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Sample records for glacial maximum climate

  1. Mediterranean Ocean Climate for the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    To correctly reproduce past climate changes is one of the prerequistes for reliably predicting anthropogenic climate change. Here, results from an attempt to simulate the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21.000 years ago) for the Mediterranean Sea are pesented. For this time slice, precompiled proxy data sets exist. One key problem in regional ocean modelling for past time slices is to obtain atmospheric forcing data. A multi-step approach is used. A coarse resolution earth system model consisting of coupled atmospheric-oceanic general circulation models (ECHAM5_T31/MPIOM_GR3) with a dynamical vegetation model (LPJ) was integrated for several thousand years to steady state. The surface conditions derived from these model simulations (sea surface temperature (SST), sea ice and vegetation) were used as lower boundary conditions for a short (20 years plus 9 years of spinup) simulation with a high resolution stand-alone atmosphere model (ECHAM5_T106). The continental runoff was calculated using a hydrological discharge model. This procedure was performed both for the Last Glacial Maximum as well as for a preindustrial control simulation. Atmospheric composition, earth orbital parameters, topography and ice sheet distribution were prescribed following the protocol for the PMIP2 project. The simulations of the Mediterranean ocean climate were performed with a regional version of MPIOM. The model has a horizontal resolution of approximately 25 km and 29 levels. The surface heat fluxes are calculated with bulk fomulas using the model SST. Freshwater forcing consists of evaporation (calculated from the latent heat flux), precipitation and river runoff. The model uses daily forcing for the atmospheric input derived from the high resolution atmosphere model. In the Atlantic box a restoring to observed hydrography is applied. For the LGM the anomalies from the coupled model are added to observations. This model has been integrated in each of the cases for more than

  2. High-resolution climate simulation of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2008-01-01

    The climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model, the NCAR CCM3 at spectral truncation of T170, corresponding to a grid cell size of roughly 75 km. The purpose of the study is to assess whether there are significant benefits from the higher resolution simulation compared to the lower resolution simulation associated with the role of topography. The LGM simulations were forced with modified CLIMAP sea ice distribution and sea surface temperatures (SST) reduced by 1 C, ice sheet topography, reduced CO{sub 2}, and 21,000 BP orbital parameters. The high-resolution model captures modern climate reasonably well, in particular the distribution of heavy precipitation in the tropical Pacific. For the ice age case, surface temperature simulated by the high-resolution model agrees better with those of proxy estimates than does the low-resolution model. Despite the fact that tropical SSTs were only 2.1 C less than the control run, there are many lowland tropical land areas 4-6 C colder than present. Comparison of T170 model results with the best constrained proxy temperature estimates (noble gas concentrations in groundwater) now yield no significant differences between model and observations. There are also significant upland temperature changes in the best resolved tropical mountain belt (the Andes). We provisionally attribute this result in part as resulting from decreased lateral mixing between ocean and land in a model with more model grid cells. A longstanding model-data discrepancy therefore appears to be resolved without invoking any unusual model physics. The response of the Asian summer monsoon can also be more clearly linked to local geography in the high-resolution model than in the low-resolution model; this distinction should enable more confident validation of climate proxy data with the high-resolution model. Elsewhere, an inferred salinity increase in the subtropical North Atlantic may have

  3. Carbon-biosphere-climate interactions in the last glacial maximum climate

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlingstein, P.; Prentice, K.C.; Fung, I.Y.

    1995-04-20

    The total carbon inventory in the terrestrial biosphere in the last glacial maximum (LGM), 18 kyr ago, is analyzed in a series of experiments that examine the sensitivity of the inventory to vegetation distribution and carbon dynamics. The results show that for most forest vegetation types, carbon densities for the LGM are within 10% of their present-day values. Discrepancies between vegetation distributions simulated by two bioclimatic schemes are attributable to the assignation of vegetation types to climates with rare or no present-day analog. The model experiments, combined with palynogical data for regions with no present-day analog climate, yield to a decrease of 612{+-}105 Gt C compared to present day. 47 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of altered boundary conditions on GCM studies of the climate of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, W.T.; Peltier, W.R.

    1993-05-21

    The authors address a problem discovered recently with global climate model results for the last glacial maximum. Bard, et. al. pointed out a mismatch in boundary conditions entered into the model. Ice sheet conditions were derived from CLIMAP based on a time 18000 radiocarbon years ago. It was assumed that radiocarbon and sidereal dates coincide. However it was recently shown that the sidereal data of the last glacial maximum is nearer 21kbp. The authors perform model calculations to attempt to evaluate the seriousness of this mismatch in terms of calculated results from the global climate model runs for the last glacial maximum. The authors find that one result of the timing mismatch is a sizable difference in northern hemisphere summer and Eurasian winter climates. These changes should have a major impact on circulation patterns in the GCM simulations. In addition new ice sheet model programs are available now which appear to improve on CLIMAP models. The authors urge that these GCM simulations be rerun.

  5. The role of sea ice in abrupt climate changes following the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisancioglu, Kerim; Dokken, Trond

    2017-04-01

    Climate changes following the last glacial maximum ( 21-10ka BP) are considered some of the most dramatic and wide reaching abrupt events of the geological past. On Greenland the transition from the last glacial maximum to the Bølling-Allerød (BA) warm period was extremely abrupt, as is the transitions in and out of the Younger Dryas (YD) cold period. In terms of ocean changes, there are indications from proxy records that the large scale Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) was significantly reduced a few thousand years before the BA and again at the start of the YD. However, the link between changes in AMOC and climate in the Northern Hemisphere and in particular on Greenland is unclear. Here, we study changes to climate and circulation in the North Atlantic across these key climate transitions based on a sediment core from the Nordic Seas as well as sensitivity studies with a global climate model. Preliminary results suggest that changes in sea ice and stratification of the Nordic Seas played a key role in the observed climate changes during and preceding the deglaciation of the large land based ice sheets. In particular the cold period following Heinrich Event 1 (H1) and ending at the BA as well as the cold YD are associated with expansions of Arctic sea ice into the Nordic Seas region.

  6. Dust fluxes and iron fertilization in Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Fabrice; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Shaffer, Gary; Lamy, Frank; Winckler, Gisela; Farias, Laura; Gallardo, Laura; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols play a major role in present and past climates. To date, we rely on climate models for estimates of dust fluxes to calculate the impact of airborne micronutrients on biogeochemical cycles. Here we provide a new global dust flux data set for Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions based on observational data. A comparison with dust flux simulations highlights regional differences between observations and models. By forcing a biogeochemical model with our new data set and using this model's results to guide a millennial-scale Earth System Model simulation, we calculate the impact of enhanced glacial oceanic iron deposition on the LGM-Holocene carbon cycle. On centennial timescales, the higher LGM dust deposition results in a weak reduction of <10 ppm in atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced efficiency of the biological pump. This is followed by a further ~10 ppm reduction over millennial timescales due to greater carbon burial and carbonate compensation.

  7. The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, G. A.; Brovkin, V. A.; Kleinen, T.

    2016-04-01

    Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100.

  8. The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, G. A.; Brovkin, V. A.; Kleinen, T.

    2016-01-01

    Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100. PMID:27095029

  9. The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, G A; Brovkin, V A; Kleinen, T

    2016-04-20

    Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100.

  10. Climate Sensitivity of the Last Glacial Maximum from Paleoclimate Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Brady, E.; Kothavala, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Global coupled climate models run for future scenarios of increasing atmospheric CO2 give a range of response of the global average surface temperature. Regional responses, including the North Atlantic overturning circulation and tropical Pacific ENSO, also vary significantly among models. The second phase of the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP 2) is coordinating simulations and data syntheses for the Last Glacial Maximum (21,000 years before present) to allow another assessment of climate sensitivity. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) have been estimated using measurements from ice cores to be 185 ppmv, approximately 50% of present-day values. Global, annual mean surface temperature simulated by the slab ocean version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) shows a cooling of -2.8°C for LGM CO2 levels and a warming of 2.5°C for a doubling of CO2. Slab and coupled CCSM3 simulations that include the reductions of the other atmospheric trace gases and the large ice sheets covering North America and Eurasia at LGM give cooling in agreement with proxy inferences and indicate that LGM CO2 explains about half of the global cooling at LGM. Regional signatures of the climate system to changed LGM forcing are also an important measure of climate sensitivity and results from the fully coupled version of CCSM3 will be shown.

  11. Impacts of surface boundary conditions on regional climate model simulations of European climate during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Raible, Christoph C.; Shao, Yaping

    2017-05-01

    We examine the influences of North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and vegetation on regional climate simulations over Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Simulated regional temperature and precipitation patterns over Europe are considerably improved when using revised SSTs based on proxy data. Likewise, the simulated permafrost is more accurately reproduced with the SST modifications. These improvements are partially related to the changed regional atmospheric circulation due to the revised SSTs, leading to colder and drier conditions over Western Europe. Further sensitivity tests with prescribed vegetation for LGM conditions provide evidence of the sensitivity of the simulated glacial climate. This study reveals the importance of considering more realistic SST and vegetation boundary conditions for a more accurate representation of regional climate variability under glacial conditions.

  12. Climate sensitivity estimated from temperature reconstructions of the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Urban, Nathan M; Shakun, Jeremy D; Mahowald, Natalie M; Clark, Peter U; Bartlein, Patrick J; Mix, Alan C; Rosell-Melé, Antoni

    2011-12-09

    Assessing the impact of future anthropogenic carbon emissions is currently impeded by uncertainties in our knowledge of equilibrium climate sensitivity to atmospheric carbon dioxide doubling. Previous studies suggest 3 kelvin (K) as the best estimate, 2 to 4.5 K as the 66% probability range, and nonzero probabilities for much higher values, the latter implying a small chance of high-impact climate changes that would be difficult to avoid. Here, combining extensive sea and land surface temperature reconstructions from the Last Glacial Maximum with climate model simulations, we estimate a lower median (2.3 K) and reduced uncertainty (1.7 to 2.6 K as the 66% probability range, which can be widened using alternate assumptions or data subsets). Assuming that paleoclimatic constraints apply to the future, as predicted by our model, these results imply a lower probability of imminent extreme climatic change than previously thought.

  13. A brief history of climate - the northern seas from the Last Glacial Maximum to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldevik, Tor; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; Bjune, Anne E.; Andersson, Carin; Birks, H. John B.; Dokken, Trond M.; Drange, Helge; Glessmer, Mirjam S.; Li, Camille; Nilsen, Jan Even Ø.; Otterå, Odd Helge; Richter, Kristin; Skagseth, Øystein

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of climate and climate change is fundamentally concerned with two things: a well-defined and sufficiently complete climate record to be explained, for example of observed temperature, and a relevant mechanistic framework for making closed and consistent inferences concerning cause-and-effect. This is the case for understanding observed climate, as it is the case for historical climate as reconstructed from proxy data and future climate as projected by models. The present study offers a holistic description of northern maritime climate - from the Last Glacial Maximum through to the projected global warming of the 21st century - in this context. It includes the compilation of the most complete temperature record for Norway and the Norwegian Sea to date based on the synthesis of available terrestrial and marine paleoclimate reconstructions into continuous times series, and their continuation into modern and future climate with the instrumental record and a model projection. The scientific literature on a variable northern climate is reviewed against this background, and with a particular emphasis on the role of the Norwegian Atlantic Current - the Gulf Stream's extension towards the Arctic. This includes the introduction of an explicit and relatively simple diagnostic relation to quantify the change in ocean circulation consistent with reconstructed ocean temperatures. It is found that maritime climate and the strength of the Norwegian Atlantic Current are closely related throughout the record. The nature of the relation is however qualitatively different as one progresses from the past, through the present, and into the future.

  14. The last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  15. Response of spatial vegetation distribution in China to climate changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyang; Xu, Xiaoting; Shrestha, Nawal; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Tang, Zhiyao; Wang, Zhiheng

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing how climate change affects vegetation distribution is one of the central issues of global change ecology as this has important implications for the carbon budget of terrestrial vegetation. Mapping vegetation distribution under historical climate scenarios is essential for understanding the response of vegetation distribution to future climatic changes. The reconstructions of palaeovegetation based on pollen data provide a useful method to understand the relationship between climate and vegetation distribution. However, this method is limited in time and space. Here, using species distribution model (SDM) approaches, we explored the climatic determinants of contemporary vegetation distribution and reconstructed the distribution of Chinese vegetation during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18,000 14C yr BP) and Middle-Holocene (MH, 6000 14C yr BP). The dynamics of vegetation distribution since the LGM reconstructed by SDMs were largely consistent with those based on pollen data, suggesting that the SDM approach is a useful tool for studying historical vegetation dynamics and its response to climate change across time and space. Comparison between the modeled contemporary potential natural vegetation distribution and the observed contemporary distribution suggests that temperate deciduous forests, subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests, temperate deciduous shrublands and temperate steppe have low range fillings and are strongly influenced by human activities. In general, the Tibetan Plateau, North and Northeast China, and the areas near the 30°N in Central and Southeast China appeared to have experienced the highest turnover in vegetation due to climate change from the LGM to the present.

  16. Response of spatial vegetation distribution in China to climate changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyang; Xu, Xiaoting; Shrestha, Nawal; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Tang, Zhiyao; Wang, Zhiheng

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing how climate change affects vegetation distribution is one of the central issues of global change ecology as this has important implications for the carbon budget of terrestrial vegetation. Mapping vegetation distribution under historical climate scenarios is essential for understanding the response of vegetation distribution to future climatic changes. The reconstructions of palaeovegetation based on pollen data provide a useful method to understand the relationship between climate and vegetation distribution. However, this method is limited in time and space. Here, using species distribution model (SDM) approaches, we explored the climatic determinants of contemporary vegetation distribution and reconstructed the distribution of Chinese vegetation during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18,000 14C yr BP) and Middle-Holocene (MH, 6000 14C yr BP). The dynamics of vegetation distribution since the LGM reconstructed by SDMs were largely consistent with those based on pollen data, suggesting that the SDM approach is a useful tool for studying historical vegetation dynamics and its response to climate change across time and space. Comparison between the modeled contemporary potential natural vegetation distribution and the observed contemporary distribution suggests that temperate deciduous forests, subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests, temperate deciduous shrublands and temperate steppe have low range fillings and are strongly influenced by human activities. In general, the Tibetan Plateau, North and Northeast China, and the areas near the 30°N in Central and Southeast China appeared to have experienced the highest turnover in vegetation due to climate change from the LGM to the present. PMID:28426780

  17. Last Glacial Maximum over China: Sensitivities of climate to paleovegetation and Tibetan ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dabang; Wang, Huijun; Drange, Helge; Lang, Xianmei

    2003-02-01

    With the boundary conditions appropriate for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), including ice sheets, sea surface temperatures, sea-ice distribution, atmospheric CO2 concentration, the Earth's orbital parameters, topography, and coastline, the atmospheric general circulation model of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP-AGCM) computes colder and drier conditions than for present day. Global annual-average surface temperature decreased by 5.3°C, and terrestrial precipitation was down by 29%. It is shown that IAP-AGCM LGM simulation compares favorably to results from other AGCMs, and/but generally shows a weak terrestrial cooling when compared to paleoclimatic reconstructions in tropics. The 21 ka (ka: thousands of years ago) vegetation reconstruction is introduced into the model to study the regional climate response to the changes in vegetation and associated soil characteristics over China. The additional cooling due to these two changes reduces, to a certain degree, the model-data discrepancies. In addition, under the precondition of continental ice existing over part of the Tibetan Plateau at the LGM, the authors examine the regional climate response to the continental ice. It follows that the glacial-age environment over the Tibetan Plateau is a very important factor for 21 ka climate simulation in East Asia.

  18. The simulated climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and insights into the global marine carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Pearse J.; Matear, Richard J.; Lenton, Andrew; Phipps, Steven J.; Chase, Zanna; Etheridge, David M.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean's ability to store large quantities of carbon, combined with the millennial longevity over which this reservoir is overturned, has implicated the ocean as a key driver of glacial-interglacial climates. However, the combination of processes that cause an accumulation of carbon within the ocean during glacial periods is still under debate. Here we present simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using the CSIRO Mk3L-COAL (Carbon-Ocean-Atmosphere-Land) earth system model to test the contribution of physical and biogeochemical processes to ocean carbon storage. For the LGM simulation, we find a significant global cooling of the surface ocean (3.2 °C) and the expansion of both minimum and maximum sea ice cover broadly consistent with proxy reconstructions. The glacial ocean stores an additional 267 Pg C in the deep ocean relative to the pre-industrial (PI) simulation due to stronger Antarctic Bottom Water formation. However, 889 Pg C is lost from the upper ocean via equilibration with a lower atmospheric CO2 concentration and a global decrease in export production, causing a net loss of carbon relative to the PI ocean. The LGM deep ocean also experiences an oxygenation ( > 100 mmol O2 m-3) and deepening of the calcite saturation horizon (exceeds the ocean bottom) at odds with proxy reconstructions. With modifications to key biogeochemical processes, which include an increased export of organic matter due to a simulated release from iron limitation, a deepening of remineralisation and decreased inorganic carbon export driven by cooler temperatures, we find that the carbon content of the glacial ocean can be sufficiently increased (317 Pg C) to explain the reduction in atmospheric and terrestrial carbon at the LGM (194 ± 2 and 330 ± 400 Pg C, respectively). Assuming an LGM-PI difference of 95 ppm pCO2, we find that 55 ppm can be attributed to the biological pump, 28 ppm to circulation changes and the remaining 12 ppm to solubility. The biogeochemical

  19. The simulated climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and insights into the global carbon cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, P. J.; Matear, R.; Lenton, A.; Phipps, S. J.; Chase, Z.; Etheridge, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean's ability to store large quantities of carbon, combined with the millennial longevity over which this reservoir is overturned, has implicated the ocean as a key driver of glacial-interglacial climates. However, the combination of processes that cause an accumulation of carbon within the ocean during glacial periods is still under debate. Here we present simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using the CSIRO Mk3L-COAL Earth System Model to test the contribution of key biogeochemical processes to ocean carbon storage. For the coupled LGM simulation, we find that significant cooling (3.2 °C), expanded minimum (Northern Hemisphere: 105 %; Southern Hemisphere: 225 %) and maximum (Northern Hemisphere: 145 %; Southern Hemisphere: 120 %) sea ice cover, and a reorganisation of the overturning circulation caused significant changes in ocean biogeochemical fields. The coupled LGM simulation stores an additional 322 Pg C in the deep ocean relative to the Pre-Industrial (PI) simulation. However, 839 Pg C is lost from the upper ocean via equilibration with a lower atmospheric CO2 concentration, causing a net loss of 517 Pg C relative to the PI simulation. The LGM deep ocean also experiences an oxygenation (>100 mmol O2 m-3) and deepening of the aragonite saturation depth (> 2,000 m deeper) at odds with proxy reconstructions. Hence, these physical changes cannot in isolation produce plausible biogeochemistry nor the required drawdown of atmospheric CO2 of 80-100 ppm at the LGM. With modifications to key biogeochemical processes, which include an increased export of organic matter due to a simulated release from iron limitation, a deepening of remineralisation and decreased inorganic carbon export driven by cooler temperatures, we find that the carbon content in the glacial oceanic reservoir can be increased (326 Pg C) to a level that is sufficient to explain the reduction in atmospheric and terrestrial carbon at the LGM (520 ± 400 Pg C). These modifications

  20. Bayesian hierarchical models for regional climate reconstructions of the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzel, Nils; Hense, Andreas; Ohlwein, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Spatio-temporal reconstructions of past climate are important for the understanding of the long term behavior of the climate system and the sensitivity to forcing changes. Unfortunately, they are subject to large uncertainties, have to deal with a complex proxy-climate structure, and a physically reasonable interpolation between the sparse proxy observations is difficult. Bayesian Hierarchical Models (BHMs) are a class of statistical models that is well suited for spatio-temporal reconstructions of past climate because they permit the inclusion of multiple sources of information (e.g. records from different proxy types, uncertain age information, output from climate simulations) and quantify uncertainties in a statistically rigorous way. BHMs in paleoclimatology typically consist of three stages which are modeled individually and are combined using Bayesian inference techniques. The data stage models the proxy-climate relation (often named transfer function), the process stage models the spatio-temporal distribution of the climate variables of interest, and the prior stage consists of prior distributions of the model parameters. For our BHMs, we translate well-known proxy-climate transfer functions for pollen to a Bayesian framework. In addition, we can include Gaussian distributed local climate information from preprocessed proxy records. The process stage combines physically reasonable spatial structures from prior distributions with proxy records which leads to a multivariate posterior probability distribution for the reconstructed climate variables. The prior distributions that constrain the possible spatial structure of the climate variables are calculated from climate simulation output. We present results from pseudoproxy tests as well as new regional reconstructions of temperatures for the last glacial maximum (LGM, ˜ 21,000 years BP). These reconstructions combine proxy data syntheses with information from climate simulations for the LGM that were

  1. Climate, CO2, and the history of North American grasses since the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Jennifer M.; Cerling, Thure E.; Hoppe, Kathryn A.; Mosier, Thomas M.; Still, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of C4 grasses in the late Neogene is one of the most important ecological transitions of the Cenozoic, but the primary driver of this global expansion is widely debated. We use the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bison and mammoth tissues as a proxy for the relative abundance of C3 and C4 vegetation in their grazing habitat to determine climatic and atmospheric CO2 controls on C4 grass distributions from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the present. We predict the spatial variability of grass δ13C in North America using a mean of three different methods of classification and regression tree (CART) machine learning techniques and nine climatic variables. We show that growing season precipitation and temperature are the strongest predictors of all single climate variables. We apply this CART analysis to high-resolution gridded climate data and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) mean paleoclimate model outputs to produce predictive isotope landscape models (“isoscapes”) for the current, mid-Holocene, and LGM average δ13C of grass-dominated areas across North America. From the LGM to the present, C4 grass abundances substantially increased in the Great Plains despite concurrent increases in atmospheric CO2. These results suggest that changes in growing season precipitation rather than atmospheric CO2 were critically important in the Neogene expansion of C4 grasses. PMID:27051865

  2. Climate, CO2, and the history of North American grasses since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Jennifer M; Cerling, Thure E; Hoppe, Kathryn A; Mosier, Thomas M; Still, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    The spread of C4 grasses in the late Neogene is one of the most important ecological transitions of the Cenozoic, but the primary driver of this global expansion is widely debated. We use the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of bison and mammoth tissues as a proxy for the relative abundance of C3 and C4 vegetation in their grazing habitat to determine climatic and atmospheric CO2 controls on C4 grass distributions from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the present. We predict the spatial variability of grass δ(13)C in North America using a mean of three different methods of classification and regression tree (CART) machine learning techniques and nine climatic variables. We show that growing season precipitation and temperature are the strongest predictors of all single climate variables. We apply this CART analysis to high-resolution gridded climate data and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) mean paleoclimate model outputs to produce predictive isotope landscape models ("isoscapes") for the current, mid-Holocene, and LGM average δ(13)C of grass-dominated areas across North America. From the LGM to the present, C4 grass abundances substantially increased in the Great Plains despite concurrent increases in atmospheric CO2. These results suggest that changes in growing season precipitation rather than atmospheric CO2 were critically important in the Neogene expansion of C4 grasses.

  3. Sensitivity of Last Glacial Maximum climate to uncertainties in tropical and subtropical ocean temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.; Pisias, N.; Mix, A.

    2006-01-01

    The faunal and floral gradients that underlie the CLIMAP (1981) sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstructions for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) reflect ocean temperature gradients and frontal positions. The transfer functions used to reconstruct SSTs from biologic gradients are biased, however, because at the warmest sites they display inherently low sensitivity in translating fauna to SST and they underestimate SST within the euphotic zones where the pycnocline is strong. Here we assemble available data and apply a statistical approach to adjust for hypothetical biases in the faunal-based SST estimates of LGM temperature. The largest bias adjustments are distributed in the tropics (to address low sensitivity) and subtropics (to address underestimation in the euphotic zones). The resulting SSTs are generally in better agreement than CLIMAP with recent geochemical estimates of glacial-interglacial temperature changes. We conducted a series of model experiments using the GENESIS general atmospheric circulation model to assess the sensitivity of the climate system to our bias-adjusted SSTs. Globally, the new SST field results in a modeled LGM surface-air cooling relative to present of 6.4 ??C (1.9 ??C cooler than that of CLIMAP). Relative to the simulation with CLIMAP SSTs, modeled precipitation over the oceans is reduced by 0.4 mm d-1 (an anomaly -0.4 versus 0.0 mm d-1 for CLIMAP) and increased over land (an anomaly -0.2 versus -0.5 mm d-1 for CLIMAP). Regionally strong responses are induced by changes in SST gradients. Data-model comparisons indicate improvement in agreement relative to CLIMAP, but differences among terrestrial data inferences and simulated moisture and temperature remain. Our SSTs result in positive mass balance over the northern hemisphere ice sheets (primarily through reduced summer ablation), supporting the hypothesis that tropical and subtropical ocean temperatures may have played a role in triggering glacial changes at higher latitudes.

  4. Effect of altered boundary conditions on GCM studies of the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, William T.; Peltier, W. Richard

    1993-05-01

    Since publication of the paper by Bard et al. (1990) it has been known that GCM studies of the climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM), employed lower boundary conditions appropriate to this time but astronomical parameters of an era 3000 years later. The LGM boundary conditions from CLIMAP were for 18 kyr BP on the 14C timescale. The GCM simulations employed the insolation regime appropriate to 18 kyr BP on the sidereal timescale whereas the appropriate LGM insolation regime is that of 21 kyr BP. These studies also used the CLIMAP ice sheet reconstruction. However, on the basis of most recent analyses the reconstruction by Tushingham and Peltier (1991) is to be preferred. Hyde et al. (1989) showed that a simple EBM compared favourably with the NCAR CCM, when both were used to simulate the temperature distribution of the LGM. Here we shall employ the same EBM to study the effect on LGM climate of the timing mismatch, and of the different horizontal extents of the different ice sheet reconstructions. In each case the climatic effect is found to be significant. Thus we cannot claim an accurate LGM simulation unless the orbital and terrestrial inputs match to within 1,000 years and unless we employ the best possible ice sheet reconstruction in the analysis.

  5. Climatic controls of western U.S. glaciers at the last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.

    1997-01-01

    We use a nested atmospheric modeling strategy to simulate precipitation and temperature of the western United States 18,000 years ago (18 ka). The high resolution of the nested model allows us to isolate the regional structure of summer temperature and winter precipitation that is crucial to determination of the net mass balance of late-Pleistocene mountain glaciers in this region of diverse topography and climate. Modeling results suggest that climatic controls of these glaciers varied significantly over the western U.S. Glaciers in the northern Rocky Mountains existed under relatively cold July temperatures and low winter accumulation, reflecting anticyclonic, easterly wind flow off the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In contrast, glaciers that existed under relatively warmer and wetter conditions are located along the Pacific coast south of Oregon, where enhanced westerlies delivered higher precipitation than at present. Between these two groupings lie glaciers that were controlled by a mix of cold and wet conditions attributed to the convergence of cold air from the ice sheet and moisture derived from the westerlies. Sensitivity tests suggest that, for our simulated 18 ka climate, many of the glaciers exhibit a variable response to climate but were generally more sensitive to changes in temperature than to changes in precipitation, particularly those glaciers in central Idaho and the Yellowstone Plateau. Our results support arguments that temperature depression generally played a larger role in lowering equilibrium line altitudes in the western U.S. during the last glacial maximum than did increased precipitation, although the magnitude of temperature depression required for steady-state mass balance varied from 8-18??C. Only the Sierra Nevada glaciers required a substantial increase in precipitation to achieve steady-state mass balance, while glaciers in the Cascade Range existed with decreased precipitation.

  6. Impact of CO2 and climate on Last Glacial Maximum vegetation - a factor separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, M.; Selent, K.; Brovkin, V.; Raddatz, T.; Gayler, V.

    2012-11-01

    Differences between glacial and pre-industrial potential vegetation patterns can conceptually be attributed to two factors: firstly to differences in the climate, caused by a strong increase in ice masses and the radiative effect of lower greenhouse gas concentrations, and secondly to differences in the ecophysiological effect of lower glacial atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The synergy emerging from these effects when operating simultaneously can be interpreted as sensitivity of the effect of enhancing physiologically available CO2 on shifting vegetation to climate warming. Alternatively and equally valid, it can be viewed as sensitivity of climatically induced vegetation changes to differences in physiologically available CO2. A first complete factor separation based on simulations with the MPI Earth System Model indicates that the pure climate effect mainly leads to a contraction or a shift in vegetation patterns when comparing glacial with pre-industrial simulation vegetation patterns. Globally, a reduction in fractional coverage of most plant functional types is seen - except for raingreen shrubs which strongly benefit from the colder and drier climate. The ecophysiological effect of CO2 appears to be stronger than the pure climate contribution for many plant functional types - in line with previous simulations. The ecophysiological effect of lower CO2 mainly yields a reduction in fractional coverage, a thinning of vegetation and a strong reduction in net primary production. The synergy appears to be as strong as each of the pure contributions locally. For tropical evergreen trees, the synergy appears strong also on global average. Hence this modelling study suggests that for tropical forests, an increase in CO2 has, on average, a stronger ecophysiological effect in warmer climate than in glacial climate. Alternatively, areal differences in tropical forests induced by climate warming can, on average, be expected to be larger with increasing concentration of

  7. Lake-level increasing under the climate cryoaridization conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, Mikhail; Strelkov, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    A lake genesis and lake-level increasing during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are the paramount issues in paleoclimatology. Investigating these problems reveals the regularities of lake development and figures out an arid territory conditions at the LGM stage. Pluvial theory is the most prevalent conception of lake formation during the LGM. This theory is based on a fact that the water bodies emerged and their level increased due to torrential rainfalls. In this study, it is paid attention to an alternative assumption of lake genesis at the LGM stage, which is called climate cryoaridization. In accordance with this hypothesis, the endorheic water basins had their level enlarged because of a simultaneous climate aridity and temperature decrease. In this research, a lake-level increasing in endorheic regions of Central Asia and South American Altiplano of the Andes is described. The lake investigation is related to its conditions during the LGM. The study also includes a lake catalogue clearly presenting the basin conditions at the LGM stage and nowadays. The data compilation partly consists of information from an earlier work of Mikhail Amosov, Lake-levels, Vegetation And Climate In Central Asia During The Last Glacial Maximum (EGU2014-3015). According to the investigation, a lake catalogue on 27 lakes showed that most of the water bodies had higher level. This feature could be mentioned for the biggest lakes of the Aral Sea, Lake Balkhash, Issyk-Kul etc. and for the small ones located in the mountains, such as Pamir, Tian-Shan and Tibet. Yet some lakes that are situated in Central Asian periphery (Lake Qinghai and lakes in Inner Mongolia) used to be lower than nowadays. Also, the lake-level increasing of Altiplano turned to be a significant feature during the LGM in accordance with the data of 5 lakes, such as Titicaca, Coipasa-Uyuni, Lejia, Miscanti and Santa-Maria. Most of the current endorheic basins at the LGM stage were filled with water due to abundant

  8. Influence of dynamic vegetation on climate change and terrestrial carbon storage in the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'ishi, R.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2013-07-01

    When the climate is reconstructed from paleoevidence, it shows that the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 21 000 yr ago) is cold and dry compared to the present-day. Reconstruction also shows that compared to today, the vegetation of the LGM is less active and the distribution of vegetation was drastically different, due to cold temperature, dryness, and a lower level of atmospheric CO2 concentration (185 ppm compared to a preindustrial level of 285 ppm). In the present paper, we investigate the influence of vegetation change on the climate of the LGM by using a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model (AOVGCM, the MIROC-LPJ). The MIROC-LPJ is different from earlier studies in the introduction of a bias correction method in individual running GCM experiments. We examined four GCM experiments (LGM and preindustrial, with and without vegetation feedback) and quantified the strength of the vegetation feedback during the LGM. The result shows that global-averaged cooling during the LGM is amplified by +13.5 % due to the introduction of vegetation feedback. This is mainly caused by the increase of land surface albedo due to the expansion of tundra in northern high latitudes and the desertification in northern middle latitudes around 30° N to 60° N. We also investigated how this change in climate affected the total terrestrial carbon storage by using offline Lund-Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ-DGVM). Our result shows that the total terrestrial carbon storage was reduced by 597 PgC during the LGM, which corresponds to the emission of 282 ppm atmospheric CO2. In the LGM experiments, the global carbon distribution is generally the same whether the vegetation feedback to the atmosphere is included or not. However, the inclusion of vegetation feedback causes substantial terrestrial carbon storage change, especially in explaining the lowering of atmospheric CO2 during the LGM.

  9. Impact of CO2 and climate on Last Glacial maximum vegetation - a factor separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, M.; Selent, K.; Brovkin, V.; Raddatz, T.; Gayler, V.

    2013-06-01

    The factor separation of Stein and Alpert (1993) is applied to simulations with the MPI Earth system model to determine the factors which cause the differences between vegetation patterns in glacial and pre-industrial climate. The factors firstly include differences in the climate, caused by a strong increase in ice masses and the radiative effect of lower greenhouse gas concentrations; secondly, differences in the ecophysiological effect of lower glacial atmospheric CO2 concentrations; and thirdly, the synergy between the pure climate effect and the pure effect of changing physiologically available CO2. It is has been shown that the synergy can be interpreted as a measure of the sensitivity of ecophysiological CO2 effect to climate. The pure climate effect mainly leads to a contraction or a shift in vegetation patterns when comparing simulated glacial and pre-industrial vegetation patterns. Raingreen shrubs benefit from the colder and drier climate. The pure ecophysiological effect of CO2 appears to be stronger than the pure climate effect for many plant functional types - in line with previous simulations. The pure ecophysiological effect of lower CO2 mainly yields a reduction in fractional coverage, a thinning of vegetation and a strong reduction in net primary production. The synergy appears to be as strong as each of the pure contributions locally, but weak on global average for most plant functional types. For tropical evergreen trees, however, the synergy is strong on global average. It diminishes the difference between glacial and pre-industrial coverage of tropical evergreen trees, due to the pure climate effect and the pure ecophysiological CO2 effect, by approximately 50 per cent.

  10. Responses of Amazonian ecosystems to climatic and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Mayle, Francis E; Beerling, David J; Gosling, William D; Bush, Mark B

    2004-03-29

    The aims of this paper are to review previously published palaeovegetation and independent palaeoclimatic datasets together with new results we present from dynamic vegetation model simulations and modern pollen rain studies to: (i) determine the responses of Amazonian ecosystems to changes in temperature, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations that occurred since the last glacial maximum (LGM), ca. 21 000 years ago; and (ii) use this long-term perspective to predict the likely vegetation responses to future climate change. Amazonia remained predominantly forested at the LGM, although the combination of reduced temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations resulted in forests structurally and floristically quite different from those of today. Cold-adapted Andean taxa mixed with rainforest taxa in central areas, while dry forest species and lianas probably became important in the more seasonal southern Amazon forests and savannahs expanded at forest-savannah ecotones. Net primary productivity (NPP) and canopy density were significantly lower than today. Evergreen rainforest distribution and NPP increased during the glacial-Holocene transition owing to ameliorating climatic and CO2 conditions. However, reduced precipitation in the Early-Mid-Holocene (ca. 8000-3600 years ago) caused widespread, frequent fires in seasonal southern Amazonia, causing increased abundance of drought-tolerant dry forest taxa and savannahs in ecotonal areas. Rainforests expanded once more in the Late Holocene owing to increased precipitation caused by greater austral summer insolation, although some of this forest expansion (e.g. in parts of the Bolivian Beni) is clearly caused by palaeo Indian landscape modification. The plant communities that existed during the Early-Mid-Holocene may provide insights into the kinds of vegetation response expected from similar increases in temperature and aridity predicted for the twenty-first century. We infer that ecotonal areas

  11. Responses of Amazonian ecosystems to climatic and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed Central

    Mayle, Francis E; Beerling, David J; Gosling, William D; Bush, Mark B

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to review previously published palaeovegetation and independent palaeoclimatic datasets together with new results we present from dynamic vegetation model simulations and modern pollen rain studies to: (i) determine the responses of Amazonian ecosystems to changes in temperature, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations that occurred since the last glacial maximum (LGM), ca. 21 000 years ago; and (ii) use this long-term perspective to predict the likely vegetation responses to future climate change. Amazonia remained predominantly forested at the LGM, although the combination of reduced temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations resulted in forests structurally and floristically quite different from those of today. Cold-adapted Andean taxa mixed with rainforest taxa in central areas, while dry forest species and lianas probably became important in the more seasonal southern Amazon forests and savannahs expanded at forest-savannah ecotones. Net primary productivity (NPP) and canopy density were significantly lower than today. Evergreen rainforest distribution and NPP increased during the glacial-Holocene transition owing to ameliorating climatic and CO2 conditions. However, reduced precipitation in the Early-Mid-Holocene (ca. 8000-3600 years ago) caused widespread, frequent fires in seasonal southern Amazonia, causing increased abundance of drought-tolerant dry forest taxa and savannahs in ecotonal areas. Rainforests expanded once more in the Late Holocene owing to increased precipitation caused by greater austral summer insolation, although some of this forest expansion (e.g. in parts of the Bolivian Beni) is clearly caused by palaeo Indian landscape modification. The plant communities that existed during the Early-Mid-Holocene may provide insights into the kinds of vegetation response expected from similar increases in temperature and aridity predicted for the twenty-first century. We infer that ecotonal areas

  12. A Short Guide to the Climatic Variables of the Last Glacial Maximum for Biogeographers.

    PubMed

    Varela, Sara; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S; Terribile, Levi Carina

    2015-01-01

    Ecological niche models are widely used for mapping the distribution of species during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Although the selection of the variables and General Circulation Models (GCMs) used for constructing those maps determine the model predictions, we still lack a discussion about which variables and which GCM should be included in the analysis and why. Here, we analyzed the climatic predictions for the LGM of 9 different GCMs in order to help biogeographers to select their GCMs and climatic layers for mapping the species ranges in the LGM. We 1) map the discrepancies between the climatic predictions of the nine GCMs available for the LGM, 2) analyze the similarities and differences between the GCMs and group them to help researchers choose the appropriate GCMs for calibrating and projecting their ecological niche models (ENM) during the LGM, and 3) quantify the agreement of the predictions for each bioclimatic variable to help researchers avoid the environmental variables with a poor consensus between models. Our results indicate that, in absolute values, GCMs have a strong disagreement in their temperature predictions for temperate areas, while the uncertainties for the precipitation variables are in the tropics. In spite of the discrepancies between model predictions, temperature variables (BIO1-BIO11) are highly correlated between models. Precipitation variables (BIO12-BIO19) show no correlation between models, and specifically, BIO14 (precipitation of the driest month) and BIO15 (Precipitation Seasonality (Coefficient of Variation)) show the highest level of discrepancy between GCMs. Following our results, we strongly recommend the use of different GCMs for constructing or projecting ENMs, particularly when predicting the distribution of species that inhabit the tropics and the temperate areas of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because climatic predictions for those areas vary greatly among GCMs. We also recommend the exclusion of BIO14

  13. A Short Guide to the Climatic Variables of the Last Glacial Maximum for Biogeographers

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Sara; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S.; Terribile, Levi Carina

    2015-01-01

    Ecological niche models are widely used for mapping the distribution of species during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Although the selection of the variables and General Circulation Models (GCMs) used for constructing those maps determine the model predictions, we still lack a discussion about which variables and which GCM should be included in the analysis and why. Here, we analyzed the climatic predictions for the LGM of 9 different GCMs in order to help biogeographers to select their GCMs and climatic layers for mapping the species ranges in the LGM. We 1) map the discrepancies between the climatic predictions of the nine GCMs available for the LGM, 2) analyze the similarities and differences between the GCMs and group them to help researchers choose the appropriate GCMs for calibrating and projecting their ecological niche models (ENM) during the LGM, and 3) quantify the agreement of the predictions for each bioclimatic variable to help researchers avoid the environmental variables with a poor consensus between models. Our results indicate that, in absolute values, GCMs have a strong disagreement in their temperature predictions for temperate areas, while the uncertainties for the precipitation variables are in the tropics. In spite of the discrepancies between model predictions, temperature variables (BIO1-BIO11) are highly correlated between models. Precipitation variables (BIO12- BIO19) show no correlation between models, and specifically, BIO14 (precipitation of the driest month) and BIO15 (Precipitation Seasonality (Coefficient of Variation)) show the highest level of discrepancy between GCMs. Following our results, we strongly recommend the use of different GCMs for constructing or projecting ENMs, particularly when predicting the distribution of species that inhabit the tropics and the temperate areas of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because climatic predictions for those areas vary greatly among GCMs. We also recommend the exclusion of BIO14

  14. Stalagmite reconstructions of western tropical Pacific climate from the last glacial maximum to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judson Wiley

    The West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) plays an important role in the global heat budget and global hydrologic cycle, so knowledge about its past variability would improve our understanding of global climate. Variations in WPWP precipitation are most notable during El Nino-Southern Oscillation events, when climate changes in the tropical Pacific impact rainfall not only in the WPWP, but around the globe. The stalagmite records presented in this dissertation provide centennial-to-millennial-scale constraints of WPWP precipitation during three distinct climatic periods: the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the last deglaciation, and the Holocene. In Chapter 2, the methodologies associated with the generation of U/Th-based absolute ages for the stalagmites are presented. In the final age models for the stalagmites, dates younger than 11,000 years have absolute errors of +/-400 years or less, and dates older than 11,000 years have a relative error of +/-2%. Stalagmite-specific 230Th/ 232Th ratios, calculated using isochrons, are used to correct for the presence of unsupported 230Th in a stalagmite at the time of formation. Hiatuses in the record are identified using a combination of optical properties, high 232Th concentrations, and extrapolation from adjacent U/Th dates. In Chapter 3, stalagmite oxygen isotopic composition (delta18O) records from N. Borneo are presented which reveal millennial-scale rainfall changes that occurred in response to changes in global climate boundary conditions, radiative forcing, and abrupt climate changes. The stalagmite delta18O records detect little change in inferred precipitation between the LGM and the present, although significant uncertainties are associated with the impact of the Sunda Shelf on rainfall delta 18O during the LGM. A millennial-scale drying in N. Borneo, inferred from an increase in stalagmite delta18O, peaks at ˜16.5ka coeval with timing of Heinrich event 1, possibly related to a southward movement of the Intertropical

  15. Synchronicity of Kuroshio Current and climate system variability since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xufeng; Li, Anchun; Kao, ShuhJi; Gong, Xun; Frank, Martin; Kuhn, Gerhard; Cai, Wenju; Yan, Hong; Wan, Shiming; Zhang, Honghai; Jiang, Fuqing; Hathorne, Edmund; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Bangqi

    2016-10-01

    The Kuroshio Current (KC) is the northward branch of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPG) and exerts influence on the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties of downstream regions in the Pacific Ocean. Resolving long-term changes in the flow of the KC water masses is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of the Pacific's role in global ocean and climate variability. Here, we reconstruct changes in KC dynamics over the past 20 ka based on grain-size spectra, clay mineral, and Sr-Nd isotope constraints of sediments from the northern Okinawa Trough. Combined with published sediment records surrounding the NPG, we suggest that the KC remained in the Okinawa Trough throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Together with Earth-System-Model simulations, our results additionally indicate that KC intensified considerably during the early Holocene (EH). The synchronous establishment of the KC ;water barrier; and the modern circulation pattern during the EH highstand shaped the sediment transport patterns. This is ascribed to the precession-induced increase in the occurrence of La Niña-like state and the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon. The synchronicity of the shifts in the intensity of the KC, Kuroshio extension, and El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability may further indicate that the western branch of the NPG has been subject to basin-scale changes in wind stress curl over the North Pacific in response to low-latitude insolation. Superimposed on this long-term trend are high-amplitude, large century, and millennial-scale variations during last 5 ka, which are ascribed to the advent of modern ENSO when the equatorial oceans experienced stronger insolation during the boreal winter.

  16. Wetland methane emissions during the Last Glacial Maximum estimated from PMIP2 simulations: Climate, vegetation, and geographic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S. L.; Drury, A. J.; Toonen, W. H. J.; van Weele, M.

    2010-03-01

    It is an open question to what extent wetlands contributed to the interglacial-glacial decrease in atmospheric methane concentration. Here we estimate methane emissions from glacial wetlands, using newly available PMIP2 simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate from coupled atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models. These simulations apply improved boundary conditions resulting in better agreement with paleoclimatic data than earlier PMIP1 simulations. Emissions are computed from the dominant controls of water table depth, soil temperature, and plant productivity, and we analyze the relative role of each factor in the glacial decline. It is found that latitudinal changes in soil moisture, in combination with ice sheet expansion, cause boreal wetlands to shift southward in all simulations. This southward migration is instrumental in maintaining the boreal wetland source at a significant level. The mean emission temperature over boreal wetlands drops by only a few degrees, despite the strong overall cooling. The temperature effect on the glacial decline in the methane flux is therefore moderate, while reduced plant productivity contributes equally to the total reduction. Model results indicate a relatively small boreal and large tropical source during the LGM, with wetlands on the exposed continental shelves mainly contributing to the tropical source. This distribution in emissions is consistent with the low interpolar difference in glacial methane concentrations derived from ice core data.

  17. The Occurrence and Climatic Implications of a Rapid Regression of Lake Elsinore, CA, During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markle, B. R.; Kirby, M.; Carrasco, J.

    2008-12-01

    Southern California is a densely populated region, highly sensitive to climate change and prone to potentially devastating hydrologic variability (e.g. droughts, floods, etc). In the interest of characterizing past climatic and hydrologic variability, this study analyzes a sediment core from Lake Elsinore, California with a particular focus on a possible rapid regression event at the height of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (between 19,330 and 21,070 calendar yr BP). Sediment analyses (grain size, magnetic susceptibility, and total organic matter) and geochemical analyses (δ13C and molar C/N) are used to characterize and identify this event (hereafter referred to as the Last Glacial Maximum Regression Event or LGMRE). The combination of sediment characteristics of the LGMRE is not observed elsewhere in sediment core LESS02-09 suggesting that the event is unique over the period of observation. This rapid drying event is superimposed on a longer, orbital scale transgressive/regressive cycle. Given the generally wet climate of the LGM, the presence of the LGMRE is unexpected and indicates that Southern California is susceptible to rapid climate change. Evidence suggests synchrony at both orbital and centennial time scales between the Lake Elsinore climate record of the LGM and other terrestrial and marine climate records from southern California as well as the Great Basin region. Furthermore, evidence is presented for synchrony between the Lake Elsinore sediment core and the GISP 2 ice core record from Greenland, at both orbital the centennial time scales, suggesting climatic teleconnections between Southern California and the North Atlantic. It is possible that these two geographically distant areas are linked via dynamics of the altered Last Glacial Maximum jet stream.

  18. Exploring the impact of climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum on the pattern of human occupation of Iberia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ariane; Levavasseur, Guillaume; James, Patrick M A; Guiducci, Dario; Izquierdo, Manuel Arturo; Bourgeon, Lauriane; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles; Vrac, Mathieu

    2014-08-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a global climate event, which had significant repercussions for the spatial distribution and demographic history of prehistoric populations. In Eurasia, the LGM coincides with a potential bottleneck for modern humans and may mark the divergence date for Asian and European populations (Keinan et al., 2007). In this research, the impact of climate variability on human populations in the Iberian Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is examined with the aid of downscaled high-resolution (16 × 16 km) numerical climate experiments. Human sensitivity to short time-scale (inter-annual) climate variability during this key time period, which follows the initial modern human colonisation of Eurasia and the extinction of the Neanderthals, is tested using the spatial distribution of archaeological sites. Results indicate that anatomically modern human populations responded to small-scale spatial patterning in climate variability, specifically inter-annual variability in precipitation levels as measured by the standard precipitation index. Climate variability at less than millennial scale, therefore, is shown to be an important component of ecological risk, one that played a role in regulating the spatial behaviour of prehistoric human populations and consequently affected their social networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of a dynamic soil scheme on the climate of the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, M.; Lohmann, G.; Knorr, G.

    2016-01-01

    In order to account for coupled climate-soil processes, we have developed a soil scheme which is asynchronously coupled to a comprehensive climate model with dynamic vegetation. This scheme considers vegetation as the primary control of changes in physical soil characteristics. We test the scheme for a warmer (mid-Holocene) and colder (Last Glacial Maximum) climate relative to the preindustrial climate. We find that the computed changes in physical soil characteristics lead to significant amplification of global climate anomalies, representing a positive feedback. The inclusion of the soil feedback yields an extra surface warming of 0.24 °C for the mid-Holocene and an additional global cooling of 1.07 °C for the Last Glacial Maximum. Transition zones such as desert-savannah and taiga-tundra exhibit a pronounced response in the model version with dynamic soil properties. Energy balance model analyses reveal that our soil scheme amplifies the temperature anomalies in the mid-to-high northern latitudes via changes in the planetary albedo and the effective longwave emissivity. As a result of the modified soil treatment and the positive feedback to climate, part of the underestimated mid-Holocene temperature response to orbital forcing can be reconciled in the model.

  20. The effect of a dynamic soil scheme on the climate of the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, Michael; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    In order to account for coupled climate-soil processes, we have developed a soil scheme, which is asynchronously coupled to a comprehensive climate model with dynamic vegetation. This scheme considers vegetation as the primary control of changes in physical soil characteristics. We test the scheme for a warmer (mid-Holocene) and colder (Last Glacial Maximum) climate relative to the preindustrial climate. We find that the computed changes of physical soil characteristics lead to significant amplification of global climate anomalies, representing a positive feedback. The inclusion of the soil feedback yields an extra surface warming of 0.24°C for the mid-Holocene and an additional global cooling of 1.07°C for the Last Glacial Maximum. Transition zones such as desert/savannah and taiga/tundra exhibit a pronounced response in the model version with dynamic soil properties. Energy balance model analyses reveal that our soil scheme amplifies the temperature anomalies in the mid-to-high northern latitudes via changes in the planetary albedo and the effective longwave emissivity. As a result of the modified soil treatment and the positive feedback on climate, part of the underestimated mid-Holocene temperature response to orbital forcing can be reconciled in the model.

  1. Lake-levels, vegetation and climate in Central Asia during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Central Asian region is bounded in the east corner of the Greater Khingan Range and the Loess Plateau, and to the west - the Caspian Sea. This representation of region boundaries is based on classical works of A.Humboldt and V.Obruchev. Three typical features of Central Asia nature are: climate aridity, extensive inland drainage basins with numerous lakes and mountain systems with developed glaciation. Nowadays the extensive data is accumulated about lake-levels during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Central Asia. Data compilation on 20 depressions, where lakes exist now or where they existed during LGM, shows that most of them had usually higher lake-level than at present time. This regularity could be mentioned for the biggest lakes (the Aral Sea, the Balkhash, the Ysyk-Kol etc.) and for small ones that located in the mountains (Tien Shan, Pamir and Tibet). All of these lake basins get the precipitation due to westerlies. On the other hand lakes, which are located in region's east rimland (Lake Qinghai and lakes in Inner Mongolia) and get the precipitation due to summer East Asian monsoons, do not comply with the proposed regularity. During LGM these lake-levels were lower than nowadays. Another exception is Lake Manas, its lake-level was also lowered. Lake Manas is situated at the bottom of Junggar Basin. There are many small rivers, which come from the ranges and suffer the violent fluctuation in the position of its lower channel. It is possible to assume that some of its runoff did not get to Lake Manas during LGM. Mentioned facts suggest that levels of the most Central Asian lakes were higher during LGM comparing to their current situation. However, at that period vegetation was more xerophytic than now. Pollen data confirm this information for Tibet, Pamir and Tien Shan. Climate aridization of Central Asia can be proved by data about the intensity of loess accumulation during LGM. This evidence received for the east part of region (the Loess Plateau) and

  2. Global connections between aeolian dust, climate and ocean biogeochemistry at the present day and at the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Mackie, D.; Gaiero, D.; Hesse, P. P.; Balkanski, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Palaeo-dust records in sediments and ice cores show that wind-borne mineral aerosol ('dust') is strongly linked with climate state. During glacial climate stages, for example, the world was much dustier, with dust fluxes two to five times greater than in interglacial stages. However, the influence of dust on climate remains a poorly quantified and actively changing element of the Earth's climate system. Dust can influence climate directly, by the scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly, by modifying cloud properties. Dust transported to the oceans can also affect climate via ocean fertilization in those regions of the world's oceans where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant but primary production and nitrogen fixation are limited by iron scarcity. Dust containing iron, as fine-grained iron oxides/oxyhydroxides and/or within clay minerals, and other essential micronutrients (e.g. silica) may modulate the uptake of carbon in marine ecosystems and, in turn, the atmospheric concentration of CO 2. Here, in order to critically examine past fluxes and possible climate impacts of dust in general and iron-bearing dust in particular, we consider present-day sources and properties of dust, synthesise available records of dust deposition at the last glacial maximum (LGM); evaluate the evidence for changes in ocean palaeo-productivity associated with, and possibly caused by, changes in aeolian flux to the oceans at the LGM; and consider the radiative forcing effects of increased LGM dust loadings.

  3. The relationship between mammal faunas and climatic instability since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Nearctic vs. Western Palearctic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Romero, Erik Joaquín; Varela, Sara; Fisher, Jason T.; Olalla-Tárraga, Miguel Á.

    2017-07-01

    Climate has played a key role in shaping the geographic patterns of biodiversity. The imprint of Quaternary climatic fluctuations is particularly evident on the geographic distribution of Holarctic faunas, which dramatically shifted their ranges following the alternation of glacial-interglacial cycles during the Pleistocene. Here, we evaluate the existence of differences between climatically stable and unstable regions - defined on the basis of climatic change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum - in the geographic distribution of several biological attributes of extant terrestrial mammals of the Nearctic and Western Palearctic regions. Specifically, we use a macroecological approach to assess the dissimilarities in species richness, range size, body size, longevity and litter size of species that inhabit regions with contrasting histories of climatic stability. While several studies have documented how the distributional ranges of animals can be affected by long-term historic climatic fluctuations, there is less evidence on the species-specific traits that determine their responsiveness under such climatic instability. We find that climatically unstable areas have more widespread species and lower mammal richness than stable regions in both continents. We detected stronger signatures of historical climatic instability on the geographic distribution of body size in the Nearctic region, possibly reflecting lagged responses to recolonize deglaciated regions. However, the way that animals respond to climatic fluctuations varies widely among species and we were unable to find a relationship between climatic instability and other mammal life-history traits (longevity and litter size) in any of the two biogeographic regions. We, therefore, conclude that beyond some biological traits typical of macroecological analyses such as geographic range size and body size, it is difficult to infer the responsiveness of species distributions to climate change solely based on

  4. Tropical climate at the last glacial maximum inferred from glacier mass-balance modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.

    2000-01-01

    Model-derived equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) of former tropical glaciers support arguments, based on other paleoclimate data, for both the magnitude and spatial pattern of terrestrial cooling in the tropics at the last glacial maximum (LGM). Relative to the present, LGM ELAs were maintained by air temperatures that were 3.5??to 6.6 ??C lower and precipitation that ranged from 63% wetter in Hawaii to 25% drier on Mt. Kenya, Africa. Our results imply the need for a ~3 ??C cooling of LGM sea surface temperatures in the western Pacific warm pool. Sensitivity tests suggest that LGM ELAs could have persisted until 16,000 years before the present in the Peruvian Andes and on Papua, New Guinea.

  5. Impacts of climatic change on carbon storage in the Sahara?Gobi desert belt since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioubimtseva, E.; Simon, B.; Faure, H.; Faure-Denard, L.; Adams, J. M.

    1998-05-01

    Reconstructions of palaeolandscapes for intervals with different climatic conditions help define regional trends in palaeobiomass and carbon storage due to global climatic change. The Sahara-Gobi desert belt stretches for about 15,000 km from the Atlantic coast to Northern China. Natural vegetation zones have undergone a number of significant shifts and complex qualitative changes under the contrasting climatic conditions of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Holocene Climatic Optimum (HCO). The results presented here are based on palynological, pedological and sedimentological evidence, which indicate that the amount of carbon stored in vegetation and soils would have been much smaller during the Glacial Maximum than in the interglacial and post glacial times. Comparison of a set of palaeogeographic maps of this region for the chosen time-slices (ca. 20-18 ka, 9-8 ka and the present) allows us to discuss land biomass changes. Dry and cool conditions during the LGM resulted in the spread of arid and semi-arid ecosystems at northern and southern margins of the desert belt. The southern limit of the Sahara migrated southward at least 400 km relative to its present position, and almost 1000 km south compared to the mid-Holocene. The northern margin of the temperate deserts and dry steppes of Central Asia shifted northward for not less than 200-300 km over Kazakhstan, southern Siberia and Mongolia. In this study we have quantified variations of the main ecosystems from the LGM to the HCO in terms of changes in carbon storage. Each vegetation zone has been assigned a carbon density for living and dead (soil) organic matter. During the last world deglaciation, the Sahara-Gobi desert belt was a sink for approximately 200 Gt of atmospheric carbon, but since the mid-Holocene, it has been a source of carbon.

  6. Gridded climate data from 5 GCMs of the Last Glacial Maximum downscaled to 30 arc s for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, D. R.; Luterbacher, J.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Pearman, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of the impacts of historical, current and future global change require very high-resolution climate data (≤ 1 km) as a basis for modelled responses, meaning that data from digital climate models generally require substantial rescaling. Another shortcoming of available datasets on past climate is that the effects of sea level rise and fall are not considered. Without such information, the study of glacial refugia or early Holocene plant and animal migration are incomplete if not impossible. Sea level at the last glacial maximum (LGM) was approximately 125 m lower, creating substantial additional terrestrial area for which no current baseline data exist. Here, we introduce the development of a novel, gridded climate dataset for LGM that is both very high resolution (1 km) and extends to the LGM sea and land mask. We developed two methods to extend current terrestrial precipitation and temperature data to areas between the current and LGM coastlines. The absolute interpolation error is less than 1 and 0.5 °C for 98.9 and 87.8 %, respectively, of all pixels within two arc degrees of the current coastline. We use the change factor method with these newly assembled baseline data to downscale five global circulation models of LGM climate to a resolution of 1 km for Europe. As additional variables we calculate 19 "bioclimatic" variables, which are often used in climate change impact studies on biological diversity. The new LGM climate maps are well suited for analysing refugia and migration during Holocene warming following the LGM.

  7. Climate-induced fluvial dynamics in tropical Africa around the last glacial maximum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangen, Mark; Neumann, Katharina; Eisenberg, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    The alluvia of the Ntem, Nyong and Sanaga fluvial systems in southern Cameroon recorded repeated fluvial activity fluctuations during the Late Pleistocene, including the last glacial maximum (LGM), the beginning of the African Humid Period and the northern hemispheric Bølling-Allerød. We applied a multi-proxy approach on alluvial stratigraphies dated between 22.4 and 13.0 cal ka BP, including remote sensing, sedimentological and morphogenetic methods, phytoliths, sponge spicules, 14C and δ 13C data. A distinct NE-SW gradient of landscape and fluvial dynamics around the LGM can be drawn, with evidence for the persistence of extended fluvial rainforest refuges only in the Ntem catchment. The Sanaga and Nyong catchment areas were characterized by frequent channel migrations, floodplain reorganization and unstable vegetation subject to fire, including grasslands, woodlands, and gallery forests with bamboo thickets. In spite of increasing rainfall after 16.4 cal ka BP, persisting landscape instability played the major role for fluvial system dynamics, floodplain transformations and vegetation development until 13.0 cal ka BP, before a general landscape stabilization and rainforest expansion set in at the beginning of the Holocene.

  8. Mid-Holocene and last glacial maximum climate simulations with the IPSL model: part II: model-data comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Masa; Braconnot, Pascale; Bopp, Laurent; Mariotti, Véronique; Roy, Tilla; Woillez, Marie-Noëlle; Caubel, Arnaud; Foujols, Marie-Alice; Guilyardi, Eric; Khodri, Myriam; Lloyd, James; Lombard, Fabien; Marti, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    The climates of the mid-Holocene (MH, 6,000 years ago) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21,000 years ago) have been extensively documented and as such, have become targets for the evaluation of climate models for climate contexts very different from the present. In Part 1 of the present work, we have studied the MH and LGM simulations performed with the last two versions of the IPSL model: IPSL_CM4, run for the PMIP2/CMIP3 (Coupled Model Intercomparion Project) projects and IPSL_CM5A, run for the most recent PMIP3/CMIP5 projets. We have shown that not only are these models different in their simulations of the PI climate, but also in their simulations of the climatic anomalies for the MH and LGM. In the Part 2 of this paper, we first examine whether palaeo-data can help discriminate between the model performances. This is indeed the case for the African monsoon for the MH or for North America south of the Laurentide ice sheet, the South Atlantic or the southern Indian ocean for the LGM. For the LGM, off-line vegetation modelling appears to offer good opportunities to distinguish climate model results because glacial vegetation proves to be very sensitive to even small differences in LGM climate. For other cases such as the LGM North Atlantic or the LGM equatorial Pacific, the large uncertainty on the SST reconstructions, prevents model discrimination. We have examined the use of other proxy-data for model evaluation, which has become possible with the inclusion of the biogeochemistry morel PISCES in the IPSL_CM5A model. We show a broad agreement of the LGM-PI export production changes with reconstructions. These changes are related to the mixed layer depth in most regions and to sea-ice variations in the high latitudes. We have also modelled foraminifer abundances with the FORAMCLIM model and shown that the changes in foraminifer abundance in the equatorial Pacific are mainly forced by changes in SSTs, hence confirming the SST-foraminifer abundance relationship

  9. The climate of the Last Glacial Maximum in south-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulmeister, J.; Cohen, T.; Kiernan, K.; Woodward, C.; Barrows, T.; Fitzsimmons, K.; Kemp, J.; Haworth, R.; Clark, D. H.; Gontz, A. M.; Chang, J.; Mueller, D.; Slee, A.; Ellerton, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Last Glaciation Maximum (c. 25-18 kyr) in south-eastern Australia has traditionally been regarded as both significantly colder than the present and much more arid. This was based on a variety of evidence including the dramatic reduction in tree pollen and dune activity in currently humid areas such as the Blue Mountains of NSW. Maintaining arid conditions under significantly lower temperatures is quite challenging and not all lines of evidence supported strong aridity. Over the last four years an ARC project has worked to develop new lines of evidence to test these inferences. Outcomes from the project indicate that winter temperatures were significantly colder than at present (an 8-11 C decrease) while summer temperatures were cooler but not as extreme (4-6.5 C). Moisture balances appear to have been more positive than present along the eastern highlands, while areas to the west were comparatively drier. The humid zone along the divide maintained at least seasonally stronger flows in the major rivers, meaning that water was more available in western districts than under modern climates. I will summarise the evidence for this new pattern and highlight the climatological patterns that would be consistent with the reconstruction. I will conclude by speculating on the implications for both human landscape use and what happened to the vegetation.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Rocky Mountain Paleoglaciers - Insights into the Climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and the Subsequent Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, E. M.; Laabs, B. J. C.; Plummer, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling of paleoglaciers can yield information on the climatic conditions necessary to sustain those glaciers. In this study we apply a coupled 2-d mass/energy balance and flow model (Plummer and Phillips, 2003) to reconstruct local last glacial maximum (LLGM) glaciers and paleoclimate in ten study areas along the crest of the U.S. Rocky Mountains between 33°N and 49°N. In some of the areas, where timing of post-LLGM ice recession is constrained by surface exposure ages on either polished bedrock upvalley from the LLGM moraines or post-LLGM recessional moraines, we use the model to assess magnitudes and rates of climate change during deglaciation. The modeling reveals a complex pattern of LLGM climate. The magnitude of LLGM-to-modern climate change (temperature and/or precipitation change) was greater in both the northern (Montana) Rocky Mountains and southern (New Mexico) Rocky Mountains than in the middle (Wyoming and Colorado) Rocky Mountains. We use temperature depression estimates from global and regional climate models to infer LLGM precipitation from our glacier model results. Our results suggest a reduction of precipitation coupled with strongly depressed temperatures in the north, contrasted with strongly enhanced precipitation and much more modest temperature depression in the south. The middle Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming appear to have experienced a reduction in precipitation at the LLGM without the strong temperature depression of the northern Rocky Mountains. Preliminary work on modeling of deglaciation in the Sangre de Cristo Range in southern Colorado suggests that approximately half of the LLGM-to-modern climate change took place during the initial ~2400 years of deglaciation. If increasing temperature and changing solar insolation were the sole drivers of this initial deglaciation, then temperature would need to have risen by slightly more than 1°C/ky through this interval to account for the observed rate of ice recession.

  11. The sensitivity of the climate response to the magnitude and location of freshwater forcing: last glacial maximum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Brady, Esther C.

    2010-01-01

    Proxy records indicate that the locations and magnitudes of freshwater forcing to the Atlantic Ocean basin as iceberg discharges into the high-latitude North Atlantic, Laurentide meltwater input to the Gulf of Mexico, or meltwater diversion to the North Atlantic via the St. Lawrence River and other eastern outlets may have influenced the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation and global climate. We have performed Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) simulations with the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) in which the magnitude of the freshwater forcing has been varied from 0.1 to 1 Sv and inserted either into the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico. In these glacial freshening experiments, the less dense freshwater provides a lid on the ocean water below, suppressing ocean convection and interaction with the atmosphere above and reducing the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). This is the case whether the freshwater is added directly to the area of convection south of Greenland or transported there by the subtropical and subpolar gyres when added to the Gulf of Mexico. The AMOC reduction is less for the smaller freshwater forcings, but is not linear with the size of the freshwater perturbation. The recovery of the AMOC from a "slow" state is ˜200 years for the 0.1 Sv experiment and ˜500 years for the 1 Sv experiment. For glacial climates, with large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and reduced greenhouse gases, the cold subpolar North Atlantic is primed to respond rapidly and dramatically to freshwater that is either directly dumped into this region or after being advected from the Gulf of Mexico. Greenland temperatures cool by 6-8 °C in all the experiments, with little sensitivity to the magnitude, location or duration of the freshwater forcing, but exhibiting large seasonality. Sea ice is important for explaining the responses. The Northern Hemisphere high latitudes are slow to recover. Antarctica and the Southern Ocean show a

  12. Last glacial maximum climate inferences from cosmogenic dating and glacier modeling of the western Uinta ice field, Uinta Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsnider, Kurt A.; Laabs, Benjamin J. C.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Mickelson, David M.; Singer, Bradley S.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2008-01-01

    During the last glacial maximum (LGM), the western Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah were occupied by the Western Uinta Ice Field. Cosmogenic 10Be surface-exposure ages from the terminal moraine in the North Fork Provo Valley and paired 26Al and 10Be ages from striated bedrock at Bald Mountain Pass set limits on the timing of the local LGM. Moraine boulder ages suggest that ice reached its maximum extent by 17.4 ± 0.5 ka (± 2σ). 10Be and 26Al measurements on striated bedrock from Bald Mountain Pass, situated near the former center of the ice field, yield a mean 26Al/ 10Be ratio of 5.7 ± 0.8 and a mean exposure age of 14.0 ± 0.5 ka, which places a minimum-limiting age on when the ice field melted completely. We also applied a mass/energy-balance and ice-flow model to investigate the LGM climate of the western Uinta Mountains. Results suggest that temperatures were likely 5 to 7°C cooler than present and precipitation was 2 to 3.5 times greater than modern, and the western-most glaciers in the range generally received more precipitation when expanding to their maximum extent than glaciers farther east. This scenario is consistent with the hypothesis that precipitation in the western Uintas was enhanced by pluvial Lake Bonneville during the last glaciation.

  13. Risky business: The impact of climate and climate variability on human population dynamics in Western Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ariane; Kageyama, Masa; Latombe, Guilllaume; Fasel, Marc; Vrac, Mathieu; Ramstein, Gilles; James, Patrick M. A.

    2017-05-01

    The extent to which climate change has affected the course of human evolution is an enduring question. The ability to maintain spatially extensive social networks and a fluid social structure allows human foragers to ;map onto; the landscape, mitigating the impact of ecological risk and conferring resilience. But what are the limits of resilience and to which environmental variables are foraging populations sensitive? We address this question by testing the impact of a suite of environmental variables, including climate variability, on the distribution of human populations in Western Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Climate variability affects the distribution of plant and animal resources unpredictably, creating an element of risk for foragers for whom mobility comes at a cost. We produce a model of habitat suitability that allows us to generate predictions about the probable distribution of human populations and discuss the implications of these predictions for the structure of human populations and their social and cultural evolution during the LGM.

  14. Climate sensitivity estimated from temperature reconstructions of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Urban, N.; Shakun, J. D.; Mahowald, N. M.; Clark, P. U.; Bartlein, P. J.; Mix, A. C.; Rosell-Melé, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 1959 IJ Good published the discussion "Kinds of Probability" in Science. Good identified (at least) five kinds. The need for (at least) a sixth kind of probability when quantifying uncertainty in the context of climate science is discussed. This discussion brings out the differences in weather-like forecasting tasks and climate-links tasks, with a focus on the effective use both of science and of modelling in support of decision making. Good also introduced the idea of a "Dynamic probability" a probability one expects to change without any additional empirical evidence; the probabilities assigned by a chess playing program when it is only half thorough its analysis being an example. This case is contrasted with the case of "Mature probabilities" where a forecast algorithm (or model) has converged on its asymptotic probabilities and the question hinges in whether or not those probabilities are expected to change significantly before the event in question occurs, even in the absence of new empirical evidence. If so, then how might one report and deploy such immature probabilities in scientific-support of decision-making rationally? Mature Probability is suggested as a useful sixth kind, although Good would doubtlessly argue that we can get by with just one, effective communication with decision makers may be enhanced by speaking as if the others existed. This again highlights the distinction between weather-like contexts and climate-like contexts. In the former context one has access to a relevant climatology (a relevant, arguably informative distribution prior to any model simulations), in the latter context that information is not available although one can fall back on the scientific basis upon which the model itself rests, and estimate the probability that the model output is in fact misinformative. This subjective "probability of a big surprise" is one way to communicate the probability of model-based information holding in practice, the probability that the

  15. PALEOCLIMATE: Glacial Climate Instability.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, L

    2000-12-08

    Throughout the last glacial period, rapid climatic changes called Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. As Labeyrie discusses in his Perspective, these events are ideal targets for testing our understanding of climate change and developing climatic change models. Important steps toward understanding D-O events, particularly regarding the role of the low latitudes, are now reported by Hughen et al. and Peterson et al.

  16. The influence of continental ice, atmospheric CO2, and land albedo on the climate of the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccoli, A. J.; Manabe, S.

    1987-02-01

    The contributions of expanded continental ice, reduced atmospheric CO2, and changes in land albedo to the maintenance of the climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are examined. A series of experiments is performed using an atmosphere-mixed layer ocean model in which these changes in boundary conditions are incorporated either singly or in combination. The model used has been shown to produce a reasonably realistic simulation of the reduced temperature of the LGM (Manabe and Broccoli 1985b). By comparing the results from pairs of experiments, the effects of each of these environmental changes can be determined. Expanded continental ice and reduced atmospheric CO2 are found to have a substantial impact on global mean temperature. The ice sheet effect is confined almost exclusively to the Northern Hemisphere, while lowered CO2 cools both hemispheres. Changes in land albedo over ice-free areas have only a minor thermal effect on a global basis. The reduction of CO2 content in the atmosphere is the primary contributor to the cooling of the Southern Hemisphere. The model sensitivity to both the ice sheet and CO2 effects is characterized by a high latitude amplification and a late autumn and early winter maximum. Substantial changes in Northern Hemisphere tropospheric circulation are found in response to LGM boundary conditions during winter. An amplified flow pattern and enhanced westerlies occur in the vicinity of the North American and Eurasian ice sheets. These alterations of the tropospheric circulation are primarily the result of the ice sheet effect, with reduced CO2 contributing only a slight amplification of the ice sheet-induced pattern.

  17. Marine palynological record for tropical climate variations since the late last glacial maximum in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lu; Weng, Chengyu

    2015-12-01

    The upper part (191-1439 cm) of the marine sediment core MD05-2906 from the northern South China Sea (SCS) was palynologically investigated. The chronology suggested that it covered the record since ~19 calendar kiloyears before present (cal ka BP) and revealed a detailed environmental change history since the late last glacial maximum (LGM). During the late LGM, due to the lowered sea level (~100 m lower) and the shortened distance from the shore to the study site, the pollen concentration was very high. The pollen assemblages were dominated by non-arboreal taxa, especially Artemisia pollen, before ~15 cal ka BP. Abundant subtropical and tropical pollen taxa were still important components and a south subtropical climate prevailed during the late LGM. The coexistent rich Artemisia pollen possibly was not derived from near shores, but was derived mainly from the northern exposed continental shelf in the East China Sea (ECS). After ~15 cal ka BP, with the rise in the sea level and enhanced distance from the pollen source areas to the core site, pollen concentrations started to decline gradually. However, during the late deglaciation and early Holocene, the higher concentrations of many pollen taxa reoccurred, which cannot be attributed to the sea level changes. Pinus pollen deposited in the core, which is considered to be mostly water-carried based on many modern pollen surveys, also started to dramatically increase at the same time. Therefore, the higher pollen concentration, with more Pinus and Typha (an aquatic plant) pollen indicated a notably enhanced terrestrial runoff and precipitation during the last deglaciation/Holocene transition (~11.3-9.4 cal ka BP). We inferred that a strong summer monsoon occurred at this time. During the late LGM/deglaciation transition period, the pollen assemblage reflected a gradually warming climate, and the climate fluctuations derived from the high-latitudes were not well-identified. This study suggests that solar insolation

  18. Last Glacial Maximum Salinity Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that salinity can be reconstructed from sediment porewater. The goal of our study is to reconstruct high precision salinity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Salinity is usually determined at high precision via conductivity, which requires a larger volume of water than can be extracted from a sediment core, or via chloride titration, which yields lower than ideal precision. It has been demonstrated for water column samples that high precision density measurements can be used to determine salinity at the precision of a conductivity measurement using the equation of state of seawater. However, water column seawater has a relatively constant composition, in contrast to porewater, where variations from standard seawater composition occur. These deviations, which affect the equation of state, must be corrected for through precise measurements of each ion's concentration and knowledge of apparent partial molar density in seawater. We have developed a density-based method for determining porewater salinity that requires only 5 mL of sample, achieving density precisions of 10-6 g/mL. We have applied this method to porewater samples extracted from long cores collected along a N-S transect across the western North Atlantic (R/V Knorr cruise KN223). Density was determined to a precision of 2.3x10-6 g/mL, which translates to salinity uncertainty of 0.002 gms/kg if the effect of differences in composition is well constrained. Concentrations of anions (Cl-, and SO4-2) and cations (Na+, Mg+, Ca+2, and K+) were measured. To correct salinities at the precision required to unravel LGM Meridional Overturning Circulation, our ion precisions must be better than 0.1% for SO4-/Cl- and Mg+/Na+, and 0.4% for Ca+/Na+, and K+/Na+. Alkalinity, pH and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon of the porewater were determined to precisions better than 4% when ratioed to Cl-, and used to calculate HCO3-, and CO3-2. Apparent partial molar densities in seawater were

  19. Topographic and climatic influences on accelerated loess accumulation since the last glacial maximum in the Palouse, Pacific Northwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Mark R.; Busacca, Alan J.; Gaylord, David R.

    2005-05-01

    Topographic and climatic influences have controlled thick loess accumulation at the southern margin of the Palouse loess in northern Oregon. Juniper and Cold Springs Canyons, located on the upwind flank of the Horse Heaven Hills, are oriented perpendicular to prevailing southwesterly winds. These canyons are topographic traps that separate eolian sand on the upwind side from thick accumulations (nearly 8 m) of latest Pleistocene to Holocene L1 loess on the downwind side. Silt- and sand-rich glacial outburst flood sediment in the Umatilla Basin is the source of eolian sand and loess for the region. Sediment from this basin also contributes to loess accumulations across much of the Columbia Plateau to the northeast. Downwind of Cold Springs Canyon, Mt. St. Helens set S and Glacier Peak tephras bracket 4 m of loess, demonstrating that approximately 2500 g m -2 yr -1 of loess accumulated between about 15,400-13,100 cal yr B.P. Mass accumulation rates decreased to approximately 250 g m -2 yr -1 from 13,100 cal yr B.P. to the present. Tephrochronology suggests that the bulk of near-source Palouse loess accumulated in one punctuated interval in the latest Pleistocene characterized by a dry and windy climate.

  20. Modeled Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet-climate interactions and contributions to sea-level change since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, M.; Timmermann, A.; Elison Timm, O.; Saito, F.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most recent massive climate change events in earth's history was the last glacial termination 19-9 thousand years before present (ka BP). Northern Hemisphere ice-sheets receded quickly, causing global sea level to rise by more than 100 m, meltwater was injected into the North Atlantic halting its deepwater formation, atmospheric CO2 concentrations rose by almost 100 ppmv, and the global surface warmed by about 4°C. It is still unresolved what exactly caused this deglacial climate change and ice sheet melting. To address this question, we set out to conduct a series of transient modeling experiments with a coupled 3-dimensional ice-sheet-climate model (iLove). The model includes atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-vegetation components of the intermediate complexity model LOVECLIM and uses bi-directional coupling to the ice-sheet model IcIES. Supporting Milankovitch theory, our results indicate that the deglaciation was initiated by orbital parameter changes. However, according to our model, rising CO2 concentrations after 17 ka BP accelerated the deglaciation. Without this deglacial CO2 increase, large parts of North America and Scandinavia would be covered by ice sheets today. Present sea level would be as much as 100 m lower, and still dropping by about 2.5 m per thousand years due to growing ice sheets. Despite the deglacial CO2-rise and global warming of 4°C, the simulated Greenland ice-sheet only looses about 25% of its volume during the deglaciation, and grows again in the Holocene after 8 ka BP at a rate of about 0.1 m sea level equivalent per thousand years. Our results indicate that the stability of the Greenland ice sheet during the deglaciation and Holocene is supported by changes of the atmospheric stationary wave pattern, and by the deglacial sea ice retreat.

  1. Vegetation and environmental responses to climate forcing during the Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation in the East Carpathians: attenuated response to maximum cooling and increased biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyari, E. K.; Veres, D.; Wennrich, V.; Wagner, B.; Braun, M.; Jakab, G.; Karátson, D.; Pál, Z.; Ferenczy, Gy; St-Onge, G.; Rethemeyer, J.; Francois, J.-P.; von Reumont, F.; Schäbitz, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Carpathian Mountains were one of the main mountain reserves of the boreal and cool temperate flora during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in East-Central Europe. Previous studies demonstrated Lateglacial vegetation dynamics in this area; however, our knowledge on the LGM vegetation composition is very limited due to the scarcity of suitable sedimentary archives. Here we present a new record of vegetation, fire and lacustrine sedimentation from the youngest volcanic crater of the Carpathians (Lake St Anne, Lacul Sfânta Ana, Szent-Anna-tó) to examine environmental change in this region during the LGM and the subsequent deglaciation. Our record indicates the persistence of boreal forest steppe vegetation (with Pinus, Betula, Salix, Populus and Picea) in the foreland and low mountain zone of the East Carpathians and Juniperus shrubland at higher elevation. We demonstrate attenuated response of the regional vegetation to maximum global cooling. Between ˜22,870 and 19,150 cal yr BP we find increased regional biomass burning that is antagonistic with the global trend. Increased regional fire activity suggests extreme continentality likely with relatively warm and dry summers. We also demonstrate xerophytic steppe expansion directly after the LGM, from ˜19,150 cal yr BP, and regional increase in boreal woodland cover with Pinus and Betula from 16,300 cal yr BP. Plant macrofossils indicate local (950 m a.s.l.) establishment of Betula nana and Betula pubescens at 15,150 cal yr BP, Pinus sylvestris at 14,700 cal yr BP and Larix decidua at 12,870 cal yr BP. Pollen data furthermore support population genetic inferences regarding the regional presence of some temperate deciduous trees during the LGM (Fagus sylvatica, Corylus avellana, Fraxinus excelsior). Our sedimentological data also demonstrate intensified aeolian dust accumulation between 26,000 and 20,000 cal yr BP.

  2. Changes in the intermediate water mass formation rates in the global ocean for the Last Glacial Maximum, mid-Holocene and pre-industrial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainer, I.; Goes, M.; Murphy, L. N.; Brady, E.

    2012-09-01

    The paleoclimate version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 3 (NCAR-CCSM3) is used to analyze changes in the water formation rates in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), mid-Holocene (MH) and pre-industrial (PI) control climate. During the MH, CCSM3 exhibits a north-south asymmetric response of intermediate water subduction changes in the Atlantic Ocean, with a reduction of 2 Sv in the North Atlantic and an increase of 2 Sv in the South Atlantic relative to PI. During the LGM, there is increased formation of intermediate water and a more stagnant deep ocean in the North Pacific. The production of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is significantly weakened. The NADW is replaced in large extent by enhanced Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water (GNAIW), and also by an intensified of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), with the latter being a response to the enhanced salinity and ice formation around Antarctica. Most of the LGM intermediate/mode water is formed at 27.4 <σθ < 29.0 kg/m3, while for the MH and PI most of the subduction transport occurs at 26.5 < σθ < 27.4 kg/m3. The simulated LGM Southern Hemisphere winds are more intense by 0.2-0.4 dyne/cm2. Consequently, increased Ekman transport drives the production of intermediate water (low salinity) at a larger rate and at higher densities when compared to the other climatic periods.

  3. The response of the Okhotsk Sea environment to the orbital-millennium global climate changes during the Last Glacial Maximum, deglaciation and Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbarenko, Sergey A.; Artemova, Antonina V.; Goldberg, Evgeniy L.; Vasilenko, Yuriy P.

    2014-05-01

    Reconstruction of regional climate and the Okhotsk Sea (OS) environment for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), deglaciation and Holocene was performed on the basis of high-resolution records of ice rafted debris (IRD), СаСО3, opal, total organic carbon (TOС), biogenic Ba (Ba_bio) and redox sensitive element (Mn, Mo) content, and diatom and pollen results of four cores that form a north-southern transect. Age models of the studied cores were earlier established by AMS 14C data, oxygen-isotope chronostratigraphy and tephrochronology. According to received results, since 25 ka the regional climate and OS environmental conditions have changed synchronously with LGM condition, cold Heinrich event 1, Bølling-Allerød (BA) warming, Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and Pre-Boreal (PB) warming recorded in the Greenland ice core, North Atlantic sediment, and China cave stalagmites. Calculation of IRD MAR in sediment of north-south transect cores indicates an increase of sea ice formation several times in the glacial OS as compared to the Late Holocene. Accompanying ice formation, increased brine rejection and the larger potential density of surface water at the north shelf due to a drop of glacial East Asia summer monsoon precipitation and Amur River run off, led to strong enhancement of the role of the OS in glacial North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) formation. The remarkable increase in OS productivity during BA and PB warming was probably related with significant reorganisation of the North Pacific deep water ventilation and nutrient input into the NPIW and OS Intermediate Water (OSIW). Seven Holocene OS millennial cold events based on the elevated values of the detrended IRD stack record over the IRD broad trend in the sediments of the studied cores have occurred synchronously with cold events recorded in the North Atlantic, Greenland ice cores and China cave stalagmites after 9 ka. Diatom production in the OS was mostly controlled by sea ice cover changes and surface

  4. Relative timing of last glacial maximum and late-glacial events in the central tropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Winckler, Gisela; Hall, Brenda L.; Todd, Claire E.; Rademaker, Kurt M.

    2009-11-01

    Whether or not tropical climate fluctuated in synchrony with global events during the Late Pleistocene is a key problem in climate research. However, the timing of past climate changes in the tropics remains controversial, with a number of recent studies reporting that tropical ice age climate is out of phase with global events. Here, we present geomorphic evidence and an in-situ cosmogenic 3He surface-exposure chronology from Nevado Coropuna, southern Peru, showing that glaciers underwent at least two significant advances during the Late Pleistocene prior to Holocene warming. Comparison of our glacial-geomorphic map at Nevado Coropuna to mid-latitude reconstructions yields a striking similarity between Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Late-Glacial sequences in tropical and temperate regions. Exposure ages constraining the maximum and end of the older advance at Nevado Coropuna range between 24.5 and 25.3 ka, and between 16.7 and 21.1 ka, respectively, depending on the cosmogenic production rate scaling model used. Similarly, the mean age of the younger event ranges from 10 to 13 ka. This implies that (1) the LGM and the onset of deglaciation in southern Peru occurred no earlier than at higher latitudes and (2) that a significant Late-Glacial event occurred, most likely prior to the Holocene, coherent with the glacial record from mid and high latitudes. The time elapsed between the end of the LGM and the Late-Glacial event at Nevado Coropuna is independent of scaling model and matches the period between the LGM termination and Late-Glacial reversal in classic mid-latitude records, suggesting that these events in both tropical and temperate regions were in phase.

  5. Genetic and palaeo-climatic evidence for widespread persistence of the coastal tree species Eucalyptus gomphocephala (Myrtaceae) during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Nevill, Paul G; Bradbury, Donna; Williams, Anna; Tomlinson, Sean; Krauss, Siegfried L

    2014-01-01

    Few phylogeographic studies have been undertaken of species confined to narrow, linear coastal systems where past sea level and geomorphological changes may have had a profound effect on species population sizes and distributions. In this study, a phylogeographic analysis was conducted of Eucalyptus gomphocephala (tuart), a tree species restricted to a 400 × 10 km band of coastal sand-plain in south west Australia. Here, there is little known about the response of coastal vegetation to glacial/interglacial climate change, and a test was made as to whether this species was likely to have persisted widely through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), or conforms to a post-LGM dispersal model of recovery from few refugia. The genetic structure over the entire range of tuart was assessed using seven nuclear (21 populations; n = 595) and four chloroplast (24 populations; n = 238) microsatellite markers designed for eucalypt species. Correlative palaeodistribution modelling was also conducted based on five climatic variables, within two LGM models. The chloroplast markers generated six haplotypes, which were strongly geographically structured (GST = 0·86 and RST = 0·75). Nuclear microsatellite diversity was high (overall mean HE 0·75) and uniformly distributed (FST = 0·05), with a strong pattern of isolation by distance (r(2) = 0·362, P = 0·001). Distribution models of E. gomphocephala during the LGM showed a wide distribution that extended at least 30 km westward from the current distribution to the palaeo-coastline. The chloroplast and nuclear data suggest wide persistence of E. gomphocephala during the LGM. Palaeodistribution modelling supports the conclusions drawn from genetic data and indicates a widespread westward shift of E. gomphocephala onto the exposed continental shelf during the LGM. This study highlights the importance of the inclusion of complementary, non-genetic data (information on geomorphology and palaeoclimate) to interpret phylogeographic patterns.

  6. Genetic and palaeo-climatic evidence for widespread persistence of the coastal tree species Eucalyptus gomphocephala (Myrtaceae) during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, Paul G.; Bradbury, Donna; Williams, Anna; Tomlinson, Sean; Krauss, Siegfried L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Few phylogeographic studies have been undertaken of species confined to narrow, linear coastal systems where past sea level and geomorphological changes may have had a profound effect on species population sizes and distributions. In this study, a phylogeographic analysis was conducted of Eucalyptus gomphocephala (tuart), a tree species restricted to a 400 × 10 km band of coastal sand-plain in south west Australia. Here, there is little known about the response of coastal vegetation to glacial/interglacial climate change, and a test was made as to whether this species was likely to have persisted widely through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), or conforms to a post-LGM dispersal model of recovery from few refugia. Methods The genetic structure over the entire range of tuart was assessed using seven nuclear (21 populations; n = 595) and four chloroplast (24 populations; n = 238) microsatellite markers designed for eucalypt species. Correlative palaeodistribution modelling was also conducted based on five climatic variables, within two LGM models. Key Results The chloroplast markers generated six haplotypes, which were strongly geographically structured (GST = 0·86 and RST = 0·75). Nuclear microsatellite diversity was high (overall mean HE 0·75) and uniformly distributed (FST = 0·05), with a strong pattern of isolation by distance (r2 = 0·362, P = 0·001). Distribution models of E. gomphocephala during the LGM showed a wide distribution that extended at least 30 km westward from the current distribution to the palaeo-coastline. Conclusions The chloroplast and nuclear data suggest wide persistence of E. gomphocephala during the LGM. Palaeodistribution modelling supports the conclusions drawn from genetic data and indicates a widespread westward shift of E. gomphocephala onto the exposed continental shelf during the LGM. This study highlights the importance of the inclusion of complementary, non-genetic data (information on geomorphology and

  7. Using Nitrogen Isotope Records to Constrain Changes to the Global Oceanic Fixed Nitrogen Budget during the Last Glacial Maximum in an Earth System Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is one of the major limiting nutrients in the ocean that prevents biological production and carbon export into the ocean interior, known as the biological carbon pump. The major source and sink processes for the oceanic fixed nitrogen budget, N fixation and denitrification, respectively, are sensitive to climate change. We force an Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity that includes three-dimensional modules ocean biogeochemistry and isotopes (MOBI) with boundary conditions from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: ~21,000 years ago) and show that the nitrogen isotope results are qualitatively consistent with a global sedimentary database. Water column denitrification, which occurs in oxygen minimum zones, decreases by a factor of ~2 due to increased oxygen solubility in the glacial surface ocean that is ~2°C cooler on the global average. Sedimentary denitrification also decreases by a factor of ~2 due more exposed continental shelves from reduced sea level. We conduct experiments showing how N fixation responds in a "Redfield" biogeochemical model with constant elemental stoichiometry (N:P=16) and another "non-Redfield" experiment that includes a higher N:P quota for nitrogen fixers (N:P=40) and preferential remineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus relative to nitrogen (2 times faster). This "non-Redfield" experiment produces a more realistic distribution of dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus in the modern ocean and stimulates additional N fixation due to less P limitation of N fixers. It predicts that the oceanic fixed nitrogen inventory during the LGM was ~9% larger than present, whereas the "Redfield" model predicts an increase of only ~5%. Our experiments suggest that the oceanic nitrogen inventory during the LGM was significantly larger than present-day and show the importance of including non-Redfield stoichiometry in marine biogeochemical models when estimating changes to N fixation.

  8. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  9. Coupled ice sheet - climate simulations of the last glacial inception and last glacial maximum with a model of intermediate complexity that includes a dynamical downscaling of heat and moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiquet, Aurélien; Roche, Didier M.

    2017-04-01

    Comprehensive fully coupled ice sheet - climate models allowing for multi-millenia transient simulations are becoming available. They represent powerful tools to investigate ice sheet - climate interactions during the repeated retreats and advances of continental ice sheets of the Pleistocene. However, in such models, most of the time, the spatial resolution of the ice sheet model is one order of magnitude lower than the one of the atmospheric model. As such, orography-induced precipitation is only poorly represented. In this work, we briefly present the most recent improvements of the ice sheet - climate coupling within the model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM. On the one hand, from the native atmospheric resolution (T21), we have included a dynamical downscaling of heat and moisture at the ice sheet model resolution (40 km x 40 km). This downscaling accounts for feedbacks of sub-grid precipitation on large scale energy and water budgets. From the sub-grid atmospheric variables, we compute an ice sheet surface mass balance required by the ice sheet model. On the other hand, we also explicitly use oceanic temperatures to compute sub-shelf melting at a given depth. Based on palaeo evidences for rate of change of eustatic sea level, we discuss the capability of our new model to correctly simulate the last glacial inception ( 116 kaBP) and the ice volume of the last glacial maximum ( 21 kaBP). We show that the model performs well in certain areas (e.g. Canadian archipelago) but some model biases are consistent over time periods (e.g. Kara-Barents sector). We explore various model sensitivities (e.g. initial state, vegetation, albedo) and we discuss the importance of the downscaling of precipitation for ice nucleation over elevated area and for the surface mass balance of larger ice sheets.

  10. Paleo-climate of the Boise area, Idaho from the last glacial maximum to the present based on groundwater δ 2H and δ 18O compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Melissa E.; Mayo, Alan L.; Nelson, Steve; Tingey, Dave; Henderson, Rachel; Eggett, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    A 30 ka paleo-climate record of the Boise area, Idaho, USA has been delineated using groundwater stable isotopic compositions. Groundwater ages are modern (cold batholith), 5-15 ka (thermal batholith) , 10-20 ka (frontal fault) , and 20-30 ka (Snake River plain thermal). The stable isotopic composition of groundwaters have been used as a surrogate for the stable isotopic composition of precipitation. Using δ 2H and δ 18O compositions, local groundwater lines (LGWL's) were defined for each system. Each LGWL has been evaluated with defined slopes of 6.94 and 8, respectively, and resulting deuterium excess values (d) were found for each groundwater system for each slope. Time dependent changes in moisture source humidity and temperature, and Boise area recharge temperatures, calculated from stable isotopic data and the deuterium excess factors, agree with previous paleo-climate studies. Results indicate that from the last glacial maximum to the present time the humidity over the ocean moisture source increased by 9%, sea surface temperature at the moisture source increased 6-7°C, and local Boise temperature increased by 4-5°C. A greater increase of temperature at the moisture source as compared to the Boise area may impart be due to a shift in the moisture source area.

  11. The anatomy of Last Glacial Maximum climate variations in south Westland, New Zealand, derived from pollen records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Newnham, Rewi M.; Denton, George H.; Blaauw, Maarten; Barrell, David J. A.

    2013-08-01

    We present pollen records from three sites in south Westland, New Zealand, that document past vegetation and inferred climate change between approximately 30,000 and 15,000 cal. yr BP. Detailed radiocarbon dating of the enclosing sediments at one of those sites, Galway tarn, provides a more robust chronology for the structure and timing of climate-induced vegetation change than has previously been possible in this region. The Kawakawa/Oruanui tephra, a key isochronous marker, affords a precise stratigraphic link across all three pollen records, while other tie points are provided by key pollen-stratigraphic changes which appear to be synchronous across all three sites. Collectively, the records show three episodes in which grassland, interpreted as indicating mostly cold subalpine to alpine conditions, was prevalent in lowland south Westland, separated by phases dominated by subalpine shrubs and montane-lowland trees, indicating milder interstadial conditions. Dating, expressed as a Bayesian-estimated single 'best' age followed in parentheses by younger/older bounds of the 95% confidence modelled age range, indicates that a cold stadial episode, whose onset was marked by replacement of woodland by grassland, occurred between 28,730 (29,390-28,500) and 25,470 (26,090-25,270) cal. yr BP (years before AD, 1950), prior to the deposition of the Kawakawa/Oruanui tephra. Milder interstadial conditions prevailed between 25,470 (26,090-25,270) and 24,400 (24,840-24,120) cal. yr BP and between 22,630 (22,930-22,340) and 21,980 (22,210-21,580) cal. yr BP, separated by a return to cold stadial conditions between 24,400 and 22,630 cal. yr BP. A final episode of grass-dominated vegetation, indicating cold stadial conditions, occurred from 21,980 (22,210-21,580) to 18,490 (18,670-17,950) cal. yr BP. The decline in grass pollen, indicating progressive climate amelioration, was well advanced by 17,370 (17,730-17,110) cal. yr BP, indicating that the onset of the termination in south

  12. Resolving Some Puzzles of Climate Evolution Since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Melding of Paleoclimate Modeling and Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Paleoclimate modeling has progressed from its early days of idealized time slices for particular geologic periods using atmosphere-only models to simulations that can explore the transient evolution of the climate system, especially the time-evolving nature of the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface and their interactions, over many millennia. These transient simulations have been made possible by increases in computing power, the development and coupling of new components into Earth System models, and the reconstruction of transient climate forcings and responses from improved chronologies and comprehensive data compilations for benchmark time periods. The mechanisms and feedbacks responsible for explaining the temporal nature of the records - leads and lags, abrupt changes - are now better understood by the combined analysis from paleoclimate modeling and data together, progress which neither can make alone. The data provides us with the `what' and `when', while modeling provides us a tool to test the `why'. In this talk, I will address some of the puzzles surrounding the last deglaciation. Why did the African Humid Period start synchronously and rapidly over much of Africa just after 15,000 years ago? How could the Younger Dryas in Greenland be as cold as it was during the Older Dryas? How much freshwater did the North American ice sheets contribute to Meltwater Pulse 1a? By continuing to explore the unanswered puzzles of paleoclimate, together, our community provides a firmer basis for understanding the future trajectory for our Earth.

  13. Climate-driven changes to dune activity since the Last Glacial Maximum in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Huayu; Yi, Shuangwen; Vandenberghe, Jef; Mason, Joseph A.; Zhou, Yali; Wang, Xianyan

    2017-04-01

    Dune field dynamics are influenced by the interplay between two variables that are highly sensitive to climate change: surface erodibility (affected by vegetation, moisture, and other factors) and wind transport capacity. This basic connection with climate is clearly important in assessing possible responses of dryland landscapes to climate change in the 21st century, and has also led to many studies utilizing dune sand stratigraphy to reconstruct paleoclimatic change. The relations between the dynamics of the aeolian landscape and its drivers are not yet completely understood, however. In recent ten years, we have been working in the Mu Us dune field, a typical semi-arid dune field in north-central China. Dozens of dune chronstratigraphies have been investigated to reconstruct paleoenvironmental changes in the Mu Us dune field since about 20,000 years, by optical simulated luminescence dating and analysis of proxy indexes. Mechanisms about climatic forcing of dune field variations could then be discussed. In particular, our recent study finds that the evidence of aeolian sand deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is scarce in not only the Mu Us but also many mid-latitude dune fields around the world, whereas abundant evidence exists for aeolian sand accumulation during the deglaciation, i.e. after about 15 ka. We find in the Mu Us dune field, aeolian sands deposited during the LGM are preserved as fills in periglacial sand wedges and beneath loess deposits near the downwind dune field margin. The scarcity of LGM dune sand elsewhere in the dune field is interpreted as the result of intensive aeolian activity without substantial net sand accumulation. Increasing sand accumulation after 15 ka, reflected by much more extensive preservation, signals a change in sand supply relative to sand transportation through the dune field. Reduced wind strength and other environmental changes including regional permafrost degradation after 15 ka transformed the dune

  14. Climate-driven changes to dune activity during the Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Huayu; Yi, Shuangwen; Vandenberghe, Jef; Mason, Joseph A.; Zhou, Yali; Wang, Xianyan

    2015-10-01

    One significant change of terrestrial landscapes in response to past climate change has been the transformation between activity and stability of extensively distributed wind-blown sand dunes. The relations between the dynamics of the aeolian landscape and its drivers are not yet completely understood, however. Evidence of aeolian sand deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is scarce in many mid-latitude dune fields, whereas abundant evidence exists for aeolian sand accumulation during the deglaciation, i.e. after about 15 ka. Whether this contrast actually reflects changes in dune activity is still unclear, making paleoclimatic interpretation uncertain. Comprehensive field investigation and luminescence dating in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China, demonstrates that aeolian sands deposited during the LGM are preserved as fills in periglacial sand wedges and beneath loess deposits near the downwind dune field margin. The scarcity of LGM dune sand elsewhere in the dune field is interpreted as the result of intensive aeolian activity without substantial net sand accumulation. Increasing sand accumulation after 15 ka, reflected by much more extensive preservation, signals a change in sand supply relative to sand transportation through the dune field. Reduced wind strength and other environmental changes including regional permafrost degradation after 15 ka transformed the dune field state from net erosion to net accumulation; the dunes, however, remained largely mobile as they were in the LGM. Similar diverging patterns of dune sand accumulation and preservation before and after 15 ka in many mid-latitude dune fields imply broad climatic controls linked to the changes in high-northern-latitude forcing.

  15. CRN Dating and Numerical Glacier Modeling to Investigate Climate During the Last Glacial Maximum, and the Subsequent Deglaciation, Sawatch Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C.; Leonard, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The current study employs a combination of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface-exposure dating and numerical glacier modeling to investigate the climate during and following the last glacial maximum (LGM) in the Sawatch Range of Colorado. A coupled 2-D energy/mass balance and flow model is used to asses the combinations of temperature and precipitation change that could have sustained glaciers in the range at their LGM extents in five valleys along the eastern flank of the range, by matching modeled ice extent to the well-preserved LGM moraines in each valley. In addition, the study couples modeling with CRN geochronology of post-LGM ice recession to try to understand the dynamics of deglaciation and the magnitudes and rates of the climate changes that drove it. Results to date include an equilibrium glacier model that fits LGM moraines in all five valleys with a 5.4°C temperature depression and no change from modern precipitation amounts or seasonality. Modeling of deglaciation indicates, however, that the response of individual glacier systems is strongly influenced by valley hypsometry as was suggested by previous workers. Low-gradient glacier systems in the range, including the Lake Creek and Clear Creek glaciers, respond dramatically to even small temperature increases, while much steeper systems, such as the Pine Creek glacier, experience much more limited retreat in response to the same climate forcing A CRN-based deglaciation chronology is available for the Lake Creek glacier, the largest of five paleoglaciers studied. The ages show that portions of the valley floor were ice-covered for several hundred years longer than the cirques above. The numerical model is currently being used to investigate two possible explanations for this. One possibility is that climate ameliorated and deglaciation proceeded so fast that thin ice in the cirques melted out before much thicker stagnant ice melted in the valley. A second possibility is that cross-divide flow from

  16. Modeling glacial climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Crowley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical climate modelling has matured as a discipline to the point that it is useful in paleoclimatology. As an example a new two dimensional energy balance model is described and applied to several problems of current interest. The model includes the seasonal cycle and the detailed land-sea geographical distribution. By examining the changes in the seasonal cycle when external perturbations are forced upon the climate system it is possible to construct hypotheses about the origin of midlatitude ice sheets and polar ice caps. In particular the model predicts a rather sudden potential for glaciation over large areas when the Earth's orbital elements are only slightly altered. Similarly, the drift of continents or the change of atmospheric carbon dioxide over geological time induces radical changes in continental ice cover. With the advance of computer technology and improved understanding of the individual components of the climate system, these ideas will be tested in far more realistic models in the near future.

  17. Human population dynamics in Europe over the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Tallavaara, Miikka; Luoto, Miska; Korhonen, Natalia; Järvinen, Heikki; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    The severe cooling and the expansion of the ice sheets during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 27,000–19,000 y ago (27–19 ky ago) had a major impact on plant and animal populations, including humans. Changes in human population size and range have affected our genetic evolution, and recent modeling efforts have reaffirmed the importance of population dynamics in cultural and linguistic evolution, as well. However, in the absence of historical records, estimating past population levels has remained difficult. Here we show that it is possible to model spatially explicit human population dynamics from the pre-LGM at 30 ky ago through the LGM to the Late Glacial in Europe by using climate envelope modeling tools and modern ethnographic datasets to construct a population calibration model. The simulated range and size of the human population correspond significantly with spatiotemporal patterns in the archaeological data, suggesting that climate was a major driver of population dynamics 30–13 ky ago. The simulated population size declined from about 330,000 people at 30 ky ago to a minimum of 130,000 people at 23 ky ago. The Late Glacial population growth was fastest during Greenland interstadial 1, and by 13 ky ago, there were almost 410,000 people in Europe. Even during the coldest part of the LGM, the climatically suitable area for human habitation remained unfragmented and covered 36% of Europe. PMID:26100880

  18. Human population dynamics in Europe over the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Tallavaara, Miikka; Luoto, Miska; Korhonen, Natalia; Järvinen, Heikki; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-07-07

    The severe cooling and the expansion of the ice sheets during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 27,000-19,000 y ago (27-19 ky ago) had a major impact on plant and animal populations, including humans. Changes in human population size and range have affected our genetic evolution, and recent modeling efforts have reaffirmed the importance of population dynamics in cultural and linguistic evolution, as well. However, in the absence of historical records, estimating past population levels has remained difficult. Here we show that it is possible to model spatially explicit human population dynamics from the pre-LGM at 30 ky ago through the LGM to the Late Glacial in Europe by using climate envelope modeling tools and modern ethnographic datasets to construct a population calibration model. The simulated range and size of the human population correspond significantly with spatiotemporal patterns in the archaeological data, suggesting that climate was a major driver of population dynamics 30-13 ky ago. The simulated population size declined from about 330,000 people at 30 ky ago to a minimum of 130,000 people at 23 ky ago. The Late Glacial population growth was fastest during Greenland interstadial 1, and by 13 ky ago, there were almost 410,000 people in Europe. Even during the coldest part of the LGM, the climatically suitable area for human habitation remained unfragmented and covered 36% of Europe.

  19. Comparing lake and soil records to climate model simulations of hydrologic conditions across the western United States at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, D. E.; Maher, K.; Oster, J. L.; Egger, A. E.; Harris, C.; Horton, D. E.; Weaver, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the potential for dramatic future hydrologic changes, studies that investigate the transitions between Earth's different climate states have the potential to enhance our understanding of the modern climate system and potential future variability. The interval surrounding the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) represents a period when Earth's boundary conditions, greenhouse gas concentrations and orbital parameters were substantially different than today, and thus reconstruction of climate at the LGM provides a key test for climate models. Our study synthesizes multi-proxy geochemical analyses and examines Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project 3 (PMIP3) simulations in an effort to reconstruct changes in the hydrologic cycle over the western United States during the LGM. To enhance the spatial coverage of lake level records, we investigated the timing and magnitude of the most recent pluvial lake cycle at Surprise Valley, California by combining the 230Th-U ages and the δ18O and δ13C of shoreline tufa deposits. This new lake record, spanning 31.2 to 4.6 ka, places lake level 180 and 100 meters above present day playa, at 13.9 ± 1.2 and 22.5 ± 4.6 ka respectively. Combined isotopic and hydrologic modeling of Lake Surprise indicates that annual evaporation may have decreased by as much as 62% (at 13.9 ka) and 20% (at 22.5 ka) during the lake highstand and the LGM. Alternatively, annual precipitation may have increased by as much as 164% and 25% during the lake highstand and the LGM, respectively. Regionally, uranium isotopic variations in dated soil opal are used to constrain net infiltration (~P-ET) along a north-south transect (34.9 to 43.2 °N) in western North America between 10 and 60 ka. Leading up to the LGM, P-ET in soils increased by about 30 to 80% in the valleys of the Great Basin and Mojave deserts, peaking between 24 to 30 ka. A comparison of lake record highstands to changes in P-ET recorded in soil opal found that increases in P-ET precede

  20. Climate change and Arctic ecosystems: 1. Vegetation changes north of 55°N between the last glacial maximum, mid-Holocene, and present

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigelow, N.H.; Brubaker, L.B.; Edwards, M.E.; Harrison, S.P.; Prentice, I.C.; Anderson, P.M.; Andreev, A.A.; Bartlein, P.J.; Christensen, T.R.; Cramer, W.; Kaplan, J.O.; Lozhkin, A.V.; Matveyeva, N.V.; Murray, D.F.; McGuire, A.D.; Razzhivin, V.Y.; Ritchie, J.C.; Smith, B.; Walker, D.A.; Gajewski, K.; Wolf, V.; Holmqvist, B.H.; Igarashi, Y.; Kremenetskii, K.; Paus, A.; Pisaric, M.F.J.; Volkova, V.S.

    2003-01-01

    A unified scheme to assign pollen samples to vegetation types was used to reconstruct vegetation patterns north of 55??N at the last glacial maximum (LGM) and mid-Holocene (6000 years B.P.). The pollen data set assembled for this purpose represents a comprehensive compilation based on the work of many projects and research groups. Five tundra types (cushion forb tundra, graminoid and forb tundra, prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, erect dwarf-shrub tundra, and low- and high-shrub tundra) were distinguished and mapped on the basis of modern pollen surface samples. The tundra-forest boundary and the distributions of boreal and temperate forest types today were realistically reconstructed. During the mid-Holocene the tundra-forest boundary was north of its present position in some regions, but the pattern of this shift was strongly asymmetrical around the pole, with the largest northward shift in central Siberia (???200 km), little change in Beringia, and a southward shift in Keewatin and Labrador (???200 km). Low- and high-shrub tundra extended farther north than today. At the LGM, forests were absent from high latitudes. Graminoid and forb tundra abutted on temperate steppe in northwestern Eurasia while prostrate dwarf-shrub, erect dwarf-shrub, and graminoid and forb tundra formed a mosaic in Beringia. Graminoid and forb tundra is restricted today and does not form a large continuous biome, but the pollen data show that it was far more extensive at the LGM, while low- and high-shrub tundra were greatly reduced, illustrating the potential for climate change to dramatically alter the relative areas occupied by different vegetation types.

  1. The Last Glacial Maximum experiment in PMIP4-CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Masa; Braconnot, Pascale; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Harrison, Sandy; Lambert, Fabrice; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), around 21,000 years ago, is a cold climate extreme. As such, it has been the focus of many studies on modelling and climate reconstruction, which have brought knowledge on the mechanisms explaining this climate, in terms of climate on the continents and of the ocean state, and in terms relationships between climate changes over land, ice sheets and oceans. It is still a challenge for climate or Earth System models to represent the amplitude of climate changes for this period, under the following forcings: - Ice sheets, which represent perturbations in land surface type, altitude and land/ocean distribution - Atmospheric composition - Astronomical parameters Feedbacks from the vegetation and dust are also known to have played a role in setting up the LGM climate but have not been accounted for in previous PMIP experiments. In this poster, we will present the experimental set-up of the PMIP4 LGM experiment, which is presently being discussed and will be finalized for March 2016. For more information and discussion of the PMIP4-CMIP6 experimental design, please visit: https://wiki.lsce.ipsl.fr/pmip3/doku.php/pmip3:cmip6:design:index

  2. Global peatland dynamics since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zicheng; Loisel, Julie; Brosseau, Daniel P.; Beilman, David W.; Hunt, Stephanie J.

    2010-07-01

    Here we present a new data synthesis of global peatland ages, area changes, and carbon (C) pool changes since the Last Glacial Maximum, along with a new peatland map and total C pool estimates. The data show different controls of peatland expansion and C accumulation in different regions. We estimate that northern peatlands have accumulated 547 (473-621) GtC, showing maximum accumulation in the early Holocene in response to high summer insolation and strong summer - winter climate seasonality. Tropical peatlands have accumulated 50 (44-55) GtC, with rapid rates about 8000-4000 years ago affected by a high and more stable sea level, a strong summer monsoon, and before the intensification of El Niño. Southern peatlands, mostly in Patagonia, South America, have accumulated 15 (13-18) GtC, with rapid accumulation during the Antarctic Thermal Maximum in the late glacial, and during the mid-Holocene thermal maximum. This is the first comparison of peatland dynamics among these global regions. Our analysis shows that a diversity of drivers at different times have significantly impacted the global C cycle, through the contribution of peatlands to atmospheric CH4 budgets and the history of peatland CO2 exchange with the atmosphere.

  3. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-03

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  4. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  5. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-03-16

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  6. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditlevsen, Peter; Shao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-04-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H˜0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H˜1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. Ref: Zhi-Gang Shao and Peter Ditlevsen, Nature Comm. 7, 10951, 2016

  7. The Southern Glacial Maximum 65,000 years ago and its Unfinished Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Birkel, Sean; Doughty, Alice M.; Kelley, Sam; Barrell, David J. A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Ninneman, Ulysses S.; Barker, Stephen; Schwartz, Roseanne; Andersen, Bjorn G.; Schluechter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Glacial maxima and their terminations provide key insights into inter-hemispheric climate dynamics and the coupling of atmosphere, surface and deep ocean, hydrology, and cryosphere, which is fundamental for evaluating the robustness of earth's climate in view of ongoing climate change. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼26-19 ka ago) is widely seen as the global cold peak during the last glacial cycle, and its transition to the Holocene interglacial, dubbed 'Termination 1 (T1)', as the most dramatic climate reorganization during this interval. Climate records show that over the last 800 ka, ice ages peaked and terminated on average every 100 ka ('100 ka world'). However, the mechanisms pacing glacial-interglacial transitions remain controversial and in particular the hemispheric manifestations and underlying orbital to regional driving forces of glacial maxima and subsequent terminations remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for a full glacial maximum in the Southern Hemisphere 65.1 ± 2.7 ka ago and its 'Unfinished Termination'. Our 10Be chronology combined with a model simulation demonstrates that New Zealand's glaciers reached their maximum position of the last glacial cycle during Marine Isotope Stage-4 (MIS-4). Southern ocean and greenhouse gas records indicate coeval peak glacial conditions, making the case for the Southern Glacial Maximum about halfway through the last glacial cycle and only 15 ka after the last warm period (MIS-5a). We present the hypothesis that subsequently, driven by boreal summer insolation forcing, a termination began but remained unfinished, possibly because the northern ice sheets were only moderately large and could not supply enough meltwater to the North Atlantic through Heinrich Stadial 6 to drive a full termination. Yet the Unfinished Termination left behind substantial ice on the northern continents (about 50% of the full LGM ice volume) and after another 45 ka of cooling and ice sheet growth the earth was at inter

  8. The tropical lapse rate steepened during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Loomis, Shannon E; Russell, James M; Verschuren, Dirk; Morrill, Carrie; De Cort, Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Olago, Daniel; Eggermont, Hilde; Street-Perrott, F Alayne; Kelly, Meredith A

    2017-01-01

    The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become less steep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountain environments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate change is uncertain because of poor constraints on high-elevation temperature during past climate states. We present a 25,000-year temperature reconstruction from Mount Kenya, East Africa, which demonstrates that cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum was amplified with elevation and hence that the lapse rate was significantly steeper than today. Comparison of our data with paleoclimate simulations indicates that state-of-the-art models underestimate this lapse-rate change. Consequently, future high-elevation tropical warming may be even greater than predicted.

  9. The tropical lapse rate steepened during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Shannon E.; Russell, James M.; Verschuren, Dirk; Morrill, Carrie; De Cort, Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Olago, Daniel; Eggermont, Hilde; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Kelly, Meredith A.

    2017-01-01

    The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become less steep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountain environments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate change is uncertain because of poor constraints on high-elevation temperature during past climate states. We present a 25,000-year temperature reconstruction from Mount Kenya, East Africa, which demonstrates that cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum was amplified with elevation and hence that the lapse rate was significantly steeper than today. Comparison of our data with paleoclimate simulations indicates that state-of-the-art models underestimate this lapse-rate change. Consequently, future high-elevation tropical warming may be even greater than predicted. PMID:28138544

  10. A Global Ocean State Estimate at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrhein, D. E.; Wunsch, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Many features of Earth's climate at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 20,000 years ago) remain a mystery, including the role of the ocean circulation in transporting thermal energy, salinity, and other tracers. Most efforts at reconstructing the ocean state during the LGM have relied either upon integrations of general circulation models under prescribed LGM boundary conditions or the interpretation of climate proxy records without explicit physical constraints. Here we describe a global, primitive equation simulation of the LGM ocean with boundary conditions (wind, surface air temperature, and other atmospheric variables) and mixing parameters derived by a least-squares fit of an ocean general circulation model to observations of deep ocean stable isotopes and sea surface temperatures at the LGM.

  11. Range persistence during the last glacial maximum: Carex macrocephala was not restricted to glacial refugia.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew G; Horning, Matthew E; Roalson, Eric H

    2009-10-01

    The distribution of many species inhabiting northwestern North America has been heavily influenced by the climatic changes during the late Pleistocene. Several studies have suggested that species were restricted to glacial refugia north and/or south of the continental ice sheet front. It is also hypothesized that the coast of northwestern North America could have been a prime location for glacial refugia because of the lowering of the eustatic sea level and the concomitant rise of the continental shelf because of tectonic rebound. Alternatively, some coastal species distributions and demographics may have been unaffected in the long-term by the last glacial maximum (LGM). We tested the glacial refugium hypothesis on an obligate coastal plant species, Carex macrocephala by sampling 600 individuals from 41 populations with 11 nuclear microsatellite loci and the rpL16 plastid intragenic spacer region. The microsatellite data sets suggest a low level of population differentiation with a standardized G'(ST) = 0.032 and inbreeding was high with an F = 0.969. The homogenization of the populations along the coast was supported by a principal coordinate analysis, amovas and samova analyses. Analyses using the rpL16 data set support the results of the microsatellite analyses, with a low F(ST) of 0.042. Coalescent and mismatch analyses using rpL16 suggest that C. macrocephala has not gone through a significant bottleneck within the past 100,000 years, although a much earlier population expansion was indicated by the mismatch analysis. Carex macrocephala exhibits the characteristics of metapopulation dynamics and on the basis of these results, we concluded that it was not restricted to glacial refugia during the LGM, but that it existed as a large metapopulation.

  12. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial–interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  13. Reconstruction of past climate variability and ENSO-like fluctuations in the southern Gulf of California (Alfonso Basin) since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staines-Urías, Francisca; González-Yajimovich, Oscar; Beaufort, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Nannofossil assemblages from core MD02-2510 provide a 22 ka record of past oceanographic variability in Alfonso Basin (Gulf of California, east subtropical Pacific). In this area, environmental conditions depend on a monsoonal system heavily influenced by changes in the location of the ITCZ and nearby atmospheric pressure centers. To reconstruct nutricline depth and ENSO-like variability, two ecological indexes were calculated based on the relative abundance of the three dominant coccolith species. The late glacial period is characterized by intensified wind-driven upwelling, high primary productivity and La Niña-like conditions. An environmental shift occurs during the glacial-interglacial transition, El Niño-like conditions intensify, nutricline deepens and surface productivity declines. The late Holocene is characterized by a persistent increase in nutricline depth and dominance of El Niño-like conditions. The fluctuations in the composition of the coccolith assemblages can be related to orbital-scale fluctuations in the average position of the ITCZ. However, while the ENSO-like signal that overprints the record varies in response to orbital forcing, on suborbital time scales the relation between ENSO-like conditions and the average position of the ITCZ and the North Pacific High changes, suggesting that the development of persistent El Niño-like conditions is strongly dependent on the specific climatic background.

  14. Global Groundwater Flushing Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, K. M.; Jasechko, S.; Luijendijk, E.; Gleeson, T. P.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's groundwater systems have responded to changing climate and ice sheet prevalence since the last glacial maximum (LGM) 20 thousand years ago. While it is intuitive that the deglacial upheaval to the terrestrial hydrosphere impacted global groundwater systems, the spatiotemporal distribution of these climate impacts on groundwater and their lasting effects remain unknown. Understanding deglacial impacts on groundwater systems is important in order to assess the resiliency of groundwater resources and interactions within the hydrosphere under significant climate change. How has this climate change affected turnover timescales of groundwater systems? What proportion of groundwater systems have received sufficient recharge to "turnover" since the LGM? Here, we use a transient climate model (TraCE-21ka) and global porosity data to calculate transient groundwater turnover times globally from the LGM to present day discretized by surface watersheds. We found that half of the watersheds on Earth have had at least one groundwater "turnover" since the LGM, and sufficient groundwater flushed, if integrated globally, to turn over the global volume of groundwater up to 20 times.

  15. First results from IODP Expedition 325 to the Great Barrier Reef: unlocking climate and sea level secrets since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, J. M.; Yokoyama, Y.; Cotterill, C.; Expedition 325 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    ages from >30 to 9 ka. This chronology, combined with their recovered depths, clearly demonstrates that Exp. 325 recovered coral reef material from key periods of interest for sea level change and environmental reconstruction, including the Last Glacial Maximum, Heinrich Events 1 and 2, 19ka-MWP, Bølling-Allerød, MWP1A, the Younger Dryas and MWPB. The new Exp. 325 cores are especially important because few fossil coral records span these intervals, and even fewer are from stable, passive margin settings far from the confounding influences of ice sheets or tectonic activity. This paper summarizes Exp. 325’s first results and their broader implications for understanding global sea-level and paleoclimate changes, and provides a first interpretation of how these reefs responded to environmental stress.

  16. Early Circum-Arctic Glacial Decay Following the Last Glacial Maximum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, T.; Alonso-Garcia, M.; Flower, B. P.; Shevenell, A.; Roehl, U.; Goddard, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent rapid warming, glacial retreat, and sea ice reduction observed in the Arctic suggest extreme regional environmental sensitivity to ongoing anthropogenic climate change. To place these recent environmental changes in context and better understand the forcings and feedbacks involved in Arctic climate change, regional studies of past intervals of rapid warming are required. Paleoceanographic studies from the high-latitude North Atlantic indicate close relationships between meltwater discharges from circum-Arctic ice sheets, perturbations of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and global climate variations on sub-orbital timescales during the Late Quaternary. During the last glacial-interglacial transition (25-10 ka), when atmospheric temperatures over Greenland warmed 10-15°C and the AMOC experienced millennial-scale variability, low-resolution stable isotope studies from Fram Strait sediment cores indicate that the circum-Arctic ice sheets began to melt earlier than lower latitude Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, discharging their meltwater into the high latitude North Atlantic. Fram Strait, located at the gateway between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, is the only region where Arctic meltwater can exchange with the world oceans on both glacial and interglacial timescales. Thus, high-resolution paleoceanographic studies of Fram Strait sediments are critically required for understanding changes in Arctic meltwater flux to the North Atlantic on sub-orbital timescales. Here we present the first high-resolution (<100 yr) multi-proxy dataset from Fram Strait (ODP Site 986; 77°20.43'N, 9°04.66'E; water depth: 2063 m) to assess the timing of circum-Arctic ice sheet decay since the Last Glacial Maximum. Foraminiferal isotopic and elemental, scanning X-Ray Fluorescence, and ice-rafted debris records are used to isolate Arctic meltwater and iceberg discharge signals. Sharp increases in productivity and changes in water mass ventilation are inferred

  17. Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Clark, P. U.; Ricken, W.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Hostetler, S. W.; Kuhn, G.

    2012-04-01

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood because only a few findings with robust chronologies exist for Antarctic ice sheets. We developed a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic ice sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates the advance to their maximum extent at 29 -28 ka, and retreat from their maximum extent at 19 ka was nearly synchronous with Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (Weber, M.E., Clark, P. U., Ricken, W., Mitrovica, J. X., Hostetler, S. W., and Kuhn, G. (2011): Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum. - Science, 334, 1265-1269, doi: 10.1126:science.1209299). As for the deglaciation, modeling studies suggest a late ice-sheet retreat starting around 14 ka BP and ending around 7 ka BP with a large impact of an unstable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and a small impact of a stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). However, the Weddell Sea sites studied here, as well as sites from the Scotia Sea, provide evidence that specifically the EAIS responded much earlier, possibly provided a significant contribution to the last sea-level rise, and was much more dynamic than previously thought. Using the results of an atmospheric general circulation we conclude that surface climate forcing of Antarctic ice mass balance would likely cause an opposite response, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. Furthermore, our new data support teleconnections involving a sea-level fingerprint forced from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets as indicated by gravitational modeling. Also, changes in North Atlantic Deepwater formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines may have contributed to synchronizing the hemispheric ice sheets.

  18. Western North Pacific Monsoon Variability since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C. C.; Okumura, Y.; Cardenas, M. B.; Siringan, F. P.; Erb, M. P.; Hori, M.; Di Nezio, P. N.; Thirumalai, K.; Banner, J.; Jackson, C. S.; Lin, K.; WU, C. C.; Hu, H. M.; Taylor, F. W.

    2016-12-01

    Our study analyzes the response of the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon (WNPSM), a division of the Asian-Australian monsoon system, to internal climate variability, to abrupt climate change, and/or to changes in external forcing. Here, we combine new hydroclimate reconstructions based on the d18O composition of stalagmites that were collected from sites across the Philippines with published proxy data and compare the compilations with climate model output to understand the mechanisms that drive changes in the monsoon system from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present. Over the last millennium, stalagmite d18O in the WNPSM exhibits a gradual trend towards drier conditions. While nearby proxy data agree on the hydroclimate trend in the region, output from transient climate model runs forced by solar and volcanic changes do not agree with the data - suggesting that the hydroclimate trends might be reflecting internal climate variability. During the abrupt climate change event known as the Younger Dryas (YD) a direct relationship between the East Asian Summer Monsoon, as recorded in Chinese stalagmites, is also observed in the WNPSM: both records get drier during the YD cold interval. However, the tropical hydroclimate response occurs more gradually than the abrupt change in the Greenland ice cores, and climate models suggest that the difference in the timing is most likely due to sea ice feedbacks around Greenland. Over the Holocene, we expected Philippine stalagmite d18O records to have a similar response to changing summer insolation and hence, a trend of decreasing monsoon rainfall over the Holocene. However, the Holocene trend in two partially replicated stalagmite d18O records is opposite to that expected: inferred rainfall increases in the WNPSM over the Holocene, despite the decrease of summer insolation over the Holocene. Climate models suggest that the rainfall anomalies are due to the land-ocean thermal response over the Holocene, which drives the

  19. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle.

  20. Glacial history of Tranquilo glacier (Central Patagonia) since the Last Glacial Maximum through to the present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Araya, P. S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Kaplan, M. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Aravena, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and the inter-hemispheric phasing of former glacial fluctuations is critical for understanding the mechanisms and climate signals underlying these glacial events. Here, we present a detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations for Río Tranquilo glacier (47°S), since the LGM, including up to the present. Río Tranquilo is a small glacial valley located on the northern flank of Monte San Lorenzo, an isolated granitic massif, ~70 km to the east of the southern limit of the Northern Patagonian Icefield. Although Mt. San Lorenzo is located on the leeward side of the Andes, it is one of the most glacierized mountains in the region, with an ice surface area of ~140 km2. Geomorphic evidence suggests that during past episodes of climate change several small glaciers that today occupy the headwalls of Río Tranquilo valley expanded and coalesced, depositing a series of moraines complexes along the flanks and bottom of the valley. We used two independent dating techniques to constrain the age of the glacial history of the area. 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders located atop moraine ridges reveal that Río Tranquilo valley underwent glacial expansion/stabilization during at least the LGM (late LGM?), Late glacial (ACR and Younger Dryas) and Mid-Holocene. Within the Mid-Holocene limits, tree-ring based chronology indicates that Río Tranquilo glacier expanded during the Late Holocene as well. Our results are the first detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations from a single valley glacier, spanning the entire period from the (end of the) LGM up to the present, in southern South America. By identifying different glacial episodes within a single alpine valley, this study provides baseline data for studying the relative magnitude of the climate events responsible for these glacial events.

  1. Constraints on the magnitude and patterns of ocean cooling at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margo Project Members; Waelbroeck, C.; Paul, A.; Kucera, M.; Rosell-Melé, A.; Weinelt, M.; Schneider, R.; Mix, A. C.; Abelmann, A.; Armand, L.; Bard, E.; Barker, S.; Barrows, T. T.; Benway, H.; Cacho, I.; Chen, M.-T.; Cortijo, E.; Crosta, X.; de Vernal, A.; Dokken, T.; Duprat, J.; Elderfield, H.; Eynaud, F.; Gersonde, R.; Hayes, A.; Henry, M.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Huang, C.-C.; Jansen, E.; Juggins, S.; Kallel, N.; Kiefer, T.; Kienast, M.; Labeyrie, L.; Leclaire, H.; Londeix, L.; Mangin, S.; Matthiessen, J.; Marret, F.; Meland, M.; Morey, A. E.; Mulitza, S.; Pflaumann, U.; Pisias, N. G.; Radi, T.; Rochon, A.; Rohling, E. J.; Sbaffi, L.; Schäfer-Neth, C.; Solignac, S.; Spero, H.; Tachikawa, K.; Turon, J.-L.

    2009-02-01

    Observation-based reconstructions of sea surface temperature from relatively stable periods in the past, such as the Last Glacial Maximum, represent an important means of constraining climate sensitivity and evaluating model simulations. The first quantitative global reconstruction of sea surface temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum was developed by the Climate Long-Range Investigation, Mapping and Prediction (CLIMAP) project in the 1970s and 1980s (refs 2, 3). Since that time, several shortcomings of that earlier effort have become apparent. Here we present an updated synthesis of sea surface temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum, rigorously defined as the period between 23 and 19 thousand years before present, from the Multiproxy Approach for the Reconstruction of the Glacial Ocean Surface (MARGO) project. We integrate microfossil and geochemical reconstructions of surface temperatures and include assessments of the reliability of individual records. Our reconstruction reveals the presence of large longitudinal gradients in sea surface temperature in all of the ocean basins, in contrast to the simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum climate available at present.

  2. Tropical Cyclones in Simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, R. A.; Korty, R. L.; Camargo, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    How tropical cyclones respond to large-scale changes in climate is an important and complex question. Here we study the question using the response to the climate forcing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Utilizing two detecting and tracking algorithms of tropical cyclones (TC), we assess the sensitivity of the genesis and frequency of TCs in a 1° x 1° simulation of a global climate model (CCSM), a limited-area simulation (western north Pacific; WNP) of the higher resolution WRF model (36 km horizontal resolution), and the statistical downscaling approach developed by Emanuel. We assess how changes between the LGM and 20th century climatology of TCs are related to changes in the large-scale environmental variables known to be important to TCs (e.g. vorticity, wind shear, and available moisture). Several facets of the TC climatology at the LGM are similar across all three modeling techniques: regions that spawn TCs and their seasonal cycle at the LGM is similar to the present-day distribution, while the total counts are slightly reduced at the LGM. The average intensity in the WRF model (which features resolution high enough to resolve strong storms) is similar between the two climates, though the distribution of intensity is more concentrated at the LGM (there are fewer weak events and fewer of the strongest events at the LGM). Conditions are similarly favorable in much of the deep tropics at the LGM compared to the 20th century, particularly in the central and western Pacific, but conditions become more hostile at the subtropical margins. We compare the resulting climatology with the underlying changes in environmental factors, and empirically derive a genesis index to identify the best fit between changes in the factors and climatology of events.

  3. Extensive glaciation in Transbaikalia, Siberia, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David; Preusser, Frank; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Mifsud, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Successively smaller glacial extents have been proposed for continental Eurasia during the stadials of the last glacial period leading up to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At the same time the large mountainous region east of Lake Baikal, Transbaikalia, has remained unexplored in terms of glacial chronology despite clear geomorphological evidence of substantial past glaciations. We have applied cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating and optically stimulated luminescence to establish the first quantitative glacial chronology for this region. Based on eighteen exposure ages from five moraine complexes, we propose that large mountain ice fields existed in the Kodar and Udokan mountains during Oxygen Isotope Stage 2, commensurate with the global LGM. These ice fields fed valley glaciers (>100 km in length) reaching down to the Chara Depression between the Kodar and Udokan mountains and to the valley of the Vitim River northwest of the Kodar Mountains. Two of the investigated moraines date to the Late Glacial, but indications of incomplete exposure among some of the sampled boulders obscure the specific details of the post-LGM glacial history. In addition to the LGM ice fields in the highest mountains of Transbaikalia, we report geomorphological evidence of a much more extensive, ice-cap type glaciation at a time that is yet to be firmly resolved.

  4. The early rise and late demise of New Zealand’s last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Rother, Henrik; Fink, David; Shulmeister, James; Mifsud, Charles; Evans, Michael; Pugh, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Recent debate on records of southern midlatitude glaciation has focused on reconstructing glacier dynamics during the last glacial termination, with different results supporting both in-phase and out-of-phase correlations with Northern Hemisphere glacial signals. A continuing major weakness in this debate is the lack of robust data, particularly from the early and maximum phase of southern midlatitude glaciation (∼30–20 ka), to verify the competing models. Here we present a suite of 58 cosmogenic exposure ages from 17 last-glacial ice limits in the Rangitata Valley of New Zealand, capturing an extensive record of glacial oscillations between 28–16 ka. The sequence shows that the local last glacial maximum in this region occurred shortly before 28 ka, followed by several successively less extensive ice readvances between 26–19 ka. The onset of Termination 1 and the ensuing glacial retreat is preserved in exceptional detail through numerous recessional moraines, indicating that ice retreat between 19–16 ka was very gradual. Extensive valley glaciers survived in the Rangitata catchment until at least 15.8 ka. These findings preclude the previously inferred rapid climate-driven ice retreat in the Southern Alps after the onset of Termination 1. Our record documents an early last glacial maximum, an overall trend of diminishing ice volume in New Zealand between 28–20 ka, and gradual deglaciation until at least 15 ka. PMID:25071171

  5. The early rise and late demise of New Zealand's last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Rother, Henrik; Fink, David; Shulmeister, James; Mifsud, Charles; Evans, Michael; Pugh, Jeremy

    2014-08-12

    Recent debate on records of southern midlatitude glaciation has focused on reconstructing glacier dynamics during the last glacial termination, with different results supporting both in-phase and out-of-phase correlations with Northern Hemisphere glacial signals. A continuing major weakness in this debate is the lack of robust data, particularly from the early and maximum phase of southern midlatitude glaciation (∼30-20 ka), to verify the competing models. Here we present a suite of 58 cosmogenic exposure ages from 17 last-glacial ice limits in the Rangitata Valley of New Zealand, capturing an extensive record of glacial oscillations between 28-16 ka. The sequence shows that the local last glacial maximum in this region occurred shortly before 28 ka, followed by several successively less extensive ice readvances between 26-19 ka. The onset of Termination 1 and the ensuing glacial retreat is preserved in exceptional detail through numerous recessional moraines, indicating that ice retreat between 19-16 ka was very gradual. Extensive valley glaciers survived in the Rangitata catchment until at least 15.8 ka. These findings preclude the previously inferred rapid climate-driven ice retreat in the Southern Alps after the onset of Termination 1. Our record documents an early last glacial maximum, an overall trend of diminishing ice volume in New Zealand between 28-20 ka, and gradual deglaciation until at least 15 ka.

  6. Climatic vs. tectonic control on glacial relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasicek, Günther; Herman, Frederic; Robl, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The limiting effect of a climatically-induced glacial buzz-saw on the height of mountain ranges has been extensively discussed in the geosciences. The buzz-saw concept assumes that solely climate controls the amount of topography present above the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), while the rock uplift rate plays no relevant role. This view is supported by analyses of hypsometric patterns in orogens worldwide. Furthermore, numerical landscape evolution models show that glacial erosion modifies the hypsometry and reduces the overall relief of mountain landscapes. However, such models often do not incorporate tectonic uplift and can only simulate glacial erosion over a limited amount of time, typically one or several glacial cycles. Constraints on glacial end-member landscapes from analytical, time-independent models are widely lacking. Here we present a steady-state solution for a glacier equilibrium profile in an active orogen modified from the mathematical conception presented by Headley et al. (2012). Our approach combines a glacial erosion law with the shallow ice approximation, specifically the formulations of ice sliding and deformation velocities and ice flux, to calculate ice surface and bed topography from prescribed specific mass balance and rock uplift rate. This solution allows the application of both linear and non-linear erosion laws and can be iteratively fitted to a predefined gradient of specific mass balance with elevation. We tested the influence of climate (fixed rock uplift rate, different ELAs) and tectonic forcing (fixed ELA, different rock uplift rates) on steady-state relief. Our results show that, similar to fluvial orogens, both climate and rock uplift rate exert a strong influence on glacial relief and that the relation among rock uplift rate and relief is governed by the glacial erosion law. This finding can provide an explanation for the presence of high relief in high latitudes. Headley, R.M., Roe, G., Hallet, B., 2012. Glacier

  7. Glacial onset predated Late Ordovician climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Le Hir, Guillaume; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Ordovician glaciation represents the acme of one of only three major icehouse periods in Earth's Phanerozoic history and is notorious for setting the scene for one of the "big five" mass extinction events. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that drove ice sheet growth remain poorly understood and the final extent of the ice sheet crudely constrained. Here using an Earth system model with an innovative coupling method between ocean, atmosphere, and land ice accounting for climate and ice sheet feedback processes, we report simulations portraying for the first time the detailed evolution of the Ordovician ice sheet. We show that the emergence of the ice sheet happened in two discrete phases. In a counterintuitive sequence of events, the continental ice sheet appeared suddenly in a warm climate. Only during the second act, and set against a background of decreasing atmospheric CO2, followed steeply dropping temperatures and extending sea ice. The comparison with abundant sedimentological, geochemical, and micropaleontological data suggests that glacial onset may have occurred as early as the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian, in agreement with recent studies reporting third-order glacioeustatic cycles during the same period. The second step in ice sheet growth, typified by a sudden drop in tropical sea surface temperatures by ˜8°C and the further extension of a single, continental-scale ice sheet over Gondwana, marked the onset of the Hirnantian glacial maximum. By suggesting the presence of an ice sheet over Gondwana throughout most of the Middle and Late Ordovician, our models embrace the emerging paradigm of an "early Paleozoic Ice Age."

  8. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Ito, T.

    2014-12-01

    The circulation and climate of the modern Southern Ocean is dominated by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and associated frontal structures that separate the cold, nutrient-rich Antarctic water masses from the subantarctic and subtropical waters of northern basins. The structure in seawater density across the ACC puts strong constraints on the intensity of the eastward flow. Here we investigate the density structure across the ACC during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We explore the relationship between the lateral density contrast across the ACC and the vertical density stratification north of the ACC in General Circulation Models (GCMs). We employ a compilation of paleoceanographic constraints from the literature, including the oxygen isotopic composition of benthic foraminifera and the chlorinity and oxygen isotopic composition of pore waters in order to reconstruct these vertical and lateral density contrasts south of Australia during the LGM. We infer that the density contrast across the ACC is slightly reduced relative today's. While some model simulations produce a density stratification and ACC much stronger than today's during the LGM, we find the bulk of the paleoceanographic data do not support such a scenario.

  9. Speleothem Paleoclimatology of the Last Glacial Maximum and Deglaciation in Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, C. L.; Hodell, D. A.; Curtis, J. H.; Brenner, M.; Gallup, C.; Endsley, E.

    2006-12-01

    Two speleothems were collected in August 2005 from Columnas Cave near Tzucacab, Yucatan, Mexico. Both stalagmites have basal ages placing the initial growth during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The first sample, Hobo 3, has a basal U/Th age of 21,089 +/- 221 years and the second sample, Hobo 4, has a basal U/Th age of 21,823 +/- 261 years. Oxygen isotopes were measured on calcite samples drilled every 0.5mm along the growth axis of these speleothems. Oxygen isotope values are relatively low at the base of both Hobo 3 and 4 during the LGM, and increase during the period inferred to represent the Late Glacial. Lower oxygen isotopic values during the LGM suggest a cold, wet climate in Yucatan followed by more arid conditions during the Late Glacial. This interpretation is consistent with recent findings from sediment cores from Lake Peten Itza, Guatemala (Hodell et al., 2006). We speculate that a cold, wet LGM may have been caused by increased winter precipitation related to polar outbreaks and "Norte" winds, which bring rain to Yucatan today during the dry season. Arid conditions during the Late Glacial may coincide with delivery of glacial meltwater to the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi River. Although additional U/Th dates are needed to constrain the chronology, our preliminary results suggest that Hobo 3 and 4 stalagmites will provide a detailed history of climate change for the northern Yucatan Peninsula during the last glacial cycle.

  10. Paleodust variability since the Last Glacial Maximum and implications for iron inputs to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Murphy, L. N.; Raiswell, R.; Moore, J. K.; Anderson, R. F.; McGee, D.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Delmonte, B.; Hesse, P. P.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    Changing climate conditions affect dust emissions and the global dust cycle, which in turn affects climate and biogeochemistry. In this study we use observationally constrained model reconstructions of the global dust cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum, combined with different simplified assumptions of atmospheric and sea ice processing of dust-borne iron, to provide estimates of soluble iron deposition to the oceans. For different climate conditions, we discuss uncertainties in model-based estimates of atmospheric processing and dust deposition to key oceanic regions, highlighting the large degree of uncertainty of this important variable for ocean biogeochemistry and the global carbon cycle. We also show the role of sea ice acting as a time buffer and processing agent, which results in a delayed and pulse-like soluble iron release into the ocean during the melting season, with monthly peaks up to ~17 Gg/month released into the Southern Oceans during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

  11. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, C J; Turney, C S M; Hutchinson, D K; Taschetto, A S; England, M H

    2015-06-26

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65 °N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5 °C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.

  12. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial

    PubMed Central

    Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344

  13. Ocean Cooling Pattern at the Last Glacial Maximum

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuang, Kelin; Giardino, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean temperature and ocean heat content change are analyzed based on four PMIP3 model results at the Last Glacial Maximum relative to the prehistorical run. Ocean cooling mostly occurs in the upper 1000 m depth and varies spatially in the tropical and temperate zones. The Atlantic Ocean experiences greater cooling than the rest of the ocean basins. Ocean cooling is closely related to the weakening of meridional overturning circulation and enhanced intrusion of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Atlantic.

  14. Meltwater input to the southern ocean during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A.; Burckle, L.H.; Hays, J.D.

    1994-12-02

    Three records of oxygen isotopes in biogenic silica from deep-sea sediment cores from the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean reveal the presence of isotopically depleted diatomaceous opal in sediment from the last glacial maximum. This depletion is attributed to the presence of lids of meltwater that mixed with surface water along certain trajectories in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the drainage from Antarctica or extensive northward transport of icebergs are among the main mechanisms that could have produced the increase in meltwater input to the glacial Southern Ocean. Similar isotopic trends were observed in older climatic cycles at the same cores.

  15. Centennial to millennial climate variability in the far northwestern Pacific (off Kamchatka) and its linkage to the East Asian monsoon and North Atlantic from the Last Glacial Maximum to the early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbarenko, Sergey A.; Shi, Xuefa; Malakhova, Galina Yu.; Bosin, Aleksandr A.; Zou, Jianjun; Liu, Yanguang; Chen, Min-Te

    2017-08-01

    High-resolution reconstructions based on productivity proxies and magnetic properties of core LV63-41-2 (off Kamchatka) reveal prevailing centennial productivity/climate variability in the northwestern (NW) Pacific from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the early Holocene (EH). The age model of the core is established by AMS 14C dating and by projections of AMS 14C data of the nearby core SO-201-12KL through correlation of the productivity proxies and relative paleomagnetic intensity. The resulting sequence of centennial productivity increases/climate warming events in the NW Pacific occurred synchronously with the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) sub-interstadials during the LGM (four events), Heinrich Event 1 (HE1) (four events), Bølling-Allerød (B/A) warming (four events), and over the EH (four events). Remarkable similarity of the sequence of the NW Pacific increased-productivity events with the EASM sub-interstadials over the LGM-HE1 implies that the Siberian High is a strong and common driver. The comparison with the δ18O record from Antarctica suggests that another mechanism associated with the temperature gradient in the Southern Hemisphere may also be responsible for the EASM/NW Pacific centennial events over the LGM-HE1. During the B/A warming and resumption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), clear synchronicity between the NW Pacific, EASM and Greenland sub-interstadials was mainly controlled by changes in the atmospheric circulation. During the EH the linkages between solar forcing, ocean circulation, and climate changes likely control the synchronicity of abrupt climate changes in the NW Pacific and North Atlantic. The sequence of centennial events recorded in this study is a persistent regional feature during the LGM-EH, which may serve as a template in high-resolution paleoceanography and sediment stratigraphy in the NW Pacific.

  16. Climatic implications of glacial evolution in the Tröllaskagi peninsula (northern Iceland) since the Little Ice Age maximum. The cases of the Gljúfurárjökull and Tungnahryggsjökull glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Fernández, José M.; Andrés, Nuria; Brynjólfsson, Skafti; Sæmundsson, Þorsteinn; Palacios, David

    2017-04-01

    The Tröllaskagi peninsula is located in northern Iceland, between meridians 19°30'W and 18°10'W, jutting out into the North Atlantic to latitude 66°12'N and joining the central highlands to the south. About 150 glaciers located on the Tröllaskagi peninsula reached their Holocene maximum extent during the Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum at the end of the 19th century. The sudden warming at the turn of the 20th century triggered a continuous retreat from the LIA maximum positions, interrupted by a reversal trend during the mid-seventies and eighties in response to a brief period of climate cooling. The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationships between glacial and climatic evolution since the LIA maximum. For this reason, we selected three small debris-free glaciers: Gljúfurárjökull, and western and eastern Tungnahryggsjökull, at the headwalls of Skíðadalur and Kolbeinsdalur, as their absence of debris cover makes them sensitive to climatic fluctuations. To achieve this purpose, we used ArcGIS to map the glacier extent during the LIA maximum and several dates over four georeferenced aerial photos (1946, 1985, 1994 and 2000), as well as a 2005 SPOT satellite image. Then, the Equilibrium-Line Altitude (ELA) was calculated by applying the Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR) and Area Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR) approaches. Climatological data series from the nearby weather stations were used in order to analyze climate development and to estimate precipitation at the ELA with different numerical models. Our results show considerable changes of the three debris-free glaciers and demonstrates their sensitivity to climatic fluctuations. As a result of the abrupt climatic transition of the 20th century, the following warm 25-year period and the warming started in the late eighties, the three glaciers retreated by ca. 990-1330 m from the LIA maximum to 2005, supported by a 40-metre ELA rise and a reduction of their area and volume of 25% and 33% on average

  17. Glacial climate in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.

    1996-06-28

    New findings have caused ideas about the Earth`s climate during the Pleistocene glaciation to change. A consensus seems to be forming that during times of glaciation, climatic conditions in the tropics were quite different from those today. However still to be explained is why strontium-calcium measurements on corals and moble gas measurements of ground water suggest a tropical cooling of 4-6 C while foraminiferal speciation, oxygen isotope, and alkenone results suggest a cooling of no more than 3 C. This article discusses different aspects of the debate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Glacier fluctuations in the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda, during the Last Glacial Maximum and Termination 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. A.; Jackson, M. S.; Russel, J.; Doughty, A. M.; Howley, J. A.; Cavagnaro, D. B.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.

    2016-12-01

    The tropics exert a profound influence on global climate; however, the role of the tropics in past climate change is uncertain. In particular, it is unclear whether the tropics may initiate abrupt climate changes or instead respond to high-latitude change. Determining the timing and spatial variability of past change in the tropics is a first step to addressing the role of the low-latitudes in both past and future climate changes. To investigate these questions, we present a cosmogenic 10Be chronology from a suite of moraines in the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda. These results indicate that ice was most extensive early during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 26.0-19.5 kyr), prior to the global sea-level lowstand at 20.5 kyr. Low-magnitude, millennial-scale glacial oscillations occurred throughout the LGM. Retreat from the LGM position was underway by 21.5 kyr, though ice remained extensive in the Rwenzori until at least 18.5 ka. Similar chronologies from elsewhere in the tropics suggest that glaciers across the low-latitudes achieved their maxima in the earliest stages of the LGM, during a period of high (mean annual) equatorial insolation and decreasing Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. In addition, the larger-scale recession that occurred subsequent to 21.5 kyr predates the post-glacial rise in atmospheric CO2 at 18.1 kyr. Therefore, we suggest that something other than Northern Hemisphere or equatorial insolation or atmospheric CO2 may have influenced the millennial-scale glacial oscillations throughout the LGM as registered by Rwenzori moraines. The chronology of glacial fluctuations in the Rwenzori Mountains is similar to other glacial chronologies located outside the tropics in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, suggesting that glaciers across the globe may have responded to a common forcing throughout the LGM and Termination 1.

  19. Reconstruction of North American drainage basins and river discharge since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Over the last glacial cycle, ice sheets and the resultant glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) rearranged river systems. As these riverine threads that tied the ice sheets to the sea were stretched, severed, and restructured, they also shrank and swelled with the pulse of meltwater inputs and time-varying drainage basin areas, and sometimes delivered enough meltwater to the oceans in the right places to influence global climate. Here I present a general method to compute past river flow paths, drainage basin geometries, and river discharges, by combining models of past ice sheets, glacial isostatic adjustment, and climate. The result is a time series of synthetic paleohydrographs and drainage basin maps from the Last Glacial Maximum to present for nine major drainage basins - the Mississippi, Rio Grande, Colorado, Columbia, Mackenzie, Hudson Bay, Saint Lawrence, Hudson, and Susquehanna/Chesapeake Bay. These are based on five published reconstructions of the North American ice sheets. I compare these maps with drainage reconstructions and discharge histories based on a review of observational evidence, including river deposits and terraces, isotopic records, mineral provenance markers, glacial moraine histories, and evidence of ice stream and tunnel valley flow directions. The sharp boundaries of the reconstructed past drainage basins complement the flexurally smoothed GIA signal that is more often used to validate ice-sheet reconstructions, and provide a complementary framework to reduce nonuniqueness in model reconstructions of the North American ice-sheet complex.

  20. Changing amounts and sources of moisture in the U.S. southwest since the Last Glacial Maximum in response to global climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Weimin; Hardt, Benjamin F.; Banner, Jay L.; Meyer, Kevin J.; James, Eric W.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Min, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. southwest has a limited water supply and is predicted to become drier in the 21st century. An improved understanding of factors controlling moisture sources and availability is aided by reconstruction of past responses to global climate change. New stable isotope and growth-rate records for a central Texas speleothem indicate a strong influence of Gulf of Mexico (GoM) moisture and increased precipitation from 15.5 to 13.5 ka, which includes the majority of the Bølling–Allerød warming (BA: 14.7–12.9 ka). Coeval speleothem records from 900 and 1200 km to the west allow reconstruction of regional moisture sources and atmospheric circulation. The combined isotope and growth-rate time series indicates 1) increased GoM moisture input during the majority of the BA, producing greater precipitation in Texas and New Mexico; and 2) a retreat of GoM moisture during Younger Dryas cooling (12.9–11.5 ka), reducing precipitation. These results portray how late-Pleistocene atmospheric circulation and moisture distribution in this region responded to global changes, providing information to improve models of future climate.

  1. Changing amounts and sources of moisture in the U.S. southwest since the Last Glacial Maximum in response to global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weimin; Hardt, Benjamin F.; Banner, Jay L.; Meyer, Kevin J.; James, Eric W.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Min, Angela

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. southwest has a limited water supply and is predicted to become drier in the 21st century. An improved understanding of factors controlling moisture sources and availability is aided by reconstruction of past responses to global climate change. New stable isotope and growth-rate records for a central Texas speleothem indicate a strong influence of Gulf of Mexico (GoM) moisture and increased precipitation from 15.5 to 13.5 ka, which includes the majority of the Bølling-Allerød warming (BA: 14.7-12.9 ka). Coeval speleothem records from 900 and 1200 km to the west allow reconstruction of regional moisture sources and atmospheric circulation. The combined isotope and growth-rate time series indicates 1) increased GoM moisture input during the majority of the BA, producing greater precipitation in Texas and New Mexico; and 2) a retreat of GoM moisture during Younger Dryas cooling (12.9-11.5 ka), reducing precipitation. These results portray how late-Pleistocene atmospheric circulation and moisture distribution in this region responded to global changes, providing information to improve models of future climate.

  2. The glaciers of Sierra Segundera (Zamora, NW Spain) during their Maximum Ice Extent: area, volume, Glacial Equilibrium Line Altitude and paleo-climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Fernández, Jose; Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the Quaternary glaciers which formed the eastern sector of the Sierra Segundera ice-cap (NW Iberian Peninsula) during its Maximum Ice Extent (MIE) local phase (33 ka) in a surface area of 165 km2, to estimate the ice volumes and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs). The study area presents a wide altimetric range of approx. 1200 m, from the Tera glacier front to the Peña Trevinca (42°14'33'' N, 6°47'46'' W; 2127 m) and Peña Negra (42°14'58'' N, 6°47'39'' W; 2121 m) horns, covering a wide plateau at an altitude of over 1700 m. The reconstruction of the MIE paleoglaciers used a combination of various tools: a rheological numerical model which describes the ice flow, GIS and geomorphological field work to validate the results. The model used here allowed the reconstruction of the surface topography of the paleoglacial ice, even though there is no existing geomorphologic evidence to reveal the thickness of the ice at that time. The GIS enabled the creation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and the estimation of thicknesses and volumes. The reconstructed topography and the delimitation of the geomorphologic features were used to estimate the ELA using the following methods: Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR), Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR), Terminus Headwall Altitude Ratio (THAR) and Maximum Elevation of Lateral Moraines (MELM). The DEM reconstructed for the surface of the paleoglaciers obtained an estimated maximum ice thickness of over 450 m during the MIE, and a total ice volume of 2.63 x 10(10)m3 for the eastern half of the ice-cap. When estimating the paleo-ELAs, the AABR and AAR methods obtain more logical values. The AABR method obtains BR=1, which questions the BR=2 assumed as representative for medium latitude glaciers with oceanic influence; the paleo-ELA AABR was 1739 m. Applying the AAR method with the ratio 0.65 gives the result 1735 m. The THAR and MELM methods give values of 1637 m and 1651 m respectively for

  3. North Pacific atmospheric rivers and their influence on western North America at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, Juan M.; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Risi, Camille; Tripati, Aradhna E.

    2017-01-01

    Southwestern North America was wetter than present during the Last Glacial Maximum. The causes of increased water availability have been recently debated, and quantitative precipitation reconstructions have been underutilized in model-data comparisons. We investigate the climatological response of North Pacific atmospheric rivers to the glacial climate using model simulations and paleoclimate reconstructions. Atmospheric moisture transport due to these features shifted toward the southeast relative to modern. Enhanced southwesterly moisture delivery between Hawaii and California increased precipitation in the southwest while decreasing it in the Pacific Northwest, in agreement with reconstructions. Coupled climate models that are best able to reproduce reconstructed precipitation changes simulate decreases in sea level pressure across the eastern North Pacific and show the strongest southeastward shifts of moisture transport relative to a modern climate. Precipitation increases of ˜1 mm d-1, due largely to atmospheric rivers, are of the right magnitude to account for reconstructed pluvial conditions in parts of southwestern North America during the Last Glacial Maximum.

  4. Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation of the Iberian Central System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, D.; Andrés, N.; Vieira, G.; Marcos, J.; Vázquez-Selem, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Central System runs E-W across the centre of the Iberian Peninsula and is composed mainly of crystalline rocks. A glacial morphology is well preserved on many of its most important summit areas especially towards the Atlantic. Research has recently been carried out in three of the sierras of this mountain system, with the aim of establishing the absolute chronology of the maximum glacial advance and of the deglaciation in the whole system. The method used is cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and glacially polished outcrops. The selected areas are the Sierra de Guadarrama (Palacios et al. 2012) close to Peñalara Peak (40°51'N, 3°57'W; 2428 m), the Sierra de Gredos (Palacios et al. 2011) close to Almanzor Peak (40°14'N, 5°17'W; 2592 m), and the Sierra de la Estrela (Vieira and Palacios, 2010) close to Alto de la Torre summit (40°20'N, 7°34'W; 1993 m). These areas are representative of the whole Central System from west to east. The results are highly homogeneous. Moraines dating from earlier than the last glaciation were not found in any of the sierras. On the contrary, in all cases the oldest moraines from the last glaciation rest on intensely weathered crystalline surfaces. The oldest moraines date from between 31 and 26 ka. In most cases, the deposition of these moraine ridges was followed by minor advances and retreats which left a sequence of ridges very close together, lasting until 18-16 ka. A fast retreat occurred after 16-15 ka, when glaciers completely abandoned the valleys, disappearing in most cases by 13-14 ka. The ice lasted until 11-10 ka, but only in small cirques found on sheltered rock-walls below the highest peaks.

  5. Paleoecology of central Kentucky since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Gary R.; Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.; Harrison, Frederick W.; Turner, Manson R.

    1991-09-01

    Pollen grains and spores, plant macrofossils, and sponge spicules from a 7.2-m sediment core from Jackson Pond dating back to 20,000 yr B.P. are the basis for new interpretations of vegetational, limnological, and climatic changes in central Kentucky. During the full-glacial interval (20,400 to 16,800 yr B.P.) upland vegetation was closed spruce forest with jack pine as a subdominant. Aquatic macrophyte and sponge assemblages indicate that the site was a relatively deep, open pond with low organic productivity. During late-glacial time (16,800 to 11,300 yr B.P.) spruce populations continued to dominate while jack pine declined and sedge increased as the vegetation became a more open, taiga-like boreal woodland. Between 11,300 and 10,000 yr B.P., abundances of spruce and oak pollen oscillated reciprocally, possibly reflecting the Younger Dryas oscillation as boreal taxa underwent a series of declines and increases at the southern limit of their ranges before becoming extirpated and replaced by deciduous forest. In the early Holocene (10,000 to 7300 yr B.P.) a mesic deciduous woodland developed; it was replaced by xeric oak-hickory forest during the middle Holocene between 7300 and 3900 yr B.P. Grass increased after 3900 yr B.P., indicating that the presettlement vegetation mosaic of mixed deciduous forest and prairie (the "Kentucky Barrens") became established in central Kentucky after the Hypsithermal interval. Sponge spicules increased in number during the Holocene, reflecting reduced water depths in the pond. Sediment infilling, as well as climatic warming and the expansion of fringing shrub thickets, increased nutrient and habitat availability for freshwater sponges.

  6. Interannual physiological responses of glacial trees to changes in atmospheric [CO2] since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, L. M.; Harris, J. M.; Ward, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, atmospheric [CO2] were as low as 180 ppm and have currently risen to a modern value of 385 ppm as a result of fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. In order to understand how changing [CO2] influenced the physiology of trees over the last 50,000 years, we analyzed carbon isotope ratios of individual tree rings from juniper wood specimens from the Rancho La Brea tar pits in southern California and kauri wood specimens from peat bogs in New Zealand (North Island). Modern trees from different altitudes were compared to account for changes in precipitation and temperature through time in order to isolate the effects of changing [CO2]. We hypothesized that over the last 50,000 years, the ratio of ci (intracellular [CO2]) to ca (atmospheric [CO2]) would be maintained within each species. Consequently, ci values would be significantly lower in glacial trees due to lower ca levels during the LGM. In addition, we hypothesized that low [CO2] (which does not vary between years during the LGM) dominated tree physiology during the LGM as evidenced by low levels of inter-annual variation in ci/ca ratios relative to modern trees (which are known to respond to high frequency variation in water and temperature between years). In both kauri and juniper trees, mean ci/ca values remained constant throughout 50,000 years despite major climatic and [CO2] changes, indicating that there is a long-term physiological set point in these species. Limitations on the ci values of glacial junipers suggest that 90 ppm CO2 represents a survival compensation point for this species. In addition, glacial trees showed very low inter-annual variation in ci/ca values compared to modern trees. This suggests that glacial tree physiology may have been dominated by low CO2 that was constant between years, whereas modern trees may be dominated by climatic factors that vary substantially between years. Consequently, while each species maintained mean ci/ca values over time

  7. Modelling the trajectory of erratic boulders in the western Alps during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Becker, Patrick; Funk, Martin; Seguinot, Julien

    2015-04-01

    Erratic boulders of the western Alps provide valuable information about the flow field prevailing during the last glacial maximum. In particular, the origin, the exposure time and the location of several boulders identified along the Jura are well documented. The goal of this study is to corroborate these information with ice flow simulations performed with the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM). PISM is capable to simulate the time evolution of a large scale ice sheet by accounting for the dynamics of ice, englacial temperature, surface mass balance and variations of the lithosphere. The main difficulty of this exercise resides in large uncertainties concerning the climate forcing required as input in the surface mass balance model. To mimic with climate conditions prevailing during the last glacial maximum, a common approach consists of applying different temperature offsets and corrections in the precipitation patterns to present-day climate data, and to select the parametrizations which yield the best match between modelled ice sheet extents and geomorphologically-based margin reconstructions. To better constrain our modelling results we take advantage of some erratic boulders from which we know their origin. More precisely, we are looking for the climatic conditions which reproduce at best the trajectories of the boulders from their origins to their final location.

  8. Reconstruction of the glacial maximum recorded in the central Cantabrian Mountains (N Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2014-05-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains is a coastal range up to 2648 m altitude trending parallel to northern Iberian Peninsula edge at a maximum distance of 100 km inland (~43oN 5oW). Glacial sediments and landforms are generally well-preserved at altitudes higher than 1600 m, evidencing the occurrence of former glaciations. Previous research supports a regional glacial maximum prior to ca 38 cal ka BP and an advanced state of deglaciation by the time of the global Last Glacial Maximum (Jiménez-Sánchez et al., 2013). A geomorphological database has been produced in ArcGIS (1:25,000 scale) for an area about 800 km2 that partially covers the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park. A reconstruction of the ice extent and flow pattern of the former glaciers is presented for this area, showing that an ice field was developed on the study area during the local glacial maximum. The maximum length of the ice tongues that drained this icefield was remarkably asymmetric between both slopes, recording 1 to 6 km-long in the northern slope and up to 19 km-long in southern one. The altitude difference between the glacier fronts of both mountain slopes was ca 100 m. This asymmetric character of the ice tongues is related to geologic and topo-climatic factors. Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., García-Ruiz, J.M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Farias, P., Valero-Garcés, B., Moreno, A., Rico, M., Valcárcel, M., 2013. A review of glacial geomorphology and chronology in northern Spain: timing and regional variability during the last glacial cycle. Geomorphology 196, 50-64. Research funded by the CANDELA project (MINECO-CGL2012-31938). L. Rodríguez-Rodríguez is a PhD student with a grant from the Spanish national FPU Program (MECD).

  9. Grassland Vegetation in the Southern Great Plains during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stephen A.; Valastro, Salvatore

    1995-09-01

    New pollen records from White Lake in the Southern High Plains and from Friesenhahn Cave on the southeastern Edwards Plateau of Texas indicate that the glacial-age vegetation of the southern Great Plains was a grassland. The High Plains was a treeless Artemisia grassland and the Edwards Plateau, at the south edge of the Great Plains, was a grassland with pinyon pines and deciduous trees in canyons and riparian habitats. The glacial-age grasslands differ from modern shortgrass and tallgrass prairies and may have no modern analog. The dominance of prairie vegetation during the last glacial maximum is compatible with late Pleistocene mammalian faunas and late-glacial grassland pollen records from the region. Earlier interpretations of a pine-spruce forest on the High Plains were based on pollen assemblages that are here shown to have been altered by postdepositional deterioration, resulting in differential preservation of conifer pollen grains. Accordingly, the "Tahoka Pluvial" and other "climatic episodes" defined by High Plains pollen records are abandoned.

  10. Craniometric analysis of European Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic samples supports discontinuity at the Late Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Ciarán; Meiklejohn, Christopher; von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Pinhasi, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) represents the most significant climatic event since the emergence of anatomically modern humans (AMH). In Europe, the LGM may have played a role in changing morphological features as a result of adaptive and stochastic processes. We use craniometric data to examine morphological diversity in pre- and post-LGM specimens. Craniometric variation is assessed across four periods—pre-LGM, late glacial, Early Holocene and Middle Holocene—using a large, well-dated, dataset. Our results show significant differences across the four periods, using a MANOVA on size-adjusted cranial measurements. A discriminant function analysis shows separation between pre-LGM and later groups. Analyses repeated on a subsample, controlled for time and location, yield similar results. The results are largely influenced by facial measurements and are most consistent with neutral demographic processes. These findings suggest that the LGM had a major impact on AMH populations in Europe prior to the Neolithic. PMID:24912847

  11. Constraint on the penultimate glacial maximum Northern Hemisphere ice topography (≈140 kyrs BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Florence; Wekerle, Claudia; Näslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Masina, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The penultimate glacial maximum (PGM, ≈140 kyrs BP), is known to be the most extensive glaciation on record that occurred during the last 400 kyrs over Eurasia. We used a coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Sea-Ice-Land model to simulate the climate of the PGM accounting for a reconstruction of the large PGM Eurasian ice sheet. Due to uncertainties in the PGM Laurentide ice-sheet topography, two simulations with different ice-sheet topographies over North America (large as for the Last Glacial Maximum, LGM and small as for 13 kyrs BP) are performed. Results show that the simulated PGM glacial maximum climates are of comparable magnitude with previous simulations of the LGM in both cases. Assuming a small Laurentide ice-sheet instead of the LGM one in our PGM simulations results in a shift in the planetary waves. This causes an increase in storm track activity over the North Atlantic as well as higher temperatures and precipitation rates over North America, North Atlantic and over the Eurasian ice sheet. In addition, it induces a negative temperature anomaly over East Siberia yielding a thick snow cover, which seems to be in agreement with data from recent Arctic campaigns suggesting that an ice cap developed over Beringia during the PGM. All together, the changes in large-scale circulation and regional climate simulated using a small Laurentide ice sheet match the proxies well. Based on our findings, we suggest that the Laurentide ice sheet might have been smaller during the PGM than during the LGM, in turn also implying a larger Eurasian ice sheet than during the LGM, which is supported by various geological evidence of the PGM.

  12. Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, M.E.; Clark, P.U.; Ricken, W.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; Kuhn, G.

    2011-01-01

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood. We develop a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates that the advance to and retreat from their maximum extent was within dating uncertainties synchronous with most sectors of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. Surface climate forcing of Antarctic mass balance would probably cause an opposite response, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. Our new data support teleconnections involving sea-level forcing from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and changes in North Atlantic deep-water formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines to synchronize the hemispheric ice sheets.

  13. Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael E; Clark, Peter U; Ricken, Werner; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Hostetler, Steven W; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2011-12-02

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood. We develop a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates that the advance to and retreat from their maximum extent was within dating uncertainties synchronous with most sectors of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. Surface climate forcing of Antarctic mass balance would probably cause an opposite response, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. Our new data support teleconnections involving sea-level forcing from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and changes in North Atlantic deep-water formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines to synchronize the hemispheric ice sheets.

  14. Shortwave forcing and feedbacks in Last Glacial Maximum and Mid-Holocene PMIP3 simulations.

    PubMed

    Braconnot, Pascale; Kageyama, Masa

    2015-11-13

    Simulations of the climates of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago, and of the Mid-Holocene (MH), 6000 years ago, allow an analysis of climate feedbacks in climate states that are radically different from today. The analyses of cloud and surface albedo feedbacks show that the shortwave cloud feedback is a major driver of differences between model results. Similar behaviours appear when comparing the LGM and MH simulated changes, highlighting the fingerprint of model physics. Even though the different feedbacks show similarities between the different climate periods, the fact that their relative strength differs from one climate to the other prevents a direct comparison of past and future climate sensitivity. The land-surface feedback also shows large disparities among models even though they all produce positive sea-ice and snow feedbacks. Models have very different sensitivities when considering the vegetation feedback. This feedback has a regional pattern that differs significantly between models and depends on their level of complexity and model biases. Analyses of the MH climate in two versions of the IPSL model provide further indication on the possibilities to assess the role of model biases and model physics on simulated climate changes using past climates for which observations can be used to assess the model results. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Patterns and mechanisms of warm pool hydroclimate change at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiNezio, Pedro; Tierney, Jessica; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Timmermann, Axel

    2016-04-01

    A definitive answer on the mechanisms driving glacial-interglacial changes in tropical hydroclimate is lacking, particularly regarding the importance of greenhouse gases. We address this issue by evaluating mechanisms and patterns of rainfall change over the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) in climate model simulations and proxy data of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our simulations show two mechanisms explaining the proxy data. Exposure of the Sunda and Sahul shelves due to lowered sea level drives a weakening of the Walker circulation explaining the dipole of drier IPWP center and wetter eastern Indian Ocean. Ice sheet albedo alters the inter-hemispheric temperature gradient driving changes in the Asian monsoon that explain the dry condition over India and the northern IPWP. Proxy and model data show consistent patterns of cooling over the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, providing independent evidence for the proposed mechanisms. Together these results demonstrate that ice sheets are a first order driver of tropical climate on glacial-interglacial timescales. Greenhouse gases drive a response that is relatively negligible and therefore cannot be detected using the available proxy data.

  16. Ground movement at Somma-Vesuvius from Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Fedele, Lorenzo; Morra, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Detailed micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from two boreholes drilled at the archaeological excavations of Herculaneum, ~ 7 km west of the Somma -Vesuvius crater, allowed reconstruction of the Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental evolution of the site. The data provide clear evidence for ground uplift movements involving the studied area. The Holocenic sedimentary sequence on which the archaeological remains of Herculaneum rest has risen several meters at an average rate of ~ 4 mm/yr. The uplift has involved the western apron of the volcano and the Sebeto-Volla Plain, a populous area including the eastern suburbs of Naples. This is consistent with earlier evidence for similar uplift for the areas of Pompeii and Sarno valley (SE of the volcano) and the Somma -Vesuvius eastern apron. An axisimmetric deep source of strain is considered responsible for the long-term uplift affecting the whole Somma -Vesuvius edifice. The deformation pattern can be modeled as a single pressure source, sited in the lower crust and surrounded by a shell of Maxwell viscoelastic medium, which experienced a pressure pulse that began at the Last Glacial Maximum.

  17. Simulated Last Glacial Maximum Δ14CATM and the Deep Glacial Ocean Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, V.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.; Bouttes, N.; Bopp, L.

    2012-12-01

    Δ14Catm has been estimated at 420 ± 80‰ (INTCAL09) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) compared to preindustrial times (0‰), but mechanisms explaining this difference are not yet resolved. Δ14Catm is a function of cosmogenic production in high atmosphere and of carbon cycling in the Earth system (through carbon exchange with the superficial reservoirs, ocean and continental biosphere). 10Be-based reconstructions show a contribution of the cosmogenic production term of only 200 ± 200‰ at the LGM. The remaining 220‰ of Δ14Catm variation between the LGM and preindustrial times have thus to be explained by changes in the carbon cycle. Recently, Bouttes et al. (2010) proposed to explain most of the difference in atmospheric pCO2 between glacial and interglacial times by brine-induced ocean stratification in the Southern Ocean. This mechanism involves the formation of very saline water masses that can store Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in the deep ocean. During glacial times, the sinking of brines is enhanced and more DIC is stored in the deep ocean, lowering atmospheric pCO2. Such an isolated ocean reservoir would be characterized by a low Δ14C signature. Evidence of such 14C-depleted deep waters during the LGM has recently been found in the Southern Ocean (Skinner et al., 2010). The degassing of this carbon with low Δ14C would then reduce Δ14Catm throughout the deglaciation. We have further developed the CLIMBER-2 model to include a cosmogenic production of 14C as well as an interactive atmospheric 14C reservoir. We investigate the role of both sinking of brines and cosmogenic production, alongside iron and vertical diffusion mechanisms to explain changes in Δ14Catm during the last deglaciation. In our simulations, not only the sinking of brine mechanism is consistent with past Δ14C data but also it explains most of the differences in atmospheric pCO2 and Δ14C between LGM and preindustrial times.

  18. Precipitation Isotopes Reveal Intensified Indonesian Monsoon Circulation During the Dry Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecky, B. L.; Russell, J. M.; Vogel, H.; Bijaksana, S.; Huang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) invigorates the oceanic-atmospheric circulation in the tropics, with far-reaching climate impacts that extend into the high latitudes. A growing number of deglacial proxy reconstructions from the region have revealed the importance of both high- and low-latitude climate processes to IPWP rainfall during the late Pleistocene. Many of these proxies reconstruct the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of rainfall (δ18Oprecip, δDprecip), a powerful tool for understanding changes in climate. However, an increasing number of studies from the region have highlighted the tendency for δ18Oprecip and δDprecip to reflect regional and/or remote circulation processes rather than local rainfall amounts, complicating the reconstruction of IPWP hydroclimate. To better understand high- and low-latitude drivers of late Pleistocene hydroclimate in the IPWP, precipitation isotopic reconstructions must be constrained with both modern observations and independent proxies for rainfall amount. We present a reconstruction of δDprecip using leaf wax compounds preserved in the sediments of Lake Towuti, Sulawesi, from 60,000 years before present to today. We interpret our proxy record with the aid of a new precipitation isotopic dataset from our study site, with daily rainfall isotope measurements to constrain the processes controlling δDprecip. Our Lake Towuti δDwax record is strikingly similar to a speleothem δ18O record from southern Indonesia (Ayliffe et al., 2013) and shares features with other nearby records spanning the Last Glacial Maximum to present. Together, these records indicate that monsoon circulation was intensified in central and southern Indonesia during the glacial period. However, other independent rainfall proxies from Lake Towuti indicate that dry conditions accompanied the intensified monsoon. Regional-scale isotopic depletion during the dry glacial period may have arisen from dynamical and other fractionating processes that

  19. Sensitivity of the oxidative capacity of the troposphere since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickley, L. J.; Murray, L. T.; Kaplan, J. O.; Sofen, E. D.; Parrella, J. P.; Alexander, B.; Schmidt, G. A.; Jacob, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidative capacity of the troposphere -- defined by the concentrations of OH, O3, H2O2, NO3, and BrOx -- controls the lifetime of many trace gases of human interest, including the long-lived greenhouse gas methane. This oxidative capacity responds to meteorological conditions, tropospheric emissions, and overhead stratospheric boundary conditions, and has likely changed significantly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The ICE age Chemistry And Proxies (ICECAP) project has developed an integrated offline-coupled climate-biosphere-chemistry model for quantifying tropospheric present day and paleo-oxidant levels. We perform detailed O3-NOx-CO-VOC-BrOx-aerosol simulations of tropospheric composition using the GEOS-Chem 3D global chemical transport model driven by meteorological fields from the GISS Model E general circulation model and land cover from the BIOME4-TG global terrestrial equilibrium vegetation model. Preliminary results showed net reduced oxidative capacities in all pre-Industrial and paleo-climates despite severe reduction in methane concentrations. Here we update our simulations to include improved representations of paleo biomass burning and biogenic emissions. We now include bromine chemistry (a potentially important pre-Industrial oxidant) and an online linearized stratospheric chemistry scheme. We compare the photochemical reaction rates from a series of sensitivity simulations to determine the most important factors controlling the oxidative capacity of the Last Glacial Maximum, the pre-Industrial Holocene, and the present day.

  20. New Zealand supereruption provides time marker for the Last Glacial Maximum in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Nelia W; Iverson, Nels A; Van Eaton, Alexa R; Sigl, Michael; Alloway, Brent V; Kurbatov, Andrei V; Mastin, Larry G; McConnell, Joseph R; Wilson, Colin J N

    2017-09-25

    Multiple, independent time markers are essential to correlate sediment and ice cores from the terrestrial, marine and glacial realms. These records constrain global paleoclimate reconstructions and inform future climate change scenarios. In the Northern Hemisphere, sub-visible layers of volcanic ash (cryptotephra) are valuable time markers due to their widespread dispersal and unique geochemical fingerprints. However, cryptotephra are not as widely identified in the Southern Hemisphere, leaving a gap in the climate record, particularly during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Here we report the first identification of New Zealand volcanic ash in Antarctic ice. The Oruanui supereruption from Taupo volcano (25,580  ±  258 cal. a BP) provides a key time marker for the LGM in the New Zealand sector of the SW Pacific. This finding provides a high-precision chronological link to mid-latitude terrestrial and marine sites, and sheds light on the long-distance transport of tephra in the Southern Hemisphere. As occurred after identification of the Alaskan White River Ash in northern Europe, recognition of ash from the Oruanui eruption in Antarctica dramatically increases the reach and value of tephrochronology, providing links among climate records in widely different geographic areas and depositional environments.

  1. Paleometeorology: High resolution Northern Hemisphere wintertime mid-latitude dynamics during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterman, M. B.; Crowley, T. J.; Hodges, K. I.; Kim, S.-J.; Erickson, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Hourly winter weather of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is simulated using the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) on a globally resolved T170 (˜75 km) grid. Results are compared to a longer LGM climatological run with the same boundary conditions and monthly saves. Hourly-scale animations are used to enhance interpretations. The purpose of the study is to explore whether additional insights into ice age conditions can be gleaned by going beyond the standard employment of monthly average model statistics to infer ice age weather and climate. Results for both LGM runs indicate a decrease in North Atlantic and increase in North Pacific cyclogenesis. Storm trajectories react to the mechanical forcing of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, with Pacific storms tracking over middle Alaska and northern Canada, terminating in the Labrador Sea. This result is coincident with other model results in also showing a significant reduction in Greenland wintertime precipitation - a response supported by ice core evidence. Higher-temporal resolution puts in sharper focus the close tracking of Pacific storms along the west coast of North America. This response is consistent with increased poleward heat transport in the LGM climatological run and could help explain “early” glacial warming inferred in this region from proxy climate records. Additional analyses shows a large increase in central Asian surface gustiness that support observational inferences that upper-level winds associated with Asian-Pacific storms transported Asian dust to Greenland during the LGM.

  2. Large temperature variability in the southern African tropics since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Lindsay A.; Johnson, Thomas C.; Werne, Josef P.; Castañeda, Isla S.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    The role of the tropics in global climate change is actively debated, particularly in regard to the timing and magnitude of thermal and hydrological response. Continuous, high-resolution temperature records through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) from tropical oceans have provided much insight but surface temperature reconstructions do not exist from tropical continental environments. Here we used the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy to reconstruct mean annual lake surface temperatures through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Lake Malawi, East Africa (9°-14°S). We find a ~3.5°C overall warming since the LGM, with temperature reversals of ~2°C during the Younger Dryas (12.5 ka BP) and at 8.2 ka BP. Maximum Holocene temperatures of ~29°C were found at 5 ka BP, a period preceding severe drought in Africa. These results suggest a substantial thermal response of southeastern tropical Africa to deglaciation and to varying conditions during the Holocene.

  3. Cooling of tropical Brazil (5{degrees}C) during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Stute, M.; Forster, M.; Frischkom, H.

    1995-07-21

    A 30,000-year paleotemperature record derived from noble gases dissolved in carbon-14-dated ground water indicates that the climate in lowland Brazil (Piaui Province, 7{degrees}S, 41.5{degrees}W; altitude, 400 meters) was 5.4{degrees} {+-} 0.6{degrees}C cooler during the last glacial maximum than today. This result suggests a rather uniform cooling of the Americas between 40{degrees}S and 40{degrees}N. A 5.4{degrees}C cooling of tropical South America is consistent with pollen records, snow line reconstructions, and strontium/calcium ratios and {delta}{sup 18}O coral records but is inconsistent with the sea-surface temperature reconstruction of CLIMAP (Climate: Long-Range investigation, Mapping and Prediction). On the basis of these results, it appears that the tropical Americas are characterized by a temperature sensitivity comparable to that found in higher latitudes. 36 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Heather L.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Polissar, Pratigya J.

    2015-01-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of global interannual variability, but its response to climate change is uncertain. Paleoclimate records from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provide insight into ENSO behavior when global boundary conditions (ice sheet extent, atmospheric partial pressure of CO2) were different from those today. In this work, we reconstruct LGM temperature variability at equatorial Pacific sites using measurements of individual planktonic foraminifera shells. A deep equatorial thermocline altered the dynamics in the eastern equatorial cold tongue, resulting in reduced ENSO variability during the LGM compared to the Late Holocene. These results suggest that ENSO was not tied directly to the east-west temperature gradient, as previously suggested. Rather, the thermocline of the eastern equatorial Pacific played a decisive role in the ENSO response to LGM climate.

  5. Reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Ford, Heather L; Ravelo, A Christina; Polissar, Pratigya J

    2015-01-16

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of global interannual variability, but its response to climate change is uncertain. Paleoclimate records from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provide insight into ENSO behavior when global boundary conditions (ice sheet extent, atmospheric partial pressure of CO2) were different from those today. In this work, we reconstruct LGM temperature variability at equatorial Pacific sites using measurements of individual planktonic foraminifera shells. A deep equatorial thermocline altered the dynamics in the eastern equatorial cold tongue, resulting in reduced ENSO variability during the LGM compared to the Late Holocene. These results suggest that ENSO was not tied directly to the east-west temperature gradient, as previously suggested. Rather, the thermocline of the eastern equatorial Pacific played a decisive role in the ENSO response to LGM climate.

  6. Reversed flow of Atlantic deep water during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Negre, César; Zahn, Rainer; Thomas, Alexander L; Masqué, Pere; Henderson, Gideon M; Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Hall, Ian R; Mas, José L

    2010-11-04

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) of the Atlantic Ocean is considered to be one of the most important components of the climate system. This is because its warm surface currents, such as the Gulf Stream, redistribute huge amounts of energy from tropical to high latitudes and influence regional weather and climate patterns, whereas its lower limb ventilates the deep ocean and affects the storage of carbon in the abyss, away from the atmosphere. Despite its significance for future climate, the operation of the MOC under contrasting climates of the past remains controversial. Nutrient-based proxies and recent model simulations indicate that during the Last Glacial Maximum the convective activity in the North Atlantic Ocean was much weaker than at present. In contrast, rate-sensitive radiogenic (231)Pa/(230)Th isotope ratios from the North Atlantic have been interpreted to indicate only minor changes in MOC strength. Here we show that the basin-scale abyssal circulation of the Atlantic Ocean was probably reversed during the Last Glacial Maximum and was dominated by northward water flow from the Southern Ocean. These conclusions are based on new high-resolution data from the South Atlantic Ocean that establish the basin-scale north to south gradient in (231)Pa/(230)Th, and thus the direction of the deep ocean circulation. Our findings are consistent with nutrient-based proxies and argue that further analysis of (231)Pa/(230)Th outside the North Atlantic basin will enhance our understanding of past ocean circulation, provided that spatial gradients are carefully considered. This broader perspective suggests that the modern pattern of the Atlantic MOC-with a prominent southerly flow of deep waters originating in the North Atlantic-arose only during the Holocene epoch.

  7. Evolution of the oxidative capacity of the troposphere since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, L. T.; Mickley, L.; Kaplan, J. O.; Sofen, E. D.; Alexander, B.; Jones, D. B.; Jacob, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Concentrations of the tropospheric oxidants (OH, O3, H2O2 , NO3) may have undergone large changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of changing climate and most recently human influence. Changing climate affects tropospheric oxidant concentrations not only via the meteorological environment but also through changes in the biosphere, lightning, dust and sea salt emissions, and stratospheric ozone. Changes in oxidant concentrations affect in turn the concentrations of major climate forcing agents (methane, sulfate, ozone itself), leading to potentially significant feedbacks. Here we present results from a detailed O3-NOx-CO-VOC-aerosol simulation of tropospheric composition with the GEOS-Chem 3D global chemical transport model driven by meteorological fields from the GISS Model E general circulation model. We simulate two different cold climates of the LGM, the preindustrial Holocene, and present day. Land cover and associated biosphere-atmosphere exchange are prescribed from the BIOME4-TG global terrestrial equilibrium vegetation model driven by the Model E meteorology for each climate scenario. Stratospheric ozone concentrations are also computed for each scenario using the Linoz method. Lightning NOx emissions in the model respond to climatic changes in deep convection. We discuss the abundances of the major oxidants for the different scenarios, the important driving factors, and the implications for radiative forcing.

  8. A Potentially Non-Steady State Pinedale Glacial Maximum, as Indicated by Half Moon Lake Glacial Valley, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacco, D.; Alley, R. B.; Pollard, D.

    2008-12-01

    The greatest extent of glacial ice during MIS2 (Wisconsinan) in the western US may record a short-lived (sub- millennial) cold event rather than an extended Last Glacial Maximum, based on modeling experiments simulating the Pinedale moraines of Half Moon Lake and adjacent valleys near Pinedale, Wyoming. In some locations including the Half Moon Lake valley, Bull Lake (MIS6) moraines lie well down-valley (2 km) of Pinedale moraines, whereas nearby the moraines are much more closely nested (e.g., Fremont Lake valley, 0.5 km). In a simple flow-line glacier model of Half Moon Lake valley, the subglacial topography (steep upper reaches feeding a nearly flat and locally overdeepened region down-glacier) introduces strong hysteresis behavior with abrupt transitions. We have been unable to find any steady conditions that would grow a steady-state glacier ending at the Pinedale moraines. Instead, the ice preferentially terminates either well up-valley, inside modern Half Moon Lake, or advances to the Bull Lake terminal moraines. In the model, advance of the glacier terminus past Half Moon Lake thickens the ice up-valley of the lake, raising more of the glacier into the accumulation zone and causing further advance. If we specify a warming event as the ice reaches the Pinedale moraines, a steady state Pinedale terminus is possible for a narrow range of parameters; smaller warming allows continuing advance, and larger warming triggers retreat. The modeled time-scale for advance from Half Moon Lake to the Pinedale moraines is typically some centuries for climatic perturbations tested, suggesting the hypothesis that the Pinedale maximum at this site records a short-lived event perhaps linked to the Dansgaard-Oeschger or Heinrich oscillations of the North Atlantic. Simulations for the adjacent Fremont Lake valley, in which the Bull Lake terminated up-valley of any prominent flattening of the valley floor, show more-nearly linear dependence of terminus position on snowline

  9. Large Scale Anthropogenic Reduction of Forest Cover in Last Glacial Maximum Europe.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jed O; Pfeiffer, Mirjam; Kolen, Jan C A; Davis, Basil A S

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructions of the vegetation of Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are an enigma. Pollen-based analyses have suggested that Europe was largely covered by steppe and tundra, and forests persisted only in small refugia. Climate-vegetation model simulations on the other hand have consistently suggested that broad areas of Europe would have been suitable for forest, even in the depths of the last glaciation. Here we reconcile models with data by demonstrating that the highly mobile groups of hunter-gatherers that inhabited Europe at the LGM could have substantially reduced forest cover through the ignition of wildfires. Similar to hunter-gatherers of the more recent past, Upper Paleolithic humans were masters of the use of fire, and preferred inhabiting semi-open landscapes to facilitate foraging, hunting and travel. Incorporating human agency into a dynamic vegetation-fire model and simulating forest cover shows that even small increases in wildfire frequency over natural background levels resulted in large changes in the forested area of Europe, in part because trees were already stressed by low atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the cold, dry, and highly variable climate. Our results suggest that the impact of humans on the glacial landscape of Europe may be one of the earliest large-scale anthropogenic modifications of the earth system.

  10. Large Scale Anthropogenic Reduction of Forest Cover in Last Glacial Maximum Europe

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Mirjam; Kolen, Jan C. A.; Davis, Basil A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructions of the vegetation of Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are an enigma. Pollen-based analyses have suggested that Europe was largely covered by steppe and tundra, and forests persisted only in small refugia. Climate-vegetation model simulations on the other hand have consistently suggested that broad areas of Europe would have been suitable for forest, even in the depths of the last glaciation. Here we reconcile models with data by demonstrating that the highly mobile groups of hunter-gatherers that inhabited Europe at the LGM could have substantially reduced forest cover through the ignition of wildfires. Similar to hunter-gatherers of the more recent past, Upper Paleolithic humans were masters of the use of fire, and preferred inhabiting semi-open landscapes to facilitate foraging, hunting and travel. Incorporating human agency into a dynamic vegetation-fire model and simulating forest cover shows that even small increases in wildfire frequency over natural background levels resulted in large changes in the forested area of Europe, in part because trees were already stressed by low atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the cold, dry, and highly variable climate. Our results suggest that the impact of humans on the glacial landscape of Europe may be one of the earliest large-scale anthropogenic modifications of the earth system. PMID:27902716

  11. Dual modes of the carbon cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Smith, H J; Fischer, H; Wahlen, M; Mastroianni, D; Deck, B

    1999-07-15

    The most conspicuous feature of the record of past climate contained in polar ice is the rapid warming which occurs after long intervals of gradual cooling. During the last four transitions from glacial to interglacial conditions, over which such abrupt warmings occur, ice records indicate that the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere increased by roughly 80 to 100 parts per million by volume. But the causes of the atmospheric CO2 concentration increases are unclear. Here we present the stable-carbon-isotope composition (delta 13 CO2) of CO2 extracted from air trapped in ice at Taylor Dome, Antarctica, from the Last Glacial Maximum to the onset of Holocene times. The global carbon cycle is shown to have operated in two distinct primary modes on the timescale of thousands of years, one when climate was changing relatively slowly and another when warming was rapid, each with a characteristic average stable-carbon-isotope composition of the net CO2 exchanged by the atmosphere with the land and oceans. delta 13 CO2 increased between 16.5 and 9 thousand years ago by slightly more than would be estimated to be caused by the physical effects of a 5 degrees C rise in global average sea surface temperature driving a CO2 efflux from the ocean, but our data do not allow specific causes to be constrained.

  12. Dual modes of the carbon cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. Jesse; Fischer, H.; Wahlen, M.; Mastroianni, D.; Deck, B.

    1999-07-01

    The most conspicuous feature of the record of past climate contained in polar ice is the rapid warming which occurs after long intervals of gradual cooling. During the last four transitions from glacial to interglacial conditions, over which such abrupt warmings occur, ice records indicate that the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere increased by roughly 80 to 100 parts per million by volume (refs 1-4). But the causes of the atmospheric CO2 concentration increases are unclear. Here we present the stable-carbon-isotope composition (δ13CO2) of CO2 extracted from air trapped in ice at Taylor Dome, Antarctica, from the Last Glacial Maximum to the onset of Holocene times. The global carbon cycle is shown to have operated in two distinct primary modes on the timescale of thousands of years, one when climate was changing relatively slowly and another when warming was rapid, each with a characteristic average stable-carbon-isotope composition of the net CO2 exchanged by the atmosphere with the land and oceans. δ13CO2 increased between 16.5 and 9 thousand years ago by slightly more than would be estimated to be caused by the physical effects of a 5°C rise in global average sea surface temperature driving a CO2 efflux from the ocean, but our data do not allow specific causes to be constrained.

  13. Antarctic density stratification and the strength of the circumpolar current during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Ito, Takamitsu; Michel, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between ocean circulation and biological processes in the Southern Ocean is thought to be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide content over glacial cycles. A better understanding of stratification and circulation in the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provides information that will help us to assess these scenarios. First, we evaluate the link between Southern Ocean stratification and circulation states in a suite of climate model simulations. While simulated Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transport varies widely (80-350 Sverdrup (Sv)), it co-varies with horizontal and vertical stratification and the formation of the southern deep water. We then test the LGM simulations against available data from paleoceanographic proxies, which can be used to assess the density stratification and ACC transport south of Australia. The paleoceanographic data suggest a moderate increase in the Southern Ocean stratification and the ACC strength during the LGM. Even with the relatively large uncertainty in the proxy-based estimates, extreme scenarios exhibited by some climate models with ACC transports of greater than 250 Sv and highly saline Antarctic Bottom Water are highly unlikely.

  14. Marine carbon cycle sensitivity to background glacial climate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamoto, M. O.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Oka, A.; Ohgaito, R.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheric pCO2 sensitivity to the glacial climate dynamics is investigated using factorial experiments with an offline biogeochemical model. The prescribing glacial climate filed is obtained from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) according to the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project 2 protocol. This offline method enables us to evaluate the representation of the glacial climate state simulated by AOGCM. In our experiments, the solubility change is a dominant factor for lowering the glacial pCO2, while the glacial ocean circulation decreases only a 4 ppm of the atmospheric pCO2. The enhancing Antarctic bottom water formation and stratification increases the storing carbon in abyssal ocean. However, since the glacial ocean circulation changes surface DIC and alkalinity simultaneously, these two difference causes surface water to be slightly more basic and consequently yields only a small reduction in atmospheric pCO2. This response is also obtained in the other glacial experiment in which the North Atlantic deep water formation is dominant. The uncertainties in the glacial ocean circulation effect on the atmospheric pCO2 would arise from the simplified treatment of ocean biogeochemical response to climate dynamics change. The changes in sea-ice coverage and solar radiation decrease the atmospheric pCO2 in southern hemisphere through preventing the air-sea interaction and increases in northern hemisphere through inhibiting the solubility. The interaction between ocean circulation state and sea-ice coverage is also a key factor to account for the observed glacial pCO2 drawdown.

  15. Numerical Modeling of the Last Glacial Maximum Yellowstone Ice Cap Captures Asymmetry in Moraine Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. S.; Wickert, A. D.; Colgan, W. T.; Anderson, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Yellowstone Ice Cap was the largest continuous ice body in the US Rocky Mountains. Terminal moraine ages derived from cosmogenic radionuclide dating (e.g., Licciardi and Pierce, 2008) constrain the timing of maximum Ice Cap extent. Importantly, the moraine ages vary by several thousand years around the Ice Cap; ages on the eastern outlet glaciers are significantly younger than their western counterparts. In order to interpret these observations within the context of LGM climate in North America, we perform two numerical glacier modeling experiments: 1) We model the initiation and growth of the Ice Cap to steady state; and 2) We estimate the range of LGM climate states which led to the formation of the Ice Cap. We use an efficient semi-implicit 2-D glacier model coupled to a fully implicit solution for flexural isostasy, allowing for transient links between climatic forcing, ice thickness, and earth surface deflection. Independent of parameter selection, the Ice Cap initiates in the Absaroka and Beartooth mountains and then advances across the Yellowstone plateau to the west. The Ice Cap advances to its maximum extent first to the older eastern moraines and last to the younger western and northwestern moraines. This suggests that the moraine ages may reflect the timescale required for the Ice Cap to advance across the high elevation Yellowstone plateau rather than the timing of local LGM climate. With no change in annual precipitation from the present, a mean summer temperature drop of 8-9° C is required to form the Ice Cap. Further parameter searches provide the full range of LGM paleoclimate states that led to the Yellowstone Ice Cap. Using our preferred parameter set, we find that the timescale for the growth of the complete Ice Cap is roughly 10,000 years. Isostatic subsidence helps explain the long timescale of Ice Cap growth. The Yellowstone Ice Cap caused a maximum surface deflection of 300 m (using a constant effective elastic

  16. Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial, modern, and doubled carbon dioxide climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahowald, N.M.; Muhs, D.R.; Levis, S.; Rasch, P.J.; Yoshioka, M.; Zender, C.S.; Luo, C.

    2006-01-01

    Desert dust simulations generated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Climate System Model for the current climate are shown to be consistent with present day satellite and deposition data. The response of the dust cycle to last glacial maximum, preindustrial, modern, and doubled-carbon dioxide climates is analyzed. Only natural (non-land use related) dust sources are included in this simulation. Similar to some previous studies, dust production mainly responds to changes in the source areas from vegetation changes, not from winds or soil moisture changes alone. This model simulates a +92%, +33%, and -60% change in dust loading for the last glacial maximum, preindustrial, and doubled-carbon dioxide climate, respectively, when impacts of carbon dioxide fertilization on vegetation are included in the model. Terrestrial sediment records from the last glacial maximum compiled here indicate a large underestimate of deposition in continental regions, probably due to the lack of simulation of glaciogenic dust sources. In order to include the glaciogenic dust sources as a first approximation, we designate the location of these sources, and infer the size of the sources using an inversion method that best matches the available data. The inclusion of these inferred glaciogenic dust sources increases our dust flux in the last glacial maximum from 2.1 to 3.3 times current deposition. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Stable water isotope behavior during the last glacial maximum: A general circulation model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jouzel, Jean; Koster, Randal D.; Suozzo, Robert J.; Russell, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Global water isotope geochemisty during the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with an 8 deg x 10 deg atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The simulation results suggest that the spatial delta O-18/temperature relationships observed for the present day and LGM climates are very similar. Furthermore, the temporal delta O-18/temperature relationship is similar to the present-day spatial relationship in regions for which the LGM/present-day temperature change is significant. This helps justify the standard practice of applying the latter to the interpretation of paleodata, despite the possible influence of other factors, such as changes in the evaportive sources of precipitation or in the seasonality of precipitation. The model suggests, for example, that temperature shifts inferred from ice core data may differ from the true shifts by only about 30%.

  18. Deepwater circulation variation in the South China Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xufeng; Kao, ShuhJi; Chen, Zhong; Menviel, Laurie; Chen, Han; Du, Yan; Wan, Shiming; Yan, Hong; Liu, Zhonghui; Zheng, Liwei; Wang, Shuhong; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Xu

    2016-08-01

    Deepwater circulation plays a central role in global climate. Compared with the Atlantic, the Pacific deepwater circulation's history remains unclear. The Luzon overflow, a branch of the North Pacific deep water, determines the ventilation rate of the South China Sea (SCS) basin. Sedimentary magnetic properties in the SCS reflect millennial-scale fluctuations in deep current intensity and orientation. The data suggest a slightly stronger current at the Last Glacial Maximum compared to the Holocene. But, the most striking increase in deep current occurred during Heinrich stadial 1 (H1) and to a lesser extent during the Younger Dryas (YD). Results of a transient deglacial experiment suggest that the northeastern current strengthening at the entrance of the SCS during H1 and the YD, times of weak North Atlantic Deep Water formation, could be linked to enhanced formation of North Pacific Deep Water.

  19. Stable water isotope behavior during the last glacial maximum: A general circulation model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jouzel, Jean; Koster, Randal D.; Suozzo, Robert J.; Russell, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Global water isotope geochemisty during the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with an 8 deg x 10 deg atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The simulation results suggest that the spatial delta O-18/temperature relationships observed for the present day and LGM climates are very similar. Furthermore, the temporal delta O-18/temperature relationship is similar to the present-day spatial relationship in regions for which the LGM/present-day temperature change is significant. This helps justify the standard practice of applying the latter to the interpretation of paleodata, despite the possible influence of other factors, such as changes in the evaportive sources of precipitation or in the seasonality of precipitation. The model suggests, for example, that temperature shifts inferred from ice core data may differ from the true shifts by only about 30%.

  20. Role of ocean-atmosphere interactions in tropical cooling during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, A.B.G.; Philander, S.G.H.

    1998-02-27

    A simulation with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model configured for the Last Glacial Maximum delivered a tropical climate that is much cooler than that produced by atmosphere-only models. The main reason is a decrease in tropical sea surface temperatures, up to 6{degree}C in the western tropical Pacific, which occurs because of two processes. The trade winds induce equatorial upwelling and zonal advection of cold water that further intensify the trade winds, and an exchange of water occurs between the tropical and extratropical Pacific in which the poleward surface flow is balanced by equatorward flow of cold water in the thermocline. Simulated tropical temperature depressions are of the same magnitude as those that have been proposed from recent proxy data. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  1. The Last Glacial Maximum and Termination in the Torres del Paine Region, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S.; Gómez, G.; Santana, F.

    2012-12-01

    Deciphering the timing, structure and termination of the local last glacial maximum (LGM) throughout Patagonia (42-55 S) remains one of the key unsolved paleoclimate questions in Quaternary sciences. During the last glaciation, the Patagonian ice sheet formed one ice body along the Patagonian Andes (42-55 S) in southern South America, but previous work has revealed different spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice margins. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass that exists at this latitude confronting the southern westerly wind belt, which seems to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the causes of glaciations in the Southern Hemisphere. Major progress has been made to document the local Late-Pleistocene glacier history, particularly in response to recent application of exposure-cosmogenic dating technique in the region, although only sparse well-dated paleoclimate records exist in this vast area. LGM moraine-based records in south Patagonia (~48-55 S) have been developed for the Strait of Magellan area, where full glacial conditions seems to have occurred between ~28.0 - 17.5 ka. Despite that these data seem to confirm previous glacial chronologies developed in north Patagonia and the Chilean Lake District (40-42 S), recent works in Torres del Paine and Última Esperanza basins (50-51 S), suggest that glacial maximum conditions may have occurred earlier (i.e., during Marine Isotope Stage 3) and that ice extent could have been twice the size of previously thought. Here, we discuss paleoclimatological implications from our 10Be and 26Al-dating program of moraines in the Torres del Paine region in southern Patagonia. We focused our efforts in the previously undated Río de las Viscachas (RV) I and II moraines, which occur distal to the late-glacial TDP II, III and IV moraines that enclose present lake bodies at the

  2. Hydrological and vegetation shifts in the Wallacean region of central Indonesia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, Satrio A.; Russell, James M.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Precipitation is the most important variable of Indonesian climate, yet there are substantial uncertainties about past and future hydroclimate dynamics over the region. This study explores vegetation and rainfall and associated changes in atmospheric circulation during the past 26,000 years in Wallacea, a biogeographical area in central Indonesia, wedged between the Sunda and Sahul shelves and known for its exceptionally high rainforest biodiversity. We use terrestrial plant biomarkers from sediment cores retrieved from Mandar Bay, off west Sulawesi, to reconstruct changes in Wallacean vegetation and climate since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Enriched leaf wax carbon isotope (δ13Cwax) values recorded in Mandar Bay during the LGM, together with other regional vegetation records, document grassland expansion, implying a regionally dry, and possibly more seasonal, glacial climate. Depleted leaf wax deuterium isotope (δDwax) values in Mandar Bay during the LGM, and low reconstructed precipitation isotope compositions from nearby sites, reveal an intensified Austral-Asian summer monsoon circulation and a southward shift of the mean position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, likely due to strong southern hemisphere summer insolation and the presence of large northern hemisphere ice sheets. Mandar Bay δ13Cwax was anti-correlated with δDwax during the LGM and the last deglaciation, but was positively correlated during most of the Holocene, indicating time-varying controls on the isotopic composition of rainfall in this region. The inundation event of the Sunda Shelf and in particular the opening of the Java Sea and Karimata Strait between 9.4 and 11.1 thousand years ago might have provided new moisture sources for regional convection and/or influenced moisture source trajectories, providing the trigger for shifts in atmospheric circulation and the controls on precipitation isotope compositions from the LGM to the Holocene.

  3. The vegetation cover of New Zealand at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, Rewi; McGlone, Matt; Moar, Neville; Wilmshurst, Janet; Vandergoes, Marcus

    2013-08-01

    A new reconstruction of the vegetation cover for New Zealand at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is presented, based primarily on a database of 66 pollen site records and a more limited range of plant macrofossil and coleopteran records. Extensive forest is evident only from Auckland northwards. Conifer-broadleaf forest similar to that in the region today, but with Agathis australis scarce, persisted in the far north, whilst Nothofagus trees and a range of shrub taxa characterised the more open forests elsewhere in Northland. Survival of Nothofagus-dominated forest in coastal and exposed continental shelf locations to the southwest of Auckland and northwestern South Island is also indicated. Beyond these regions, vegetation cover comprised shrubland- and grassland-dominant communities, with the latter more prominent in eastern areas, to the south and presumably at higher altitudes. Nevertheless the survival of forest trees is indicated unambiguously in most regions apart from the eastern South Island. Thus the concept of 'micro glacial forest refugia' in New Zealand remains supported by this latest glacial vegetation reconstruction and we draw possible parallels with the developing but contentious concept of 'northern cryptic refugia' in Europe. Recent assertions that pollen and beetle reconstructions of the New Zealand LGM vegetation patterns diverge significantly are not supported by this analysis. Rather, the two proxies are readily reconciled if the term 'woody' as indicated by coleoptera is not restricted to tall forest trees but extended to the widespread woody shrub and small tree elements of the New Zealand flora. Regional distinctions in the LGM vegetation reconstruction concur broadly with the contemporary vegetation pattern, suggesting that, along with temperature depression and likely drier growing conditions, a zonal circulation regime with prominent southern westerly winds was important at 21 ka, as it is today. Pollen-climate modelling of the extent of

  4. Arctic Dinoflagellate Migration Marks the Oligocene Glacial Maximum: Implications for the Rupelian-Chattian Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Simaeys, S.; Brinkhuis, H.; Pross, J.; Williams, G. L.; Zachos, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Various geochemical and biotic climate proxies, and notably deep-sea benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records indicate that the Eocene 'greenhouse' state of the Earth gradually evolved towards an earliest Oligocene 'icehouse' state, eventually triggering the abrupt appearance of large continental ice-sheets on Antarctic at ˜33.3 Ma (Oi-1 event). This, however, was only the first of two major glacial events in the Oligocene. Benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records show a second positive excursion in the mid Oligocene, consistent with a significant ice-sheet expansion and/or cooling at 27.1 Ma (Oi-2b) coincident with magnetosubchron C9n. Here, we report on a mid Oligocene, globally synchronous, Arctic dinoflagellate migration event, calibrated against the upper half of C9n. A sudden appearance, and abundance increases of the Arctic taxon Svalbardella at lower-middle latitudes coincides with the so-called Oi-2b benthic δ 18O event, dated at ˜27.1 Ma. This phenomenon is taken to indicate significant high-latitude surface water cooling, concomitant Antarctic ice-sheet growth, and sea level lowering. The duration of the Svalbardella migrations, and the episode of profound cooling is estimated as ˜500 ka, and is here termed the Oligocene Glacial Maximum (OGM). Our records suggest a close link between the OGM, sea-level fall, and the classic Rupelian-Chattian boundary, magnetostratigraphically dating this boundary as ˜27.1 Ma.

  5. Large Temperature Variability in a Southern Tropical Continental Setting Through the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, L. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Werne, J. P.; Castaneda, I. S.; Hopmans, E. C.; Damst, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2004-12-01

    The magnitude and timing of temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) on the tropical continents is becoming better understood as the box of independent paleotemperature tools for continental systems expands. Here we present a paleotemperature record derived from the application of TEX86 to lacustrine sediments for Lake Malawi, East Africa through the LGM. We find a ˜4 ° C overall warming since the LGM, with temperature reversals of more than 2 ° C during the Younger Dryas (12.5 ka BP) and in the early Holocene. The warmest Holocene temperatures in this part of Africa appear to have occurred around 5000 years ago. The onset of warming in the Lake Malawi basin coincides with the BYRD oxygen isotope record of warming in Antarctica. While the range of temperatures observed in this study is not surprising, the timing of post-glacial warming, the thermal response to the YD, and the Holocene history of warming and cooling trends are providing important new insights into tropical climate dynamics on centennial to millennial scales.

  6. Groundwater and lake storage contributions to global mean sea level at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, K. L.; Wickert, A. D.; Fan, Y.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Austermann, J.; Ng, G. H. C.; He, F.

    2016-12-01

    At the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), global mean sea level was 130-135 m lower than today. Balancing this sea-level lowstand with excess land-based ice volumes has been contentious, with most ice sheet reconstructions falling short by 10 m of sea level equivalent ice volume. Models that attempt to add significant excess ice to North America or Antarctica often contradict glaciological modelling and/or glacial geological evidence. Here we investigate groundwater and lakes as an alternative water reservoir at the LGM. High pluvial lake levels and the presence of proglacial lakes at ice margins indicate the potential for enhanced LGM groundwater storage, but this may be balanced or overcome by groundwater drainage to the coast following global mean sea-level fall. We assess past groundwater levels using a global model that provides water table depth estimates at 30 arcsecond resolution. The model has already been applied to the present day and has proven successful in estimating modern groundwater depths worldwide. We use this model in combination with modelled past topography and climate to compare groundwater and lake storage between the LGM and present day. If these additional mechanisms of continental water storage can account for 10 m sea-level fall, they may help to close the LGM continental water storage budget while also satisfying geological observations and ice-physics-based models of continental ice sheets.

  7. Dynamical downscaling of tropical cyclones from CCSM4 simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jinwoong; Galewsky, Joseph; Camargo, Suzana J.; Korty, Robert; Zamora, Ryan

    2016-09-01

    Dynamical downscaling of simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and late twentieth century (20C) were conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the aim of (1) understanding how the downscaled kinematic and thermodynamic variables influence simulated tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the western North Pacific during the LGM and the 20C periods and (2) to test the relevance of TC genesis factors for the colder LGM climate. The results show that, despite the lower temperatures during the LGM, the downscaled TC climatology over the western North Pacific in the LGM simulation does not differ significantly from that in the 20C simulation. Among the TC environmental factors, the TC potential intensity, mid-tropospheric entropy deficit, and vertical wind shear during the LGM were consistent with previous analyses of TC genesis factors in LGM global climate model simulations. Changes in TC genesis density between the LGM and the 20C simulations seem to be well represented by the ventilation index, a nondimensional measure of the combined effects of vertical wind shear, and thermodynamic properties, suggesting the potential applicability of those factors for TC activity evaluation during the LGM and possibly other climates.

  8. Temperature forcing of hydroclimate during the Last Glacial Maximum in western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, C.; Lowry, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    During the last glacial and early deglacial periods, large lakes expanded in many drainage basins across the currently-arid western United States. These pluvial conditions have been explained for decades by a southward deflection of the jet stream into this region by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Here, we analyze output from coupled climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to test this explanation and use forward models of lake energy and water balance to simulate Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) lake levels in nine drainage basins from New Mexico to Oregon for quantitative comparison to the paleoclimate record. CMIP5 models achieve varying degrees of success in driving the forward models to match observed LGM lake level changes, as measured in both data and models by the ratio of lake area to drainage basin area. Those models that successfully match observations are distinguished by large decreases in lake evaporation and basin evapotranspiration at LGM due to cooling. We further analyze the atmospheric water budgets of the CMIP5 models to provide the first full accounting of both dynamic and thermodynamic causes of moisture convergence supporting precipitation and evaporation changes for the LGM in western North America. This analysis shows that the thermodynamic effects of the Laurentide Ice Sheet were more important than dynamic jet stream effects in forming large lakes in the southwestern United States. Namely, strong cooling by the ice sheet altered atmospheric humidity patterns, both increasing moisture advection in the westerlies due to steepened humidity gradients and decreasing water vapor divergence in the cold-climate counterpart of the "dry get drier" phenomenon proposed for future warming. Our results establish the important role of temperature in determining past moisture conditions over western North America, supporting the strong likelihood of drying in the future.

  9. Expansion and retreat of the Jura ice sheet (France) during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoncristiani, J. F.; Campy, M.

    2004-03-01

    In continental environments, while there is no uninterrupted record of glaciation, glacier activity can be reconstructed from the nature and geometry of sediments trapped by lake filling. Examination of the Combe d'Ain lake filling provides insight into the history of the Jura Mountains during the last glacial maximum (LGM). From the evidence of outcrops, borehole cores, and seismic reflection profiles of the lake filling, we show that glaciation was marked by three stages of stabilization. Then, recessional moraines marked five episodes of stabilization in the course of glacial retreat. Comparison with ∂ 18O data from ice cores of Greenland makes possible to date the last glacial maximum at 25,500-22,000 Cal. BC and glacial retreat at 22,000-17,000 Cal. BC.

  10. High resolution record of the Last Glacial Maximum in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Lynda; Moss, Patrick; McGowan, Hamish

    2010-05-01

    time than traditionally accepted, and was not uniformly cool and dry. Alloway, B. V., D. J. Lowe, D. J. A. Barrell, R. M. Newnham, P. C. Almond, P. C. Augustinus, N. A. N. Bertler, L. Carter, N. J. Litchfield, M. S. McGlone, J. Shulmeister, M. J. Vandergoes, P. W. Williams and N.-I. members (2007). Towards a climate event stratigraphy for New Zealand over the past 30 000 years (NZ-INTIMATE project). Journal of Quaternary Science 22(1): 9-35. Denton, G. H., T. V. Lowell, C. J. Heusser, C. Schluchter, B. G. Andersen, L. E. Heusser, P. I. Moreno and D. R. Marchant (1999). Geomorrphology, stratigraphy, and radiocarbon chronology of Llanquihe Drift in the area of the Southern Lake District, Seno Reloncavi, and Isal Grande de Chiloe, Chile. Geografiska Annaler 81A: 167-229. EPICA (2006). One-to-one coupling of glacial climate variability in Greenland and Antarctica. Nature 444: 195-198. Kershaw, A. P., G. M. McKenzie, N. Porch, R. G. Roberts, J. Brown, H. Heijnis, M. L. Orr, G. Jacobsen and P. R. Newall (2007). A high-resolution record of vegetation and climate through the last glacial cycles from Caledonia Fen, southeastern highlands of Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science 22(5): 481-500. Newnham, R. M., D. J. Lowe, T. Giles and B. V. Alloway (2007). Vegetation and climate of Auckland, New Zealand, since ca. 32 000 cal. yr ago: support for an extended LGM Journal of Quaternary Science 22(5): 517-534. Petherick, L. M., H. A. McGowan and P. T. Moss (2008). Climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum in eastern Australia: Evidence of two stadials? Journal of Quaternary Science 23(8): 787-802. Röthlisberger, R., R. Mulvaney, E. W. Wolff, M. A. Hutterli, M. Bigler, S. Sommer and J. Jouzel (2002). Dust and sea salt variability in central East Antarctica (Dome C) over the last 45 kyr and its implications for southern high latitude climate. Geophysical Research Letters 29(20): Art # 1963. Smith, M. A. (2009). Late Quaternary landscapes in Central Australia: sedimentary

  11. Hydrological and Vegetation Dynamics in Central Indonesia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. A.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian archipelago sits within the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool and plays a crucial role in today's global water vapor and heat transport. Despite the region's importance in the global climate system, we understand relatively little of long-term patterns of convection and precipitation across Indonesia. To better characterize the regional precipitation response in Indonesia since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), we developed continuous high-resolution records of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of terrestrial leaf waxes (long-chain n-alkanoic acids; δ13Cwax and δDwax respectively) from marine and lacustrine cores retrieved offshore and in central Sulawesi, in the heart of Indonesia. Present-day rainfall variability in central Sulawesi is strongly influenced by variations in topography and wind pattern, including land-sea breezes, orographically-forced winds, and monsoonal winds related to the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Our terrestrial and marine records show excellent agreement. Together, our δ13Cwax records suggest that rainforests contracted and grasslands became more abundant during the LGM, indicating that the aridification and the likely increase of water stress during the dry season in central Indonesia are linked to high-latitude climate forcings (i.e. global cooling and Northern Hemisphere ice sheet expansion). However, our data also indicate that the highlands of Sulawesi remained relatively wet and might have become a refuge for rainforests during the LGM, suggesting that altitudinal gradients within the archipelago strongly influence local manifestations of hydrological changes at glacial-interglacial timescales. Despite evidence for regional drying, we observe depleted δDwax values during the LGM, demonstrating that the amount effect may not always be the most important factor controlling the δD of precipitation (δDprecip) in this region at orbital timescales. Instead, the presence of strong glacial

  12. Glacial and climatic evolution from the Little Ice Age last Maximum to the present in Tröllaskagi Peninsula (North Iceland): the case of Gljúlfurárjökull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Fernández, Jose; Andres, Nuria; Tanarro, Luis Miguel; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the evolution of the Gljúlfurárjökull glacier (65°42'48'' N, 18°39'13'' W; 980 m), located at the headwall of the Skiðadalur valley, on the Tröllaskagi peninsula (N. Iceland). This is one of many small glaciers situated on the bottom of the Tröllaskagi valleys. This glacier is one of the few "clean" glaciers, i.e. not covered with boulders, as is the case with most of the glaciers on this peninsula. This makes the glacier especially sensitive to climate change, and it has retreated and advanced many times since its last maximum during the Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum in the mid- 19th century (Caseldine and Stötter, 1993), leaving a large number of moraine ridges. This paper analyses the change in this glacier from the LIA up to the present day, with reference to the variations in the surface, ELA and volume. Lichenometry and geomorphological field analysis were used to establish the exact limits of the glacier during the LIA last maximum. An aerial photo from 1946 and two orthophotos from 2000 and 2013 were also used. Using photointerpretation and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), the aerial photos were georeferenced to delimit the glacier in different years, analyse the surface and volume variations, and calculate the ELA for each date. The ELA analysis was carried out using the method: Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR 0.67). The results obtained with this method are: Little Ice Age Maximum: 945 m a.s.l. (almost the same ELA proposed by Caseldine and Stötter, 1993) 1946: 970 m a.s.l. 2000: 980 m a.s.l. 2013: 990 m a.s.l. The ice volume lost from LIA to 2000 was: 111.68 hm3 Reference Caseldine, C., Stötter, J., 1993. "Little Ice Age" glaciation of Tröllaskagi Peninsula, northern Iceland: Climatic implications for reconstructed equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs). Holocene 3: 357-366. Research funded by Cryocrisis project (CGL2012-35858), Government of Spain, and Nils Mobility projects (EEA GRANTS)

  13. Decadal-scale climate drivers for glacial dynamics in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pederson, G.T.; Fagre, D.B.; Gray, S.T.; Graumlich, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries A.D.) glacial maxima and 20th century retreat have been well documented in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. However, the influence of regional and Pacific Basin driven climate variability on these events is poorly understood. We use tree-ring reconstructions of North Pacific surface temperature anomalies and summer drought as proxies for winter glacial accumulation and summer ablation, respectively, over the past three centuries. These records show that the 1850's glacial maximum was likely produced by ???70 yrs of cool/wet summers coupled with high snowpack. Post 1850, glacial retreat coincides with an extended period (>50 yr) of summer drought and low snowpack culminating in the exceptional events of 1917 to 1941 when retreat rates for some glaciers exceeded 100 m/yr. This research highlights potential local and ocean-based drivers of glacial dynamics, and difficulties in separating the effects of global climate change from regional expressions of decadal-scale climate variability. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Carbon storage in Amazonia during the last glacial maximum: secondary data and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Turcq, Bruno; Cordeiro, Renato C; Sifeddine, Abdefettah; Simões Filho, Francisco F L; Albuquerque, Ana Luisa S; Abrão, Jorge J

    2002-12-01

    The Amazonian forest is, due to its great size, carbon storage capacity and present-day variability in carbon uptake and release, an important component of the global carbon cycle. Paleo-environmental reconstruction is difficult for Amazonia due to the scarcity of primary palynological data and the mis-interpretation of some secondary data. Studies of lacustrine sediment records have shown that Amazonia has known periods in which the climate was drier than it is today. However, not all geomorphological features such as dunes, and slope erosion, which are thought to indicate rainforest regression, date from the time of the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) and these features do not necessarily correspond to episodes of forest regression. There is also uncertainty concerning LGM carbon storage due to rainforest soils and biomass estimates. Soil carbon content may decrease moderately during the LGM, whereas rainforest biomass may change considerably in response to changes in the global environment. Biomass per unit area in Amazonia has probably been reduced by the cumulative effects of low CO2 concentration, a drier climate and lower temperatures. As few paleo-vegetation data are available, there is considerable uncertainty concerning the amount of carbon stored in Amazonia during the LGM, which may have corresponded to 44-94% of the carbon currently stored in biomass and soils.

  15. Palaeodistribution modelling of European vegetation types at the Last Glacial Maximum using modern analogues from Siberia: Prospects and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janská, Veronika; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Chytrý, Milan; Divíšek, Jan; Anenkhonov, Oleg; Korolyuk, Andrey; Lashchinskyi, Nikolai; Culek, Martin

    2017-03-01

    We modelled the European distribution of vegetation types at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using present-day data from Siberia, a region hypothesized to be a modern analogue of European glacial climate. Distribution models were calibrated with current climate using 6274 vegetation-plot records surveyed in Siberia. Out of 22 initially used vegetation types, good or moderately good models in terms of statistical validation and expert-based evaluation were computed for 18 types, which were then projected to European climate at the LGM. The resulting distributions were generally consistent with reconstructions based on pollen records and dynamic vegetation models. Spatial predictions were most reliable for steppe, forest-steppe, taiga, tundra, fens and bogs in eastern and central Europe, which had LGM climate more similar to present-day Siberia. The models for western and southern Europe, regions with a lower degree of climatic analogy, were only reliable for mires and steppe vegetation, respectively. Modelling LGM vegetation types for the wetter and warmer regions of Europe would therefore require gathering calibration data from outside Siberia. Our approach adds value to the reconstruction of vegetation at the LGM, which is limited by scarcity of pollen and macrofossil data, suggesting where specific habitats could have occurred. Despite the uncertainties of climatic extrapolations and the difficulty of validating the projections for vegetation types, the integration of palaeodistribution modelling with other approaches has a great potential for improving our understanding of biodiversity patterns during the LGM.

  16. An interhemispheric mechanism for glacial abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, Rubén; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Robinson, Alexander; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-05-01

    The last glacial period was punctuated by abrupt climate changes that are widely considered to result from millennial-scale variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the origin of these AMOC reorganizations remains poorly understood. The climatic connection between both hemispheres indicated by proxies suggests that the Southern Ocean (SO) could regulate this variability through changes in winds and atmospheric CO concentration. Here, we investigate this hypothesis using a coupled climate model forced by prescribed CO and SO wind-stress variations. We find that the AMOC exhibits an oscillatory behavior between weak and strong circulation regimes which is ultimately caused by changes in the meridional density gradient of the Atlantic Ocean. The evolution of the simulated climatic patterns matches the amplitude and timing of the largest events that occurred during the last glacial period and their widespread climatic impacts. Our results suggest the existence of an internal interhemispheric oscillation mediated by the bipolar seesaw that could promote glacial abrupt climate changes through variations in atmospheric CO levels, the strength of the SO winds and AMOC reorganizations, and provide an explanation for the pervasive Antarctic-like climate signal found in proxy records worldwide.

  17. Similarities between Last Glacial Maximum and present-day mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Sasgen, I.; Bevis, M. G.; van Dam, T. M.; Bamber, J. L.; Wahr, J. M.; Willis, M. J.; Kjaer, K. H.; Wouters, B.; Helm, V.; Csatho, B. M.; Fleming, K. M.; Bjork, A. A.; Aschwanden, A.; Knudsen, P.; Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate quantification of the millennial scale mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its contribution to global sea-level rise remains challenging, because of sparse in situ observations in key regions. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is the ongoing response of the solid Earth to ice and ocean load changes occurring since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 ka BP) and may be used to constrain the GrIS deglaciation history. Here, we use data from the Greenland Global Positioning System Network to measure GIA directly and to estimate basin-wide mass changes since the LGM. Unpredicted, large GIA uplift rates of +12 mm/yr are found in southeast Greenland. These rates are due to low upper mantle viscosity in the region, from when Greenland passed over the Iceland Hotspot about 40 Ma BP. This region of concentrated soft rheology has a profound influence on reconstructing the deglaciation history of Greenland. We re-evaluate the evolution of the GrIS since LGM and obtain an loss of 1.5 m sea level equivalent from the northwest and southeast. These same sectors are dominating modern mass loss. We suggest the present destabilization of these marine-based sectors may increase sea-level for centuries to come. Our new deglaciation history and GIA uplift implies studies using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity mission to infer present-day changes in the GrIS may have erroneously corrected for GIA and underestimated the mass loss by about 20 Gt/yr.

  18. Reconstructing Oceanographic Conditions From the Holocene to the Last Glacial Maximum in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.

    2015-12-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 354 drilled 7 sites in the Bay of Bengal, providing a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of the link between glacial cycles, tropical oceanographic changes, and monsoon strength. Deep-sea sediment cores of the Bengal Fan fluctuate between sand, hemipelagic and terrestrial sediment layers. All but one of the sites (U1454) contain a layer of calcareous clay in the uppermost part of the core that is late Pleistocene in age. During Expedition 354 site U1452C was sampled at high resolution (every 2cm) by a broad group of collaborators with the goal of reconstructing monsoon strength and oceanographic conditions using a variety of proxies. The top 480 cm of site U1452C (8ºN, 87ºE, 3671m water depth) contains primarily nannofossil rich calcareous clay. The relatively high abundance of foraminifera will allow us to generate a high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) using standard foraminifera proxies. We will present oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mg/Ca data of mixed layer planktonic foraminifera from the top 70cm of the core, representing the Holocene to the last glacial maximum. δ18O of planktonic foraminifera records global ice volume and local SST and SSS, while Mg/Ca of foraminifera is a proxy for SST. The paired Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements on the same samples of foraminifera, together with published estimates with global ocean δ18O, can be used to reconstruct both SST and local δ18O of seawater, which is a function of the evaporation/precipitation balance. In future work, the local SSS and SST during the LGM will be paired with terrestrial and other oceanic proxies to increase our understanding of how global climate is connected to monsoon strength.

  19. Atmospheric moisture transport to western North America during the Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, J. M.; Mitchell, J.; Risi, C.; Tripati, A.

    2016-12-01

    Proxy reconstructions of the paleoclimate of western North America indicate that the southwest was considerably wetter during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka) than in the present, while the Pacific Northwest received substantially less rainfall. Pluvial paleolake systems existed in regions that today are arid, from the Great Basin down to the modern Mojave Desert. Many lakes grew to highstands during the early deglaciation, before quickly falling to near-modern levels of dryness around 15 ka, around the same time when moisture in the northwest increased. The timing and distribution of these shifts observed in hydroclimate proxies have been hypothesized to reflect changes in the position of the polar jet stream or the seasonality of precipitation, but the source and delivery processes of the water feeding these regions are debated. Using results from a range of climate models and reanalyses, we explore the role of atmospheric rivers in delivering water to western North America during the glacial, as well as the evolution of water delivery during the deglaciation. Due to the presence of continental ice sheets, deepened Aleutian Low and weakened North Pacific High pressure systems concentrated water transport in atmospheric rivers into California relative to the present, enhancing moisture and precipitation in the southwest and shifting it away from the northwest. As the ice sheets receded, a rapid reorganization of the atmospheric circulation, accompanied by abrupt changes of the semi-permanent pressure systems, precipitated drying and moistening of southwestern and northwestern North America, respectively. We find that during this interval, changes in the water budget of western North America are attributable to the intensity of moisture transport into the continent, and not to the position of the jet stream.

  20. Radiocarbon chronology of the last glacial maximum and its termination in northwestern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Patricio I.; Denton, George H.; Moreno, Hugo; Lowell, Thomas V.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Kaplan, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    We examine the timing and magnitude of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the last glacial termination (LGT) in northwestern Patagonia, situated in the middle latitudes of South America. Our data indicate that the main phase of the LGT began with abrupt warm pulses at 17,800 and 17,100 cal yrs BP, accompanied by rapid establishment of evergreen temperate rainforests and extensive deglaciation of the Andes within 1000 years. This response shows that South American middle-latitude temperatures had approached average interglacial values by 16,800 cal yrs BP. The temperature rise in northwestern Patagonia coincides with the beginning of major warming and glacier recession in the Southern Alps of New Zealand at southern mid-latitudes on the opposite side of the Pacific Ocean. From this correspondence, the warming that began at 17,800 cal yrs BP appears to have been widespread in middle latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, accounting for at least 75% of the total temperature recovery from the LGM to the Holocene. Moreover, this warming pulse is coeval with the first half of the Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) in the North Atlantic region. HS1 featured a decline of North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, a southward shift of the westerly wind belt in both hemispheres and of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, as well as a weakening of the Asian monsoon. Along with the initiating trigger, identifying the mechanisms whereby these opposing climate signals in the two polar hemispheres interacted -whether through an oceanic or an atmospheric bipolar seesaw, or both- lies at the heart of understanding the LGT.

  1. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-21

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials.

  2. Near-synchronous interhemispheric termination of the last glacial maximum in mid-latitudes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Joerg M; Denton, George H; Barrell, David J A; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter W; Andersen, Bjorn G; Phillips, Fred M; Lowell, Thomas V; Schlüchter, Christian

    2006-06-09

    Isotopic records from polar ice cores imply globally asynchronous warming at the end of the last glaciation. However, 10Be exposure dates show that large-scale retreat of mid-latitude Last Glacial Maximum glaciers commenced at about the same time in both hemispheres. The timing of retreat is consistent with the onset of temperature and atmospheric CO2 increases in Antarctic ice cores. We suggest that a global trend of rising summer temperatures at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum was obscured in North Atlantic regions by hypercold winters associated with unusually extensive winter sea ice.

  3. Timing of maximum glacial extent and deglaciation from HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru), obtained with cosmogenic 36Cl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Vazquez, Lorenzo; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Andean glacial deposits are key records of climate fluctuations in the southern hemisphere. During the last decades, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have provided fresh and significant dates to determine past glacier behavior in this region. But still there are many important discrepancies such as the impact of Last Glacial Maximum or the influence of Late Glacial climatic events on glacial mass balances. Furthermore, glacial chronologies from many sites are still missing, such as HualcaHualca (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a high volcano of the Peruvian Andes located 70 km northwest of Arequipa. The goal of this study is to establish the age of the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) and deglaciation at HualcaHualca volcano. To achieve this objetive, we focused in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) characterized by a well-preserved sequence of moraines and roches moutonnées. The method is based on geomorphological analysis supported by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. 36Cl ages have been estimated with the CHLOE calculator and were compared with other central Andean glacial chronologies as well as paleoclimatological proxies. In Huayuray valley, exposure ages indicates that MGE occurred ~ 18 - 16 ka. Later, the ice mass gradually retreated but this process was interrupted by at least two readvances; the last one has been dated at ~ 12 ka. In the other hand, 36Cl result reflects a MGE age of ~ 13 ka in Mollebaya valley. Also, two samples obtained in Pujro-Huayjo and Mucurca valleys associated with MGE have an exposure age of 10-9 ka, but likely are moraine boulders affected by exhumation or erosion processes. Deglaciation in HualcaHualca volcano began abruptly ~ 11.5 ka ago according to a 36Cl age from a polished and striated bedrock in Pujro Huayjo valley, presumably as a result of reduced precipitation as well as a global increase of temperatures. The glacier evolution at HualcaHualca volcano presents a high correlation with

  4. Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gajewski, K. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Viau, A. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sawada, M. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Atkinson, D. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, S. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of Sphagnum spores in North America and Eurasia are mapped for the past 21ka, as described in Gajewski et al. (2002). In summary, spore data were taken from existing pollen data bases, as were radiocarbon chronologies. The abundance of Sphagnum spores was mapped at 2000-year intervals beginning 21000 years BP (before present). The present-day distribution of abundant Sphagnum spores corresponds closely to areas with peatland development, with maximum Sphagnum abundance between 630 and 1300 mm annual precipitation and between -2° and 60°C mean annual air temperature. Carbon content of peatlands was generated from estimated peatland area, calculated values of peat thickness, and specified values of bulk density (112 × 103 g m-3) and fraction of carbon (51.7%).

  5. The concept of global monsoon applied to the last glacial maximum: A multi-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dabang; Tian, Zhiping; Lang, Xianmei; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The last glacial maximum (LGM, ca. 21,000 years ago) has been extensively investigated for better understanding of past glacial climates. Global-scale monsoon changes, however, have not yet been determined. In this study, we examine global monsoon area (GMA) and precipitation (GMP) as well as GMP intensity (GMPI) at the LGM using the experiments of 17 climate models chosen from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) according to their ability to reproduce the present global monsoon climate. Compared to the reference period (referring to the present day, ca. 1985, for three atmospheric plus two atm-slab ocean models and the pre-industrial period, ca. 1750, for 12 fully coupled atmosphere-ocean or atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models), the LGM monsoon area increased over land and decreased over the oceans. The boreal land monsoon areas generally shifted southward, while the northern boundary of land monsoon areas retreated southward over southern Africa and South America. Both the LGM GMP and GMPI decreased in most of the models. The GMP decrease mainly resulted from the reduced monsoon precipitation over the oceans, while the GMPI decrease was derived from the weakened intensity of monsoon precipitation over land and the boreal ocean. Quantitatively, the LGM GMP deficit was due to, first, the GMA reduction and, second, the GMPI weakening. In response to the LGM large ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, the global surface and tropospheric temperatures cooled, the boreal summer meridional temperature gradient increased, and the summer land-sea thermal contrast at 40°S - 70°N decreased. These are the underlying dynamic mechanisms for the LGM monsoon changes. Qualitatively, simulations agree with reconstructions in all land monsoon areas except in the western part of northern Australia where disagreements occur and in South America and the southern part of southern Africa where there is uncertainty in reconstructions

  6. Last Glacial Maximum Dated by Means of 10Be in the Maritime Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, D. E.; Spagnolo, M.; Federici, P.; Pappalardo, M.; Ribolini, A.; Cyr, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Relatively few exposure dates of LGM moraines boulders are available for the European Alps, and none on the southern flank. Ponte Murato (PM) is a frontal moraine at 860 m asl in the Gesso Basin (Maritime Alps, SW European Alps). The PM moraine dams the 157 km2 Gesso della Barra Valley and it represents the lowermost frontal moraine of the entire Gesso Valley, near the outlet of the valley in the Po Plain. Its ELA, determined from the paleo- shape of the supposed Gesso della Barra glacier, is 1746 m asl. Tetti Bandito (TB) is a small and badly preserved glacial deposit, tentatively attributed to a lateral-frontal moraine, that is positioned 5 km downvalley from the PM deposit at 800 m asl. There are no other glacial deposits downvalley from the TB moraine in the Gesso Basin or farther NE in the piedmont region of the upper Po Plain. Boulders sampled on the PM and on the TB moraine crests gave a 10Be cosmogenic age of respectively 16300 ± 880 ka (average value) and 18798 ± 973 ka. This result constrains the PM frontal moraine within the LGM interval but also suggests that the maximum expansion of the Gesso Basin glacier was more downvalley at some point during the last glaciation. If the TB is a lateral-frontal moraine as supposed, the two TB and PM moraines would represent the outer and inner moraine crests of the same LGM stadial, with the outer moraine much less pronounced than the inner moraine, similarly to the maximalstand and the hochstand described in the Eastern Alps (Van Husen, 1997). Within this perspective, the PM and TB dates are consistent with a European Alps LGM corresponding to MIS 2 (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004). This study of the Maritime Alps moraines is also in agreement with the Upper Würm climatic theory (Florineth and Schlüchter, 2000) of a stronger influence of the W and SW incoming humid airflows in the European Alps, differently from the nearby Vosges and Pyrenees mountain chains where more dry conditions were probably responsible for a very

  7. Upward Altitudinal Shifts in Habitat Suitability of Mountain Vipers since the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Mohsen; Nourani, Elham; Behrooz, Roozbeh; Rajabizadeh, Mehdi; Geniez, Philippe; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of past and future climate changes on the distribution of the Montivipera raddei species complex (MRC) that contains rare and endangered viper species limited to Iran, Turkey and Armenia. We also investigated the current distribution of MRC to locate unidentified isolated populations as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of the current network of protected areas for their conservation. Present distribution of MRC was modeled based on ecological variables and model performance was evaluated by field visits. Some individuals at the newly identified populations showed uncommon morphological characteristics. The distribution map of MRC derived through modeling was then compared with the distribution of protected areas in the region. We estimated the effectiveness of the current protected area network to be 10%, which would be sufficient for conserving this group of species, provided adequate management policies and practices are employed. We further modeled the distribution of MRC in the past (21,000 years ago) and under two scenarios in the future (to 2070). These models indicated that climatic changes probably have been responsible for an upward shift in suitable habitats of MRC since the Last Glacial Maximum, leading to isolation of allopatric populations. Distribution will probably become much more restricted in the future as a result of the current rate of global warming. We conclude that climate change most likely played a major role in determining the distribution pattern of MRC, restricting allopatric populations to mountaintops due to habitat alterations. This long-term isolation has facilitated unique local adaptations among MRC populations, which requires further investigation. The suitable habitat patches identified through modeling constitute optimized solutions for inclusion in the network of protected areas in the region. PMID:26367126

  8. Upward Altitudinal Shifts in Habitat Suitability of Mountain Vipers since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Mohsen; Nourani, Elham; Behrooz, Roozbeh; Rajabizadeh, Mehdi; Geniez, Philippe; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of past and future climate changes on the distribution of the Montivipera raddei species complex (MRC) that contains rare and endangered viper species limited to Iran, Turkey and Armenia. We also investigated the current distribution of MRC to locate unidentified isolated populations as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of the current network of protected areas for their conservation. Present distribution of MRC was modeled based on ecological variables and model performance was evaluated by field visits. Some individuals at the newly identified populations showed uncommon morphological characteristics. The distribution map of MRC derived through modeling was then compared with the distribution of protected areas in the region. We estimated the effectiveness of the current protected area network to be 10%, which would be sufficient for conserving this group of species, provided adequate management policies and practices are employed. We further modeled the distribution of MRC in the past (21,000 years ago) and under two scenarios in the future (to 2070). These models indicated that climatic changes probably have been responsible for an upward shift in suitable habitats of MRC since the Last Glacial Maximum, leading to isolation of allopatric populations. Distribution will probably become much more restricted in the future as a result of the current rate of global warming. We conclude that climate change most likely played a major role in determining the distribution pattern of MRC, restricting allopatric populations to mountaintops due to habitat alterations. This long-term isolation has facilitated unique local adaptations among MRC populations, which requires further investigation. The suitable habitat patches identified through modeling constitute optimized solutions for inclusion in the network of protected areas in the region.

  9. European emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from the Last Glacial Maximum to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurgers, G.; Hickler, T.; Miller, P. A.; Arneth, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), such as isoprene and monoterpenes, play an important role in atmospheric processes. BVOC species are oxidized in the atmosphere and influence levels of ozone. The less volatile amongst the BVOC and their oxidation products are important for the formation and growth of secondary biogenic aerosol. In this way, the Earth's radiation balance is affected. Geographic distribution and temporal changes in BVOC emissions are highly uncertain. Here we assessed changes in emission patterns across Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with a dynamic vegetation model. This model reproduces European tree species distribution and includes a process-based algorithm for terpenoid production. In a set of simulations the model was driven with paleoclimate anomalies and reconstructed CO2 concentrations. We quantified three main driving factors for the changes in emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes since the LGM: (1) the changes in climate, with temperature changes as the most important factor affecting plant physiology and terpenoid production in all plant species, (2) a change in species distribution related to the changes in climate, causing local shifts in emission characteristics of the vegetation, and (3) a change in CO2 concentration, causing opposing effects on the availability of different substrates for terpenoid production. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration is particularly uncertain, but sensitivity simulations showed an increase in European BVOC emissions in all sensitivity experiments irrespective of the use of a direct inhibition of terpenoid production by CO2. The effects of climate change on physiology and terpenoid production resulted in an overall relatively uniform increase of emissions in Europe over the simulation period, but regionally the effect of changes in species distribution and the related changes in emission capacities resulted in changes of emissions that can dominate over the physiology

  10. Radiocarbon evidence for enhanced respired carbon storage in the Atlantic at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, E.; Skinner, L. C.; Waelbroeck, C.; Hodell, D.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of ocean circulation changes on atmospheric CO2 hinges primarily on the ability to alter the ocean interior's respired nutrient inventory. Here we investigate the Atlantic overturning circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum and its impact on respired carbon storage using radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope data from the Brazil and Iberian Margins. The data demonstrate the existence of a shallow well-ventilated northern-sourced cell overlying a poorly ventilated, predominantly southern-sourced cell at the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find that organic carbon remineralization rates in the deep Atlantic remained broadly similar to modern, but that ventilation ages in the southern-sourced overturning cell were significantly increased. Respired carbon storage in the deep Atlantic was therefore enhanced during the last glacial period, primarily due to an increase in the residence time of carbon in the deep ocean, rather than an increase in biological carbon export.

  11. Radiocarbon evidence for enhanced respired carbon storage in the Atlantic at the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, E.; Skinner, L. C.; Waelbroeck, C.; Hodell, D.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ocean circulation changes on atmospheric CO2 hinges primarily on the ability to alter the ocean interior's respired nutrient inventory. Here we investigate the Atlantic overturning circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum and its impact on respired carbon storage using radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope data from the Brazil and Iberian Margins. The data demonstrate the existence of a shallow well-ventilated northern-sourced cell overlying a poorly ventilated, predominantly southern-sourced cell at the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find that organic carbon remineralization rates in the deep Atlantic remained broadly similar to modern, but that ventilation ages in the southern-sourced overturning cell were significantly increased. Respired carbon storage in the deep Atlantic was therefore enhanced during the last glacial period, primarily due to an increase in the residence time of carbon in the deep ocean, rather than an increase in biological carbon export. PMID:27346723

  12. Thermocline Structure and ENSO Variability in the eastern equatorial Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.; Koutavas, A.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Rustic, G.

    2015-12-01

    The mean state and variability of the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are of great interest because of the region's role in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and global climate. We investigated changes in thermocline structure between the Late Holocene (LH) and LGM with stable isotopes of planktonic foraminifera in sediment cores from the Galápagos. We measured δ18O in two species—Globigerinoides ruber, inhabiting the surface mixed layer, and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, inhabiting the deep thermocline—in order to evaluate the vertical temperature contrast between the two species. We also measured δ18O of individual N. dutertrei from modern (late 20th century) and LGM sediments in order to assess thermocline temperature variability related to ENSO activity. Our data indicate a reduced vertical contrast in the upper ocean during the LGM, which is most consistent with a deeper thermocline and thicker mixed layer. Additionally, δ18O of individual N. dutertrei shells shows 2.5 times greater population variance in the LGM than in the modern sample. This large variance indicates that thermocline temperatures were more variable during the LGM than today, consistent with more active ENSO. Together, these results imply that the mean state of the EEP was characterized by a deeper thermocline and greater ENSO variability. The results further show the potential for reconstructing ENSO variability from deep-sea sediments of the EEP, where other geological archives of ENSO are currently extremely limited.

  13. Sensitivity of palaeotidal models of the northwest European shelf seas to glacial isostatic adjustment since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Sophie L.; Neill, Simon P.; Scourse, James D.; Bradley, Sarah L.; Uehara, Katsuto

    2016-11-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of relative sea-level change over the northwest European shelf seas has varied considerably since the Last Glacial Maximum, due to eustatic sea-level rise and a complex isostatic response to deglaciation of both near- and far-field ice sheets. Because of the complex pattern of relative sea level changes, the region is an ideal focus for modelling the impact of significant sea-level change on shelf sea tidal dynamics. Changes in tidal dynamics influence tidal range, the location of tidal mixing fronts, dissipation of tidal energy, shelf sea biogeochemistry and sediment transport pathways. Significant advancements in glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) modelling of the region have been made in recent years, and earlier palaeotidal models of the northwest European shelf seas were developed using output from less well-constrained GIA models as input to generate palaeobathymetric grids. We use the most up-to-date and well-constrained GIA model for the region as palaeotopographic input for a new high resolution, three-dimensional tidal model (ROMS) of the northwest European shelf seas. With focus on model output for 1 ka time slices from the Last Glacial Maximum (taken as being 21 ka BP) to present day, we demonstrate that spatial and temporal changes in simulated tidal dynamics are very sensitive to relative sea-level distribution. The new high resolution palaeotidal model is considered a significant improvement on previous depth-averaged palaeotidal models, in particular where the outputs are to be used in sediment transport studies, where consideration of the near-bed stress is critical, and for constraining sea level index points.

  14. Mediterranean fire histories since the Last Glacial Maximum from lake sedimentary micro- charcoals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, C.; Turner, R.

    2006-12-01

    Microscopic charcoal analysis has been used to reconstruct past fire activity over a range of spatial and temporal scales in Europe, the Americas and Australasia. By contrast, and despite the importance of fire in its modern landscape ecology, few systematic attempts have been made in the circum-Mediterranean region to reconstruct long-term fire histories using micro-charcoals or other methods of analysis. This study has used non-destructive methods of charcoal extraction based on sieving plus heavy-liquid separation (Turner et al in press In: Charcoal from the past: cultural and palaeoenvironmental implications. BAR International Series, Archaeopress, Oxford) along with contiguous core sampling of sedimentary core sequences from a number of East Mediterranean lakes that span the last glacial-interglacial climatic transition. At Eski Acýgöl, central Turkey (Roberts et al. Holocene, 2001, 11, 719-734), then a deepwater crater lake, overall micro-charcoal concentrations in sediments are low and were dominated by influx from regional-landscape rather than local- scale fire events. This record therefore provides a good proxy for overall fire frequency/intensity across the central Anatolia plateau, whose (hypothetical) modern "natural" vegetation is predominantly open oak-grass- Artemisia parkland. Shallow water sites such as Akgöl typically record much higher overall micro-charcoal abundance as a result of local-scale burning of the marsh surface at times of lowered water table, and thus received episodic local charcoal influx superimposed on background regional airborne sources. These results indicate that site type / catchment area and sampling / analytic methodology can critically influence reconstructed fire histories. We have correlated our charcoal records with existing multi-proxy data from the same cores (stable isotopes and pollen). This shows that climatic variations and biomass availability were the main factors controlling the timing of regional fire

  15. Ice-sheet configuration in the CMIP5/PMIP3 Last Glacial Maximum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Kageyama, M.; Braconnot, P.; Harrison, S. P.; Lambeck, K.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Peltier, W. R.; Tarasov, L.; Peterschmitt, J.-Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-06-01

    We describe the creation of boundary conditions related to the presence of ice sheets, including ice sheet extent and height, ice shelf extent, and the distribution and altitude of ice-free land, at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) for use in LGM experiments conducted as part of the fifth phase of the Coupled Modelling Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the third phase of the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP3). The CMIP5/PMIP3 data sets were created from reconstructions made by three different groups, which were all obtained using a model-inversion approach but differ in the assumptions used in the modelling and in the type of data used as constraints. The ice sheet extent, and thus the albedo mask, for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) does not vary substantially between the three individual data sources. The difference in the topography of the NH ice sheets is also moderate, and smaller than the differences between these reconstructions (and the resultant composite reconstruction) and ice-sheet reconstructions used in previous generations of PMIP. Only two of the individual reconstructions provide information for Antarctica. The discrepancy between these two reconstructions is larger than the difference for the NH ice sheets although still less than the difference between the composite reconstruction and previous PMIP ice-sheet reconstructions. Differences in the climate response to the individual LGM reconstructions, and between these reconstructions and the CMIP5/PMIP3 composite, are largely confined to the ice-covered regions, but also extend over North Atlantic Ocean and Northern Hemisphere continents through atmospheric stationary waves. There are much larger differences in the climate response to the latest reconstructions (or the derived composite) and ice-sheet reconstructions used in previous phases of PMIP.

  16. The influence of Antarctic subglacial volcanism on the global iron cycle during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisia, Silvia; Weyrich, Laura S.; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Rivard, Camille; Cooper, Alan

    2017-06-01

    Marine sediment records suggest that episodes of major atmospheric CO2 drawdown during the last glacial period were linked to iron (Fe) fertilization of subantarctic surface waters. The principal source of this Fe is thought to be dust transported from southern mid-latitude deserts. However, uncertainty exists over contributions to CO2 sequestration from complementary Fe sources, such as the Antarctic ice sheet, due to the difficulty of locating and interrogating suitable archives that have the potential to preserve such information. Here we present petrographic, geochemical and microbial DNA evidence preserved in precisely dated subglacial calcites from close to the East Antarctic Ice-Sheet margin, which together suggest that volcanically-induced drainage of Fe-rich waters during the Last Glacial Maximum could have reached the Southern Ocean. Our results support a significant contribution of Antarctic volcanism to subglacial transport and delivery of nutrients with implications on ocean productivity at peak glacial conditions.

  17. The influence of Antarctic subglacial volcanism on the global iron cycle during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Frisia, Silvia; Weyrich, Laura S.; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Rivard, Camille; Cooper, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Marine sediment records suggest that episodes of major atmospheric CO2 drawdown during the last glacial period were linked to iron (Fe) fertilization of subantarctic surface waters. The principal source of this Fe is thought to be dust transported from southern mid-latitude deserts. However, uncertainty exists over contributions to CO2 sequestration from complementary Fe sources, such as the Antarctic ice sheet, due to the difficulty of locating and interrogating suitable archives that have the potential to preserve such information. Here we present petrographic, geochemical and microbial DNA evidence preserved in precisely dated subglacial calcites from close to the East Antarctic Ice-Sheet margin, which together suggest that volcanically-induced drainage of Fe-rich waters during the Last Glacial Maximum could have reached the Southern Ocean. Our results support a significant contribution of Antarctic volcanism to subglacial transport and delivery of nutrients with implications on ocean productivity at peak glacial conditions. PMID:28598412

  18. Glacial wetland distribution and methane emissions estimated from PMIP2 climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Nanne; Drury, Annajoy; Toonen, Willem; van Weele, Michiel

    2010-05-01

    It is an open question to what extent wetlands contributed to the interglacial-glacial decrease in atmospheric methane concentration. Here we estimate methane emissions from glacial wetlands, using newly available PMIP2 simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate from coupled atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models. Emissions are computed from the dominant controls of water table depth, soil temperature and plant productivity and we analyse the relative role of each factor in the glacial decline. It is found that latitudinal changes in soil moisture, in combination with ice-sheet expansion, cause boreal wetlands to shift southward in all simulations. This southward migration is instrumental in maintaining the boreal wetland source at a significant level. The temperature effect is found to be moderate, while reduced plant productivity contributes equally to the total reduction. Model results indicate a relatively small boreal and large tropical source during the LGM, consistent with the low interpolar difference in glacial methane concentrations derived from ice-core data.

  19. Pollen record from Ka'au Crater, Oahu, Hawaii: Evidence for a dry glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, S.C.; Juvik, J.O. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo )

    1993-06-01

    Fossil pollen from a 3.5 m-long core from Ka'au Crater, Hawaii (elev. 460 m), yields a ca. 23,000-year record of regional vegetation history. Results indicate a full-glacial period drier and possibly cooler than present, a warmer and wetter early Holocene, and a somewhat drier late Holocene; this sequence agrees with earlier work by Selling (1948) on other islands. The oldest zone is donated by pollen of Chenopodium oahuense, Acacia koa, and Dodonaea viscosa; post-glacial pollen assemblages feature high percentages of Myrsine and Coprosma, followed by increases in Lycopodium cernuum Ilex anomala. Freycinetia arborea and Pritchardia. After about 8000 years ago, Chenopodium, Acacia, and Dodonaea increase, suggesting a return to drier conditions. Abundant pollen of Chenopodium oahuense, a plant of dry regions, during the last glacial maximum implies that neither the trade winds nor cyclonic storms were delivering as much moisture to the regional vegetation as they presently do. This suggests that the ocean surface temperature during the last glacial maximum may have been cooler than present, a finding contradictory to the reconstructions of the CLIMAP (1981) group, which show temperatures near Hawaii equal to or even warmer than present.

  20. The role of glacial cycles in promoting genetic diversity in the Neotropics: the case of cloud forests during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    The increasing aridity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been proposed as a major factor affecting Neotropical species. The character and intensity of this change, however, remains the subject of ongoing debate. This review proposes an approach to test contrasting paleoecological hypotheses by way of their expected demographic and genetic effects on Neotropical cloud forest species. We reviewed 48 paleoecological records encompassing the LGM in the Neotropics. The records show contrasting evidence regarding the changes in precipitation during this period. Some regions remained fairly moist and others had a significantly reduced precipitation. Many paleoecological records within the same region show apparently conflicting evidence on precipitation and forest stability. From these data, we propose and outline two demographic/genetic scenarios for cloud forests species based on opposite precipitation regimes: the dry refugia and the moist forests hypotheses. We searched for studies dealing with the population genetic structure of cloud forest and other montane taxa and compared their results with the proposed models. To date, the few available molecular studies show insufficient genetic evidence on the predominance of glacial aridity in the Neotropics. In order to disentangle the climatic history of the Neotropics, the present study calls for a general multi-disciplinary approach to conduct future phylogeographic studies. Given the contradictory paleoecological information, population genetic data on Neotropical cloud forest species should be used to explicitly test the genetic consequences of competing paleoecological models. PMID:23531632

  1. The Northern Extent of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Belt since the Last Glacial Maximum Tracked via Sediment Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, A. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere Westerlies are known to be important for climate due to their effects on the global carbon cycle and on the global thermohaline circulation. Many proxy records suggest that the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds have changed significantly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at ~21,000 years BP. However, a recent compilation of all available evidence for Southern Hemisphere westerly wind changes during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) led to the conclusion that "their strength and position in colder and warmer climates relative to today remain a wide open question" (Kohfeld et al. (2013) Quaternary Science Reviews, 68). This paper finds that an equatorward displacement of the glacial winds is consistent with observations, but cannot rule out other, competing hypotheses. Using the geochemical characteristics of deep-sea sediments deposited along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, I test the hypothesis that the LGM Southern Hemisphere Westerlies were displaced northward. In the central South Atlantic, dust can be delivered from South America via the Westerlies, or from Africa via the Trade Winds. The continental sources of South America and Africa have very different geochemical signatures, making it possible to distinguish between eolian transport via the Westerlies vs. the Trade Winds. Any northward shift in the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies would increase the northward extent of a South American provenance in sediments dominated by eolian sources. I will present geochemical provenance data (radiogenic isotope ratios; major and trace element concentrations) in a latitudinal transect of cores along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that document whether, in fact, such a shift occurred, and put an important constraint on how far north the wind belts shifted during the LGM.

  2. Factors controlling Hadley circulation changes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the end of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Roberta; Lionello, Piero; Adam, Ori; Schneider, Tapio

    2017-08-01

    The Hadley circulation (HC) extent and strength are analyzed in a wide range of simulated climates from the Last Glacial Maximum to global warming scenarios. Motivated by HC theories, we analyze how the HC is influenced by the subtropical stability, the near-surface meridional potential temperature gradient, and the tropical tropopause level. The subtropical static stability accounts for the bulk of the HC changes across the simulations. However, since it correlates strongly with global mean surface temperature, most HC changes can be attributed to global mean surface temperature changes. The HC widens as the climate warms, and it also weakens, but only robustly so in the Northern Hemisphere. On the other hand, the Southern Hemisphere strength response is uncertain, in part because subtropical static stability changes counteract meridional potential temperature gradient changes to various degrees in different models, with no consensus on the response of the latter to global warming.

  3. Fast Vegetational Responses to Late-Glacial Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Post, D. M.; Cwynar, L. C.; Lotter, A. F.; Levesque, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    How rapidly can natural ecosystems respond to rapid climate change? This question can be addressed by studying paired paleoecological and paleoclimatological records spanning the last deglaciation. Between 16 and 10 ka, abrupt climatic oscillations (e.g. Younger Dryas, Gerzensee/Killarney Oscillations) interrupted the general warming trend. Rates of climate change during these events were as fast or faster than projected rates of change for this century. We compiled a dozen high-resolution lacustrine records in North America and Europe with a pollen record and independent climatic proxy, a clear Younger Dryas signal, and good age control. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that vegetation responded rapidly to late-glacial climate change, with significant changes in vegetation composition occurring within the lifespan of individual trees. At all sites, vegetation lagged climate by less than 200 years, and at two-thirds of the sites, the initial vegetational response occurred within 100 years. The finding of rapid vegetational responses is consistent across sites and continents, and is similar to the 100-200 year response times predicted by gap-scale forest models. Likely mechanisms include 1) increased susceptibility of mature trees to disturbances such as fire, wind, and disease, thereby opening up gaps for colonization, 2) the proximity of these sites to late-glacial treeline, where climate may directly control plant population densities and range limits, 3) the presence of herbaceous taxa with short generation times in these plant communities, and 4) rapid migration due to rare long-distance seed dispersals. Our results are consistent with reports that plant ranges are already shifting in response to recent climate change, and suggest that these shifts will persist for the next several centuries. Widespread changes in plant distributions may affect surface-atmosphere interactions and will challenge attempts to manage ecosystems and conserve biodiversity.

  4. Vegetation and environment in Eastern North America during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Stephen T.; Webb, Robert S.; Anderson, Katharine H.; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; Webb, Thompson, III; Williams, John W.; Hansen, Barbara C. S.

    2000-02-01

    Knowledge of the vegetation and environment of eastern North America during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is important to understanding postglacial vegetational and biogeographic dynamics, assessing climate sensitivity, and constraining and evaluating earth-system models. Our understanding of LGM conditions in the region has been hampered by low site density, problems of data quality (particularly dating), and the possibility that LGM vegetation and climate lacked modern analogs. In order to generate improved reconstructions of LGM vegetation and environment, we assembled pollen and plant macrofossil data from 21 and 17 well-dated LGM sites, respectively. All sites have assemblages within the LGM timespan of 21,000±1500 calendar yr BP. Based on these data, we prepared maps of isopolls, macrofossil presence/absence, pollen-analogs, biomes, inferred mean January and July temperatures and mean annual precipitation for the LGM. Tundra and open Picea-dominated forest grew along the Laurentide ice sheet, with tundra predominantly in the west. In the east, Pinus-dominated vegetation (mainly P. banksiana with local P. resinosa and P. strobus) occurred extensively to 34°N and possibly as far south as 30°N. Picea glauca and a now-extinct species, P. critchfieldii, occurred locally. Picea-dominated forest grew in the continental interior, with temperate hardwoods ( Quercus, Carya, Juglans, Liriodendron, Fagus, Ulmus) growing locally near the Lower Mississippi Valley at least as far north as 35°N. Picea critchfieldii was the dominant species in this region. The Florida peninsula was occupied by open vegetation with warm-temperate species of Pinus. Eastern Texas was occupied by open vegetation with at least local Quercus and Picea. Extensive areas of peninsular Florida and the continental interior had vegetation unmatched by any modern pollen samples. The paleovegetational data indicate more extensive cooling in eastern North America at the LGM than simulated by either the

  5. Loop Current variability due to wind stress and reduced sea level during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildner, T. C.; Eden, C.; Nuernberg, D.; Schoenfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most prominent features of the circulation in the Gulf of Mexico is the Loop Current (LC). It is of special interest as it influences not only the climate in the Gulf of Mexico. Although causation is not well understood yet, dynamical relationships between LC retraction and extension, seasonal migrations of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the related wind stress curl over the subtropical North Atlantic, and changes in the thermohaline circulation are indicated by model simulations. A characteristic feature of the LC is the shedding of anticyclonic eddies. These eddies can have depth signatures of up to 1000 m and are of special interest as they supply heat and moisture into the western and northern Gulf. The eddies are generated aperiodically every 3 to 21 months, with an average shedding time of 9.5 months. Eddy shedding appears to be related to a suite of oceanographic forcing fields such as the Yucatan Channel throughflow, the Florida Current and North Brazil Current variability, as well as synoptic meteorological forcing variability. By combining state-of-the-art paleoceanographic and meso-scale eddy-resolving numerical modeling techniques, we examined the Loop Current dynamics and hydrographic changes in the Gulf going back in time up to ~21,000 years. To assess the impact of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) wind stress and reduced sea level we have re-configured an existing hierarchy of models of the North Atlantic Ocean (FLAME) with a horizontal grid resolution of ca. 30 km (wind stress was taken from the PMIP-II database). The sea level was lowered compared to the CONTROL run by 110 m and 67 m. These sea level changes have been chosen according to the cold-deglacial periods Heinrich I and Younger Dryas. The result of our model simulations is a continuous increase in eddy shedding from the LGM to the Holocene. This increase is predominantly controlled by the continuous deglacial sea level rise. Changes in wind stress curl related to the

  6. Glacial geomorphic evidence for a late climatic change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Strom, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    In a series of preliminary reports, we documented evidence of former glacial epochs on Mars. Apparent glacial landforms seemed to be concentrated primarily at middle to high southern latitudes. We now have additional evidence supporting the view that Martian glaciation appears to have been more extensive than previously recognized. The growth and collapse of ice sheets on Mars seems closely analogous to the growth and decline of Earth's great Pleistocene ice sheets. This implies that climate change was probably somewhat comparable on the two planets, although in the case of Mars the entire planet seems to have changed rapidly to a cold, dry present-day environment after the collapse of the ice sheets.

  7. A global climate reconstruction of the past eight glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, A.; Friedrich, T.

    2016-12-01

    Climate variability over the past 8 glacial cycles can be regarded as a superposition of externally forced orbital-scale variations and internally generated centennial/millennial-scale fluctuations. To better understand the nature, timing and pattern of these anomalies in paleo-climate records, we developed a novel paleo-climate hindcast covering the past 8 glacial cycles that captures both types of variability. We blend an externally forced transient earth system model simulation, which responds to orbital forcing, greenhouse gas and ice-sheet changes, with an empirical estimate of the Dansgaard-Oeschger continuum. The latter is obtained as the product of a normalized high-resolution North Atlantic SST record and the millennial-scale regression patterns derived from a transient Dansgaard-Oeschger hindcast simulation. We will demonstrate the skill of this global paleoclimate reconstruction through comparison with a plethora of high-resolution temperature and hydroclimate paleo records and discuss the most prominent patterns atmospheric teleconnection patterns. The global climate reconstruction can be used to force offline paleo-proxy models, ice-sheet models and human migration simulations. It also provides an easy means to synchronize paleo-proxy records from different sites in a physically consistent manner.

  8. Dust: a diagnostic of the hydrologic cycle during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Yung, Y L; Lee, T; Wang, C H; Shieh, Y T

    1996-02-16

    Dust concentrations in ice of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are high in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The magnitude of the enhancements can be explained if the strength of the hydrologic cycle during the LGM was about half of that at present. This notion is consistent with a large decrease (5 degrees Celsius) in ocean temperature during the LGM, as recently deduced from measurements of strontium and calcium in corals.

  9. Dust: a diagnostic of the hydrologic cycle during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Lee, T.; Wang, C. H.; Shieh, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    Dust concentrations in ice of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are high in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The magnitude of the enhancements can be explained if the strength of the hydrologic cycle during the LGM was about half of that at present. This notion is consistent with a large decrease (5 degrees Celsius) in ocean temperature during the LGM, as recently deduced from measurements of strontium and calcium in corals.

  10. Dust: A diagnostic of the hydrologic cycle during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Yuk L. Yung; Typhoon Lee; Chung-Ho Wang; Ying-Tzung Shieh

    1996-02-16

    Dust concentrations in ice of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are high in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The magnitude of the enhancements can be explained if the strength of the hydrologic cycle during the LGM was about half of that at present. This notion is consistent with a large decrease (5{degrees}C) in ocean temperature during the LGM, as recently deduced from measurements of strontium and calcium in corals. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Atlantic Ocean Circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum: Inferences from Data and Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    development of estimates of ocean state that are (1) within error bounds of a given dataset, (2) consistent with known oceanic dynamics, and (3...United States Government. This thesis should be cited as: Holly Janine Dail, 2012. Atlantic Ocean Circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum: Inferences...this thesis a novel approach to dynamical reconstruction is applied to make estimates of LGM Atlantic Ocean state that are consistent with these proxy

  12. Last glacial maximum constraints on the Earth System model HadGEM2-ES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response of the atmospheric and land surface components of the CMIP5/AR5 Earth System model HadGEM2-ES to pre-industrial (PI: AD 1860) and last glacial maximum (LGM: 21 kyr) boundary conditions. HadGEM2-ES comprises atmosphere, ocean and sea-ice components which are interactively coupled to representations of the carbon cycle, aerosols including mineral dust and tropospheric chemistry. In this study, we focus on the atmosphere-only model HadGEM2-A coupled to terrestrial carbon cycle and aerosol models. This configuration is forced with monthly sea surface temperature and sea-ice fields from equivalent coupled simulations with an older version of the Hadley Centre model, HadCM3. HadGEM2-A simulates extreme cooling over northern continents and nearly complete die back of vegetation in Asia, giving a poor representation of the LGM environment compared with reconstructions of surface temperatures and biome distributions. The model also performs significantly worse for the LGM in comparison with its precursor AR4 model HadCM3M2. Detailed analysis shows that the major factor behind the vegetation die off in HadGEM2-A is a subtle change to the temperature dependence of leaf mortality within the phenology model of HadGEM2. This impacts on both snow-vegetation albedo and vegetation dynamics. A new set of parameters is tested for both the pre-industrial and LGM, showing much improved coverage of vegetation in both time periods, including an improved representation of the needle-leaf forest coverage in Siberia for the pre-industrial. The new parameters and the resulting changes in global vegetation distribution strongly impact the simulated loading of mineral dust, an important aerosol for the LGM. The climate response in an abrupt 4× pre-industrial CO2 simulation is also analysed and shows modest regional impacts on surface temperatures across the Boreal zone.

  13. Global Monsoon Change During the Last Glacial Maximum: A Multi-Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M.; Wang, B.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Change of Global Monsoon (GM) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is investigated using results from the multi-model ensemble of 7 coupled climate models participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The GM changes during LGM are identified by comparison of the results from the pre-industrial control run and the LGM run. The results show (1) The annual mean GM precipitation and GM domain are reduced by about 10% and 5%, respectively; (2) The monsoon intensity (demonstrated by the local summer-minus-winter precipitation) is also weakened over most monsoon regions except Australian monsoon; (3) The monsoon precipitation is reduced more during the local summer than winter; (4) Distinct from all other regional monsoons, the Australian monsoon is strengthened and the monsoon area is enlarged. Four major factors contribute to these changes. The lower greenhouse gas concentration and the presence of the ice sheets decrease air temperature and water vapor content, resulting in a general weakening of the GM precipitation and reduction of GM domain. The reduced hemispheric difference in seasonal variation of insolation may contribute to the weakened GM intensity. The changed land-ocean configuration in the vicinity of the Maritime Continent, along with the presence of the ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentration, result in strengthened land-ocean and North-South hemispheric thermal contrasts, leading to the unique strengthened Australian monsoon. Although some of the results are consistent with the proxy data, uncertainties remain in different models. More comparison is needed between proxy data and model experiments to better understand the changes of the GM during the LGM.

  14. Effect of the Long-Term Warming Since the Last Glacial Maximum on Terrestrial Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Duan, W.; Wang, H.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow is a geophysical parameter enumerating the outward energy flux from the interior of Earth. It is conventionally measured in boreholes as the product of thermal conductivity of rocks and geothermal gradient, which is subject to the influence from the variations in ground surface temperature condition. As such, on the one hand variation of heat flow density with depth is a direct temperature record of paleoclimate change; on the other hand ground surface temperature history imposes transient perturbation on a heat flow measurement. The assessment of the paleoclimate effect on a heat flow measurement requires a good understanding of the paleoclimate history. In this study, we evaluate the transient effect of the long-term warming since the last glacial maximum on the continental heat flow with both forward and inversion approaches. With the forward approach, we calculate the subsurface temperature response to climate change based on the latest reconstruction of the last 30,000 year paleoclimate history. We then translate the thermal response to the perturbation to a heat flow measurement. With the inversion approach, we use a set of 6,144 qualified data selected from more than 13,000 reported continental heat flow measurements to synthesize a global profile of heat flow versus depth. We then invert this synthesized profile for a paleoclimate history and a steady-state heat flow profile. Our result shows that continental heat flow measurements within the depths down to around 2000 m are systematically lower than the steady state heat flow because of the effect of the last deglacial warming. If this transient perturbation is leaved uncorrected, the mean continental heat flow could be underestimated by as much as twenty percents. This study is supported by the NSF Grant 1202673 and Grant SKLLQG1201 of the Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Global monsoon change during the Last Glacial Maximum: a multi-model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mi; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Change of global monsoon (GM) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is investigated using results from the multi-model ensemble of seven coupled climate models participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. The GM changes during LGM are identified by comparison of the results from the pre-industrial control run and the LGM run. The results show (1) the annual mean GM precipitation and GM domain are reduced by about 10 and 5 %, respectively; (2) the monsoon intensity (demonstrated by the local summer-minus-winter precipitation) is also weakened over most monsoon regions except Australian monsoon; (3) the monsoon precipitation is reduced more during the local summer than winter; (4) distinct from all other regional monsoons, the Australian monsoon is strengthened and the monsoon area is enlarged. Four major factors contribute to these changes. The lower greenhouse gas concentration and the presence of the ice sheets decrease air temperature and water vapor content, resulting in a general weakening of the GM precipitation and reduction of GM domain. The reduced hemispheric difference in seasonal variation of insolation may contribute to the weakened GM intensity. The changed land-ocean configuration in the vicinity of the Maritime Continent, along with the presence of the ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentration, result in strengthened land-ocean and North-South hemispheric thermal contrasts, leading to the unique strengthened Australian monsoon. Although some of the results are consistent with the proxy data, uncertainties remain in different models. More comparison is needed between proxy data and model experiments to better understand the changes of the GM during the LGM.

  16. Glacial meltwater cooling of the Gulf of Mexico - GCM implications for Holocene and present-day climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Maasch, Kirk A.; Saltzman, Barry

    1989-01-01

    The NCAR Community Climate Model GCM is presently used to investigate the possible effects on regional and hemispheric climates of reduced SSTs in the Gulf of Mexico, in view of delta-O-18 records and terrestrial evidence for at least two major glacial meltwater discharges after the last glacial maximum. Three numerical experiments have been conducted with imposed gulfwide SST coolings of 3, 6, and 12 C; in all cases, significant reductions arise in the North Atlantic storm-track intensity, together with a strong decrease in transient eddy water vapor transport out of the Gulf of Mexico. Other statistically significant changes occur across the Northern Hemisphere.

  17. Glacial meltwater cooling of the Gulf of Mexico - GCM implications for Holocene and present-day climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Maasch, Kirk A.; Saltzman, Barry

    1989-01-01

    The NCAR Community Climate Model GCM is presently used to investigate the possible effects on regional and hemispheric climates of reduced SSTs in the Gulf of Mexico, in view of delta-O-18 records and terrestrial evidence for at least two major glacial meltwater discharges after the last glacial maximum. Three numerical experiments have been conducted with imposed gulfwide SST coolings of 3, 6, and 12 C; in all cases, significant reductions arise in the North Atlantic storm-track intensity, together with a strong decrease in transient eddy water vapor transport out of the Gulf of Mexico. Other statistically significant changes occur across the Northern Hemisphere.

  18. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Eiler, John M.; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J. David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K.

    2013-01-01

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth’s most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6–7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation. PMID:23671087

  19. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L; Eiler, John M; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K

    2013-05-28

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth's most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6-7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation.

  20. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Conway, T M; Wolff, E W; Röthlisberger, R; Mulvaney, R; Elderfield, H E

    2015-07-23

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial-interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1-42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01-0.84 mg m(-2) per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been ≥10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply.

  1. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, T. M.; Wolff, E. W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H. E.

    2015-07-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial-interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1-42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01-0.84 mg m-2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been >=10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply.

  2. Chronology of the last glacial maximum in the upper Bear River Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laabs, B.J.C.; Munroe, Jeffrey S.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Refsnider, K.A.; Mickelson, D.M.; Singer, B.S.; Caffee, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    The headwaters of the Bear River drainage were occupied during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) by outlet glaciers of the Western Uinta Ice Field, an extensive ice mass (???685 km2) that covered the western slope of the Uinta Mountains. A well-preserved sequence of latero-frontal moraines in the drainage indicates that outlet glaciers advanced beyond the mountain front and coalesced on the piedmont. Glacial deposits in the Bear River drainage provide a unique setting where both 10Be cosmogenic surface-exposure dating of moraine boulders and 14C dating of sediment in Bear Lake downstream of the glaciated area set age limits on the timing of glaciation. Limiting 14C ages of glacial flour in Bear Lake (corrected to calendar years using CALIB 5.0) indicate that ice advance began at 32 ka and culminated at about 24 ka. Based on a Bayesian statistical analysis of cosmogenic surface-exposure ages from two areas on the terminal moraine complex, the Bear River glacier began its final retreat at about 18.7 to 18.1 ka, approximately coincident with the start of deglaciation elsewhere in the central Rocky Mountains and many other alpine glacial localities worldwide. Unlike valleys of the southwestern Uinta Mountains, deglaciation of the Bear River drainage began prior to the hydrologie fall of Lake Bonneville from the Provo shoreline at about 16 ka. ?? 2007 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  3. The dynamic relationship between temperate and tropical circulation systems across South Africa since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Brian M.; Chevalier, Manuel; Boom, Arnoud; Carr, Andrew S.

    2017-10-01

    A fundamental and long-standing question of southern African palaeoclimatology is the way tropical and temperate climate system dynamics have influenced rainfall regimes across the subcontinent since the Last glacial maximum. In this paper, we analyse a selection of recently published palaeoclimate reconstructions along a southwest-northeast transect across South Africa. These records span the last 22,000 years, and encompass the transition between the region's winter and summer rainfall zones. In synthesis, these records confirm broad elements of the dominant paradigm, which proposes an inverse coeval relationship between temperate and tropical systems, with increased precipitation in the winter (summer) rainfall zone during glacial (interglacial) periods. Revealed, however, is a substantially more complex dynamic, with millennial-scale climate change events being strongly - even predominantly - influenced by the interaction and combination of temperate and tropical systems. This synoptic forcing can create same sign anomalies across the South African rainfall zones, contrary to expectations based on the classic model of phase opposition. These findings suggest a new paradigm for the interpretation of southern African palaeoenvironmental records that moves beyond simple binary or additive influences of these systems.

  4. Multiple evolutionary units and demographic stability during the last glacial maximum in the Scytalopus speluncae complex (Aves: Rhinocryptidae).

    PubMed

    Pulido-Santacruz, Paola; Bornschein, Marcos Ricardo; Belmonte-Lopes, Ricardo; Bonatto, Sandro L

    2016-09-01

    The Atlantic Forest (AF) of South America harbors one of the world's highest bird species richness, but to date there is a deficient understanding of the spatial patterns of genetic diversity and the evolutionary history of this biome. Here we estimated the phylogenetic and populational history of the widespread Mouse-colored Tapaculo (Scytalopus speluncae) complex across the Brazilian AF, using data from two mitochondrial genes and 12 microsatellite loci. Both markers uncovered several cryptic, mostly allopatric and well-supported lineages that may represent distinct species-level taxa. We investigated whether diversification in S. speluncae is compatible with the Carnaval-Moritz model of Pleistocene refugia. We found that northern lineages have high levels of genetic diversity, agreeing with predictions of more stable forest refugia in these areas. In contrast, southern lineages have lower levels of mtDNA diversity with a signature of population expansion that occurred earlier (∼0.2Mya) than the last glacial maximum. This result suggests that the AF may be stable enough to maintain endemic taxa through glacial cycles. Moreover, we propose that the "mid-Pleistocene climate transition" between 1.2 and 0.7million years ago, from a warmer to a colder climate, may have played an important but mostly overlooked role in the evolution of AF montane taxa.

  5. Climatic implications of correlated upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits on the Cinca and Gallego rivers, NE Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Claudia J; Mcdonald, Eric; Sancho, Carlos; Pena, Jose- Luis

    2008-01-01

    We correlate Upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits of the Cinca and Gallego River valleys (south central Pyrenees and Ebro basin, Spain) using geomorphic position, luminescence dates, and time-related trends in soil development. The ages obtained from glacial deposits indicate glacial periods at 85 {+-} 5 ka, 64 {+-} 11 ka, and 36 {+-} 3 ka (from glacial till) and 20 {+-} 3 ka (from loess). The fluvial drainage system, fed by glaciers in the headwaters, developed extensive terrace systems in the Cinca River valley at 178 {+-} 21 ka, 97 {+-} 16 ka, 61 {+-} 4 ka, 47 {+-} 4 ka, and 11 {+-} 1 ka, and in the Gallego River valley at 151 {+-} 11 ka, 68 {+-} 7 ka, and 45 {+-} 3 ka. The times of maximum geomorphic activity related to cold phases coincide with Late Pleistocene marine isotope stages and heinrich events. The maximum extent of glaciers during the last glacial occurred at 64 {+-} 11 ka, and the terraces correlated with this glacial phase are the most extensive in both the Cinca (61 {+-} 4 ka) and Gallego (68 {+-} 7 ka) valleys, indicating a strong increase in fluvial discharge and availability of sediments related to the transition to deglaciation. The global Last Glacial Maximum is scarcely represented in the south central Pyrenees owing to dominantly dry conditions at that time. Precipitation must be controlled by the position of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation system. The glacial systems and the associated fluvial dynamic seem sensitive to (1) global climate changes controlled by insolation, (2) North Atlantic thermohaline circulation influenced by freshwater pulses into the North Atlantic, and (3) anomalies in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic controlling precipitation on the Iberian peninsula. The model of glacial and fluvial evolution during the Late Pleistocene in northern Spain could be extrapolated to other glaciated mountainous areas in southern Europe.

  6. Climate Controls on European Fluvial Denudation over Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam; Mutz, Sebastian G.

    2017-04-01

    Quaternary climate change between glacial-interglacial cycles is commonly thought to induce variations in catchment denudation rates. However, measurements of temporal variations in fluvial denudation are often lacking. Here we present an integration of existing and new cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates from European river terraces with predicted climate change during glacial and interglacial periods derived from a high-resolution (T159, 80x80km) global atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5) . Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations were interpreted from river terraces spanning 12 degrees of latitude in unglaciated, tectonically quiescent settings. 25 analyses of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations provide catchment-wide paleodenudation rates from terraces. From 0.5-2.0 Ma these data indicate low, and constant (< 20 mm/kyr) fluvial paleodenudation rates. Modern cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates are generally higher (20-50 mm/kyr). However, previous higher-fidelity studies of terraces formed since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) suggest a factor of 1.5-3 higher denudation rates during the LGM compared to modern. Results from paleoclimate simulations of the LGM, mid-Holocene, and modern times suggest precipitation rates during the last glacial period were 100-500 mm/yr drier than the modern rates across Europe. Mid-Holocene precipitation rates were 100 mm/yr drier (SW Europe) to 200 mm/yr wetter (central Europe) than modern rates. Predicted LGM temperatures indicate periglacial conditions in some areas. Thus, despite moderate changes in predicted precipitation between glacial and interglacial cycles, there is no clear signal of these cycles in cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates between 0.5-2 Ma. In contrast, catchments with higher-fidelity records since the LGM document higher denudation rates during glacial times. We suggest this temporal difference in denudation rates is driven by periglacial, not fluvial, processes. These results have

  7. Basal conditions and flow dynamics of the Rhine glacier, Alps, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Denis; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Zwinger, Thomas; Machguth, Horst; Haeberli, Wilfried; Fischer, Urs H.

    2016-04-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geological repositories requires their containment and isolation for up to one million years. In Switzerland, repositories are planned in the northern Swiss lowlands near the marginal zone of the former Rhine glacier that repeatedly formed two extensive piedmont lobes (the Rhine and Linth lobes) over the Swiss Plateau. Future ice-age conditions may thus impact the repositories due to erosion by glaciers, permafrost conditions, and changes in groundwater fluxes. We use the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a representative future ice-age scenario over northern Switzerland and model the Rhine glacier at the LGM using a full three-dimensional, thermo-mechanical model that solves Stokes flow in ice and the heat equation in both ice and rock. Permafrost in rocks and sediments is implemented using an effective heat capacity formulation. The Rhine glacier at the LGM is one of the best studied paleo-glacier with geomorphic reconstructions of terminal moraines, equilibrium lines, provenance of erratics, till extent and provenance, and evidences of cold vs warm subglacial environments. These data are compared with modeled ice ice thickness, cold vs warm basal condition, and flow paths. Numerical results indicate that LGM modeled ice extent and ice thickness are not fully consistent with geomorphic reconstructions and known climate proxies: ice is either too thick in the accumulation zone or summer temperatures are too cold at the terminus. Simulations with different climate parameters all indicate, however, that the beds of the Rhine and Linth lobes were at the melting temperature except above local topographic highs and along a thin marginal zone. Sliding speed was highest along topographic lows with ice moving at 20 to 80 m a-1 depending on mass balance gradients. Basal shear stress was low (< 30 kPa). Melt water was probably abundant due to above-freezing temperatures in summer. Thus, melt water was likely routed over large

  8. Reconstructing Last Glacial Maximum and Younger Dryas paleolandscapes through subsurface paleosol stratigraphy: An example from the Po coastal plain, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Agnese; Bruno, Luigi; Cleveland, David M.; Drexler, Tina M.; Amorosi, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Paleosols are commonly used to reconstruct ancient landscapes and past environmental conditions. Through identification and subsurface mapping of two pedogenically modified surfaces formed at the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and during the Younger Dryas (YD) cold event, respectively, and based on their lateral correlation with coeval channel-belt sand bodies, we assessed the geomorphic processes affecting the Po coastal plain during the Late Pleistocene (30-11.5 cal ky BP). The 3D-reconstruction of the LGM and YD paleosurfaces provides insight into the paleolandscapes that developed in the Po alluvial plain at the transitions between warm and cold climate periods. The LGM paleosol records a stratigraphic hiatus of approximately 5 kyr (29-24 cal ky BP), whereas the development of the YD paleosol was associated with a climatic episode of significantly shorter duration. Both paleosols, dissected by Apennine rivers flowing from the south, dip towards the north-east, where they are replaced by fluvial channel belts fed by the Po River. The LGM channel-belt sand body reflects the protracted lateral migration of the Po River at the onset of the glacial maximum. It is wider (> 24 km) and thicker ( 15 m) of the fluvial sand body formed during the YD. The northern margin of LGM Po channel-belt deposits was not encountered in the study area. In contrast, a spatially restricted paleosol, identified in the north at the same elevation as the southern plateau, may represent local expression of the Alpine interfluve during the YD event. This study highlights how 3D-mapping of regionally extensive, weakly developed paleosols can be used to assess the geomorphic response of an alluvial system to rapid climate change.

  9. Glacial landscape evolution on Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island, since the Last Glacial Maximum: insights into switching glacial dynamics and thermo-mechanical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Ross, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ice cover in north central Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island has evolved from full Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) cover during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to a thin ice cap that now covers about 800 km2 in the northeast sector. The exposed subglacial landscape consists of contrasting geomorphological zones which allude to complex spatial and temporal changes in basal ice dynamics and thermal regime since LGM. We used satellite imagery, field observations, a large till geochemical database, and terrestrial cosmogenic isotopes to get new insights into subglacial erosion intensity, ice flow dynamics, and glacial history. Fields of streamlined bedrock-cored ridges (e.g. drumlins) have been mapped and their elongation ratios calculated. The density of bedrock-controlled lakes, which has traditionally been used as a proxy for subglacial erosion intensity on Baffin Island, has been re-examined using modern GIS techniques. This work has revealed a mosaic of glacial terrain zones each consisting of characteristics that are distinct from the other zones. Five glacial terrain zones (GTZ) have been recognized. One zone (GTZ 1) is characterized by a broad flowset of northeast trending streamlined hills and parallel paleo-flow indicators. It also has the highest streamlined hill density, longest elongation ratios, and the highest lake density of the study area. This northeast flowset is crosscut locally by ice flow indicators that converge into troughs that now form a series of fjords. Landforms and ice flow indicators of this younger system (GTZ 2) are traced inland showing propagation of the channelized system into this portion of the LIS. The central area of the peninsula contains a zone of thicker till and rolling topography (GTZ 3) as well as a zone consisting of southeast trending features and associated perpendicular moraines (GTZ 4). The modern ice cap and its past extension form the last zone (GTZ 5). The preservation of the northeast system (GTZ 1) outside of the

  10. Geoarchaeological response to landscape changes of the Greek continental shelf since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Pavlopoulos, Kosmas; Panagiotopoulos, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    An overview of geological, sedimentological, palaeoclimatic, archaeological and mythological data is presented in order to detect the geomorphological changes of the Aegean and Ionian shelves during the last sea-level transgression, and comprehend the consequent prehistoric human adaptations. The irregular rise of sea level since the Last Glacial Maximum forced the Palaeolithic human to abandon its settlements located near the old (lower) coastlines and to move landward in new positions. Commonly, the coastline movement was very slow causing no significant impact on human activities; however in some cases, the transgression was very prompt causing human migration towards highlands. In some very gentle-dipped and wide regions, e.g. the North Aegean plateau, the sea-level rise caused a rapid coastline retreat (in some extreme case as fast as 10 m/yr) and inundation of an extended surface area. However, at the same time, in the steep parts of the Greek shelf, e.g. the Kyparissiakos Gulf and Crete, the coastline advanced landwards with a slow motion (commonly, a few cm/yr) covering small areas. In addition, coastal regions with particular geomorphologic characteristics, e.g. coastal paleo-lakes protected by a sill (gulfs of Corinth, Amvrakikos, Pagasitikos Evvoikos, Saronikos), were deluged by the sea during different periods and under different intensity, depending on the elevation of the sill and the manner of its overflow. Although the presence of Palaeolithic human in the Greek mainland has been confirmed by several archaeological excavations, there is no certain evidence for human settlement in the deep parts of Greek shelf. However, many archaeologists have suggested that some of Palaeolithic people lived on the shelf, when the sea level was lower than its present position. Nevertheless, some potential Palaeolithic migration routes can be indicated taking into account (a) the palaeogeographic reconstruction of Greek shelf over the Last Quaternary; (b

  11. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    DOE PAGES

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; ...

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission,more » atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times

  12. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  13. Last Glacial vegetation and climate change in the southern Levant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, Andrea; Chen, Chunzhu; Litt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing past climatic and environmental conditions is a key task for understanding the history of modern mankind. The interaction between environmental change and migration processes of the modern Homo sapiens from its source area in Africa into Europe is still poorly understood. The principal corridor of the first human dispersal into Europe and also later migration dynamics crossed the Middle East. Therefore, the southern Levant is a key area to investigate the paleoenvironment during times of human migration. In this sense, the Last Glacial (MIS 4-2) is particularly interesting to investigate for two reasons. Firstly, secondary expansions of the modern Homo sapiens are expected to occur during this period. Secondly, there are ongoing discussions on the environmental conditions causing the prominent lake level high stand of Lake Lisan, the precursor of the Dead Sea. This high stand even culminated in the merging of Lake Lisan and Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee). To provide an independent proxy for paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the southern Levant during the Last Glacial, we investigated pollen assemblages of the Dead Sea/Lake Lisan and Lake Kinneret. Located at the Dead Sea Transform, the freshwater Lake Kinneret is nowadays connected via the Jordan with the hypersaline Dead Sea, which occupies Earth's lowest elevation on land. The southern Levant is a transition area of three different vegetation types. Therefore, also small changes in the climate conditions effect the vegetation and can be registered in the pollen assemblage. In contrast to the Holocene, our preliminary results suggest another vegetation pattern during the Last Glacial. The vegetation belt of the fragile Mediterranean biome did no longer exist in the vicinity of Lake Kinneret. Moreover, the vegetation was rather similar in the whole study area. A steppe vegetation with dwarf shrubs, herbs, and grasses predominated. Thermophilous elements like oaks occurred in limited amounts. The

  14. Using Climate Models to Evaluate Mechanisms of Glacial Inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and subsequent growth of an ice sheet or large glacier is based on two primary factors: 1. Most fundamentally, a region must exist with a positive net snow accumulation, that is, cold season snowfall exceeds warm season snowmelt. Because snow can melt very rapidly, in a practical sense this probably means that little or no snow melt should occur in the warm season (mountain glaciers being one possible exception). 2. When sufficient ice builds in a region with a positive net snow accumulation, the ice will flow into adjoining regions with a negative mass balance. Feedbacks can also then arise between the emerging ice sheet and the overall climate, which, among other effects, may cause the mass balance in that region to turn positive. A key question is the relative importance of these two factors. In particular, is it possible for a large lowland region to experience a positive mass balance, such that the ice sheet can arise largely 'in-situ'? Or instead are uplands necessary, such that essentially mountain glaciers form first, and then, under the right conditions, grow and coalesce, eventually spreading out into the lowlands? This is probably the single most fundamental question to be addressed in the modeling of glacial inception. Other key questions then focus on how the (upland or low-land) positive mass balance is obtained at some times, but not others (the ice sheets are not continuously present). For Northern Hemisphere ice sheets in particular, what climatic conditions can lead to abundant winter snowfall in the Canadian Arctic and northern Labrador in conjunction with cool summertime conditions? Are both required, or will cool summer conditions alone suffice? Conversely, are a few years of abnormally heavy snowfall all that is required to trigger glacial inception? A major need at present is for carefully constructed climate model studies aimed at addressing these questions. A successful strategy will almost certainly require more than just a

  15. Vegetation responses to climate changes during the penultimate glacial period (marine isotope stage 6) in southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roucoux, Katy; Margari, V.; Lawson, I. T.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2010-05-01

    Like the last glacial, the penultimate glacial interval (MIS 6, 185,000 to 132,000 years before present) was characterised by increasing continental ice volume and decreasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. However, greater orbital eccentricity during MIS 6 resulted in precessional-scale insolation changes of higher amplitude. This led to some unexpected combinations of climatic boundary conditions such as the high northern hemisphere summer insolation but relatively large ice volume and low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations of marine isotopic event 6.5. Records of regional climatic responses to different combinations of climatic forcing factors, in the form of pollen records of vegetation change, can contribute to our understanding of which factors determine conditions at the Earth's surface. Few palaeoecological records cover the penultimate glacial in detail and hence environmental and climatic responses during this interval are not yet well known. At Lake Ioannina, NW Greece, records of the last two glacial intervals are preserved at the same site enabling comparisons of vegetation responses to be made between periods with differing orbital configurations while keeping site variables constant. Our new palynological record spans the penultimate glacial interval at centennial scale resolution and represents the most detailed terrestrial record of this interval to date. Vegetation development throughout the glacial period indicates long-term cooling and drying reflecting the overall decline of northern hemisphere summer insolation and accumulation of large-northern hemisphere ice sheets, as expected. Conditions in NW Greece at the penultimate glacial maximum (PGM) appear to have been colder and drier than during the Last Glacial Maximum, consistent with records of lower Mediterranean sea surface temperature and greater extent of the European ice sheet at the PGM. During the early part of MIS 6, however, it appears that the high amplitude

  16. Model Comparison of Subantarctic Mode and Antarctic Intermediate Water In The Southeast Pacific During The Present And Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, C. A.; Fine, R. A.; Clement, A. C.; Kamenkovich, I. V.; Peterson, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are large volume mid-depth (400-1200 m) water masses, which transport heat, freshwater and CO2 into the Southern Hemisphere subtropical gyres and to the equatorial thermoclines. This study investigates variations in SAMW and AAIW properties and circulation in the southeast Pacific between the present and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Observations from the 1990s and 2000s and model output from NCAR CCSM3 climate model are compared. Under present climate conditions, some of the coldest SAMW and freshest AAIW are formed in the southeast Pacific Ocean. Presently, SAMW is formed equatorward of the Subantarctic Front (SAF) within deep mixed layers, while AAIW is formed just poleward of the SAF. During the LGM there was a fundamental reorganization of the ocean circulation. The model simulates an equatorward shift in the location of formation by approximately 7° between present day and the LGM. The model also simulates a fresher SAMW during the LGM, while AAIW is saltier by up to 1.5 psu. In addition, depth, equatorward extent and thickness have varied between the LGM and present. Comparisons of SAMW and AAIW under present day conditions and under extreme climate conditions (i.e. the LGM), can be used to shed light on how these important water masses will vary with future climate change.

  17. Climatic Instability and Regional Glacial Advances in the Late Ediacaran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, J. L.; Stein, H. J.; Marolf, N.; Bingen, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Ediacaran Period closed out the environmentally raucous Neoproterozoic Era with the last of multiple glacial events and the first ephemeral glimmer of multicellular life. As such, evolution of Earth's biosphere and the marine environments that nurtured this nascent biota are of particular interest. Because the Ediacaran biota appear in the stratigraphic record just above tillites in many localities, inferences are naturally drawn to link glaciation to bioevolution. Here we review known controls on the timing and extent of the late Ediacaran Gaskier and Varanger glacial events, bolstered by new constraints on the Moelv tillite of South Norway. The elusive mid-Ediacaran glacial strata are poorly dated, patchy in distribution, and relatively limited in thickness. The type Gaskier glaciogenic units in Newfoundland are 582 to 584 Ma, based on U-Pb zircon ages from intercalated ash beds [1]. The Varanger glaciogenic deposits in northern Norway, in contrast, remain only roughly constrained to ca. 630 to 560 Ma. Post-Gaskier negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) have been reported from multiple localities in both China and SW United States, suggesting climatic instability in the late Ediacaran. Although most localities lack solid geochronology, paleontologic constraints place the Hongtiegou glacial diamictite and accompanying CIE in the Chaidam Basin, NW China, in the latest Ediacaran, ca. 555 Ma [2]. We previously suggested that the Moelv tillite in south Norway was roughly equivalent to the Gaskier, based on an imprecise Re-Os age of ~560 Ma [3] for the underlying Biri shale. Reanalysis of these data shows that the upper part of the shale section was disturbed by a redox front during the Caledonian orogeny. The undisturbed lower part of the section yields a more precise Model 1 isochron age of 559.5 ± 6.2 Ma, clearly post-dating the Gaskier event well outside analytical uncertainty. These new results bolster arguments that the Gaskier glaciation was not a global

  18. Controls on Last Glacial Maximum ice extent in the Weddell Sea embayment, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Pippa L.; Bentley, Michael J.; Vieli, Andreas; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.; Hein, Andrew S.; Sugden, David E.

    2017-01-01

    The Weddell Sea sector of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is hypothesized to have made a significant contribution to sea-level rise since the Last Glacial Maximum. Using a numerical flowline model we investigate the controls on grounding line motion across the eastern Weddell Sea and compare our results with field data relating to past ice extent. Specifically, we investigate the influence of changes in ice temperature, accumulation, sea level, ice shelf basal melt, and ice shelf buttressing on the dynamics of the Foundation Ice Stream. We find that ice shelf basal melt plays an important role in controlling grounding line advance, while a reduction in ice shelf buttressing is found to be necessary for grounding line retreat. There are two stable positions for the grounding line under glacial conditions: at the northern margin of Berkner Island and at the continental shelf break. Global mean sea-level contributions associated with these two scenarios are 50 mm and 130 mm, respectively. Comparing model results with field evidence from the Pensacola Mountains and the Shackleton Range, we find it unlikely that ice was grounded at the continental shelf break for a prolonged period during the last glacial cycle. However, we cannot rule out a brief advance to this position or a scenario in which the grounding line retreated behind present during deglaciation and has since re-advanced. Better constraints on past ice sheet and ice shelf geometry, ocean temperature, and ocean circulation are needed to reconstruct more robustly past behavior of the Foundation Ice Stream.

  19. Equatorial Moisture Transport in the Asia-Australia Region During the Last Glacial Maximum - Evidence from Paleoceanographic Observations and Modelling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A.; Hope, P.

    2007-05-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), about 20,000 years ago, was on average cooler and also drier across the globe. Northern Australia, however, has few appropriate sites from which to gain proxy evidence of the climatic conditions during the culmination of the last glacial. The sediment blown off the continent and deposited in marine cores can begin to provide such evidence. In Australia there are two preferred off-shore dust paths - one of which is to the north-west. Sediment cores from the Timor Trough show higher elemental ratios of Mg/Al, K/Al, and Ti/Al and the presence of an inorganic nitrogen fraction during the late glacial compared to the Holocene (the last 10,000 years). These changes indicate both greater amounts of material off the continent during glacial times and a weathering regime more common in arid, cold climates at the source region of the sediment. To complement the proxy evidence, the results from GCMs forced with LGM sea surface temperatures, ice-sheets and lower atmospheric CO2, were examined. They show cold and dry conditions across northern Australia and stronger off-shore winds in the north-west, conditions that match the climate reconstructions based on the sediment in the marine cores. Cross-equatorial moisture transport during this time does not extend as far south as in the present day, contributing to these dry conditions. However, further north there was limited change in that transport. The LGM sea surface temperature grids used to force these GCMs were based upon temperature reconstructions from cores such as the ones examined here. The fact that the proxy reconstructions of the continental climate from the marine cores matches the GCM simulations based on the surface temperatures reconstructed from such cores provides a consistent picture of the climate of northern Australia during glacial times. This provides evidence where there are few appropriate sites for direct proxy evidence to be obtained.

  20. Tree ring and glacial records of Holocene climate change, northern Gulf of Alaska region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, David J.

    1998-11-01

    Tree-ring cross-dates of glacially overrun trees at eight sites around western Prince William Sound show ice margins advanced in the early (late 12th through 13th centuries AD) and middle (17th to early 18th centuries) Little Ice Age. Tree-ring dates of 22 moraines at 13 glaciers in the same region indicate an early period of moraine stabilization in the early 18th century. This overlaps with the second period of glaciers overrunning trees and marks culmination of this middle Little Ice Age advance. Moraine stabilization on nine of the study forefields in the latter 19th century delineates a third interval of Little Ice Age glacial expansion. These intervals of land-terminating glacier advance are synchronous with other tree-ring dated glacial histories from around the northern Gulf of Alaska, suggesting common climatic forcing across this region. Ring-widths in a 1119-year long tree-ring-width chronology developed from subfossil and living trees on glacial forefields around western Prince William Sound are primarily controlled by May through July temperatures of the growth year. Multi-decadal length warm periods in western Prince William Sound during the past 750 years were centered on 1300, 1440, 1730 and 1950 AD. Major cool periods were centered on 1400, 1660 and 1870 AD. Surficial mapping and 52 radiocarbon ages enable reconstruction of the Holocene glacial history of Yakutat Bay and Russell Fiord. Following an early to middle Holocene non-glacial interval, Hubbard Glacier began an advance at ~5600 cal. BP that culminated between ~4300 and 3474 cal. BP. Retreat by ~3200 cal. BP preceded readvance to Holocene maxima in Yakutat Bay and Russell Fiord at ~725 cal. BP (1225 cal. AD). The Hubbard ice margin in Yakutat Bay retreated by 1245 cal. AD, and was behind its modern position by 1791 AD. Ice from the Brabazon Range kept the Russell Fiord glacier lobe at its maximum until retreat during the late 18th and 19th centuries AD. The extent and timing of specific

  1. The atmospheric CH4 increase since the Last Glacial Maximum. I - Source estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappellaz, Jerome A.; Fung, Inez Y.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1993-01-01

    An estimate of the distribution of wetland area and associated CH4 emission is presented for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18 kyr BP, kiloyear Before Present) and the Pre-Industrial Holocene (PIH, 9000-200 years BP). The wetland source, combined with estimates of the other biogenic sources and sink, yields total source strengths of 120 and 180 Tg CH4/yr for LGM and PIH respectively. These source strengths are shown to be consistent with source estimates inferred from a photochemical model, and point to changes in wetland CH4 source as a major factor driving the atmospheric CH4 increase from LGM to PIH.

  2. The atmospheric CH4 increase since the Last Glacial Maximum. I - Source estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappellaz, Jerome A.; Fung, Inez Y.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1993-01-01

    An estimate of the distribution of wetland area and associated CH4 emission is presented for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18 kyr BP, kiloyear Before Present) and the Pre-Industrial Holocene (PIH, 9000-200 years BP). The wetland source, combined with estimates of the other biogenic sources and sink, yields total source strengths of 120 and 180 Tg CH4/yr for LGM and PIH respectively. These source strengths are shown to be consistent with source estimates inferred from a photochemical model, and point to changes in wetland CH4 source as a major factor driving the atmospheric CH4 increase from LGM to PIH.

  3. Maximum extent and decay of the Laurentide Ice Sheet in Western Baffin Bay during the Last glacial episode.

    PubMed

    Brouard, Etienne; Lajeunesse, Patrick

    2017-09-06

    Reconstructing the extent, flow and decay of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) on the continental shelves of North America during the last glaciation provides paleoglaciological analogues that are essential for understanding and predicting how modern marine-based ice-sheets will respond to future climate change and sea level fluctuations. The geometry of the LIS during Marine isotope stage 2 (MIS-2; 29-14 ka BP) is one key element for ice-sheet modelling. The maximum extent of the LIS during this stage is well constrained for most sectors of the ice sheet, but major uncertainties remain, especially along the continental shelves of Arctic Canada. Despite a series of recent papers, the extent of the LIS in Western Baffin Bay, an area draining large volumes of glacial ice through multiple ice streams and likely characterized by ice shelves, remains highly speculative. Here we present unequivocal marine geophysical evidence that during the MIS-2 the LIS extended to the edge of the continental shelf, seaward of the previously proposed limits and subsequently retreated episodically westward during deglaciation. These data support interpretations of deep glacial ice grounding in Western Baffin Bay.

  4. The narrow endemic Norwegian peat moss Sphagnum troendelagicum originated before the last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Stenøien, H K; Shaw, A J; Stengrundet, K; Flatberg, K I

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly found that individual hybrid, polyploid species originate recurrently and that many polyploid species originated relatively recently. It has been previously hypothesized that the extremely rare allopolyploid peat moss Sphagnum troendelagicum has originated multiple times, possibly after the last glacial maximum in Scandinavia. This conclusion was based on low linkage disequilibrium in anonymous genetic markers within natural populations, in which sexual reproduction has never been observed. Here we employ microsatellite markers and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA)-encoded trnG sequence data to test hypotheses concerning the origin and evolution of this species. We find that S. tenellum is the maternal progenitor and S. balticum is the paternal progenitor of S. troendelagicum. Using various Bayesian approaches, we estimate that S. troendelagicum originated before the Holocene but not before c. 80 000 years ago (median expected time since speciation 40 000 years before present). The observed lack of complete linkage disequilibrium in the genome of this species suggests cryptic sexual reproduction and recombination. Several lines of evidence suggest multiple origins for S. troendelagicum, but a single origin is supported by approximate Bayesian computation analyses. We hypothesize that S. troendelagicum originated in a peat-dominated refugium before last glacial maximum, and subsequently immigrated to central Norway by means of spore flow during the last thousands of years. PMID:20717162

  5. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Felis, Thomas; McGregor, Helen V; Linsley, Braddock K; Tudhope, Alexander W; Gagan, Michael K; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inoue, Mayuri; Thomas, Alexander L; Esat, Tezer M; Thompson, William G; Tiwari, Manish; Potts, Donald C; Mudelsee, Manfred; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Webster, Jody M

    2014-06-17

    Tropical south-western Pacific temperatures are of vital importance to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the growth of the GBR since the Last Glacial Maximum remains largely unknown. Here we present records of Sr/Ca and δ(18)O for Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial corals that show a considerably steeper meridional SST gradient than the present day in the central GBR. We find a 1-2 °C larger temperature decrease between 17° and 20°S about 20,000 to 13,000 years ago. The result is best explained by the northward expansion of cooler subtropical waters due to a weakening of the South Pacific gyre and East Australian Current. Our findings indicate that the GBR experienced substantial meridional temperature change during the last deglaciation, and serve to explain anomalous deglacial drying of northeastern Australia. Overall, the GBR developed through significant SST change and may be more resilient than previously thought.

  6. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Thomas; McGregor, Helen V.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Gagan, Michael K.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inoue, Mayuri; Thomas, Alexander L.; Esat, Tezer M.; Thompson, William G.; Tiwari, Manish; Potts, Donald C.; Mudelsee, Manfred; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical south-western Pacific temperatures are of vital importance to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the growth of the GBR since the Last Glacial Maximum remains largely unknown. Here we present records of Sr/Ca and δ18O for Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial corals that show a considerably steeper meridional SST gradient than the present day in the central GBR. We find a 1–2 °C larger temperature decrease between 17° and 20°S about 20,000 to 13,000 years ago. The result is best explained by the northward expansion of cooler subtropical waters due to a weakening of the South Pacific gyre and East Australian Current. Our findings indicate that the GBR experienced substantial meridional temperature change during the last deglaciation, and serve to explain anomalous deglacial drying of northeastern Australia. Overall, the GBR developed through significant SST change and may be more resilient than previously thought. PMID:24937320

  7. Evolutionary History Underlies Plant Physiological Responses to Global Change Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklin, K. M.; Medeiros, J. S.; Sale, K. R.; Ward, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Assessing family and species-level variation in physiological responses to global change across geologic time is critical for understanding factors that underlie changes in species distributions and community composition. Ancient plant specimens preserved within packrat middens are invaluable in this context since they allow for comparisons between co-occurring plant lineages. Here we used modern and ancient plant specimens preserved within packrat middens from the Snake Range, NV to investigate the physiological responses of a mixed montane conifer community to global change since the last glacial maximum. We used a conceptual model to infer relative changes in stomatal conductance and maximum photosynthetic capacity from measures of leaf carbon isotopes, stomatal characteristics, and leaf nitrogen content. Our results indicate that most of the sampled taxa decreased stomatal conductance and/or photosynthetic capacity from glacial to modern times. However, plant families differed in the timing and magnitude of these physiological responses. Additionally, leaf-level responses were more similar within plant families than within co-occurring species assemblages. This suggests that adaptation at the level of leaf physiology may not be the main determinant of shifts in community composition, and that plant evolutionary history may drive physiological adaptation to global change over recent geologic time.

  8. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linn J.; Breitbarth, Eike; Strzepek, Robert F.; Wolff, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and ‘bioavailability’ of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1), chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1) and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1) production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively). The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded more

  9. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tim M; Hoffmann, Linn J; Breitbarth, Eike; Strzepek, Robert F; Wolff, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and 'bioavailability' of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1), chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1) and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1) production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively). The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded more strongly

  10. Evolutionary history underlies plant physiological responses to global change since the last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Becklin, Katie M.; Medeiros, Juliana S.; Sale, Kayla R.; Ward, Joy K.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing family- and species-level variation in physiological responses to global change across geologic time is critical for understanding factors that underlie changes in species distributions and community composition. Here, we used stable carbon isotopes, leaf nitrogen content and stomatal measurements to assess changes in leaf-level physiology in a mixed conifer community that underwent significant changes in composition since the last glacial maximum (LGM) (21 kyr BP). Our results indicate that most plant taxa decreased stomatal conductance and/or maximum photosynthetic capacity in response to changing conditions since the LGM. However, plant families and species differed in the timing and magnitude of these physiological responses, and responses were more similar within families than within co-occurring species assemblages. This suggests that adaptation at the level of leaf physiology may not be the main determinant of shifts in community composition, and that plant evolutionary history may drive physiological adaptation to global change over recent geologic time. PMID:24636555

  11. Antarctic ice dynamics and southern ocean surface hydrology during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Labeyrie, L.D.; Burckle, L.; Labracherie, M.; Pichon, J.J.; Ippolito, P.; Grojean, M.C.; Duplessy, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Eight high sedimentation rate cores located between 61/sup 0/S and 43/sup 0/S in the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean have been studied in detail for foraminifera and diatom /sup 18/O//sup 16/O ratios, and changes in radiolarian and diatom specific abundance. Comparison of these different parameters permits a detailed description of the surface water hydrology during the last glacial maximum. The authors demonstrate that from 25 kyr BP to 15 kyr BP a large number of icebergs formed around the Antarctic continent. Melting along the Polar Front decreased surface salinity by approximately 1.5 per thousand between 43/sup 0/S and 50/sup 0/S. They propose that an increase of snow accumulation at the Antarctic periphery and downdraw during maximum ice extension are primary causes for this major discharge of icebergs.

  12. Evolutionary history underlies plant physiological responses to global change since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Becklin, Katie M; Medeiros, Juliana S; Sale, Kayla R; Ward, Joy K

    2014-06-01

    Assessing family- and species-level variation in physiological responses to global change across geologic time is critical for understanding factors that underlie changes in species distributions and community composition. Here, we used stable carbon isotopes, leaf nitrogen content and stomatal measurements to assess changes in leaf-level physiology in a mixed conifer community that underwent significant changes in composition since the last glacial maximum (LGM) (21 kyr BP). Our results indicate that most plant taxa decreased stomatal conductance and/or maximum photosynthetic capacity in response to changing conditions since the LGM. However, plant families and species differed in the timing and magnitude of these physiological responses, and responses were more similar within families than within co-occurring species assemblages. This suggests that adaptation at the level of leaf physiology may not be the main determinant of shifts in community composition, and that plant evolutionary history may drive physiological adaptation to global change over recent geologic time.

  13. Assessing the Impact of Laurentide Ice-sheet Topography on Glacial Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, D. J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Carlson, A. E.; Anslow, F. S.; Licciardi, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of past climates require altered boundary conditions to account for known shifts in the Earth system. For the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and subsequent deglaciation, the existence of large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets caused profound changes in surface topography and albedo. While ice-sheet extent is fairly well known, numerous conflicting reconstructions of ice-sheet topography suggest that precision in this boundary condition is lacking. Here we use a high-resolution and oxygen-isotopeenabled fully coupled global circulation model (GCM) (GISS ModelE2-R), along with two different reconstructions of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) that provide maximum and minimum estimates of LIS elevation, to assess the range of climate variability in response to uncertainty in this boundary condition.We present this comparison at two equilibrium time slices: the LGM, when differences in ice-sheet topography are maximized, and 14 ka, when differences in maximum ice-sheet height are smaller but still exist. Overall, we find significant differences in the climate response to LIS topography, with the larger LIS resulting in enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and warmer surface air temperatures, particularly over northeastern Asia and the North Pacific. These up- and downstream effects are associated with differences in the development of planetary waves in the upper atmosphere, with the larger LIS resulting in a weaker trough over northeastern Asia that leads to the warmer temperatures and decreased albedo from snow and sea-ice cover. Differences between the 14 ka simulations are similar in spatial extent but smaller in magnitude, suggesting that climate is responding primarily to the larger difference in maximum LIS elevation in the LGM simulations. These results suggest that such uncertainty in ice-sheet boundary conditions alone may significantly impact the results of paleoclimate simulations and their ability to successfully simulate past climates

  14. Testing a dynamic global vegetation model for pre-industrial and Last Glacial Maximum boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handiani, Dian N.; Rachmayani, Rima; Paul, André; Dupont, Lydie M.

    2010-05-01

    Achieving better comparison between dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) with pollen or plant data is important for the climate-vegetation modeling community. Our study tried to find a scheme that can be applied consistently to compare DGVMs with pollen data sets. We tested two models, the Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics (TRIFFID) and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM), which we both ran for pre-industrial boundary conditions. In addition, we ran the TRIFFID model using boundary conditions for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~19,000- 23,000 years before present). For comparisons, we used the modern vegetation of the BIOME4 model and the reconstruction for the year 18000 after pollen data from the BIOME6000 (Version 4.2) project. Differences in the number of PFTs in each DGVMs lead to different results of the biome distribution even if models and data qualitatively agree. In the CLM-DGVM pre-industrial run, northern South America is covered by savanna or desert biome, which is associated with more growing degree days and lower rates of precipitation. Meanwhile, the TRIFFID model simulated a tropical forest in northern South America and a desert biome in Australia, probably because of higher values of growing degree days and different precipitation rates, which is lower in South America and higher in Australia. The climate parameters from both models show a similar pattern as in the BIOME4 model, but the values are higher in the DGVMs. Biome distributions of the pre-industrial simulation show similarities and differences between dynamic vegetation modeling and data reconstructions. Both models reveal a fair agreement simulating savanna and desert biomes around the Sahel, tropical forest in western Africa, boreal forest in eastern North America and in Siberia, and tundra in northern Canada. Some discrepancies appear in South America and Africa, where pollen data indicate a combination of

  15. Climate driven thresholds for post-glacial soil development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. L.; Chadwick, O.

    2013-12-01

    We explore thresholds in soil development along a strong climate gradient in the South Island of New Zealand. Soils are developed in thin (~1m) loess deposits that mantle LGM and post LGM moraines and outwash in the Waitaki catchment, extending from Lake Benmore in the south to just below the Tasman glacier in the north. We sampled 28 soil profiles across a strong precipitation gradient spanning 400-4000 mm/yr. Base cations in soils are increasingly leached as rainfall increases and soil pH decreases along the climate gradient. The pools of exchangeable iron and aluminum increase with rainfall while pools of plant available nutrients decrease. Several soil processes are nonlinearly affected by rainfall and we identify two important thresholds for soil development in these loessal soils. The first occurs at approximately 800 mm/yr where the soil leaching intensity increases markedly with rainfall, likely associated with the transition to a positive water balance. The second occurs at high rainfall (~2000 mm/yr) where soils become depleted in labile nutrients and base cations, and extractable Al and Fe concentrations no longer increase with increasing rainfall. Together these data identify nonlinear changes in weathering intensity with rainfall, and show clear climate control on relatively young, post-glacial soil development.

  16. Phylogenetic assemblage structure of North American trees is more strongly shaped by glacial-interglacial climate variability in gymnosperms than in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-05-01

    How fast does biodiversity respond to climate change? The relationship of past and current climate with phylogenetic assemblage structure helps us to understand this question. Studies of angiosperm tree diversity in North America have already suggested effects of current water-energy balance and tropical niche conservatism. However, the role of glacial-interglacial climate variability remains to be determined, and little is known about any of these relationships for gymnosperms. Moreover, phylogenetic endemism, the concentration of unique lineages in restricted ranges, may also be related to glacial-interglacial climate variability and needs more attention. We used a refined phylogeny of both angiosperms and gymnosperms to map phylogenetic diversity, clustering and endemism of North American trees in 100-km grid cells, and climate change velocity since Last Glacial Maximum together with postglacial accessibility to recolonization to quantify glacial-interglacial climate variability. We found: (1) Current climate is the dominant factor explaining the overall patterns, with more clustered angiosperm assemblages toward lower temperature, consistent with tropical niche conservatism. (2) Long-term climate stability is associated with higher angiosperm endemism, while higher postglacial accessibility is linked to to more phylogenetic clustering and endemism in gymnosperms. (3) Factors linked to glacial-interglacial climate change have stronger effects on gymnosperms than on angiosperms. These results suggest that paleoclimate legacies supplement current climate in shaping phylogenetic patterns in North American trees, and especially so for gymnosperms.

  17. Effects of fire and CO2 on biogeography and primary production in glacial and modern climates.

    PubMed

    Martin Calvo, Maria; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) can disentangle causes and effects in the control of vegetation and fire. We used a DGVM to analyse climate, CO2 and fire influences on biome distribution and net primary production (NPP) in last glacial maximum (LGM) and pre-industrial (PI) times. The Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX) DGVM was run in a factorial design with fire 'off' or 'on', CO2 at LGM (185 ppm) or PI (280 ppm) concentrations, and LGM (modelled) or recent climates. Results were analysed by Stein-Alpert decomposition to separate primary effects from synergies. Fire removal causes forests to expand and global NPP to increase slightly. Low CO2 greatly reduces forest area (dramatically in a PI climate; realistically under an LGM climate) and global NPP. NPP under an LGM climate was reduced by a quarter as a result of low CO2 . The reduction in global NPP was smaller at low temperatures, but greater in the presence of fire. Global NPP is controlled by climate and CO2 directly through photosynthesis, but also through biome distribution, which is strongly influenced by fire. Future vegetation simulations will need to consider the coupled responses of vegetation and fire to CO2 and climate.

  18. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, K.L.; Betancourt, J.L.; Riddle, B.R.; Van Devender, T. R.; Cole, K.L.; Geoffrey, Spaulding W.

    2000-01-01

    1 A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26-10 14C kyr BP or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ???4.0 14C kyr BP. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr BP. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr BP in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (???37??N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr BP. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture. ?? 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  19. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Kimberly L.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Riddle, Brett R.; Van Devender, Thomas R.; Cole, K.L.; Spaulding, W.G.

    2001-01-01

    1. A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26a??10 14C kyr bp or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ~4.0 14C kyr bp. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr bp. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr bp in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (~37A?N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr bp. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture.

  20. Export production in the New-Zealand region since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Axel; Chase, Zanna; Noble, Taryn L.; Bostock, Helen; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Kitchener, Priya; Townsend, Ashley T.; Jansen, Nils; Kinsley, Les; Jacobsen, Geraldine; Johnson, Sean; Neil, Helen

    2017-07-01

    Increased export production (EP) in the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) of the Southern Ocean due to iron fertilisation has been proposed as a key mechanism for explaining carbon drawdown during the last glacial maximum (LGM). This work reconstructs marine EP since the LGM at four sites around New Zealand. For the first time in this region, 230-Thorium-normalised fluxes of biogenic opal, carbonate, excess barium, and organic carbon are presented. In Subtropical Waters and the SAZ, these flux variations show that EP has not changed markedly since the LGM. The only exception is a site currently north of the subtropical front. Here we suggest the subtropical front shifted over the core site between 18 and 12 ka, driving increased EP. To understand why EP remained mostly low and constant elsewhere, lithogenic fluxes at the four sites were measured to investigate changes in dust deposition. At all sites, lithogenic fluxes were greater during the LGM compared to the Holocene. The positive temporal correlation between the Antarctic dust record and lithogenic flux at a site in the Tasman Sea shows that regionally, increased dust deposition contributed to the high glacial lithogenic fluxes. Additionally, it is inferred that lithogenic material from erosion and glacier melting deposited on the Campbell Plateau during the deglaciation (18-12 ka). From these observations, it is proposed that even though increased glacial dust deposition may have relieved iron limitation within the SAZ around New Zealand, the availability of silicic acid limited diatom growth and thus any resultant increase in carbon export during the LGM. Therefore, silicic acid concentrations have remained low since the LGM. This result suggests that both silicic acid and iron co-limit EP in the SAZ around New Zealand, consistent with modern process studies.

  1. Retreat history of the last glacial maximum ice sheet in Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, Stephanie Staples

    High-resolution geophysical and geologic data were acquired in western and central Ross Sea, Antarctica, to determine the: (1) maximum extent and configuration of the ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM); (2) conditions and processes at the base of the expanded ice sheet and their role in ice stream activity; and (3) relative retreat history of the ice sheet. This information can provide geologic constraints for modeling of ice-sheet retreat. The research formed the basis for development of a public Web site (http://www.glacier.rice.edu) and for middle-school earth-science instructional materials. Based on identification of isolated grounding-zone wedges and consistency of mega-scale glacial lineations, the LGM ice edge reached the Coulman Island region in western Ross Sea. The maximum extent in central Ross Sea occurred at the continental-shelf edge, based on the presence of mega-scale glacial lineations, glacio-tectonic features, and shelf-edge gullies. Streaming ice, overlying a deforming bed typically <5 m in thickness, filled the troughs. Thinner, divergent, slower moving ice, not underlain by deforming sediment, occupied the bank tops. The ice sheet eroded and conveyed sediment from the inner regions toward the outer shelf, where the material was deposited at the grounding line. No features associated with meltwater occur; water available to the subglacial system probably was incorporated into a deforming unit. The ice sheet may have undergone an initial phase of mass wasting, based the large, arcuate iceberg furrows associated with the grounding zones. Ice retreated first from western Ross Sea, possibly because of a diminished contribution from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Ice retreat from central Ross Sea lagged that of western Ross Sea. The banks remained ice covered after ice retreat from the troughs; ice shelves may have covered the troughs. During retreat, the grounded ice reworked the substrate into back-stepping grounding-zone wedges and

  2. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Conway, T.M.; Wolff, E.W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial–interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial–interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1–42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01–0.84 mg m−2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been ≥10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply. PMID:26204562

  3. Polar front shift and atmospheric CO2 during the glacial maximum of the Early Paleozoic Icehouse.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R A; Armstrong, Howard A; Williams, Mark; Paris, Florentin; Zalasiewicz, Jan A; Sabbe, Koen; Nõlvak, Jaak; Challands, Thomas J; Verniers, Jacques; Servais, Thomas

    2010-08-24

    Our new data address the paradox of Late Ordovician glaciation under supposedly high pCO(2) (8 to 22x PAL: preindustrial atmospheric level). The paleobiogeographical distribution of chitinozoan ("mixed layer") marine zooplankton biotopes for the Hirnantian glacial maximum (440 Ma) are reconstructed and compared to those from the Sandbian (460 Ma): They demonstrate a steeper latitudinal temperature gradient and an equatorwards shift of the Polar Front through time from 55 degrees -70 degrees S to approximately 40 degrees S. These changes are comparable to those during Pleistocene interglacial-glacial cycles. In comparison with the Pleistocene, we hypothesize a significant decline in mean global temperature from the Sandbian to Hirnantian, proportional with a fall in pCO(2) from a modeled Sandbian level of approximately 8x PAL to approximately 5x PAL during the Hirnantian. Our data suggest that a compression of midlatitudinal biotopes and ecospace in response to the developing glaciation was a likely cause of the end-Ordovician mass extinction.

  4. Polar front shift and atmospheric CO2 during the glacial maximum of the Early Paleozoic Icehouse

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Armstrong, Howard A.; Williams, Mark; Paris, Florentin; Zalasiewicz, Jan A.; Sabbe, Koen; Nõlvak, Jaak; Challands, Thomas J.; Verniers, Jacques; Servais, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Our new data address the paradox of Late Ordovician glaciation under supposedly high pCO2 (8 to 22× PAL: preindustrial atmospheric level). The paleobiogeographical distribution of chitinozoan (“mixed layer”) marine zooplankton biotopes for the Hirnantian glacial maximum (440 Ma) are reconstructed and compared to those from the Sandbian (460 Ma): They demonstrate a steeper latitudinal temperature gradient and an equatorwards shift of the Polar Front through time from 55°–70° S to ∼40° S. These changes are comparable to those during Pleistocene interglacial-glacial cycles. In comparison with the Pleistocene, we hypothesize a significant decline in mean global temperature from the Sandbian to Hirnantian, proportional with a fall in pCO2 from a modeled Sandbian level of ∼8× PAL to ∼5× PAL during the Hirnantian. Our data suggest that a compression of midlatitudinal biotopes and ecospace in response to the developing glaciation was a likely cause of the end-Ordovician mass extinction. PMID:20696937

  5. Mite dispersal among the Southern Ocean Islands and Antarctica before the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, E; Jansen van Vuuren, B; Lee, J E; Marshall, D J; Convey, P; Chown, S L

    2011-04-22

    It has long been maintained that the majority of terrestrial Antarctic species are relatively recent, post last glacial maximum, arrivals with perhaps a few microbial or protozoan taxa being substantially older. Recent studies have questioned this 'recolonization hypothesis', though the range of taxa examined has been limited. Here, we present the first large-scale study for mites, one of two dominant terrestrial arthropod groups in the region. Specifically, we provide a broad-scale molecular phylogeny of a biologically significant group of ameronothroid mites from across the maritime and sub-Antarctic regions. Applying different dating approaches, we show that divergences among the ameronothroid mite genera Podacarus, Alaskozetes and Halozetes significantly predate the Pleistocene and provide evidence of independent dispersals across the Antarctic Polar Front. Our data add to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that many taxa have survived glaciation of the Antarctic continent and the sub-Antarctic islands. Moreover, they also provide evidence of a relatively uncommon trend of dispersals from islands to continental mainlands. Within the ameronothroid mites, two distinct clades with specific habitat preferences (marine intertidal versus terrestrial/supralittoral) exist, supporting a model of within-habitat speciation rather than colonization from marine refugia to terrestrial habitats. The present results provide additional impetus for a search for terrestrial refugia in an area previously thought to have lacked ice-free ground during glacial maxima.

  6. Could brown bears (Ursus arctos) have survived in Ireland during the Last Glacial Maximum?

    PubMed

    Leonard, Saoirse A; Risley, Claire L; Turvey, Samuel T

    2013-08-23

    Brown bears are recorded from Ireland during both the Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. Although most of the Irish landmass was covered by an ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Irish brown bears are known to have hybridized with polar bears during the Late Pleistocene, and it is suggested that the Irish brown bear population did not become extinct but instead persisted in situ through the LGM in a southwestern ice-free refugium. We use historical population modelling to demonstrate that brown bears are highly unlikely to have survived through the LGM in Ireland under any combination of life-history parameters shown by living bear populations, but instead would have rapidly become extinct following advance of the British-Irish ice sheet, and probably recolonized Ireland during the end-Pleistocene Woodgrange Interstadial from a closely related nearby source population. The time available for brown bear-polar bear hybridization was therefore restricted to narrow periods at the beginning or end of the LGM. Brown bears would have been extremely vulnerable to extinction in Quaternary habitat refugia and required areas substantially larger than southwestern Ireland to survive adverse glacial conditions.

  7. Ancient DNA supports southern survival of Richardson's collared lemming (Dicrostonyx richardsoni) during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Tara L; Norris, Ryan W; Graham, Russell W; Semken, Holmes A; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-05-01

    Collared lemmings (genus Dicrostonyx) are circumpolar Arctic arvicoline rodents associated with tundra. However, during the last glacial maximum (LGM), Dicrostonyx lived along the southern ice margin of the Laurentide ice sheet in communities comprising both temperate and boreal species. To better understand these communities and the fate of these southern individuals, we compare mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data from three LGM-age Dicrostonyx fossils from south of the Laurentide ice sheet to sequences from modern Dicrostonyx sampled from across their present-day range. We test whether the Dicrostonyx populations from LGM-age continental USA became extinct at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition ~11000 years ago or, alternatively, if they belong to an extant species whose habitat preferences can be used to infer the palaeoclimate along the glacial margin. Our results indicate that LGM-age Dicrostonyx from Iowa and South Dakota belong to Dicrostonyx richardsoni, which currently lives in a temperate tundra environment west of Hudson Bay, Canada. This suggests a palaeoclimate south of the Laurentide ice sheet that contains elements similar to the more temperate shrub tundra characteristic of extant D. richardsoni habitat, rather than the very cold, dry tundra of the Northern Arctic. While more data are required to determine whether or not the LGM southern population is ancestral to extant D. richardsoni, it seems most probable that the species survived the LGM in a southern refugium.

  8. Mite dispersal among the Southern Ocean Islands and Antarctica before the last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, E.; Jansen van Vuuren, B.; Lee, J. E.; Marshall, D. J.; Convey, P.; Chown, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been maintained that the majority of terrestrial Antarctic species are relatively recent, post last glacial maximum, arrivals with perhaps a few microbial or protozoan taxa being substantially older. Recent studies have questioned this ‘recolonization hypothesis’, though the range of taxa examined has been limited. Here, we present the first large-scale study for mites, one of two dominant terrestrial arthropod groups in the region. Specifically, we provide a broad-scale molecular phylogeny of a biologically significant group of ameronothroid mites from across the maritime and sub-Antarctic regions. Applying different dating approaches, we show that divergences among the ameronothroid mite genera Podacarus, Alaskozetes and Halozetes significantly predate the Pleistocene and provide evidence of independent dispersals across the Antarctic Polar Front. Our data add to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that many taxa have survived glaciation of the Antarctic continent and the sub-Antarctic islands. Moreover, they also provide evidence of a relatively uncommon trend of dispersals from islands to continental mainlands. Within the ameronothroid mites, two distinct clades with specific habitat preferences (marine intertidal versus terrestrial/supralittoral) exist, supporting a model of within-habitat speciation rather than colonization from marine refugia to terrestrial habitats. The present results provide additional impetus for a search for terrestrial refugia in an area previously thought to have lacked ice-free ground during glacial maxima. PMID:20943685

  9. Atmospheric Rivers Enhanced Water Delivery to Southwestern North America at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, J. M.; Mitchell, J.; Risi, C. M.; Tripati, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Proxy reconstructions of the late Pleistocene paleoclimate indicate that southwestern North America was significantly more wet at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ~21 ka) than in the present. Pluvial paleolakes were abundant throughout the Great Basin and as far south as the modern Mojave Desert. The source of precipitation that fed these lakes and the role of evaporation in the hydrologic balance are debated. A leading hypothesis is increased Pacific winter storm frequency as a result of the jet stream being split or shifted south by the North American ice sheets. Alternative hypotheses include enhanced monsoonal precipitation, a re-routing of the storm track across the continent, and/or reduced evaporation. Using LGM simulations from the PMIP3 ensemble and the LMDZ general circulation model, and comparing to proxy records of LGM precipitation in the region, we find that atmospheric rivers, narrow filaments of humid tropical air, were strengthened over the eastern Pacific during glacial intervals and directed into southern California. A strengthened Aleutian Low and a weakened North Pacific High produced a mean state conducive to this strong, south-shifted atmospheric river system, which enhanced moisture delivery into the southwestern part of the Great Basin.

  10. Erosion and transport by Byrd Glacier, Antarctica during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, K. J.; Palmer, E. F.

    2013-02-01

    Glacial till samples from seven, modern-Holocene Byrd Glacier moraines were characterized using particle size analysis, sand petrography and detrital zircon geochronology and compared to Ross Sea tills deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum. The goal was to identify the paleoflow path for Byrd Glacier and assess the use of multiple provenance techniques. The coarse sand fraction of Byrd Glacier tills is dominated by lithic fragments of adjacent bedrock outcrops, except samples from the Lonewolf Nunataks, which have a higher proportion of mineral to lithic fragments, as well as a recognizable exotic component. Cluster analysis shows that Byrd Glacier tills, with the exception of the two Lonewolf Nunataks sites, do not cluster strongly with Ross Sea samples because they have a higher proportion of lithic fragments. This indicates that comminution must be an active subglacial process beneath East Antarctic outlet glaciers. Byrd Glacier tills are also typically coarser grained that Ross Sea tills and their maturity is a reflection of both glacial processes and rock type. Measured U/Pb ages of detrital zircons from Byrd Glacier tills range from Triassic to Archean (240-3540 Ma) with a dominance of grains 530-600 Ma. Ross Sea till samples show spatial variability in U/Pb age distributions, with the core sites west of the 180° longitude line showing similarity to most Byrd Glacier tills, whereas core NBP9407-39, east of 180° long., is dominated by ˜100 Ma grains. Ross Sea tills also contain a recognizable detrital zircon fraction eroded inland of the Transantarctic Mountains. Both provenance methods indicate that the ice flow line for Byrd Glacier during the LGM was to the east of Ross Island and extended on either side of Ross Bank, with the majority of ice flowing to the Ross Sea's Central Basin. Our analysis shows that sand petrography and detrital zircon U/Pb age spectra provide complementary datasets that produce similar ice flow reconstructions and reveal

  11. Linking microbial assemblages to paleoenvironmental conditions from the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum times in Laguna Potrok Aike sediments, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurele; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda

    2014-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a closed basin located in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitudes (52°S) where paleoenvironmental conditions were recorded as temporal sedimentary sequences resulting from variations in the regional hydrological regime and geology of the catchment. The interpretation of the limnogeological multiproxy record developed during the ICDP-PASADO project allowed the identification of contrasting time windows associated with the fluctuations of Southern Westerly Winds. In the framework of this project, a 100-m-long core was also dedicated to a detailed geomicrobiological study which aimed at a thorough investigation of the lacustrine subsurface biosphere. Indeed, aquatic sediments do not only record past climatic conditions, but also provide a wide range of ecological niches for microbes. In this context, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and survival remained still unexplored for the deep lacustrine realm. Therefore, we investigated living microbes throughout the sedimentary sequence using in situ ATP assays and DAPI cell count. These results, compiled with pore water analysis, SEM microscopy of authigenic concretions and methane and fatty acid biogeochemistry, provided evidence for a sustained microbial activity in deep sediments and pinpointed the substantial role of microbial processes in modifying initial organic and mineral fractions. Finally, because the genetic material associated with microorganisms can be preserved in sediments over millennia, we extracted environmental DNA from Laguna Potrok Aike sediments and established 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal clone libraries to better define the use of DNA-based techniques in reconstructing past environments. We focused on two sedimentary horizons both displaying in situ microbial activity, respectively corresponding to the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum periods. Sequences recovered from the productive Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to

  12. The Influence of Glacial Ice Sheets on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Through Atmospheric Circulation Change under Glacial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, S.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Oka, A.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that glacial ice sheets (Laurentide, Fennoscandian and Antarctic ice sheets) exert a large influence on the climate including the atmospheric circulation. Moreover, recent climate modeling studies suggest that glacial ice sheets have a large impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the process by which the ice sheets impact on the AMOC is not yet fully understood. On the other hand, recent studies showed that surface wind changes play a crucial role on changes to the AMOC under glacial climate. Therefore, in this study, we investigate in detail, the process by which the ice sheet modifies the AMOC through surface wind change. Here we conduct numerical experiments using an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) separately. Our method consists of 2 steps. First, from AGCM experiments, we evaluate the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind. Second, from OGCM experiments, we evaluate the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC by applying the surface wind change as a boundary condition, while leaving other boundary conditions (surface heat and water fluxes) unchanged. In addition, we conduct several sensitivity experiments. Using the AGCM, we explore individual ice sheet effect, ice sheet topography effect and albedo effect on surface wind change. Moreover, using the OGCM, we change the surface wind gradually or apply the surface wind change only at a specific region in order to explore the wind change effect in detail. We find that glacial ice sheets largely intensify the AMOC by surface wind change under glacial climate. Compare to other regions, it reveals that the wind change at the North Atlantic (NA) is a key region. There, the northern glacial ice sheet topography intensifies the Icelandic Low and anti-cyclonic circulation over the Laurentide ice sheet. However, this wind effect is effective only when the NA is not widely covered by sea ice

  13. Retreat history of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Verleyen, Elie; O'Brien, Philip E.; White, Duanne A.; Jones, R. Selwyn; McKay, Robert; Dunbar, Robert; Gore, Damian B.; Fink, David; Post, Alexandra L.; Miura, Hideki; Leventer, Amy; Goodwin, Ian; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Lilly, Katherine; Crosta, Xavier; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Wagner, Bernd; Berg, Sonja; van Ommen, Tas; Zwartz, Dan; Roberts, Stephen J.; Vyverman, Wim; Masse, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) is the largest continental ice mass on Earth, and documenting its evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is important for understanding its present-day and future behaviour. As part of a community effort, we review geological evidence from East Antarctica that constrains the ice sheet history throughout this period (˜30,000 years ago to present). This includes terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dates from previously glaciated regions, 14C chronologies from glacial and post-glacial deposits onshore and on the continental shelf, and ice sheet thickness changes inferred from ice cores and continental-scale ice sheet models. We also include new 14C dates from the George V Land - Terre Adélie Coast shelf. We show that the EAIS advanced to the continental shelf margin in some parts of East Antarctica, and that the ice sheet characteristically thickened by 300-400 m near the present-day coastline at these sites. This advance was associated with the formation of low-gradient ice streams that grounded at depths of >1 km below sea level on the inner continental shelf. The Lambert/Amery system thickened by a greater amount (800 m) near its present-day grounding zone, but did not advance beyond the inner continental shelf. At other sites in coastal East Antarctica (e.g. Bunger Hills, Larsemann Hills), very little change in the ice sheet margin occurred at the LGM, perhaps because ice streams accommodated any excess ice build up, leaving adjacent, ice-free areas relatively unaffected. Evidence from nunataks indicates that the amount of ice sheet thickening diminished inland at the LGM, an observation supported by ice cores, which suggest that interior ice sheet domes were ˜100 m lower than present at this time. Ice sheet recession may have started ˜18,000 years ago in the Lambert/Amery glacial system, and by ˜14,000 years ago in Mac.Robertson Land. These early pulses of deglaciation may have been responses to abrupt sea-level rise

  14. The atmospheric CH4 increase since the Last Glacial Maximum. II - Interactions with oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Chappellaz, Jerome A.; Fung, Inez Y.; Kucsera, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    Results of two studies of the effect of changing CH4 fluxes on global tropospheric oxidant levels, O3, OH, and H2O2, performed with a multibox photochemical model, are presented. A sensitivity study is conducted by scaling back CH4, CO, and NO emissions relative to the present-day budget. When the CH4 ice core record is compared to calculated CH4 abundances, corresponding CH4 fluxes for the preindustrial Holocene (PIH) and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are fairly well-constrained: 175-225 Tg CH/4/yr for PIH and 100-130 Tg CH4/yr for LGM. Specific scenarios for CH4/CO/NO are selected to represent sources for the PIH and LGM. The CH4 budget is taken from an evaluation of wetlands and other natural sources.

  15. The atmospheric CH4 increase since the Last Glacial Maximum. II - Interactions with oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Chappellaz, Jerome A.; Fung, Inez Y.; Kucsera, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    Results of two studies of the effect of changing CH4 fluxes on global tropospheric oxidant levels, O3, OH, and H2O2, performed with a multibox photochemical model, are presented. A sensitivity study is conducted by scaling back CH4, CO, and NO emissions relative to the present-day budget. When the CH4 ice core record is compared to calculated CH4 abundances, corresponding CH4 fluxes for the preindustrial Holocene (PIH) and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are fairly well-constrained: 175-225 Tg CH/4/yr for PIH and 100-130 Tg CH4/yr for LGM. Specific scenarios for CH4/CO/NO are selected to represent sources for the PIH and LGM. The CH4 budget is taken from an evaluation of wetlands and other natural sources.

  16. Colombian vegetation at the Last Glacial Maximum: a comparison of model- and pollen-based biome reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, Robert; Boom, Arnoud; Behling, Hermann; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Melief, Bert; van Geel, Bas; van der Hammen, Thomas; Wille, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Colombian vegetation, at the ecological level of the biome, is reconstructed at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using two methods. A reconstruction of modern biomes shows that, for the majority of the sites, the pollen data accurately reflect the potential vegetation, even though much of the original vegetation has been transformed by agricultural practices. At 18 000 14C yr BP a generally cool and dry environment is reflected in biome assignments of cold mixed forests, cool evergreen forests and cool grassland/shrub, the latter extending to lower altitudes than presently recorded. Differential responses of the vegetation to climatic shifts are related to changes in moisture sources and the importance of edaphic control on the vegetation. Secondly, biomes at the LGM are also investigated by applying a vegetation model (BIOME-3) set to operate at CO2 levels of 200 ppmV and with climatic data from 12 meteorological stations that encompass a range of environments within Colombia. At lower altitudes it is apparent that moisture is the dominant control on driving vegetation change whereas temperature becomes more important at higher altitudes. The combined reconstruction of biome-scale vegetation dynamics in Colombia allows an understanding of the environmental controls on these to be developed that demonstrates the need to invoke different factors to explain the vegetation change rather than a uniform reduction in temperature or moisture. Copyright

  17. Deepwater redox changes in the southern Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yanguang; Yang, Shouye; Li, Chao; Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Jihua; Bi, Lei

    2015-06-01

    In this study, rare earth element (REE) was treated as a paleo-redox proxy to investigate the changes of depositional environment in the southern Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum. The acid-leachable fraction (leachate) of the sediments recovered from the ODP Site 1202B is dominated by biogenic and authigenic components while detrital contamination is minor. The significant enrichment of middle REE suggests a large contribution from authigenic Mn oxyhydroxides and cerium (Ce) anomaly can indicate deepwater redox change. The REE parameters including Ce anomaly in the leachate exhibit remarkable and abrupt changes in the early Holocene (∼9.5 ka) and during LGM (∼20 ka). An increase of Ce anomaly at 28-22 ka implies the suboxic deepwater condition probably caused by increased primary productivity. Weak positive Ce anomalies during the last glacial maximum and deglaciation suggest an oxic depositional environment responding to the enhanced deepwater ventilation with the advection of the North Pacific Intermediate Water and/or South China Sea Intermediate Water into the trough. A decrease of Ce anomaly in the early Holocene might be caused by the intrusion and strengthening of the Kuroshio Current in the trough that enhanced the water stratification and induced a gradual development of suboxic depositional condition. Furthermore, an abrupt change of chemical composition at ca. 4 ka probably indicates a decrease of dissolved oxygen in deepwater and a weakening of ventilation in the Okinawa Trough. This study suggests that REE proxy can provide new insights into the linkage among surface current, deepwater circulation and sediment record in the continental margin where terrigenous input dominates.

  18. Reaching and abandoning the furthest ice extent during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Wirsig, Christian; Zasadni, Jerzy; Hippe, Kristina; Christl, Marcus; Akçar, Naki; Schluechter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the European Alps (late Würm) local ice caps and extensive ice fields in the high Alps fed huge outlet glaciers that occupied the main valleys and extended onto the forelands as piedmont lobes. Records from numerous sites suggest advance of glaciers beyond the mountain front by around 30 ka (Ivy-Ochs 2015 and references therein). Reaching of the maximum extent occurred by about 27-26 ka, as exemplified by dates from the Rhein glacier area (Keller and Krayss, 2005). Abandonment of the outermost moraines at sites north and south of the Alps was underway by about 24 ka. In the high Alps, systems of transection glaciers with transfluences over many of the Alpine passes dominated, for example, at Grimsel Pass in the Central Alps (Switzerland). 10Be exposure ages of 23 ± 1 ka for glacially sculpted bedrock located just a few meters below the LGM trimline in the Haslital near Grimsel Pass suggest a pulse of ice surface lowering at about the same time that the foreland moraines were being abandoned (Wirsig et al., 2016). Widespread ice surface lowering in the high Alps was underway by no later than 18 ka. Thereafter, glaciers oscillated at stillstand and minor re-advance positions on the northern forelands for several thousand years forming the LGM stadial moraines. Final recession back within the mountain front took place by 19-18 ka. Recalculation to a common basis of all published 10Be exposure dates for boulders situated on LGM moraines suggests a strong degree of synchrony for the timing of onset of ice decay both north and south of the Alps. Ivy-Ochs, S., 2015, Cuadernos de investigación geográfica 41: 295-315. Keller, O., Krayss, E., 2005, Vierteljahrschr. Naturforsch. Gesell. Zürich 150: 69-85. Wirsig, C. et al., 2016, J. Quat. Sci. 31: 46-59.

  19. Instability of glacial climate in a model of the ocean- atmosphere-cryosphere system.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Weaver, Andrew J

    2002-02-22

    In contrast to the relatively stable climate of the past 10,000 years, during glacial times the North Atlantic region experienced large-amplitude transitions between cold (stadial) and warm (interstadial) states. In this modeling study, we demonstrate that hydrological interactions between the Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) and adjacent continental ice sheets can trigger abrupt warming events and also limit the lifetime of the interstadial circulation mode. These interactions have the potential to destabilize the THC, which is already more sensitive for glacial conditions than for the present-day climate, thus providing an explanation for the increased variability of glacial climate.

  20. Quantifying the change in equilibrium-line altitude during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Subtropical Andes using a mass-balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargo, L.; Galewsky, J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying changes in equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) can be used to better understand past regional climates. We use a glacial mass-balance model in conjunction with global climate model (GCM) output data to calculate the change in ELA between modern and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka) climates in the presently hyper-arid subtropical Andes. The region is currently unglaciated, despite cold enough temperatures, as there is too little moisture to sustain glaciers. Previous studies suggest this area was glaciated during the LGM, however, little is known about the extent of the glaciation or the climate required to sustain it. The mass-balance model used in this study calculates the change in ELA using the positive degree-day (PDD) sum, the sum of daily mean air temperatures that are above zero. The PDD sum is used to calculate ablation, which is then assumed to be proportional to temperature, in order to calculate the change in ELA. Using output from several GCM simulations, we compare the change in ELA between LGM and modern climates across the different models for the subtropical Andes. These simulations suggest that the changes in climate resulted in a lowering of ELAs to the extent that parts of the subtropical Andes were glaciated during the LGM.

  1. First Global Climate Model Simulations of the M2 Pliocene Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, A.; Haywood, A.; Hunter, S. J.; Tindall, J.; Valdes, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Pliocene Epoch (5.2 to 2.6 Ma) and specifically the PRISM interval (3.0 to 3.3 Ma) have frequently been targeted to investigate warm intervals in Earth history (e.g. Haywood et al., 2013). However, climate variability within the Pliocene is often overlooked. Although not as dramatic as the glacial and interglacial cycles that typified the Pleistocene, the Pliocene also exhibited climate variability and periods which were apparently cooler than modern (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005). Of particular interest is the major cooling event that occurred around 3.3 Ma during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2. This 'Pliocene glacial' punctuates an otherwise relatively warm background climate and has been referred to as a failed attempt of the climate to reach a full glacial state (De Schepper et al., 2009; Haug and Tiedemann, 1998). The onset of full Northern Hemisphere (NH) glaciation finally occurred at the end of the Pliocene (~ 2.75 Ma). Although numerous temperature reconstructions from around the world's oceans tend to capture the MIS M2 cooling event, the exact nature of M2 remains enigmatic. Sea level records vary but suggest a maximum sea level drop of ~65 m compared to modern, which in itself is significant enough to necessitate the growth of a NH ice sheet (Dwyer and Chandler, 2009). Previous ice sheet modelling suggests that ~8 m sea level equivalent (SLE) ice could be stored on Antarctica (Pollard and DeConto, 2009) and this larger ice sheet (compared to modern) is potentially supported by the increase in ice-rafted debris (IRD) found offshore of East Antarctica during this time (Passchier, 2011). IRD in the North Atlantic would suggest the presence of an ice sheet on Greenland (e.g. Kleiven et al., 2002), but the locations of other ice caps in the NH are not determined due to the destructive nature of subsequent Pleistocene ice sheet advances. Moreover, recent evidence questions whether the climate in the NH was favourable at all for the initiation of ice sheets

  2. Sea-surface temperatures around the Australian margin and Indian Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Juggins, Steve

    2005-04-01

    We present new last glacial maximum (LGM) sea-surface temperature (SST) maps for the oceans around Australia based on planktonic foraminifera assemblages. To provide the most reliable SST estimates we use the modern analog technique, the revised analog method, and artificial neural networks in conjunction with an expanded modern core top database. All three methods produce similar quality predictions and the root mean squared error of the consensus prediction (the average of the three) under cross-validation is only ±0.77 °C. We determine LGM SST using data from 165 cores, most of which have good age control from oxygen isotope stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates. The coldest SST occurred at 20,500±1400 cal yr BP, predating the maximum in oxygen isotope records at 18,200±1500 cal yr BP. During the LGM interval we observe cooling within the tropics of up to 4 °C in the eastern Indian Ocean, and mostly between 0 and 3 °C elsewhere along the equator. The high latitudes cooled by the greatest degree, a maximum of 7-9 °C in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Our maps improve substantially on previous attempts by making higher quality temperature estimates, using more cores, and improving age control.

  3. The climate response of the Indo-Pacific warm pool to glacial sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nezio, Pedro N.; Timmermann, Axel; Tierney, Jessica E.; Jin, Fei-Fei; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Rosenbloom, Nan; Mapes, Brian; Neale, Rich; Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Montenegro, Alvaro

    2016-06-01

    Growing climate proxy evidence suggests that changes in sea level are important drivers of tropical climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales. These paleodata suggest that rainfall patterns over the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) are highly sensitive to the landmass configuration of the Maritime Continent and that lowered sea level contributed to large-scale drying during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, approximately 21,000 years B.P.). Using the Community Earth System Model Version 1.2 (CESM1), we investigate the mechanisms by which lowered sea level influenced the climate of the IPWP during the LGM. The CESM1 simulations show that, in agreement with previous hypotheses, changes in atmospheric circulation are initiated by the exposure of the Sunda and Sahul shelves. Ocean dynamical processes amplify the changes in atmospheric circulation by increasing the east-west sea surface temperature (SST) gradient along the equatorial Indian Ocean. The coupled mechanism driving this response is akin to the Bjerknes feedback and results in a large-scale climatic reorganization over the Indian Ocean with impacts extending from east Africa to the western tropical Pacific. Unlike exposure of the Sunda shelf, exposure of Sahul shelf and the associated changes in surface albedo play a key role because of the positive feedback. This mechanism could explain the pattern of dry (wet) eastern (western) Indian Ocean identified in climate proxies and LGM simulations. However, this response also requires a strengthened SST gradient along the equatorial Indian Ocean, a pattern that is not evident in marine paleoreconstructions. Strategies to resolve this issue are discussed.

  4. North American paleoclimate reconstructions for the Last Glacial Maximum using an inverse modeling through iterative forward modeling approach applied to pollen data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Kenji; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    2016-10-01

    The inverse modeling through iterative forward modeling (IMIFM) approach was used to reconstruct Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climates from North American fossil pollen data. The approach was validated using modern pollen data and observed climate data. While the large-scale LGM temperature IMIFM reconstructions are similar to those calculated using conventional statistical approaches, the reconstructions of moisture variables differ between the two approaches. We used two vegetation models, BIOME4 and BIOME5-beta, with the IMIFM approach to evaluate the effects on the LGM climate reconstruction of differences in water use efficiency, carbon use efficiency, and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Although lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations influence pollen-based LGM moisture reconstructions, they do not significantly affect temperature reconstructions over most of North America. This study implies that the LGM climate was very cold but not very much drier than present over North America, which is inconsistent with previous studies.

  5. Bundled turbidite deposition in the central Pandora Trough (Gulf of Papua) since Last Glacial Maximum: Linking sediment nature and accumulation to sea level fluctuations at millennial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorry, StéPhan J.; Droxler, André W.; Mallarino, Gianni; Dickens, Gerald R.; Bentley, Sam J.; Beaufort, Luc; Peterson, Larry C.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2008-03-01

    Since Last Glacial Maximum (23-19 ka), Earth climate warming and deglaciation occurred in two major steps (Bølling-Allerød and Preboreal), interrupted by a short cooling interval referred to as the Younger Dryas (12.5-11.5 ka B.P.). In this study, three cores (MV-33, MV-66, and MD-40) collected in the central part of Pandora Trough (Gulf of Papua) have been analyzed, and they reveal a detailed sedimentary pattern at millennial timescale. Siliciclastic turbidites disappeared during the Bølling-Allerød and Preboreal intervals to systematically reoccur during the Younger Dryas interval. Subsequent to the final disappearance of the siliciclastic turbidites a calciturbidite occurred during meltwater pulse 1B. The Holocene interval was characterized by a lack of siliciclastic turbidites, relatively high carbonate content, and fine bank-derived aragonitic sediment. The observed millennial timescale sedimentary variability can be explained by sea level fluctuations. During the Last Glacial Maximum, siliciclastic turbidites were numerous when the lowstand coastal system was located along the modern shelf edge. Although they did not occur during the intervals of maximum flooding of the shelf (during meltwater pulses 1A and 1B), siliciclastic turbidites reappear briefly during the Younger Dryas, an interval when sea level rise slowed, stopped, or perhaps even fell. The timing of the calciturbidite coincides with the first reflooding of Eastern Fields Reef, an atoll that remained exposed for most of the glacial stages.

  6. Mechanisms of ENSO Response to Glacial and Milankovitch Forcing in the NCAR Climate System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Brady, E. C.; Shields, C.

    2002-12-01

    The tropical Pacific climate response to Holocene/glacial boundary conditions is examined for the last glacial-interglacial cycle with simulations using the fully coupled, non-flux corrected NCAR CSM model. The present-day CSM simulation reproduces both the spatial and temporal character of the observed equatorial Pacific variability quite well. The standard deviation of the model Nino-3 index is 0.68°C, comparable to values calculated from observations. The model simulates weaker El Ninos compared to present for the last 11,000 years (Nino-3 index = 0.54°C at 11 ka) and stronger El Ninos for the Last Glacial Maximum (Nino-3 index = 0.81°C at 21 ka). The changes in intensity for the last 11,000 years are traced to modulation of wind stresses across the tropical Pacific Ocean by the summer Asian monsoon and weakening of the tropical thermocline. Seasonal and annual solar radiation anomalies associated with Milankovitch forcing drive these changes and are shown to dominate the effect of the residual continental ice sheets. For the Last Glacial Maximum, changes in the intensity are traced to a sharpening of the tropical thermocline and weakening of the east-west sea surface temperature gradient. The ocean dynamical thermostat mechanism in the tropics and subduction of colder waters from Southern Hemisphere latitudes associated with the expansion of sea ice are important. Reduced atmospheric greenhouse gases force these ocean temperature changes at the LGM. Decreased ENSO variability going back to 11 ka, with more occurrences of small and less occurrences of large El Ninos and La Ninas compared to present, agrees with interpretation of laminae changes in an alpine lake in Ecuador by Rodbell and collaborators. The CSM suggests that the reduced amplitudes of glacial ENSO variability documented by Tudhope and collaborators in corals from New Guinea are associated with weaker teleconnections to precipitation changes over the region that occur with a shift eastward of

  7. The Dorsa Argentea Formation and the Noachian-Hesperian Transition: Climate and Glacial Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, K. E.; Head, J. W.; Fastook, J. L.; Wordsworth, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    We used early Mars GCM and glacial flow model simulations to constrain climates allowing development, basal melting, and recession of an ice sheet consistent with the Noachian-Hesperian landforms and geologic units at the south pole of Mars.

  8. Migration Patterns of Subgenus Alnus in Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Douda, Jan; Doudová, Jana; Drašnarová, Alena; Kuneš, Petr; Hadincová, Věroslava; Krak, Karol; Zákravský, Petr; Mandák, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, new palaeoecological records supported by molecular analyses and palaeodistributional modelling have provided more comprehensive insights into plant behaviour during the last Quaternary cycle. We reviewed the migration history of species of subgenus Alnus during the last 50,000 years in Europe with a focus on (1) a general revision of Alnus history since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), (2) evidence of northern refugia of Alnus populations during the LGM and (3) the specific history of Alnus in particular European regions. Methodology We determined changes in Alnus distribution on the basis of 811 and 68 radiocarbon-dated pollen and macrofossil sites, respectively. We compiled data from the European Pollen Database, the Czech Quaternary Palynological Database, the Eurasian Macrofossil Database and additional literature. Pollen percentage thresholds indicating expansions or retreats were used to describe patterns of past Alnus occurrence. Principal Findings An expansion of Alnus during the Late Glacial and early Holocene periods supports the presence of alders during the LGM in southern peninsulas and northerly areas in western Europe, the foothills of the Alps, the Carpathians and northeastern Europe. After glaciers withdrew, the ice-free area of Europe was likely colonized from several regional refugia; the deglaciated area of Scandinavia was likely colonized from a single refugium in northeastern Europe. In the more northerly parts of Europe, we found a scale-dependent pattern of Alnus expansion characterised by a synchronous increase of Alnus within individual regions, though with regional differences in the times of the expansion. In southern peninsulas, the Alps and the Carpathians, by contrast, it seems that Alnus expanded differently at individual sites rather than synchronously in whole regions. Conclusions Our synthesis supports the idea that northern LGM populations were important sources of postglacial Alnus expansion. The

  9. Deep ocean nutrients during the Last Glacial Maximum deduced from sponge silicon isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Katharine R.; Georg, R. Bastian; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Robinson, Laura F.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2010-04-01

    The relative importance of biological and physical processes within the Southern Ocean for the storage of carbon and atmospheric pCO 2 on glacial-interglacial timescales remains uncertain. Understanding the impact of surface biological production on carbon export in the past relies on the reconstruction of the nutrient supply from upwelling deep waters. In particular, the upwelling of silicic acid (Si(OH) 4) is tightly coupled to carbon export in the Southern Ocean via diatom productivity. Here, we address how changes in deep water Si(OH) 4 concentrations can be reconstructed using the silicon isotopic composition of deep-sea sponges. We report δ30Si of modern deep-sea sponge spicules and show that they reflect seawater Si(OH) 4 concentration. The fractionation factor of sponge δ30Si compared to seawater δ30Si shows a positive relationship with Si(OH) 4, which may be a growth rate effect. Application of this proxy in two down-core records from the Scotia Sea reveals that Si(OH) 4 concentrations in the deep Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) were no different than today. Our result does not support a coupling of carbon and nutrient build up in an isolated deep ocean reservoir during the LGM. Our data, combined with records of stable isotopes from diatoms, are only consistent with enhanced LGM Southern Ocean nutrient utilization if there was also a concurrent reduction in diatom silicification or a shift from siliceous to organic-walled phytoplankton.

  10. Quantifying the stability of planktic foraminiferal physical niches between the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterson, A. M.; Edgar, K. M.; Schmidt, D. N.; Valdes, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    The application of transfer functions on fossil assemblages to reconstruct past environments is fundamentally based on the assumption of stable environmental niches in both space and time. We quantitatively test this assumption for six dominant planktic foraminiferal species (Globigerinoides ruber (pink), G. ruber (white), Trilobatus sacculifer, Truncorotalia truncatulinoides, Globigerina bulloides, and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma) by contrasting reconstructions of species realized and optimum distributions in the modern and during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using an ecological niche model (ENM; MaxEnt) and ordination framework. Global ecological niche models calibrated in the modern ocean have high predictive performance when projected to the LGM for subpolar and polar species, indicating that the environmental niches of these taxa are largely stable at the global scale across this interval. In contrast, ENMs had much poorer predictive performance for the optimal niche of tropical-dwelling species, T. sacculifer and G. ruber (pink). This finding is supported by independent metrics of niche margin change, suggesting that niche stability in environmental space was greatest for (sub)polar species, with greatest expansion of the niche observed for tropical species. We find that globally calibrated ENMs showed good predictions of species occurrences globally, whereas models calibrated in either the Pacific or Atlantic Oceans only and then projected globally performed less well for T. sacculifer. Our results support the assumption of environmental niche stability over the last 21,000 years for most of our focal planktic foraminiferal species and, thus, the application of transfer function techniques for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction during this interval. However, the lower observed niche stability for (sub)tropical taxa T. sacculifer and G. ruber (pink) suggests that (sub)tropical temperatures could be underestimated in the glacial ocean with the strongest

  11. Carbonate chemistry of intermediate waters in the Southwest Pacific Ocean since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. A.; Sikes, E. L.; Elmore, A.; Hoenisch, B.; deMenocal, P. B.; Rosenthal, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Shifts in ocean circulation and marine carbon storage likely played an important role in the termination of the last ice age, but the mechanisms driving these changes have not yet been fully explained. It has been suggested that a greater amount of CO2 was stored in the deep sea during glacial periods via the biologic pump and/or increased uptake by a more alkaline ocean. To quantify the relative roles of such processes, more constraints on past deep ocean alkalinity are needed. Here, we present a new record of deep water carbonate chemistry for the last 30,000 years derived from a sediment core located at 1,627 meters depth in New Zealand's Bay of Plenty. Today, this core site lies at the boundary between relatively fresh Antarctic/Tasman Intermediate Water (above), and Circumpolar Deep Water (below) with more corrosive Pacific Deep Water also intruding from the north. Trace element and stable isotopic composition of foraminiferal calcite (the epibenthic species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi) reveal changes in bottom water carbonate chemistry during periods of atmospheric CO2 change. The boron to calcium ratio (B/Ca) in these shells indicates that deep water saturation (ΔCO32-) during the last glacial maximum (LGM) was only 5 μmol kg-1 less than the modern value of ~ 20 μmol/kg, consistent with previous work identifying the Pacific as a 'well-buffered' ocean basin on long timescales. However, reconstructed ΔCO32- values fluctuated by as much as 30 μmol/kg across the deglaciation, exhibiting the most pronounced changes between 17 and 13 ka. Together with shifts in carbon isotopes, these results imply changes in circulation and/or respired CO2 storage, and support a series of events in which major oceanographic changes are intimately linked with shifts in atmospheric circulation.

  12. Anatomy of Some Non-Heinrich Events During The Last Glacial Maximum on Laurentian Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, I. M.; Keigwin, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution diatom assemblage analyses coupled with oxygen and carbon isotopic records from a new 28 m piston core on Laurentian Fan reveal significant sedimentological and marine productivity changes related to variability of the nearby Laurentide Ice Sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum. Between 21.0 and 19.7 ka and between 18.8 and 18.6 ka, olive-grey clays intervals interrupt the usual glacial red-clays sedimentation. The timing of these two intervals corresponds to reported occurrence of layers low in detrital carbonate (LDC, considered as non-Heinrich events) that occurred between Heinrich Event 1 and 2. Diatoms are only abundant during those LDC - olive-grey clay intervals and suggest ice retreat (allowing light penetration necessary to diatoms). The species succession reveals also different environmental conditions. The 21.0 to 19.7 ka interval is divisible to two main periods: the first was characterized by environmental conditions dominated by ice, while the second period (starting at 20.2 ka) was warmer than the first. During the shorter 18.8 to 18.6 ka interval, conditions were even warmer than during the 20.2 to 19.7 ka sub-interval. Finally, the comparison of the interpreted oceanographic conditions with changes in Ice Rafted Debris and other records from the North Atlantic will bring a new insight into those episodes that precede the transition to deglaciation beginning ~18.2 ka on Laurentian Fan (based on δ18-O in N. pachyderma (s.)).

  13. The Last Glacial Maximum around Lago d'Orta, Northern Italy; a multi method reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, Jochem; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Hajdas, Irka; Monegato, Giovanni; Gianotti, Franco; Christl, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    During the Quaternary multiple ice-ages saw the ice reaching the low Alpine forelands. Glacial erosion helped creating overdeepenings and during stable glacier positions moraines could be built up. Today we can recognize these landforms in the research area as a lake basin which accomodates Lago d'Orta and sets of moraines surrounding the southern lake tip, referred to as the amphitheatre. The glacier that used to fill the overdeepening during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a small branch of the Toce Glacier, which originated from the Simplon and Monte Rosa areas and which saw a bigger branch flowing down the Lago Maggiore area. However, which moraines can be attributed to the LGM is variously discussed in the literature. To determine which ice-ages have formed the different moraines in the amphitheatre, we used cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating on the erratic boulders found on the frontal and lateral moraines. On a nearby outcropping section of a Ticino River terrace in Castelnovate we applied radiocarbon dating over a profile depth of 5 meters to find ages of deposition. Whilst using multiple preparation methods on the radiocarbon samples we found large variations in the resulting ages. Possible reasons for these variations will be discussed. Combining results of both these dating methods, conventional geomorphological mapping and ArcGIS landscape analysis, we have constructed a spatial and temporal reconstruction of the LGM around Lago d'Orta. This research adds to our understanding of the termination of the LGM on the Southern side of the Alps.

  14. Sea-surface temperatures of the southwest Pacific Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, T. T.; Juggins, S.; de Deckker, P.; Thiede, J.; Martinez, J. I.

    2000-02-01

    The southwest Pacific Ocean covers a broad range of surface-water conditions ranging from warm, salty water in the subtropical East Australian Current to fresher, cold water in the Circumpolar Current. Using a new database of planktonic foraminifera assemblages (AUSMAT-F2), we demonstrate that the modern analog technique can be used to accurately reconstruct the magnitude of sea-surfacetemperature (SST) in this region. We apply this technique to data from 29 deep-sea cores along a meridional transect of the southwest Pacific Ocean to estimate the magnitude of SST cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum. We find minimal cooling in the tropics (0°-2°C), moderate cooling in the subtropical midlatitudes (2°-6°C), and maximum cooling to the southeast of New Zealand (6°-10°C). The magnitude of cooling at the sea surface from the tropics to the temperate latitudes is found to generally be less than cooling at the surface of adjacent land masses.

  15. The Environment Changes in the Southwestern Taiwan Since the Last Glacial Maximum Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yung-Jan; Chen, Wen-Shan

    2015-04-01

    We use 31 boreholes to reconstruct the depositional environments in the southwestern Taiwan. Based on the sedimentary structures, it is divided into eight facies associations that is important to reconstruct depositional environment. Based on the depositional environment, sequence stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating data, it can be implied significant environment and shoreline changes. (1) The southwestern Taiwan is characterized by a subaerial environment and formed two incised valleys during the sea-level fall in the last glacial maximum epoch. (2) The shoreline was migrated to the landward and close to the frontal foothills, and the environment changed deepen into tidal flat and lagoon during 18,000-10,000 years ago. (3) The area occurred the deepest environment from shoreface to offshore transition during 8,000-7,000 years ago. (4) The shoreline was retreated to the seaward. The environment changed shallowen into barrier island, lagoon, and coastal plain since 7,000 years ago. This study confirm the decreasing accommodation space in this area result from huge sediment inputs and decreased eustatic sea-level rise, which cause the maximum flooding epoch appear earlier.

  16. North Atlantic storm track changes during the Last Glacial Maximum recorded by Alpine speleothems.

    PubMed

    Luetscher, Marc; Boch, R; Sodemann, H; Spötl, C; Cheng, H; Edwards, R L; Frisia, S; Hof, F; Müller, W

    2015-02-27

    The European Alps are an effective barrier for meridional moisture transport and are thus uniquely placed to record shifts in the North Atlantic storm track pattern associated with the waxing and waning of Late-Pleistocene Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. The lack of well-dated terrestrial proxy records spanning this time period, however, renders the reconstruction of past atmospheric patterns difficult. Here we present a precisely dated, continuous terrestrial record of meteoric precipitation in Europe between 30 and 14.7 ka. In contrast to present-day conditions, our speleothem data provide strong evidence for preferential advection of moisture from the South across the Alps supporting a southward shift of the storm track during the local Last Glacial Maximum (that is, 26.5-23.5 ka). Moreover, our age control indicates that this circulation pattern preceded the Northern Hemisphere precession maximum by ~3 ka, suggesting that obliquity may have played a considerable role in the Alpine ice aggradation.

  17. North Atlantic storm track changes during the Last Glacial Maximum recorded by Alpine speleothems

    PubMed Central

    Luetscher, Marc; Boch, R.; Sodemann, H.; Spötl, C.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Frisia, S.; Hof, F.; Müller, W.

    2015-01-01

    The European Alps are an effective barrier for meridional moisture transport and are thus uniquely placed to record shifts in the North Atlantic storm track pattern associated with the waxing and waning of Late-Pleistocene Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. The lack of well-dated terrestrial proxy records spanning this time period, however, renders the reconstruction of past atmospheric patterns difficult. Here we present a precisely dated, continuous terrestrial record of meteoric precipitation in Europe between 30 and 14.7 ka. In contrast to present-day conditions, our speleothem data provide strong evidence for preferential advection of moisture from the South across the Alps supporting a southward shift of the storm track during the local Last Glacial Maximum (that is, 26.5–23.5 ka). Moreover, our age control indicates that this circulation pattern preceded the Northern Hemisphere precession maximum by ~3 ka, suggesting that obliquity may have played a considerable role in the Alpine ice aggradation. PMID:25724008

  18. Reconstruction of glacial changes on HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru) from the Maximum Glacier Extent to present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about glacial area changes in the Peruvian glaciers and how responds to climate fluctuations especially in the arid region where ice masses represent the major water supply. In this research, we present the results related to glacier area, volume and minimum glacier altitude evolution from the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) to 2000 on HualcaHualca volcano (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a large andesitic stratovolcano located in the south-western Peruvian Andes approximately 70 km north-west of Arequipa. We focused the study in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) because preserved a complete and well-defined sequence of glacial deposits. Moreover, these valleys, with the exception of Mucurca, still retain ice masses relegated to active cirques on summits areas so has been possible to reconstruct glacier recent dynamics. To reconstruct former glaciers, we used frontal and lateral moraines while delimitation of recent ice masses was based on the analysis of aerial photographs (1955) as well as Landsat satellite scene (2000). Geographical Information System (GIS) allowed map and quantify with high accuracy glacier spatial parameters. The magnitude of glacial expansion was highest during MEG in Huayuray, where the glacier reached 22.7 km2 of extension and the front ice was situated at 3,650 masl, than in Pujro Huayjo (23.8 km2; 4,300 masl), Mollebaya (17.8 km2; 4,315 masl) and Mucurca (8.0 km2; 4,350 masl). The cause of this difference has been associated to the control exercised by topography. Glacier of Huayuray flowed by a steep slope while mass ices of Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca slipped to the Altiplano. In the other hand, the data from 2000 show that the intensity of deglaciation was more drastic in Mucurca, where glacier has already disappeared, than in Huayuray (1.2 km2; 5,800 masl), Pujro Huayjo (1.8 km2; 5,430 masl) or Mollebaya (0.95 km2; 5,430 masl) as a consequence of it's lesser glacier entity. Research

  19. Millenial-scale lag times in vegetation response to glacial climate in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzschuh, Ulrike; Birks, John H.; Andreev, Andrei; Melles, Martin; Brigham-Grette, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation change on all relevant temporal scales is assumed to be primarily driven by contemporary climate change, which would imply that vegetation-climate feedbacks become effective without long-term delay. However, our results from multivariate analyses of pollen assemblages from Lake Eĺgygytgyn (NE Siberia) and other data covering the Mid-Pliocene-Warm-Period and the Plio-Pleistocene-Transition challenge this concept of broad-scale vegetation-climate equilibrium. Our results indicate that interglacial vegetation during the Plio-Pleistocene transition mainly reflects the condition of the preceding glacial instead of contemporary interglacial climate. We assume that the observed vegetation-climate disequilibrium, in particular the absence of pine and spruce in interglacials following strong glacial stages, originates from the combined effects of permafrost persistence, distant glacial refugia, and fire plus possible interactions. Our results imply that today's widespread larch ecosystem on permafrost is not in climate-equilibrium but rather represents a transient vegetation type which is still responding to the extreme glacial condition of the last glacial. This also implies that feedback between vegetation and climate and between permafrost and climate in northern mid- and high latitudes becomes active with long-term delay, which is of relevance for global climate change.

  20. Paleoclimatic Reconstructions From Plant Macrofossils For The Last Glacial Maximum, Middle Holocene, And Latest Holocene In The American Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. S.; Anderson, K.; Pelltier, R.; Strickland, L. E.; Shafer, S. L.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil plant remains preserved in a variety of geologic settings provide direct evidence of where individual species lived in the past, and there are long-established methods for paleoclimatic reconstructions based on comparisons between modern and past geographic ranges of plant species. In principle, these methods use relatively straightforward procedures that frequently result in what appear to be very precise estimates of past temperature and moisture conditions. The reconstructed estimates can be mapped for specific time slices for synoptic-scale reconstructions for data-model comparisons. Although paleobotanical data can provide apparently precise estimates of past climatic conditions, it is difficult to gauge the associated uncertainties. The estimates may be affected by the choice of modern calibration data, reconstruction methods employed, and whether the climatic variable under consideration is an important determinant of the distributions of the species being considered. For time-slice reconstructions, there are also issues involving the adequacy of the spatial coverage of the fossil data and the degree of variability through time. To examine some of these issues, we estimated annual precipitation and summer and winter temperatures for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21000 × 1000 yr BP), Middle Holocene (MH, 6000 × 500 yr BP), and Latest Holocene (LH, the last 500 yrs), based on the application of four quantitative approaches to paleobotanical assemblages preserved in packrat middens in the American Southwest. Our results indicate that historic variability and difficulties in interpolating climatic values to fossil sites may impose ranges of uncertainties of more than × 1°C for temperature and × 50 mm for annual precipitation. Climatic estimates based on modern midden assemblages generally fall within these ranges, although there may be biases that differ regionally. Samples of similar age and location provide similar climatic estimates, and the four

  1. Internal diversification of mitochondrial haplogroup R0a reveals post-last glacial maximum demographic expansions in South Arabia.

    PubMed

    Cerný, Viktor; Mulligan, Connie J; Fernandes, Verónica; Silva, Nuno M; Alshamali, Farida; Non, Amy; Harich, Nourdin; Cherni, Lotfi; El Gaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Al-Meeri, Ali; Pereira, Luísa

    2011-01-01

    Widespread interest in the first successful Out of Africa dispersal of modern humans ∼60-80 thousand years ago via a southern migration route has overshadowed the study of later periods of South Arabian prehistory. In this work, we show that the post-Last Glacial Maximum period of the past 20,000 years, during which climatic conditions were becoming more hospitable, has been a significant time in the formation of the extant genetic composition and population structure of this region. This conclusion is supported by the internal diversification displayed in the highly resolved phylogenetic tree of 89 whole mitochondrial genomes (71 being newly presented here) for haplogroup R0a-the most frequent and widespread haplogroup in Arabia. Additionally, two geographically specific clades (R0a1a1a and R0a2f1) have been identified in non-Arabic speaking peoples such as the Soqotri and Mahri living in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula where a past refugium was identified by independent archaeological studies. Estimates of time to the most recent common ancestor of these lineages match the earliest archaeological evidence for seafaring activity in the peninsula in the sixth millennium BC.

  2. Ice-age Ice-sheet Rheology: Constraints from the Last Glacial Maximum Form of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. Richard; Goldsby, David L.; Kohlstedt, David L.; Tarasov, Lev

    2000-01-01

    State-ot-the-art thermomechanical models of the modern Greenland ice and the ancient Laurenticle ice sheet that covered Canada at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not able to explain simultaneously the observed forms of these cryospheric structures when the same, anisotropy-enhanced, version of the conventional Glen flow law is employed to describe their rheology. The LGM Laurenticle ice sheet. predicted to develop in response to orbital climate forcing, is such that the ratio of its thickness to its horizontal extent is extremely large compared to the aspect ratio inferred on the basis of surface-geomorphological and solid-earth-geophysical constraints. We show that if the Glen flow law representation of the rheology is replaced with a new rheology based upon very high quality laboratory measurements of the stress-strain-rate relation, then the aspect ratios of both the modern Greenland ice sheet and the Laurenticle ice sheet, that existed at the LGM, are simultaneously explained with little or no retuning of the flow law.

  3. Ancient mtDNA diversity reveals specific population development of wild horses in Switzerland after the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Julia; Hofreiter, Michael; Schibler, Jörg; Schlumbaum, Angela

    2017-01-01

    On large geographical scales, changes in animal population distribution and abundance are driven by environmental change due to climatic and anthropogenic processes. However, so far, little is known about population dynamics on a regional scale. We have investigated 92 archaeological horse remains from nine sites mainly adjacent to the Swiss Jura Mountains dating from c. 41,000-5,000 years BP. The time frame includes major environmental turning points such as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), followed by steppe vegetation, afforestation and initial re-opening of the landscape by human agricultural activities. To investigate matrilinear population dynamics, we assembled 240 base pairs of the mitochondrial d-loop. FST values indicate large genetic differentiation of the horse populations that were present during and directly after the LGM. After the retreat of the ice, a highly diverse population expanded as demonstrated by significantly negative results for Tajima's D, Fu's FS and mismatch analyses. At the same time, a different development took place in Asia where populations declined after the LGM. This first comprehensive investigation of wild horse remains on a regional scale reveals a discontinuous colonisation of succeeding populations, a pattern that diverges from the larger Eurasian trend.

  4. Models and the paleo record of biome responses to glacial climate and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice; Colin, I.; Haxeltine

    1995-06-01

    Continental-scale reconstructions of the distribution of biomes at the last glacial maximum (LGM) indicate big changes, which can primarily be explained by climate. The climate was different from today mainly because of a combination of low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases and the presence of large continental ice sheets. Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, driven by these factors and linked to simple biome models in {open_quotes}diagnostic{close_quotes} mode, account for the broad outlines of the changes in vegetation patterns, including encroachment of C4 grasslands and savannas on what are now tropical forests. Physiological effects of low CO{sub 2} might also have played a role by altering the partitioning of precipitation to evapotranspiration and runoff, and altering the competitive balance of C3 and C4 plants. Such effects have not been quantified until recently, with the development of integrated biome/biochemistry models like those used in the VEMAP project. In these models, vegetation composition affects the coupled C and H{sub 2}O fluxes, which in turn influence the competitive balance of the constituent plant types. The relative importance of climatic and physiological effects of CO{sub 2} on biome distributions is a key issue for the future. This is gives added impetus to research that aims to exploit the potential of palaeo, data, through global data synthesis projects like BIOME 6000, to provide objective benchmarks against which to test models of the biosphere and climate.

  5. Simulating the effect of glacial sea level changes on Indo-Pacific climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nezio, P. N.; Tierney, J. E.; Timmermann, A.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Mapes, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Lowered sea level during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) altered the geography of the Maritime Continent exposing the Sunda shelf. Multi-proxy evidence indicates that the exposure of the Sunda shelf has a first-order effect on the climate of the Indo-Pacific warm pool. The climate response involves changes in the Walker circulation driven by a massive reduction in atmospheric deep convection over the Sunda shelf. Few climate models participating in the Paleo Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP) are capable of simulating this response. Using the Community Earth System Model Version 1 (CESM1) we show that a models ability of to simulate this response depends on the formulation of the atmospheric deep convection scheme. Using CESM1 we also find that the Indian Ocean amplifies the response via the Bjerknes feedback. This results in a large reorganization of the climate of the Indian Ocean, which during the LGM resembles the Pacific, with a cold tongue and dry conditions in the east, and warmer SSTs and wetter conditions in the west. Ideas for testing these mechanisms using proxy data will be discussed.

  6. Range-wide genetic structure of maritime pine predates the last glacial maximum: evidence from nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Krassimir D; Alexandrov, Alexander; Matevski, Vlado; Vasilevski, Kole; Naydenov, Michel K; Gyuleva, Veselka; Carcaillet, Christopher; Wahid, Nadya; Kamary, Salim

    2014-02-01

    Using nuclear simple sequence repeats (nuSSRs), we determined the genetic variability in the natural distribution range of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) in the western Mediterranean region. We analysed the role of global and significant climatic fluctuations in driving the evolutionary diversification of this species. We attempted to determine the impact of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and human activity on genetic variation and to identify the effect of bottlenecks, admixing, migration, time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA), and recent splits. A total of 972 individuals were analysed. The sample represented 27 natural populations from the western Mediterranean region, which encompasses most of the natural range of P. pinaster. Using eight nuSSRs, we analysed genetic diversity indices for each population and group of populations. We also examined the interpopulation structure by the frequency and distance method and investigated genetic barriers, signals of historical demographic fluctuations, phylogeographic structure, admixing, rate of mutation, migration, as well as testing the hypothesis of isolation by distance (IBD). Both cluster analyses showed similar population genetic structure with three genetic barriers that divided the samples into four large groups. Intensive migration was only detected during the period of the last glacial maximum (LGM), which permitted the mutation rate of the markers used to be calculated. The majority of the population was found to exhibit signs of a recent bottleneck and its timing showed a clear northeast-southwest geographic distribution. A clearly defined phylogeographic structure (Nst > Gst and Rst > Gst ) under IBD was established, and showed the highest divergence between groups of populations separated by physical barriers, such as the Strait of Gibraltar, the Mediterranean Sea and the Pyrenees. The high level of intergroup genetic differentiation (ΦIS = 20.26) was attributed to a long historical isolation

  7. A 3000-yr annually laminated stalagmite record of the Last Glacial Maximum from Hulu Cave, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Fucai; Wu, Jiangying; Wang, Yongjin; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Kong, Xinggong; Zhang, Weihong

    2015-03-01

    A high-resolution, annual layer-counted and 230Th-dated multi-proxy record is constructed from a stalagmite in Hulu Cave, China. These proxies, including δ18O, annual layer thickness (ALT), gray level (GL) and Sr/Ca, cover a time span of ~ 3000 yr from 21 to 24 ka. The physical proxies (ALT and GL) and the geochemical index (Sr/Ca), all primarily reflecting karst hydrological processes, vary in concert and their coherence is supported by wavelet analyses. Variations in the δ18O data agree with fluctuations in the ALT and Sr/Ca records on multi-decadal to centennial scales, suggesting that the Hulu δ18O signal is strongly associated with varying local rainfall amounts on short timescales. A monsoon failure event at ~ 22.2 ka correlates with a decrease in tropical rainfall, a reduction in global CH4 and an ice-rafted event in the North Atlantic. This correlation highlights roles of the Asian monsoon and tropical hydrological cycle in modulating global CH4, because the high-latitude emission was inhibited during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Spectral analysis of the δ18O record displays peaks at periodicities of 139, 59, 53, 43, 30, 23 and 19-15 yr. The absence of typical centennial solar cycles may be related to muted changes in ocean circulation during the LGM.

  8. Paleolithic human exploitation of plant foods during the last glacial maximum in North China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Bestel, Sheahan; Shi, Jinming; Song, Yanhua; Chen, Xingcan

    2013-01-01

    Three grinding stones from Shizitan Locality 14 (ca. 23,000–19,500 calendar years before present) in the middle Yellow River region were subjected to usewear and residue analyses to investigate human adaptation during the last glacial maximum (LGM) period, when resources were generally scarce and plant foods may have become increasingly important in the human diet. The results show that these tools were used to process various plants, including Triticeae and Paniceae grasses, Vigna beans, Dioscorea opposita yam, and Trichosanthes kirilowii snakegourd roots. Tubers were important food resources for Paleolithic hunter–gatherers, and Paniceae grasses were exploited about 12,000 y before their domestication. The long tradition of intensive exploitation of certain types of flora helped Paleolithic people understand the properties of these plants, including their medicinal uses, and eventually led to the plants' domestication. This study sheds light on the deep history of the broad spectrum subsistence strategy characteristic of late Pleistocene north China before the origins of agriculture in this region. PMID:23509257

  9. Changes in North African dust deposition: 35 ka through the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsley, C. W.; McGee, D.; Winckler, G.; deMenocal, P. B.; Stuut, J. W.; Bradtmiller, L. I.

    2013-12-01

    Past changes in atmospheric circulation and aridity in the North African region can be explored by examining continuous records of reconstructed eolian dust accumulation in West African margin sediments. Recent high-resolution reconstructions of dust deposition by McGee et al. (2013) from a meridional transect of cores stretching from 27°N to 19°N along the northwest African margin indicate dramatic changes in North African dust emissions over the last 20 ka. Times of high dust emissions were documented during Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas, and lower dust emissions during the African Humid Period. Here we present a continuation of these records, combining grain size endmember modeling with 230Th-normalized fluxes in these cores to document spatial and temporal changes in dust loads and grain size distributions within the North African dust plume from 20 to ~35 ka. Our results provide quantitative estimates of the magnitude of dust flux changes associated with previous Heinrich Stadials, and lend insight to the nature of the North African dust plume through the entirety of the Last Glacial Maximum. References: McGee, D., deMenocal, P.B., Winckler, G., Stuut, J.B.W., Bradtmiller, L.I., 2013. The magnitude, timing and abruptness of changes in North African dust deposition over the last 20,000 yr. Earth And Planetary Science Letters 371-372, 163-176.

  10. Last glacial maximum environments in northwestern Patagonia revealed by fossil small mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammone, Mauro N.; Hajduk, Adan; Arias, Pablo; Teta, Pablo; Lacey, Eileen A.; Pardiñas, Ulyses F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Comparisons of historical and modern assemblages of mammals can yield important insights into patterns and processes of environmental change. Here, we present the first analyses of small mammal assemblages present in northern Patagonia during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Using remains obtained from owl pellets excavated from an archeological cave site (Arroyo Corral I, levels VII-V, carbon dates of 22,400-21,530 cal yr BP), we generate estimates of the minimum number of individuals for all species detected; these estimates, in turn are used to determine relative species abundances. Comparisons of these data with similar analyses of small mammal remains obtained from a second archeological site (ACoII, levels IV-V, carbon dates of 10,010-9220 cal yr BP) as well as from modern owl pellets reveal pronounced changes in relative species abundance since the LGM. In particular, Euneomys chinchilloides and Ctenomys sociabilis - the predominant species during the LGM - declined markedly, suggesting a change from open, bare habitat punctuated by patches of wet meadows and shrubs to the more densely vegetated mosaic of ecotone habitats found in this region today. These data provide important new insights into the environmental changes that have occurred in northern Patagonia over the last 20,000 years.

  11. Remote forcing at the Last Glacial Maximum in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, Dyke H.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Broccoli, Anthony J.

    2001-01-01

    We present results of a Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) wind stress sensitivity experiment using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model of the tropical Pacific Ocean. LGM wind stress, used to drive the ocean model, was generated using an atmospheric general circulation model simulation forced by LGM boundary conditions as part of the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) [Broccoli, 2000]. LGM wind stress anomalies were large in the western half of the basin, yet there was a significant hydrographic response in the eastern half. This ocean model experiment hind casts changes that are in close agreement with paleoceanographic data from the entire region, even without the explicit modeling of the air-sea interactions. Data and model both predict that the annual average thermocline tilt across the basin was enhanced. Data and model are consistent with a stronger equatorial undercurrent which shoaled to the west of where it does today, and stronger advection of water from the Peru Current into the east equatorial Pacific and across the equator. Paleoproductivity and sea surface temperature (SST) data are interpreted in light of the modeling results, indicating that paleoproductivity changes were related to wind-forced dynamical changes resulting from LGM boundary conditions, while SST changes were related to independent, possibly radiative, forcing. Overall, our results imply that much of the dynamic response of the tropical Pacific during the LGM can be explained by wind field changes resulting from global LGM boundary conditions.

  12. Last Glacial Maximum cirque glaciation in Ireland and implications for reconstructions of the Irish Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron M.; Clark, Peter U.; Clark, Jorie; McCabe, A. Marshall; Caffee, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Reconstructions of the extent and height of the Irish Ice Sheet (IIS) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼19-26 ka) are widely debated, in large part due to limited age constraints on former ice margins and due to uncertainties in the origin of the trimlines. A key area is southwestern Ireland, where various LGM reconstructions range from complete coverage by a contiguous IIS that extends to the continental shelf edge to a separate, more restricted southern-sourced Kerry-Cork Ice Cap (KCIC). We present new 10Be surface exposure ages from two moraines in a cirque basin in the Macgillycuddy's Reeks that provide a unique and unequivocal constraint on ice thickness for this region. Nine 10Be ages from an outer moraine yield a mean age of 24.5 ± 1.4 ka while six ages from an inner moraine yield a mean age of 20.4 ± 1.2 ka. These ages show that the northern flanks of the Macgillycuddy's Reeks were not covered by the IIS or a KCIC since at least 24.5 ± 1.4 ka. If there was more extensive ice coverage over the Macgillycuddy's Reeks during the LGM, it occurred prior to our oldest ages.

  13. Estimates of sea surface temperature in the Coral Sea at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Prell, W. L.; Barratt, N. J.

    1989-12-01

    The CLIMAP [1981] reconstruction of the Coral Sea found relatively little cooling (2°C) in the low latitudes (10°S) but a warming off Australia at about 25°S. The small low-latitude changes are of interest because terrestrial pollen and snowline data from the New Guinea highlands imply that surface temperatures may have been 6° to 9°C colder at the last glacial maximum (LGM). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate these conclusions on the basis of additional core sites, new oxygen isotope stratigraphy, and new sea surface temperature (SST) estimates using the modern analog technique (MAT). In the northern Coral Sea, planktonic foraminifer assemblages consist of tropical-subtropical species that show little change over the past 20 kyr. Quantitative estimates of SST using the modern analog technique (MAT) confirm the CLIMAP [1981] conclusion that little or no temperature change occurred in this tropical region at the LGM, thus reinforcing the conflict with terrestrial evidence. In the southern region (25°S), two cores indicate that foraminifer faunas became more subtropical at the LGM. The MAT estimates for the LGM are 3° to 4°C colder than modern, producing a steeper thermal gradient in the southern Coral Sea. These data remove the warm SST anomaly along the eastern coast of Australia and indicate that during the LGM, cool high- latitude waters were displaced northward along the coast of Australia into the southern Coral Sea.

  14. Simulation of the global bio-geophysical interactions during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubatzki, C.; Claussen, M.

    The bio-geophysical feedbacks during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21000 yBP) are investigated by use of an asynchronously coupled global atmosphere-biome model. It is found that the coupled model improves on the results of an atmosphere-only model especially for the Siberian region, where the inclusion of vegetation-snow-albedo interaction leads to a better agreement with geological reconstructions. Furthermore, it is shown that two stable solutions of the coupled model are possible under LGM boundary conditions. The presence of bright sand desert at the beginning of a simulation leads to more extensive subtropical deserts, whereas an initial global vegetation cover with forest, steppe, or dark desert results in a northward spread of vegetation of up to some 1000 km, mainly in the western Sahara. These differences can be explained in the framework of Charney's theory of a ``self-induction'' of deserts through albedo enhancement. Moreover, it is found that the tropical easterly jet is strengthened in the case of the ``green'' Sahara, which in turn leads to a modification of the Indian summer monsoon.

  15. Paleolithic human exploitation of plant foods during the last glacial maximum in North China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Bestel, Sheahan; Shi, Jinming; Song, Yanhua; Chen, Xingcan

    2013-04-02

    Three grinding stones from Shizitan Locality 14 (ca. 23,000-19,500 calendar years before present) in the middle Yellow River region were subjected to usewear and residue analyses to investigate human adaptation during the last glacial maximum (LGM) period, when resources were generally scarce and plant foods may have become increasingly important in the human diet. The results show that these tools were used to process various plants, including Triticeae and Paniceae grasses, Vigna beans, Dioscorea opposita yam, and Trichosanthes kirilowii snakegourd roots. Tubers were important food resources for Paleolithic hunter-gatherers, and Paniceae grasses were exploited about 12,000 y before their domestication. The long tradition of intensive exploitation of certain types of flora helped Paleolithic people understand the properties of these plants, including their medicinal uses, and eventually led to the plants' domestication. This study sheds light on the deep history of the broad spectrum subsistence strategy characteristic of late Pleistocene north China before the origins of agriculture in this region.

  16. Kelp genes reveal effects of subantarctic sea ice during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Nikula, Raisa; Spencer, Hamish G; Waters, Jonathan M

    2009-03-03

    The end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) dramatically reshaped temperate ecosystems, with many species moving poleward as temperatures rose and ice receded. Whereas reinvading terrestrial taxa tracked melting glaciers, marine biota recolonized ocean habitats freed by retreating sea ice. The extent of sea ice in the Southern Hemisphere during the LGM has, however, yet to be fully resolved, with most palaeogeographic studies suggesting only minimal or patchy ice cover in subantarctic waters. Here, through population genetic analyses of the widespread Southern Bull Kelp (Durvillaea antarctica), we present evidence for persistent ice scour affecting subantarctic islands during the LGM. Using mitochondrial and chloroplast genetic markers (COI; rbcL) to genetically characterize some 300 kelp samples from 45 Southern Ocean localities, we reveal a remarkable pattern of recent recolonization in the subantarctic. Specifically, in contrast to the marked phylogeographic structure observed across coastal New Zealand and Chile (10- to 100-km scales), subantarctic samples show striking genetic homogeneity over vast distances (10,000-km scales), with a single widespread haplotype observed for each marker. From these results, we suggest that sea ice expanded further and ice scour during the LGM impacted shallow-water subantarctic marine ecosystems more extensively than previously suggested.

  17. Extent and Timing of the Last Glacial Maximum in Southwestern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Daniel H.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    1994-09-01

    A glacier complex composed of confluent alpine glaciers, island ice caps, and piedmont lobes covered much of the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Island during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Because this glacier complex formed the southeastern border of Beringia, its dynamics may have been important in the timing and feasibility of the northwest coast route for human migration into lower-latitude North America. Radiocarbon dates from stratigraphic sections on Kodiak Island and in the Bristol Bay lowlands bracket the LGM in southwestern Alaska between 23,000 and 14,700 yr B.P. Reconstruction of ice thickness based on glacier trimlines, moraines, and calculations of basal-shear stress depict the Alaska Peninsula Glacier Complex flowing to the outer edge of the continental shelf in the Gulf of Alaska. Equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) were 300 to 700 m lower than today and approached sea level on the southwestern Alaska Peninsula. In northeastern areas where ELAs were higher, bedrock topography largely controlled ice flow except where ice saddles bridged straits and inlets.

  18. Kelp genes reveal effects of subantarctic sea ice during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Nikula, Raisa; Spencer, Hamish G.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    The end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) dramatically reshaped temperate ecosystems, with many species moving poleward as temperatures rose and ice receded. Whereas reinvading terrestrial taxa tracked melting glaciers, marine biota recolonized ocean habitats freed by retreating sea ice. The extent of sea ice in the Southern Hemisphere during the LGM has, however, yet to be fully resolved, with most palaeogeographic studies suggesting only minimal or patchy ice cover in subantarctic waters. Here, through population genetic analyses of the widespread Southern Bull Kelp (Durvillaea antarctica), we present evidence for persistent ice scour affecting subantarctic islands during the LGM. Using mitochondrial and chloroplast genetic markers (COI; rbcL) to genetically characterize some 300 kelp samples from 45 Southern Ocean localities, we reveal a remarkable pattern of recent recolonization in the subantarctic. Specifically, in contrast to the marked phylogeographic structure observed across coastal New Zealand and Chile (10- to 100-km scales), subantarctic samples show striking genetic homogeneity over vast distances (10,000-km scales), with a single widespread haplotype observed for each marker. From these results, we suggest that sea ice expanded further and ice scour during the LGM impacted shallow-water subantarctic marine ecosystems more extensively than previously suggested. PMID:19204277

  19. Indo-Pacific Warm Pool variability during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Holbourn, Ann; Regenberg, Marcus; Andersen, Nils

    We measured oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca ratios in the surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (white s.s.) and the thermocline dweller Pulleniatina obliquiloculata to investigate upper ocean spatial variability in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP). We focused on three critical time intervals: the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 18-21.5 ka), the early Holocene (8-9 ka), and the late Holocene (0-2 ka). Our records from 24 stations in the South China Sea, Timor Sea, Indonesian seas, and western Pacific indicate overall dry and cool conditions in the IPWP during the LGM with a low thermal gradient between surface and thermocline waters. During the early Holocene, sea surface temperatures increased by ˜3°C over the entire region, indicating intensification of the IPWP. However, in the eastern Indian Ocean (Timor Sea), the thermocline gradually shoaled from the LGM to early Holocene, reflecting intensification of the subsurface Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Increased surface salinity in the South China Sea during the Holocene appears related to northward displacement of the monsoonal rain belt over the Asian continent together with enhanced influx of saltier Pacific surface water through the Luzon Strait and freshwater export through the Java Sea. Opening of the freshwater portal through the Java Sea in the early Holocene led to a change in the vertical structure of the ITF from surface- to thermocline-dominated flow and to substantial freshening of Timor Sea thermocline waters.

  20. Across-shelf sediment transport since the Last Glacial Maximum, southern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C.K.; Lee, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation of continental shelf-slope stratigraphy in Santa Monica Bay (southern California) with Ocean Drilling Program records for nearby slope-basin sites has illuminated the timing and scale of terrigenous sediment dispersal on margin since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Marine flooding surfaces preserved in a transgressive sequence on the Santa Monica Shelf provide a key link between base-level elevation and sediment transport across shelf. Sediment-accumulation rates at slope-basin sites were maximal ca. 15-10 ka, well after the LGM, decreased during the 12-9 ka transition from fluvial-estuarine to fully marine conditions on the shelf, and decelerated throughout the Holocene to 30%-75% of their values at the LGM. The deceleration is interpreted to manifest a landward shift in the margin depocenter with the onset of transgressive sedimentation beginning when sea level surmounted the shelf edge ca. 13 ka, as predicted by sequence-stratigraphic models. However, the records make clear that factors other than base level modulated slope-basin accumulation rates during the deglaciation. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  1. The vegetation and climate during the Last Glacial Cold Period, northern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, S. Louise; Newnham, Rewi M.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Smith, Carol

    2013-08-01

    Pollen assemblages from Howard Valley, South Island, New Zealand, were used to reconstruct the palaeovegetation and infer past climate during the period ca 38-21 cal. ka, which encompasses the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3/2 transition and Last Glacial Cold Period (LGCP). A glacier occupied the upper Howard Valley during the Last Glacial, whilst extensive glaciofluvial outwash surfaces were constructed in the lower valley. Episodic periods of fluvial aggradation and incision have produced a complex sequence of terraces flanking the main Howard River and its tributaries. Sedimentary sequences from three exposed valley fills, sampled for palynological analysis and radiocarbon dating, consist of a complex vertical and lateral arrangement of coarse textured cobbly sandy gravels interbedded with organic-rich silt deposits. Palynology of these organic-rich horizons was directly compared to an existing beetle record from these same horizons. During late MIS 3 the site was dominated by marshy shrubland vegetation interspersed with mixed beech forest, indicating temperatures ˜2-3 °C cooler than present. Climate cooling began as early as 35.7 cal. ka and coincides with evidence of cooling from other sites in New Zealand, South America and with an Antarctic cooling signature. A three phase vegetation and inferred climate pattern occurs at the site during the LGCP beginning with a transition to an alpine/sub-alpine grassland comparable to communities growing near treeline today marking the change to glacial conditions before 31 cal. ka. A small increase in tree abundance between ca 25.8 and 22.7 cal. ka suggests minor climate amelioration during the mid-LGCP. During this phase, a possible volcanically induced vegetation disruption caused by the deposition of the Kawakawa Tephra at 25 cal. ka is evident in the pollen record. This is followed by a further decline in tree pollen and increase in alpine grassland and herb pollen indicating further deterioration of conditions and a

  2. Sea level and global ice volumes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Lambeck, Kurt; Rouby, Hélène; Purcell, Anthony; Sun, Yiying; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2014-10-28

    The major cause of sea-level change during ice ages is the exchange of water between ice and ocean and the planet's dynamic response to the changing surface load. Inversion of ∼1,000 observations for the past 35,000 y from localities far from former ice margins has provided new constraints on the fluctuation of ice volume in this interval. Key results are: (i) a rapid final fall in global sea level of ∼40 m in <2,000 y at the onset of the glacial maximum ∼30,000 y before present (30 ka BP); (ii) a slow fall to -134 m from 29 to 21 ka BP with a maximum grounded ice volume of ∼52 × 10(6) km(3) greater than today; (iii) after an initial short duration rapid rise and a short interval of near-constant sea level, the main phase of deglaciation occurred from ∼16.5 ka BP to ∼8.2 ka BP at an average rate of rise of 12 m⋅ka(-1) punctuated by periods of greater, particularly at 14.5-14.0 ka BP at ≥40 mm⋅y(-1) (MWP-1A), and lesser, from 12.5 to 11.5 ka BP (Younger Dryas), rates; (iv) no evidence for a global MWP-1B event at ∼11.3 ka BP; and (v) a progressive decrease in the rate of rise from 8.2 ka to ∼2.5 ka BP, after which ocean volumes remained nearly constant until the renewed sea-level rise at 100-150 y ago, with no evidence of oscillations exceeding ∼15-20 cm in time intervals ≥200 y from 6 to 0.15 ka BP.

  3. Sea level and global ice volumes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Lambeck, Kurt; Rouby, Hélène; Purcell, Anthony; Sun, Yiying; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The major cause of sea-level change during ice ages is the exchange of water between ice and ocean and the planet’s dynamic response to the changing surface load. Inversion of ∼1,000 observations for the past 35,000 y from localities far from former ice margins has provided new constraints on the fluctuation of ice volume in this interval. Key results are: (i) a rapid final fall in global sea level of ∼40 m in <2,000 y at the onset of the glacial maximum ∼30,000 y before present (30 ka BP); (ii) a slow fall to −134 m from 29 to 21 ka BP with a maximum grounded ice volume of ∼52 × 106 km3 greater than today; (iii) after an initial short duration rapid rise and a short interval of near-constant sea level, the main phase of deglaciation occurred from ∼16.5 ka BP to ∼8.2 ka BP at an average rate of rise of 12 m⋅ka−1 punctuated by periods of greater, particularly at 14.5–14.0 ka BP at ≥40 mm⋅y−1 (MWP-1A), and lesser, from 12.5 to 11.5 ka BP (Younger Dryas), rates; (iv) no evidence for a global MWP-1B event at ∼11.3 ka BP; and (v) a progressive decrease in the rate of rise from 8.2 ka to ∼2.5 ka BP, after which ocean volumes remained nearly constant until the renewed sea-level rise at 100–150 y ago, with no evidence of oscillations exceeding ∼15–20 cm in time intervals ≥200 y from 6 to 0.15 ka BP. PMID:25313072

  4. Antarctic sea ice control on ocean circulation in present and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Jansen, Malte F; Adkins, Jess F; Burke, Andrea; Stewart, Andrew L; Thompson, Andrew F

    2014-06-17

    In the modern climate, the ocean below 2 km is mainly filled by waters sinking into the abyss around Antarctica and in the North Atlantic. Paleoproxies indicate that waters of North Atlantic origin were instead absent below 2 km at the Last Glacial Maximum, resulting in an expansion of the volume occupied by Antarctic origin waters. In this study we show that this rearrangement of deep water masses is dynamically linked to the expansion of summer sea ice around Antarctica. A simple theory further suggests that these deep waters only came to the surface under sea ice, which insulated them from atmospheric forcing, and were weakly mixed with overlying waters, thus being able to store carbon for long times. This unappreciated link between the expansion of sea ice and the appearance of a voluminous and insulated water mass may help quantify the ocean's role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide on glacial-interglacial timescales. Previous studies pointed to many independent changes in ocean physics to account for the observed swings in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here it is shown that many of these changes are dynamically linked and therefore must co-occur.

  5. Satsurblia: new insights of human response and survival across the Last Glacial Maximum in the southern Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Pinhasi, Ron; Meshveliani, Tengiz; Matskevich, Zinovi; Bar-Oz, Guy; Weissbrod, Lior; Miller, Christopher E; Wilkinson, Keith; Lordkipanidze, David; Jakeli, Nino; Kvavadze, Eliso; Higham, Thomas F G; Belfer-Cohen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The region of western Georgia (Imereti) has been a major geographic corridor for human migrations during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic (MP/UP). Knowledge of the MP and UP in this region, however, stems mostly from a small number of recent excavations at the sites of Ortvale Klde, Dzudzuana, Bondi, and Kotias Klde. These provide an absolute chronology for the Late MP and MP-UP transition, but only a partial perspective on the nature and timing of UP occupations, and limited data on how human groups in this region responded to the harsh climatic oscillations between 37,000-11,500 years before present. Here we report new UP archaeological sequences from fieldwork in Satsurblia cavein the same region. A series of living surfaces with combustion features, faunal remains, stone and bone tools, and ornaments provide new information about human occupations in this region (a) prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 25.5-24.4 ka cal. BP and (b) after the LGM at 17.9-16.2 ka cal. BP. The latter provides new evidence in the southern Caucasus for human occupation immediately after the LGM. The results of the campaigns in Satsurblia and Dzudzuana suggest that at present the most plausible scenario is one of a hiatus in the occupation of this region during the LGM (between 24.4-17.9 ka cal. BP). Analysis of the living surfaces at Satsurblia offers information about human activities such as the production and utilisation of lithics and bone tools, butchering, cooking and consumption of meat and wild cereals, the utilisation of fibers, and the use of certain woods. Microfaunal and palynological analyses point to fluctuations in the climate with consequent shifts in vegetation and the faunal spectrum not only before and after the LGM, but also during the two millennia following the end of the LGM.

  6. Satsurblia: New Insights of Human Response and Survival across the Last Glacial Maximum in the Southern Caucasus

    PubMed Central

    Pinhasi, Ron; Meshveliani, Tengiz; Matskevich, Zinovi; Bar-Oz, Guy; Weissbrod, Lior; Miller, Christopher E.; Wilkinson, Keith; Lordkipanidze, David; Jakeli, Nino; Kvavadze, Eliso; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Belfer-Cohen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The region of western Georgia (Imereti) has been a major geographic corridor for human migrations during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic (MP/UP). Knowledge of the MP and UP in this region, however, stems mostly from a small number of recent excavations at the sites of Ortvale Klde, Dzudzuana, Bondi, and Kotias Klde. These provide an absolute chronology for the Late MP and MP–UP transition, but only a partial perspective on the nature and timing of UP occupations, and limited data on how human groups in this region responded to the harsh climatic oscillations between 37,000–11,500 years before present. Here we report new UP archaeological sequences from fieldwork in Satsurblia cavein the same region. A series of living surfaces with combustion features, faunal remains, stone and bone tools, and ornaments provide new information about human occupations in this region (a) prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 25.5–24.4 ka cal. BP and (b) after the LGM at 17.9–16.2 ka cal. BP. The latter provides new evidence in the southern Caucasus for human occupation immediately after the LGM. The results of the campaigns in Satsurblia and Dzudzuana suggest that at present the most plausible scenario is one of a hiatus in the occupation of this region during the LGM (between 24.4–17.9 ka cal. BP). Analysis of the living surfaces at Satsurblia offers information about human activities such as the production and utilisation of lithics and bone tools, butchering, cooking and consumption of meat and wild cereals, the utilisation of fibers, and the use of certain woods. Microfaunal and palynological analyses point to fluctuations in the climate with consequent shifts in vegetation and the faunal spectrum not only before and after the LGM, but also during the two millennia following the end of the LGM. PMID:25354048

  7. Subglacial Calcites from Northern Victoria Land: archive of Antarctic volcanism in the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisia, Silvia; Weirich, Laura; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Barbante, Carlo; Cooper, Alan

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial carbonates bear similarities to stalagmites in their fabrics and the potential to obtain precise chronologies using U-series methods. Their chemical properties also reflect those of their parent waters, which, in contrast to stalagmites, are those of subglacial meltwaters. In analogy to speleothems, stable Carbon isotope ratios and trace elements such as Uranium, Iron and Manganese provide the opportunity to investigate ancient extreme environments without the need to drill through thousands of metres of ice. Sedimentological, geochemical and microbial evidence preserved in LGM subglacial calcites from Northern Victoria Land, close to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet margin, allow us to infer that subglacial volcanism was active in the Trans Antarctic Mountain region and induced basal ice melting. We hypothesize that a meltwater reservoir was drained and injected into interconnected basal pore systems where microbial processes enhanced bedrock weathering and, thus, released micronutrients. Volcanic influence is supported by the presence of fluorine (F) and sulphur in sediment-laden calcite layers containing termophilic species. Notably, calcite δ13C points to dissolved inorganic carbon evolved from subglacial metabolic processes. Once transported to the sea, soluble iron likely contributed to fertilizing the Southern Ocean and CO2 drawdown. This is the first well-dated evidence for LGM volcanism in Antarctica, which complements the record of volcanic eruptions retrieved from Talos Dome ice core, and supports the hypothesis of large-scale volcanism as an important driver of climate change. We conclude that subglacial carbonates are equivalent to speleothems in their palaeoclimate potential and may become a most useful source of information of ecosystems and processes at peak glacials in high altitude/high latitude settings.

  8. A Reconstruction of Temperature and δ18O Data Since the Last Glacial Maximum Using Soil and Gastropods from the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunaga, B.; Mering, J. A.; Eagle, R.; Bricker, H. L.; Davila, N.; Trewman, S.; Burford, S.; Li, G.; Tripati, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The climate of the Chinese Loess Plateau is affected by the East Asian Monsoon, an important water source for over a billion people. We are examining how temperature and hydrology on the Loess Plateau has changed since the Last Glacial Maximum (18,000 - 23,000 years before the present) in response to insolation, deglaciation, and rising levels of greenhouse gases. Specifically, we are reconstructing temperature and meteoric δ18O through paired clumped and oxygen isotope analyses performed on carbonate minerals. Clumped isotope thermometry—the use of 13C—18O bond frequency in carbonates—is a novel geochemical proxy that provides constraints on mineral formation temperatures and can be combined with carbonate δ18O to quantify meteoric δ18O. We have measured a suite of nodular loess concretions and gastropod shells from the modern as well as the Last Glacial Maximum from 15 sites across the Chinese Loess Plateau. These observations constrain spatial variations in temperature and precipitation, which in turn will provide key constraints on models that simulate changes in regional climates and monsoon intensity over the last 20,000 years.

  9. Rapid climate and environmental changes in the western Iberian Peninsula since the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etourneau, Johan; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Sujin; Oliveira, Dulce; Gal, Jong-Ku; Choi, Bohyung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Penaud, Aurélie; Fernanda Sanchez Goni, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Waters (MOW) affect density structure of the North Atlantic current, thereby altering the Atlantic Meridional Overturning circulation and thus global climate. Previous studies on southwestern European margin sequences have demonstrated their capability to reconstruct past changes in atmospheric and oceanic conditions at orbital and millennial time scales. However, the detailed evolution of the climate and environmental variability during the last climatic transition, especially during the last major abrupt climate events (e.g. the Dansgaard-Oeschger, Heinrich and 8.2 kyr events), is not well documented. Furthermore, the potential impact of changes in the Mediterranean Outflow Waters (MOW) on the North Atlantic and climate are far from being understood. Here we scrutinize changes in MOW over the last 25 kyrs by investigating sediment core MD99-2339 (35.89°N, 7.53°W, 1170 m water depth) collected in the Gulf of Cadiz. We analyzed alkenones (UK'37) to gain information on the sea surface temperatures. We also analyzed n-alkanes and their associated carbon (d13C) isotopes that we combined to pollen assemblages to reconstruct vegetation and humidity changes. We find that the cold alkenone-derived SST periods (Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Younger Dryas (YD) and Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1)) might be associated to a regional increase in the upwelling activity driven by stronger coastal off-shore winds that supply this area by cold deep waters. Stronger upwelling intensity may be linked to a greater export of MOW. In comparison, the d13C n-alkanes indicate drier conditions during HS1 and YD, and wetter conditions during the LGM and Holocene, which is opposite to the recorded precipitation signal by pollen assemblages. This inverse relationship suggest an opposite trend in seasonal precipitation (summer vs winter) which might imply a distinct forcing since the last glacial period. Alternatively, the signals of d13C n-alkanes might

  10. Millennial climatic fluctuations are key to the structure of last glacial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Brian; Allen, Judy R M; Collingham, Yvonne C; Hickler, Thomas; Lister, Adrian M; Singarayer, Joy; Stuart, Anthony J; Sykes, Martin T; Valdes, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Whereas fossil evidence indicates extensive treeless vegetation and diverse grazing megafauna in Europe and northern Asia during the last glacial, experiments combining vegetation models and climate models have to-date simulated widespread persistence of trees. Resolving this conflict is key to understanding both last glacial ecosystems and extinction of most of the mega-herbivores. Using a dynamic vegetation model (DVM) we explored the implications of the differing climatic conditions generated by a general circulation model (GCM) in "normal" and "hosing" experiments. Whilst the former approximate interstadial conditions, the latter, designed to mimic Heinrich Events, approximate stadial conditions. The "hosing" experiments gave simulated European vegetation much closer in composition to that inferred from fossil evidence than did the "normal" experiments. Given the short duration of interstadials, and the rate at which forest cover expanded during the late-glacial and early Holocene, our results demonstrate the importance of millennial variability in determining the character of last glacial ecosystems.

  11. Last Glacial - Holocene climate variability in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenshen; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a major role in the glacial/interglacial global carbon cycle. However, there is a substantial lack of information from its Antarctic Zone south of the Polar Front (PF) to understand key climate processes (e.g., sea ice variability, productivity changes, CO2 source region, shifts of the Southern Westerly Wind) active in this region during the glacial/interglacial transition, due to the limited high-resolution sediment records from this area. To close this gap, we investigated high resolution diatom records from a series of sediment cores from the Atlantic and Western Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean between the modern PF and the Winter Sea Ice (WSI) edge. Summer Sea Surface Temperature (SSST) and sea ice information spanning the past 30 thousand years were derived from diatom transfer functions and indicators, which augment comprehensive information on past surface ocean conditions and related ocean and atmospheric circulation, as well as opal deposition. These complementary lines of evidences also provide important environmental boundary conditions for climate simulations understanding the past climate development in the high latitudes Southern Ocean. Our reconstructions show that the Last Glacial (LG) SSSTs south of the modern PF are 1-3 °C colder than modern conditions, WSI expanded to the modern PF. Our data suggests effective carbon export in the Antarctic Zone during the LG. Deglacial two steps of warming support the bipolar seesaw mechanism. Antarctic Zone is an important source region for the CO2 deglacial increase. The warming was more suppressed towards south, due to continuous ice discharge from Antarctica. The SSSTs exceeded modern values during the early Holocene optimum, when WSI extent probably retreated south of its modern position. The southern boundary of maximum opal deposition zone may have shifted to south of 55°S in the Bouvet Island area at this time. The mid-late Holocene cooling with WSI re-expanding to the

  12. Simulating the response of glacial ice-sheets to past abrupt climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, Rubén; Álvarez-Solas, Jorge; Robinson, Alexander; Montoya, Marisa

    2016-04-01

    Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) events were recurrent glacial abrupt climatic transitions between cold and warm conditions over Greenland with an approximate characteristic time of a thousand years. The uncertainties among the available sea level reconstructions hinder our understanding of the interactions between climate and global ice volume. In addition, only limited highly-resolved and continuous sea level records exist. Thus, the millennial time-scale response of glacial ice-sheets to past abrupt climate changes is not well known. Here, we use a hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf model in order to investigate the response of glacial ice-sheets to the influence of millennial-scale climate variability. An ensemble of simulations is performed by forcing the model with a wide range of time-varying climatologies derived from proxy data and from some of the currently available climate model simulations. The assessment of the resulting suite of transient simulations will contribute to constrain the inadequacies of sea level reconstructions in terms of amplitude and timing and will help to understand the implications of glacial abrupt climate changes in past sea level variability. Furthermore, our experiments could be useful to elucidate the mechanisms that involve the interactions between climate and ice sheets on millennial time scales, including future climate change.

  13. Dynamics of the last glacial maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Nicholas R; Fogwill, Christopher J; Mackintosh, Andrew N; Buckley, Kevin M

    2012-10-02

    Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level propagated from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) as northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however, despite the growing recognition that dynamic effects account for a sizeable proportion of mass-balance changes observed in modern ice sheets. Here we use a 5-km resolution whole-continent numerical ice-sheet model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We first simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet, using pan-Antarctic terrestrial and marine geological data for constraint, then perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. Our results identify that fast-flowing glaciers in the eastern Weddell Sea, the Amundsen Sea, central Ross Sea, and in the Amery Trough respond most rapidly to ocean forcings, in agreement with empirical data. Most significantly, we find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about mainly localized glacier acceleration, concomitant drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments-a discovery that has important ramifications for the dynamic changes presently being observed in modern ice sheets.

  14. Patterns of hydroclimatic change in the Rocky Mountains and surrounding regions since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Bryan N.; Serravezza, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The paleohydrologic record of western North America since the last glacial maximum reveals a wide range of hydroclimatic variability in time and space. To improve the understanding of abrupt hydroclimatic shifts and millennial-scale hydrologic changes in the central Rocky Mountains, we reconstruct the lake-level histories of two small lakes in the Beartooth and Bighorn Mountains in northern Wyoming over the past 17 ka. To do so, we use ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and sediment cores to track the elevations of shoreline sediments within the lakes through time. We compare the stratigraphies with those from four other lakes in Wyoming and Colorado, and find widespread evidence for a Terminal Pleistocene Drought from 15 to 11 ka, an early Holocene humid period from 11 to 8 ka, and mid-Holocene aridity from 8 to 5.5 ka. The northern Wyoming lakes also provide evidence of high levels in the Pleistocene, possibly before ca. 15 ka, and rapid hydroclimatic changes that may have correlated with Heinrich Event 1 (ca. 16.8 ka). We place the changes in a broad context by summarizing and mapping water-level changes from 107 additional, previously studied lakes. Important patterns include 1) extensive drying across the western U.S. after 15 ka; 2) sub-regional differences during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition; 3) a north-south contrast from 9 to 6 ka consistent with a northward shift in storm tracks as the influence of the Laurentide Ice Sheet diminished; and 4) rapid increases in effective moisture across much of western North America from 6 to 4 ka.

  15. Shoreline reconstructions for the Persian Gulf since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, Kurt

    1996-07-01

    Sea-level change in the Persian Gulf since the time of the last maximum glaciation at about 18 000 yr BP is predicted to exhibit considerable spatial variability, because of the response of the Earth to glacial unloading of the distant ice sheets and to the meltwater loading of the Gulf itself and the adjacent ocean. Models for these glacio-hydro-isostatic effects have been compared with observations of sea-level change and palaeoshoreline reconstructions of the Gulf have been made. From the peak of the glaciation until about 14 000 yr BP the Gulf is free of marine influence out to the edge of the Biaban Shelf. By 14 000 yr BP the Strait of Hormuz had opened up as a narrow waterway and by about 12 500 years ago the marine incursion into the Central Basin had started. The Western Basin flooded about 1000 years later. Momentary stillstands may have occurred during the Gulf flooding phase at about 11 300 and 10 500 yr BP. The present shorelines was reached shortly before 6000 yr ago and exceeded as relative sea level rose 1-2 m above its present level, inundating the low-lying areas of lower Mesopotamia. These reconstructions have implications for models of the evolution of the Euphrates-Tigris-Karun delta, as well as for the movements of people and the timing of the earliest settlements in lower Mesopotamia. For example, the early Gulf floor would have provided a natural route for people moving westwards from regions to the east of Iran from the late Palaeolithic to early Neolithic.

  16. Dynamics of the last glacial maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, Nicholas R.; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Buckley, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level propagated from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) as northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however, despite the growing recognition that dynamic effects account for a sizeable proportion of mass-balance changes observed in modern ice sheets. Here we use a 5-km resolution whole-continent numerical ice-sheet model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We first simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet, using pan-Antarctic terrestrial and marine geological data for constraint, then perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. Our results identify that fast-flowing glaciers in the eastern Weddell Sea, the Amundsen Sea, central Ross Sea, and in the Amery Trough respond most rapidly to ocean forcings, in agreement with empirical data. Most significantly, we find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about mainly localized glacier acceleration, concomitant drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments—a discovery that has important ramifications for the dynamic changes presently being observed in modern ice sheets. PMID:22988078

  17. Surface Velocities of Himalayan Glaciers: Implications for Glacial Erosion Potential During Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mountain glaciers in the high elevations (> 3.5 km) of the Himalaya are very efficient erosion agents. Glacier size and thus the area affected by glacial erosion are controlled by climatic conditions. Understanding the impact of climate change and variability on glacial budgets and erosion requires knowledge of the erosive potential of glaciers, which is inferred to scale with ice flux. Here, we use ASTER satellite imagery in combination with the orthorectification and correlation tool COSI-Corr to derive horizontal surface velocities of glaciers from several regions across the Himalayan-Karakoram domain. Our results show that glaciers in the Eastern and Central Himalaya, where precipitation is mainly supplied by the Indian Summer Monsoon, are relatively slow, with velocities usually below 50-60 m/a. In contrast, glaciers in the Western Himalaya and Karakoram, receive a significant amount of precipitation during the winter months and are considerably faster with velocities often exceeding 80-100 m/a. This discrepancy is visible among glaciers of different size and orientation although local slope and catchment area effects may cause velocity excursions. A relatively sharp gradient appears to exist in the catchment area of the Sutlej River in the NW Himalaya of India at approximately 79°E. To the east, glaciers in the Garhwal Himalaya - among them Gangotri glacier, the largest in the Indian Himalaya - have mean velocities of around 20-40 m/a, whereas glaciers in the much drier Lahul region to the west attain mean velocities of around 30-60 m/a. Importantly, the Sutlej River valley marks a climatic transition zone from an annual summer-rainfall maximum (more than 75% of annual rainfall during the summer) to the east to a winter-rainfall maximum (more than 60% of annual rainfall during the winter) to the west. These observations corroborate the notion of a significant climatic boundary in this part of the Himalaya, which may have shifted west- and northward during

  18. Paleosecular variations of geomagnetic field from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene in the north of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    The high-resolution geomagnetic field records from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene, which possessed of a notable climate change, were scarce in the global area. In this abstract, two gravity piston cores ZSQD2 (114.16oE, 19.58oN, ~190 cm in length, water depth 681m) and ZSQD34 (114.74oE, 19.05oN, ~184 cm in length, water depth 1820 m), situated in the north of South China Sea, were selected to study the secular variations of geomagnetic field in this area. Radiocarbon ages of G.sacculifer suggest that the deposition rate varied with 56.1 cm/kyr and 3.7 cm/kyr during the Last Glacial and the Holocene, respectively. Rock magnetic results indicate that the pseudo-single domain magnetite with low coercivity dominate the properties of sediments. The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) values are evaluated using the 5-8 AF steps when MAD values are generally <5. Constrained by the radiocarbon chronology, the secular variation curves since ~18 cal. kyr can be constructed using the ChRM directions and NRM/ARM ratios (as a proxy of relative intensity). Comparing the Holocene SV with that from terrestrial lakes in Southern China, similar shape corroborates the reliability of records and uniform pattern of non-dipole magnetic field. Two significant features on SV curves present the geomagnetic field characteristics from ~17 cal. kyr to the early Holocene. One is that the direction variations lag behind the relative intensity on the millennium time scale. Such as a major direction shift occurred around 13 cal. kyr while the relative intensity low was about 14 cal. kyr. Another feature is the fast and frequent wiggles both in direction and intensity between ~17 to ~14.5 cal. kyr. During this period, two significant negative inclination anomalies occurred at ~16.4 and ~15.4 cal. kyr associated with low intensity, respectively. Nevertheless, the corresponding declinations did not show the reversed features although they had also some slight fluctuations. The

  19. Climate vs. carbon dioxide controls on biomass burning: a model analysis of the glacial-interglacial contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. Martin; Prentice, I. C.; Harrison, S. P.

    2014-02-01

    Climate controls fire regimes through its influence on the amount and types of fuel present and their dryness; CO2 availability, in turn, constrains primary production by limiting photosynthetic activity in plants. However, although fuel accumulation depends on biomass production, and hence CO2 availability, the links between atmospheric CO2 and biomass burning are not well known. Here a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model (the Land surface Processes and eXchanges model, LPX) is used to attribute glacial-interglacial changes in biomass burning to CO2 increase, which would be expected to increase primary production and therefore fuel loads even in the absence of climate change, vs. climate change effects. Four general circulation models provided Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate anomalies - that is, differences from the pre-industrial (PI) control climate - from the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase 2, allowing the construction of four scenarios for LGM climate. Modelled carbon fluxes in biomass burning were corrected for the model's observed biases in contemporary biome-average values. With LGM climate and low CO2 (185 ppm) effects included, the modelled global flux was 70 to 80% lower at the LGM than in PI time. LGM climate with pre-industrial CO2 (280 ppm) however yielded unrealistic results, with global and Northern Hemisphere biomass burning fluxes greater than in the pre-industrial climate. Using the PI CO2 concentration increased the modelled LGM biomass burning fluxes for all climate models and latitudinal bands to between four and ten times their values under LGM CO2 concentration. It is inferred that a substantial part of the increase in biomass burning after the LGM must be attributed to the effect of increasing CO2 concentration on productivity and fuel load. Today, by analogy, both rising CO2 and global warming must be considered as risk factors for increasing biomass burning. Both effects need to be included in models to

  20. Paleoglacier reconstruction of the central massif of Gredos range during Last Glacial Maximum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Néstor; Tanarro, Luis Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The accurate reconstruction of paleoglaciers require a well determined extent and morphology of them, one of the main problems is the absence of glacial geomorphic evidences which made possible the delimitation of the ice limits, for this reason physical-based models are useful for ice surface reconstruction in areas where geomorphological information is incomplete. A paleoglacier reconstruction during its maximum extension is presented for a high mountain area of the western part of the central massif of Gredos range, in the center of Iberian Peninsula, this area is located 30 km west of Almanzor (40˚ 14' 48? N; 5˚ 17' 52? W; 2596 m a.s.l.), the highest peak of Iberian Central System (ICS) and covers five gorges: La Nava, Taheña- Honda, La Vega, San Martín and Los Infiernos, the first three facing North, San Martin facing Northwest and Los Infiernos facing West. Despite the existence of some works analyzing the extension of paleoglaciers in the ICS during its maximum extension, there is still a need to improve the understanding of this zone, to provide a more detailed knowlegde of the evolution of the range and to know more in detail the full extent of paleoglaciers in this area. For delimitate the glaciated area the most distant frontal moraines with a larger geomorphological entity that indicates a great advance or a prolonged stay and stabilization which would presumably correspond with the maximum advance of the glaciers have been mapped, for that, photo interpretation of digital aerial photographs (25 cm resolution) has been done, in some areas where the location or limits of the moraines were not clear 3D images were used, all the work was complemented with detailed field surveys. Once the ice limits have been determined is necessary to estimate the topography of the paleoglaciers, for that purpose a simple steady-state models that assume a perfectly plastic ice rheology have been used, reconstructing the theoretical ice profiles and obtaining the extent

  1. Rapid Expansion of Glacial Lakes Caused by Climate and Glacier Retreat in the Central Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.

    2016-12-01

    Glacial lake outburst floods are among the most serious natural hazards in the Himalayas. Such floods are of high scientific and political importance because they exert trans-boundary impacts on bordering countries. The preparation of an updated inventory of glacial lakes and the analysis of their evolution are an important first step in assessment of hazards from glacial lake outbursts. Here, we report the spatiotemporal developments of the glacial lakes in the Poiqu River basin, a trans-boundary basin in the Central Himalayas, from 1976 to 2010 based on multi-temporal Landsat images. Studied glacial lakes are classified as glacierfed lakes and non-glacier-fed lakes according to their hydrologic connection to glacial watersheds. A total of 119 glacial lakes larger than 0.01 km2 with an overall surface area of 20.22 km2 (±10.8%) were mapped in 2010, with glacier-fed lakes being predominant in both number (69, 58.0%) and area (16.22 km2, 80.2%). We found that lakes connected to glacial watersheds (glacier-fed lakes) significantly expanded (122.1%) from 1976 to 2010, whereas lakes not connected to glacial watersheds (non-glacier-fed lakes) remained stable (+2.8%) during the same period. This contrast can be attributed to the impact of glaciers. Retreating glaciers not only supply meltwater to lakes but also leave space for them to expand. Compared with other regions of the Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH), the lake area per glacier area in the Poiqu River basin was the highest. This observation might be attributed to the different climate regimes and glacier status along the HKH. The results presented in this study confirm the significant role of glacier retreat on the evolution of glacial lakes.

  2. Oxygen isotopic composition of the Mediterranean Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum: constraints from pore water analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Hilary A.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Schmid, Daniel W.; McKenzie, Judith A.

    2001-09-01

    Interstitial waters recovered from Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 161, site 976 in the western Mediterranean Sea are used in conjunction with a numerical model to constrain the δ 18O of seawater in the basin since the Last Glacial Maximum, including Sapropel Event 1. To resolve the oxygen isotopic composition of the deep Mediterranean, we use a model that couples fluid diffusion with advective transport, thus producing a profile of seawater δ 18O variability that is unaffected by glacial-interglacial variations in marine temperature. Comparing our reconstructed seawater δ 18O to recent determinations of 1.0‰ for the mean ocean change in glacial-interglacial δ 18O due to the expansion of global ice volume, we calculate an additional 0.2‰ increase in Mediterranean δ 18O caused by local evaporative enrichment. This estimate of δ 18O change, due to salinity variability, is smaller than previous studies have proposed and demonstrates that Mediterranean records of foraminiferal calcite δ 18O from the last glacial period include a strong temperature component. Paleotemperatures determined in combination with a stacked record of foraminiferal calcite depict almost 9°C of regional cooling for the Last Glacial Maximum. Model results suggest a decrease of ˜1.1‰ in seawater δ 18O relative to the modern value caused by increased freshwater input and reduced salinity accompanying the formation of the most recent sapropel. The results additionally indicate the existence of isotopically light water circulating down to bottom water depths, at least in the western Mediterranean, supporting the existence of an 'anti-estuarine' thermohaline circulation pattern during Sapropel Event 1.

  3. Late glacial climate estimates for southern Nevada: The ostracode fossil record

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, R.M.; Smith, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    Climate change plays an important role in determining as possible long term hydrological performance of the potential high level nuclear waste repository within Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Present-day global circulation results in this region having an arid to semi-arid climate characterized by hot and relatively dry summers. Global circulation during the late glacial (about 14 to 20 ka) was very different from the present-day. Preliminary study of late-glacial fossil ostracodes from {open_quotes}marsh deposits{close_quotes} in the upper Las Vegas Valley suggests mean annual precipitation may have been four times higher, while mean annual temperature may have been about 10{degrees}C cooler than today. A major difference between present-day and late-glacial climate was likely the existence of cooler, cloudier, and wetter summers in the past.

  4. Abrupt lake-level changes in the Rocky Mountains and surrounding regions since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, B. N.; Serravezza, M.

    2016-12-01

    The paleohydrologic record of western North America since the last glacial maximum reveals a wide range of hydroclimatic variability and distinctive patterns associated with abrupt climate changes. To evaluate the sequence of abrupt hydroclimatic shifts and centennial-to-millennial hydrologic variability in western North America over the past 17 ka, we reconstruct lake-level histories from two high-elevation lakes in the Beartooth and Bighorn Mountains. The lakes represent the headwaters of the Missouri River drainage in northern Wyoming, but also have the potential to capture regional hydroclimate variability that links the northern Rocky Mountains to the mid-continent, Pacific Northwest, and the Great Basin. We first discuss the stratigraphic record of lake-level changes in small mid-latitude lakes and then use ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and sediment cores to track the elevations of shoreline sediments within the lakes through time. We compare the stratigraphies to the records from four other lakes in Wyoming and Colorado, and find widespread evidence for a Terminal Pleistocene Drought from 15-11 ka, an early Holocene humid period from 11-8 ka, and a period of severe mid-Holocene aridity from 8-5.7 ka. The northern Wyoming lakes also provide evidence of high levels before ca. 15 ka, including rapid hydroclimatic changes at ca. 16.8 ka during Heinrich Event 1. We place the changes in a broad context by summarizing and mapping water-level changes from 107 additional, previously studied lakes. Important patterns include 1) extensive drying across the western U.S. after 15 ka; 2) coherent sub-regional differences during the Younger Dryas and Pleistocene-Holocene transition; 3) a north-south contrast from 9-6 ka consistent with a northward shift in storm tracks as the influence of the Laurentide Ice Sheet diminished; and 4) rapid increases in effective moisture across much of western North America from 6-4 ka.

  5. The cold climate geomorphology of the Eastern Cape Drakensberg: A reevaluation of past climatic conditions during the last glacial cycle in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S. C.; Barrows, T. T.; Telfer, M. W.; Fifield, L. K.

    2017-02-01

    Southern Africa is located in a unique setting for investigating past cold climate geomorphology over glacial-interglacial timescales. It lies at the junction of three of the world's major oceans and is affected by subtropical and temperate circulation systems, therefore recording changes in Southern Hemisphere circulation patterns. Cold climate landforms are very sensitive to changes in climate and thus provide an opportunity to investigate past changes in this region. The proposed existence of glaciers in the high Eastern Cape Drakensberg mountains, together with possible rock glaciers, has led to the suggestion that temperatures in this region were as much as 10-17 °C lower than present. Such large temperature depressions are inconsistent with many other palaeoclimatic proxies in Southern Africa. This paper presents new field observations and cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages from putative cold climate landforms. We discuss alternative interpretations for the formation of the landforms and confirm that glaciers were absent in the Eastern Cape Drakensberg during the last glaciation. However, we find widespread evidence for periglacial activity down to an elevation of 1700 m asl, as illustrated by extensive solifluction deposits, blockstreams, and stone garlands. These periglacial deposits suggest that the climate was significantly colder ( 6 °C) during the Last Glacial Maximum, in keeping with other climate proxy records from the region, but not cold enough to initiate or sustain glaciers or rock glaciers.

  6. Heinrich-type glacial surges in a low-order dynamical climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Verbitsky, M.; Saltzman, B.

    1994-07-01

    Recent studies suggest the occurrence of sporadic episodes during which the ice streams that discharge ice sheets become enormously active, producing large numbers of icebergs (reflected in North Atlantic sea cores as {open_quotes}Heinrich events{close_quotes}) and possibly causing the partial collapse of the ice sheets. To simulate the mechanism of implied internal thermo-hydrodynamical instability in the context of a more general paleoclimate dynamics model (PDM), a new sliding-catastrophe function that can account for ice-sheet surges in terms of the thickness, density, viscosity, heat-capacity. and heat-conductivity of ice is introduced. Analysis suggests these events might be of three possible kinds: the first occurs in periods of glacial maximum when temperature conditions on the ice surface are extremely cold, but internal friction within bottom boundary layer is also at its maximum and is strong enough to melt ice and cause its surge. The second may happen during an interglacial, when the ice thickness is small but relatively warm climate conditions on the upper surface of ice can be easily advected with the flow of ice to the bottom where even a small additional heating due to friction may cause melting. The third and, perhaps, most interesting type is one that may occur during ice sheet growth: in this period particles of ice reaching the bottom {open_quotes}remember{close_quotes} the warm temperature conditions of the previous interglacial and additional heating due to increasing friction associated with the growing ice sheet may again cause melting. This third introduces the interesting possibility that earlier CO{sub 2} concentrations may be as important for the present-day climate as its current value. According to our model the climate system seems more vulnerable to surges during the penultimate interglacial period than in present one contributing to an explanation of the recent results of the Greenland Ice Core Project. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The hierarchical structure of glacial climatic oscillations: Interactions between ice-sheet dynamics and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Paillard, D.

    1995-04-01

    Abrupt climatic oscillations around the North Atlantic have been identified recently in Greenland ice cores as well as in North Atlantic marine sediment cores. The good correlation between the {open_quote}Dansgaard Oeschger events{close_quote} in the ice and the {open_quote}Heinrich events{close_quote} in the ocean suggests climate, in the North Atlantic region, underwent several massive reorganizations in the last glacial period. A characteristic feature seems to be their hierarchical structure. Every 7 to 10-thousand years, when the temperature is close to its minimum, the ice-sheet undergoes a massive iceberg discharge. This Heinrich event is followed by an abrupt warming. then by other oscillations, each lasting between one and two thousand years. These secondary oscillations do not have a clear signature in marine sediments but constitute most of the{open_quote} Dansgaard-Oeschger events{close_quote} found in the ice. A simplified model coupling an ice-sheet and an ocean basin, to illustrate how the interactions between these two components can lead to such a hierarchical structure. The ice-sheet model exhibits internal oscillations composed of growing phases and basal ice melting phases that induce massive iceberg discharges. These fresh water inputs in the ocean stop for a moment the thermohaline circulation, enhancing the temperature contrast between low- and high-latitudes. Just after this event, the thermohaline circulation restarts and an abrupt warming of high-latitude regions is observed. For some parameter values, these warmer temperatures have some influence on the ice-sheet, inducing secondary oscillations similar to those found in paleoclimatic records. Although the mechanism presented here may be too grossly simplified. it nevertheless underlines the potential importance of the coupling between ice-sheet dynamics and oceanic thermohaline circulation on the structure of the climatic records during the last glacial period. 33 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Climate versus carbon dioxide controls on biomass burning: a model analysis of the glacial-interglacial contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. Martin; Prentice, I. C.; Harrison, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    Climate controls fire regimes through its influence on the amount and types of fuel present and their dryness. CO2 concentration constrains primary production by limiting photosynthetic activity in plants. However, although fuel accumulation depends on biomass production, and hence on CO2 concentration, the quantitative relationship between atmospheric CO2 concentration and biomass burning is not well understood. Here a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model (the Land surface Processes and eXchanges model, LPX) is used to attribute glacial-interglacial changes in biomass burning to an increase in CO2, which would be expected to increase primary production and therefore fuel loads even in the absence of climate change, vs. climate change effects. Four general circulation models provided last glacial maximum (LGM) climate anomalies - that is, differences from the pre-industrial (PI) control climate - from the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase~2, allowing the construction of four scenarios for LGM climate. Modelled carbon fluxes from biomass burning were corrected for the model's observed prediction biases in contemporary regional average values for biomes. With LGM climate and low CO2 (185 ppm) effects included, the modelled global flux at the LGM was in the range of 1.0-1.4 Pg C year-1, about a third less than that modelled for PI time. LGM climate with pre-industrial CO2 (280 ppm) yielded unrealistic results, with global biomass burning fluxes similar to or even greater than in the pre-industrial climate. It is inferred that a substantial part of the increase in biomass burning after the LGM must be attributed to the effect of increasing CO2 concentration on primary production and fuel load. Today, by analogy, both rising CO2 and global warming must be considered as risk factors for increasing biomass burning. Both effects need to be included in models to project future fire risks.

  9. Timing, variability and sediment provenance of the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, L. W. M.; Sejrup, H. P.; Hjelstuen, B. O. B.; Haflidason, H.

    2016-12-01

    The extent of the NW European ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum is fairly well constrained to, at least in periods, the shelf edge. However, the exact timing and varying activity of the largest ice stream, the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS), remains uncertain. We here present three sediment records, recovered proximal and distal to the upper NW European continental slope. All age models for the cores are constructed in the same way and based solely on 14C dating of planktonic foraminifera. The sand-sized sediments in the discussed cores is believed to be primarily transported by ice rafting. All records suggest ice streaming activity between 25.8 and 18.5 ka BP. However, the core proximal to the mouth of the Norwegian Channel (NC) shows distinct periods of activity and periods of very little coarse sediment input. Out of this there appear to be at least three well-defined periods of ice streaming activity which lasted each for 1.5 to 2 ka, with "pauses" of several hundred years in between. The same core shows a conspicuous variation in several proxies and sediment colour within the first peak of ice stream activity, compared to the second and third peak. The light grey colour of the sediment was earlier attributed to Triassic chalk grains, yet all "chalk" grains are in fact mollusc fragments. The low magnetic susceptibility values, the high Ca, high Sr and low Fe content compared to the other peaks suggests a different provenance for the material of the first peak. We suggest therefore, that the origin of this material is rather the British Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) and not the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS). Earlier studies have shown an extent of the BIIS at least to the NC, whereas ice from the FIS likely stayed within the boundaries of the NC. A possible scenario for the different provenance could therefore be the build-up of the BIIS into the NC until it merged with the FIS. At this point the BIIS calved off the shelf edge southwest of the mouth of

  10. Tropical Ice Core Isotopes Reveal Changes in Convection from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. R.; Gedzelman, S. D.

    2002-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of water vapors over the tropical oceans has been measured. Samples were collected at three locations: 8.4N 167.6E, 16.0N 97.2W, and 24.5N 81.6W over 3 to 8 week periods two to three times per day. Isotope values varied from -10 to -24 per mil. Dew points varied from 20 to 28 degrees centigrade. The lowering of isotope values below isotopic equilibrium with seawater was caused by exposure of air parcels to rainfall upwind of the sampling location. The higher the intensity and the better the organization of tropical rain systems the lower were the isotope values. This isotopic variation is transferred to tropical ice cores such as those in the Andes Mountains. Raleigh Distillation model curves along the moist adiabat show how isotopes in water vapor and precipitation vary from the ocean surface to the ice core site. Isotope values of precipitation today at the ice core site are lower than those predicted from the Raleigh model assuming that the oxygen isotopic composition of the starting vapor was in near isotopic equilibrium with the sea surface. Simply by lowering the isotopic composition of water vapor over the oceans in the source region it is possible to achieve overlap of model results with measured values. The average oxygen isotope value of ice over the range of present-day measured temperatures matches the model-calculated values if we assume that the initial oxygen isotope value for the source water vapor is about -17 per mil. The average oxygen isotope value of ice at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) over the range of estimated temperatures overlaps Raleigh model calculated values. The closer proximity of this data field to the model calculated values can be explained by a higher oxygen isotope value for the source water vapor. Less intense and less organized convection over the tropical oceans at LGM would have resulted in higher oxygen isotope values for the source vapors. In addition, examination of cloud top echoes from

  11. Similar millennial climate variability on the Iberian margin during two early Pleistocene glacials and MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, B.; Hodell, D. A.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Skinner, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Although millennial-scale climate variability (<10 ka) has been well studied during the last glacial cycles, little is known about this important aspect of climate in the early Pleistocene, prior to the Middle Pleistocene Transition. Here we present an early Pleistocene climate record at centennial resolution for two representative glacials (marine isotope stages (MIS) 37-41 from approximately 1235 to 1320 ka) during the "41 ka world" at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1385 (the "Shackleton Site") on the southwest Iberian margin. Millennial-scale climate variability was suppressed during interglacial periods (MIS 37, MIS 39, and MIS 41) and activated during glacial inceptions when benthic δ18O exceeded 3.2‰. Millennial variability during glacials MIS 38 and MIS 40 closely resembled Dansgaard-Oeschger events from the last glacial (MIS 3) in amplitude, shape, and pacing. The phasing of oxygen and carbon isotope variability is consistent with an active oceanic thermal bipolar see-saw between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during most of the prominent stadials. Surface cooling was associated with systematic decreases in benthic carbon isotopes, indicating concomitant changes in the meridional overturning circulation. A comparison to other North Atlantic records of ice rafting during the early Pleistocene suggests that freshwater forcing, as proposed for the late Pleistocene, was involved in triggering or amplifying perturbations of the North Atlantic circulation that elicited a bipolar see-saw response. Our findings support similarities in the operation of the climate system occurring on millennial time scales before and after the Middle Pleistocene Transition despite the increases in global ice volume and duration of the glacial cycles.

  12. Reconstructing ecological niches and geographic distributions of caribou ( Rangifer tarandus) and red deer ( Cervus elaphus) during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, William E.; d'Errico, Francesco; Peterson, A. Townsend; Kageyama, Masa; Colombeau, Guillaume

    2008-12-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to reconstruct glacial distributions of species, identify their environmental characteristics, and understand their influence on subsequent population expansions. Traditional methods, however, provide only rough estimates of past distributions, and are often unable to identify the ecological and geographic processes that shaped them. Recently, ecological niche modeling (ENM) methodologies have been applied to these questions in an effort to overcome such limitations. We apply ENM to the European faunal record of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to reconstruct ecological niches and potential ranges for caribou ( Rangifer tarandus) and red deer ( Cervus elaphus), and evaluate whether their LGM distributions resulted from tracking the geographic footprint of their ecological niches (niche conservatism) or if ecological niche shifts between the LGM and present might be implicated. Results indicate that the LGM geographic ranges of both species represent distributions characterized by niche conservatism, expressed through geographic contraction of the geographic footprints of their respective ecological niches.

  13. To what extent can global warming events influence scaling properties of climatic fluctuations in glacial periods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's climate is an extremely unstable complex system consisting of nonlinear and still rather unknown interactions among atmosphere, land surface, ice and oceans. The system is mainly driven by solar irradiance, even if internal components as volcanic eruptions and human activities affect the atmospheric composition thus acting as a driver for climate changes. Since the extreme climate variability is the result of a set of phenomena operating from daily to multi-millennial timescales, with different correlation times, a study of the scaling properties of the system can evidence non-trivial persistent structures, internal or external physical processes. Recently, the scaling properties of the paleoclimate changes have been analyzed by distinguish between interglacial and glacial climates [Shao and Ditlevsen, 2016]. The results show that the last glacial record (20-120 kyr BP) presents some elements of multifractality, while the last interglacial period (0-10 kyr BP), say the Holocene period, seems to be characterized by a mono-fractal structure. This is associated to the absence of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events in the interglacial climate that could be the cause for the absence of multifractality. This hypothesis is supported by the analysis of the period between 18 and 27 kyr BP, i.e. during the Last Glacial Period, in which a single DO event have been registred. Through the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) we were able to detect a timescale separation within the Last Glacial Period (20-120 kyr BP) in two main components: a high-frequency component, related to the occurrence of DO events, and a low-frequency one, associated to the cooling/warming phase switch [Alberti et al., 2014]. Here, we investigate the scaling properties of the climate fluctuations within the Last Glacial Period, where abrupt climate changes, characterized by fast increase of temperature usually called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, have been particularly pronounced. By using the

  14. An attempt to use current permafrost thickness to constrain the Last Glacial Maximum temperature in eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, Tetsuo; Ohgaito, Rumi; Chikamoto, Megumi O.; Hajima, Tomohiro; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Okajima, Hideki; Saito, Fuyuki; O'ishi, Ryota; Watanabe, Shingo; Kawamiya, Michio; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2013-04-01

    The thickness of permafrost changes in responding to changing climate conditions. Since this process takes place as a result of thermal conduction from the surface, its response time becomes much longer for thick permafrost, compared with the timescale for climate change (Lachenbruch et al, 1982). The goal of the study is to constrain the ground temperature history using this characteristic of permafrost. Genral circulation models (GCMs) has been used to calculate LGM climate, prescribing the reconstructed forcing conditions (i.e. orbital patameters, trace gases, topography, etc). Using temperature outputs from those experiments and assuming that the pattern of the climate history over last glacial cycle is basically follows the ice-core based temperature reconstruction, we ran a one-dimensional permafrost model to calculate the temperature profile variation for the north and central Siberia. Here, only spatially averaged characteristics of permafrost, such as permafrost thickness of the region or ground thermal properties, are discussed, to constrain the general temperature pattern over Siberia. A series of 1-D experiments for ground temperature profiles are conducted to calculate temperature profile history in Siberia over last glacial cycle and to give the present (i.e. 0ka) value of permafrost thickness. The pattern of the climate history is assumed to be same, while the strength in LGM cooling is treated as a parameter for these experiments. Reflecting the long response time, the 0ka permafrost thickness is strongly dependent of LGM temperature condition for such deep-permafrost area, varying from 200m to 600m for given conditions. 1-D ground temperature experiments suggest that strong cooling is required to explain the current deep permafrost thickness in eastern-central Siberia. Results from climate models, in which the difference in surface temperatures between LGM and present are larger in inland Siberia than arctic coast region, are consistent with the

  15. Investigating vegetation-climate interactions during glacial times using the IPSL GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, Marie-Noelle; Kageyama, Masa; Krinner, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation plays an important role in the climate system, through its impact on albedo, rugosity and water fluxes. Only few GCM studies have investigated the climatic impact of vegetation changes in glacial times, some using a fixed glacial vegetation based on pollinic reconstructions (e.g. Crowley & Baum 1997; Wyputta & McAvaney 2001) and some others using vegetation models ( Kubatzki & Claussen 1998; Levis & Foley 1999; Crucifix & Hewitt 2005), but seldom with a full atmosphere-vegetation coupling. Moreover, most of these simulations have been run with fixed sea surface temperatures, thus inhibiting potential oceanic retroactions. Here we force two different vegetation models, ORCHIDEE and BIOME4, with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM). Two different glacial climates are used: with and without collapsed Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).The state with a collapsed AMOC results from an imposed additional freshwater flux in the North Atlantic ocean. Then, the different resulting vegetations are used to force the AOGCM. The new climatic states are compared with data and with results from other simulations performed in the PMIP2 project. If time allows we will also show the results from a fully coupled glacial simulation IPSL_CM4-ORCHIDEE and compare the results to those obtained in forced mode.

  16. Late Glacial and Early Holocene Climatic Changes Based on a Multiproxy Lacustrine Sediment Record from Northeast Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Kokorowski, H D; Anderson, P M; Sletten, R S; Lozhkin, A V; Brown, T A

    2008-05-20

    Palynological (species assemblage, pollen accumulation rate), geochemical (carbon to nitrogen ratios, organic carbon and biogenic silica content), and sedimentological (particle size, magnetic susceptibility) data combined with improved chronology and greater sampling resolution from a new core from Elikchan 4 Lake provide a stronger basis for defining paleoenvironmental changes than was previously possible. Persistence of herb-dominated tundra, slow expansion of Betula and Alnus shrubs, and low percentages of organic carbon and biogenic silica suggest that the Late-Glacial transition (ca. 16,000-11,000 cal. yr BP) was a period of gradual rather than abrupt vegetation and climatic change. Consistency of all Late-Glacial data indicates no Younger Dryas climatic oscillation. A dramatic peak in pollen accumulation rates (ca. 11,000-9800 cal. yr BP) suggests a possible summer temperature optimum, but finer grain-sizes, low magnetic susceptibility, and greater organic carbon and biogenic silica, while showing significant warming at ca. 11,000 cal. yr BP, offer no evidence of a Holocene thermal maximum. When compared to trends in other paleo-records, the new Elikchan data underscore the apparent spatial complexity of climatic responses in Northeast Siberia to global forcings between ca. 16,000-9000 cal. yr BP.

  17. Variability of neodymium isotopes associated with planktonic foraminifera in the Pacific Ocean during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Bostock, Helen C.; Crowhurst, Simon; Rennie, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The deep Pacific Ocean holds the largest oceanic reservoir of carbon which may interchange with the atmosphere on climatologically important timescales. The circulation of the deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), however, is not well understood. Neodymium (Nd) isotopes of ferromanganese oxide coatings precipitated on planktonic foraminifera are a valuable proxy for deep ocean water mass reconstruction in paleoceanography. In this study, we present Nd isotope compositions (εNd) of planktonic foraminifera for the Holocene and the LGM obtained from 55 new sites widely distributed in the Pacific Ocean. The Holocene planktonic foraminiferal εNd results agree with the proximal seawater data, indicating that they provide a reliable record of modern bottom water Nd isotopes in the deep Pacific. There is a good correlation between foraminiferal εNd and seawater phosphate concentrations (R2 = 0.80), but poorer correlation with silicate (R2 = 0.37). Our interpretation is that the radiogenic Nd isotope is added to the deep open Pacific through particle release from the upper ocean during deep water mass advection and aging. The data thus also imply the Nd isotopes in the Pacific are not likely to be controlled by silicate cycling. In the North Pacific, the glacial Nd isotopic compositions are similar to the Holocene values, indicating that the Nd isotope composition of North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) remained constant (-3.5 to -4). During the LGM, the southwest Pacific cores throughout the water column show higher εNd corroborating previous studies which suggested a reduced inflow of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Pacific. However, the western equatorial Pacific deep water does not record a corresponding radiogenic excursion, implying reduced radiogenic boundary inputs during the LGM probably due to a shorter duration of seawater-particle interaction in a stronger glacial deep boundary current. A significant negative glacial εNd excursion is evident in

  18. Poorly ventilated deep ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum inferred from carbon isotopes: A data-model comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menviel, L.; Yu, J.; Joos, F.; Mouchet, A.; Meissner, K. J.; England, M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 was ˜90 ppmv lower at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) compared to the late Holocene, but the mechanisms responsible for this change remain elusive. Here we employ a carbon isotope-enabled Earth System Model to investigate the role of ocean circulation in setting the LGM oceanic δ13C distribution, thereby improving our understanding of glacial/interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. We find that the mean ocean δ13C change can be explained by a 378 ± 88 Gt C(2σ) smaller LGM terrestrial carbon reservoir compared to the Holocene. Critically, in this model, differences in the oceanic δ13C spatial pattern can only be reconciled with a LGM ocean circulation state characterized by a weak (10-15 Sv) and relatively shallow (2000-2500 m) North Atlantic Deep Water cell, reduced Antarctic Bottom Water transport (≤10 Sv globally integrated), and relatively weak (6-8 Sv) and shallow (1000-1500 m) North Pacific Intermediate Water formation. This oceanic circulation state is corroborated by results from the isotope-enabled Bern3D ocean model and further confirmed by high LGM ventilation ages in the deep ocean, particularly in the deep South Atlantic and South Pacific. This suggests a poorly ventilated glacial deep ocean which would have facilitated the sequestration of carbon lost from the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere.

  19. Future Implications of Climate-driven Vegetation Change in North America Since the Last Glacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, C.; Jackson, S. T.; Overpeck, J. T.; Betancourt, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Climate projections for the next century include increases in average global temperature that are likely to cause changes in plant community composition and structure across the globe. Characterizing the magnitude of impending climate-driven vegetation changes is important for conservation planning and adaptation, but difficult because climate-driven vegetation change is the result of interacting processes operating on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Paleoecological records from all the vegetated continents offer a proxy record of the vegetation during the last glacial period (defined here as 14,000 to 21,000 years before present). Assessment of the degree of change between glacial-age and modern vegetation provides a metric for assessing impacts of future climate change. A global comparison is underway, in which regional experts are compiling all available pollen and plant macrofossil records with coverage during the last glacial period, and comparing glacial-age vegetation with modern (or late Holocene) vegetation, assessing the magnitude of compositional and structural change. Here we present results from North America (excepting Beringia). Nearly all sites assessed show large changes in composition and structure, all attributable to climate change associated with a sub-continental annual surface air warming of ca. 4 to 10+ °C. Current rates of atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions promise comparable magnitudes of climate change over the next one to two centuries, and at a rate much faster than over the last deglaciation. Our results thus suggest that this future climate change will drive major changes in vegetation distributions everywhere in North America.

  20. Glacial-Interglacial Climate Changes Recorded by Debris Flow Grain Size, Eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, M. K.; Whittaker, A. C.; Roda Boluda, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties remain about the sensitivity of eroding landscapes to climate changes over a range of frequencies and amplitudes. Numerical models suggest that simple catchment-fan systems should be responsive to glacial-interglacial climate cycles, recording them in both sediment flux and the grain size distribution of their deposits. However these models are largely untested and the propagation of climatic signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological data from 8 debris flow fans in Owens Valley, eastern California. These fans have an exceptionally well-constrained depositional record spanning the last 120 ka, which we use to examine how sediment export has varied as a function of high-amplitude climate changes. We find a strong and sustained relationship between debris flow grain size and paleoclimate proxies over an entire glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits correlated with warm and dry conditions. Our data suggest these systems are highly reactive to climate forcing, with a short response timescale of <10 ka and no evidence of signal buffering, which we interpret to be driven by rapid sediment transfer from source to sink. We demonstrate that debris flow grain size follows an exponential relationship with temperature, coarsening at a rate of ~10 % per °C. Using this observation, and a known relationship between temperature and storm intensity, we propose that the climate signal recorded in these fan deposits captures changing storm intensity during the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This study offers a direct test of existing models of catchment-fan systems, confirming that glacial-interglacial climate changes can be clearly expressed in their grain size records. Our results also suggest that these debris flow deposits contain a high-resolution, testable record of past storm intensity, and that storminess is the primary control on their sedimentological

  1. Impact of glacial ice sheets on the duration of the stadial climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, Sam; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2017-04-01

    It has been shown from ice core reconstructions that glacial periods experienced climate shifts between warm interstadials and cold stadials. The duration of these climate modes varied during glacial periods, and that both the interstadials and stadials was shorter during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3) compare to MIS5. Recent study showed that the duration of the interstdials is controlled by Antarctic temperate through its impact on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). However, similar relation could not be found for the stadials, suggesting that other climate factor (e.g. changes in ice sheet size, greenhouse gases and insolation) may play a role. Thus, for a better understanding of the stability of the climate, it is very important to evaluate the impact of these climate factors on the duration of the stadial climate. In this study, we investigate the role of glacial ice sheets. For this purpose, freshwater hosing experiments are conducted with an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model MIROC4m under several ice sheets configurations computed by an ice sheet model Icies (Abe-Ouchi et al. 2013). The impact of glacial ice sheets on the duration of the stadial climate is evaluated by comparing the behavior of the weak AMOC after the freshwater forcing is reduced. All experiments show drastic weakening of the AMOC in response to freshwater hosing, which accompanied cooling over the North Atlantic, southward shift of the tropical rain belt and warming over the Antarctic. When the fresh water hosing is reduced, we find that experiments with smaller ice sheet takes more time to recover. Sensitivity simulations show that differences in the surface wind is important. Thus our result suggests that differences in the shape of the ice sheets between MIS3 and MIS5 may play an important role in causing shorter stadials during MIS3 compare to MIS5.

  2. A high-resolution history of the South American Monsoon from Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novello, Valdir F.; Cruz, Francisco W.; Vuille, Mathias; Stríkis, Nicolás M.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Emerick, Suellyn; de Paula, Marcos S.; Li, Xianglei; Barreto, Eline De S.; Karmann, Ivo; Santos, Roberto V.

    2017-03-01

    The exact extent, by which the hydrologic cycle in the Neotropics was affected by external forcing during the last deglaciation, remains poorly understood. Here we present a new paleo-rainfall reconstruction based on high-resolution speleothem δ18O records from the core region of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS), documenting the changing hydrological conditions over tropical South America (SA), in particular during abrupt millennial-scale events. This new record provides the best-resolved and most accurately constrained geochronology of any proxy from South America for this time period, spanning from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the mid-Holocene.

  3. A high-resolution history of the South American Monsoon from Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Novello, Valdir F.; Cruz, Francisco W.; Vuille, Mathias; Stríkis, Nicolás M.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Emerick, Suellyn; de Paula, Marcos S.; Li, Xianglei; Barreto, Eline de S.; Karmann, Ivo; Santos, Roberto V.

    2017-01-01

    The exact extent, by which the hydrologic cycle in the Neotropics was affected by external forcing during the last deglaciation, remains poorly understood. Here we present a new paleo-rainfall reconstruction based on high-resolution speleothem δ18O records from the core region of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS), documenting the changing hydrological conditions over tropical South America (SA), in particular during abrupt millennial-scale events. This new record provides the best-resolved and most accurately constrained geochronology of any proxy from South America for this time period, spanning from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the mid-Holocene. PMID:28281650

  4. A high-resolution history of the South American Monsoon from Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Novello, Valdir F; Cruz, Francisco W; Vuille, Mathias; Stríkis, Nicolás M; Edwards, R Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Emerick, Suellyn; de Paula, Marcos S; Li, Xianglei; Barreto, Eline de S; Karmann, Ivo; Santos, Roberto V

    2017-03-10

    The exact extent, by which the hydrologic cycle in the Neotropics was affected by external forcing during the last deglaciation, remains poorly understood. Here we present a new paleo-rainfall reconstruction based on high-resolution speleothem δ(18)O records from the core region of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS), documenting the changing hydrological conditions over tropical South America (SA), in particular during abrupt millennial-scale events. This new record provides the best-resolved and most accurately constrained geochronology of any proxy from South America for this time period, spanning from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the mid-Holocene.

  5. Last Glacial Maximum sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Verena; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer; Lamy, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperatures and sea-ice extent are most critical variables to evaluate the Southern Ocean paleoceanographic evolution in relation to the development of the global carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2 and ocean-atmosphere circulation. Here we present diatom transfer function-based summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and winter sea-ice (WSI) estimates from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean to bridge a gap in information that has to date hampered a well-established reconstruction of the last glacial Southern Ocean at circum-Antarctic scale. We studied the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at the EPILOG time slice (19,000-23,000 calendar years before present) in 17 cores and consolidated our LGM picture of the Pacific sector taking into account published data from its warmer regions. Our data display a distinct east-west differentiation with a rather stable WSI edge north of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge in the Ross Sea sector and a more variable WSI extent over the Amundsen Abyssal Plain. The zone of maximum cooling (>4 K) during the LGM is in the present Subantarctic Zone and bounded to its south by the 4 °C isotherm. The isotherm is in the SSST range prevailing at the modern Antarctic Polar Front, representing a circum-Antarctic feature, and marks the northern edge of the glacial Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The northward deflection of colder than modern surface waters along the South American continent led to a significant cooling of the glacial Humboldt Current surface waters (4-8 K), which affected the temperature regimes as far north as tropical latitudes. The glacial reduction of ACC temperatures may also have resulted in significant cooling in the Atlantic and Indian Southern Ocean, thus enhancing thermal differentiation of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic continental cooling. The comparison with numerical temperature and sea-ice simulations yields discrepancies, especially concerning the estimates of the sea-ice fields, but some simulations

  6. Lack of deep air convection in firn at Dome Fuji in the last glacial maximum from precise measurements of krypton isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Polar ice cores and occluded air provide records of past climate, atmospheric composition and glaciological conditions. In order to establish the age difference between ice and gas records (e.g. Antarctic temperature and CO2), firn densification models with reconstructed temperature and accumulation rate are generally employed for estimating the past firn thickness. However, nitrogen and argon isotopes (15N/14N and 40Ar/36Ar) from the Antarctic interior (Vostok, Dome Fuji, Dome C) for glacial periods have shown significantly smaller gravitational fractionation (equivalent to 30-40 m of firn thickness) than predicted by densification models (e.g. Caillon et al., 2003). This discrepancy may be explained if a deep air convection, which eliminates isotopic fractionation at the top part of firn, was extremely well developed during glacial periods. A modern Antarctic site having deep convective zone (23 m) has been found at a near-zero accumulation area (leeward face of Megadunes) with deep cracks (Severinghaus et al., 2010), although the magnitude is still smaller than hypothesized for the deep ice core sites in glacial maxima. Here we show, by measuring isotopic ratios of krypton (Kr) as well as argon and nitrogen from Dome Fuji ice core, that a thick convective zone was not developed during the last glacial maximum (LGM) at this site. Because heavy noble gases such as Kr and Xe have smaller diffusivities than N2 and Ar, they are less fractionated in deep firn if strong convective mixing exists. We developed a method to simultaneously measure 15N/14N, 40Ar/36Ar and 86Kr/82Kr in ice-core air and applied it to Dome Fuji ice core over the last ~30,000 years including the LGM and current interglacial period (Holocene). When normalized to unit mass difference and corrected for thermal signal by using N2 and Ar isotopic records, the differences between N2 and Kr isotopic ratios are similar for the Holocene and LGM, suggesting that convection zone in LGM was similar to today

  7. Antarctic sea ice control on ocean circulation in present and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Jansen, Malte F.; Adkins, Jess F.; Burke, Andrea; Stewart, Andrew L.; Thompson, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    In the modern climate, the ocean below 2 km is mainly filled by waters sinking into the abyss around Antarctica and in the North Atlantic. Paleoproxies indicate that waters of North Atlantic origin were instead absent below 2 km at the Last Glacial Maximum, resulting in an expansion of the volume occupied by Antarctic origin waters. In this study we show that this rearrangement of deep water masses is dynamically linked to the expansion of summer sea ice around Antarctica. A simple theory further suggests that these deep waters only came to the surface under sea ice, which insulated them from atmospheric forcing, and were weakly mixed with overlying waters, thus being able to store carbon for long times. This unappreciated link between the expansion of sea ice and the appearance of a voluminous and insulated water mass may help quantify the ocean’s role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide on glacial–interglacial timescales. Previous studies pointed to many independent changes in ocean physics to account for the observed swings in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here it is shown that many of these changes are dynamically linked and therefore must co-occur. PMID:24889624

  8. The Paleoclimate of the Dead Sea Basin from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the late glacial paleoclimate of the Southern Levant. A study of delta 13C and delta 18O in carbonates...derived from carbon and oxygen isotopes provide insight into the paleoclimate of the Southern Levant. The period from 20-14.6 kya was dry and cool, with...organic matter into the basin. The results of this study agree with other studies based on paleolake levels, pollen levels and paleoclimate studies from the Dead Sea Basin.

  9. Glacial evolution in King George and Livingston Islands (Antarctica) since the Last Glacial Maximum based on cosmogenic nuclide dating and glacier surface reconstruction - CRONOANTAR project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; Fernández Menéndez, Susana del Carmen; García Hernández, Cristina; Menéndez Duarte, Rosa Ana; Pellitero Ondicol, Ramón; Pérez Alberti, Augusto; Schimmelpfennig, Irene

    2017-04-01

    CRONOANTAR brings together researchers from Spain, Portugal, France and United Kingdom with the objective of spatially and temporally reconstruct the deglaciation process at the two largest islands in the South Shetlands Archipelago (Maritime Antarctica), since the Global Last Glacial Maximum. Glacier retreat in polar areas has major implications at a local, regional and even planetary scale. Global average sea level rise is the most obvious and socio-economically relevant, but there are others such as the arrival of new fauna to deglaciated areas, plant colonisation or permafrost formation and degradation. This project will study the ice-free areas in Byers and Hurd peninsulas (Livingston Island) and Fildes and Potter peninsulas (King George Island). Ice-cap glacier retreat chronology will be revealed by the use of cosmogenic isotopes (mainly 36Cl) on glacially originated sedimentary and erosive records. Cosmogenic dating will be complemented by other dating methods (C14 and OSL), which will permit the validation of these methods in regions with cold-based glaciers. Given the geomorphological evidences and the obtained ages, a deglaciation calendar will be proposed and we will use a GIS methodology to reconstruct the glacier extent and the ice thickness. The results emerging from this project will allow to assess whether the high glacier retreat rates observed during the last decades were registered in the past, or if they are conversely the consequence (and evidence) of the Global Change in Antarctica. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (Reference: CTM2016-77878-P).

  10. A 33,000-Year-Old Incipient Dog from the Altai Mountains of Siberia: Evidence of the Earliest Domestication Disrupted by the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Ovodov, Nikolai D.; Crockford, Susan J.; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V.; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.; van der Plicht, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Background Virtually all well-documented remains of early domestic dog (Canis familiaris) come from the late Glacial and early Holocene periods (ca. 14,000–9000 calendar years ago, cal BP), with few putative dogs found prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 26,500–19,000 cal BP). The dearth of pre-LGM dog-like canids and incomplete state of their preservation has until now prevented an understanding of the morphological features of transitional forms between wild wolves and domesticated dogs in temporal perspective. Methodology/Principal Finding We describe the well-preserved remains of a dog-like canid from the Razboinichya Cave (Altai Mountains of southern Siberia). Because of the extraordinary preservation of the material, including skull, mandibles (both sides) and teeth, it was possible to conduct a complete morphological description and comparison with representative examples of pre-LGM wild wolves, modern wolves, prehistoric domesticated dogs, and early dog-like canids, using morphological criteria to distinguish between wolves and dogs. It was found that the Razboinichya Cave individual is most similar to fully domesticated dogs from Greenland (about 1000 years old), and unlike ancient and modern wolves, and putative dogs from Eliseevichi I site in central Russia. Direct AMS radiocarbon dating of the skull and mandible of the Razboinichya canid conducted in three independent laboratories resulted in highly compatible ages, with average value of ca. 33,000 cal BP. Conclusions/Significance The Razboinichya Cave specimen appears to be an incipient dog that did not give rise to late Glacial – early Holocene lineages and probably represents wolf domestication disrupted by the climatic and cultural changes associated with the LGM. The two earliest incipient dogs from Western Europe (Goyet, Belguim) and Siberia (Razboinichya), separated by thousands of kilometers, show that dog domestication was multiregional, and thus had no single place of origin (as

  11. A 33,000-year-old incipient dog from the Altai Mountains of Siberia: evidence of the earliest domestication disrupted by the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Ovodov, Nikolai D; Crockford, Susan J; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V; Higham, Thomas F G; Hodgins, Gregory W L; van der Plicht, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Virtually all well-documented remains of early domestic dog (Canis familiaris) come from the late Glacial and early Holocene periods (ca. 14,000-9000 calendar years ago, cal BP), with few putative dogs found prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 26,500-19,000 cal BP). The dearth of pre-LGM dog-like canids and incomplete state of their preservation has until now prevented an understanding of the morphological features of transitional forms between wild wolves and domesticated dogs in temporal perspective. We describe the well-preserved remains of a dog-like canid from the Razboinichya Cave (Altai Mountains of southern Siberia). Because of the extraordinary preservation of the material, including skull, mandibles (both sides) and teeth, it was possible to conduct a complete morphological description and comparison with representative examples of pre-LGM wild wolves, modern wolves, prehistoric domesticated dogs, and early dog-like canids, using morphological criteria to distinguish between wolves and dogs. It was found that the Razboinichya Cave individual is most similar to fully domesticated dogs from Greenland (about 1000 years old), and unlike ancient and modern wolves, and putative dogs from Eliseevichi I site in central Russia. Direct AMS radiocarbon dating of the skull and mandible of the Razboinichya canid conducted in three independent laboratories resulted in highly compatible ages, with average value of ca. 33,000 cal BP. The Razboinichya Cave specimen appears to be an incipient dog that did not give rise to late Glacial-early Holocene lineages and probably represents wolf domestication disrupted by the climatic and cultural changes associated with the LGM. The two earliest incipient dogs from Western Europe (Goyet, Belguim) and Siberia (Razboinichya), separated by thousands of kilometers, show that dog domestication was multiregional, and thus had no single place of origin (as some DNA data have suggested) and subsequent spread.

  12. Response of the Indian Creek alluvial fan, Nevada, to glacial-interglacial climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alexander; Brooke, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Alluvial fans have been shown to record signals of glacial-interglacial climate changes. Specifically, it has been suggested that their down-system grain size fining patterns may record changes in sediment flux. However, very few field studies have tested this because they require (i) robust fan chronologies, (ii) constraints on basin subsidence and 3D fan geometry, and (iii) a suitable model for inverting grain size fining for sediment flux. Here, we present a case study from the fluvially-dominated Indian Creek fan system in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada, which satisfies these criteria. We measure grain size fining patterns on a surface dating to the mid-glacial period ˜71 kyr ago, and a surface dating to the Holocene, which between them represent an overall warming (˜3 ˚ C) and drying (˜30%) of the regional climate. We use constraints on basin subsidence and a self-similar model of grain size fining to reconstruct sediment fluxes to the alluvial fan during the time periods captured by the two surfaces. Our results indicate a decline in sediment flux of ˜38% between the deposition of the ˜71 kyr and Holocene surfaces, implying significant sensitivity to climatic forcing over time periods of >10 kyr. This could represent a decrease in catchment erosion rates and/or a decrease in sediment export as the climate dried. Our results offer quantitative new constraints on how simple landscapes react to known glacial-interglacial climate shifts.

  13. Sloppy inversion and optimal experiment design for last glacial maximum Barents Sea Ice Sheet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachuck, S. B.; Cathles, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ice load history of the Barents Sea over the last glacial cycle is in dispute. Reconstructions rely, in large part, on the inversion of geophysical observations of glacial isostatic adjustment from the encircling archipelagos. The physical models of these observations depend nonlinearly on the ice configuration in question, which leads to parameter sensitivities that evenly span many orders of magnitude and large covariances that prevent independently estimating smaller portions of the ice sheet. This complication is a ubiquitous feature of many-parametered, nonlinear models, whose behavior is characterized by a strong dependence on a few "stiff" directions in parameter space and increasingly weaker dependence on "sloppy" directions. This talk introduces the theory of sloppiness and demonstrates how the geometric structure of sloppiness can be used to assess the value of new data. Applied to the problem of reconstructing the ice configuration in the Barents Sea, sloppy inversion indicates that, for present data, the ice sheet is equally likely to have been a massive, marine-centered dome as an ice load concentrated on the archipelagos. These divergent possibilities imply very different paleoclimate and ice physics, but the sloppy analysis predicts the locations where further measurements could best discriminate between the possible ice configurations.

  14. A biomarker record of temperature and phytoplankton community in Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jiaping

    2017-04-01

    A variety of biomarkers were examined from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) core 1202B to reconstruct temperature and phytoplankton community structures in the southern Okinawa Trough for the past ca. 20000 years. Two molecular temperature proxies (Uk37 and TEX86) show 5-6 ℃ warming during the glacial/interglacial transition. Prior to the Holocene, the Uk37-derived temperature was generally 1-4 ℃ higher than TEX86-derived temperature. This difference, however, was reduced to <1 ℃ in the Holocene when the Kuroshio Current was intensified. Correspondingly, the phytoplankton biomarkers (e.g., C37:2 alkenone, brassicasterol, C30 1,15-diols and dinosterol) suggest a shift of planktonic community assemblages with coccolithophorids becoming more abundant in the Holocene at the expense of diatoms/dinoflagellates. Such a shift is related to the variability of nutrient, temperature and salinity in the Okinawa Trough, controlled by the sea level and the intensity of Kuroshio Current. The phytoplankton community change may have profound implications on atmospheric CO2 fluctuations during glacial/interglacial cycles since diatoms and dinoflagellates have a higher efficiency of biological pump than coccolithophorids.

  15. Invertebrate Metacommunity Structure and Dynamics in an Andean Glacial Stream Network Facing Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio; Jacobsen, Dean; Dangles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Under the ongoing climate change, understanding the mechanisms structuring the spatial distribution of aquatic species in glacial stream networks is of critical importance to predict the response of aquatic biodiversity in the face of glacier melting. In this study, we propose to use metacommunity theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico-chemical and food resource conditions, and calculated geographical, altitudinal and glaciality distances among all sites. Using partial redundancy analysis, we partitioned community variation to evaluate the relative strength of environmental conditions (e.g., glaciality, food resource) vs. spatial processes (e.g., overland, watercourse, and downstream directional dispersal) in organizing the aquatic metacommunity. Results revealed that both environmental and spatial variables significantly explained community variation among sites. Among all environmental variables, the glacial influence component best explained community variation. Overland spatial variables based on geographical and altitudinal distances significantly affected community variation. Watercourse spatial variables based on glaciality distances had a unique significant effect on community variation. Within alpine catchment, glacial meltwater affects macroinvertebrate metacommunity structure in many ways. Indeed, the harsh environmental conditions characterizing glacial influence not only constitute the primary environmental filter but also, limit water-borne macroinvertebrate dispersal. Therefore, glacier runoff acts as an aquatic dispersal barrier, isolating species in headwater streams, and preventing non-adapted species to colonize throughout the entire stream network. Under a scenario of glacier runoff decrease, we

  16. Invertebrate Metacommunity Structure and Dynamics in an Andean Glacial Stream Network Facing Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio; Jacobsen, Dean; Dangles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Under the ongoing climate change, understanding the mechanisms structuring the spatial distribution of aquatic species in glacial stream networks is of critical importance to predict the response of aquatic biodiversity in the face of glacier melting. In this study, we propose to use metacommunity theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico-chemical and food resource conditions, and calculated geographical, altitudinal and glaciality distances among all sites. Using partial redundancy analysis, we partitioned community variation to evaluate the relative strength of environmental conditions (e.g., glaciality, food resource) vs. spatial processes (e.g., overland, watercourse, and downstream directional dispersal) in organizing the aquatic metacommunity. Results revealed that both environmental and spatial variables significantly explained community variation among sites. Among all environmental variables, the glacial influence component best explained community variation. Overland spatial variables based on geographical and altitudinal distances significantly affected community variation. Watercourse spatial variables based on glaciality distances had a unique significant effect on community variation. Within alpine catchment, glacial meltwater affects macroinvertebrate metacommunity structure in many ways. Indeed, the harsh environmental conditions characterizing glacial influence not only constitute the primary environmental filter but also, limit water-borne macroinvertebrate dispersal. Therefore, glacier runoff acts as an aquatic dispersal barrier, isolating species in headwater streams, and preventing non-adapted species to colonize throughout the entire stream network. Under a scenario of glacier runoff decrease, we

  17. Reliable radiocarbon evidence for the maximum extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the easternmost Amundsen Sea Embayment during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, C. D.; Klages, J. P.; Kuhn, G.; Smith, J.; Graham, A. G. C.; Gohl, K.; Wacker, L.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first age control and sedimentological data for the upper part of a stratified seismic unit that is unusually thick ( 6-9 m) for the outer shelf of the ASE and overlies an acoustically transparent unit. The transparent unit probably consists of soft till deposited during the last advance of grounded ice onto the outer shelf. We mapped subtle mega-scale glacial lineations (MSGL) on the seafloor and suggest that these are probably the expressions of bedforms originally moulded into the surface of the underlying till layer. We note that the lineations are less distinct when compared to MSGLs recorded in bathymetric data collected further upstream and suggest that this is because of the blanketing influence of the thick overlying drape. The uppermost part (≤ 3 m) of the stratified drape was sampled by two of our sediment cores and contains sufficient amounts of calcareous foraminifera throughout to establish reliable age models by radiocarbon dating. In combination with facies analysis of the recovered sediments the obtained radiocarbon dates suggest deposition of the draping unit in a sub-ice shelf/sub-sea ice to seasonal-open marine environment that existed on the outer shelf from well before (>45 ka BP) the Last Glacial Maximum until today. This indicates the maximum extent of grounded ice at the LGM must have been situated south of the two core locations, where a well-defined grounding-zone wedge (`GZWa') was deposited. The third sediment core was recovered from the toe of this wedge and retrieved grounding-line proximal glaciogenic debris flow sediments that were deposited by 14 cal. ka BP. Our new data therefore provide direct evidence for 1) the maximum extent of grounded ice in the easternmost ASE at the LGM (=GZWa), 2) the existence of a large shelf area seawards the wedge that was not covered by grounded ice during that time, and 3) landward grounding line retreat from GZWa prior to 14 cal. ka BP. This knowledge will help to improve LGM ice

  18. Quaternary fluvial response to climate change in glacially influenced river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Stéphane; Adamson, Kathryn; Delmas, Magali; Calvet, Marc; Harmand, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Over the last few decades, many studies in Europe and other continents have focused on the fluvial response to climate forcing in unglaciated basins. However, glacial activity may have a profound impact on the behaviour of the fluvial systems located downstream. In comparison to ice-free basins, these systems are characterised by distinctive hydrological and sediment supply regimes. Over Quaternary timescales, the fluvial records are influenced by periglacial (in non-glaciated areas), proglacial, and paraglacial processes. Understanding the impacts of these processes on the formation and preservation of the Quaternary geomorphological and sedimentary archives is key for our understanding of glacial-fluvial interactions. We investigate the impact of Quaternary glacial activity on fluvial sediment transfer, deposition, and preservation. Using existing studies from across Europe, we create a database of glaciofluvial geomorphology, sedimentology, and geochronology. This is used to examine how glacial forcing of fluvial systems varies spatially in different basin settings, and temporally over successive Milankovitch cycles. In particular, we focus on the ways in which the primary glacial-fluvial depositional signal could be distinguished from periglacial and paraglacial reworking and redeposition.

  19. Polar Climate Connections of the Last Glacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the cross-core chronology became available, the connection between the Earth's polar regions - or the lack of such [Wunsch, 2003; 2006] - has been an on-going debate in the paleoclimate community. While the inverse relationship inferred from the bipolar seesaw model [Crowley, 1992] could not account for the difference in signal shape of the polar records, integration/differentiation (I/D) has been proposed as the linkage between them [Schmittner et al., 2003; Huybers, 2004; Roe and Steig, 2004; Schmittner et al., 2004]. Stoker and Johnsen [2003] have proposed a revised (thermal) bipolar seesaw model (TBS), demonstrating that the climate record from Antarctic is that of the Greenland convolved with an exponential decaying function, which represents the heat reservoir of the Southern Ocean. More recently, Rial [2012] has proposed phase synchronization (PS) as the polar climate connection from which polar climate records can be treated approximately as a Hilbert transform pair. All three models (I/D, TBS, and PS) have been used to reconstruct past climate of the north from the longer climate record of the south [Siddall et al., 2006; Barker et al., 2011; Oh et al., 2014]. However, no comparison has been made to test and analyze these models against one another for their performance and stabilities. Here we investigated the aforementioned models with polar climate data on the recent AICC2012 chronology to derive the similarities and differences among them in both time and frequency domains. Most importantly we discussed how such differences translate to the discrepancies in reconstructions of the northern climate and possible physical mechanism(s) of connection each model limits and allows. ReferencesBarker et al., 2011, Science, 334(6054), 347-351. Crowley, 1992, Paleoceanography, 7(4), 489-497. Huybers, 2004, QSR, 23(1-2), 207-210. Oh et al., 2014, QSR, 83, 129-142. Rial, 2012, Am J Sci, 312(4), 417-448. Roe & Steig, 2004, Journal of Climate, 17(10), 1929

  20. Connecting Antarctic sea ice to deep-ocean circulation in modern and glacial climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, Alice; Jansen, Malte F.

    2017-06-01

    Antarctic sea-ice formation plays a key role in shaping the abyssal overturning circulation and stratification in all ocean basins, by driving surface buoyancy loss through the associated brine rejection. Changes in Antarctic sea ice have therefore been suggested as drivers of major glacial-interglacial ocean circulation rearrangements. Here, the relationship between Antarctic sea ice, buoyancy loss, deep-ocean stratification, and overturning circulation is investigated in Last Glacial Maximum and preindustrial simulations from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP). The simulations show substantial intermodel differences in their representation of the glacial deep-ocean state and circulation, which is often at odds with the geological evidence. We argue that these apparent inconsistencies can largely be attributed to differing (and likely insufficient) Antarctic sea-ice formation. Discrepancies can be further amplified by short integration times. Deep-ocean equilibration and sea-ice representation should, therefore, be carefully evaluated in the forthcoming PMIP4 simulations.

  1. Multi-millennial-scale climate variability in Antarctica during the past seven glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Climate variability on 1,000- to 10,000 -year timescales and associated interhemispheric seesaw during the last glacial period have been documented in a variety of paleoclimatic records. However, the frequency, magnitude, cause and prerequisites for the older glacial periods are still uncertain. We here present a new 720,000-year ice core record from Dome Fuji, East Antarctica. The agreement between the Dome Fuji and Dome C isotopic temperature records indicates homogeneous climate variability across the East Antarctic plateau throughout the past 720 kyr. By combining the two temperature proxy records, we identified persistent multi-millennial-scale Antarctic events over the past seven glacial periods. With a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model, it is suggested that the prerequisite for the bipolar seesaw is the combination of a cold background climate and freshwater input into the northern North Atlantic. With our identification criteria, the mean repetition period of the large Antarctic events increased from 6 kyr in the older three glacial periods to 8 kyr in the younger four glacial periods. Low frequency variations (repetition period of >10 kyr) occur in the early parts of the last four glacial periods (i.e. after Mid-Brunhes climatic shift), suggesting a role of insolation forcing on the large bipolar events in the recent glacial periods. Dome Fuji Ice Core Project members (listed in alphabetical order): Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Yutaka Ageta, Shuji Aoki, Nobuhiko Azuma, Yoshiyuki Fujii, Koji Fujita, Shuji Fujita, Kotaro Fukui, Teruo Furukawa, Atsushi Furusaki, Kumiko Goto-Azuma, Ralf Greve, Motohiro Hirabayashi, Takeo Hondoh, Akira Hori, Shinichiro Horikawa, Kazuho Horiuchi, Makoto Igarashi, Yoshinori Iizuka, Takao Kameda, Kokichi Kamiyama, Hiroshi Kanda, Kenji Kawamura, Mika Kohno, Takayuki Kuramoto, Yuki Matsushi, Morihiro Miyahara, Takayuki Miyake, Atsushi Miyamoto, Hideaki Motoyama, Yasuo Nagashima, Yoshiki Nakayama, Takakiyo Nakazawa, Fumio

  2. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, James U.L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events. PMID:26616338

  3. Millennial Climatic Fluctuations Are Key to the Structure of Last Glacial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Brian; Allen, Judy R. M.; Collingham, Yvonne C.; Hickler, Thomas; Lister, Adrian M.; Singarayer, Joy; Stuart, Anthony J.; Sykes, Martin T.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas fossil evidence indicates extensive treeless vegetation and diverse grazing megafauna in Europe and northern Asia during the last glacial, experiments combining vegetation models and climate models have to-date simulated widespread persistence of trees. Resolving this conflict is key to understanding both last glacial ecosystems and extinction of most of the mega-herbivores. Using a dynamic vegetation model (DVM) we explored the implications of the differing climatic conditions generated by a general circulation model (GCM) in “normal” and “hosing” experiments. Whilst the former approximate interstadial conditions, the latter, designed to mimic Heinrich Events, approximate stadial conditions. The “hosing” experiments gave simulated European vegetation much closer in composition to that inferred from fossil evidence than did the “normal” experiments. Given the short duration of interstadials, and the rate at which forest cover expanded during the late-glacial and early Holocene, our results demonstrate the importance of millennial variability in determining the character of last glacial ecosystems. PMID:23613985

  4. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    PubMed

    Baldini, James U L; Brown, Richard J; McElwaine, Jim N

    2015-11-30

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events.

  5. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, James U. L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events.

  6. Reconstructing paleo-ocean silicon chemistry and ecology during Last Glacial Maximum, a biogeochemical cycle modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    It has been established by a number of investigators that opal content and Si-C isotope studies in the marine sediments reveal information about paleooceanography and the impact on silicic acid utilization by marine autotrophes (diatoms, silicoflagellates) and heterotrophes (radiolarians) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Opal, as an amorphous form of SiO2, formed by marine Si-secreting organisms, has been used as a proxy to indicate chemical ocean evolution, paleoproductivity and temperature variations in the paleoenvironment and regional ocean water biogeochemical studies, both on million- and thousand-year scales. Here, we are using a model of the global silicon biogeochemical cycle to understand and reconstruct evolutionary history of the paleobiogeochemical cycle and paleoenvironment since LGM. The model is process-driven, temperature-driven, and land-ocean-sediment coupled with specific marine Si-secreting organisms that represent different trophic levels and physiological mechanisms. Specifically, Si utilization by marine silicoflagellates and radiolarians are each about 5% of that of ubiquitous marine diatoms. Available marine reactive Si is controlled by variation of diatom bioproduction that represents 5% of the total marine primary productivity (Si/C Redfield ratio in the marine organic matter is ~0.13, which is an order of magnitude higher than ratio in land organic matter). River input of Si is controlled by chemical weathering of silicate rocks and biocyling of land plant phytoliths. Decreasing dissolved and particulate Si input from land and less favorable climatic condition into LGM diminished the primary production of marine diatoms. However, because radiolarians favor deep-water habitat, where a higher level of DSi is found and that is less affected by temperature changes, a peak of relative abundance is usually observed in sedimentary record during LGM. Given that opal formation fractionated seawater δ30Si (1‰) and enriched seawater with

  7. High-elevation amplification of warming since the Last Glacial Maximum in East Africa: New perspectives from biomarker paleotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, S. E.; Russell, J. M.; Kelly, M. A.; Eggermont, H.; Verschuren, D.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical lapse rate variability on glacial/interglacial time scales has been hotly debated since the publication of CLIMAP in 1976. Low-elevation paleotemperature reconstructions from the tropics have repeatedly shown less warming from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present than reconstructions from high elevations, leading to widespread difficulty in estimating the true LGM-present temperature change in the tropics. This debate is further complicated by the fact that most paleotemperature estimates from high elevations in the tropics are derived from pollen- and moraine-based reconstructions of altitudinal shifts in vegetation belts and glacial equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs). These traditional approaches rely on the assumption that lapse rates have remained constant through time. However, this assumption is problematic in the case of the LGM, when pervasive tropical aridity most likely led to substantial changes in lapse rates. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) can be used to reconstruct paleotemperatures independent of hydrological changes, making them the ideal proxy to reconstruct high elevation temperature change and assess lapse rate variability through time. Here we present two new equatorial paleotemperature records from high elevations in East Africa (Lake Rutundu, Mt. Kenya and Lake Mahoma, Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda) based on branched GDGTs. Our record from Lake Rutundu shows deglacial warming starting near 17 ka and a mid-Holocene thermal maximum near 5 ka. The overall amplitude of warming in the Lake Rutundu record is 6.8×1.0°C from the LGM to the present, with mid-Holocene temperatures 1.6×0.9°C warmer than modern. Our record from Lake Mahoma extends back to 7 ka and shows similar temperature trends to our record from Lake Rutundu, indicating similar temporal resolution of high-elevation temperature change throughout the region. Combining these new records with three previously published GDGT temperature records from different

  8. Interhemispheric climate links revealed by late-glacial cooling episode in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Moreno, P I; Jacobson, G L; Lowell, T V; Denton, G H

    2001-02-15

    Understanding the relative timings of climate events in the Northern and Southern hemispheres is a prerequisite for determining the causes of abrupt climate changes. But climate records from the Patagonian Andes and New Zealand for the period of transition from glacial to interglacial conditions--about 14.6-10 kyr before present, as determined by radiocarbon dating--show varying degrees of correlation with similar records from the Northern Hemisphere. It is necessary to resolve these apparent discrepancies in order to be able to assess the relative roles of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and oceanic, atmospheric and astronomical influences in initiating climate change in the late-glacial period. Here we report pollen records from three sites in the Lake District of southern Chile (41 degrees S) from which we infer conditions similar to modern climate between about 13 and 12.2 14C kyr before present (BP), followed by cooling events at about 12.2 and 11.4 14C kyr BP, and then by a warming at about 9.8 14C kyr BP. These events were nearly synchronous with important palaeoclimate changes recorded in the North Atlantic region, supporting the idea that interhemispheric linkage through the atmosphere was the primary control on climate during the last deglaciation. In other regions of the Southern Hemisphere, where climate events are not in phase with those in the Northern Hemisphere, local oceanic influences may have counteracted the effects that propagated through the atmosphere.

  9. How well do we really know the timing and extent of glaciers during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Alps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Braakhekke, Jochem; Monegato, Giovanni; Gianotti, Franco; Forno, Gabriella; Hippe, Kristina; Christl, Marcus; Akçar, Naki; Schluechter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Alps saw much of the mountains inundated by ice. Several main accumulation areas comprising local ice caps and plateau icefields fit into a picture of transection glaciers flowing into huge valley glaciers. In the north the valley glaciers covered long distances (hundreds of kilometers) to reach the forelands where they spread out in fan-shaped piedmont lobes tens of kilometers across, e.g. the Rhine glacier. In the south travel distances to the mountain front were often shorter, the pathway steeper. Nevertheless, not all glaciers even reached beyond the front, as the temperatures were notably warmer in the south. For example at Orta the glacier snout remained within the mountains. Where glaciers reached the forelands they stopped abruptly and the moraine amphitheaters were constructed, e.g. at Ivrea and Rivoli-Avigliana. Sets of stacked moraines built-up as glacier advance was directly confined by the older moraines. We may temporally and spatially identify the culmination of the last glacial cycle by pinpointing the outermost moraines that date to the LGM (generally about 26-24 ka). On the other hand, the timing of abandonment of foreland positions is given by ages of the innermost, often lake-bounding, moraines (about 19-18 ka). Between the two, glacier fluctuations left the stadial moraines. In the Linth-Rhine system three stadials have been recognized: Killwangen, Schlieren and Zurich. Nevertheless, already in the Swiss sector correlation of the LGM stadials among the several foreland lobes is not unambiguous. Across the Alps, not only north to south but also west to east, how do the timing and extent of glaciers during the LGM vary? Recent glacier modelling by Seguinot et al. (2017) informs and suggests the possibility of differences in timing for reaching of the maximum extent and for the number of oscillations of individual lobes during the LGM. At present few sites in the Alps have detailed enough geomorphological

  10. Simulation of glacial ocean biogeochemical tracer and isotope distributions based on the PMIP3 suite of climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwala, Samar; Muglia, Juan; Kvale, Karin; Schmittner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the present climate system, buoyancy forced convection at high-latitudes together with internal mixing results in a vigorous overturning circulation whose major component is North Atlantic Deep Water. One of the key questions of climate science is whether this "mode" of circulation persisted during glacial periods, and in particular at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21000 years before present). Resolving this question is both important for advancing our understanding of the climate system, as well as a critical test of numerical models' ability to reliably simulate different climates. The observational evidence, based on interpreting geochemical tracers archived in sediments, is conflicting, as are simulations carried out with state-of-the-art climate models (e.g., as part of the PMIP3 suite), which, due to the computational cost involved, do not by and large include biogeochemical and isotope tracers that can be directly compared with proxy data. Here, we apply geochemical observations to evaluate the ability of several realisations of an ocean model driven by atmospheric forcing from the PMIP3 suite of climate models to simulate global ocean circulation during the LGM. This results in a wide range of circulation states that are then used to simulate biogeochemical tracer and isotope (13C, 14C and Pa/Th) distributions using an efficient, "offline" computational scheme known as the transport matrix method (TMM). One of the key advantages of this approach is the use of a uniform set of biogeochemical and isotope parameterizations across all the different circulations based on the PMIP3 models. We compare these simulated distributions to both modern observations and data from LGM ocean sediments to identify similarities and discrepancies between model and data. We find, for example, that when the ocean model is forced with wind stress from the PMIP3 models the radiocarbon age of the deep ocean is systematically younger compared with reconstructions. Changes in

  11. Glacial morphology in the Chinese Pamir: Connections among climate, erosion, topography, lithology and exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Chen, Jie; Stutz, Jamey; Sobel, Edward R.; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Kirby, Benjamin; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2014-09-01

    Modification of the landscape by glacial erosion reflects the dynamic interplay of climate through temperature, precipitation, and prevailing wind direction, and tectonics through rock uplift and exhumation rate, lithology, and range and fault geometry. We investigate these relationships in the northeast Pamir Mountains using mapping and dating of moraines and terraces to determine the glacial history. We analyze modern glacial morphology to determine glacier area, spacing, headwall relief, debris cover, and equilibrium line altitude (ELA) using the area x altitude balance ratio (AABR), toe-to-headwall altitude ratio (THAR) and toe-to-summit altitude method (TSAM) for 156 glaciers and compare this to lithologic, tectonic, and climatic data. We observe a pronounced asymmetry in glacial ELA, area, debris cover, and headwall relief that we interpret to reflect both structural and climatic control: glaciers on the downwind (eastern) side of the range are larger, more debris covered, have steeper headwalls, and tend to erode headward, truncating the smaller glaciers of the upwind, fault-controlled side of the range. We explain this by the transfer of moisture deep into the range as wind-blown or avalanched snow and by limitations imposed on glacial area on the upwind side of the range by the geometry of the Kongur extensional system (KES). The correspondence between rapid exhumation along the KES and maxima in glacier debris cover and headwall relief and minimums in all measures of ELA suggest that taller glacier headwalls develop in a response to more rapid exhumation rates. However, we find that glaciers in the Muji valley did not extend beyond the range front until at least 43 ka, in contrast to extensive glaciation since 300 ka in the south around the high peaks, a pattern which does not clearly reflect uplift rate. Instead, the difference in glacial history and the presence of large peaks (Muztagh Ata and Kongur Shan) with flanking glaciers likely reflects

  12. Glacial-interglacial climate changes recorded by debris flow fan deposits, Owens Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda-Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.

    2017-08-01

    It is hotly debated whether and how climate changes are recorded by terrestrial stratigraphy. Basin sediments produced by catchment-alluvial fan systems may record past climate over a variety of timescales, and could offer unique information about how climate controls sedimentation. Unfortunately, there are fundamental uncertainties about how climatic variables such as rainfall and temperature translate into sedimentological signals. Here, we examine 35 debris flow fan surfaces in Owens Valley, California, that record deposition throughout the past 125,000 years, during which climate has varied significantly. We show that the last full glacial-interglacial cycle is recorded with high fidelity by the grain size distributions of the debris flow deposits. These flows transported finer sediment during the cooler glacial climate, and became systematically coarser-grained as the climate warmed and dried. We explore the physical mechanisms that might explain this signal, and rule out changes in sediment supply through time. Instead, we propose that grain size records past changes in storm intensity, which is responsible for debris flow initiation in this area and is decoupled from average rainfall rates. This is supported by an exponential Clausius-Clapeyron-style scaling between grain size and temperature, and also reconciles with climate dynamics and the initiation of debris flows. The fact that these alluvial fans exhibit a strong, sustained sensitivity to orbital climate changes sheds new light on how eroding landscapes and their sedimentary products respond to climatic forcing. Finally, our findings highlight the importance of threshold-controlled events, such as storms and debris flows, in driving erosion and sedimentation at the Earth's surface in response to climate change.

  13. Analysis of the global atmospheric methane budget using ECHAM-MOZ simulations for present-day, pre-industrial time and the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, A.; Schultz, M. G.; Schröder, S.; Francois, L.; Zhang, X.; Lohmann, G.; Laepple, T.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric methane concentrations increased considerably from pre-industrial (PI) to present times largely due to anthropogenic emissions. However, firn and ice core records also document a notable rise of methane levels between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the pre-industrial era, the exact cause of which is not entirely clear. This study investigates these changes by analyzing the methane sources and sinks at each of these climatic periods. Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane and play a key role in determining methane budget changes in particular in the absence of anthropogenic sources. Here, a simple wetland parameterization suitable for coarse-scale climate simulations over long periods is introduced, which is derived from a high-resolution map of surface slopes together with various soil hydrology parameters from the CARAIB vegetation model. This parameterization was implemented in the chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5-MOZ and multi-year time slices were run for LGM, PI and present-day (PD) climate conditions. Global wetland emissions from our parameterization are 72 Tg yr-1 (LGM), 115 Tg yr-1 (PI), and 132 Tg yr-1 (PD). These estimates are lower than most previous studies, and we find a stronger increase of methane emissions between LGM and PI. Taking into account recent findings that suggest more stable OH concentrations than assumed in previous studies, the observed methane distributions are nevertheless well reproduced under the different climates. Hence, this is one of the first studies where a consistent model approach has been successfully applied for simulating methane concentrations over a wide range of climate conditions.

  14. Role of the Bering Strait on the hysteresis of the ocean conveyor belt circulation and glacial climate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Aixue; Meehl, Gerald A; Han, Weiqing; Timmermann, Axel; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Liu, Zhengyu; Washington, Warren M; Large, William; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Kimoto, Masahide; Lambeck, Kurt; Wu, Bingyi

    2012-04-24

    Abrupt climate transitions, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events, occurred frequently during the last glacial period, specifically from 80-11 thousand years before present, but were nearly absent during interglacial periods and the early stages of glacial periods, when major ice-sheets were still forming. Here we show, with a fully coupled state-of-the-art climate model, that closing the Bering Strait and preventing its throughflow between the Pacific and Arctic Oceans during the glacial period can lead to the emergence of stronger hysteresis behavior of the ocean conveyor belt circulation to create conditions that are conducive to triggering abrupt climate transitions. Hence, it is argued that even for greenhouse warming, abrupt climate transitions similar to those in the last glacial time are unlikely to occur as the Bering Strait remains open.

  15. Role of the Bering Strait on the hysteresis of the ocean conveyor belt circulation and glacial climate stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Aixue; Meehl, Gerald A.; Han, Weiqing; Timmermann, Axel; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Liu, Zhengyu; Washington, Warren M.; Large, William; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Kimoto, Masahide; Lambeck, Kurt; Wu, Bingyi

    2012-01-01

    Abrupt climate transitions, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events, occurred frequently during the last glacial period, specifically from 80–11 thousand years before present, but were nearly absent during interglacial periods and the early stages of glacial periods, when major ice-sheets were still forming. Here we show, with a fully coupled state-of-the-art climate model, that closing the Bering Strait and preventing its throughflow between the Pacific and Arctic Oceans during the glacial period can lead to the emergence of stronger hysteresis behavior of the ocean conveyor belt circulation to create conditions that are conducive to triggering abrupt climate transitions. Hence, it is argued that even for greenhouse warming, abrupt climate transitions similar to those in the last glacial time are unlikely to occur as the Bering Strait remains open. PMID:22493225

  16. High altitude Himalayan climate inferred from glacial ice flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Joel T.; Humphrey, Neil F.

    2003-07-01

    Glaciological processes are modeled to investigate precipitation patterns and the resulting mass flux of snow and ice across Himalayan topography. Our model tracks the accumulation and ablation of snow and ice and the transport of snow and ice across the topography by glacier motion. We investigate high elevation precipitation on the Annapurna Massif by comparing the existing ice cover with model-simulated glaciers produced by a suite of different precipitation scenarios. Our results suggest that precipitation reaches a maximum level well below the elevation of the highest peaks. Further, essentially no snow accumulates on the topography above an elevation of 6200-6300 m. Hence, the upper 1000+ m of the massif is a high elevation desert with little flux of snow and ice. Active glaciers are limited to a band of intermediate elevations where a maximum of about 60% of the landscape is covered by moving ice.

  17. Climate change and evolving human diversity in Europe during the last glacial.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Clive; Davies, William; Pettitt, Paul; Richards, Martin

    2004-02-29

    A link between climate change and human evolution during the Pleistocene has often been assumed but rarely tested. At the macro-evolutionary level Foley showed for hominids that extinction, rather than speciation, correlates with environmental change as recorded in the deep sea record. Our aim is to examine this finding at a smaller scale and with high-resolution environmental and archaeological archives. Our interest is in changing patterns of human dispersal under shifting Pleistocene climates during the last glacial period in Europe. Selecting this time frame and region allows us to observe how two hominid taxa, Neanderthals and Crô-Magnons, adapted to climatic conditions during oxygen isotope stage 3. These taxa are representative of two hominid adaptive radiations, termed terrestrial and aquatic, which exhibited different habitat preferences but similar tolerances to climatic factors. Their response to changing ecological conditions was predicated upon their ability to extend their societies in space and time. We examine this difference further using a database of all available radiocarbon determinations from western Europe in the late glacial. These data act as proxies for population history, and in particular the expansion and contraction of regional populations as climate changed rapidly. Independent assessment of these processes is obtained from the genetic history of Europeans. The results indicate that climate affects population contraction rather than expansion. We discuss the consequences for genetic and cultural diversity which led to the legacy of the Ice Age: a single hominid species, globally distributed.

  18. Climate change and evolving human diversity in Europe during the last glacial.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Clive; Davies, William; Pettitt, Paul; Richards, Martin

    2004-01-01

    A link between climate change and human evolution during the Pleistocene has often been assumed but rarely tested. At the macro-evolutionary level Foley showed for hominids that extinction, rather than speciation, correlates with environmental change as recorded in the deep sea record. Our aim is to examine this finding at a smaller scale and with high-resolution environmental and archaeological archives. Our interest is in changing patterns of human dispersal under shifting Pleistocene climates during the last glacial period in Europe. Selecting this time frame and region allows us to observe how two hominid taxa, Neanderthals and Crô-Magnons, adapted to climatic conditions during oxygen isotope stage 3. These taxa are representative of two hominid adaptive radiations, termed terrestrial and aquatic, which exhibited different habitat preferences but similar tolerances to climatic factors. Their response to changing ecological conditions was predicated upon their ability to extend their societies in space and time. We examine this difference further using a database of all available radiocarbon determinations from western Europe in the late glacial. These data act as proxies for population history, and in particular the expansion and contraction of regional populations as climate changed rapidly. Independent assessment of these processes is obtained from the genetic history of Europeans. The results indicate that climate affects population contraction rather than expansion. We discuss the consequences for genetic and cultural diversity which led to the legacy of the Ice Age: a single hominid species, globally distributed. PMID:15101580

  19. Friis Hills glacial history: an international collaboration to examine Miocene climate in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halberstadt, A. R. W.; Kowalewski, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Friis Hills, Antarctica (western McMurdo Dry Valleys) contain unique, well-preserved records of Miocene climate. These terrestrial deposits hold geomorphic clues for deciphering the glacial history in a region directly adjacent to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Stacked till sheets, interbedded with lake sediments and non-glacial deposits, reveal a complex history of ice flow and erosion throughout multiple glacial-interglacial cycles (Lewis and Ashworth, 2015). Fossiliferous beds containing Nothofagus, diatoms, algal cells, pollen, insects, and mosses provide past climatological constraints. The Friis Hills sustained multiple alpine glaciations as well as full ice-sheet development, recording glacial drainage reorganization and evidence of previous ice configurations that possibly overrode the Transantarctic Mountains (Lewis and Ashworth, 2015) exposing only scattered nunataks (i.e. a portion of Friis Hills). Lack of chronological control has previously hindered efforts to link the Friis Hills glacial history with regional context; a tephra deposit at the base of the glacial drifts currently provides a single age constraint within the drift deposits. To build upon previous studies, an international collaboration between the USAP, Antarctic New Zealand, and the Italian Antarctic community proposes to core a paleo-lake in the center of the Friis Hills in November 2016, thereby acquiring one of the oldest continuous sedimentological records within the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Here we report discoveries from this year's fieldwork, and reconstruct paleoenvironment at the periphery of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet for the mid-early Miocene, a critical time when marine isotopic records indicate dramatic ice fluctuations. Ash within the sediment core stratigraphy will provide a more robust chronology for the region, and will also suggest possible outcrop locations of corresponding ash deposits to pursue while in the field. We anticipate that the Friis Hills stratigraphy will

  20. Vegetation and climate changes in western Amazonia during a previous Interglacial- Glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. L.; Gosling, W. D.; Sherlock, S. C.; Poole, I.; Pennington, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Amazonia is one of the most biodiverse areas of the world and its vegetation plays a crucial role in controlling the global climate through the regulation of the levels of atmospheric CO2. However, Amazonian ecosystems and their role in the climate system are threatened by ongoing the human impact (already estimated loss of 60% of the species in western Amazonia) and predicted climate change (+1.1-6.4oC by 2100). Unfortunately, there is absence of data relating to the ecological baseline function and response to global climate change of western Amazonian ecosystems in the absence of humans. To help anticipate the impact of future climate change predictions an improved understanding of the natural responses of tropical vegetation to known past climate change is required. Here we present the first study that shows the response of pristine tropical ecosystems in western Amazonia biodiversity hotspot to a major global climate change event (a Quaternary Interglacial-Glacial transition). Pleistocene lake/swamp sediments preserved at the Erazo study site (Lat. 00o 33’S, Long. 077o 52’W, 1927m alt.) today within tropical cloud forest vegetation provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of past climate shifts. The sediment are >40,000 years old (radiocarbon infinite) and younger than 1 million years (presence of Alder biomarker) and consist of organic layers interbedded with volcanic ash (tephra). This study presents data from multiple proxies (fossil pollen, wood macrofossils and charcoal) to establish a comprehensive picture of regional and local vegetation change prior to human arrival. Our data show a change of vegetation from palm-dominated forest indicative of warm and wet conditions similar to the present at the base of this record, to a forest dominated by Podocarpus sp. suggesting cold and wet conditions at the top of the record. The transition between these two vegetation communities appears to be progressive with small sharp changes along the

  1. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Lachniet, Matthew S; Denniston, Rhawn F; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J

    2014-05-02

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle.

  2. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Denniston, Rhawn F.; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J.

    2014-05-01

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle.

  3. Genetic signals of demographic expansion in Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) after the last North American glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Pulgarín-R, Paulo C; Burg, Theresa M

    2012-01-01

    The glacial cycles of the Pleistocene have been recognized as important, large-scale historical processes that strongly influenced the demographic patterns and genetic structure of many species. Here we present evidence of a postglacial expansion for the Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), a common member of the forest bird communities in North America with a continental distribution. DNA sequences from the mitochondrial tRNA-Lys, and ATPase 6 and 8 genes, and microsatellite data from seven variable loci were combined with a species distribution model (SDM) to infer possible historical scenarios for this species after the last glacial maximum. Analyses of Downy Woodpeckers from 23 geographic areas suggested little differentiation, shallow genealogical relationships, and limited population structure across the species' range. Microsatellites, which have higher resolution and are able to detect recent differences, revealed two geographic groups where populations along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains (Montana, Utah, Colorado, and southern Alberta) were genetically isolated from the rest of the sampled populations. Mitochondrial DNA, an important marker to detect historical patterns, recovered only one group. However, populations in Idaho and southeast BC contained high haplotype diversity and, in general were characterized by the absence of the most common mtDNA haplotype. The SDM suggested several areas in the southern US as containing suitable Downy Woodpecker habitat during the LGM. The lack of considerable geographic structure and the starburst haplotype network, combined with several population genetic tests, suggest a scenario of demographic expansion during the last part of Pleistocene and early Holocene.

  4. Saharan Wind Regimes Traced by the Sr-Nd Isotopic Composition of Subtropical Atlantic Sediments: Last Glacial Maximum vs Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grousset, F. E.; Parra, M.; Bory, A.; Martinez, P.; Bertrand, P.; Shimmield, G.; Ellam, R. M.

    New Nd-Sr isotopic data on the <30 μm lithic particles of surface and Last Glacial Maximum sediments recovered along the African margin between the Equator and the Gibraltar Strait are presented in combination with grain-size measurements. This <30 μm size fraction allows us to eliminate any hemipelagic contribution that could occur in the coarser fractions. In the eolian fraction, both Sr and Nd isotopic tracers reveal the same major northwestern origin (Mauritania, Mali, southern Algeria and Morocco). The Archaean formations of the western Saharan shield could be the source of the very unradiogenic ratios observed here. The more southern regions (Senegal, Guinea) act only as secondary sources. A similar pattern is observed for the LGM. Lithic particles are mostly transported by both Trade and Saharan Air Layer (SAL) winds, along an approximate NE-SW axis; this main feature matches the 'southern plume', characterizing the dust transport observed during winter. No significant latitudinal shift of the belt winds is observed between the LGM and today. At the LGM, however, dust fluxes were 2-4 times higher than today, leading to a more 'Archaean-type' imprint in the deposits. We do not observe any clear relationship between the latitudinal variability of the upwelling systems identified in this region at the LGM and the location of the major wind systems. Both enhanced aridity on the continent and increased wind speed probably occurred together over western tropical Africa during the Last Glacial period.

  5. Flow of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet on the continental margin of the Bellingshausen Sea at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Larter, Rob D.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Pudsey, Carol J.; Evans, Jeffrey; Morris, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Geophysical data show that during the last glaciation the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) drained to the continental shelf edge of the Bellingshausen Sea through a cross-shelf bathymetric trough (Belgica Trough) as a grounded, fast flowing, ice stream. The drainage basin feeding this ice stream probably encompassed southwestern Palmer Land, parts of southern Alexander Island, and the Bryan Coast of Ellsworth Land, with an area exceeding 200,000 km2. On the inner continental shelf, streamlined bedrock and drumlins mapped by swath bathymetry show that the ice stream was fed by convergent ice flow draining from Eltanin Bay and bays to the east, as well as by ice draining the southern part of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet through the Ronne Entrance. The presence of a paleoice stream in Belgica Trough is indicated by megascale glacial lineations formed in soft till and a trough mouth fan on the continental margin. Grounding zone wedges on the inner and midshelf record ice marginal stillstands during deglaciation and imply a staggered pattern of ice sheet retreat. These new data indicate an extensive WAIS at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) on the Bellingshausen Sea continental margin, which advanced to the shelf edge. In conjunction with ice sheet reconstructions from the Antarctic Peninsula and Pine Island Bay, this implies a regionally extensive ice sheet configuration during the LGM along the Antarctic Peninsula, Bellingshausen Sea, and Amundsen Sea margins, with fast flowing ice streams draining the WAIS and Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet to the continental shelf edge.

  6. Simulating soil organic carbon in yedoma deposits during the Last Glacial Maximum in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Peng, S.; Ciais, P.; Zech, R.; Krinner, G.; Zimov, S.; Grosse, G.

    2016-05-01

    Substantial quantities of organic carbon (OC) are stored in the thick, ice-rich, and organic-rich sediments called yedoma deposits, distributed in eastern Siberia and Alaska today. Quantifying yedoma carbon stocks during the glacial period is important for understanding how much carbon could have been decomposed during the last deglaciation. Yet processes that yield the formation of thick frozen OC in yedoma deposits are missing in global carbon cycle models. Here we incorporate sedimentation parameterizations into the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE-MICT) land surface model, which leads to reasonable results in OC vertical distribution and regional budgets, compared with site-specific observations and inventories for today's nondegraded yedoma region. Simulated total soil OC stock for the northern permafrost region during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is 1536-1592 Pg C, of which 390-446 Pg C is within today's yedoma region. This result is an underestimation since we did not account for the potentially much larger yedoma area during the LGM than the present day.

  7. Genetic Signals of Demographic Expansion in Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) after the Last North American Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Pulgarín-R, Paulo C.; Burg, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    The glacial cycles of the Pleistocene have been recognized as important, large-scale historical processes that strongly influenced the demographic patterns and genetic structure of many species. Here we present evidence of a postglacial expansion for the Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), a common member of the forest bird communities in North America with a continental distribution. DNA sequences from the mitochondrial tRNA-Lys, and ATPase 6 and 8 genes, and microsatellite data from seven variable loci were combined with a species distribution model (SDM) to infer possible historical scenarios for this species after the last glacial maximum. Analyses of Downy Woodpeckers from 23 geographic areas suggested little differentiation, shallow genealogical relationships, and limited population structure across the species’ range. Microsatellites, which have higher resolution and are able to detect recent differences, revealed two geographic groups where populations along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains (Montana, Utah, Colorado, and southern Alberta) were genetically isolated from the rest of the sampled populations. Mitochondrial DNA, an important marker to detect historical patterns, recovered only one group. However, populations in Idaho and southeast BC contained high haplotype diversity and, in general were characterized by the absence of the most common mtDNA haplotype. The SDM suggested several areas in the southern US as containing suitable Downy Woodpecker habitat during the LGM. The lack of considerable geographic structure and the starburst haplotype network, combined with several population genetic tests, suggest a scenario of demographic expansion during the last part of Pleistocene and early Holocene. PMID:22792306

  8. Migration of the subtropical front as a modulator of glacial climate.

    PubMed

    Bard, Edouard; Rickaby, Rosalind E M

    2009-07-16

    Ice cores extracted from the Antarctic ice sheet suggest that glacial conditions, and the relationship between isotopically derived temperatures and atmospheric PCO(2) have been constant over the last 800,000 years of the Late Pleistocene epoch. But independent lines of evidence, such as the extent of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, sea level and other temperature records, point towards a fluctuating severity of glacial periods, particularly during the more extreme glacial stadials centred around 340,000 and 420,000 years ago (marine isotope stages 10 and 12). Previously unidentified mechanisms therefore appear to have mediated the relationship between insolation, CO(2) and climate. Here we test whether northward migration of the subtropical front (STF) off the southeastern coast of South Africa acts as a gatekeeper for the Agulhas current, which controls the transport of heat and salt from the Indo-Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean. Using a new 800,000-year record of sea surface temperature and ocean productivity from ocean sediment core MD962077, we demonstrate that during cold stadials (particularly marine isotope stages 10 and 12), productivity peaked and sea surface temperature was up to 6 degrees C cooler than modern temperatures. This suggests that during these cooler stadials, the STF moved northward by up to 7 degrees latitude, nearly shutting off the Agulhas current. Our results, combined with faunal assemblages from the south Atlantic show that variable northwards migration of the Southern Hemisphere STF can modulate the severity of each glacial period by altering the strength of the Agulhas current carrying heat and salt to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. We show hence that the degree of northwards migration of the STF can partially decouple global climate from atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide, P CO(2), and help to resolve the long-standing puzzle of differing glacial amplitudes within a consistent range of atmospheric

  9. Abrupt climate and vegetation variability of eastern Anatolia during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickarski, N.; Kwiecien, O.; Langgut, D.; Litt, T.

    2015-11-01

    Detailed analyses of the Lake Van pollen, Ca / K ratio, and stable oxygen isotope record allow the identification of millennial-scale vegetation and environmental changes in eastern Anatolia throughout the last glacial (~ 111.5-11.7 ka BP). The climate of the last glacial was cold and dry, indicated by low arboreal pollen (AP) levels. The driest and coldest period corresponds to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 (~ 28-14.5 ka BP), which was dominated by highest values of xerophytic steppe vegetation. Our high-resolution multi-proxy record shows rapid expansions and contractions of tree populations that reflect variability in temperature and moisture availability. These rapid vegetation and environmental changes can be related to the stadial-interstadial pattern of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events as recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Periods of reduced moisture availability were characterized by enhanced occurrence of xerophytic species and high terrigenous input from the Lake Van catchment area. Furthermore, the comparison with the marine realm reveals that the complex atmosphere-ocean interaction can be explained by the strength and position of the westerlies, which are responsible for the supply of humidity in eastern Anatolia. Influenced by the diverse topography of the Lake Van catchment, more pronounced DO interstadials (e.g., DO 19, 17-16, 14, 12 and 8) show the strongest expansion of temperate species within the last glacial. However, Heinrich events (HE), characterized by highest concentrations of ice-rafted debris (IRD) in marine sediments, cannot be separated from other DO stadials based on the vegetation composition in eastern Anatolia. In addition, this work is a first attempt to establish a continuous microscopic charcoal record for the last glacial in the Near East. It documents an immediate response to millennial-scale climate and environmental variability and enables us to shed light on the history of fire activity during the last glacial.

  10. Deep lakes in the Polar Urals - unique archives for reconstructing the Quaternary climate and glacial history in the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, J.; Gyllencreutz, R.; Henriksen, M.; Lohne, O. S.; Mangerud, J.; Nazarov, D.

    2009-12-01

    A lake coring campaign in the Polar Urals is carried out within the framework of the Norwegian-Russian IPY-project “The Ice Age Development and Human Settlement in Northern Eurasia” (ICEHUS). The overall aim of the project is to improve the description and understanding of the Late Quaternary environmental and climate changes in the Russian Arctic and how these changes may have affected the early human occupation. In order to obtain a continuous record of climate variability back in time seismic records and sediment cores have been collected from selected mountain lakes. The summer of 2009 we cored two lakes situated near the water shed in the interior northernmost Urals. Seismic profiles show that both these glacially eroded basins contain thick sequences of Quaternary sediments. The thickest strata were found in Bolshoye Shuchye, the largest and deepest lake in the Ural Mountains. This lake is 13 km long and 140 m deep and contains more than 130 m of acoustically laminated sediments. These strata probably accumulated over a rather long time span, possibly covering several interglacial-glacial cycles. Up to 24 m long cores were obtained from the lake floors. We anticipate that they will provide unique high resolution records of the climate and glacial history during the last Ice Age. The seismic records and the sediment cores will form a well-founded basis for assessing the potential and possibilities to core also the deeper strata that could not be reached with the applied coring equipment. In view of the obtained results from the investigated basins, as well as other geological and geochronological data from the surrounding areas, we find it highly unlikely that any glaciers extended into these lakes during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), supporting our current hypothesis that the local glaciers in the Polar Urals remained small during the LGM. Our observations indicate that the mountain valleys have been essentially ice free since Marine Isotope Stage 4, at

  11. Bayesian comparison of conceptual models of abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Niklas; Ghil, Michael; Rousseau, Denis-Didier

    2017-04-01

    Records of oxygen isotope ratios and dust concentrations from the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) provide accurate proxies for the evolution of Arctic temperature and atmospheric circulation during the last glacial period (12ka to 100ka b2k) [1]. The most distinctive feature of these records are sudden transitions, called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, during which Arctic temperatures increased by up to 10 K within a few decades. These warming events are consistently followed by more gradual cooling in Antarctica [2]. The physical mechanisms responsible for these transitions and their out-of-phase relationship between the northern and southern hemisphere remain unclear. Substantial evidence hints at variations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as a key mechanism [2,3], but also other mechanisms, such as variations of sea ice extent [4] or ice shelf coverage [5] may play an important role. Here, we intend to shed more light on the relevance of the different mechanisms suggested to explain the abrupt climate changes and their inter-hemispheric coupling. For this purpose, several conceptual differential equation models are developed that represent the suggested physical mechanisms. Optimal parameters for each model candidate are then determined via maximum likelihood estimation with respect to the observed paleoclimatic data. Our approach is thus semi-empirical: While a model's general form is deduced from physical arguments about relevant climatic mechanisms — oceanic and atmospheric — its specific parameters are obtained by training the model on observed data. The distinct model candidates are evaluated by comparing statistical properties of time series simulated with these models to the observed statistics. In particular, Bayesian model selection criteria like Maximum Likelihood Ratio tests are used to obtain a hierarchy of the different candidates in terms of their likelihood, given the observed oxygen isotope and dust time series

  12. Vegetation history since the last glacial maximum in the Ozark highlands (USA): A new record from Cupola Pond, Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Rachel A.; Williams, John W.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2017-08-01

    The timing and drivers of vegetation dynamics and formation of no-analog plant communities during the last deglaciation in the unglaciated southeastern US are poorly understood. We present a multi-proxy record spanning the past 19,800 years from Cupola Pond in the Ozarks Mountains, consisting of replicate high-resolution pollen records, 25 AMS radiocarbon dates, and macrofossil, charcoal, and coprophilous spore analyses. Full-glacial Pinus and Picea forests gave way to no-analog vegetation after 17,400 yr BP, followed by development of Quercus-dominated Holocene forests, with late Holocene rises in Pinus and Nyssa. Vegetation transitions, replicated in different cores, are closely linked to hemispheric climate events. Rising Quercus abundances coincide with increasing Northern Hemisphere temperatures and CO2 at 17,500 yr BP, declining Pinus and Picea at 14,500 yr BP are near the Bølling-Allerød onset, and rapid decline of Fraxinus and rise of Ostrya/Carpinus occur 12,700 yr BP during the Younger Dryas. The Cupola no-analog vegetation record is unusual for its early initiation (17,000 yr BP) and for its three vegetation zones, representing distinct rises of Fraxinus and Ostrya/Carpinus. Sporormiella was absent and sedimentary charcoal abundances were low throughout, suggesting that fire and megaherbivores were not locally important agents of disturbance and turnover. The Cupola record thus highlights the complexity of the late-glacial no-analog communities and suggests direct climatic regulation of their formation and disassembly.

  13. Deep circulation changes in the South Atlantic since the Last Glacial Maximum from Nd isotope and multi-proxy records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R.; Abouchami, W.; Zahn, R.; Masque, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report down-core sedimentary Nd isotope (εNd) records from two South Atlantic sediment cores, MD02-2594 and GeoB3603-2, located on the western South African continental margin. The core sites are positioned downstream of the present-day flow path of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and close to the Southern Ocean, which makes them suitable for reconstructing past variability in NADW circulation over the last glacial cycle. The Fe-Mn leachates εNd records show a coherent decreasing trend from glacial radiogenic values towards less radiogenic values during the Holocene. This trend is confirmed by εNd in fish debris and mixed planktonic foraminifera, albeit with an offset during the Holocene to lower values relative to the leachates, matching the present-day composition of NADW in the Cape Basin. We interpret the εNd changes as reflecting the glacial shoaling of Southern Ocean waters to shallower depths combined with the admixing of southward flowing Northern Component Water (NCW). A compilation of Atlantic εNd records reveals increasing radiogenic isotope signatures towards the south and with increasing depth. This signal is most prominent during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and of similar amplitude across the Atlantic basin, suggesting continuous deep water production in the North Atlantic and export to the South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. The amplitude of the εNd change from the LGM to Holocene is largest in the southernmost cores, implying a greater sensitivity to the deglacial strengthening of NADW at these sites. This signal impacted most prominently the South Atlantic deep and bottom water layers that were particularly deprived of NCW during the LGM. The εNd variations correlate with changes in 231Pa/230Th ratios and benthic δ13C across the deglacial transition. Together with the contrasting 231Pa/230Th: εNd pattern of the North and South Atlantic, this indicates a progressive reorganization of the AMOC to full strength during the Holocene.

  14. Imaging Evidence for Hubbard Glacier Advances and Retreats since the Last Glacial Maximum in Disenchantment and Yakutat Bays, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, J.; Gulick, S. P.; Levoir, M. A.; Goff, J. A.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    confirms at least two of these advances to be during the Holocene while the oldest may represent the Last Glacial Maximum. The most recent advance likely reached its terminal position at the mouth of Disenchantment Bay, never entering Yakutat Bay. Our interpretation suggests that the Hubbard Glacier has repeatedly advanced around the east side of Yakutat Bay in Knight Island Channel, possibly due to the presence of Malaspina Glacier cutting off access to the central Yakutat Bay during a time of mutual advance. Within the rang