Drosophila (I factor), mosquito Aedes aegypti (MosquI) and chordate ascidian Ciona intestinalis (CiI) retrotransposons. Nimbus (BgI) represents the first complete mobile element characterised from a mollusk that appears to be transcriptionally active and is widely distributed in snails of the neotropics and the Old World.

  3. Phylogeography of Biomphalaria glabrata and B. pfeifferi, important intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni in the New and Old World tropics.

    PubMed

    Dejong, R J; Morgan, J A T; Wilson, W D; Al-Jaser, M H; Appleton, C C; Coulibaly, G; D'Andrea, P S; Doenhoff, M J; Haas, W; Idris, M A; Magalhães, L A; Moné, H; Mouahid, G; Mubila, L; Pointier, J-P; Webster, J P; Zanotti-Magalhães, E M; Paraense, W L; Mkoji, G M; Loker, E S

    2003-11-01

    The historical phylogeography of the two most important intermediate host species of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, B. glabrata in the New World, and B. pfeifferi in the Old World, was investigated using partial 16S and ND1 sequences from the mitochondrial genome. Nuclear sequences of an actin intron and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 were also obtained, but they were uninformative for the relationships among populations. Phylogenetic analyses based on mtDNA revealed six well-differentiated clades within B. glabrata: the Greater Antilles, Venezuela and the Lesser Antilles, and four geographically overlapping Brazilian clades. Application of a Biomphalaria-specific mutation rate gives an estimate of the early Pleistocene for their divergence. The Brazilian clades were inferred to be the result of fragmentation, due possibly to climate oscillations, with subsequent range expansion producing the overlapping ranges. Within the Venezuela and Lesser Antilles clade, lineages from each of these areas were estimated to have separated approximately 740 000 years ago. Compared to B. glabrata, mitochondrial sequences of B. pfeifferi are about 4x lower in diversity, reflecting a much younger age for the species, with the most recent common ancestor of all haplotypes estimated to have existed 880 000 years ago. The oldest B. pfeifferi haplotypes occurred in southern Africa, suggesting it may have been a refugium during dry periods. A recent range expansion was inferred for eastern Africa less than 100 000 years ago. Several putative species and subspecies, B. arabica, B. gaudi, B. rhodesiensis and B. stanleyi, are shown to be undifferentiated from other B. pfeifferi populations.

  4. Discontinuation of echinocandin and azole treatments led to the disappearance of an FKS alteration but not azole resistance during clonal Candida glabrata persistent candidaemia.

    PubMed

    Imbert, S; Castain, L; Pons, A; Jacob, S; Meyer, I; Palous, M; Vezinet, C; Langeron, O; Hennequin, C; Monsel, A; Fekkar, A

    2016-10-01

    To give an indication of a fitness cost conferred by FKS mutation-associated echinocandin resistance in Candida glabrata during human infection. Six C. glabrata clinical strains sequentially isolated from blood and a hepatic abscess in a solid organ transplant recipient were analysed. The patient had received long-term azole and echinocandin therapy for invasive aspergillosis and persistent candidaemia. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. Molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance were determined by sequencing hot spots of the FKS. Strain relatedness was determined using a microsatellite-based typing method. Typing analysis revealed an identical microsatellite pattern for all isolates, supporting a close relation. The first C. glabrata isolate showed wild-type phenotype (i.e. susceptibility to echinocandins and low level of azole resistance). After voriconazole therapy, the C. glabrata quickly acquired pan-azole resistance. Later, echinocandin treatment led to the emergence of a FKS2 S663P alteration and echinocandin resistance. After disruption of both azole and echinocandin therapy in favour of liposomal amphotericin B, C. glabrata isolates regained full susceptibility to echinocandin and lost the FKS2 S663P alteration while nonetheless maintaining their pan-azole resistance. Our clinical report supports the potential existence of a fitness cost conferred by FKS mutation in C. glabrata, as disruption of treatment led to a rapid disappearance of the resistant clone. This suggests that a more restricted use and/or a discontinuous administration of echinocandins may limit the spread of clinical resistance to this class.

  5. Green synthesis and characterization of gold and silver nanoparticles using Mussaenda glabrata leaf extract and their environmental applications to dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sijo; Joseph, Siby; Koshy, Ebey P; Mathew, Beena

    2017-07-01

    Plant-derived nanomaterials opened a green approach in solving the current environment issues. Present study focused on rapid microwave-assisted synthesis and applications of gold and silver nanoparticles mediated by aqueous leaf extract of Mussaenda glabrata. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis, FT-IR, powder XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron (TEM), and atomic force microscopic techniques (AFM). FCC crystal structure of both nanoparticles was confirmed by peaks corresponding to (111), (200), (220), and (311) planes in XRD spectra and bright circular spots in SAED pattern. IC50 values shown by gold and silver nanoparticles (44.1 ± 0.82 and 57.92 ± 1.33 μg/mL) reflected their high free radical scavenging potential. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles revealed their potency to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms Bacillus pumilus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger, and Penicillium chrysogenum. Anthropogenic pollutants rhodamine B and methyl orange were effectively degraded from aquatic environment and waste water sewages of dye industries using the prepared nanocatalysts. The catalytic capacities of the synthesized nanoparticles were also exploited in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Graphical abstract.

  6. In vitro fungicidal activities of anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis evaluated by time-kill studies.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin killing activities against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis were evaluated by the time-kill methodology. The concentrations assayed were 0.06, 0.125, and 0.5 μg/ml, which are achieved in serum. Anidulafungin and micafungin required between 13 and 26 h to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) against C. glabrata and C. bracarensis. All echinocandins were less active against C. nivariensis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Distribution of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, within a St Lucian field habitat.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, R F

    1975-01-01

    A total of 6360 mud samples were obtained, in 62 collections made with an exhaustive sampling device, from banana drains on the West Indian island of St Lucia during fortnightly samplings over a 2(1/2)-year period. Analysis of counts of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata from these samples showed that this species had a contagious distribution. This finding is consistent with other evidence that banana drains form a rigorous habitat for B. glabrata. Its distribution was more contagious than that of Oncomelania quadrasi in certain Philippine habitats and several species of aquatic snail in various African irrigation canals. The exact transformation for normalizing the snail counts for standard statistical techniques was z = x(0.287) but the more convenient cube root transformation is probably adequate. However, if too few snails are collected (15 or fewer per 100 samples) or if the frequency distribution of snail counts is discontinuous, with too many widely separated high frequency counts, neither transformation will be entirely satisfactory.

  8. Identification of signature volatiles to discriminate Candida albicans, glabrata, krusei and tropicalis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Moritz; Hartwig, Stefan; Schütte, Eyke; Gillissen, Bernhard; Preissner, Robert; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Kastner, Isabell; Preissner, Saskia

    2016-02-01

    Oral candidiasis is the most frequent fungal infection of the oral cavity. Clinical diagnoses require mycological confirmation, which is time-consuming in case of culture testing. The aim of the study was to identify signature volatiles to develop a chairside breath test to diagnose oral candidiasis. Headspaces above Candida albicans, glabrata, tropicalis, krusei cultures, and growth media as control were analysed after eight and 24 h using offline gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The identification of signature volatiles was assisted using various microbial databases. Retrieved volatile patterns enabled Candida species discrimination in vitro. For C. albicans 3-methyl-2-butanone and styrene and for C. krusei a combination of p-xylene, 2-octanone, 2-heptanone and n-butyl acetate were found to be specific. 1-hexanol was found in C. tropicalis, but is emitted by a variety of other microorganisms. C. glabrata was characterised through the absence of these volatiles. The development of a breath test is a promising approach in confirming suspicions of oral candidiasis. To confirm the retrieved results in vivo, breath tests in affected and healthy subjects have to be performed. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Distribution of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, within a St Lucian field habitat

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    A total of 6360 mud samples were obtained, in 62 collections made with an exhaustive sampling device, from banana drains on the West Indian island of St Lucia during fortnightly samplings over a 2½-year period. Analysis of counts of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata from these samples showed that this species had a contagious distribution. This finding is consistent with other evidence that banana drains form a rigorous habitat for B. glabrata. Its distribution was more contagious than that of Oncomelania quadrasi in certain Philippine habitats and several species of aquatic snail in various African irrigation canals. The exact transformation for normalizing the snail counts for standard statistical techniques was z = x0.287 but the more convenient cube root transformation is probably adequate. However, if too few snails are collected (15 or fewer per 100 samples) or if the frequency distribution of snail counts is discontinuous, with too many widely separated high frequency counts, neither transformation will be entirely satisfactory. PMID:1084797

  10. Biomphalysin, a new β pore-forming toxin involved in Biomphalaria glabrata immune defense against Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Galinier, Richard; Portela, Julien; Moné, Yves; Allienne, Jean François; Henri, Hélène; Delbecq, Stéphane; Mitta, Guillaume; Gourbal, Benjamin; Duval, David

    2013-03-01

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the β pore-forming toxin (β-PFT) superfamily that are abundantly distributed in bacteria. More rarely, β-PFTs have been described in eukaryotic organisms. Recently, we identified a putative cytolytic protein in the snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, whose primary structural features suggest that it could belong to this β-PFT superfamily. In the present paper, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of this protein, which we call Biomphalysin, and demonstrate that it is indeed a new eukaryotic β-PFT. We show that, despite weak sequence similarities with aerolysins, Biomphalysin shares a common architecture with proteins belonging to this superfamily. A phylogenetic approach revealed that the gene encoding Biomphalysin could have resulted from horizontal transfer. Its expression is restricted to immune-competent cells and is not induced by parasite challenge. Recombinant Biomphalysin showed hemolytic activity that was greatly enhanced by the plasma compartment of B. glabrata. We further demonstrated that Biomphalysin with plasma is highly toxic toward Schistosoma mansoni sporocysts. Using in vitro binding assays in conjunction with Western blot and immunocytochemistry analyses, we also showed that Biomphalysin binds to parasite membranes. Finally, we showed that, in contrast to what has been reported for most other members of the family, lytic activity of Biomphalysin is not dependent on proteolytic processing. These results provide the first functional description of a mollusk immune effector protein involved in killing S. mansoni.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata with anions.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Alessio; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Mastrolorenzo, Antonio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-15

    A beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the protein encoded by the NCE103 gene of Candida glabrata which also present in Candida albicans and Saccharomycescerevisiae, was cloned, purified, characterized kinetically and investigated for its inhibition by a series simple, inorganic anions such as halogenides, pseudohalogenides, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite, perchlorate, sulfate and some isosteric species. The enzyme showed significant CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 3.8 x 10(5)s(-1) and k(cat)/K(M) of 4.8 x 10(7)M(-1)s(-1). The Cà glabrata CA (CgCA) was moderately inhibited by metal poisons (cyanide, azide, cyanate, thiocyanate, K(I)s of 0.60-1.12 mM) but strongly inhibited by bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic acid (K(I)s of 86-98 microM). The other anions investigated showed inhibition constants in the low millimolar range, with the exception of bromide and iodide (K(I)s of 27-42 mM).

  12. Genome Sequencing of the Pyruvate-producing Strain Candida glabrata CCTCC M202019 and Genomic Comparison with Strain CBS138

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Nan; Ye, Chao; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Jia; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata CCTCC M202019 as an industrial yeast strain that is widely used to produce α-oxocarboxylic acid. Strain M202019 has been proven to have a higher pyruvate-producing capacity than the reference strain CBS138. To characterize the genotype of the M202019 strain, we generated a draft sequence of its genome, which has a size of 12.1 Mbp and a GC content of 38.47%. Evidence accumulated during genome annotation suggests that strain M202019 has strong capacities for glucose transport and pyruvate biosynthesis, defects in pyruvate catabolism, as well as variations in genes involved in nutrient and dicarboxylic acid transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and other relevant aspects of carbon metabolism, which might promote pyruvate accumulation. In addition to differences in its central carbon metabolism, a genomic analysis revealed genetic differences in adhesion metabolism. Forty-nine adhesin-like proteins of strain M202019 were identified classified into seven subfamilies. Decreased amounts of adhesive proteins, and deletions or changes of low-complexity repeats and functional domains might lead to lower adhesion and reduced pathogenicity. Further virulence experiments validated the biological safety of strain M202019. Analysis of the C. glabrata CCTCC M202019 genome sequence provides useful insights into its genetic context, physical characteristics, and potential metabolic capacity. PMID:27713500

  13. Fine-scale population structure and dispersal in Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni, in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Mavárez, J; Amarista, M; Pointier, J-P; Jarne, P

    2002-05-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata is the main intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni in America and one of the most intensely studied species of freshwater snails, yet very little is known about its population biology. Here, we used seven highly polymorphic microsatellite loci to analyse genetic diversity in the Valencia lake basin, which represents the core of the endemic area for schistosomiasis in Venezuela. Populations were sampled at short spatial scale (a few kilometres), both inside the lake and in ponds or rivers near the lake. Our results indicate that B. glabrata essentially cross-fertilizes, with little variation in selfing rates among populations. Our markers detected considerable genetic variation, with an average heterozygosity of 0.60. More diversity per population was found within than outside the lake, suggesting an influence of connectivity among populations on the levels of genetic diversity. A marked population structure was detected and lake populations were less structured than other populations. Most individuals were assigned to their population of origin using an assignment test. No strong demographic signal (e.g. bottleneck) was detected, though lake populations are likely to experience bottlenecks more frequently than the other populations analysed. Differences in gene flow therefore seem to play an important role in population differentiation and in the restoring of genetic diversity in demographically unstable populations.

  14. A multistrain approach to studying the mechanisms underlying compatibility in the interaction between Biomphalaria glabrata and Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Yves; Duval, David; Grunau, Christoph; Genthon, Clémence; Rognon, Anne; Arancibia, Nathalie; Dejean, Bernard; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin; Mitta, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, numerous studies have sought to better understand the mechanisms underlying the compatibility between Biomphalaria glabrata and Schistosoma mansoni. The developments of comparative transcriptomics, comparative genomics, interactomics and more targeted approaches have enabled researchers to identify a series of candidate genes. However, no molecular comparative work has yet been performed on multiple populations displaying different levels of compatibility. Here, we seek to fill this gap in the literature. We focused on B. glabrata FREPs and S. mansoni SmPoMucs, which were previously demonstrated to be involved in snail/schistosome compatibility. We studied the expression and polymorphisms of these factors in combinations of snail and schistosome isolates that display different levels of compatibility. We found that the polymorphism and expression levels of FREPs and SmPoMucs could be linked to the compatibility level of S. mansoni. These data and our complementary results obtained by RNA-seq of samples from various snail strains indicate that the mechanism of compatibility is much more complex than previously thought, and that it is likely to be highly variable within and between populations. This complexity must be taken into account if we hope to identify the molecular pathways that are most likely to be good targets for strategies aimed at blocking transmission of the parasite through the snail intermediate host. PMID:28253264

  15. Monoamines in the albumen gland, plasma, and central nervous system of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata during egg-laying.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jon P; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2002-06-01

    The potential role of selected biogenic monoamines and related compounds in the reproductive physiology of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata was investigated. Extracts of the albumen gland (AG), plasma, and central nervous system (CNS) were subjected to high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED), and under the extraction and separation conditions employed the following amines were detected: tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), dopamine, and tryptophan in the AG; DOPA, tyrosine, and tryptophan in the plasma; DOPA, tyrosine, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the CNS. These compounds were then quantified in individual samples taken from snails known to be in a particular stage of the egg-laying process. AG dopamine levels were highest in snails in the first stage of the reproductive process, when the AG is secreting perivitelline fluid around each fertilized ovum. Significant decreases in AG protein content during the later stages of the egg-laying process were also evident. Plasma tyrosine and DOPA levels were lowest in snails that contained a fully packaged egg mass, while no changes in monoamine content were observed in the CNS. These data provide insights into the role(s) that monoamines, especially catecholamine-related compounds, may play in B. glabrata reproductive physiology.

  16. Identification and Comparative Analysis of the Tegillarca granosa Haemocytes MicroRNA Transcriptome in Response to Cd Using a Deep Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yongbo; Zhang, Lili; Dong, Yinghui; Lin, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) that can base pair with their target mRNAs, which represses their translation or induces their degradation in various biological processes. To identify miRNAs regulated by heavy metal stress, we constructed two sRNA libraries for the blood clam Tegillarca granosa: one for organisms exposed to toxic levels of cadmium (Cd) and one for a control group. Results Sequencing of the two libraries and subsequent analysis revealed 215 conserved and 39 new miRNAs. Most of the new miRNAs in T. granosa were up- or down-regulated in response to Cd exposure. There were significant differences in expression between the Cd and control groups for 16 miRNAs. Of these, five miRNAs were significantly up-regulated and 11 were significantly down-regulated in the Cd stress library. Potential targets were predicted for the 16 differential miRNAs in pre-miRNAs identified according to sequence homology. Some of the predicted miRNA targets are associated with regulation of the response to stress induced by heavy metals. Five differentially expressed miRNAs (Tgr-nmiR-8, Tgr-nmiR-21, Tgr-miR-2a, Tgr-miR-10a-5p, and Tgr-miR-184b) were validated by qRT-PCR. Conclusion Our study is the first large-scale identification of miRNAs in T. granosa haemocytes. Our findings suggest that some miRNAs and their target genes and pathways may play critical roles in the responses of this species to environmental heavy metal stresses. PMID:24690903

  17. A norepinephrine-responsive miRNA directly promotes CgHSP90AA1 expression in oyster haemocytes during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Xin, Lusheng; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2017-05-01

    Oyster Crassostrea gigas is one model mollusc inhabiting in the intertidal zone and is frequently stressed by desiccation. The adaptation mechanism of oyster to environmental stress involves multiple levels, and miRNA is one of the most important regulators in post-transcriptional level. In the present study, an oyster norepinephrine-responsive miRNA cgi-miR-365 was proved to contribute to the host adaptation against desiccation by directly promoting the expression of CgHSP90AA1. Briefly, a significant increase of cgi-miR-365 was observed from the first day after aerial exposure and the up-regulation was vigorously repressed when oysters were injected with adrenoceptors antagonists. A total of 15 genes involved in biological regulation, metabolic process and response to stimulus were predicted to be modulated by cgi-miR-365. Among these genes, CgHSP90AA1 was up-regulated significantly during desiccation and could be down-regulated after simultaneous injection of adrenoceptors antagonists. The interaction between cgi-miR-365 and CgHSP90AA1 was subsequently verified in vitro, and a significant promotion of CgHSP90AA1 transcripts was observed after overexpressing cgi-miR-365 in either in vitro luciferase reporter assay or primarily cultured haemocytes. Meanwhile, CgHSP90AA1 transcripts decreased in vivo when cgi-miR-365 was repressed by its inhibitor during desiccation. Collectively, it was suggested that cgi-miR-365 could be induced by norepinephrine during desiccation and promote CgHSP90AA1 expression directly after binding to its 3'-UTR, which would provide new evidence in miRNA-mediated adaptation mechanism in oysters against intertidal stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. cDNA cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a novel antimicrobial peptide gene penaeidin-3 (Fi-Pen3) from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, S; Vaseeharan, B

    2012-03-20

    A new member of antimicrobial peptide genes of the penaeidin family, penaeidin 3, was cloned from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropeneaus indicus (F. indicus), by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE-PCR) methods. The complete nucleotide sequence of cDNA clone of Indian white shrimp F. indicus Penaeidin 3 (Fi-Pen3) was 243bp long and has an open reading frame which encodes 80 amino acid peptide. The homology analysis of Fi-Pen3 sequence with other Penaeidins 3 shows higher similarity with Penaeus monodon (92%). The theoretical 3D structure generated through ab initio modelling indicated the presence of two-disulphide bridges in the alpha-helix. The signal peptide sequence of Fi-Pen3 is almost entirely homologous to that of other Penaeidin 3 of crustaceans, while differing relatively in the N-terminal domain of the mature peptide. The mature peptide has a predicted molecular weight of 84.9kDa, and a theoretical pI of 9.38. Phylogenetic analysis of Fi-Pen3 shows high resemblance with other Pen-3 from P. monodon, Litopenaeus stylirostris, Litopenaeus vannamei and Litopenaeus setiferus. Fi-Pen3 found to be expressed in haemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, muscles, gills, intestine, and eyestalk with higher expression in haemocytes. Microbial challenge resulted in mRNA up-regulation, up to 6h post injection of Vibrio parahemolyticus. The Fi-Pen3 mRNA expression of F. indicus in the premolt stage (D(01) and D(02)) was significantly up-regulated than the postmolt (A and B) and intermolt stages (C). The findings of the present paper underline the involvement of Fi-Pen3 in innate immune system of F. indicus.

  19. The ROS-mediated pathway coupled with the MAPK-p38 signalling pathway and antioxidant system plays roles in the responses of Mytilus edulis haemocytes induced by BDE-47.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongshun; Tang, Xuexi; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Tianli; Chen, Hongmei; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, You

    2017-03-18

    Our previous study found that BDE-47 could change the immune function of haemocytes in Mytilus edulis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) might be involved in the process of physiological alteration. Here, we aimed to better understand this relationship. To accomplish this, we analysed changes in different ROS as well as various antioxidant system components. Additionally, the expression of MAPK-p38, a signalling protein regulated by ROS that helps to regulate numerous cellular processes, was also analysed. BDE-47 was given at low, medium, and high amounts. The results showed that (1) BDE-47 significantly affected ROS component levels in haemocytes. O2(-) content was increased under all conditions. H2O2 content was also increased under all conditions, except in the middle concentration group. In contrast, OH content was increased in the low and middle concentration groups and decreased in the high concentration group. (2) Estimations of the antioxidant systems revealed concentration-dependent changes. Catalase activity was increased throughout the experiment, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) exhibited a decreasing trend in the tested groups with an increase of exposure time. On day 21, only the high concentration group showed a slight increase in SOD activity compared to the control. Furthermore, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity increased in the low and middle concentration groups but decreased in the high concentration group. The GSH/GSSG ratio increased for all treatments over time, indicating that changes in redox status occurred. (3) MAPK-p38 was activated following BDE-47 exposure. Based on our previous study, we speculate that BDE-47 exposure induces ROS production and affects the ROS-mediated pathway, which may explain the resultant functional damage observed in haemocytes. Furthermore, BDE-47 also affected the antioxidant system and altered redox status, although these changes did not ameliorate the damage caused by ROS.

  20. Biomphalaria glabrata Metallothionein: Lacking Metal Specificity of the Protein and Missing Gene Upregulation Suggest Metal Sequestration by Exchange Instead of through Selective Binding

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, Sara; Zerbe, Oliver; Atrian, Sílvia; Palacios, Òscar; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    The wild-type metallothionein (MT) of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and a natural allelic mutant of it in which a lysine residue was replaced by an asparagine residue, were recombinantly expressed and analyzed for their metal-binding features with respect to Cd2+, Zn2+ and Cu+, applying spectroscopic and mass-spectrometric methods. In addition, the upregulation of the Biomphalaria glabrata MT gene was assessed by quantitative real-time detection PCR. The two recombinant proteins revealed to be very similar in most of their metal binding features. They lacked a clear metal-binding preference for any of the three metal ions assayed—which, to this degree, is clearly unprecedented in the world of Gastropoda MTs. There were, however, slight differences in copper-binding abilities between the two allelic variants. Overall, the missing metal specificity of the two recombinant MTs goes hand in hand with lacking upregulation of the respective MT gene. This suggests that in vivo, the Biomphalaria glabrata MT may be more important for metal replacement reactions through a constitutively abundant form, rather than for metal sequestration by high binding specificity. There are indications that the MT of Biomphalaria glabrata may share its unspecific features with MTs from other freshwater snails of the Hygrophila family. PMID:28684706

  1. Production of white colonies on CHROMagar Candida BD by species in the C. glabrata clade, and other species with overlapping phenotypic traits.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chromogenic agars are important diagnostic media used in the clinical mycology laboratory. Candida spp. that produced white colonies on CHROMagar Candida (Becton Dickinson) (CAC) were found during a study designed to detect and identify C. bracarensis, a newly-described species in the C. glabrata c...

  2. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase activity and accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl esters to protect against abiotic and biotic stresses. Caffeoyl esters, in particular, can be substrates for endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Recently, we showed that perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain PPO and identified one PPO su...

  3. The Rho1 GTPase-activating Protein CgBem2 Is Required for Survival of Azole Stress in Candida glabrata*

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Kaur, Rupinder

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are common clinical complications of neonates, critically ill, and immunocompromised patients worldwide. Candida species are the leading cause of disseminated fungal infections, with Candida albicans being the most prevalent species. Candida glabrata, the second/third most common cause of candidemia, shows reduced susceptibility to a widely used antifungal drug fluconazole. Here, we present findings from a screen of 9134 C. glabrata Tn7 insertion mutants for altered survival profiles in the presence of fluconazole. We have identified two components of RNA polymerase II mediator complex, three players of Rho GTPase-mediated signaling cascade, and two proteins implicated in actin cytoskeleton biogenesis and ergosterol biosynthesis that are required to sustain viability during fluconazole stress. We show that exposure to fluconazole leads to activation of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in C. glabrata. Our data demonstrate that disruption of a RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein) domain-containing protein, CgBem2, results in bud-emergence defects, azole susceptibility, and constitutive activation of CgRho1-regulated CgPkc1 signaling cascade and cell wall-related phenotypes. The viability loss of Cgbem2Δ mutant upon fluconazole treatment could be partially rescued by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Additionally, we present evidence that CgBEM2 is required for the transcriptional activation of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps in response to fluconazole exposure. Last, we report that Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin renders fluconazole a fungicidal drug in C. glabrata. PMID:21832071

  4. Analysis of the essentiality of ROM2 genes in the pathogenic yeasts Candida glabrata and Candida albicans using temperature-sensitive mutants.

    PubMed

    Kanno, T; Takekawa, D; Miyakawa, Y

    2015-04-01

    To analyse the essentiality of the ROM2 genes originating from the pathogenic yeasts Candida glabrata and Candida albicans by using temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants. Based on the general concepts that ts mutations are generated by virtue of point mutation within essential genes, we have previously established a novel method (termed 'ETS system' for screening and identification of essential genes using ts mutants of C. glabrata). According to this ETS system, the present study successfully identified a putative C. glabrata ROM2 homologue as an essential gene that complements its point mutation (Cys-1275/Tyr substitution). The C. albicans ROM2 mutant (Cys-1281/Tyr), constructed patterned after this point mutation, also displayed ts phenotype. Both ts mutants recovered colony-forming ability, with concomitant suppression of lysis phenotype, at the elevated temperature in the presence of 1 mol l(-1) sorbitol as an osmotic stabilizer. Sequence alignment revealed that human genome possesses relatively low homology against Rom2 homologues, which are highly conserved among yeast species. ROM2 genes of C. glabrata and C. albicans are essential for viability, probably involved in cell wall integrity. ROM2 genes essential for both Candida species may be a potentially useful antifungal targets from chemotherapeutic viewpoint. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine in the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, a snail intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Fneich, Sara; Dheilly, Nolwenn; Adema, Coen; Rognon, Anne; Reichelt, Michael; Bulla, Jan; Grunau, Christoph; Cosseau, Céline

    2013-06-06

    Biomphalaria glabrata is the mollusc intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, a digenean flatworm parasite that causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. An estimated 200 million people in 74 countries suffer from schistosomiasis, in terms of morbidity this is the most severe tropical disease after malaria. Epigenetic information informs on the status of gene activity that is heritable, for which changes are reversible and that is not based on the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms generate variability that provides a source for potentially heritable phenotypic variation and therefore could be involved in the adaptation to environmental constraint. Phenotypic variations are particularly important in host-parasite interactions in which both selective pressure and rate of evolution are high. In this context, epigenetic changes are expected to be major drivers of phenotypic plasticity and co-adaptation between host and parasite. Consequently, with characterization of the genomes of invertebrates that are parasite vectors or intermediate hosts, it is also essential to understand how the epigenetic machinery functions to better decipher the interplay between host and parasite. The CpGo/e ratios were used as a proxy to investigate the occurrence of CpG methylation in B. glabrata coding regions. The presence of DNA methylation in B. glabrata was also confirmed by several experimental approaches: restriction enzymatic digestion with isoschizomers, bisulfite conversion based techniques and LC-MS/MS analysis. In this work, we report that DNA methylation, which is one of the carriers of epigenetic information, occurs in B. glabrata; approximately 2% of cytosine nucleotides are methylated. We describe the methylation machinery of B. glabrata. Methylation occurs predominantly at CpG sites, present at high ratios in coding regions of genes associated with housekeeping functions. We also demonstrate by bisulfite treatment that methylation occurs in multiple copies of Nimbus, a

  6. A Novel Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Influences Compatibility between the Gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, and the Digenean Trematode Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pila, Emmanuel A.; Tarrabain, Mahmoud; Kabore, Alethe L.; Hanington, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a devastating disease caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, affects over 260 million people worldwide especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Schistosomes must undergo their larval development within specific species of snail intermediate hosts, a trait that is shared among almost all digenean trematodes. This unique and long-standing host-parasite relationship presents an opportunity to study both the importance of conserved immunological features in novel immunological roles, as well as new immunological adaptations that have arisen to combat a very specific type of immunological challenge. While it is well supported that the snail immune response is important for protecting against schistosome infection, very few specific snail immune factors have been identified and even fewer have been functionally characterized. Here, we provide the first functional report of a snail Toll-like receptor, which we demonstrate as playing an important role in the cellular immune response of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata following challenge with Schistosoma mansoni. This TLR (BgTLR) was identified as part of a peptide screen of snail immune cell surface proteins that differed in abundance between B. glabrata snails that differ in their compatibility phenotype to challenge by S. mansoni. The S. mansoni-resistant strain of B. glabrata (BS-90) displayed higher levels of BgTLR compared to the susceptible (M-line) strain. Transcript expression of BgTLR was found to be very responsive in BS-90 snails when challenged with S. mansoni, increasing 27 fold relative to β-actin (non-immune control gene); whereas expression in susceptible M-line snails was not significantly increased. Knockdown of BgTLR in BS-90 snails via targeted siRNA oligonucleotides was confirmed using a specific anti-BgTLR antibody and resulted in a significant alteration of the resistant phenotype, yielding patent infections in 43% of the normally resistant snails, which

  7. A Novel Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Influences Compatibility between the Gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, and the Digenean Trematode Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Pila, Emmanuel A; Tarrabain, Mahmoud; Kabore, Alethe L; Hanington, Patrick C

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis, a devastating disease caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, affects over 260 million people worldwide especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Schistosomes must undergo their larval development within specific species of snail intermediate hosts, a trait that is shared among almost all digenean trematodes. This unique and long-standing host-parasite relationship presents an opportunity to study both the importance of conserved immunological features in novel immunological roles, as well as new immunological adaptations that have arisen to combat a very specific type of immunological challenge. While it is well supported that the snail immune response is important for protecting against schistosome infection, very few specific snail immune factors have been identified and even fewer have been functionally characterized. Here, we provide the first functional report of a snail Toll-like receptor, which we demonstrate as playing an important role in the cellular immune response of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata following challenge with Schistosoma mansoni. This TLR (BgTLR) was identified as part of a peptide screen of snail immune cell surface proteins that differed in abundance between B. glabrata snails that differ in their compatibility phenotype to challenge by S. mansoni. The S. mansoni-resistant strain of B. glabrata (BS-90) displayed higher levels of BgTLR compared to the susceptible (M-line) strain. Transcript expression of BgTLR was found to be very responsive in BS-90 snails when challenged with S. mansoni, increasing 27 fold relative to β-actin (non-immune control gene); whereas expression in susceptible M-line snails was not significantly increased. Knockdown of BgTLR in BS-90 snails via targeted siRNA oligonucleotides was confirmed using a specific anti-BgTLR antibody and resulted in a significant alteration of the resistant phenotype, yielding patent infections in 43% of the normally resistant snails, which

  8. Differential expression of the CrV1 haemocyte inactivation-associated polydnavirus gene in the African maize stem borer Busseola fusca (Fuller) parasitized by two biotypes of the endoparasitoid Cotesia sesamiae (Cameron).

    PubMed

    Gitau, C W; Gundersen-Rindal, D; Pedroni, M; Mbugi, P J; Dupas, S

    2007-07-01

    Polydnaviruses are rarely studied for their natural variation in immune suppressive abilities. The polydnavirus harboring braconid Cotesia sesamiae, a widespread endoparasitoid of Busseola fusca and Sesamia calamistis in sub-Saharan Africa exists as two biotypes. In Kenya, the western biotype completes development in B. fusca larvae. However, eggs of the coastal C. sesamiae are encapsulated in this host and ultimately, no parasitoids emerge from parasitized B. fusca larvae. Both biotypes develop successfully in S. calamistis larvae. Encapsulation activity by B. fusca larvae towards eggs of the avirulent C. sesamiae was detectable six hours post-parasitization. The differences in encapsulation of virulent and avirulent strains were associated with differences in nucleotide sequences and expression of a CrV1 polydnavirus (PDV) gene, which is associated with haemocyte inactivation in the Cotesia rubecula/Pieris rapae system. CrV1 expression was faint or absent in fat body and haemolymph samples from B. fusca parasitized by the avirulent C. sesamiae, which exhibited encapsulation of eggs. Expression was high in fat body and haemolymph samples from both B. fusca and S. calamistis larvae parasitized by the virulent C. sesamiae, encapsulation in the former peaking at the same time points as CrV1 expression in the latter. Non synonymous difference in CrV1 gene sequences between virulent and avirulent wasp suggests that variations in B. fusca parasitism by C. sesamiae may be due to qualitative differences in CrV1-haemocyte interactions.

  9. Fungal CYP51 Inhibitors VT-1161 and VT-1129 Exhibit Strong In Vitro Activity against Candida glabrata and C. krusei Isolates Clinically Resistant to Azole and Echinocandin Antifungal Compounds.

    PubMed

    Schell, W A; Jones, A M; Garvey, E P; Hoekstra, W J; Schotzinger, R J; Alexander, B D

    2017-03-01

    The in vitro activities of fungal CYP51 inhibitors VT-1161 and VT-1129 were determined for Candida glabrata (n = 34) and C. krusei (n = 50). C. glabrata isolates were screened for FKS gene mutations. All isolates were resistant clinically and/or in vitro to at least one standard antifungal compound. VT-1161 and VT-1129 MICs for all isolates were at least 5-fold below achievable human plasma levels for VT-1161. VT-1161 and VT-1129 are promising for the treatment of resistant C. glabrata and C. krusei infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Genetic Diversity among Clinical Isolates of Candida glabrata Analyzed by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA and Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Boldo, Xavier M.; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2003-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 47 clinical and reference strains of Candida glabrata from several geographical origins and diverse clinical disorders, with different antifungal susceptibilities, as well as their genetic relationships were studied through multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques. The genetic diversity estimated for 11 MLEE loci measured as average heterozygosity (h) was 0.055. A high level of genetic relatedness among isolates was established by cluster analysis. Forty-nine RAPD markers were analyzed, and the average genetic diversity among isolates, estimated by Shannon's index (Ho), was 0.372. The ΦST values estimated through an analysis of molecular variance to assess genetic differentiation among isolates revealed no genetic differentiation among them. Our results revealed very low genetic diversity among isolates, a lack of differentiation, and no association with their geographic origin and the clinical characteristics. PMID:14532225

  11. Successful parasitism of vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata by the human blood fluke (trematode) Schistosoma mansoni: a 2009 assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by infections by human blood flukes (Trematoda), continues to disrupt the lives of over 200,000,000 people in over 70 countries, inflicting misery and precluding the individuals’ otherwise reasonable expectations of productive lives. Infection requires contact with freshwater in which infected snails (the intermediate hosts of schistosomes) have released cercariae larvae. Habitats suitable for the host snails continue to expand as a consequence of water resource development. No vaccine is available, and the emergence and spread of resistance to the single licensed schistosomicide drug would be devastating. Since human infections would cease if parasite infections in snails were prevented, efforts are being made to discover requirements of intra-molluscan development of these parasites. Wherever blood flukes occur, naturally resistant conspecific snails are present. To understand the mechanisms used by parasites to ensure their survival in immunocompetent hosts, one must comprehend the internal defense mechanisms that are available to the host. For one intermediate host snail (Biomphalaria glabrata) and trematodes for which it serves as vector, molecular genetic and proteomic surveys for genes and proteins influencing the outcomes on infections are yielding lists of candidates. A comparative approach drawing on data from studies in divergent species provides a robust basis for hypothesis generation to drive decisions as to which candidates merit detailed further investigation. For example, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are known mediators or effectors in battles between infectious agents and their hosts. An approach targeting genes involved in relevant pathways has been fruitful in the Schistosoma mansoni-B. glabrata parasitism, leading to discovery of a functionally relevant gene set (encoding enzymes responsible for the leukocyte respiratory burst) that associates significantly with host resistance phenotype. This review summarizes

  12. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  13. Biompha-LAMP: A New Rapid Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Detecting Schistosoma mansoni in Biomphalaria glabrata Snail Host

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Goenaga, Juan; López-Abán, Julio; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis remains one of the most common endemic parasitic diseases affecting over 230 million people worlwide. Schistosoma mansoni is the main species causing intestinal and hepatic schistosomiasis and the fresh water pulmonate snails of the genus Biomphalaria are best known for their role as intermediate hosts of the parasite. The development of new molecular monitoring assays for large-scale screening of snails from transmission sites to detect the presence of schistosomes is an important point to consider for snail control interventions related to schistosomiasis elimination. Our work was focussed on developing and evaluating a new LAMP assay combined with a simple DNA extraction method to detect S. mansoni in experimentally infected snails as a diagnostic tool for field conditions. Methodology/Principal findings A LAMP assay using a set of six primers targeting a sequence of S. mansoni ribosomal intergenic spacer 28S-18S rRNA was designed. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 0.1 fg of S. mansoni DNA at 63°C for 50 minutes. LAMP was evaluated by examining S. mansoni DNA in B. glabrata snails experimentally exposed to miracidia at different times post-exposure: early prepatent period (before cercarial shedding), light infections (snails exposed to a low number of miracidia) and detection of infected snails in pooled samples (within a group of uninfected snails). DNA for LAMP assays was obtained by using a commercial DNA extraction kit or a simple heat NaOH extraction method. We detected S. mansoni DNA in all groups of snails by using no complicated requirement procedure for DNA obtaining. Conclusions/Significance Our LAMP assay, named Biompha-LAMP, is specific, sensitive, rapid and potentially adaptable as a cost-effective method for screening of intermediate hosts infected with S. mansoni in both individual snails and pooled samples. The assay could be suitable for large-scale field surveys for schistosomes control campaigns in endemic

  14. In vitro effects of cadmium on two different animal cell models.

    PubMed

    Olabarrieta, I; L'Azou, B; Yuric, S; Cambar, J; Cajaraville, M P

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess comparatively the effects of cadmium on two different in vitro cell models, a cell line derived from proximal tubule renal cells (LLC-PK1) and haemocytes or blood cells of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). Cells were seeded in 96-well microplates and exposed in vitro to different concentrations of cadmium (CdCl(2)) ranging from 10 to 2000 microM for haemocytes and from 1 to 100 microM for LLC-PK1 cells, added to the culture medium. After 24 h of exposure, different assays were performed on haemocytes: neutral red uptake, phagocytosis of neutral red-stained zymosan, XTT assay, activity of lysosomal acid phosphatase and demonstration of the actin cytoskeleton using TRITC-labeled phalloidin. Cell viability expressed as LC50 was 750 microM when using the neutral red assay and 400 microM with the XTT assay. The phagocytic ability and the activity of acid phosphatase increased significantly in cells treated with Cd in a non dose-dependent manner. Doses of Cd above 100 microM caused disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. In LLC-PK1 cells, cell viability expressed as LC50 was found to be around 40 microM when using the neutral red assay and 50-60 microM with MTT and LDH assays, respectively. These results show that mussel haemocytes are in general more resistant to Cd exposure than LLC-PK1 cells. Furthermore, Cd appears to stimulate phagocytic and lysosomal activities in haemocytes in vitro.

  15. Genotoxic effects of cadmium and influence on fitness components of Lymantria dispar caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Matić, Dragana; Vlahović, Milena; Kolarević, Stoimir; Perić Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Vuković Gačić, Branka

    2016-11-01

    The current study extends our previous findings concerning the sensitivity of Lymantria dispar larvae to cadmium in light of ecotoxicological risk assessment. Here we report the results of the comet assay performed for the first time on this species. We examined the chronic effects of two cadmium concentrations (50 and 100 μg Cd/g dry food) on DNA integrity and haemocyte viability, as well as on fitness-related traits (larval mass and development duration parameters). All parameters were assessed individually and then used to calculate the integrated biomarker response (IBR) index. Egg-masses of L. dispar were collected from two locations in Serbia - the uncontaminated Homolje mountains and a metal-polluted area near Bor copper mines, smelter and refinery. Distinctive patterns in the response of these populations to cadmium exposure were noticed. In haemocytes of larvae from the pollution-free location both cadmium treatments increased the level of DNA damage, although in a similar range. Haemocyte viability and larval mass were reduced, while duration of the fourth instar and total development time were prolonged in a concentration-dependent manner. Cadmium tolerance was noticeable in the population from the metal-contaminated site at all organizational levels. Nevertheless, haemocyte viability in that population was reduced by the stronger treatment. Haemocyte viability was recognized as a promising biomarker due to the evident response of both populations to dietary cadmium. Genotoxicity, fitness-related traits and the IBR index could be used for biomonitoring of sensitive populations not previously exposed to metals.

  16. Combination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and temperature exposure: In vitro effects on immune response of European clam (Ruditapes decussatus).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Chalbia; Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Esteban, María Ángeles; Mosbahi, Dalila Saidane

    2017-08-01

    Marine organisms are subjected to various biotic and abiotic factors such as changes of temperature and pollutants [e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and heavy metals, which may affect their defense mechanisms. In this context, the aim was to evaluate the combined effects of temperature (20 and 30 °C) and PAHs (fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene) at two concentrations (10(-5) and 10(-3) mg mL(-1)) on the immune responses of the European clam Ruditapes decussatus were after 24 h of in vitro exposure. Total haemocyte count, cell viability, phenoloxidase, lysozyme, alkaline phosphatase, esterase, antibacterial and agglutinating activities were measured. Exposure to high temperatures resulted in lower phosphatase alkaline activity and higher haemocyte viability and antibacterial and haemagglutinating activities, compared with the values recorded for clams maintained at low temperature. Only pyrene induced a significant decrease in haemocyte lysozyme (at 20 and 30 °C) and esterase (at 30 °C) activities. The total haemocyte count was increased by phenanthrene and pyrene at 20 °C and at 30 °C, respectively. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased when haemocytes were exposed to pyrene at 30 °C but decreased in the presence of fluorene at 20 °C. Furthermore, haemocyte viability was low in the presence of pyrene and fluorene at 20 °C and 30 °C, respectively, but was unaffected by phenanthrene. Antibacterial activity was significantly increased and no-significantly affected by the presence of pyrene and fluorene at 20 °C and 30 °C, respectively. The present study demonstrates the strong effect of PAHs and high temperature on haemocyte viability and other important immune functions, including phosphatase alkaline and antibacterial activities. Furthermore, changes in the immune parameters of European clam resulting from high temperatures may modulate the effects of PAHs and vice versa. Copyright © 2017

  17. The interaction of light and gravity on the transmission of Echinostoma caproni (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) cercariae to the second intermediate host, Biomphalaria glabrata (Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Platt, Thomas R; Greenlee, Hali; Zelmer, Derek A

    2010-04-01

    The current experiments were designed to assess the interaction of light and gravity on the transmission of Echinostoma caproni cercariae to the second intermediate host, Biomphalaria glabrata. Transmission chambers were constructed of clear polyvinyl chloride pipe covered with a black sleeve to exclude light. Snails were constrained within the chamber to prevent movement, while permitting the cercariae to swim freely. A trial consisted of 2 infected B. glabrata shedding E. caproni cercariae placed at the center of the chamber with 5 uninfected B. glabrata placed 10 cm above and below the shedding snails as sentinels. Three experiments, consisting of 12 trials each, were conducted under the following lighting conditions, i.e., above and below the transmission chamber, and in complete darkness. In all 3 experiments, the proportion of metacercariae was significantly higher in snails at the top of the chamber. The results suggest that a negative geotaxis is the primary factor in the initial dispersal of E. caproni cercariae. Coupling negative geotaxis and positive phototaxis (light from above) resulted in a significantly higher proportion of metacercariae in sentinel snails at the top of the transmission chamber when corrected for cercarial density. There was no significant difference in the proportion of metacercariae in snails at the top or bottom of the transmission chamber with light at the bottom of the chamber or in complete darkness. Cercariae of E. caproni only respond to light in context, i.e., from above, and ignore the light stimulus when it comes from an unexpected location (bottom of the water column). Significantly greater numbers of cercariae were released from shedding snails when light was present, suggesting that emergence of cercariae from B. glabrata is dependent on light regardless of the position of the light source.

  18. Molecular evidence supports an african affinity of the neotropical freshwater gastropod, Biomphalaria glabrata, say 1818, an intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, G; Jones, C S; Lockyer, A E; Hughes, S; Brown, D; Noble, L R; Rollinson, D

    2000-01-01

    Freshwater snails of the genus Biomphalaria, Preston 1910, are the most important and widely distributed intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, the blood fluke responsible for human intestinal schistosomiasis, in Africa and the Neotropics. S. mansoni is thought to have been imported repeatedly into the Americas during the last 500 years with the African slave trade. Surprisingly considering that the New and Old World separated 95-106 million years (Myr) ago, the disease rapidly became established due to the presence of endemic susceptible hosts. Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships within Biomphalaria may provide insights into the successful intercontinental spread of S. mansoni. Parsimony and distance analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear sequences show African taxa to be monophyletic and Neotropical species paraphyletic, with Biomphalaria glabrata forming a separate clade from other Neotropical Biomphalaria, and ancestral to the African taxa. A west to east trans-Atlantic dispersal of a B. glabrata-like taxon, possibly as recently as the Plio-Pleistocene (1.8-3.6 Myr ago) according to a general mitochondrial clock, would fit these observations. Vicariance or an African origin for B. glabrata followed by multiple introductions to South America over the past 500 years with the African slave trade seem unlikely explanations. Knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships among important intermediate host species may prove useful in furthering control measures which exploit genetic differences in susceptibility to parasites, and in elucidating the evolution of schistosome resistance. PMID:11133023

  19. Epigenetic modulation, stress and plasticity in susceptibility of the snail host, Biomphalaria glabrata, to Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Knight, Matty; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Arican-Goktas, Halime D; Bridger, Joanna M

    2016-06-01

    Blood flukes are the causative agent of schistosomiasis - a major neglected tropical disease that remains endemic in numerous countries of the tropics and sub-tropics. During the past decade, a concerted effort has been made to control the spread of schistosomiasis, using a drug intervention program aimed at curtailing transmission. These efforts notwithstanding, schistosomiasis has re-emerged in southern Europe, raising concerns that global warming could contribute to the spread of this disease to higher latitude countries where transmission presently does not take place. Vaccines against schistosomiasis are not currently available and reducing transmission by drug intervention programs alone does not prevent reinfection in treated populations. These challenges have spurred awareness that new interventions to control schistosomiasis are needed, especially since the World Health Organization hopes to eradicate the disease by 2025. For one of the major species of human schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of hepatointestinal schistosomiasis in Africa and the Western Hemisphere, freshwater snails of the genus Biomphalaria serve as the obligate intermediate host of this parasite. To determine mechanisms that underlie parasitism by S. mansoni of Biomphalaria glabrata, which might be manipulated to block the development of intramolluscan larval stages of the parasite, we focused effort on the impact of schistosome infection on the epigenome of the snail. Results to date reveal a complex relationship, manifested by the ability of the schistosome to manipulate the snail genome, including the expression of specific genes. Notably, the parasite subverts the stress response of the host to ensure productive parasitism. Indeed, in isolates of B. glabrata native to central and South America, susceptible to infection with S. mansoni, the heat shock protein 70 (Bg-HSP70) gene of this snail is rapidly relocated in the nucleus and transcribed to express HSP70

  20. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida glabrata species complex, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis species complex and Candida tropicalis causing invasive candidiasis in China: 3 year national surveillance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Fan, Xin; Chen, Sharon C-A; Wang, He; Sun, Zi-Yong; Liao, Kang; Chen, Shu-Lan; Yan, Yan; Kang, Mei; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Hu, Tie-Shi; Ni, Yu-Xing; Zou, Gui-Ling; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-03-01

    To define the antifungal susceptibility patterns of the most common non-albicans Candida spp. in China. We evaluated the susceptibilities to nine antifungal drugs of Candida parapsilosis species complex, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata species complex and Candida krusei isolates from patients with invasive candidiasis at 11 hospitals over 3 years. Isolates were identified by MALDI-TOF MS supplemented by DNA sequencing. MICs were determined by Sensititre YeastOne(TM) using current clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cut-off values to assign susceptibility (or WT), and by CLSI M44-A2 disc diffusion for fluconazole and voriconazole. Of 1072 isolates, 392 (36.6%) were C. parapsilosis species complex. C. tropicalis, C. glabrata species complex and C. krusei comprised 35.4%, 24.3% and 3.7% of the isolates, respectively. Over 99.3% of the isolates were of WT phenotype to amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. Susceptibility/WT rates to azoles among C. parapsilosis species complex were ≥97.5%. However, 11.6% and 9.5% of C. tropicalis isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively (7.1% were resistant to both). Approximately 14.3% of C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates (n = 258) were fluconazole resistant, and 11.6% of C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates were cross-resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. All C. krusei isolates were susceptible/WT to voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole. Overall, 97.7%-100% of isolates were susceptible to caspofungin, micafungin and anidulafungin, but 2.3% of C. glabrata were non-susceptible to anidulafungin. There was no azole/echinocandin co-resistance. Disc diffusion and Sensititre YeastOne(TM) methods showed >95% categorical agreement for fluconazole and voriconazole. In summary, reduced azole susceptibility was seen among C. tropicalis. Resistance to echinocandins was uncommon. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  1. Application of response surface methodology in medium optimization for pyruvic acid production of Torulopsis glabrata TP19 in batch fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Gao, Nian-fa

    2007-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the fermentation medium for enhancing pyruvic acid production by Torulopsis glabrata TP19. In the first step of optimization, with Plackett-Burman design, ammonium sulfate, glucose and nicotinic acid were found to be the important factors affecting pyruvic acid production significantly. In the second step, a 23 full factorial central composite design and RSM were applied to determine the optimal concentration of each significant variable. A second-order polynomial was determined by the multiple regression analysis of the experimental data. The optimum values for the critical components were obtained as follows: ammonium sulfate 0.7498 (10.75 g/L), glucose 0.9383 (109.38 g/L) and nicotinic acid 0.3633 (7.86 mg/L) with a predicted value of maximum pyruvic acid production of 42.2 g/L. Under the optimal conditions, the practical pyruvic acid production was 42.4 g/L. The determination coefficient (R2) was 0.9483, which ensures adequate credibility of the model. By scaling up fermentation from flask to jar fermentor, we obtained promising results. PMID:17266184

  2. Bioactivity Evaluation of Plant Extracts Used in Indigenous Medicine against the Snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, and the Larvae of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Edilson Alves; de Carvalho, Cenira M.; Costa, Ana L. S.; Conceição, Adilva S.; Moura, Flávia de B. Prado; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the molluscicidal and larvicidal activity of eight plants that are used in the traditional medicine of the Pankararé indigenous people in the Raso da Catarina region, Bahia state, Brazil. The tested plants were chosen based on the results of previous studies. Only those plants that were used either as insect repellents or to treat intestinal parasitic infections were included in the study. Crude extracts (CEs) of these plants were tested for their larvicidal activity (against Aedes aegypti larvae in the fourth instar) and molluscicidal activity (against the snail Biomphalaria glabrata). The plant species Scoparia dulcis and Helicteres velutina exhibited the best larvicidal activities (LC50 83.426 mg/L and LC50 138.896 mg/L, resp.), and Poincianella pyramidalis, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Mimosa tenuiflora presented the best molluscicidal activities (LC50 0.94 mg/L, LC50 13.51 mg/L, and LC50 20.22 mg/L, resp.). As we used crude extracts as the tested materials, further study is warranted to isolate and purify the most active compounds. PMID:22194773

  3. Acetylcholine-binding protein in the hemolymph of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata is a pentagonal dodecahedron (60 subunits).

    PubMed

    Saur, Michael; Moeller, Vanessa; Kapetanopoulos, Katharina; Braukmann, Sandra; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Tenzer, Stefan; Markl, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) play important neurophysiological roles and are of considerable medical relevance. They have been studied extensively, greatly facilitated by the gastropod acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBP) which represent soluble structural and functional homologues of the ligand-binding domain of nAChR. All these proteins are ring-like pentamers. Here we report that AChBP exists in the hemolymph of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata (vector of the schistosomiasis parasite) as a regular pentagonal dodecahedron, 22 nm in diameter (12 pentamers, 60 active sites). We sequenced and recombinantly expressed two ∼25 kDa polypeptides (BgAChBP1 and BgAChBP2) with a specific active site, N-glycan site and disulfide bridge variation. We also provide the exon/intron structures. Recombinant BgAChBP1 formed pentamers and dodecahedra, recombinant BgAChBP2 formed pentamers and probably disulfide-bridged di-pentamers, but not dodecahedra. Three-dimensional electron cryo-microscopy (3D-EM) yielded a 3D reconstruction of the dodecahedron with a resolution of 6 Å. Homology models of the pentamers docked to the 6 Å structure revealed opportunities for chemical bonding at the inter-pentamer interfaces. Definition of the ligand-binding pocket and the gating C-loop in the 6 Å structure suggests that 3D-EM might lead to the identification of functional states in the BgAChBP dodecahedron.

  4. A Shift from Cellular to Humoral Responses Contributes to Innate Immune Memory in the Vector Snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, Silvain; Portela, Julien; Duval, David; Nowacki, Fanny C; Olive, Marie-Aude; Allienne, Jean-François; Galinier, Richard; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries made over the past ten years have provided evidence that invertebrate antiparasitic responses may be primed in a sustainable manner, leading to the failure of a secondary encounter with the same pathogen. This phenomenon called "immune priming" or "innate immune memory" was mainly phenomenological. The demonstration of this process remains to be obtained and the underlying mechanisms remain to be discovered and exhaustively tested with rigorous functional and molecular methods, to eliminate all alternative explanations. In order to achieve this ambitious aim, the present study focuses on the Lophotrochozoan snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, in which innate immune memory was recently reported. We provide herein the first evidence that a shift from a cellular immune response (encapsulation) to a humoral immune response (biomphalysin) occurs during the development of innate memory. The molecular characterisation of this process in Biomphalaria/Schistosoma system was undertaken to reconcile mechanisms with phenomena, opening the way to a better comprehension of innate immune memory in invertebrates. This prompted us to revisit the artificial dichotomy between innate and memory immunity in invertebrate systems.

  5. A Shift from Cellular to Humoral Responses Contributes to Innate Immune Memory in the Vector Snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Pinaud, Silvain; Portela, Julien; Duval, David; Nowacki, Fanny C.; Olive, Marie-Aude; Allienne, Jean-François; Galinier, Richard; Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries made over the past ten years have provided evidence that invertebrate antiparasitic responses may be primed in a sustainable manner, leading to the failure of a secondary encounter with the same pathogen. This phenomenon called “immune priming” or "innate immune memory" was mainly phenomenological. The demonstration of this process remains to be obtained and the underlying mechanisms remain to be discovered and exhaustively tested with rigorous functional and molecular methods, to eliminate all alternative explanations. In order to achieve this ambitious aim, the present study focuses on the Lophotrochozoan snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, in which innate immune memory was recently reported. We provide herein the first evidence that a shift from a cellular immune response (encapsulation) to a humoral immune response (biomphalysin) occurs during the development of innate memory. The molecular characterisation of this process in Biomphalaria/Schistosoma system was undertaken to reconcile mechanisms with phenomena, opening the way to a better comprehension of innate immune memory in invertebrates. This prompted us to revisit the artificial dichotomy between innate and memory immunity in invertebrate systems. PMID:26735307

  6. Antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles in combination with nystatin and chlorhexidine digluconate against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Sónia; Negri, Melyssa; Gorup, Luiz F; de Camargo, Emerson R; Oliveira, Rosário; Barbosa, Debora B; Henriques, Mariana

    2013-11-01

    Although silver nanoparticles (SN) have been investigated as an alternative to conventional antifungal drugs in the control of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, the antifungal activity of SN in combination with antifungal drugs against Candida biofilms remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of SN in combination with nystatin (NYT) or chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms. The drugs alone or combined with SN were applied on mature Candida biofilms (48 h), and after 24 h of treatment their antibiofilm activities were assessed by total biomass quantification (by crystal violet staining) and colony forming units enumeration. The structure of Candida biofilms was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The data indicated that SN combined with either NYT or CHG demonstrated synergistic antibiofilm activity, and this activity was dependent on the species and on the drug concentrations used. SEM images showed that some drug combinations were able to disrupt Candida biofilms. The results of this study suggest that the combination of SN with NYT or CHG may have clinical implications in the treatment of denture stomatitis. However, further studies are needed before recommending the use of these drugs safely in clinical situations.

  7. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  8. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  9. Carbohydrates of the Organic Shell Matrix and the Shell-Forming Tissue of the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say).

    PubMed

    Marxen, J C; Hammer, M; Gehrke, T; Becker, W

    1998-04-01

    Sulfated carbohydrates may play a role in the biomineralization of the molluscan shell. The carbohydrates of the extracted water-insoluble organic shell matrix (IM) of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata were identified as glucose, mannose, galactose, and N-acetyl-glucosamine, whereas the water-soluble organic matrix (SM) additionally contained N-acetyl-galactosamine. A specific lectin binding pattern of the matrix was obtained. One prominent protein of the SM, with a size of 19.6 kDa and a pI of 7.4, was shown to be a glycoprotein with terminal glucosyl or mannosyl moieties. The acidic constitutents of the matrix showed a variety of possible terminal sugars, indicating a heterogenous mixture of proteoglycans or glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and glycoproteins. At the shell-forming mantle edge, an alcian-blue-positive material was observed in the periostracum groove (PG), the belt, and apically in the cells of the outer mantle epithelium (OME). With the help of lectins, all sugars in question were detected in the PG and the belt, whereas the OME was bound by glucose/mannose- and GlcNac-specific lectins only. Although the complete set of GAGs will be produced in the PG and the belt, a very acidic fraction of GAGs and the 19.6-kDa protein can also be delivered by the OME.

  10. Localization of carbohydrate determinants common to Biomphalaria glabrata as well as to sporocysts and miracidia of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Lehr, T; Beuerlein, K; Doenhoff, M J; Grevelding, C G; Geyer, R

    2008-07-01

    The presence of antigenic carbohydrate epitopes shared by Biomphalaria glabrata as well as by the sporocysts and miracidia representing snail-pathogenic larval stages of Schistosoma mansoni was assayed by immunohistochemical staining of paraformaldehyde-fixed tissues. To this end, both polyclonal rabbit antiserum raised against soluble egg antigens (SEA) of S. mansoni and monoclonal antibodies recognizing the carbohydrate epitopes LDN [GalNAc(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-)], F-LDN [Fuc(alpha1-3)GalNAc(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-)], LDN-F [GalNAc(beta1-4)[Fuc(alpha1-3)]GlcNAc(beta1-)], LDN-DF [GalNAc(beta1-4)[Fuc(alpha1-2)Fuc(alpha1-3)]GlcNAc(beta1-)] and Lewis X [Gal(beta1-4)[Fuc(alpha1-3)]GlcNAc(beta1-)] were used. Intriguingly, anti-SEA serum as well as anti-F-LDN antibodies displayed significant binding in the foot region, anterior tissue and the hepatopancreas of uninfected snails, whereas the Lewis X epitope was only weakly detectable in the latter tissue. In contrast, increased binding of antibodies recognizing LDN, LDN-F and LDN-DF was observed in infected snail tissue, in particular in regions involved in sporocystogenesis, in addition to an enhanced binding of anti-SEA serum and antibodies reacting with F-LDN. A pronounced expression of most of these carbohydrate antigens was also observed at the surface of miracidia. Hence, the detection of shared carbohydrate determinants in uninfected snail tissue, sporocysts and miracidia may support the hypothesis of carbohydrate-based molecular mimicry as a survival strategy of S. mansoni.

  11. Surface membrane proteins of Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic cells bind fucosyl determinants on the tegumental surface of Schistosoma mansoni primary sporocysts.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Maria G; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Dinguirard, Nathalie; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2007-08-01

    Previous observations that in vitro adherence of Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic (Bge) cells to sporocyst larval stages of Schistosoma mansoni was strongly inhibited by fucoidan, a sulfated polymer of L-fucose, suggested a role for lectinlike Bge cell receptors in sporocyst binding interactions. In the present investigation, monoclonal antibodies with specificities to 3 major glycan determinants found on schistosomes, LacdiNAc, fucosylated LacdiNAc (LDNF), and the Lewis X antigen, were used in adhesion blocking studies to further analyze the molecular interactions at the host-parasite interface. Results showed that only the anti-LDNF antibody significantly reduced snail Bge cell adhesion to the surface of sporocysts, suggesting that fucosyl determinants may be important in larval-host cell interactions. Affinity chromatographic separation of fucosyl-reactive Bge cell proteins from fucoidan-bound Sepharose 4B revealed the presence of polypeptides ranging from 6 to 200 kDa after elution with fucoidan-containing buffer. Pre-elution of the Bge protein-bound affinity column with dextran (Dex) and dextran sulfate (DexS) before introduction of the fucoidan buffer served as controls for protein binding based on nonspecific sugar or negative charge interactions. A subset of polypeptides (approximately 35-150 kDa) released by fucoidan elution was identified as Bge surface membrane proteins, representing putative fucosyl-binding proteins. Far-western blot analysis also demonstrated binding reactivity between Bge cell and sporocyst tegumental proteins. The finding that several of these parasite-binding Bge cell proteins were also fucoidan-reactive suggests the possible involvement of these molecules in mediating cellular interactions with sporocyst tegumental carbohydrates. It is concluded that Bge cells have surface protein(s) that may be playing a role in facilitating host cell adhesion to the surface of schistosome primary sporocysts through larval fucosylated

  12. Identification of genetic markers of resistance to echinocandins, azoles and 5-fluorocytosine in Candida glabrata by next-generation sequencing: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, C; Chen, S C-A; Halliday, C; Kennedy, K; Playford, E G; Marriott, D J; Slavin, M A; Sorrell, T C; Sintchenko, V

    2017-09-01

    Multi-antifungal drug resistance in Candida glabrata is increasing. We examined the feasibility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to investigate the presence of antifungal drug resistance markers in C. glabrata. The antifungal susceptibility of 12 clinical isolates and one ATCC strain of C. glabrata was determined using the Sensititre YeastOne(®) YO10 assay. These included three isolate pairs where the second isolate of each pair had developed a rise in drug MICs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to be linked to echinocandin, azole and 5-fluorocytosine resistance were analysed in all isolates through NGS. High-quality non-synonymous SNPs in antifungal resistance genes such as FKS1, FKS2, CgCDR1, CgPDR1 and FCY2 were identified. For two of three isolate pairs, there was a >60-fold rise in MICs to all echinocandins in the second isolate from each pair; one echinocandin-resistant isolate harboured a mutation in FKS1 (S629P) and the other in FKS2 (S663P). Of the third pair, both the 5-fluorocytosine-susceptible, and resistant isolates had a mutation in FCY2 (A237T). SNPs in CgPDR1 were found in pan-azole-resistant isolates. SNPs in other genes linked to azole resistance (CgCDR1, ERG9 and CgFLR1) were present in both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant isolates. SNPs were also identified in Candida adhesin genes EPA1, EPA6, PWP2 and PWP5 but their presence was not associated with higher drug MICs. Genome-wide analysis of antifungal resistance markers was feasible and simultaneously revealed mutation patterns of genes implicated in resistance to different antifungal drug classes. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  14. Assessment of caspofungin susceptibility of Candida glabrata by the Etest®, CLSI, and EUCAST methods, and detection of FKS1 and FKS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, N; Laurens, C; Bertout, S; Balard, Y; Krasteva, D; Rispail, P; Lachaud, L

    2014-07-01

    Candida glabrata has emerged as a major pathogen in invasive candidiasis in recent years. Currently, guidelines for invasive candidiasis treatment recommend fluconazole or an echinocandin as the first-line therapy. Nevertheless, the resistance of Candida glabrata to echinocandin is an emerging problem and has been partly associated with mutations in the FKS1 and FKS2 genes. The Etest® is an appropriate method for determining antifungal susceptibility in emergency routine diagnosis. In this work, we evaluated the reliability of the Etest® in comparison with the two reference broth microdilution methods, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST), to assess the caspofungin resistance of 193 isolates of Candida glabrata. The interpretation of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values was also discussed according to different breakpoints. Moreover, FKS1 and FKS2 mutations were investigated for isolates with high MICs. Our results showed that the MIC50 value was similar to the MIC90 value for each method. The Etest® method showed the lowest MIC values, whereas EUCAST presented the highest. Categorical agreement between the Etest® and CLSI methods was 100 % and 36 % using the breakpoints proposed by Arendrup et al. (Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56(7):3965-3968, 2012) and Pfaller et al. (Int J Antimicrob Agents 38(1):65-69, 2011), respectively. Two isolates showed high MIC values with the three methods and both presented FKS2 mutations. A novel FKS2 mutation was also reported for one isolate. Future epidemiological studies should also evaluate the reliability of the Etest® to detect echinocandin resistance, as it remains a routine method.

  15. De Novo Acquisition of Resistance to SCY-078 in Candida glabrata Involves FKS Mutations That both Overlap and Are Distinct from Those Conferring Echinocandin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Perez, Winder B; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Perlin, David S

    2017-09-01

    SCY-078 is an orally active antifungal whose target is the β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthase (GS). We evaluated the spontaneous emergence of SCY-078-resistant Candida glabrata isolates following drug exposure in vitro Resistant isolates were analyzed using broth microdilution methodology and FKS sequencing. The kinetic inhibition parameter IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) was also determined from GS complexes. The spectrum of resistance mutations found suggested a partially overlapping but independent binding site for SCY-078 relative to echinocandins on GS. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Differentiation of Candida glabrata, C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis based on fragment length polymorphism of ITS1 and ITS2 and restriction fragment length polymorphism of ITS and D1/D2 regions in rDNA.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, H; Bruun, B; Schønheyder, H C; Christensen, J J; Fuursted, K; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Johansen, H K; Nielsen, L; Knudsen, J D; Arendrup, M C

    2011-11-01

    Different molecular methods for the discrimination of Candida glabrata, C. bracarensis and C. nivariensis were evaluated and the prevalence of these species among Danish blood isolates investigated. Control strains were used to determine fragment length polymorphism in the ITS1, ITS2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions and in the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA using primers designed for this study. A total of 133 blood isolates previously identified as C. glabrata were examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and the peptide nucleic acid-fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method. The size of ITS1 allowed differentiation between C. glabrata (483), C. nivariensis (361) and C. bracarensis (385), whereas the ITS2 region was of similar size in C. nivariensis (417) and C. glabrata (418). Sequence analysis of the ITS region suggested that many restriction enzymes were suitable for RFLP differentiation of the species. Enzymatic digestion of the D1/D2 domain with TatI produced unique band sizes for each of the three species. PCR-RFLP and PNA-FISH were in agreement for all of the isolates tested. None of the 133 Danish blood isolates were C. nivariensis or C. bracarensis. Fragment size polymorphism of ITS1 and RFLP of the D1/D2 domain or the ITS region are useful methods for the differentiation of the species within the C. glabrata group. C. bracarensis and C. nivariensis are rare among Danish C. glabrata blood isolates.

  17. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  18. The Candida genome database incorporates multiple Candida species: multispecies search and analysis tools with curated gene and protein information for Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Diane O; Arnaud, Martha B; Binkley, Jonathan; Shah, Prachi; Skrzypek, Marek S; Wymore, Farrell; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, http://www.candidagenome.org/) is an internet-based resource that provides centralized access to genomic sequence data and manually curated functional information about genes and proteins of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and other Candida species. As the scope of Candida research, and the number of sequenced strains and related species, has grown in recent years, the need for expanded genomic resources has also grown. To answer this need, CGD has expanded beyond storing data solely for C. albicans, now integrating data from multiple species. Herein we describe the incorporation of this multispecies information, which includes curated gene information and the reference sequence for C. glabrata, as well as orthology relationships that interconnect Locus Summary pages, allowing easy navigation between genes of C. albicans and C. glabrata. These orthology relationships are also used to predict GO annotations of their products. We have also added protein information pages that display domains, structural information and physicochemical properties; bibliographic pages highlighting important topic areas in Candida biology; and a laboratory strain lineage page that describes the lineage of commonly used laboratory strains. All of these data are freely available at http://www.candidagenome.org/. We welcome feedback from the research community at candida-curator@lists.stanford.edu.

  19. Isolation of Candida glabrata Homologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRE9 and KNH1 Genes and Their Involvement in Cell Wall β-1,6-Glucan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagahashi, Shigehisa; Lussier, Marc; Bussey, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The Candida glabrata KRE9 (CgKRE9) and KNH1 (CgKNH1) genes have been isolated as multicopy suppressors of the tetracycline-sensitive growth of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with the disrupted KNH1 locus and the KRE9 gene placed under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. Although a cgknh1Δ mutant showed no phenotype beyond slightly increased sensitivity to the K1 killer toxin, disruption of CgKRE9 resulted in several phenotypes similar to those of the S. cerevisiae kre9Δ null mutant: a severe growth defect on glucose medium, resistance to the K1 killer toxin, a 50% reduction of β-1,6-glucan, and the presence of aggregates of cells with abnormal morphology on glucose medium. Replacement in C. glabrata of the cognate CgKRE9 promoter with the tetracycline-responsive promoter in a cgknh1Δ background rendered cell growth tetracycline sensitive on media containing glucose or galactose. cgkre9Δ cells were shown to be sensitive to calcofluor white specifically on glucose medium. In cgkre9 mutants grown on glucose medium, cellular chitin levels were massively increased. PMID:9748432

  20. Evaluation of a linear spectral mixture model and vegetation indices (NDVI and EVI) in a study of schistosomiasis mansoni and Biomphalaria glabrata distribution in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Ricardo J P S; Freitas, Corina C; Dutra, Luciano V; Scholte, Ronaldo G C; Amaral, Ronaldo S; Drummond, Sandra C; Shimabukuro, Yosio E; Oliveira, Guilherme C; Carvalho, Omar S

    2010-07-01

    This paper analyses the associations between Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) on the prevalence of schistosomiasis and the presence of Biomphalaria glabrata in the state of Minas Gerais (MG), Brazil. Additionally, vegetation, soil and shade fraction images were created using a Linear Spectral Mixture Model (LSMM) from the blue, red and infrared channels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer spaceborne sensor and the relationship between these images and the prevalence of schistosomiasis and the presence of B. glabrata was analysed. First, we found a high correlation between the vegetation fraction image and EVI and second, a high correlation between soil fraction image and NDVI. The results also indicate that there was a positive correlation between prevalence and the vegetation fraction image (July 2002), a negative correlation between prevalence and the soil fraction image (July 2002) and a positive correlation between B. glabrata and the shade fraction image (July 2002). This paper demonstrates that the LSMM variables can be used as a substitute for the standard vegetation indices (EVI and NDVI) to determine and delimit risk areas for B. glabrata and schistosomiasis in MG, which can be used to improve the allocation of resources for disease control.

  1. Rapid detection and identification of Candida albicans and Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata in clinical specimens by species-specific nested PCR amplification of a cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (L1A1) gene fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Burgener-Kairuz, P; Zuber, J P; Jaunin, P; Buchman, T G; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1994-01-01

    PCR of a Candida albicans cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (P450-L1A1) gene segment is a rapid and sensitive method of detection in clinical specimens. This enzyme is a target for azole antifungal action. In order to directly detect and identify the clinically most important species of Candida, we cloned and sequenced 1.3-kbp fragments of the cytochrome P450-L1A1 genes from Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata and from Candida krusei. These segments were compared with the published sequences from C. albicans and Candida tropicalis. Amplimers for gene sequences highly conserved throughout the fungal kingdom were first used; positive PCR results were obtained for C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, Candida parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Trichosporon beigelii DNA extracts. Primers were then selected for a highly variable region of the gene, allowing the species-specific detection from purified DNA of C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. The assay sensitivity as tested for C. albicans in seeded clinical specimens such as blood, peritoneal fluid, or urine was 10 to 20 cells per 0.1 ml. Compared with results obtained by culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the species-specific nested PCR tested with 80 clinical specimens were 71, 95, and 83% for C. albicans and 100, 97, and 98% for T. glabrata, respectively. Images PMID:7989540

  2. [Comparison of microdilution and disk diffusion methods for the detection of fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibility against clinical Candida glabrata isolates and determination of changing susceptibility with new CLSI breakpoints].

    PubMed

    Hazırolan, Gülşen; Sarıbaş, Zeynep; Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated species as the causative agent of Candida infections. However, in recent years, the isolation rate of non-albicans Candida species have increased. In many centers, Candida glabrata is one of the commonly isolated non-albicans species of C.glabrata infections which are difficult-to-treat due to decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and cross-resistance to other azoles. The aims of this study were to determine the in vitro susceptibility profiles of clinical C.glabrata isolates against fluconazole and voriconazole by microdilution and disk diffusion methods and to evaluate the results with both the previous (CLSI) and current species-specific CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) clinical breakpoints. A total of 70 C.glabrata strains isolated from clinical samples were included in the study. The identification of the isolates was performed by morphologic examination on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and assimilation profiles obtained by using ID32C (BioMérieux, France). Broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods were performed according to CLSI M27-A3 and CLSI M44-A2 documents, respectively. The results were evaluated according to CLSI M27-A3 and M44-A2 documents and new vs. species-specific CLSI breakpoints. By using both previous and new CLSI breakpoints, broth microdilution test results showed that voriconazole has greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against C.glabrata isolates. For the two drugs tested, very major error was not observed with disk diffusion method when microdilution method was considered as the reference method. Since "susceptible" category no more exists for fluconazole vs. C.glabrata, the isolates that were interpreted as susceptible by previous breakpoints were evaluated as susceptible-dose dependent by current CLSI breakpoints. Since species-specific breakpoints remain yet undetermined for voriconazole, comparative analysis was not possible for this agent. The results obtained

  3. Comparison of genome engineering using the CRISPR-Cas9 system in C. glabrata wild-type and lig4 strains.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yuke; Timmermans, Bea; Souffriau, Ben; Thevelein, Johan M; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in North America and is threatening patients all over the world. Its incidence is rising, while it has developed resistance to the most widely used antifungal drugs, necessitating new approaches based on better insight into the biology of the organism. Despite its close phylogenetic relationship with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, generating precise genomic alterations in this species is problematic. Previously we have shown that deletion of LIG4, which encodes an enzyme involved in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ), strongly enhances the probability of obtaining correctly modified transformants. In this work we used the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system to genetically engineer the C. glabrata genome, targeting the genes ADE2, MET15 and SOK2, located on different chromosomes. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to replace the open reading frame (ORF) by the SAT1 selective marker or introduced a premature stop codon in ADE2 and MET15, as they are easily scored by their adenine or methionine auxotrophy, respectively. The SOK2 gene was modified by insertion of a triple HA-tag sequence and the transformants were verified in a western blot. The CRISPR-Cas9 mediated targeting efficiency varies depending on the gene targeted and the genetic modification performed. We show that CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing is more efficient than the conventional method in the wild-type strain, moreover it has the big advantage being marker-free. In previous work, we showed that the targeting efficiency is highly increased in the lig4Δ strain using the conventional way to delete genes in C. glabrata. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system in this strain, the percentage of correct transformants is consistently higher compared to the wild-type strain. This indicates that using the lig4 mutant as such is already a strong

  4. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  5. Multifunctional role of β-1, 3 glucan binding protein purified from the haemocytes of blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus and in vitro antibacterial activity of its reaction product.

    PubMed

    Anjugam, Mahalingam; Iswarya, Arokiadhas; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2016-01-01

    β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (β-GBP) was isolated from the haemocytes of blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus and purified by laminarin coupled Sephadex G-100 affinity column chromatography. The purified β-GBP has the molecular mass of 100 kDa, confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The X-ray diffraction analysis of purified β-GBP indicates the crystalline nature of the protein and also the presence of single peak confirming the existence of β-glucan molecule. The results of agglutination assay showed that the purified β-GBP had the ability to agglutinate with yeast cell, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian erythrocytes. β-GBP can agglutinate with yeast cells at the concentration of 50 μg/ml. The phagocytic and encapsulation activity of purified β-GBP from P. pelagicus was determined with yeast cell S. cerevisiae and sepharose bead suspension respectively. This reveals that, β-GBP have the ability to detect the pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMP) found on the surface of fungi and bacteria. The recognition of invading foreign substances and in the involvement of functional activities induces the activation of prophenoloxidase. This revealed that β-GBP play a major role in the innate immune system of crustaceans by stimulating the prophenoloxidase system. Moreover, it was obvious to note that β-GBP reaction product exhibited antibacterial and antibiofilm activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. This study concludes the functional aspects of β-GBP purified from P. pelagicus and its vital role in the stimulation of prophenoloxidase cascade during the pathogenic infection.

  6. Candida glabrata PDR1, a Transcriptional Regulator of a Pleiotropic Drug Resistance Network, Mediates Azole Resistance in Clinical Isolates and Petite Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Huei-Fung; Krol, Anna A.; Sarti, Kelly E.; Bennett, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a yeast with intrinsically low susceptibility to azoles, frequently develops increased azole resistance during prolonged treatment. Transposon mutagenesis revealed that disruption of CgPDR1 resulted in an 8- to 16-fold increase in fluconazole susceptibility of C. glabrata. CgPDR1 is a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PDR1, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of multidrug transporters. Northern blot analyses indicated that CgPDR1 regulated both constitutive and drug-induced expression of CgCDR1, a multidrug transporter gene. In agreement with the Northern analysis, the Cgpdr1 mutant had increased rhodamine accumulation, in contrast to the decreased accumulation in the CgPDR1-overexpressing strain. Northern analyses also indicated the importance of CgPDR1 in fluconazole resistance arising during therapy. Two clinically resistant isolates had higher expression of CgPDR1 and CgCDR1 compared to their paired susceptible isolates. Integrative transformation of CgPDR1 from the two resistant isolates converted the Cgpdr1 mutant into azole-resistant strains with upregulated CgPDR1 expression. Two different amino acid substitutions, W297S in one isolate and F575L in the other, accounted for the upregulated CgPDR1 expression and the resistance. Finally, CgPDR1 was shown to be required for the azole resistance due to mitochondrial deficiency. Thus, CgPDR1 encodes a transcriptional regulator of a pleiotropic drug resistance network and contributes to the azole resistance of clinical isolates and petite mutants. PMID:16569856

  7. Detection of early effects of a single herbicide (diuron) and a mix of herbicides and pharmaceuticals (diuron, isoproturon, ibuprofen) on immunological parameters of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) spat.

    PubMed

    Luna-Acosta, A; Renault, T; Thomas-Guyon, H; Faury, N; Saulnier, D; Budzinski, H; Le Menach, K; Pardon, P; Fruitier-Arnaudin, I; Bustamante, P

    2012-06-01

    In the context of massive summer mortality events of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, the aim of this study was to investigate the early effects on genes, enzymes and haemocyte parameters implicated in immune defence mechanisms in C. gigas oysters exposed to a potentially hostile environment, i.e. to an herbicide alone or within a mixture. Following 2 h of exposure to the herbicide diuron at 1 μg L(-1), the repression of different genes implicated in immune defence mechanisms in the haemocytes and the inhibition of enzyme activities, such as laccase-type phenoloxidase (PO) in the plasma, were observed. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the plasma was also observed after 6 and 24 h of exposure. In the mixture with the herbicides diuron and isoproturon, and the pharmaceutical ibuprofen, catecholase-type PO activity in the plasma and the percentage of phagocytosis in the haemocytes were reduced after 6 h of exposure. Our results showed that early effects on molecular, biochemical and cellular parameters can be detected in the presence of diuron alone or within a mixture, giving an insight of its potential effect in situations that can be found in natural environments, i.e. relatively high concentrations for short periods of time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A systematic analysis reveals an essential role for high-affinity iron uptake system, haemolysin and CFEM domain-containing protein in iron homoeostasis and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Suneetha, Korivi Jyothiraj; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms and human pathogens employ a battery of factors to scavenge iron from the high-affinity iron-binding host proteins. In the present study, we have elucidated, via a candidate gene approach, major iron acquisition and homoeostatic mechanisms operational in an opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Phenotypic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a set of 13 C. glabrata strains, deleted for proteins potentially implicated in iron metabolism, revealed that the high-affinity reductive iron uptake system is required for utilization of alternate carbon sources and for growth under both in vitro iron-limiting and in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the cysteine-rich CFEM (common in fungal extracellular membranes) domain-containing cell wall structural protein, CgCcw14, and a putative haemolysin, CgMam3, are essential for maintenance of intracellular iron content, adherence to epithelial cells and virulence. Consistent with their roles in iron homoeostasis, mitochondrial aconitase activity was lower and higher in mutants disrupted for high-affinity iron transport, and haemolysin respectively. Additionally, we present evidence that the mitochondrial frataxin, CgYfh1, is pivotal to iron metabolism. Besides yielding insights into major in vitro and in vivo iron acquisition strategies, our findings establish high-affinity iron uptake mechanisms as critical virulence determinants in C. glabrata.

  9. Using lysosomal membrane stability of haemocytes in Ruditapes philippinarum as a biomarker of cellular stress to assess contamination by caffeine, ibuprofen, carbamazepine and novobiocin.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Martínez, Gabriela V; Buratti, Sara; Fabbr, Elena; DelValls, Angel T; Martín-Díaz, M Laura

    2013-07-01

    Although pharmaceuticals have been detected in the environment only in the range from ng/L to microg/L, it has been demonstrated that they can adversely affect the health status of aquatic organisms. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) has previously been applied as an indicator of cellular well-being to determine health status in bivalve mussels. The objective of this study is to evaluate LMS in Ruditapes philippinarum haemolymph using the neutral red retention assay (NRRA). Clams were exposed in laboratory conditions to caffeine (0.1, 5, 15, 50 microg/L), ibuprofen (0.1, 5, 10, 50 microg/L), carbamazepine and novobiocin (both at 0.1, 1, 10, 50 microg/L) for 35 days. Results show a dose-dependent effect of the pharmaceuticals. The neutral red retention time measured at the end of the bioassay was significantly reduced by 50% after exposure to environmental concentrations (p < 0.05) (caffeine = 15 microg/L; ibuprofen = 10 microg/L; carbamazepine = 1 microg/L and novobiocin = 1 microg/L), compared to controls. Clams exposed to these pharmaceuticals were considered to present a diminished health status (retention time < 45 min), significantly worse than controls (96 min) (p < 0.05). The predicted no environmental effect concentration (PNEC) results showed that these pharmaceuticals are very toxic at the environmental concentrations tested. Measurement of the alteration of LMS has been found to be a sensitive technique that enables evaluation of the health status of clams after exposure to pharmaceuticals under laboratory conditions, thus representing a robust Tier-1 screening biomarker.

  10. Reduced susceptibility to polyenes associated with a missense mutation in the ERG6 gene in a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata with pseudohyphal growth.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Tronchin, Guy; Bergès, Thierry; Hennequin, Christophe; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2007-03-01

    Little information is available about the molecular mechanisms responsible for polyene resistance in pathogenic yeasts. A clinical isolate of Candida glabrata with a poor susceptibility to polyenes, as determined by disk diffusion method and confirmed by determination of MIC, was recovered from a patient treated with amphotericin B. Quantitative analysis of sterols revealed a lack of ergosterol and an accumulation of late sterol intermediates, suggesting a defect in the final steps of the ergosterol pathway. Sequencing of CgERG11, CgERG6, CgERG5, and CgERG4 genes revealed exclusively a unique missense mutation in CgERG6 leading to the substitution of a cysteine by a phenylalanine in the corresponding protein. In addition, real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated an overexpression of genes encoding enzymes involved in late steps of the ergosterol pathway. Moreover, this isolate exhibited a pseudohyphal growth whatever the culture medium used, and ultrastructural changes of the cell wall of blastoconidia were seen consisting in a thinner inner layer. Cell wall alterations were also suggested by the higher susceptibility of growing cells to Calcofluor white. Additionally, complementation of this isolate with a wild-type copy of the CgERG6 gene restored susceptibility to polyenes and a classical morphology. Together, these results demonstrated that mutation in the CgERG6 gene may lead to a reduced susceptibility to polyenes and to a pseudohyphal growth due to the subsequent changes in sterol content of the plasma membrane.

  11. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase activity and accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Many plants accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl esters to protect against abiotic and biotic stresses. Caffeoyl esters in particular can be substrates for endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Recently, we showed that perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain PPO and identified one PPO substrate, caftaric acid (trans-caffeoyl-tartaric acid). Additional compounds were believed to be cis- and trans-p-coumaroyl tartaric acid and cis- and trans-feruloyl-tartaric acid, but lack of standards prevented definitive identifications. Here we characterize enzymatic activities in peanut leaves to understand how caftaric acid and related hydroxycinnamoyl esters are made in this species. We show that peanut leaves contain a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HTT) activity capable of transferring p-coumaroyl, caffeoyl, and feruloyl moieties from CoA to tartaric acid (specific activities of 11 ± 2.8, 8 ± 1.8, 4 ± 0.8 pkat mg(-1) crude protein, respectively). The HTT activity was used to make cis- and trans-p-coumaroyl- and -feruloyl-tartaric acid in vitro. These products allowed definitive identification of the corresponding cis- and trans-hydroxycinnamoyl esters extracted from leaves. We tentatively identified sinapoyl-tartaric acid as another major phenolic compound in peanut leaves that likely participates in secondary reactions with PPO-generated quinones. These results suggest hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters are made by an acyltransferase, possibly a BAHD family member, in perennial peanut. Identification of a gene encoding HTT and further characterization of the enzyme will aid in identifying determinants of donor and acceptor substrate specificity for this important class of biosynthetic enzymes. An HTT gene could also provide a means by genetic engineering for producing caffeoyl- and other hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters in forage crops that lack them.

  12. Performance, carcass yield, and carcass quality characteristics of steers finished on rhizoma peanut (Arachis glabrata)-tropical grass pasture or concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bennett, L L; Hammond, A C; Williams, M J; Kunkle, W E; Johnson, D D; Preston, R L; Miller, M F

    1995-07-01

    Steers (n = 156) finished on rhizoma peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.)-tropical grass pasture in Florida and slaughtered at Central Packing, Center Hill were compared with steers (n = 152) finished on a concentrate diet in Texas and slaughtered at Excel, Plainview. Average daily gain during the growing and finishing periods was lower (P < .001) for forage-finished steers (.49 and .94 kg/d, respectively) than for concentrate-finished steers (.78 and 1.33 kg/d, respectively). Forage-finished steers had less fat over the ribeye (8.3 vs 11.4 mm; P < .01), lighter hot carcass weight (280 vs 346 kg; P < .001), and smaller longissimus muscle area (70.8 vs 86.6 cm2; P < .001) than concentrate-finished steers. Yield grade was not different (2.7 vs 2.6; P > .10), but quality grade was slightly better (low Select vs mid Select; P < .01) for concentrate-finished steers. Lean color of forage-finished steers was darker (P < .001) and fat of forage-finished steers had a creamier color (P < .001), but carcasses were not discounted due to yellow fat color. Shear force values were higher (6.8 vs 4.0 kg; P < .001) for forage-finished than for concentrate-finished steers. Off-flavors were detected by trained sensory panelists in 36% of forage-finished and 14% of concentrate-finished carcasses, but all at barely detectable levels. This research indicates that steers can be finished on rhizoma peanut-tropical grass pastures, but with some reduction in quality grade relative to concentrate-finished steers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H(+) Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2.

    PubMed

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H(+) Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance.

  14. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H+ Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance. PMID:27148215

  15. A paralogue of the phosphomutase-like gene family in Candida glabrata, CgPmu2, gained broad-range phosphatase activity due to a small number of clustered substitutions.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Kelly A; Iosue, Christine L; Leone, Sarah G; Davies, Danielle L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-10-15

    Inorganic phosphate is required for a range of cellular processes, such as DNA/RNA synthesis and intracellular signalling. The phosphate starvation-inducible phosphatase activity of Candida glabrata is encoded by the gene CgPMU2 (C. glabrata phosphomutase-like protein). CgPMU2 is part of a three-gene family (∼75% identical) created through gene duplication in the C. glabrata clade; only CgPmu2 is a PHO-regulated broad range acid phosphatase. We identified amino acids that confer broad range phosphatase activity on CgPmu2 by creating fusions of sections of CgPMU2 with CgPMU1, a paralogue with little broad range phosphatase activity. We used site-directed mutagenesis on various fusions to sequentially convert CgPmu1 to CgPmu2. Based on molecular modelling of the Pmu proteins on to a histidine phosphatase crystal structure, clusters of amino acids were found in two distinct regions that were able to confer phosphatase activity. Substitutions in these two regions together conferred broad phosphatase activity on CgPmu1. Interestingly, one change is a histidine adjacent to the active site histidine of CgPmu2 and it exhibits a novel ability to partially replace the conserved active site histidine in CgPmu2. Additionally, a second amino acid change was able to confer nt phosphatase activity to CgPmu1, suggesting single amino acid changes neofunctionalize CgPmu2. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  16. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns activate expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, immunity and detoxification in the amebocyte-producing organ of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Loker, Eric S.; Sullivan, John T.

    2017-01-01

    The anterior pericardial wall of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been identified as a site of hemocyte production, hence has been named the amebocyte-producing organ (APO). A number of studies have shown that exogenous abiotic and biotic substances, including pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), are able to stimulate APO mitotic activity and/or enlarge its size, implying a role for the APO in innate immunity. The molecular mechanisms underlying such responses have not yet been explored, in part due to the difficulty in obtaining sufficient APO tissue for gene expression studies. By using a modified RNA extraction technique and microarray technology, we investigated transcriptomic responses of APOs dissected from snails at 24 hours post-injection with two bacterial PAMPs, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN), or with fucoidan (FCN), which may mimic fucosyl-rich glycan PAMPs on sporocysts of Schistosoma mansoni. Based upon the number of genes differentially expressed, LPS exhibited the strongest activity, relative to saline-injected controls. A concurrent activation of genes involved in cell proliferation, immune response and detoxification metabolism was observed. A gene encoding checkpoint 1 kinase, a key regulator of mitosis, was highly expressed after stimulation by LPS. Also, seven different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that play an essential role in protein synthesis were found to be highly expressed. In addition to stimulating genes involved in cell proliferation, the injected substances, especially LPS, also induced expression of a number of immune-related genes including arginase, peptidoglycan recognition protein short form, tumor necrosis factor receptor, ficolin, calmodulin, bacterial permeability increasing proteins and E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. I