Science.gov

Sample records for glacial refugial site

  1. Reconstruction of full glacial environments and summer temperatures from Lago della Costa, a refugial site in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samartin, Stéphanie; Heiri, Oliver; Kaltenrieder, Petra; Kühl, Norbert; Tinner, Willy

    2016-07-01

    Vegetation and climate during the last ice age and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼23,000-19,000 cal BP) were considerably different than during the current interglacial (Holocene). Cold climatic conditions and growing ice-sheets during the last glaciation radically reduced forest extent in Europe to a restricted number of so-called ;refugia;, mostly located in the southern part of the continent. On the basis of paleobotanical analyses the Euganian Hills (Colli Euganei) in northeastern Italy have previously been proposed as one of the northernmost refugia of temperate trees (e.g. deciduous Quercus, Tilia, Ulmus, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer, Abies alba, Fagus sylvatica, Carpinus and Castanea) in Europe. In this study we provide the first quantitative, vegetation independent summer air temperature reconstruction for Northern Italy spanning the time ∼31,000-17,000 cal yr BP, which covers the coldest periods of the last glacial, including the LGM and Heinrich stadials 1 to 3. Chironomids preserved in a lake sediment core from Lago della Costa (7m a.s.l.), a small lake at the south-eastern edge of the Euganean Hills, allowed quantitative reconstruction of Full and Late Glacial summer air temperatures using a combined Swiss-Norwegian temperature inference model based on chironomid assemblages from 274 lakes. Chironomid and pollen evidence from Lago della Costa derives from finely stratified autochthonous organic gyttja sediments, which excludes major sediment mixing or reworking. After reconstructing paleo-temperatures, we address the question whether climate conditions were warm enough to permit the local survival of temperate tree species during the LGM and whether local expansions and pollen-inferred contractions of temperate tree taxa coincided with chironomid-inferred climatic changes. Our results suggest that chironomids at Lago della Costa have responded to major climatic fluctuations such as temperature decreases during the LGM and Heinrich stadials. The

  2. Reconstruction of full glacial environments and summer air temperatures from Lago della Costa, a refugial site in northeastern Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samartin, S. V.; Heiri, O.; Boltshauser-Kaltenrieder, P.; Tinner, W.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation and climate during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) were considerably different than during the current interglacial (Holocene). In Europe large areas north of 40°N were entirely covered by continental ice-sheets and widespread permafrost, with temperatures around 10-20°C lower than at present, whereas further south aridity and temperatures 7-10°C cooler than today occurred. Cool climatic conditions and growing ice-sheets during the LGM radically reduced forest extent and diversity in Europe to a restricted number of so-called "refugia", mostly located in the southern part of the continent. The Euganian Hills in northeastern Italy are supposed to be one of the northernmost refugia of thermophilous mixed oak forest species (e.g. deciduous Quercus, Tilia, Ulmus, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer, Carpinus, Castanea) as well of some temperate mesophilous species (e.g. Fagus sylvatica, Abies alba) in Europe. In this study we present the first European chironomid-based quantitative temperature reconstruction for the LGM and address the question whether climate conditions were warm enough to permit the local survival of Quercetum mixtum species between ca. 31'000-17'000 cal yr BP. Chironomids preserved in a lake sediment core from Lago della Costa (7m a.s.l.), a lake on the border of the Euganean Hills in northeastern Italy, allowed quantitative reconstruction of Full and Late Glacial July air temperatures using a combined Swiss-Norwegian temperature inference model based on chironomid assemblages from 274 lakes. Our results suggest that July air temperatures never fell below 10°C which are considered necessary for forest growth. In general, mild climatic conditions prevailed between ca. 31'000-17'000 cal yr BP with temperatures ranging from ca. 11°C to 15.7°C. The expansion of thermophilous trees such as Quercus, Tilia, Ulmus, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer, Carpinus, Castanea (Quercetum mixtum) between ca. 30'000-23'000 cal yr BP can most likely be explained by climate

  3. Did glacials and/or interglacials promote allopatric incipient speciation in East Asian temperate plants? Phylogeographic and coalescent analyses on refugial isolation and divergence in Dysosma versipellis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Guan, Bi-Cai; Fu, Cheng-Xin; Comes, Hans Peter

    2009-05-01

    To explore the evolutionary consequences of climate-induced fluctuations in presently fragmented temperate forest habitats in continental East Asia we investigated the phylogeography and demographic history of the temperate-deciduous forest endemic Dysosma versipellis from disjunct montane sites in Central-Southeast China. Based on a survey of chloroplast (cp) DNA sequence variation, our analyses show that this perennial herb consists of morphologically indistinguishable western and central/eastern cpDNA lineages. Coalescent analyses under the 'isolation with migration' (IM) model support an ancient (Mid-Pleistocene) divergence between these lineages, with the western lineage having persisted without significant population growth in a long-term refuge just east of the Tibetan (Qinghai-Xizang) Plateau. In contrast, for the central/eastern lineage, we found strong evidence for population expansion from a refuge located south of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, and likely coinciding with the last or penultimate interglacial, followed by considerable population isolation and divergence in situ over (at least) the latest glacial-interglacial cycle. In line with recent evidence from palaeomodeling of East Asian forest biomes, our results suggest that the same vicariance factor, i.e. climate-induced eco-geographic isolation through (a)biotic displacement of temperate-deciduous forested habitats, promoted the divergence of D. versipellis lineages and populations at different spatial-temporal scales and over glacial and interglacial periods. Thus, there is no evidence that populations of D. versipellis merged at lower elevations during the last glacial(s). As such, D. versipellis accords with the premise that Late Quaternary refugial isolation is likely to have enhanced allopatric (incipient) species formation of temperate plants in East Asia.

  4. Aspects of conducting site investigations in glacial terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.E. )

    1993-03-01

    Much of northern US is mantled by Pleistocene glacial drift consisting of heterogeneous deposits of fine to coarse-textured sediments. Hazardous waste site investigations in glacial settings can often present unique design and implementation considerations. Complex glacial stratigraphy encountered during drilling activities demands flexibility built into work plans to allow for field decisions based on field conditions. Continuous cores should be collected from boreholes on a routine basis for stratigraphic purposes with particular importance assigned to field identification of relative permeabilities of stratigraphic units. Selection of appropriate field screening methodology should be based on site conditions. Utilization of open borehole groundwater sampling is recommended for fine-textured glacial settings where soil gas and well point sampling are ineffective. Installation of boreholes allows for collection of stratigraphic information and enables more surface area exposed beneath the water table for groundwater recharge and sampling. Water level determinations can be made on open boreholes for an initial assessment of the horizontal direction of groundwater flow. Placement of screens for monitoring wells should be based on field determination of likely groundwater flow paths. Nested wells are necessary to define the vertical groundwater flow system at most sites. Evaluation of the vertical flow system can often dominate site investigations in fine-textured glacial terrain. Two case studies from Iowa illustrate the usefulness of incorporating the above considerations in planning and implementing in fine-textured glacial sediments. Field investigations utilizing open borehole groundwater sampling successfully delineated site glacial geology and hydrogeology for determination of the nature and extent of groundwater contamination and better located the horizontal and vertical placement of monitoring wells.

  5. Glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas--from an area-wide glacial lake inventory to on-site and modeling based risk assessment of critical glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Glacial lake hazards and glacial lake distributions are investigated in many glaciated regions of the world, but comparably little attention has been given to these topics in the Indian Himalayas. In this study we present a first area-wide glacial lake inventory, including a qualitative classification at 251 glacial lakes >0.01 km(2). Lakes were detected in the five states spanning the Indian Himalayas, and lake distribution pattern and lake characteristics were found to differ significantly between regions. Three glacial lakes, from different geographic and climatic regions within the Indian Himalayas were then selected for a detailed risk assessment. Lake outburst probability, potential outburst magnitudes and associated damage were evaluated on the basis of high-resolution satellite imagery, field assessments and through the use of a dynamic model. The glacial lakes analyzed in the states of Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh were found to present moderate risks to downstream villages, whereas the lake in Sikkim severely threatens downstream locations. At the study site in Sikkim, a dam breach could trigger drainage of ca. 16×10(6)m(3) water and generate maximum lake discharge of nearly 7000 m(3) s(-). The identification of critical glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas and the detailed risk assessments at three specific sites allow prioritizing further investigations and help in the definition of risk reduction actions.

  6. Refugial persistence and postglacial recolonization of North America by the cold-tolerant herbaceous plant Orthilia secunda.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Gemma E; Provan, Jim

    2010-11-01

    Previous phylogeographical and palaeontological studies on the biota of northern North America have revealed a complex scenario of glacial survival in multiple refugia and differing patterns of postglacial recolonization. Many putative refugial regions have been proposed both north and south of the ice sheets for species during the Last Glacial Maximum, but the locations of many of these refugia remain a topic of great debate. In this study, we used a phylogeographical approach to elucidate the refugial and recolonization history of the herbaceous plant species Orthilia secunda in North America, which is found in disjunct areas in the west and east of the continent, most of which were either glaciated or lay close to the limits of the ice sheets. Analysis of 596 bp of the chloroplast trnS-trnG intergenic spacer and five microsatellite loci in 84 populations spanning the species' range in North America suggests that O. secunda persisted through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in western refugia, even though palaeodistribution modelling indicated a suitable climate envelope across the entire south of the continent. The present distribution of the species has resulted from recolonization from refugia north and south of the ice sheets, most likely in Beringia or coastal regions of Alaska and British Columbia, the Washington/Oregon region in the northwest USA, and possibly from the region associated with the putative 'ice-free corridor' between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets. Our findings also highlight the importance of the Pacific Northwest as an important centre of intraspecific genetic diversity, owing to a combination of refugial persistence in the area and recolonization from other refugia.

  7. Glacial-Interglacial, Orbital and Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle at Shackleton Site U1385 based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying Site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated (sub)millennial-scale (~600 year interval) dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from Shackleton Site U1385 (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity/upwelling over the last 152 kyrs. In addition, our approach allows for detailed land-sea correlations, because we also counted assemblages of pollen and spores from higher plants. Dinocyst SST and upwelling proxies, as well as warm/cold pollen proxies from Site U1385 show glacial-interglacial, orbital and stadial-interstadial climate variability and correlate very well to Uk'37, planktic foraminifer δ18O and Ca/Ti proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and Greenland Ice Core δ18O. The palynological proxies capture (almost) all Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last glacial cycle, also before ~70 ka, where millennial-scale variability is overprinted by precession. We compare the performance and results of the palynology of Site U1385 to proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and conclude that palynology strengthens the potential of this site to form a multi-proxy reference section for millennial scale climate variability across the Pleistocene-Holocene. Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down

  8. A Complex System of Glacial Sub-Refugia Drives Endemic Freshwater Biodiversity on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Clewing, Catharina; Albrecht, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Although only relatively few freshwater invertebrate families are reported from the Tibetan Plateau, the degree of endemism may be high. Many endemic lineages occur within permafrost areas, raising questions about the existence of isolated intra-plateau glacial refugia. Moreover, if such refugia existed, it might be instructive to learn whether they were associated with lakes or with more dynamic ecosystems such as ponds, wetlands, or springs. To study these hypotheses, we used pulmonate snails of the plateau-wide distributed genus Radix as model group and the Lake Donggi Cona drainage system, located in the north-eastern part of the plateau, as model site. First, we performed plateau-wide phylogenetic analyses using mtDNA data to assess the overall relationships of Radix populations inhabiting the Lake Donggi Cona system for revealing refugial lineages. We then conducted regional phylogeographical analyses applying a combination of mtDNA and nuclear AFLP markers to infer the local structure and demographic history of the most abundant endemic Radix clade for identifying location and type of (sub-)refugia within the drainage system. Our phylogenetic analysis showed a high diversity of Radix lineages in the Lake Donggi Cona system. Subsequent phylogeographical analyses of the most abundant endemic clade indicated a habitat-related clustering of genotypes and several Late Pleistocene spatial/demographic expansion events. The most parsimonious explanation for these patterns would be a scenario of an intra-plateau glacial refugium in the Lake Donggi Cona drainage system, which might have consisted of isolated sub-refugia. Though the underlying processes remain unknown, an initial separation of lake and watershed populations could have been triggered by lake-level fluctuations before and during the Last Glacial Maximum. This study inferred the first intra-plateau refugium for freshwater animals on the Tibetan Plateau. It thus sheds new light on the evolutionary history

  9. A Complex System of Glacial Sub-Refugia Drives Endemic Freshwater Biodiversity on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Clewing, Catharina; Albrecht, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although only relatively few freshwater invertebrate families are reported from the Tibetan Plateau, the degree of endemism may be high. Many endemic lineages occur within permafrost areas, raising questions about the existence of isolated intra-plateau glacial refugia. Moreover, if such refugia existed, it might be instructive to learn whether they were associated with lakes or with more dynamic ecosystems such as ponds, wetlands, or springs. To study these hypotheses, we used pulmonate snails of the plateau-wide distributed genus Radix as model group and the Lake Donggi Cona drainage system, located in the north-eastern part of the plateau, as model site. First, we performed plateau-wide phylogenetic analyses using mtDNA data to assess the overall relationships of Radix populations inhabiting the Lake Donggi Cona system for revealing refugial lineages. We then conducted regional phylogeographical analyses applying a combination of mtDNA and nuclear AFLP markers to infer the local structure and demographic history of the most abundant endemic Radix clade for identifying location and type of (sub-)refugia within the drainage system. Our phylogenetic analysis showed a high diversity of Radix lineages in the Lake Donggi Cona system. Subsequent phylogeographical analyses of the most abundant endemic clade indicated a habitat-related clustering of genotypes and several Late Pleistocene spatial/demographic expansion events. The most parsimonious explanation for these patterns would be a scenario of an intra-plateau glacial refugium in the Lake Donggi Cona drainage system, which might have consisted of isolated sub-refugia. Though the underlying processes remain unknown, an initial separation of lake and watershed populations could have been triggered by lake-level fluctuations before and during the Last Glacial Maximum. This study inferred the first intra-plateau refugium for freshwater animals on the Tibetan Plateau. It thus sheds new light on the evolutionary history

  10. Results of geophysical surveys of glacial deposits near a former waste-disposal site, Nashua, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Dorgan, Tracy H.

    1995-01-01

    Geophysical investigations were done near a former waste-disposal site in Nashua, New Hampshire to determine the thickness and infer hydraulic characteristics of the glacial sediments that underlie the area. Approximately 5 miles of ground- penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected in the study area by use of dual-80 Megahertz antennas. Three distinct radar-reflection signatures were evident from the data and are interpreted to represent (1) glacial lake-bottom sediments, (2) coarse sand and gravel and (or) sandy glacial till, and (3) bedrock. The GPR signal penetrated as much as 70 feet of sediment in coarse-grained areas, but penetration depth was generally less than 40 feet in extensive areas of fine-grained deposits. Geologic features were evident in many of the profiles. Glacial-lake-bottom sediments were the most common features identified. Other features include deltas deposited in glacial Lake Nashua and lobate fans of sediment deposited subaqueously at the distal end of deltaic sediments. Cross-bedded sands were often identifiable in the deltaic sediments. Seismic-refraction data were also collected at five of the GPR data sites. In most cases, depths to the water table and to the till and (or) bedrock surface indicated by the seismic-refraction data compared favorably with depths calculated from the GPR data. Test holes were drilled at three locations to determine the true depths to radar reflectors and to determine the types of geologic material represented by the various reflectors.

  11. Late-glacial vegetation and climate at the Manis Mastodon site, Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Kenneth L.; Mehringer, Peter J.; Gustafson, Carl E.

    1983-09-01

    As the late Wisconsin Cordilleran Ice Sheet retreated, sediment accumulated in shallow depressions at the Manis Mastodon Archaeological site on the Olympic Peninsula, near Sequim, Washington. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and bones of mastodon, caribou, and bison occur within the lower 47 cm of these deposits. The fossil pollen and seed assemblages indicate persistence for 1000 yr (11,000-12,000 yr B.P.) of an herb-and-shrub-dominated landscape at a time when forest species appear elsewhere in Washington and in adjacent British Columbia. At present, Sequim is near the northern coastal limits of both Cactaceae and Ceratophyllum. Mean annual precipitation is 42.7 cm and summer temperatures average 15°-16°C in July. The absence of coniferous trees and the presence of cactus and Ceratophyllum in late-glacial sediments are explained by a regional climate that was drier and at least as warm as today. These conditions persisted in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains until at least 11,000 yr B.P.

  12. Lithic technological responses to Late Pleistocene glacial cycling at Pinnacle Point Site 5-6, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kyle S.; Oestmo, Simen; Pereira, Telmo; Ranhorn, Kathryn L.; Schoville, Benjamin J.; Marean, Curtis W.

    2017-01-01

    There are multiple hypotheses for human responses to glacial cycling in the Late Pleistocene, including changes in population size, interconnectedness, and mobility. Lithic technological analysis informs us of human responses to environmental change because lithic assemblage characteristics are a reflection of raw material transport, reduction, and discard behaviors that depend on hunter-gatherer social and economic decisions. Pinnacle Point Site 5–6 (PP5-6), Western Cape, South Africa is an ideal locality for examining the influence of glacial cycling on early modern human behaviors because it preserves a long sequence spanning marine isotope stages (MIS) 5, 4, and 3 and is associated with robust records of paleoenvironmental change. The analysis presented here addresses the question, what, if any, lithic assemblage traits at PP5-6 represent changing behavioral responses to the MIS 5-4-3 interglacial-glacial cycle? It statistically evaluates changes in 93 traits with no a priori assumptions about which traits may significantly associate with MIS. In contrast to other studies that claim that there is little relationship between broad-scale patterns of climate change and lithic technology, we identified the following characteristics that are associated with MIS 4: increased use of quartz, increased evidence for outcrop sources of quartzite and silcrete, increased evidence for earlier stages of reduction in silcrete, evidence for increased flaking efficiency in all raw material types, and changes in tool types and function for silcrete. Based on these results, we suggest that foragers responded to MIS 4 glacial environmental conditions at PP5-6 with increased population or group sizes, ‘place provisioning’, longer and/or more intense site occupations, and decreased residential mobility. Several other traits, including silcrete frequency, do not exhibit an association with MIS. Backed pieces, once they appear in the PP5-6 record during MIS 4, persist through MIS

  13. Fossil Arthropods from a Full-Glacial Site in Northeastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foddai, Donatella; Minelli, Alessandro

    1994-05-01

    Fossil remains of beetles and oribatid mites from a peat deposit dated 18,870 ± 300 yr B.P. near Verona, northeastern Italy, represent the first insect fauna of its kind from the last glacial maximum to be described from Italy. The assemblage includes the ground beetle Amara alpina, whose distribution today in Europe is restricted to mountains in Scandinavia and Scotland. Ecological requirements and geographic distribution of recent populations of the identified species suggest mesic habitats with standing water and peat bogs during the glacial maximum. The paleoenvironment was comparable to present-day lowland moors in Scandinavia or mesic environments above 1000 m altitude on the southern slopes of the Alps. The climate is inferred to have been colder and wetter than today. Mean July temperature may have been 8-9°C lower than at present.

  14. Chlorine-36 and cesium-137 in ice-core samples from mid-latitude glacial sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, J.R.; Cecil, L.D.; Synal, H.-A.; Kreutz, K.J.; Wake, C.P.; Naftz, D.L.; Frape, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorine-36 (36Cl) concentrations, 36Cl/Cl ratios, and 36Cl fluxes in ice-core samples collected from the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) in the Wind River Mountain Range, Wyoming, United States and the Nangpai Gosum Glacier (NGG) in the Himalayan Mountains, Nepal, were determined and compared with published results from the Dye-3 ice-core drilling site on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Cesium-137 (137Cs) concentrations in the NGG also were determined. The background fluxes for 36Cl for each glacial site were similar: (1.6??0.3)??10-2 atoms/cm2 s for the UFG samples, (0.7??0.1)??10-2 atoms/cm2 s for the NGG samples, and (0.4??0.1)??10-2 atoms/cm2 s for the Dye-3 samples. The 36Cl fluxes in ice that was deposited as snow during peak atmospheric nuclear weapon test (1957-1958) were (33??1)??10-2 atoms/cm2 s for the UFG site, (291??3)??10-2 atoms/cm2 s for the NGG site, and (124??5)??10-2 atoms/ cm2 s for the Dye-3 site. A weapon test period 137Cs concentration of 0.79??0.05 Bq/kg in the NGG ice core also was detected in the same section of ice that contained the largest 36Cl concentration. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A high-resolution record of early Miocene Antarctic glacial history from ODP Site 1165, Prydz Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Trevor; Handwerger, David

    2005-06-01

    ODP Site 1165, located 400 km northwest of Prydz Bay, contains a high-resolution early Miocene record of pulses of ice-rafted debris (IRD) originating from the ancestral Lambert Glacier system and the Antarctic coast to the east. The 520 m of early Miocene sediments consist of dark gray claystone with silt laminae (contourites) alternating with decimeter-scale layers of greenish-gray bioturbated claystone that commonly contain ice-rafted debris. Downhole logs also record the alternations between the two facies: the IRD-bearing greenish-grey claystone corresponds to high resistivity and density values because of increased cementation by silica, and corresponds to lower natural gamma radiation values because of diluted clay content. The downhole logs thus allow a continuous and detailed stratigraphic record of the IRD-bearing layers to be obtained. The IRD-bearing layers represent deglaciations and interglacials, when a high flux of icebergs with incorporated material were melting out over the site; the contourite-rich layers represent glacials, when the Polar Current over the site was relatively strong. The sequence is dated by magnetostratigraphy, and the timing of the major IRD pulses is paced by orbital eccentricity, indicating that the volume of the East Antarctic ice sheet also fluctuates on this timescale. After 19.7 Ma, minor precessional and subprecessional IRD layers appear in the record, indicating that the ice sheet becomes more prone to deglaciation through this interval, perhaps associated with the gradual warming trend through the early Miocene.

  16. Deep-sea trace fossil and benthic foraminiferal assemblages across glacial Terminations 1, 2 and 4 at the "Shackleton Site" (IODP Expedition 339, Site U1385)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.; Dorador, Javier; Grunert, Patrick; Hodell, David

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies focused on the transitions between glacial and interglacial periods, the so-called terminations, due to the associated significant reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. However, analyses combining macro- and micropaleontological information are near absent. In this research, an integrative study of trace fossils and benthic foraminiferal assemblages is conducted in order to improve the characterization of Terminations 1, 2 and 4, as revealing the response of the macro-and microbenthic habitats to the involved paleoenvironmental changes. For this purpose, selected cores from Site U1385 (IODP Expedition 339) located off the western Iberian Margin, have been studied. Changes in trace fossils and benthic foraminifera related to both long-term variations at the glacial/interglacial scale, and short-term millennial-scale climatic events. Food and oxygen availability have been identified as the main factors determining variations in the macro- and microbenthic community structure across glacial terminations in the context of changes in water mass distribution and productivity in the NE Atlantic. A deep-sea multi-tiered tracemaker community, consisting of biodeformational structures, Chondrites, ?Nereites, Palaeophycus, Planolites, Thalassinoides, and Zoophycos, suggest generally well-oxygenated bottom and pore-water conditions during interglacial as well as glacial intervals, with punctual decreases in oxygenation. Short-climatic events registered during Terminations 1, 2, and 4 induce a similar response of trace fossil and benthic foraminifera communities to the variable incidence of food and oxygen availability. Termination 1 shows a severe deterioration of oxic conditions and increasing food availability during the YD and HS 1, favoring appearance/dominance of Zoophycos, together with the lowest miliolid and the highest deep infaunal taxa abundances. Short-term climatic events (HS 11, IRE 10.1) associated with Terminations 2 and 4 are

  17. Glacial refugia and modern genetic diversity of 22 western North American tree species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David R.; Hamann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    North American tree species, subspecies and genetic varieties have primarily evolved in a landscape of extensive continental ice and restricted temperate climate environments. Here, we reconstruct the refugial history of western North American trees since the last glacial maximum using species distribution models, validated against 3571 palaeoecological records. We investigate how modern subspecies structure and genetic diversity corresponds to modelled glacial refugia, based on a meta-analysis of allelic richness and expected heterozygosity for 473 populations of 22 tree species. We find that species with strong genetic differentiation into subspecies had widespread and large glacial refugia, whereas species with restricted refugia show no differentiation among populations and little genetic diversity, despite being common over a wide range of environments today. In addition, a strong relationship between allelic richness and the size of modelled glacial refugia (r2 = 0.55) suggest that population bottlenecks during glacial periods had a pronounced effect on the presence of rare alleles. PMID:25761711

  18. Amsterdamøya: a key site for the post-glacial of Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, Jostein; Balascio, Nicholas; van der Bilt, Willem; D`Andrea, William; Bradley, Raymond; Gjerde, Marthe; Hormes, Anne; Olafsdottir, Sædis; Røthe, Torgeir; Vasskog, Kristian; De Wet, Greg; Werner, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    No other place on Earth is changing as fast as the Arctic in terms of climate. On average this region is warming twice as fast as the global average with a seasonal bias towards winter. A major retreat in sea ice extent accompanied by an even more massive thinning represents one of the most robust trends in the Arctic. This trend is anticipated to continue in the decades to come and, according to some models, will leave the Arctic Ocean open during summer some time between 2050-2100. Unabated reduction in the spring-snow cover represents another significant trend. The current warming is also expressed in the massive melting of the Greenland ice sheet as well as local glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic, which causes increased freshwater influx to the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas. Climate modeling and scenarios are improving and becoming of growing importance, but without a firmer understanding of natural climate variability over longer timescale it is still hard to evaluate and best read the output from these models. In the SHIFTS project we have done an unparalleled effort to overcome this quandary, providing necessary empirical data on past climate which is critical for assessing past changes in atmospheric circulation patterns controlling Arctic hydroclimate. Our study site is located at the northwestern corner of Svalbard on the Island of Amsterdamøya, a site sensitive to changes in both oceanic and atmospheric forcing, at tail of the westward moving branch of the North Atlantic current. Here we have cored several lakes with the goal of providing quantitative data on temperature, hydrology and winter precipitation for the Holocene. Our approach has been to combine reconstruction of glaciers with lipid biomarkers and hydrogen isotopes with the goal of unravel the underlying signature of past climate in the Arctic. Chronological control is secured by radiocarbon dates on macrofossils combined with measurement of paleomagnetic secular variations. Here we

  19. Assemblage Composition and Glacial-Interglacial Variations in Deep-Sea Ostracoda from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (odp Site 1238) Over the Last 460 KA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, A.; Lyle, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    We examine the benthic ostracod assemblages and their glacial-interglacial variations over the last 460 ka at ODP Site 1238 located ~200 km west of Ecuador at a water depth of 2203 m. Ages for Site 1238 were estimated by correlating its carbonate profile to cores v19-28 and v19-29, which have oxygen isotope age control. The CaCO3 profile for Site 1238 was generated by XRF scanning. For the 25-28 mcd interval of the core 1238 age was obtained by linear interpolation using a tie-point of 460 ka at 27.44 mcd. A total of three different assemblages were distinguished: glacial, interglacial and background. Glacial assemblage is characterized by higher total ostracod abundance, ostracod valve accumulation rates, and diversity. The typical glacial taxa here are Krithe spp., Legitimocythere castanea, Bradleya mesembrina, Cytheropteron spp. and Apatihowella (Fallacihowella) sol. Interglacial intervals are characterized by low abundance and diversity and the characteristic taxa are Pseudobosquetina mucronalata, Bradleya dictyon, Agrenocythere hazelae, Poseidonamicus major. A background assemblage is found throughout the entire record and consists of Krithe spp., Parakrithe sp., Ambocythere cf. sturgio and Rugocythereis sp. Taxonomic composition of the glacial assemblage suggests a deep sea environment with stronger influence of cold water from Antarctica (Circumpolar Deep Water) and higher oxygen content. Higher Corg MAR during glacials result in overall higher total abundance levels. The interglacial assemblage appears to be related to dissolution intervals. Although the characteristic taxa are not restricted to corrosive bottom waters, it is possible that only they can grow and reproduce in calcite undersaturated bottom waters. In the Equatorial Pacific interglacials are associated with increased dissolution and corrosiveness of bottom water. So, it seems natural that the low abundance low diversity interglacial assemblage of ostracods at Site 1238 reflects the

  20. Groundwater flow modeling of periods with periglacial and glacial climate conditions for the safety assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidstrand, Patrik; Follin, Sven; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Näslund, Jens-Ove

    2014-09-01

    The impact of periglacial and glacial climate conditions on groundwater flow in fractured crystalline rock is studied by means of groundwater flow modeling of the Forsmark site, which was recently proposed as a repository site for the disposal of spent high-level nuclear fuel in Sweden. The employed model uses a thermal-hydraulically coupled approach for permafrost modeling and discusses changes in groundwater flow implied by the climate conditions found over northern Europe at different times during the last glacial cycle (Weichselian glaciation). It is concluded that discharge of particles released at repository depth occurs very close to the ice-sheet margin in the absence of permafrost. If permafrost is included, the greater part discharges into taliks in the periglacial area. During a glacial cycle, hydraulic gradients at repository depth reach their maximum values when the ice-sheet margin passes over the site; at this time, also, the interface between fresh and saline waters is distorted the most. The combined effect of advances and retreats during several glaciations has not been studied in the present work; however, the results indicate that hydrochemical conditions at depth in the groundwater flow model are almost restored after a single event of ice-sheet advance and retreat.

  1. Process studies in modern glacial environments: An innovative method and tool for subsurface site characterization at U.S. Army Alaska installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, E. B.; Lawson, D. E.; Kopczynski, S. E.; Finnegan, D. C.; Bigl, S. R.; Fosbrook, C.

    2002-12-01

    Subsurface stratigraphy in previously glaciated terrain is complex and difficult to interpret. Textbook models illustrating glacial and periglacial environments are often too idealized to serve as adequate analogs to interpret site-specific subsurface data. Models of emplacement generally provide the perspective of glacial and periglacial processes at synoptic scales. While these models are useful to understand general principles, these models are insufficient to provide geologic information at resolutions necessary for quantitative environmental remediation efforts. Contaminated sites on U.S. Army Alaska Installations are characterized by glacially driven complex subsurface stratigraphy. These subsurface conditions cannot entirely be defined through boreholes, nor can geophysical data (ground penetrating radar, shallow seismics, etc.) be readily interpreted through existing conceptual models, especially in areas of discontinuous permafrost (Fort Wainwright, central Alaska) or formerly glaciated terrains (Fort Richardson, South Central Alaska; Haines Fuel Terminal, Southeast Alaska). Process studies at modern glacier locales, such as the Matanuska Glacier and Glacier Bay, allow us to apply actual field-process observations at a variety of scales to characterize site-specific stratigraphy. This work has led us to refine our geophysical approaches to detect the presence of buried ice, permafrost and sediment layers in active terrestrial and tidewater glacial environments, which has greatly enhanced our ability to map the vertical and lateral distribution of confining layers in our investigative areas (i.e. permafrost and sediments). These data and process observations are synthesized as three-dimensional models allowing us to predict the probable spatial distribution and relationships that exist among aquifers and their confining units. This approach allows us the ability to accurately develop subsurface models that are essential in developing groundwater models to

  2. Phylogeographic analysis of a temperate-deciduous forest restricted plant (Bupleurum longiradiatum Turcz.) reveals two refuge areas in China with subsequent refugial isolation promoting speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cai; Wang, Chang-Bao; Ma, Xiang-Guang; Liang, Qian-Long; He, Xing-Jin

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of climate-induced oscillations and complicated geological conditions on the evolutionary processes responsible for species formation in presently fragmented temperate forest habitats, located in continental East Asia. In addition to this, we also investigate the heavily debated issue of whether temperate forests migrated southwards during such glacial periods or, alternatively, whether there existed refugia within north China, enabling localized survival of temperate forests within this region. In order to achieve these, we surveyed the phylogeography of Bupleurum longiradiatum Turcz. (a herbaceous plant solely confined to temperate forests) constructed from sequence variation in three chloroplast (cp) DNA fragments: trnL-trnF, psbA-trnH and rps16. Our analyses show high genetic diversity within species (h(T)=0.948) and pronounced genetic differentiation among groups (yellow and purple flowers) with a significant phylogeographical pattern (N(ST)>G(ST), P<0.05). Forty-three haplotypes were identified and clustered into two lineages (the purple-flowered lineage and the yellow-flowered lineage). Two corresponding refuge areas, one in Qinling and its adjacent regions and one in the Changbai Mountains/eastern China, were revealed across the entire distribution ranges of Bupleurum longiradiatum. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that independent refugia were maintained across the range of temperate forests in northern China during the last glacial maximum or earlier cold periods. Bupleurum longiradiatum var. porphyranthum formed a single taxon based on molecular data. This specific formation process suggests that the historical vicariance factors, i.e. climate-induced eco-geographic isolation through the biotic displacement of temperate-deciduous forest habitats, enhanced the divergence of the yellow and purple flower lineages at different spatial-temporal scales and over glacial and interglacial periods

  3. Hydrogeologic framework, arsenic distribution, and groundwater geochemistry of the glacial-sediment aquifer at the Auburn Road landfill superfund site, Londonderry, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Degnan, James R.; Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    Leachate continues to be generated from landfills at the Auburn Road Landfill Superfund Site in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Impermeable caps on the three landfills at the site inhibit direct infiltration of precipitation; however, high water-table conditions allow groundwater to interact with landfill materials from below, creating leachate and ultimately reducing conditions in downgradient groundwater. Reducing conditions can facilitate arsenic transport by allowing it to stay in solution or by liberating arsenic adsorbed to surfaces and from geologic sources, such as glacial sediments and bedrock. The site occupies a 180-acre parcel of land containing streams, ponds, wetlands, and former gravel pits located in glacial sediment. Four areas, totaling 14 acres, including three landfills and one septage lagoon, were used for waste disposal. The site was closed in 1980 after volatile organic compounds associated with industrial waste dumping were detected. The site was added to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priority List in 1982, and the landfills were capped in 1996. Although volatile organic compound concentrations in groundwater have declined substantially, some measurable concentrations remain. Temporally variable and persistent elevated arsenic concentrations have been measured in groundwater affected by the landfill leachate. Microbial consumption of carbon found in leachate is a driver of reducing conditions that liberate arsenic at the site. In addition to sources of carbon in landfill leachate, wetland areas throughout the site also could contribute carbon to groundwater, but it is currently unknown if any of the wetland areas have downward or reversing gradients that could allow the infiltration of surface water to groundwater. Red-stained sediments and water indicate iron-rich groundwater discharge to surface water and are also associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic in sediment and groundwater. Ironrich groundwater seeps have

  4. A pulse in the delivery of ice-rafted debris at site 704 in the southeast Atlantic during glacial Termination V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanfoush, Sharon L.

    2016-03-01

    Termination V, the transition from glacial marine isotope stage 12 to interglacial stage 11-425 ka, is the largest deglaciation of the late Pleistocene and culminated with temperatures potentially warmer than present. Coastal geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence provides estimates of a sea-level high-stand 20 m above present at the time (Hearty et al. in Geology 27(4):375-378, 1999). Such sea-level rise would require disintegration of the Greenland Ice Sheet and West Antarctic Ice Sheet as well as part of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (Raynaud et al. in Earth's climate and orbital eccentricity: the marine isotope stage 11 question. Geophysical monograph 137. American Geophysical Union, Washington, 2003). Lithic fragments in deep-sea sediments >150 μm at Site 704 in the South Atlantic Ocean were quantified. A large multipronged peak in concentration of this ice-rafted debris consisting of clear minerals, rose-colored transparent minerals, and ash punctuates glacial Termination V. It coincides with a brief two-pronged 1 ‰ reversal to heavier isotopic values from ~2.4 to ~3.4 ‰ at ~416 ka interpreted to reflect cooling resulting from influx of a large number of icebergs. The peak in ice-rafted debris also coincides with a 1 ‰ decrease in carbon isotopic ratios interrupting the ~2 ‰ increase in carbon isotope values across the entirety of Termination V. This is interpreted to reflect a reduction or shutdown in North Atlantic Deep Water formation and attendant Circumpolar Deep Water upwelling at the site and is also consistent with a shift in storage of carbon and carbonate from the deep sea to continental shelves resulting from a dramatic sea-level high-stand. Consequently, the lithic record at Site 704 lends support for the upper end of sea-level estimates based upon land-based evidence that requires a substantial contribution from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. However, caution is warranted as differences with lithic records from Site 1089, 1090 and 1094

  5. Impact of paleoceanographic changes at glacial/interglacial transitions on benthic foraminiferal faunas of the eastern North Atlantic (IODP Expedition 339, Site U1385)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, Patrick; Hodell, David; Alvarez Zarikian, Carlos; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Stow, Dorrik A. V.

    2014-05-01

    Communities of deep-sea foraminifera are sensitive recorders of environmental conditions. Consequently, the actualistic interpretation of fossil foraminiferal assemblages has become a valuable tool for the reconstruction of paleoceanographic conditions at the sea-floor. For the present study, a quantitative data-set of benthic foraminifera >125μm from the eastern North Atlantic has been analysed to understand paleoceanographic changes (AMOC, ventilation, productivity) associated with glacial/interglacial transitions in more detail. The data-set consists of a series of samples from IODP Site U1385 spanning Terminations I, II and IV and several short-term (millennial-scale) climatic events including the Younger Dryas (YD), Heinrich (H) 1, and H 11. On the family and generic levels, a characteristic succession of foraminiferal assemblages can be recognized at all studied glacial/interglacial transitions: a glacial fauna with abundant occurrences of cassidulinids (Cassidulina, Globocassidulina); a fauna characterized by high abundances of buliminds (Bulimina, Globobulimina) and/or bolivinellids (Bolivinita) that is associated with H-events and the beginning of each termination; a fauna with high abundances of miliolids (mainly Pyrgo) and cibicidids at the end of the termination; an interglacial fauna composed of buliminds (Bulimina), gavellinellids (Gyroidinoides), and pseudoparrellids (Epistominella). For the glacial and interglacial endmembers, this succession indicates a moderately oxygenated environment at the seafloor with mesotrophic conditions due to moderate export productivity. For the early phase of the terminations as well as the short-term events, the dominance of infaunal taxa and high abundances of deep infaunal taxa indicate an environment with high export productivity that is mainly controlled by oxygen. Conversely, the absence of these taxa and the presence of miliolids suggests well-ventilated environments and decreasing export productivity during

  6. Summer air temperature, reconstructions from the last glacial stage based on rodents from the site Taillis-des-Coteaux (Vienne), Western France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Aurélien; Lécuyer, Christophe; Montuire, Sophie; Primault, Jérôme; Fourel, François; Jeannet, Marcel

    2014-09-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate from tooth enamel of rodents (δ18Op) constitutes a valuable proxy to reconstruct past air temperatures in continental environments. This method has been applied to rodent dental remains from three genera, Arvicola sp., Microtus sp. and Dicrostonyx sp., coming from Taillis-des-Coteaux, Vienne, France. This archaeological site contains an exceptionally preserved sedimentary sequence spanning almost the whole Upper Palaeolithic, including seven stratigraphic layers dated from 35 to 17 cal ka BP. The abundant presence of rodent remains offers the opportunity to quantify the climatic fluctuations coeval of the various stages of human occupation of the site. Differences between δ18Op values of Arvicola sp. and Microtus sp. teeth are interpreted as the result of heterochrony in tooth formation as well as differences in ecology. Mean δ18Op values of Microtus sp. are preferentially used to reconstruct summer air temperatures, which range from 16.0 ± 3.7 to 19.1 ± 3.1°C throughout the sedimentary sequence; however, the highest variability is observed during the last glacial maximum.

  7. Paleoenvironmental change as derived from loess sediment properties: Examples of last glacial loess sites from the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhl, Frank; Zeeden, Christian; Bösken, Janina; Eckmeier, Eileen; Hambach, Ulrich; Hauck, Thomas; Klasen, Nicole; Markovic, Slobodan; Obreht, Igor; Schulte, Philipp; Sümegi, Pal; Chu, Wei; Timar-Gabor, Alida; Veres, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The project B1 within the CRC 806 "Our way to Europe" focuses on the "Eastern Trajectory" of modern human migration from Africa into Europe. The Middle East, and SE Europe constitute the principal areas to be investigated. SE Europe has become a special research focus since two early Homo sapiens individuals have been found at Oase Cave in the southern Banat. The fossils lack any stratigraphic context; cultural and environmental circumstances of these findings have remained unclear. In the neighbourhood of Oase Cave, however, several early Upper Palaeolithic sites, embedded in loess sequences were known since the 1950's. Some sites were re-investigated by our research team. Conceptionally we are following the idea of upland-lowland interaction, which combines parameters as sedimentary transport, sediment distribution, and paleosol development in different altitudes, all influenced by paleoclimate in space and time. Furthermore, some detailed studies concerning site-formation processes and the quality of open-air sites (sedimentary development, paleoecology, multilayering, reworking, human impact on soils and sediments) are being conducted at selected localities. Recent investigations of the loess-paleosol sequences (LPS) in SE Europe provided important environmental information which differ from "classical" ecological approaches derived from other European loess provinces. New luminescence dating results provide a sensitive chronology of environmental changes recorded in the LPS from both upland and lowland positions, giving the potential to link these.

  8. Glacial refugia and the prediction of future habitat coverage of the South American lichen species Ochrolechia austroamericana

    PubMed Central

    Kukwa, Martin; Kolanowska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The biogeographic history of lichenized fungi remains unrevealed because those organisms rarely fossilize due to their delicate, often tiny and quickly rotting thalli. Also the ecology and factors limiting occurrence of numerous taxa, especially those restricted in their distribution to tropical areas are poorly recognized. The aim of this study was to determine localization of glacial refugia of South American Ochrolechia austroamericana and to estimate the future changes in the coverage of its habitats using ecological niche modeling tools. The general glacial potential range of the studied species was wider than it is nowadays and its niches coverage decreased by almost 25% since last glacial maximum. The refugial areas were covered by cool and dry grasslands and scrubs and suitable niches in South America were located near the glacier limit. According to our analyses the further climate changes will not significantly influence the distribution of the suitable niches of O. austroamericana. PMID:27929090

  9. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for Rapid Uplifting Caused by Glacial Retreat: (2) Establishment of Continuous GPS Sites (CGPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Freymueller, J. T.; Miura, S.; Cross, R. S.; Sato, T.; Sun, W.; Fujimoto, H.

    2006-12-01

    Rapid disintegration and thinning of Glacier Bay's tidewater glaciers and ice fields followed the end of the Little Ice Age. Geodetic studies by Larsen et al. have quantified average rates of post-glacial isostatic rebound (PGR) in the vicinity of Glacier Bay in Southeast Alaska. PGR continues today with maximum uplift rates of 30 mm/yr in Glacier Bay's upper West Arm and 32 mm/yr in the Yakutat Icefield. ISEA is a collaborative Japanese-American project which will combine CGPS measurements of uplift with absolute gravity and gravity tide observations in Southeast Alaska. ISEA will build on previous work in Glacier Bay with a multi-pronged geophysical approach similar to that used by Sato et al. in Svalbard, Norway. CGPS data sets from Gustavus and elsewhere in Alaska show seasonal variability in vertical velocity. We hypothesize this is due to winter snow loading and summer ice loss in adjacent mountain ranges. If uplift rates are found to accelerate over the five year span of this project, this would suggest increasing rates of present day ice loss in Glacier Bay. CGPS measurements of seasonal crustal deformation might be used as a powerful integrating tool for mass balance monitoring over an extensive, glacierized area. ISEA supplements existing CGPS stations [U.S. Coast Guard and Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO)] and improves the spatial array with new stations in and around Glacier Bay. During June and September of 2006, an ISEA field team established five new CGPS stations. Two new sites within Glacier Bay National Park, at Blue Mouse Cove and Queen Inlet, are near the zone of maximum uplift. The third CGPS was placed to the east, on Eldred Rock, in northern Lynn Canal. The fourth site, to the west near Dry Bay, completes a 200 km east-west "transect" through this uplift peak. The fifth site lies to the northeast along the Haines Highway in Yukon, Canada. A sixth site in the Tatshenshini River region, north of Glacier Bay, is proposed for 2007. Site

  10. Plio-Pleistocene orbital periodicities (21 to 413 ky) in glacially -influenced sediments from Antarctic peninsula ODP sites 1095,1096,1101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, M.; Wolf-Welling, T.; Moerz, T.

    2003-04-01

    Petrophysical and lithological data sets spectral analyses, from Plio-Pleistocene successions, cored in sedimentary drift of the Western Antarctic continental rise during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178, shown, in different cores, non-harmonic wavelength peaks. When the wavelength peaks are normalised, they exhibit a very high correlation factor to each other and to the predicted Earth's orbital variations calculated for the same geological period. In addition, both short (≈95--125 ky) and long (≈413 ky) eccentricity clearly emerges from the signal during the Pleistocene, without evident switch to obliquity at the mid-Pleistocene transition (0.9 Ma B.P). This suggests that the lithological parameters, proxy of glacial cycles, are controlled, directly or indirectly, by astronomically forced processes (Milankovitch cycles). Moreover, the good correlatability among distant coring sites, based on systematic sedimentological variations, corresponding to intervals of about 140 and 370 ky, allows extension of the results to a regional scale. Finally, some matching with the 3rd order relative sea-level oscillations suggests a superimposed eustatic influence for the last 2.6 Ma.

  11. A New Late Glacial Site in the Central Appalachians of Virginia. Preliminary Findings From Paleobotany, Palynology, and Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, B. F.; Upchurch, G. R.; Willard, D. A.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Valella, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Thick clay deposits in a recently identified paleo-lake bed in a central Appalachian karst system in Highland County, Virginia have yielded well-preserved pollen and macroflora that provide the opportunity to refine the understanding of Pleistocene climate, vegetation dynamics, and erosion in the region. A radiocarbon date of 22,000 14C yr B.P. on wood fragments near the top of the sequence establishes the age of the sediments. Pollen and plant macrofloras characteristic of modern boreal forests are present in sediments at this site. Pollen assemblages show a dominance of conifers, mostly Pinus banksiana and Picea, with Lycopodium as important ground cover. Leaf fossils sieved from the clay show a dominance of Picea needles and common dicot leaf fragments, suggesting that Pinus is either over-represented in the pollen flora or more distal to the paleo-lake. Macrofossil assemblages sieved from the clay contain a variety of non-leaf remains, including fruits, seeds, mosses, insects, feathers, and fungi. Test augering and geophysical results indicate that these clay deposits are at least 9m and perhaps as much as 15m thick. The amount and temporal distribution of sediment loads to the paleo-lake (a depositional environment) from the surrounding landscape (an erosional environment) will be modeled using analysis of sediment facies in and above (>12m) these clays, combined with sediment volume calculations and drainage basin analysis, and constrained by dates from the sediments themselves. Due to the rare occurrence of still-water depositional environments in the Appalachians, this site provides paleo-climate and sedimentological data that will refine regional models of landscape evolution and incision. This work also has implications for the development and modification of a significant karst system that surrounds and underlies the paleo-lake bed. The same karst system is responsible both for the formation of the paleo-lake (after the drain in a blind valley became

  12. Mitogenomic phylogenetics of the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus, a model system for studying end-glacial colonization of Europe.

    PubMed

    Filipi, Karolína; Marková, Silvia; Searle, Jeremy B; Kotlík, Petr

    2015-01-01

    We have revisited the mtDNA phylogeny of the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus based on Sanger and next-generation Illumina sequencing of 32 complete mitochondrial genomes. The bank vole is a key study species for understanding the response of European fauna to the climate change following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and one of the most convincing examples of a woodland mammal surviving in cryptic northern glacial refugia in Europe. The genomes sequenced included multiple representatives of each of the eight bank vole clades previously described based on cytochrome b (cob) sequences. All clades with the exception of the Basque - likely a misidentified pseudogene clade - were highly supported in all phylogenetic analyses and the relationships between the clades were resolved with high confidence. Our data extend the distribution of the Carpathian clade, the marker of a northern glacial refugium in the Carpathian Mountains, to include Britain and Fennoscandia (but not adjacent areas of continental Europe). The Carpathian sub-clade that colonized Britain and Fennoscandia had a somewhat different history from the sub-clade currently found in or close to the Carpathians and may have derived from a more north-westerly refugial area. The two bank vole populations that colonized Britain at the end of the last glaciation are for the first time linked with particular continental clades, the first colonists with the Carpathian clade and the second colonists with the western clade originating in a more southerly refugium in the vicinity of the Alps. We however found no evidence that a functional divergence of proteins encoded in the mitochondrial genome promoted the partial genetic replacement of the first colonists by the second colonists detected previously in southern Britain. We did identify one codon site that changed more often and more radically in the tree than expected and where the observed amino acid change may affect the reductase activity of the cytochrome bc1

  13. Refugial isolation and secondary contact in the dyeing poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Brice P; Gaucher, Philippe

    2006-12-01

    Recent palaeoclimactic research suggests that fluctuating environmental conditions throughout the Pleistocene of Amazonia occurred with previously unrecognized frequency. This has resulted in a theoretical shift from glacially influenced fluctuations to those driven by precessional rhythms. This theoretical revolution has a profound impact on expectations of biotic diversity within biogeographical regions that have long been based on the idea of large-scale landscape fragmentation associated with increased aridity and glacial cycles. Generally speaking, this shifts phylogeographical expectations from that of (i) large areas of sympatry of closely related (but not sister) species whose origins lie in separate refugia, and current distributions are the results of cyclic connectivity of those two refugia (refuge hypothesis), to that of (ii) fine scale genetic structure, often associated with elevation, and divergence well below expected speciation levels [disturbance-vicariance (DV) hypothesis]. To date there have been few tests of the expectations of the DV hypothesis based on empirical studies of Neotropical floral and faunal communities. Herein we examine phylogeographical structure of Dendrobates tinctorius, an amphibian species endemic to the uplands of the eastern Guiana Shield, based on sampling of 114 individuals from 24 localities. Phylogenetic, nested clade, and dispersal-vicariance (DIVA) analyses of cytochrome b sequence data reveal the presence of two mitochondrial lineages that are associated with previously identified western and eastern uplands of this area. The geographical distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes and the results of DIVA and coalescent analyses suggest that there has been extensive secondary contact between these lineages indicating a complex history of connectivity between these western and eastern highlands, supporting the predictions of the DV hypothesis.

  14. Differences in the energy and mass balance between a low- and a high-altitude glacial site in the Ortles-Cevedale (Italy), during the warm summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, Luca; Avvenuti, Marco; Cazorzi, Federico; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Dinale, Roberto; Gabrielli, Paolo; Mair, Volkmar; Seppi, Roberto; Zanoner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Like in most of the European Alps, the glaciers of the Ortles-Cevedale (Eastern Italian Alps) are rapidly shrinking under the current warm climatic conditions. Different glaciers of this mountain group were found to react in different ways. The main control of their individual response appears to be the hypsometric distribution of area vs. altitude. In fact, the elevation affects the spatial distribution of the energy and mass balance through the atmospheric temperature and precipitation lapse rates, that determine the amount and frequency of ablation and accumulation. However, other processes and feedbacks take place during periods of rapid climatic change, which still need to be investigated and fully understood, in particular at high elevation. Two Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), operating on glacial sites at different altitudes in the Ortles-Cevedale, enabled a first comparative analysis for the warm summer of 2012. The lower AWS was placed in the ablation area of La Mare glacier, at 2970 m a.s.l., on temperate ice. The upper AWS worked on the high-altitude accumulation area of Alto dell'Ortles glacier, at 3840 m a.s.l., over temperate firn overlying cold ice. The two AWSs, located 10 km away from each other, monitor air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed and direction, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, surface temperature and snow height, and record mean values at time intervals of 15 minutes. The upper AWS also measures the temperature profile below the surface to a depth of 15 m. Direct mass balance measurements were carried out in the proximity of the two AWSs at the end of the accumulation and ablation seasons, by means of snow depth soundings, density measurements into snow pits and ablation measurements through ablation stakes. A strongly negative mass balance was measured in 2012 at the lowest AWS, which lost early in the summer the 110 cm thick snowpack accumulated during winter and underwent a net ablation of 350 cm

  15. Glacial oceanographic contrasts explain phylogeography of Australian bull kelp.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Spencer, Hamish G; Waters, Jonathan M

    2009-05-01

    The evolutionary effects of Southern Hemisphere Pleistocene oceanographic conditions - marked by fluctuations in sea levels and water temperatures, and redirected currents - are poorly understood. The southeastern tip of Australia presents an intriguing model system for studying the biological impacts of palaeoceanography. In particular, contrasting oceanographic conditions that existed on eastern vs. western sides of the Bassian Isthmus during Pleistocene glacial periods allow for natural comparisons between putative refugial vs. re-invading populations. Whereas many western Tasmanian marine taxa were likely eliminated by cold subantarctic water during the last glacial period, eastern Tasmanian populations would have persisted in relatively warm temperatures mediated by the ongoing influence of the East Australian Current (EAC). Here we test for the effects of contrasting palaeoceanographic conditions on endemic bull kelp, Durvillaea potatorum, using DNA sequence analysis (COI; rbcL) of more than 100 individuals from 14 localities in southeastern Australia. Phylogenetic reconstructions reveal a deep (maximum divergence 4.7%) genetic split within D. potatorum, corresponding to the 'eastern' and 'western' geographical regions delimited by the Bassian Isthmus, a vicariant barrier during low Pleistocene sea levels. Concordant with the western region's cold glacial conditions, samples from western Tasmania and western Victoria are genetically monomorphic, suggesting postglacial expansion from a mainland refugium. Eastern samples, in contrast, comprise distinct regional haplogroups, suggesting the species persisted in eastern Tasmania throughout recent glacial periods. The deep east-west divergence seems consistent with earlier reports of morphological differences between 'western' and 'eastern' D. potatorum, and it seems likely that these forms represent reproductively isolated species.

  16. (Lack of) genetic diversity in immune genes predates glacial isolation in the North American mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus).

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Fan, Chia Wei; Côté, Steeve D; Coltman, David W

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in an organism's ability to respond to pathogens. Immunogenetic diversity is advantageous as it permits the recognition of more external antigens. For this reason, MHC and immune gene variation are considered a barometer for the genetic health of wild populations. Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) were previously shown to have little variation at the MHC Class II Oram-DRB locus, which was attributed to population bottlenecks during the last glacial maximum (LGM). In this paper, we extended the analysis of immunogenetic variability in mountain goats to 5 genes representing the 3 classes of MHC gene (Class I OLA, Class II DRA and DRB, and Class III TNF-α) and the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein. We sequenced approximately 3000 bp from 31 individuals sampled across the range of mountain goats and found very low levels of diversity (1-3 polymorphic sites per gene) with the exception of the Class I Oram-OLA gene. Oram-OLA was nearly 30 times more diverse than the other immune genes and appears to represent a source of increased immunogenetic diversity. This diversity may be attributed to multiple loci, mediated by pathogen exposure, or potentially influenced by social factors. The distribution of SNPs was not associated with refugial history, suggesting that the current distribution of immunogenetic diversity was present prior to the LGM. These data suggest that although they have low levels of diversity at the 4 of 5 immune loci, mountain goats may be better equipped for future climate oscillations and pathogen exposure than previously thought.

  17. Mitochondrial population structure and post-glacial dispersal of longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus in Labrador, Canada: evidence for multiple refugial origins and limited ongoing gene flow.

    PubMed

    Langille, B L; Perry, R; Keefe, D; Barker, O; Marshall, H D

    2016-08-01

    Two hundred and eighty-seven longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus were collected from 14 lakes in Labrador, 52 from three lakes in Ontario, 43 from two lakes in British Columbia and 32 from a lake in Yukon; a total of 414 in all. The resulting 34 haplotypes (20 in Labrador) contained moderate haplotypic diversity (h = 0·657) and relatively low nucleotide diversity (π = 3·730 × 10(-3) . Mean ϕST (0·453, P < 0·05) over all populations revealed distinct genetic structuring among C. catostomus populations across Canada, based on province, which was validated by the analysis and spatial analysis of molecular variance (c. 80% variation between provinces). These results probably reflect the historical imprint of recolonization from different refugia and possibly indicate limited ongoing gene flow within provinces. A haplotype network revealed one major and two minor clades within Labrador that were assigned to the Atlantic, Beringian and Mississippian refugia, respectively, with tests of neutrality and mismatch distribution indicative of a recent population expansion in Labrador, dated between c. 3500 and 8300 years ago.

  18. Hydrostratigraphic mapping of the Milford-Souhegan glacial drift aquifer, and effects of hydrostratigraphy on transport of PCE, Operable Unit 1, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2010-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in the Town of Milford, New Hampshire, was underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume (as mapped in 1994) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), most of which consisted of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within highly transmissive stratified-drift deposits but also extends into underlying till and bedrock. The plume has been divided into two areas called Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit 2 (OU2), which is defined as the extended plume area outside of OU1. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier wall that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE and a series of injection and extraction wells to contain and remove contaminants. The barrier wall likely penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; in many places, it also penetrates the full thickness of the underlying basal till and sits atop bedrock.From 1998 to 2004, PCE concentrations decreased by an average of 80 percent at most wells outside the barrier wall. However, inside the barrier, PCE concentrations greater than 10,000 micrograms per liter (μg/L) still exist (2008). The remediation of these areas of recalcitrant PCE presents challenges to successful remediation.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Region 1, is studying the solute transport of VOCs (primarily PCE) in contaminated groundwater in the unconsolidated sediments (overburden) of the Savage site and specifically assisting in the evaluation of the effectiveness of remedial operations in the OU1 area. As part of this effort, the USGS analyzed the subsurface stratigraphy to help understand hydrostratigraphic controls on remediation.A combination of lithologic, borehole natural gamma-ray and electromagnetic (EM) induction logging, and test drilling has identified 11 primary

  19. Late-glacial recolonization and phylogeography of European red deer (Cervus elaphus L.).

    PubMed

    Meiri, Meirav; Lister, Adrian M; Higham, Thomas F G; Stewart, John R; Straus, Lawrence G; Obermaier, Henriette; González Morales, Manuel R; Marín-Arroyo, Ana B; Barnes, Ian

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene was an epoch of extreme climatic and environmental changes. How individual species responded to the repeated cycles of warm and cold stages is a major topic of debate. For the European fauna and flora, an expansion-contraction model has been suggested, whereby temperate species were restricted to southern refugia during glacial times and expanded northwards during interglacials, including the present interglacial (Holocene). Here, we test this model on the red deer (Cervus elaphus) a large and highly mobile herbivore, using both modern and ancient mitochondrial DNA from the entire European range of the species over the last c. 40,000 years. Our results indicate that this species was sensitive to the effects of climate change. Prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) haplogroups restricted today to South-East Europe and Western Asia reached as far west as the UK. During the LGM, red deer was mainly restricted to southern refugia, in Iberia, the Balkans and possibly in Italy and South-Western Asia. At the end of the LGM, red deer expanded from the Iberian refugium, to Central and Northern Europe, including the UK, Belgium, Scandinavia, Germany, Poland and Belarus. Ancient DNA data cannot rule out refugial survival of red deer in North-West Europe through the LGM. Had such deer survived, though, they were replaced by deer migrating from Iberia at the end of the glacial. The Balkans served as a separate LGM refugium and were probably connected to Western Asia with genetic exchange between the two areas.

  20. Simulation of solute transport of tetrachloroethylene in ground water of the glacial-drift aquifer at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire, 1960-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2004-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, named after the former municipal water-supply well for the town of Milford, is underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within a highly transmissive sand-and-gravel unit, but also extends to an underlying till and bedrock unit. The plume logistically is divided into two areas termed Operable Unit No. 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit No. 2 (OU2), which is the extended plume area. PCE concentrations in excess of 100,000 parts per billion (ppb) had been detected in the OU1 area in 1995, indicating a likely Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) source. In the fall of 1998, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) installed a remedial system in OU1. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE, and a series of injection and extraction wells. The barrier primarily sits atop bedrock and penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; and in some places, the full thickness of the underlying basal till. The sand and gravel unit and the till comprise the aquifer termed the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer (MSGD). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite-difference solute-transport models of the unconsolidated sediments (MSGD aquifer) were constructed to help evaluate solute-transport processes, assess the effectiveness of remedial activities in OU1, and to help design remedial strategies in OU2. The solute-transport models simulate PCE concentrations, and model results were compared to observed concentrations of PCE. Simulations were grouped into the following three time periods: an historical calibration of the distribution of PCE from the initial input (circa 1960) of PCE into the subsurface to the 1990s, a pre-remedial calibration from 1995

  1. Sea-level driven glacial-age refugia and post-glacial mixing on subtropical coasts, a palaeohabitat and genetic study.

    PubMed

    Dolby, Greer A; Hechinger, Ryan; Ellingson, Ryan A; Findley, Lloyd T; Lorda, Julio; Jacobs, David K

    2016-11-30

    Using a novel combination of palaeohabitat modelling and genetic mixture analyses, we identify and assess a sea-level-driven recolonization process following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our palaeohabitat modelling reveals dramatic changes in estuarine habitat distribution along the coast of California (USA) and Baja California (Mexico). At the LGM (approx. 20 kya), when sea level was approximately 130 m lower, the palaeo-shoreline was too steep for tidal estuarine habitat formation, eliminating this habitat type from regions where it is currently most abundant, and limiting such estuaries to a northern and a southern refugium separated by 1000 km. We assess the recolonization of estuaries formed during post-LGM sea-level rise through examination of refugium-associated alleles and approximate Bayesian computation in three species of estuarine fishes. Results reveal sourcing of modern populations from both refugia, which admix in the newly formed habitat between the refuges. We infer a dramatic peak in habitat area between 15 and 10 kya with subsequent decline. Overall, this approach revealed a previously undocumented dynamic and integrated relationship between sea-level change, coastal processes and population genetics. These results extend glacial refugial dynamics to unglaciated subtropical coasts and have significant implications for biotic response to predicted sea-level rise.

  2. Refugial isolation and range expansions drive the genetic structure of Oxyria sinensis (Polygonaceae) in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lihua; Chen, Gang; Li, Zhonghu; Yang, Yongping; Wang, Zhengkun; Wang, Liuyang

    2015-05-27

    The formation of the Mekong-Salween Divide and climatic oscillations in Pleistocene were the main drivers for the contemporary diversity and genetic structure of plants in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains (HHM). To identify the relative roles of the two historical events in shaping population history of plants in HHM, we investigated the phylogeographic pattern of Oxyria sinensis, a perennial plant endemic to the HHM. Sixteen chloroplast haplotypes were identified and were clustered into three phylogenetic clades. The age of the major clades was estimated to be in the Pleistocene, falling into several Pleistocene glacial stages and postdating the formation of the Mekong-Salween Divide. Range expansions occurred at least twice in the early and middle Pleistocene, but the spatial genetic distribution rarely changed since the Last Glacial Maximum. Our results suggest that temporary mountain glaciers may act as barriers in promoting the lineage divergence in O. sinensis and that subsequential range expansions and secondary contacts might reshape the genetic distribution in geography and blur the boundary of population differentiation created in the earlier glacial stages. This study demonstrates that Pleistocene climatic change and mountain glaciers, rather than the Mekong-Salween Divide, play the primary role in shaping the spatial genetic structure of O. sinensis.

  3. Refugial isolation and range expansions drive the genetic structure of Oxyria sinensis (Polygonaceae) in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lihua; Chen, Gang; Li, Zhonghu; Yang, Yongping; Wang, Zhengkun; Wang, Liuyang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Mekong-Salween Divide and climatic oscillations in Pleistocene were the main drivers for the contemporary diversity and genetic structure of plants in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains (HHM). To identify the relative roles of the two historical events in shaping population history of plants in HHM, we investigated the phylogeographic pattern of Oxyria sinensis, a perennial plant endemic to the HHM. Sixteen chloroplast haplotypes were identified and were clustered into three phylogenetic clades. The age of the major clades was estimated to be in the Pleistocene, falling into several Pleistocene glacial stages and postdating the formation of the Mekong-Salween Divide. Range expansions occurred at least twice in the early and middle Pleistocene, but the spatial genetic distribution rarely changed since the Last Glacial Maximum. Our results suggest that temporary mountain glaciers may act as barriers in promoting the lineage divergence in O. sinensis and that subsequential range expansions and secondary contacts might reshape the genetic distribution in geography and blur the boundary of population differentiation created in the earlier glacial stages. This study demonstrates that Pleistocene climatic change and mountain glaciers, rather than the Mekong-Salween Divide, play the primary role in shaping the spatial genetic structure of O. sinensis. PMID:26013161

  4. Future intrusion of oxygenated glacial meltwaters into the Fennoscandian shield: a possibility to consider in performance assessments for nuclear-waste disposal sites?: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Provost et al. (1998) and Glynn and Voss (1999; also published in Glynn et al., 1999) considered the possibility that during future glaciations, oxygenated glacial meltwaters from two- to three-kilometer thick ice sheets could potentially intrude to the 500 m depth of planned nuclear-waste repositories. This possibility has been of concern because of potential negative effects on the stability of the repository engineered environment, and because of the potential mobilization of radionuclides should the oxygenated waters come into contact with the radioactive waste. The above reports argued that given the current state of knowledge, it was hard to discount the possibility that oxygenated waters could penetrate to repository level depth. The reports also suggested that oxidizing conditions might be present in the fractured rock environment for significant amounts of time, on the order of thousands to tens of thousands of years. In some earlier reports, Swedish and Finnish governmental agencies in charge of nuclear-waste disposal had considered the possibility that oxygenated meltwaters might intrude to the repository depth (SKI: 1992; Martinerie et al, 1992; Ahonen and Vieno, 1994). Subsequent to the publication of Provost et al. (1998), Glynn et al. (1999) and Glynn and Voss (1999), the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Handling Company (SKB) commissioned efforts to examine more thoroughly the possibilities that oxygenated meltwaters might occur under ice-sheet conditions and intrude to the repository depth.

  5. Glacial integrative modelling.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, Andrey

    2003-09-15

    Understanding the mechanisms of past climate changes requires modelling of the complex interaction between all major components of the Earth system: atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. This paper reviews attempts at such an integrative approach to modelling climate changes during the glacial age. In particular, the roles of different factors in shaping glacial climate are compared based on the results of simulations with an Earth-system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2. It is shown that ice sheets, changes in atmospheric compositions, vegetation cover, and reorganization of the ocean thermohaline circulation play important roles in glacial climate changes. Another example of this approach is the modelling of two major types of abrupt glacial climate changes: Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Our results corroborate some of the early proposed mechanisms, which relate abrupt climate changes to the internal instability of the ocean thermohaline circulation and ice sheets. At the same time, it is shown that realistic representation of the temporal evolution of the palaeoclimatic background is crucial to simulate observed features of the glacial abrupt climate changes.

  6. Sources of glacial moisture in Mesoamerica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Paleoclimatic records from Mesoamerica document the interplay between Atlantic and Pacific sources of precipitation during the last glacial stage and Holocene. Today, and throughout much of the Holocene, the entire region receives its principal moisture in the summer from an interaction of easterly trade winds with the equatorial calms. Glacial records from sites east of 95?? W in Guatemala, Florida, northern Venezuela and Colombia record dry conditions before 12 ka, however. West of 95?? W, glacial conditions were moister than in the Holocene. For example, pollen and diatom data show that Lake Pa??tzcuaro in the central Mexican highlands was cool, deep and fresh during this time and fossil pinyon needles in packrat middens in Chihuahua, Sonora, Arizona, and Texas indicate cooler glacial climates with increased winter precipitation. Cold Gulf of Mexico sea-surface temperatures and reduced strength of the equatorial calms can explain arid full and late glacial environments east of 95?? W whereas an intensified pattern of winter, westerly air flow dominated hydrologic balances as far south as 20?? N. Overall cooler temperatures may have increased effective moisture levels during dry summer months in both areas. ?? 1997 INQUA/ Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Lateglacial-Holocene abrupt vegetation changes at Lago Trifoglietti in Calabria, Southern Italy: The setting of ecosystems in a refugial zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Jacques-Louis de; Brugiapaglia, Elisabetta; Joannin, Sébastien; Guiter, Frédéric; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Wulf, Sabine; Peyron, Odile; Bernardo, Liliana; Didier, Julien; Stock, Agnès; Rius, Damien; Magny, Michel

    2017-02-01

    Retrospective science such as palaeoecology deeply depends on the preservation of archives in sensitive places. As an example, mountains of medium altitude from Mediterranean peninsulas have long been identified by biogeographers as refuges zones allowing the survival of European temperate taxa during the ice ages, but archives to validate this hypothesis are scarce, especially in Southern Italy. Here we present a new sequence from Lago Trifoglietti (1048 m a.s.l.) in the Calabrian Mountains, which covers the Late Glacial Interstadial (LGI, corresponding to the Bölling-Alleröd period in northern-central Europe) and the transition to the Holocene. The independent chronology based on seven radiocarbon dates is supported by the evidence of three tephra layers already identified in other regional sequences. During the LGI, besides the high diversity of non arboreal pollen grains, a great number of pollens of temperate forest trees are present or abundant (mostly deciduous oaks and fir). These assemblages suggest that the site was above but not far from the upper limit of diversified woodland stands. They confirm a local survival during the last glacial. The Younger Dryas is not marked by major changes, and oak percentages are even higher, suggesting a resilient expansion at lower altitude. Surprisingly the site remains above the timberline until an aridity crisis centered at 11,100 cal 14C yr PB, which is correlated with the Preboreal Oscillation (PBO). This event is immediately followed by the local settlement of a dense fir and beech forest around the lake. A comparison with other Italian key sequences aims at explaining the climate forcing factors that governed this original vegetation dynamic. Further investigations using additional proxies are needed for a more robust climate reconstruction.

  8. A new millipede, Austrotyla awishoshola n. sp., (Diplopoda, Chordeumatida, Conotylidae) from New Mexico, USA, and the importance of cave moss gardens as refugial habitats.

    PubMed

    Wynne, J Judson; Shear, William A

    2016-02-25

    Austrotyla awishoshola n. sp. is described from the moss gardens of one lava tube cave in El Malpais National Monument, Cibola Co., New Mexico. Most chordeumatidans require mesic conditions, and these environments are limited to moss gardens in several cave entrances and beneath cave skylights in El Malpais. Presently, this species is known from the moss gardens of a single of cave in the monument. We suggest A. awishoshola may be a climatic relict, having become restricted to the cave environment following the end of the Pleistocene. We discuss the importance of cave moss gardens as refugial and relictual habitats. Recommendations are provided to aid in the conservation and management of A. awishoshola and these habitats.

  9. Glacial vicariance in Eurasia: mitochondrial DNA evidence from Scots pine for a complex heritage involving genetically distinct refugia at mid-northern latitudes and in Asia Minor

    PubMed Central

    Naydenov, Krassimir; Senneville, Sauphie; Beaulieu, Jean; Tremblay, Francine; Bousquet, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Background At the last glacial maximum, Fennoscandia was covered by an ice sheet while the tundra occupied most of the rest of northern Eurasia. More or less disjunct refugial populations of plants were dispersed in southern Europe, often trapped between mountain ranges and seas. Genetic and paleobotanical evidences indicate that these populations have contributed much to Holocene recolonization of more northern latitudes. Less supportive evidence has been found for the existence of glacial populations located closer to the ice margin. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is a nordic conifer with a wide natural range covering much of Eurasia. Fractures in its extant genetic structure might be indicative of glacial vicariance and how different refugia contributed to the current distribution at the continental level. The population structure of Scots pine was investigated on much of its Eurasian natural range using maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. Results A novel polymorphic region of the Scots pine mitochondrial genome has been identified, the intron 1 of nad7, with three variants caused by insertions-deletions. From 986 trees distributed among 54 populations, four distinct multi-locus mitochondrial haplotypes (mitotypes) were detected based on the three nad7 intron 1 haplotypes and two previously reported size variants for nad1 intron B/C. Population differentiation was high (GST = 0.657) and the distribution of the mitotypes was geographically highly structured, suggesting at least four genetically distinct ancestral lineages. A cosmopolitan lineage was widely distributed in much of Europe throughout eastern Asia. A previously reported lineage limited to the Iberian Peninsula was confirmed. A new geographically restricted lineage was found confined to Asia Minor. A new lineage was restricted to more northern latitudes in northeastern Europe and the Baltic region. Conclusion The contribution of the various ancestral lineages to the current

  10. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age."…

  11. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  12. PALEOCLIMATE: Glacial Climate Instability.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, L

    2000-12-08

    Throughout the last glacial period, rapid climatic changes called Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. As Labeyrie discusses in his Perspective, these events are ideal targets for testing our understanding of climate change and developing climatic change models. Important steps toward understanding D-O events, particularly regarding the role of the low latitudes, are now reported by Hughen et al. and Peterson et al.

  13. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  14. Late Pleistocene ice margin fluctuations in the Nahanni National Park-UNESCO World Heritage Site and their impact on glacial lake formation and architecture of drainage systems across the Yukon-NWT continental divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duk-Rodkin, A.; Barendregt, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the late Pleistocene the southern Mackenzie region was glaciated by ice masses from a Cordilleran and continental source (Laurentide). Stratigraphic and geomorphologic evidence indicate that the two glaciers occupied this region at different times during the Late Pleistocene. The continental ice sheet advanced over the foothills and up major valleys reaching its maximum extent, ca. 30 ka. B. P. This took place when Cordilleran glaciers were in their initial stages of development. The Laurentide Ice Sheet blocked the drainage of the South Nahanni River near Virginia Falls, forming a glacial lake which inundated an area of approximately 900 km2 at its maximum stand, and had an outlet to the southwest, across the continental divide into the Yukon Territory and eventually into the Pacific Ocean. Lacustrine sediments at various sites reach thicknesses ranging from 110 to 120 metres, at an elevation of around 700 m. Cordilleran glaciers advanced eastward and approximately 5000 years later blocked this southwestward drainage, rerouting it to the east and north along the Mackenzie Mountain front. The drainage was confined between the mountains and continental ice margin where it incised major canyons into the limestone bedrock, and produced a spectacular karst landscape, which today forms part of the Nahanni National Park. During the retreat of the Laurentide and advance of Cordilleran glaciers, glacial Lake Nahanni cut an outlet to the east at First Canyon. This outlet drained into a continuous northbound network of marginal meltwater channels joining the north-flowing drainage that eventually reached the Arctic Ocean, and during further retreat of the ice sheet established the Mackenzie River in its modern location. The presence of Laurentide ice in this region is evidenced by large granite boulders carried from the Canadian Shield. Erratics are found up to 100 km west of the mountain front. Neotectonic activity in the area is interpreted from exposures such as those

  15. Glacial Lake Lind, Wisconsin and Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.D.; Addis, K.L.; Ferber, L.R.; Hemstad, C.B.; Meyer, G.N.; Komai, L.T.

    1999-01-01

    Glacial Lake Lind developed in the pre-late Wisconsinan St. Croix River valley, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and lasted more than 1000 yr during the retreat of the Superior lobe at the end of the Wisconsinan glaciation. Lake Lind sediment consists primarily of red varved silt and clay, but also includes mud-flow deposits, nearshore silt (penecontemporaneously deformed in places), nearshore rippled sand, and deltaic sand. Lake Lind varved red clay is not part of glacial Lake Grantsburg, as suggested by earlier authors, because the red varves are separated from overlying glacial Lake Grantsburg silt and clay by a unit of deltaic and fluvial sand. Furthermore, varve correlations indicate that the base of the red varves is younger to the north, showing that the basin expanded as the Superior lobe retreated and was not a lake basin dammed to the southwest by the advancing Grantsburg sublobe. Varve correlations indicate that the Superior lobe retreated at a rate of about 200 m/yr. Uniform winter-clay thickness throughout most of the varve couplets suggests thermal stratification in the lake with clay trapped in the epilimnion; some clay would exit the lake at the outlet prior to winter freeze. Zones of thicker winter-clay layers, in places associated with mud-flow layers, indicate outlet incision, lake-level fall, and shoreline erosion and resuspension of lake clay. The most likely outlet for glacial Lake Lind was in the southwest part of the lake near the present site of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Nearshore sediment indicates that the lake level of glacial Lake Lind was around 280 m. The elevation of the base of the Lake Lind sediments indicates water depth was 20 to 55 m. Evidence in the southern part of the lake basin suggests that the Superior lobe readvanced at least once during the early stages of glacial Lake Lind. Lake Lind ended not by drainage but by being filled in by prograding deltas and outwash plains composed of sand derived from the retreating Superior lobe. It

  16. Glacial vicariance in the Pacific Northwest: evidence from a lodgepole pine mitochondrial DNA minisatellite for multiple genetically distinct and widely separated refugia.

    PubMed

    Godbout, Julie; Fazekas, Aron; Newton, Craig H; Yeh, Francis C; Bousquet, Jean

    2008-05-01

    The Canadian side of the Pacific Northwest was almost entirely covered by ice during the last glacial maximum, which has induced vicariance and genetic population structure for several plant and animal taxa. Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex. Loud.) has a wide latitudinal and longitudinal distribution in the Pacific Northwest. Our main objective was to identify relictual signatures of glacial vicariance in the population structure of the species and search for evidence of distinct glacial refugia in the Pacific Northwest. A maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA minisatellite-like marker was used to decipher haplotype diversity in 91 populations of lodgepole pine located across the natural range. Overall population differentiation was sizeable (G(ST) = 0.365 and R(ST) = 0.568). Four relatively homogeneous groups of populations, possibly representative of as many genetically distinct glacial populations, were identified for the two main subspecies, ssp. latifolia and ssp. contorta. For ssp. contorta, one glacial lineage is suggested to have been located at high latitudes and possibly off the coast of mainland British Columbia (BC), while the other is considered to have been located south of the ice sheet along the Pacific coast. For ssp. latifolia, two genetically distinct glacial populations probably occurred south of the ice sheet: in the area bounded by the Cascades and Rocky Mountains ranges, and on the eastern side of the Rockies. A possible fifth refugium located in the Yukon may have also been present for ssp. latifolia. Zones of contact between these ancestral lineages were also apparent in interior and northern BC. These results indicate the role of the Queen Charlotte Islands and the Alexander Archipelago as a refugial zone for some Pacific Northwest species and the vicariant role played by the Cascades and the American Rocky Mountains during glaciation.

  17. What happened to the coal forests during Pennsylvanian glacial phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon-Lang, H.J.; Dimichele, W.A.

    2010-09-15

    Sequence stratigraphic analysis of Pennsylvanian coal-bearing strata suggests that glacial-interglacial fluctuations at high latitudes drove cyclic changes in tropical biomes. A literature review of plant assemblages in this paleoclimatic context suggests that coal forests dominated during humid interglacial phases, but were replaced by seasonally dry vegetation during glacial phases. After each glacial event, coal forests reassembled with largely the same species composition. This remarkable stasis implies that coal-forest refugia existed across the equatorial landscape during glacial phases, expanding to repopulate lowlands during and following deglaciation. One possibility is that refugia comprised small pockets of wetland forest strung out along valleys at some sites, but data are currently insufficient to test this hypothesis. The model presented here, if accepted, dramatically alters our understanding of the coal forests and helps explain aspects of their dynamics.

  18. Glacial history of the North Atlantic marine snail, Littorina saxatilis, inferred from distribution of mitochondrial DNA lineages.

    PubMed

    Panova, Marina; Blakeslee, April M H; Miller, A Whitman; Mäkinen, Tuuli; Ruiz, Gregory M; Johannesson, Kerstin; André, Carl

    2011-03-11

    The North Atlantic intertidal gastropod, Littorina saxatilis (Olivi, 1792), exhibits extreme morphological variation between and within geographic regions and has become a model for studies of local adaptation; yet a comprehensive analysis of the species' phylogeography is lacking. Here, we examine phylogeographic patterns of the species' populations in the North Atlantic and one remote Mediterranean population using sequence variation in a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (607 bp). We found that, as opposed to many other rocky intertidal species, L. saxatilis has likely had a long and continuous history in the Northwest Atlantic, including survival during the last glacial maximum (LGM), possibly in two refugia. In the Northeast Atlantic, several areas likely harboured refugial populations that recolonized different parts of this region after glacial retreat, resulting in strong population structure. However, the outlying monomorphic Venetian population is likely a recent anthropogenic introduction from northern Europe and not a remnant of an earlier wider distribution in the Mediterranean Sea. Overall, our detailed phylogeography of L. saxatilis adds an important piece to the understanding of Pleistocene history in North Atlantic marine biota as well as being the first study to describe the species' evolutionary history in its natural range. The latter contribution is noteworthy because the snail has recently become an important model species for understanding evolutionary processes of speciation; thus our work provides integral information for such endeavours.

  19. Glacial History of the North Atlantic Marine Snail, Littorina saxatilis, Inferred from Distribution of Mitochondrial DNA Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Panova, Marina; Blakeslee, April M. H.; Miller, A. Whitman; Mäkinen, Tuuli; Ruiz, Gregory M.; Johannesson, Kerstin; André, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The North Atlantic intertidal gastropod, Littorina saxatilis (Olivi, 1792), exhibits extreme morphological variation between and within geographic regions and has become a model for studies of local adaptation; yet a comprehensive analysis of the species' phylogeography is lacking. Here, we examine phylogeographic patterns of the species' populations in the North Atlantic and one remote Mediterranean population using sequence variation in a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (607 bp). We found that, as opposed to many other rocky intertidal species, L. saxatilis has likely had a long and continuous history in the Northwest Atlantic, including survival during the last glacial maximum (LGM), possibly in two refugia. In the Northeast Atlantic, several areas likely harboured refugial populations that recolonized different parts of this region after glacial retreat, resulting in strong population structure. However, the outlying monomorphic Venetian population is likely a recent anthropogenic introduction from northern Europe and not a remnant of an earlier wider distribution in the Mediterranean Sea. Overall, our detailed phylogeography of L. saxatilis adds an important piece to the understanding of Pleistocene history in North Atlantic marine biota as well as being the first study to describe the species' evolutionary history in its natural range. The latter contribution is noteworthy because the snail has recently become an important model species for understanding evolutionary processes of speciation; thus our work provides integral information for such endeavours. PMID:21412417

  20. Spatial patterns of AFLP diversity in Bulbophyllum occultum (Orchidaceae) indicate long-term refugial isolation in Madagascar and long-distance colonization effects in La Réunion

    PubMed Central

    Jaros, U; Fischer, G A; Pailler, T; Comes, H P

    2016-01-01

    Bulbophyllum occultum, an epiphytic orchid mainly distributed in the rainforests of (north)eastern Madagascar and La Réunion, represents an interesting model case for testing the effects of anthropogenic vs historical (e.g., climate induced) habitat isolation and long-distance colonization on the genetic structure of plant species with disjunct distributions in the Madagascan region. To this aim, we surveyed amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) across 13 populations in Madagascar and nine in La Réunion (206 individuals in total). We found overall high levels of population subdivision (ΦPT=0.387) and low within-population diversity (HE, range: 0.026–0.124), indicating non-equilibrium conditions in a mainly selfing species. There was no impact of recent deforestation (Madagascar) or habitat disturbance (La Réunion) detectable on AFLP diversity. K-means clustering and BARRIER analyses identified multiple gene pools and several genetic breaks, both within and among islands. Inter-island levels of population genetic diversity and subdivision were similar, whereby inter-individual divergence in flower colour explained a significant part of gene pool divergence in La Réunion. Our results suggest that (i) B. occultum persisted across multiple isolated (‘refugial') regions along the eastern rainforest corridor of Madagascar over recent climatic cycles and (ii) populations in La Réunion arose from either single or few independent introductions from Madagascar. High selfing rates and sufficient time for genetic drift likely promoted unexpectedly high population genetic and phenotypic (flower colour) differentiation in La Réunion. Overall, this study highlights a strong imprint of history on the genetic structure of a low-gene-dispersing epiphytic orchid from the Madagascan region. PMID:26883184

  1. Spatial patterns of AFLP diversity in Bulbophyllum occultum (Orchidaceae) indicate long-term refugial isolation in Madagascar and long-distance colonization effects in La Réunion.

    PubMed

    Jaros, U; Fischer, G A; Pailler, T; Comes, H P

    2016-05-01

    Bulbophyllum occultum, an epiphytic orchid mainly distributed in the rainforests of (north)eastern Madagascar and La Réunion, represents an interesting model case for testing the effects of anthropogenic vs historical (e.g., climate induced) habitat isolation and long-distance colonization on the genetic structure of plant species with disjunct distributions in the Madagascan region. To this aim, we surveyed amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) across 13 populations in Madagascar and nine in La Réunion (206 individuals in total). We found overall high levels of population subdivision (Φ(PT)=0.387) and low within-population diversity (H(E), range: 0.026-0.124), indicating non-equilibrium conditions in a mainly selfing species. There was no impact of recent deforestation (Madagascar) or habitat disturbance (La Réunion) detectable on AFLP diversity. K-means clustering and BARRIER analyses identified multiple gene pools and several genetic breaks, both within and among islands. Inter-island levels of population genetic diversity and subdivision were similar, whereby inter-individual divergence in flower colour explained a significant part of gene pool divergence in La Réunion. Our results suggest that (i) B. occultum persisted across multiple isolated ('refugial') regions along the eastern rainforest corridor of Madagascar over recent climatic cycles and (ii) populations in La Réunion arose from either single or few independent introductions from Madagascar. High selfing rates and sufficient time for genetic drift likely promoted unexpectedly high population genetic and phenotypic (flower colour) differentiation in La Réunion. Overall, this study highlights a strong imprint of history on the genetic structure of a low-gene-dispersing epiphytic orchid from the Madagascan region.

  2. Glacial bed forms at Findelengletscher, Zermatt, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madella, Andrea; Nyffenegger, Franziska; Schlüchter, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The current glacier meltdown is increasingly unveiling the glacial bed forms produced by the most recent glacial advance of the 1980ies, such as flutes, mega-flutes and drumlins. This is a challenging opportunity to study these morphologies and the processes involved in their formation; in addition, our observation suggests a new question to be answered: why can't any of these features in units belonging to previous glacial advances be recognised? Similar forms could either have been washed away already, or never been built during LGM and since. The most beautiful and evident of the forms under investigation are the flutes and mega-flutes: elongated streamlined ridges of sediments either starting from an obstacle or just sticking out of the basal lodgement till. The way flutes have been initiated and then evolve is still partially unknown, due to their variety in shape, size and material. The glacial forefield at Findelengletscher under investigation deglaciated over the past two years, offers a well-preserved variety of such forms at all scales. Their material (basal lodgement till) is homogeneous and consistent all over the site, as well as their fabric. In addition, this silty sand shows a low plasticity index. These preliminary results support the idea that flutes build up very quickly during repeated seasonal advances in thin ice conditions with retreating trend (Coray, 2007), and that they could be equally easily and rapidly washed away. References: Coray Sandro (2007): Genesis and significance of flutes at Findelengletscher, Valais, Switzerland, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.

  3. Direct evidence of central European forest refugia during the last glacial period based on mollusc fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juřičková, Lucie; Horáčková, Jitka; Ložek, Vojen

    2014-07-01

    Although there is evidence from molecular studies for the existence of central European last glacial refugia for temperate species, there is still a great lack of direct fossil records to confirm this theory. Here we bring such evidence in the form of fossil shells from twenty strictly forest land snail species, which were recorded in radiocarbon-dated late glacial or older mollusc assemblages of nine non-interrupted mollusc successions situated in the Western Carpathians, and one in the Bohemian Massif. We proposed that molluscs survived the last glacial period in central Europe in isolated small patches of broadleaf forest, which we unequivocally demonstrate for two sites of last glacial maximum age.

  4. The last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  5. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography.

    PubMed

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J; Montgomery, David R

    2015-08-14

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 10(4) years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain.

  6. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography

    PubMed Central

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J.; Montgomery, David R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 104 years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  7. Somma-Vesuvius ground deformation over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Vertical ground movements at Somma-Vesuvius during the last glacial cycle have been inferred from micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from boreholes drilled at the archaeological sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii as well as on the apron of the volcano and the adjacent Sebeto and Sarno Valleys. Opposing movements occurred during the periods preceding and following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The uplift began 20 ka ago with marine deposits rising several tens of metres up to 25 m a.s.l., recovering previous subsidence which occurred during the Late glacial period, suggesting a strict connection between volcano-tectonic and glacial cycles. Here we present the analysis of deposits predating the LGM, which confirms subsidence of the Campanian Plain where Mt. Somma-Vesuvius is located, shows variable surface loading effects and highlights the volcano-tectonic stages experienced by the volcano. The self-balancing mechanism of the volcanic system, evolving towards an explosive, subaerial activity 60 ka ago, is testified to by a large ground oscillation in phase with sea level change during the last glacial cycle.

  8. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  9. Genome-wide set of SNPs reveals evidence for two glacial refugia and admixture from postglacial recolonization in an alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Zijian; Hall, Jocelyn C; Jex, Bill; Hegel, Troy M; Coltman, David W

    2016-08-01

    Past glaciation events have played a major role in shaping the genetic diversity and distribution of wild sheep in North America. The advancement of glaciers can isolate populations in ice-free refugia, where they can survive until the recession of ice sheets. The major Beringian refugium is thought to have held thinhorn sheep (Ovis dalli) populations during times of glacial advance. While isolation in the major refugium can account for much of the genetic and morphological diversity seen in extant thinhorn sheep populations, mounting evidence suggests the persistence of populations in smaller minor refugia. We investigated the refugial origins of thinhorn sheep using ~10 000 SNPs obtained via a cross-species application of the domestic sheep ovine HD BeadChip to genotype 52 thinhorn sheep and five bighorn sheep (O. canadensis) samples. Phylogenetic inference revealed a distinct lineage of thinhorn sheep inhabiting British Columbia, which is consistent with the survival of a group of thinhorn sheep in a minor refugium separate from the Beringian refugium. Isolation in separate glacial refugia probably mediated the evolution of the two thinhorn sheep subspecies, the white Dall's sheep (O. d. dalli), which persisted in Beringia, and the dark Stone's sheep (O. d. stonei), which utilized the minor refugium. We also found the first genetic evidence for admixture between sheep from different glacial refugia in south-central Yukon as a consequence of post glacial expansion and recolonization. These results show that glaciation events can have a major role in the evolution of species inhabiting previously glaciated habitats and the need to look beyond established refugia when examining the evolutionary history of such species.

  10. The Arctic: Glacial Refugium or Area of Secondary Contact? Inference from the Population Genetic Structure of the Thick-Billed Murre (Uria lomvia), with Implications for Management.

    PubMed

    Tigano, Anna; Damus, Martin; Birt, Tim P; Morris-Pocock, Jamie A; Artukhin, Yuri B; Friesen, Vicki L

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary glaciations affected the distribution of many species. Here, we investigate whether the Arctic represented a glacial refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum or an area of secondary contact following the ice retreat, by analyzing the genetic population structure of the thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia), a seabird that breeds throughout the North Atlantic, North Pacific and Arctic Oceans. The thick-billed murre is a species of socio-economic importance and faces numerous threats including hunting, oil pollution, gill netting, and climate change. We compared variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (n = 424), supplemented by 4 microsatellite loci (n = 445), among thick-billed murres sampled throughout their range. MtDNA data indicated that colonies comprise 4 genetically differentiated groups (Φst = 0.11-0.81): 1) Atlantic Ocean plus New Siberian Islands region, 2) Cape Parry, 3) Chukchi Sea, and 4) Pacific Ocean. Microsatellite variation differed between Atlantic and Pacific populations. Otherwise, little substructure was found within either ocean. Atlantic and Pacific populations appear to have been genetically isolated since the last interglacial period and should be considered separate evolutionary significant units for management. The Chukchi Sea and Cape Parry appear to represent areas of secondary contact, rather than arctic refugial populations.

  11. Imprints of multiple glacial refugia in the Pyrenees revealed by phylogeography and palaeodistribution modelling of an endemic spider.

    PubMed

    Bidegaray-Batista, Leticia; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Santulli, Giulia; Maiorano, Luigi; Guisan, Antoine; Vogler, Alfried P; Arnedo, Miquel A

    2016-05-01

    Mediterranean mountain ranges harbour highly endemic biota in islandlike habitats. Their topographic diversity offered the opportunity for mountain species to persist in refugial areas during episodes of major climatic change. We investigate the role of Quaternary climatic oscillations in shaping the demographic history and distribution ranges in the spider Harpactocrates ravastellus, endemic to the Pyrenees. Gene trees and multispecies coalescent analyses on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences unveiled two distinct lineages with a hybrid zone around the northwestern area of the Catalan Pyrenees. The lineages were further supported by morphological differences. Climatic niche-based species distribution models (SDMs) identified two lowland refugia at the western and eastern extremes of the mountain range, which would suggest secondary contact following postglacial expansion of populations from both refugia. Neutrality test and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analyses indicated that several local populations underwent severe bottlenecks followed by population expansions, which in combination with the deep population differentiation provided evidence for population survival during glacial periods in microrefugia across the mountain range, in addition to the main Atlantic and Mediterranean (western and eastern) refugia. This study sheds light on the complexities of Quaternary climatic oscillations in building up genetic diversity and local endemicity in the southern Europe mountain ranges.

  12. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L

    2014-04-15

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth's biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this "geothermal glacial refugia" hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species.

  13. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth’s biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this “geothermal glacial refugia” hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species. PMID:24616489

  14. Glacial modification of granite tors in the Cairngorms, Scotland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A.M.; Phillips, W.M.

    2006-01-01

    A range of evidence indicates that many granite tors in the Cairngorms have been modified by the flow of glacier ice during the Pleistocene. Comparisons with SW England and the use of a space-time transformation across 38 tor groups in the Cairngorms allow a model to be developed for progressive glacial modification. Tors with deeply etched surfaces and no, or limited, block removal imply an absence of significant glacial modification. The removal of superstructure and blocks, locally forming boulder trains, and the progressive reduction of tors to stumps and basal slabs represent the more advanced stages of modification. Recognition of some slabs as tor stumps from which glacial erosion has removed all superstructure allows the original distribution of tors to be reconstructed for large areas of the Cairngorms. Unmodified tors require covers of non-erosive, cold-based ice during all of the cold stages of the Middle and Late Pleistocene. Deformation beneath cold-based glacier ice is capable of the removal of blocks but advanced glacial modification requires former wet-based glacier ice. The depth of glacial erosion at former tor sites remains limited largely to the partial or total elimination of the upstanding tor form. Cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages (Phillips et al., 2006) together with data from weathering pit depths (Hall and Phillips, 2006), from the surfaces of tors and large erratic blocks require that the glacial entrainment of blocks from tors occurred in Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 4-2, 6 and, probably, at least one earlier phase. The occurrence of glacially modified tors on or close to, the main summits of the Cairngorms requires full ice cover over the mountains during these Stages. Evidence from the Cairngorms indicates that tor morphology can be regarded as an important indicator of former ice cover in many formerly glaciated areas, particularly where other evidence of ice cover is sparse. Recognition of the glacial modification of tors is important

  15. Extraterrestrial accretion and glacial cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the approx. 100-k.y. cycle seen in terrestrial glaciation is due to changes in meteor flux that come from changes in the Earth's orbit. This model can explain a 70-k.y. 'anomalous' period in climate data and the apparent discrepancy between present extraterrestrial fluxes and those in oceanic sediments. It can be tested by measuring Ir densities in sediments and ice during glacials and interglacials.

  16. Displaced phylogeographic signals from Gyrodactylus arcuatus, a parasite of the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus, suggest freshwater glacial refugia in Europe.

    PubMed

    Lumme, Jaakko; Mäkinen, Hannu; Ermolenko, Alexey V; Gregg, Jacob L; Ziętara, Marek S

    2016-08-01

    We examined the global mitochondrial phylogeography of Gyrodactylus arcuatus, a flatworm ectoparasite of three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. In accordance with the suggested high divergence rate of 13%/million years, the genetic variation of the parasite was high: haplotype diversity h=0.985 and nucleotide diversity π=0.0161. The differentiation among the parasite populations was substantial (Φst=0.759), with two main allopatric clades (here termed Euro and North) accounting for 54% of the total genetic variation. The diversity center of the Euro clade was in the Baltic Sea, while the North clade was spread across the Barents and White Seas. A single haplotype within the North clade was found in the western and eastern Pacific Ocean. Divergence of main clades was estimated to be circa 200 thousand years ago. Each main clade was further divided into six distinct subclades, estimated to have diverged in isolation since 135 thousand years ago. This second division corresponds approximately to the Eemian interglacial predating the last glacial maximum. A demographic expansion of the subclades is associated with colonisation of northern Europe since the last glacial maximum, circa 15-40 thousand years ago. The parasite phylogeny is most likely explained by sequential isolated bottlenecks and expansions in numerous allopatric refugia. The postglacial intermingling and high variation in the marine parasite populations, separately in the Baltic and Barents Seas, suggest low competition of divergent parasite matrilines, coupled with a large population size and high rate of dispersal of hosts. The genetic contribution of the assumed refugial fish populations maintaining the parasite during the last glacial maximum was not detected among the marine sticklebacks, which perhaps were infected after range expansion.

  17. Pleistocene glacial refugia across the Appalachian Mountains and coastal plain in the millipede genus Narceus: Evidence from population genetic, phylogeographic, and paleoclimatic data

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Matt J; Stockman, Amy K; Marek, Paul E; Bond, Jason E

    2009-01-01

    Background Species that are widespread throughout historically glaciated and currently non-glaciated areas provide excellent opportunities to investigate the role of Pleistocene climatic change on the distribution of North American biodiversity. Many studies indicate that northern animal populations exhibit low levels of genetic diversity over geographically widespread areas whereas southern populations exhibit relatively high levels. Recently, paleoclimatic data have been combined with niche-based distribution modeling to locate possible refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum. Using phylogeographic, population, and paleoclimatic data, we show that the distribution and mitochondrial data for the millipede genus Narceus are consistent with classical examples of Pleistocene refugia and subsequent post-glacial population expansion seen in other organismal groups. Results The phylogeographic structure of Narceus reveals a complex evolutionary history with signatures of multiple refugia in southeastern North America followed by two major northern expansions. Evidence for refugial populations were found in the southern Appalachian Mountains and in the coastal plain. The northern expansions appear to have radiated from two separate refugia, one from the Gulf Coastal Plain area and the other from the mid-Atlantic coastal region. Distributional models of Narceus during the Last Glacial Maximum show a dramatic reduction from the current distribution, with suitable ecological zones concentrated along the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain. We found a strong correlation between these zones of ecological suitability inferred from our paleo-model with levels of genetic diversity derived from phylogenetic and population estimates of genetic structuring. Conclusion The signature of climatic change, during and after the Pleistocene, on the distribution of the millipede genus Narceus is evident in the genetic data presented. Niche-based historical distribution modeling strengthens the

  18. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Observed with VLBI and SLR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, D.; Peltier, W.; Watkins, M.

    1999-01-01

    In global geodetic solutions vertical rates of site motion are usually estimated relative to the geocenter (center of figure) of the solid earth. The velocity of the geocenter is estimated assuming that the plates are rigid, that the velocities of the plates equal those in NUVEL-1A (DeMets et al. 1990, 1994) and that the uplift, subsidence, and intraplate deformation due to glacial isostatic adjustment is negligible.

  19. Early Circum-Arctic Glacial Decay Following the Last Glacial Maximum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, T.; Alonso-Garcia, M.; Flower, B. P.; Shevenell, A.; Roehl, U.; Goddard, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent rapid warming, glacial retreat, and sea ice reduction observed in the Arctic suggest extreme regional environmental sensitivity to ongoing anthropogenic climate change. To place these recent environmental changes in context and better understand the forcings and feedbacks involved in Arctic climate change, regional studies of past intervals of rapid warming are required. Paleoceanographic studies from the high-latitude North Atlantic indicate close relationships between meltwater discharges from circum-Arctic ice sheets, perturbations of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and global climate variations on sub-orbital timescales during the Late Quaternary. During the last glacial-interglacial transition (25-10 ka), when atmospheric temperatures over Greenland warmed 10-15°C and the AMOC experienced millennial-scale variability, low-resolution stable isotope studies from Fram Strait sediment cores indicate that the circum-Arctic ice sheets began to melt earlier than lower latitude Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, discharging their meltwater into the high latitude North Atlantic. Fram Strait, located at the gateway between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, is the only region where Arctic meltwater can exchange with the world oceans on both glacial and interglacial timescales. Thus, high-resolution paleoceanographic studies of Fram Strait sediments are critically required for understanding changes in Arctic meltwater flux to the North Atlantic on sub-orbital timescales. Here we present the first high-resolution (<100 yr) multi-proxy dataset from Fram Strait (ODP Site 986; 77°20.43'N, 9°04.66'E; water depth: 2063 m) to assess the timing of circum-Arctic ice sheet decay since the Last Glacial Maximum. Foraminiferal isotopic and elemental, scanning X-Ray Fluorescence, and ice-rafted debris records are used to isolate Arctic meltwater and iceberg discharge signals. Sharp increases in productivity and changes in water mass ventilation are inferred

  20. Enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands: A sink for atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shiming; Clift, Peter D.; Zhao, Debo; Hovius, Niels; Munhoven, Guy; France-Lanord, Christian; Wang, Yinxi; Xiong, Zhifang; Huang, Jie; Yu, Zhaojie; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Wentao; Zhang, Guoliang; Li, Anchun; Li, Tiegang

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and global climate are closely coupled. Since 800 ka CO2 concentrations have been up to 50% higher during interglacial compared to glacial periods. Because of its dependence on temperature, humidity, and erosion rates, chemical weathering of exposed silicate minerals was suggested to have dampened these cyclic variations of atmospheric composition. Cooler and drier conditions and lower non-glacial erosion rates suppressed in situ chemical weathering rates during glacial periods. However, using systematic variations in major element geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotopes and clay mineral records from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1143 and 1144 in the South China Sea spanning the last 1.1 Ma, we show that sediment deposited during glacial periods was more weathered than sediment delivered during interglacials. We attribute this to subaerial exposure and weathering of unconsolidated shelf sediments during glacial sealevel lowstands. Our estimates suggest that enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands can account for ∼9% of the carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere during the glacial and thus represent a significant part of the observed glacial-interglacial variation of ∼80 ppmv. As a result, if similar magnitudes can be identified in other tropical shelf-slope systems, the effects of increased sediment exposure and subsequent silicate weathering during lowstands could have potentially enhanced the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 during cold stages of the Quaternary. This in turn would have caused an intensification of glacial cycles.

  1. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  2. Quaternary climate change drives allo-peripatric speciation and refugial divergence in the Dysosma versipellis-pleiantha complex from different forest types in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Han; Comes, Hans Peter; Cao, Ya-Nan; Guo, Rui; Mao, Yun-Rui; Qiu, Ying-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Subtropical China harbours the world’s most diverse temperate flora, but little is known about the roles of geographical and eco-climatic factors underlying the region’s exceptionally high levels of species diversity and endemism. Here we address this key question by investigating the spatio-temporal and ecological processes of divergence within the Dysosma versipellis-pleiantha species complex, endemic to subtropical China. Our cpDNA phylogeny showed that this monophyletic group of understory herbs is derived from a Late Pliocene ancestor of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP)/Southwest China. Genetic and ENM data in conjunction with niche differentiation analyses support that the early divergence of D. versipellis and D. pleiantha proceeded through allo-peripatric speciation, possibly triggered by Early Pleistocene climate change, while subsequent climate-induced cycles of range contractions/expansions enhanced the eco-geographical isolation of both taxa. Furthermore, modelling of population-genetic data indicated that major lineage divergences within D. versipellis likely resulted from long-term allopatric population isolation in multiple localized refugia over the last glacial/interglacial periods, and which in turn fostered endemic species formation (D. difformis, D. majoensis) from within D. versipellis in Southwest China. These findings point to an overriding role of Quaternary climate change in triggering essentially allopatric (incipient) speciation in this group of forest-restricted plant species in subtropical China. PMID:28074927

  3. Differences in Bacterial Diversity and Communities Between Glacial Snow and Glacial Soil on the Chongce Ice Cap, West Kunlun Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang Li; Hou, Shu Gui; Le Baoge, Ri; Li, Zhi Guo; Xu, Hao; Liu, Ya Ping; Du, Wen Tao; Liu, Yong Qin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of microbial ecology in different supraglacial habitats is important due to the unprecedented speed of glacier retreat. Differences in bacterial diversity and community structure between glacial snow and glacial soil on the Chongce Ice Cap were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. Based on rarefaction curves, Chao1, ACE, and Shannon indices, we found that bacterial diversity in glacial snow was lower than that in glacial soil. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and heatmap analysis indicated that there were major differences in bacterial communities between glacial snow and glacial soil. Most bacteria were different between the two habitats; however, there were some common bacteria shared between glacial snow and glacial soil. Some rare or functional bacterial resources were also present in the Chongce Ice Cap. These findings provide a preliminary understanding of the shifts in bacterial diversity and communities from glacial snow to glacial soil after the melting and inflow of glacial snow into glacial soil. PMID:27811967

  4. Differences in Bacterial Diversity and Communities Between Glacial Snow and Glacial Soil on the Chongce Ice Cap, West Kunlun Mountains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang Li; Hou, Shu Gui; Le Baoge, Ri; Li, Zhi Guo; Xu, Hao; Liu, Ya Ping; Du, Wen Tao; Liu, Yong Qin

    2016-11-04

    A detailed understanding of microbial ecology in different supraglacial habitats is important due to the unprecedented speed of glacier retreat. Differences in bacterial diversity and community structure between glacial snow and glacial soil on the Chongce Ice Cap were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. Based on rarefaction curves, Chao1, ACE, and Shannon indices, we found that bacterial diversity in glacial snow was lower than that in glacial soil. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and heatmap analysis indicated that there were major differences in bacterial communities between glacial snow and glacial soil. Most bacteria were different between the two habitats; however, there were some common bacteria shared between glacial snow and glacial soil. Some rare or functional bacterial resources were also present in the Chongce Ice Cap. These findings provide a preliminary understanding of the shifts in bacterial diversity and communities from glacial snow to glacial soil after the melting and inflow of glacial snow into glacial soil.

  5. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  6. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  7. Pleistocene glacial evolution of Fuentes Carrionas (Cantabrian Range, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellitero, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Fuentes Carrionas is a massif situated at the N of Spain, between Castilla y Leon and Cantabria regions. It is the second highest mountain massif of the Cantabrian Range after Picos de Europa, with peaks over 2500 m.a.s.l. and valleys well over 1000 m.a.s.l. Fuentes Carrionas was glaciated during Quaternary, and even during the Holocene and as far as Little Ice Age the presence of glaciers, or at least permafrost is controversial. Results from glacial geomorphology analysis of Fuentes Carrionas Massif are presented. Based on the interpretation of glacial landforms, glacial evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum until Pleistocene deglaciation is described. Four different glacial equilibrium phases are identified, the last one divided into two pulsations. Deglaciation process took place between 36 ka BP and 11 ka BP. Local Last Glacial Maximum is dated back to 36-38 ka. BP, therefore earlier than LGM. Glaciers reached 15 km. long and occupied valleys down to 1250 m.a.s.l. during this phase. By European LGM (20-18 ka.BP) glaciers had substantially retreated to fronts about 1700 m.a.s.l. A final stage with two marked pulsations shows only small glaciers located at cirques above 2000 m.a.s.l. and, finally, only small cirque glaciers at North and Northeast orientation above 2200 m.a.s.l. Both these phases have been correlated to Oldest and Younger Dryas, although no dates have been done yet. A palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is proposed, based on ELA (Equilibrium Line Altitude) rise. ELA has been calculated with the AAR method and 0.67 ratio. This reconstruction shows that temperatures ranged between 9°C and 10°C lower than present ones at the end of Pleistocene, depending on a precipitations variation between 30% higher and 20% lower than current ones. Further research will focus on these retreat phases, especially on Younger Dryas identification and reconstruction for this site and the rest of Cantabrian Range.

  8. Microbial Succession in Glacial Foreland Soils of the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, S.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian arctic has experienced increasing temperatures over the past century leading to heightened rate of glacial retreat. Glacial retreat leads to subsequent exposure of foreland soils to atmospheric conditions, thus creating a sequence of change in these ecosystems. Microbes are critical for soil development and nutrient dynamics in glacial systems as they are the primary colonizers of these soils and have been demonstrated to play a role in geochemical weathering and nutrient cycling beneath the glacier. Although viable microbial communities exist beneath glaciers and are known to be important for the glacial ecosystem, the impact of glacial retreat on these communities and development of the resulting foreland ecosystem is not well understood. Here, we investigate how microbial communities respond to changing conditions brought on by glacial retreat and whether a pattern of succession, such as those found in well characterized plant systems, occurs along a soil foreland in these microbial communities. We hypothesis that time since deglaciation is the major determinant of structure and composition of microbial assemblages. To test this, soil samples were collected along two glacier forelands, Trapridge Glacier and Duke River Glacier, located in Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory. Chronosequence dating of satellite images using geographic information system software revealed sampling sites have been ice-free from ~30 years to over 60 years. Soil chemistry analysis of major nutrients revealed no change in chemical parameters along the chronosequence, suggesting that presence of microbes after exposure from subglacial environments does not significantly alter soil characteristics in the timeframe observed. Furthermore, next-generation IonTorrentTM sequencing performed on soil samples revealed over five million sequencing reads, suggesting prominent microbial presence within these soils. Further analysis on sequencing data is needed to establish the

  9. Invertebrate Metacommunity Structure and Dynamics in an Andean Glacial Stream Network Facing Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio; Jacobsen, Dean; Dangles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Under the ongoing climate change, understanding the mechanisms structuring the spatial distribution of aquatic species in glacial stream networks is of critical importance to predict the response of aquatic biodiversity in the face of glacier melting. In this study, we propose to use metacommunity theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico-chemical and food resource conditions, and calculated geographical, altitudinal and glaciality distances among all sites. Using partial redundancy analysis, we partitioned community variation to evaluate the relative strength of environmental conditions (e.g., glaciality, food resource) vs. spatial processes (e.g., overland, watercourse, and downstream directional dispersal) in organizing the aquatic metacommunity. Results revealed that both environmental and spatial variables significantly explained community variation among sites. Among all environmental variables, the glacial influence component best explained community variation. Overland spatial variables based on geographical and altitudinal distances significantly affected community variation. Watercourse spatial variables based on glaciality distances had a unique significant effect on community variation. Within alpine catchment, glacial meltwater affects macroinvertebrate metacommunity structure in many ways. Indeed, the harsh environmental conditions characterizing glacial influence not only constitute the primary environmental filter but also, limit water-borne macroinvertebrate dispersal. Therefore, glacier runoff acts as an aquatic dispersal barrier, isolating species in headwater streams, and preventing non-adapted species to colonize throughout the entire stream network. Under a scenario of glacier runoff decrease, we

  10. Do crustal deformations observed by GPS in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) reflect glacial-isostatic adjustment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Del Cogliano, D.; Dietrich, R.; Fritsche, M.

    2010-09-01

    Vertical site velocities determined by geodetic GPS observations in the Lago Fagnano area, Tierra del Fuego main island, are interpreted with respect to their potential relation with the glacial-isostatic crustal response to ice mass changes. The spatial pattern of the uplift rates, in combination with the horizontal crustal deformation pattern, point towards a fault-tectonic rather than glacial-isostatic origin of the determined vertical crustal deformations. This implies rather small GIA effects pointing towards relatively small Holocene ice-mass changes in Tierra del Fuego. However, these findings are considered to be preliminary. They should be confirmed by additional observations covering an extended area with GPS sites.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of lake cisco (Coregonus artedi): evidence supporting extensive secondary contacts between two glacial races.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, J; Bernatchez, L

    2001-04-01

    The comparative molecular phylogeography of regional fish fauna has revealed the wide distribution of young clades in freshwater fishes of formerly glaciated areas as well as interspecific incongruences in their refugial origins and recolonization routes. In this study, we employed single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and sequence analyses to describe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism among 27 populations of the lake cisco (Coregonus artedi) from its entire range of distribution in order to evaluate the hypothesis of dual glacial refuges proposed by Bernatchez & Dodson against the traditional view that this species is solely of Mississippian origin. Results indicate that this taxon is composed of two closely related groups that are widely distributed and intermixed over most of the sampled range. The estimated level of divergence (0.48%), the contrast in the geographical distribution of each group, as well as the general distribution of C. artedi in North America together support the hypothesis that one group dispersed from a Mississippian refuge via the proglacial lakes, while the other is of Atlantic origin and also took advantages of earlier dispersal routes towards eastern Hudson Bay drainages. However, the signal of past range fragmentation revealed by a nested clade analysis was weak, and did not allow to formally exclude the hypothesis of a single Mississippian origin for both lineages. Comparisons with the phylogeographic patterns of other Nearctic freshwater fishes suggest that the salinity tolerance and thermal sensitivity of lake cisco may have been determinant for its extensive postglacial dispersal. The presence or co-occurrence of sympatric or allopatric eco/morphotypes were not found to be necessarily associated with the presence of both haplotype groups.

  12. Record of glacial Lake Missoula floods in glacial Lake Columbia, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Michelle A.; Clague, John J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2), outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula deposited diagnostic sediments within glacial Lake Columbia. Two dominant outburst flood lithofacies are present within glacial Lake Columbia deposits: a flood expansion bar facies and a finer-grained hyperpycnite facies. We conclude that the flood sediments have a glacial Lake Missoula source because: (1) current indicators indicate westward flow through the lake, and upvalley flow followed by downvalley flow in tributary valleys; (2) no flood sediments are found north of a certain point; (3) there is a dominance of Belt-Purcell Supergroup clasts in a flood expansion bar; and (4) some of the finer-grained beds have a pink colour, reflective of glacial Lake Missoula lake-bottom sediments. A new radiocarbon age of 13,400 ± 100 14C BP on plant detritus found below 37 flood beds helps constrain the timing of outburst flooding from glacial Lake Missoula.

  13. Systematically enhanced subarctic Pacific stratification and nutrient utilization during glacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, K. P.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The modern subarctic North Pacific is characterized as a high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area, but evidence for increased nutrient utilization during the last glacial indicates that this region is highly dynamic. As such, this HNLC area is of particular interest in regard to understanding changes in the biological pump and carbon sequestration and predicting how biogeochemical processes will influence, or be influenced by, future climate change. While it has been suggested that changes in iron supply and/or ocean stratification could explain fluctuations in nutrient utilization and productivity in the subarctic Pacific, short records of nutrient utilization have previously hindered the evaluation of these potential mechanisms over long timescales. Here we present new, high-resolution records of bulk sediment δ15N from 0-1.2 Ma from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Exp. 323 Site U1342, which are used to calculate Δδ15N (U1342 δ15Nbulk - ODP Site 1012 δ15Nbulk) as a nitrate utilization proxy. The unprecedented length and resolution of this new record allows us, for the first time, to determine orbital-scale systematic behavior in subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization over many glacial/interglacial cycles. Spectral analyses demonstrate that enhanced nutrient utilization was paced by climate on Milankovitch orbital cycles since the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT; ~800 ka). Nitrate utilization maxima is statistically correlated with glacial maxima and enhanced dust/iron availability (represented by existing records of EPICA ice core dust, Southern Pacific Ocean sediment iron, and China loess) but shows low correlation to primary productivity, suggesting that stratification has systematically exerted an important control on subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization since the MPT. These findings imply that the presence of iron helped to change the region into a nitrate-limited, rather than iron-limited, region during glacials and that stratification, which

  14. Evaluation of modeling for groundwater flow and tetrachloroethylene transport in the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services entered into a cooperative agreement to assist in the evaluation of remedy simulations of the MSGD aquifer that are being performed by various parties to track the remedial progress of the PCE plume. This report summarizes findings from this evaluation. Topics covered include description of groundwater flow and transport models used in the study of the Savage Superfund site (section 2), evaluation of models and their results (section 3), testing of several new simulations (section 4), an assessment of the representation of models to simulate field conditions (section 5), and an assessment of models as a tool in remedial operational decision making (section 6).

  15. Understanding the glacial methane cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Kaplan, Jed O.; Beerling, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) varied with climate during the Quaternary, rising from a concentration of 375 p.p.b.v. during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago, to 680 p.p.b.v. at the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the causes of this increase remain unclear; proposed hypotheses rely on fluctuations in either the magnitude of CH4 sources or CH4 atmospheric lifetime, or both. Here we use an Earth System model to provide a comprehensive assessment of these competing hypotheses, including estimates of uncertainty. We show that in this model, the global LGM CH4 source was reduced by 28-46%, and the lifetime increased by 2-8%, with a best-estimate LGM CH4 concentration of 463-480 p.p.b.v. Simulating the observed LGM concentration requires a 46-49% reduction in sources, indicating that we cannot reconcile the observed amplitude. This highlights the need for better understanding of the effects of low CO2 and cooler climate on wetlands and other natural CH4 sources.

  16. Understanding the glacial methane cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Kaplan, Jed O.; Beerling, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) varied with climate during the Quaternary, rising from a concentration of 375 p.p.b.v. during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago, to 680 p.p.b.v. at the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the causes of this increase remain unclear; proposed hypotheses rely on fluctuations in either the magnitude of CH4 sources or CH4 atmospheric lifetime, or both. Here we use an Earth System model to provide a comprehensive assessment of these competing hypotheses, including estimates of uncertainty. We show that in this model, the global LGM CH4 source was reduced by 28–46%, and the lifetime increased by 2–8%, with a best-estimate LGM CH4 concentration of 463–480 p.p.b.v. Simulating the observed LGM concentration requires a 46–49% reduction in sources, indicating that we cannot reconcile the observed amplitude. This highlights the need for better understanding of the effects of low CO2 and cooler climate on wetlands and other natural CH4 sources. PMID:28220787

  17. Changing glacial lakes and associated outburst floods risks in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal, S.; Singh, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    Glacial lakes and associated outburst floods (GLOFs) have increased in the Himalayan region due to climate change during the last century that has led to huge losses to society. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to map glacial lakes, their increasing extent, and associated damage potential in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR), Indian Himalaya. The glacial lakes were mapped on Landsat TM (3 November, 2009 and 6 November 2010) and Landsat MSS satellite images (15 November 1976 and 26 October 1979) to assess their changing area. Potential GLOFs sites have been identified and studied for their damage potentials using site characteristics and past occurrence of GLOFs. A total of 35 lakes were mapped, of which 14 lakes are located at more than 4500 m. The size and damage potentials of lakes have increased. Some lakes grew so much that they merged to form a big lake. All of these are potential GLOFs and can cause severe damage to society.

  18. Analysis of recent glacial earthquakes in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K.; Nettles, M.

    2015-12-01

    Large calving events at Greenland's outlet glaciers produce teleseismically detectable glacial earthquakes. These events are observed in the seismic record for the past 22 years, but the complete catalog of glacial earthquakes still numbers only ~300. The annual occurrence of these long-period events has increased over time, which makes recent years especially valuable in expanding the global dataset. Glacial earthquakes from 1993- 2010 have been analyzed systematically (Tsai and Ekström, 2007; Veitch and Nettles, 2012). Here, we analyze more recent events using the same centroid—single-force (CSF) approach as previous authors, focusing initially on data from 2013. In addition, we perform a focused study of selected events from 2009-2010 to assess the reliability of the force azimuths obtained from such inversions. Recent spatial and temporal patterns of glacial earthquakes in Greenland differ from those in previous years. In 2013, three times as many events occurred on the west coast as on the east, and these events originated predominantly from two glaciers: Jakobshavn Glacier on the west coast and Helheim Glacier on the east. Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier, on the east coast, produced no glacial earthquakes in 2013, though it produced many events in earlier years. Previous CSF results for glacial earthquakes show force azimuths perpendicular to the glacier front during a calving event, with force plunges near horizontal. However, some azimuths indicate forces initially oriented upglacier, while others are oriented downglacier (seaward). We perform a set of experiments on events from 2009 and 2010 and find two acceptable solutions for each glacial earthquake, oriented 180° apart with plunges of opposite sign and centroid times differing by approximately one half of the assumed duration of the earthquake time function. These results suggest the need for a more complex time function to model glacial earthquakes more accurately.

  19. A fresh look at glacial foods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, it has become clear that ice ages are characterized by glacial as well as climatic instability on millennial time scales. In his Perspective, Colman highlights two recent papers investigating the role of glacial meltwater and continental drainage in this instability. The results suggest a fundamental instability feedback between ocean circulation and ice sheet dynamics and provides an explanation for why instability was greatest at times of intermediate ice volume.

  20. Nutrient Dynamics in the Glacial Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, J. C.; Filippelli, G. M.

    2004-12-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) was likely a key contributor to glacial/interglacial climate change resulting from variability either in biogeochemical cycles or ocean stratification and CO2 degassing. Many of the hypotheses to explain the interglacial to glacial difference in atmospheric CO2 suggest that higher glacial dust fluxes led to Fe fertilization of surface waters and increased export production in the SO because the modern-day Southern Ocean is co-limited by both Fe and light availability. Documented Fe sources include upwelled Upper Circumpolar Deep Water, eolian deposition, and melting sea-ice. However, the influence of these sources is variable with latitude and position relative to major frontal zones. Presumably these same Fe sources were important during glacial times albeit at potentially different rates and magnitudes. To examine this effect, we have compared sedimentary Fe fluxes with records of dust deposition. We have found that Fe fluxes are higher than can be explained by eolian deposition, supporting an additional hemipelagic source of Fe to the deep ocean during glacial intervals. Furthermore, different proxies used to evaluate export production and nutrient utilization during glacial intervals yield different and seemingly contradictory results-for example, different studies have concluded that net productivity increased, decreased, and/or remained constant in the SO. Results from phosphorus geochemistry suggest that maxima in export production actually occur at terminations rather than either full glacial or interglacial conditions adding yet another possibility. The focus here will be to try to reconcile the nutrient, export production, and Fe data into a coherent view of nutrient utilization and export production in the glacial SO.

  1. A new record of post-glacial sedimentation in a glacial trough, offshore sub-Antarctic South Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Ove; Graham, Alastair; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Past studies of South Georgia's climatic history were constrained to land-based sedimentary records, such as peat bogs and coastal lakes, or to terrestrial geomorphology, such as terminal moraines. Hence, the current state of knowledge on past climatic changes in South Georgia is characterised by a complete absence of records from sedimentary marine archives in the fjords or coastal embayments of the region. This study comprises detailed examination of one of the first marine sediment cores recovered on its northeastern shelf in Royal Bay Glacial Trough. Alongside the analysis of new acoustic sub-bottom data, it is the first work to deliver extensive insight into South Georgia's post-glacial climatic history from a marine perspective. The glacial troughs on the South Georgia shelf radiate from the coast towards the shelf edge and represent major sediment traps as they form the only key large-scale depressions in the shelf bathymetry. Sedimentary records, covering a period since at least the Last Glacial Maximum, are thought likely to be recorded in most of them. The sediment core of this study covers sedimentation dated from a maximum of 15,346 ± 492 cal. yr BP until the present day. Physical core parameters indicate a major change in climatic conditions around 14,000 cal. yr BP, the time of the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Holocene climate variabilities are also recorded in the trough infill. The acoustic data show a major change in sedimentation and a pronounced unconformity at the core site, which appears to have had a widespread effect over a large area of the shelf. The origin of the unconformity remains unclear, though several hypotheses, including bottom-current erosion, glacial overriding and earthquake activity, are proposed and discussed. Another important finding at the core site is the presence of methane-derived authigenic carbonates. They form either as secondary precipitates in the subsurface or syndepositional at the seafloor as individual minerals or

  2. Ecology of invasive Melilotus albus on Alaskan glacial river floodplains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, Jeff S.; Werdin-Pfisterer, Nancy R.; Beattie, Katherine L.; Densmore, Roseann V.

    2011-01-01

    Melilotus albus (white sweetclover) has invaded Alaskan glacial river floodplains. We measured cover and density of plant species and environmental variables along transects perpendicular to the Nenana, Matanuska, and Stikine Rivers to study interactions between M. albus and other plant species and to characterize the environment where it establishes. Melilotus albus was a pioneer species on recently disturbed sites and did not persist into closed canopy forests. The relationships between M. albus cover and density and other species were site-specific.Melilotus albus was negatively correlated with native species Elaeagnus commutata at the Nenana River, but not at the Matanuska River. Melilotus albus was positively correlated with the exotic species Crepis tectorumand Taraxacum officinale at the Matanuska River and T. officinale on the upper Stikine River. However, the high density of M. albus at a lower Stikine River site was negatively correlated with T. officinale and several native species including Lathyrus japonicus var. maritimus and Salix alaxensis. Glacial river floodplains in Alaska are highly disturbed and are corridors for exotic plant species movement. Melilotus albus at moderate to low densities may facilitate establishment of exotic species, but at high densities can reduce the cover and density of both exotic and native species.

  3. Bayesian analysis of radiocarbon chronologies: examples from the European Late-glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockley, S. P. E.; Lowe, J. J.; Walker, M. J. C.; Asioli, A.; Trincardi, F.; Coope, G. R.; Donahue, R. E.

    2004-02-01

    Although there are many Late-glacial (ca. 15 000-11 000 cal. yr BP) proxy climate records from northwest Europe, some analysed at a very high temporal resolution (decadal to century scale), attempts to establish time-stratigraphical correlations between sequences are constrained by problems of radiocarbon dating. In an attempt to overcome some of these difficulties, we have used a Bayesian approach to the analysis of radiocarbon chronologies for two Late-glacial sites in the British Isles and one in the Adriatic Sea. The palaeoclimatic records from the three sites were then compared with that from the GRIP Greenland ice-core. Although there are some apparent differences in the timing of climatic events during the early part of the Late-glacial (pre-14 000 cal. yr BP), the results suggest that regional climatic changes appear to have been broadly comparable between Greenland, the British Isles and the Adriatic during the major part of the Late-glacial (i.e. between 14 000 and 11 000 cal. yr BP). The advantage of using the Bayesian approach is that it provides a means of testing the reliability of Late-glacial radiocarbon chronologies that is independent of regional chronostratigraphical (climatostratigraphical) frameworks. It also uses the full radiocarbon inventory available for each sequence and makes explicit any data selection applied. Potentially, therefore, it offers a more objective basis for comparing regional radiocarbon chronologies than the conventional approaches that have been used hitherto. Copyright

  4. Low-temperature formation and stabilization of rare allotropes of cyclooctasulfur (β-S8 and γ-S8) in the presence of organic carbon at a sulfur-rich glacial site in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Graham E.; Cosmidis, Julie; Grasby, Stephen E.; Trivedi, Christopher B.; Spear, John R.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale deposits of elemental sulfur form annually on a glacier's surface at Borup Fiord Pass in the Canadian High Arctic. However, the mechanisms of mineralization and stabilization of elemental sulfur at this site are currently unknown. Here we show that X-ray diffraction (XRD) data for fresh sulfur precipitates collected from the surface of a melt pool over sulfide-rich ice reveal the presence of three sulfur allotropes, α-S8, β-S8, and γ-S8 (the three solid forms of cyclooctasulfur (S8)). The detection of the β-S8 allotrope of elemental sulfur is notable, since β-S8 typically only forms in high temperature environments (>96 °C). The γ-S8 allotrope is also rare in natural settings and has previously been implicated as a signature of microbial sulfur cycling. Using combustion and infrared spectroscopy approaches, organic carbon is also detected within the sample bearing the three allotropes of elemental sulfur. Electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the C K-edge show that the sulfur precipitates are intimately associated with the organic carbon at the submicron scale. The occurrence of β-S8 and γ-S8 in this low-temperature setting indicates that there are unknown pathways for the formation and stabilization of these rare allotropes of elemental sulfur. In particular, we infer that the occurrence of these allotropes is related to their association with organic carbon. The formation of carbon-associated sulfur globules may not be a direct by-product of microbial activity; however, a potential role of direct or indirect microbial mediation in the formation and stabilization of β-S8 and γ-S8 remains to be assessed.

  5. Glacial history of Tranquilo glacier (Central Patagonia) since the Last Glacial Maximum through to the present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Araya, P. S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Kaplan, M. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Aravena, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and the inter-hemispheric phasing of former glacial fluctuations is critical for understanding the mechanisms and climate signals underlying these glacial events. Here, we present a detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations for Río Tranquilo glacier (47°S), since the LGM, including up to the present. Río Tranquilo is a small glacial valley located on the northern flank of Monte San Lorenzo, an isolated granitic massif, ~70 km to the east of the southern limit of the Northern Patagonian Icefield. Although Mt. San Lorenzo is located on the leeward side of the Andes, it is one of the most glacierized mountains in the region, with an ice surface area of ~140 km2. Geomorphic evidence suggests that during past episodes of climate change several small glaciers that today occupy the headwalls of Río Tranquilo valley expanded and coalesced, depositing a series of moraines complexes along the flanks and bottom of the valley. We used two independent dating techniques to constrain the age of the glacial history of the area. 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders located atop moraine ridges reveal that Río Tranquilo valley underwent glacial expansion/stabilization during at least the LGM (late LGM?), Late glacial (ACR and Younger Dryas) and Mid-Holocene. Within the Mid-Holocene limits, tree-ring based chronology indicates that Río Tranquilo glacier expanded during the Late Holocene as well. Our results are the first detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations from a single valley glacier, spanning the entire period from the (end of the) LGM up to the present, in southern South America. By identifying different glacial episodes within a single alpine valley, this study provides baseline data for studying the relative magnitude of the climate events responsible for these glacial events.

  6. Last Glacial loess in the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettis, E. Arthur; Muhs, Daniel R.; Roberts, Helen M.; Wintle, Ann G.

    2003-01-01

    The conterminous United States contains an extensive and generally well-studied record of Last Glacial loess. The loess occurs in diverse physiographic provinces, and under a wide range of climatic and ecological conditions. Both glacial and non-glacia lloess sources are present, and many properties of the loess vary systematically with distance from loess sources. United States' mid-continent Last Glacial loess is probably the thickest in the world, and our calculated mass accumulation rates (MARs) are as high as 17,500 g/m2/yr at the Bignell Hill locality in Nebraska, and many near-source localities have MARs greater than 1500 g/m2/yr. These MARs are high relative to rates calculated in other loess provinces around the world. Recent models of LastGlacial dust sources fail to predict the extent and magnitude of dust flux from the mid-continent of the United States. A better understanding of linkages between climate, ice sheet behaviour, routing of glacial meltwater, land surface processes beyond the ice margin, and vegetation is needed to improve the predictive capabilities of models simulating dust flux from this region.

  7. Beyond the Seafloor: a Plio-Pleistocene Archive of Glacial Geomorphology from Basin-Wide 3D Seismic Reflection Data on the Mid-Norwegian Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, A.; Huuse, M.

    2015-12-01

    Oil and gas exploration on the mid-Norwegian shelf has created an extensive geophysical and geological database. As such, this margin has become one of the most comprehensively studied formerly-glaciated continental margins in the world. Industrial operations have concentrated on the structure and geohazard potential of glacial sediments whilst academic work has looked at reconstructing environmental conditions during and since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This has generally consisted of mapping seafloor glacial geomorphology and a limited number of shallow sediment cores. Despite the increasingly large volume of 3D seismic reflection data available across the majority of the shelf, only limited work has been carried out investigating the oldest glaciations. A Plio-Pleistocene archive of glacial-interglacial history is preserved offshore and represents a unique study site because of the availability of 100s of 3D seismic reflection datasets. This database allows numerous different glacial erosion events and glacial landforms to be imaged throughout the glacially-derived NAUST Formation. We present an inventory of glacial history for the mid-Norwegian shelf and review the implications for the glacial history of Northwest Europe. This record shows glacial landforms such as iceberg scours, mega-scale glacial lineations and grounding-zone wedges, each of which provides an insight into ice characteristics. Dating is limited to a few tentative dates based on side-wall core data but we infer a further dating chronology based on dated sediments from the Voring Plateau, fluctuations in the benthic δ18O derived global sea level record, interpretation of seismic facies and the overall architecture. Glacial evidence is present regularly throughout the stratigraphy with the earliest evidence for marine terminating ice found at the base of the NAUST Formation at ~2.8 Ma.

  8. A Mars Analog for Wet-Based Glacial Alteration of Volcanic Terrains: Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing at Three Sisters, Oregon, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Scudder, N. A.; Horgan, B.; Rampe, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    This study characterizes wet-based glacial weathering products at a volcanic Mars analog site using thermal infrared remote sensing. Decorrelation stretches are used to examine the geographic relationships between compositional units.

  9. Glacial stages and post-glacial environmental evolution in the Upper Garonne valley, Central Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M; Oliva, M; Palma, P; Ruiz-Fernández, J; Lopes, L

    2017-04-15

    The maximum glacial extent in the Central Pyrenees during the Last Glaciation is known to have occurred before the global Last Glacial Maximum, but the succession of cold events afterwards and their impact on the landscape are still relatively unknown. This study focuses on the environmental evolution in the upper valley of the Garonne River since the Last Glaciation. Geomorphological mapping allows analysis of the spatial distribution of inherited and current processes and landforms in the study area. The distribution of glacial records (moraines, till, erratic boulders, glacial thresholds) suggests the existence of four glacial stages, from the maximum expansion to the end of the glaciation. GIS modeling allows quantification of the Equilibrium Line Altitude, extent, thickness and volume of ice in each glacial stage. During the first stage, the Garonne glacier reached 460m in the Loures-Barousse-Barbazan basin, where it formed a piedmont glacier 88km from the head and extended over 960km(2). At a second stage of glacier stabilization during the deglaciation process, the valley glaciers were 12-23km from the head until elevations of 1000-1850m, covering an area of 157km(2). Glaciers during stage three remained isolated in the upper parts of the valley, at heights of 2050-2200m and 2.6-4.5km from the head, with a glacial surface of 16km(2). In stage four, cirque glaciers were formed between 2260m and 2590m, with a length of 0.4-2km and a glacial area of 5.7km(2). Also, the wide range of periglacial, slope, nival and alluvial landforms existing in the formerly glaciated environments allows reconstruction of the post-glacial environmental dynamics in the upper Garonne basin. Today, the highest lands are organized following three elevation belts: subnival (1500-1900m), nival (1900-2300m) and periglacial/cryonival (2300-2800m).

  10. Glacial geology, glacial recession, proglacial lakes, and postglacial environments, Fishers Island, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkin, L. ); Funk, R.E. . Anthropological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    The Fishers Island Moraine, a complex of three parallel ice margin depositional trends, forms the west-central segment of a major recessional moraine of the Connecticut-Rhode Island Lobe of the late Wisconsinan glacier. As such, the moraine links the Orient Point Moraine of eastern Long Island and the Charlestown Moraine of western Rhode Island and marks a prominent recessional ice margin. The moraine is correlative with the Roanoke Point Moraine of the Connecticut Lobe of northeastern Long Island. Pollen stratigraphy of >13,180 ka bog sediments begins early in the spruce (A) pollen zone with evidence of a cold, late-glacial climate. The pine (B) pollen zone, beginning prior to 11,145 ka, and the oak (C) pollen zone, dating from about 9,000 ka with hickory and hemlock subzones, are well represented. However, after about 2,000 ka, the stratigraphic record in the bog sections is missing in most cases due to peat harvesting. Pollen spectra from several archeological sites fall within the late oak pollen zone, well within the land clearing interval with evidence of hardwood forests and locally holly and cedar. Evidence of cultigens in the pollen record is sparse. Marine deposits over fresh water bog and proglacial lake sediments show that some coastal bogs were drowned by sea level rise.

  11. Similar millennial climate variability on the Iberian margin during two early Pleistocene glacials and MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, B.; Hodell, D. A.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Skinner, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Although millennial-scale climate variability (<10 ka) has been well studied during the last glacial cycles, little is known about this important aspect of climate in the early Pleistocene, prior to the Middle Pleistocene Transition. Here we present an early Pleistocene climate record at centennial resolution for two representative glacials (marine isotope stages (MIS) 37-41 from approximately 1235 to 1320 ka) during the "41 ka world" at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1385 (the "Shackleton Site") on the southwest Iberian margin. Millennial-scale climate variability was suppressed during interglacial periods (MIS 37, MIS 39, and MIS 41) and activated during glacial inceptions when benthic δ18O exceeded 3.2‰. Millennial variability during glacials MIS 38 and MIS 40 closely resembled Dansgaard-Oeschger events from the last glacial (MIS 3) in amplitude, shape, and pacing. The phasing of oxygen and carbon isotope variability is consistent with an active oceanic thermal bipolar see-saw between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during most of the prominent stadials. Surface cooling was associated with systematic decreases in benthic carbon isotopes, indicating concomitant changes in the meridional overturning circulation. A comparison to other North Atlantic records of ice rafting during the early Pleistocene suggests that freshwater forcing, as proposed for the late Pleistocene, was involved in triggering or amplifying perturbations of the North Atlantic circulation that elicited a bipolar see-saw response. Our findings support similarities in the operation of the climate system occurring on millennial time scales before and after the Middle Pleistocene Transition despite the increases in global ice volume and duration of the glacial cycles.

  12. Fast Vegetational Responses to Late-Glacial Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Post, D. M.; Cwynar, L. C.; Lotter, A. F.; Levesque, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    How rapidly can natural ecosystems respond to rapid climate change? This question can be addressed by studying paired paleoecological and paleoclimatological records spanning the last deglaciation. Between 16 and 10 ka, abrupt climatic oscillations (e.g. Younger Dryas, Gerzensee/Killarney Oscillations) interrupted the general warming trend. Rates of climate change during these events were as fast or faster than projected rates of change for this century. We compiled a dozen high-resolution lacustrine records in North America and Europe with a pollen record and independent climatic proxy, a clear Younger Dryas signal, and good age control. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that vegetation responded rapidly to late-glacial climate change, with significant changes in vegetation composition occurring within the lifespan of individual trees. At all sites, vegetation lagged climate by less than 200 years, and at two-thirds of the sites, the initial vegetational response occurred within 100 years. The finding of rapid vegetational responses is consistent across sites and continents, and is similar to the 100-200 year response times predicted by gap-scale forest models. Likely mechanisms include 1) increased susceptibility of mature trees to disturbances such as fire, wind, and disease, thereby opening up gaps for colonization, 2) the proximity of these sites to late-glacial treeline, where climate may directly control plant population densities and range limits, 3) the presence of herbaceous taxa with short generation times in these plant communities, and 4) rapid migration due to rare long-distance seed dispersals. Our results are consistent with reports that plant ranges are already shifting in response to recent climate change, and suggest that these shifts will persist for the next several centuries. Widespread changes in plant distributions may affect surface-atmosphere interactions and will challenge attempts to manage ecosystems and conserve biodiversity.

  13. Late glacial 10Be ages for glacial landforms in the upper region of the Taibai glaciation in the Qinling Mountain range, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Liang; Chen, Yixin; Liu, Beibei; Harbor, Jonathan M.; Cui, Zhijiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiao; Zhao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Glacial landforms are well preserved on Taibai Mountain (3767 m), the main peak of the Qinling mountain range located south of the Loess Plateau and east of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The timing and extent of Quaternary glaciation in the study area is important for reconstructing Quaternary environmental change however numerical ages for glaciation in this study area have not previously been well resolved. Using terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides we dated four samples collected from two glacially eroded rock steps in the upper part of a valley near the main peak, in an area previously identified as having been occupied by ice during the Taibai glaciation. The 10Be results are all late glacial in age: 18.6 ± 1.1 ka, 16.9 ± 1.0 ka, 16.9 ± 1.1 ka and 15.1 ± 1.0 ka. The spatial pattern of ages in the valley suggests fast retreat, with horizontal and vertical retreat rates estimated to be on the order of 0.4 and 0.09 m a-1, respectively. A simple extrapolation of these retreat rates from the ages at the two sample sites suggests that the glacier retreat began during Last Glacial Maximum and that glaciers disappeared from the main peak by about 15 ka.

  14. Paleoclimate of northern Guatemala during the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Brenner, M.; Curtis, J.; Gilli, A.; Mueller, A.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Peten Itza (zmax = 165 m) in northern Guatemala is the deepest lake in the lowlands of Central America. Annual rainfall averages ~1600 mm and is highly seasonal with over 90% occurring in the months from May to October. As part of an ICDP project, we recovered 1327 m of lake sediment at seven sites using the GLAD800 superbarge. Preliminary research has focused on Site PI-6 at a water depth of 71 m. Three holes were drilled and recovered a complete stratigraphic section to a maximum depth of 75.9 mblf. Radiocarbon dates on terrestrial organic matter display a regular increase in age with depth, and indicate a mean sedimentation rate of ~100 cm per 1000 yrs (1mm/yr). The top 10.8 mcd were deposited during the Holocene and consist primarily of gray carbonate clay with abundant charcoal. The Pleistocene/Holocene boundary at 10.8 mcd is marked by a transition to Holocene clay from underlying, interbedded dense gypsum sand and clay deposited during the Late Glacial period from ~17 to 9.3 kyrs. This transition represents a switch to moist climate during the early Holocene from more arid conditions during the Late Glacial. Arid conditions during the Late Glacial period may coincide with episodic delivery of seasonal meltwater to the Gulf of Mexico (Aharon, 2003, Paleoceanography, 18, 1079). In contrast to the Late Glacial period, the earlier Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), from 23 to 17 kyrs, consists of gray carbonate clay that is very similar to Holocene deposits, suggesting high detrital input and high lake level. This finding contradicts previous results suggesting that the LGM was dry in the Peten lowlands. We speculate that a cold, wet LGM may have been caused by increased winter precipitation when the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) was at its southernmost extent. The mechanism may have been related to increased frequency of polar outbreaks and "Norte" winds, which occasionally bring rain to the Peten today during the dry season. Similar increases in winter

  15. Glacial influence on caldera-forming eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Adelina; Bindeman, Ilya

    2011-04-01

    It has been suggested that deglaciations have influenced volcanism in several areas around the world increasing productivity of mantle melting and eruptions from crustal magma chambers. However, the connection between glaciations and increased volcanism is not straightforward. Investigation of Ar-Ar, U-Pb, and 14C ages of caldera-forming eruptions for the past million years in the glaciated arc of Kamchatka has lead to the observation that the majority of large-volume ignimbrites, which are associated with the morphologically preserved calderas, correspond in time with "maximum glacial" conditions for the past several glacial cycles. In the field, the main proof is related to the fact that glaciated multi-caldera volcanoes hosted thick glacial ice caps. Additional evidence comes from clustering Kamchatka-derived marine ash layers with glacial moraines in DSDP cores. Here we present a set of new results from numerical modelling using the Finite Element Method that investigate how the glacial load dynamic may affect the conditions for ring-fault formation in such glaciated multi-caldera volcanoes. Different scenarios were simulated by varying: (1) the thickness and asymmetric distribution of the existing ice cap, (2) the depth and size of the magmatic reservoir responsible for the subsequent collapse event, (3) the thickness and mechanical properties of the roof rock due to the alteration by hydrothermal fluids, (4) the existence of a deeper and wider magmatic reservoir and (5) possible gravitational failure triggered, in part, by subglacial rock mass build up and hydrothermal alteration. The results obtained indicate that: (1) Any ice cap plays against ring fault formation; (2) Asymmetric distribution of ice may favour the initiation of trap-door type collapse calderas; (3) Glacial erosion of part of volcanic edifice or interglacial edifice failure may facilitate subsequent ring fault formation; (4) hydrothermal system under an ice cap may lead to a quite effective

  16. Caribbean Salinity Variation During the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Spero, H. J.; Lea, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    Evaporation exceeds precipitation in the tropical Atlantic, resulting in a net freshwater removal across the Central American Isthmus. Because most of the north Atlantic's subtropical gyre water circulates through the Caribbean before flowing north to sub-polar regions via the Gulf Stream, changes in tropical atmospheric circulation have the potential to affect the salinity and density structure of the entire north Atlantic, thereby influencing glacial-interglacial oscillations in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation. Here, we combine Mg/Ca measurements (a proxy for the temperature of calcification) and δ 18O analyses of shells from the surface-dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber s.s. (white var.) from the western Caribbean Colombian Basin at ODP Site 999A (2827m; 4cm/ka sed. rate) and VM28-122 (3623m; 4-10cm/ka sed. rate) to produce the first continuous record of western tropical Atlantic δ 18OSEAWATER (δ 18OSW) during the last 130ka. In order to generate a record for sea surface salinity (SSS) due to regional hydrological change, we removed the δ 18OSW signal due to glacial ice volume variation and normalized the residual to the modern δ 18OSW value for the Colombian Basin (0.8‰ ). The resulting ice volume-free (Δ δ 18OIVF-SW) record shows that Caribbean Δ δ 18OIVF-SW increased by ˜0.5‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum and Marine Isotope Stage 4. Using a modern western Caribbean δ 18OSW:SSS relationship, these enriched δ 18OSW values suggest glacial Caribbean salinities were 2.3 - 2.8‰ higher than modern after removing the influence of ice-volume. Our data supports the hypothesis that the tropics might have been in a state more similar to the modern El Nino mode, characterized by a more southerly position of the ITCZ, during cold phases of the last glacial cycle. Within the resolution of our Δ δ 18OIVF-SW record from VM28-122, elevated glacial Caribbean salinity decreased to modern levels at the onset of the Bolling-Allerod (B

  17. Glacial-marine and glacial-lacustrine sedimentation in Sebago Lake, Maine: Locating the marine limit

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.A.; Kelley, J.T. ); Belknap, D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The marine limit in Maine marks a sea-level highstand at approximately 13 ka. It was inferred to cross Sebago Lake near Frye Island by Thompson and Borns (1985) on the Surficial Geological Map of Maine, dividing the lake into a northern glacial-lacustrine basin and a southern glacial-marine basin. This study examined the accuracy of the mapped marine limit in the lake and the nature of glacial-lacustrine and glacial-marine facies in Maine. Recognition of the marine limit is usually based on mapped shorelines, glacial-marine deltas, and contacts with glacial-marine sediments. This study, in Maine's second largest lake, collected 100 kilometers of side-scan sonar images, 100 kilometers of seismic reflection profiles, and one core. Side-scan sonar records show coarse sand and gravel and extensive boulder fields at an inferred grounding-line position near Frye Island, where the marine limit was drawn. ORE Geopulse seismic reflection profiles reveal a basal draping unit similar to glacial-marine units identified offshore. Later channels cut more than 30 m into the basal stratified unit. In addition, till and a possible glacial-tectonic grounding-line feature were identified. Slumps and possible spring disruptions are found in several locations. The top unit is an onlapping ponded Holocene lacustrine unit. Total sediment is much thicker in the southern basin; the northern basin, >97 m deep, north of the marine limit appears to have been occupied by an ice block. Retrieved sediments include 12 meters of rhythmites. Microfossil identifications and dating will resolve the environments and time of deposition in this core.

  18. Delineating Glacial Till Bed Kinematics using AMS and Pebble Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentoso, M. J.; Evenson, E.; Kodama, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and pebble fabric analysis was used to explore glacial till bed kinematics in streamlined glacial landforms of the Weedsport Drumlin field of north central New York State. Five wave-truncated drumlins were sampled at two locations each along the shore of Lake Ontario. A total of 500 pebble orientations and 250 AMS samples were collected from 10 sampling sites in the drumlins. Six flutes were also sampled at 10 sampling sites for a total of 500 pebble orientations and 200 AMS measurements. All AMS measurements were conducted on a KLY-3s Kappabridge. The average orientation of the maximum principal susceptibility axes for the drumlins (N2°E) was parallel, within 95% confidence limits, to the average pebble long-axis orientations (N5°W) and parallel to the N-S trend of the drumlins. Both AMS and pebble average orientations plunge toward the north in the “up glacier” direction indicating an imbrication due to ice flow. The clustering of the AMS principal axis directions indicates that the strength of the AMS drumlin fabric is highly variable, at 3 of the 10 sites it is as strong as fabrics developed in a ring shear device (Iverson et al., 2008) at intermediate shear strains. AMS fabrics in the flutes are stronger and more unidirectional than for the drumlins with the average pebble direction (N4°E) parallel to the average AMS maximum susceptibility direction (N12°E), but not at the 95% confidence level. Northward plunge of these average orientations indicates an imbrication. The flutes trend N10°W, so the fabric orientations are not as closely parallel to the glacial landforms for the flutes as they are for the drumlins. Thermal demagnetization of three orthogonal components of an isothermal remanent magnetization indicates that the AMS is carried primarily by maghemite. The stronger AMS fabric in the flutes compared to the drumlins suggests that the till of the flutes has been subjected to higher strains and perhaps

  19. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  20. Geomorphical and Geochronological Constrains of the Last Glacial Period in Southern Patagonia, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S. A.; Hein, A.; Gómez, G. N.; Ferrada, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the outer limits of the former Patagonian ice sheet (PIS, ~38-55S) having been extensively mapped, it remains unknown if the Patagonian glaciers fluctuated synchronously or asynchronously during the last glacial period. Previous work has revealed asynchronous spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice-margins at the end of the last glaciation but it is not well understood if the northern and southern parts of the PIS reached concurrent maximum glaciation during the last glacial cycle. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass involving the southern westerly wind belt latitudinal range, which is thought to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the cause of glaciations in Patagonia and the role of the westerlies in climate change. Here, we discuss paleoglaciological and paleoclimatological implications of new 10Be and 14C data obtained from moraines and strategically selected mires in two contiguous glacially molded basins of south Patagonia (48-55S): Torres del Paine (51S) and Última Esperanza (52S). In this region, we focused our 10Be cosmogenic-dating efforts in the previously undated outer moraines deposited (supposedly) during the last glacial cycle. In order to crosscheck cosmogenic data we collected boulders embedded in moraines and cobbles from the main glaciofluvial plains grading from the outermost moraines. Geomorphic and cosmogenic dating affords evidence for glacial maximum conditions occurring between 40-50 ka (ka = thousand of years before present) in southern Patagonia, which is different from other chronologies within southern South America. We obtained 14C basal ages from sites located within moraine depressions and on former paleolake shorelines and thus these may provide key data on deglaciation and debated regional paleolake history.

  1. Neodymium isotopic composition of intermediate and deep waters in the glacial southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Taryn L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; McCave, I. Nick

    2013-12-01

    Neodymium (Nd) isotopes, tracers of deep water mass source and mixing, were measured on sedimentary planktic foraminifera with authigenic coatings from a depth-transect of cores (1400-4800 m) from Chatham Rise in the southwest Pacific, over the past 30 ka. We observe deglacial variations in the Nd isotopic composition, which showed an average glacial composition of ɛNd=-5.0 (1σ; ±0.3n=4) for cores sites below 3200 mbsl. No significant deglacial variation was observed in the Nd isotopic composition of intermediate depth waters (1400 mbsl), in contrast with benthic foraminifera δC13 data. The deglacial ɛNd shift of CDW in the southwest Pacific is consistent with changes observed in the deep South Atlantic and Equatorial Indian Ocean, but ɛNd values are offset by ˜1ɛNd-unit to more radiogenic values throughout the deglacial records, likely due to admixture of a Nd isotope signal which was modified in the Southern Ocean or Pacific, perhaps by boundary exchange. However, this modification did not overprint the deglacial Nd isotope change. The consistent deglacial evolution of ɛNd in the South Atlantic, Equatorial Indian and southwest Pacific CDW, is evidence for the connection of CDW during the glacial, and propagation of diminished North Atlantic Deep Water export to the glacial Southern Ocean. In contrast, spatial heterogeneities in the benthic foraminifera δC13 of CDW have been observed in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific basins of the deep glacial Southern Ocean. The Nd isotope data implies a well-connected deep Southern Ocean, which transported waters from the Atlantic to the Indian and Pacific oceans, during the glacial. This suggests that basin-scale variability in the glacial δC13 composition of CDW was unrelated to circulation changes.

  2. Subglacial morphology and glacial evolution of the Palmer deep outlet system, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, Eugene; Amblàs, David; Gilbert, Robert; Brachfeld, Stefanie; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Rebesco, Michele; Canals, Miquel; Urgeles, Roger

    2006-04-01

    The Palmer Deep is an erosional, inner-shelf trough located at the convergence of ice flow from three distinct accumulation centers. It served as a funnel for ice flow out across the continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula. Swath mapping of 1440 km 2 of seafloor in and adjacent to the Palmer Deep basin defines a large paleo-ice stream that flowed 230 km across the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf during the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS-2). The unique perspective and detail of the Palmer Deep physiography allow us to recognize several phases of erosion and deposition in the outlet basin. These events are uniquely constrained by two ODP drill cores (sites 1099 and 1098) that together recovered over 150 m of latest Pleistocene and Holocene sediment. We divide this region of the continental shelf into three zones based upon mega- to meso-scale bathymetric features and emphasize that all three were part of one glacial outlet during the most recent period of glaciation. These zones include from inner shelf to outer shelf: the Palmer Deep basin, the Palmer Deep Outlet Sill and the Hugo Island Trough. Specific seafloor features associated with these zones include: relict terraces, sub-glacial lake deltas, channels and levees, debris slopes, spindle and out bed forms, mega-scale glacial lineations, morainal banks, and bank breach points. The origin of many of these features can be linked to the development of a sub-glacial lake basin within the Palmer Deep during or prior to MIS-2, its subsequent drainage, and recession of the Palmer Deep ice stream system. This sub-glacial lake system is reconstructed at the head of a major paleo-ice stream.

  3. Variations in Glacial Erosion over Multiple Glacial-Interglacial Cycles: A Numerical Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, Rachel M.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2013-04-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. As one of these processes, glacial erosion plays an important role in the development of landscapes by the formation of distinctive topographic features. Glacial landscape evolution models reproduce many observed features at the orogen scale. Detailed comparisons at the scale of individual valleys holds potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in glacial erosion models. Over long timescales (>10,000 yr), glacial erosion has typically been simulated using a modified shallow ice approximation (SIA) approach. In this study, we compare the strengths and weaknesses of shallow ice and high-order, Stokes-flow glacial landscape evolution models. Our emphasis is placed on the patterns and rates of glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. We present a comparison of two different numerical models for glacial erosion. For both approaches, a modified version of the ICE Cascade model is used to develop and evolve topography. This model calculates hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, temporally variable orographic precipitation, and a range of glaciological processes: glacial mass balance, snow avalanching, basal ice superfreezing, and basal water buoyancy feedback in large overdeepenings. Within this framework, we compare the predicted ice-flow field and erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as predictions from a nested, thermally-coupled, Stokes-flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Simulations are conducted for a range of amplitudes and periodicity in surface temperature change between glacial and interglacial periods. We investigate these simulations, as well as the effects of each model for various initial topographies and with a temperature-dependent ice rheology. In general, both models predict visually similar patterns in sliding velocity, and resulting erosion rates, assuming the erosion rate scales with the

  4. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-03

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  5. Relative timing of last glacial maximum and late-glacial events in the central tropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Winckler, Gisela; Hall, Brenda L.; Todd, Claire E.; Rademaker, Kurt M.

    2009-11-01

    Whether or not tropical climate fluctuated in synchrony with global events during the Late Pleistocene is a key problem in climate research. However, the timing of past climate changes in the tropics remains controversial, with a number of recent studies reporting that tropical ice age climate is out of phase with global events. Here, we present geomorphic evidence and an in-situ cosmogenic 3He surface-exposure chronology from Nevado Coropuna, southern Peru, showing that glaciers underwent at least two significant advances during the Late Pleistocene prior to Holocene warming. Comparison of our glacial-geomorphic map at Nevado Coropuna to mid-latitude reconstructions yields a striking similarity between Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Late-Glacial sequences in tropical and temperate regions. Exposure ages constraining the maximum and end of the older advance at Nevado Coropuna range between 24.5 and 25.3 ka, and between 16.7 and 21.1 ka, respectively, depending on the cosmogenic production rate scaling model used. Similarly, the mean age of the younger event ranges from 10 to 13 ka. This implies that (1) the LGM and the onset of deglaciation in southern Peru occurred no earlier than at higher latitudes and (2) that a significant Late-Glacial event occurred, most likely prior to the Holocene, coherent with the glacial record from mid and high latitudes. The time elapsed between the end of the LGM and the Late-Glacial event at Nevado Coropuna is independent of scaling model and matches the period between the LGM termination and Late-Glacial reversal in classic mid-latitude records, suggesting that these events in both tropical and temperate regions were in phase.

  6. Ice flow models and glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, R. M.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2014-06-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. Over glaciological time scales, even simple representations of glacial-flow physics can reproduce many of the distinctive features formed through glacial erosion. However, detailed comparisons at orogen time and length scales hold potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in landscape evolution models. We present a comparison using two different numerical models for glacial flow over single and multiple glaciations, within a modified version of the ICE-Cascade landscape evolution model. This model calculates not only glaciological processes but also hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, and temporally and spatially variable orographic precipitation. We compare the predicted erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as a nested, 3-D Stokes-flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Both glacial-flow models predict different patterns in time-averaged erosion rates. However, these results are sensitive to the climate and the ice temperature. For warmer climates with more sliding, the higher-order model has a larger impact on the erosion rate, with variations of almost an order of magnitude. As the erosion influences the basal topography and the ice deformation affects the ice thickness and extent, the higher-order glacial model can lead to variations in total ice-covered that are greater than 30%, again with larger differences for temperate ice. Over multiple glaciations and long-time scales, these results suggest that consideration of higher-order glacial physics may be necessary, particularly in temperate, mountainous settings.

  7. Ice flow models and glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, R. M.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. Over glaciological timescales, even simple representations of glacial-flow physics can reproduce many of the distinctive features formed through glacial erosion. However, detailed comparisons at orogen time and length scales hold potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in landscape evolution models. We present a comparison using two different numerical models for glacial flow over single and multiple glaciations, within a modified version of the ICE-Cascade landscape evolution model. This model calculates not only glaciological processes but also hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, and temporally and spatially variable orographic precipitation. We compare the predicted erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as a nested, 3-D Stokes flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Both glacial-flow models predict different patterns in time-averaged erosion rates. However, these results are sensitive to the climate and the ice temperature. For warmer climates with more sliding, the higher-order model yields erosion rates that vary spatially and by almost an order of magnitude from those of the SIA model. As the erosion influences the basal topography and the ice deformation affects the ice thickness and extent, the higher-order glacial model can lead to variations in total ice-covered area that are greater than 30% those of the SIA model, again with larger differences for temperate ice. Over multiple glaciations and long timescales, these results suggest that higher-order glacial physics should be considered, particularly in temperate, mountainous settings.

  8. Glacial curvilineations: gradual or catastrophic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Livingstone, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Glacial curvilineations (GCLs) are enigmatic landforms that have recently been discovered in Poland (Lesemann et al., 2010, 2014). They comprise parallel sets of sinuous ridges separated by troughs that are found in tunnel valleys and replicate the morphology and pattern of the valley sides. The sedimentology for some has been reported to indicate that the sediment composition relates to a pre-GCL phase. So far just one theory for their formation exists - erosion by longitudinal-vortices within high-energy subglacial meltwater flows (Lesemann et al., 2010). Here, we provide an alternative hypothesis for their formation developed from observations of GCLs found along the southern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In all cases GCLs were found associated with tunnel valley widenings or hollows and occur as distinct parallel sets that mimic each other in terms of nicks and cusps. Using analogies from tree-rings and coral growth we take such mimicry as indicating either incremental growth or development from a template over time. Although without a strong physical explanation we find it much less likely that a series of parallel water channels would maintain such strong mimicry. We instead suggest that subglacial thawing of frozen ground in association with discrete water bodies (tunnel valleys or subglacial lakes) resulted in retrogressive bank failure, possibly along a glide plane provided by a frozen surface. References: Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2010. "Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sediment. Geol. 312, 1-18.

  9. Late Glacial ice advances in southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasky, Stefan; Graf, Angela A.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Kubik, Peter W.; Baur, Heinrich; Schlüchter, Christian; Wieler, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    The sensitivity of Tibetan glacial systems to North Atlantic climate forcing is a major issue in palaeoclimatology. In this study, we present surface exposure ages of erratic boulders from a valley system in the Hengduan Mountains, southeastern Tibet, showing evidence of an ice advance during Heinrich event 1. Cosmogenic nuclide analyses ( 10Be and 21Ne) revealed consistent exposure ages, indicating no major periods of burial or pre-exposure. Erosion-corrected (3 mm/ka) 10Be exposure ages range from 13.4 to 16.3 ka. This is in agreement with recalculated exposure ages from the same valley system by [Tschudi, S., Schäfer, J.M., Zhao, Z., Wu, X., Ivy-Ochs, S., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., 2003. Glacial advances in Tibet during the Younger Dryas? Evidence from cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 22, 301-306.]. Thus this indicates that local glaciers advanced in the investigated area as a response to Heinrich event 1 cooling and that periglacial surface adjustments during the Younger Dryas overprinted the glacial morphology, leading to deceptively young exposure ages of certain erratic boulders.

  10. Testing the "Mudball Earth" Hypothesis: Are Neoproterozoic Glacial Deposits Capped with Supraglacial Dust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. C.; Alvim Lage, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Snowball Earth hypothesis has inspired several variants which may help to explain some of the great mysteries of the Neoproterozoic glaciations. One of these, the "Mudball Earth", proposes that as the Earth remained completely frozen for millions of years, a layer of dust accumulated on the ice surface. This dust layer would darken the planet, making it easier for the Earth to escape from the highly stable snowball climate state. This hypothesis is testable: after the ice melted at the end of a glacial era, this dust would sink to the bottom of the ocean, possibly forming a distinct clay, mud, or silt layer on the top of the glacial till deposits: this "clay drape" would then be covered by the cap carbonates that mark a return to warm climate. Sublimation and ice flow during the glacial episode should make this layer thicker at the equator and thinner or absent in the poles. Is this clay layer actually present in the rock record? Is it more prevalent at the paleoequator, as predicted? A clay drape has been noticed anecdotally, but no global survey has been done to date. We conducted a thorough literature review of all sites where Neoproterozoic glacial diamictites have been observed, identifying the type of rock that lies between the diamictite and the postglacial cap carbonate, when present, during both Sturtian and Marinoan glacial periods. Only a few publications identify a distinct clay/silt/mud layer that might represent weathered dust. These sites are not grouped by paleolatitude in any obvious way. With access only to published reports, we cannot determine whether such a layer is absent, went unreported, or was misinterpreted by us. With this work we hope to attract the attention of Neoproterozoic field geologists, inviting them to comment on the presence or absence of strata which could confirm or reject the "Mudball" hypothesis.

  11. Pore fluid constraints on the temperature and oxygen isotopic composition of the glacial ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Schrag, D.P.; Hampt, G.; Murray, D.W.

    1996-06-28

    Pore fluids from the upper 60 meters of sediment 3000 meters below the surface of the tropical Atlantic indicate that the oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O) of seawater at this site during the last glacial maximum was 0.8 {plus_minus} 0.1 per mil higher than it is today. Combined with the {delta}{sup 18}O change in benthic foraminifera from this region, the elevated ratio indicates that the temperature of deep water in the tropical Atlantic Ocean was 4{degree}C colder during the last glacial maximum. Extrapolation from this site to a global average suggests that the ice volume contribution to the change in {delta}{sup 18}O of foraminifera is 1.0 per mil, which partially reconciles the foraminiferal oxygen isotope record of tropical sea surface temperatures with estimates from Barbados corals and terrestrial climate proxies. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Constraints on the glacial erosion rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that glaciers erode their underlying bedrock mainly through abrasion and quarrying. Theories predict erosion to be proportional to ice-sliding velocity raised to some power: ˙e = Kguls (1) where ė is the erosion rate, and Kg a proportionality constant and l an exponent. By implementing such a rule in numerical models, it has been possible to reproduce typical glacial landscape features, such as U-shape valleys, hanging valleys, glacial cirques or fjords. Although there have been great advances in the level of sophistication of these models, for example through the inclusion of high-order ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology, the proportionality constant, and the exponent have remained poorly constrained parameters. Recently, two independent studies in the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonian Andes (Koppes et al., 2015) and the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand (Herman et al., 2015) simultaneously collected erosion rate and ice velocity data to find that erosion depends non-linearly on sliding velocity, and that the exponent on velocity is about 2. Such a nonlinear rule is appealing because it may, in part, explain the observed variations in erosion rates globally. Furthermore, an exponent about 2 closely matches theoretical predictions for abrasion. Although it is tempting to argue that abrasion is the dominant process for fast flowing glaciers like the Franz Josef Glacier, there is a clear need for more data and better quantification for the role of quarrying. Both studies also led to very similar values for the proportionality constant Kg. These new results therefore imply that glacial erosion processes might be better constrained than previously thought. Given that glacial velocity can nowadays be measured and modeled at an unprecedented resolution, it may potentially become possible to use glacial erosion models in a predictive manner. Herman, F. et al. "Erosion by an Alpine glacier." Science 350.6257 (2015): 193-195. Koppes, M. et al. "Observed

  13. Dating the Late Cenozoic glacial sequence, Pieman River basin, western Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustinus, Paul C.

    1999-10-01

    The Pieman River basin, western Tasmania, displays one of the most complete Middle to Early Pleistocene glacial sequences from a Southern Hemisphere mid-latitude site. Most of the glacial deposits exceed the 14C limit, although mapping of the depositional units using morphostratigraphic, post-depositional weathering criteria and magnetostratigraphy, shows that the sediments of the Boco and Bobadil glaciation were deposited during the Brunhes normal chron (<783 kyr), whilst the reversed polarity of Bulgobac Glaciation deposits indicates deposition prior to 783 kyr. A maximum age of latest Pliocene for the Bulgobac Glaciation is suggested by magneto- and palynostratigraphy of underlying organic-rich silts. Refinement in dating the Middle Pleistocene glacial deposits has been achieved using U/Th methods on ferricretes and peat developed within and upon the sediment bodies whereby the deposits of the Boco and Bobadil glaciation are shown to be broadly correlative with Oxygen Isotope Stages 6 and 8, respectively. An older mid-Pleistocene glacial event (Animal Creek Glaciation) has also been recognised and dated to >275 kyr. Late Last (Margaret) Glaciation advances in the Pieman basin are much more restricted in extent and display evidence for multiple stillstand-readvance phases during the decay of the system, with most of the ice having disappeared by ˜14 kyr BP.

  14. Disparities in glacial advection of Southern Ocean Intermediate Water to the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R.; Nürnberg, D.; Ronge, T.; Tiedemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Intermediate Waters formed in the Southern Ocean are critical for ventilating the thermocline in the Southern Hemisphere Gyres and transporting climatic signals from high to low latitudes on glacial-interglacial time-scales. Despite the importance of the Southern Ocean Intermediate Waters (SOIWs), information on past changes in SOIWs formation is fragmentary, and its impact on the South Pacific Gyre (SPG)'s thermocline largely unknown. Here, we present a 200 kyr record of paired Mg/Ca ratios and stable oxygen isotope from surface and deep dwelling planktonic foraminifera, from the SPG. On average, the Globigerina bulloides Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures show similar conditions during the LGM and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 (9.4 °C versus 9.8 °C). In contrast, the subsurface temperatures derived from the Mg/Ca values of Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides suggest that LGM is ∼3 to ∼2 °C colder than MIS 6. Furthermore, at subsurface depths the reconstructed δ18Osw-ivc record (proxy for relative local salinity changes) suggests opposite glacial conditions, with slightly saltier-than-Holocene waters during MIS 6, and fresher-than-Holocene waters during LGM. Contrasting glacial scenarios, plausibly due to changes in the presence of SOIWs at the study site, suggest variable formation and/or advection of SOIWs to the SPG during different glacial stages. The variability in SOIWs is probably driven by the changes in the intensity of the Southern Westerly Winds.

  15. Variable sea ice contributions to seawater δ18O on glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, C. E.; Weaver, A. J.; Eby, M.; Meissner, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of seawater varies in time, mainly based on the amount of (depleted) ice stored on continents. Oxygen isotope records derived from ocean sediment cores serve as indicators of changes in both seawater temperature and continental ice volume. Seawater δ18O may contain a variable signature of sea ice production, especially at high latitudes. Sea ice growth produces isotopically enriched ice and depleted brine. Over glacial-interglacial cycles, changes in the sites and rates of sea ice production (and by extension sea ice meltwater and brine export) hold the potential to shift local to regional seawater isotopic chemistry. Neglecting variability in sea ice production may therefore superimpose error upon reconstructions employing high latitude δ18O records. We examine the effects of variability in sea ice production between glacial and interglacial climate states on seawater δ18O in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model. Oxygen isotopes are implemented in all components (ocean, atmosphere, land surface, and sea ice) of the coupled model. The role of glacial-interglacial sea ice variability is investigated in a set of model experiments. Here we isolate the seawater δ18O field due only to sea ice in the model. By contrasting the seawater δ18O fields due to sea ice resulting from the glacial and interglacial climates, we investigate the potential for variable sea ice formation to shift seawater δ18O.

  16. Cold-Based Glaciations on Mars: Landscapes of Glacial Selective Linear Erosion on Devon Island, Nunavut, Arctic Canada, as a Possible Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal

    2000-01-01

    The apparent selective nature of erosion on Mars is discussed in light of observations of landscapes of glacial selective linear erosion observed on Devon Island, Arctic Canada, and at other high-latitude sites on Earth. Emphasis is placed here on the creation of so-called landscapes of little or no glacial erosion following the disappearance of former dominantly coldbased ice covers. Possible implications for Mars are explored. Additional information can be found in the original extended abstract.

  17. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial–interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  18. Earth's glacial record and its tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.

    1993-09-01

    Glaciations have occurred episodically at different time intervals and for different durations in Earth's history. Ice covers have formed in a wide range of plate tectonic and structural settings but the bulk of Earth's glacial record can be shown to have been deposited and preserved in basins within extensional settings. In such basins, source area uplift and basin subsidence fulfill the tectonic preconditions for the initiation of glaciation and the accomodation and preservation of glaciclastic sediments. Tectonic setting, in particular subsidence rates, also dictates the type of glaciclastic facies and facies successions that are deposited. Many pre-Pleistocene glaciated basins commonly contain well-defined tectonostratigraphic successions recording the interplay of tectonics and sedimentation; traditional climatostratigraphic approaches involving interpretation in terms of either ice advance/retreat cycles or glacio-eustatic sea-level change require revision. The direct record of continental glaciation in Earth history, in the form of classically-recognised continental glacial landforms and "tillites", is meagre; it is probable that more than 95% of the volume of preserved "glacial" strata are glacially-influenced marine deposits that record delivery of large amounts of glaciclastic sediment to offshore basins. This flux has been partially or completely reworked by "normal" sedimentary processes such that the record of glaciation and climate change is recorded in marine successions and is difficult to decipher. The dominant "glacial" facies in the rock record are subaqueous debris flow diamictites and turbidites recording the selective preservation of poorly-sorted glaciclastic sediment deposited in deep water basins by sediment gravity flows. However, these facies are also typical of many non-glacial settings, especially volcanically-influenced environments; numerous Archean and Proterozoic diamictites, described in the older literature as tillites, have no

  19. Paleoecology of central Kentucky since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Gary R.; Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.; Harrison, Frederick W.; Turner, Manson R.

    1991-09-01

    Pollen grains and spores, plant macrofossils, and sponge spicules from a 7.2-m sediment core from Jackson Pond dating back to 20,000 yr B.P. are the basis for new interpretations of vegetational, limnological, and climatic changes in central Kentucky. During the full-glacial interval (20,400 to 16,800 yr B.P.) upland vegetation was closed spruce forest with jack pine as a subdominant. Aquatic macrophyte and sponge assemblages indicate that the site was a relatively deep, open pond with low organic productivity. During late-glacial time (16,800 to 11,300 yr B.P.) spruce populations continued to dominate while jack pine declined and sedge increased as the vegetation became a more open, taiga-like boreal woodland. Between 11,300 and 10,000 yr B.P., abundances of spruce and oak pollen oscillated reciprocally, possibly reflecting the Younger Dryas oscillation as boreal taxa underwent a series of declines and increases at the southern limit of their ranges before becoming extirpated and replaced by deciduous forest. In the early Holocene (10,000 to 7300 yr B.P.) a mesic deciduous woodland developed; it was replaced by xeric oak-hickory forest during the middle Holocene between 7300 and 3900 yr B.P. Grass increased after 3900 yr B.P., indicating that the presettlement vegetation mosaic of mixed deciduous forest and prairie (the "Kentucky Barrens") became established in central Kentucky after the Hypsithermal interval. Sponge spicules increased in number during the Holocene, reflecting reduced water depths in the pond. Sediment infilling, as well as climatic warming and the expansion of fringing shrub thickets, increased nutrient and habitat availability for freshwater sponges.

  20. Excitation of the earth's rotational axis by recent glacial discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperini, P.; Sabadini, R.; Yuen, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of present-day glacial discharges and the growth of the Antarctic ice sheet on exciting the earth's rotational axis are studied. Glacial forcing could cause a maximum change in J2 of about one-third of the observed amount, for the Maxwell rheology and for Burgers' body models with a long-term, lower-mantle viscosity greater than about 10 to the 23rd P. For transient rheologies the amount of excitation due to glacial melting decreases. Polar wander is not much excited by recent glacial melting for the various types of rheologies examined.

  1. Glacial isostatic uplift of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Juergen; Scherler, Dirk; Wickert, Andrew D.; Egholm, David L.; Tesauro, Magdala; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Present-day vertical movements of the Earth's surface are mostly due to tectonic deformation, volcanic processes, and crustal loading/unloading. In tectonically stable regions of North America and Scandinavia, vertical movements are almost entirely attributable to glacial isostatic rebound after the melting of the Laurentide and Fennoscandian ice sheets. In contrast, the Pleistocene Alpine icecap grew on a younger mountain belt that formed by collision of the European and African plates, still subject to shortening. Therefore, measured uplift is potentially a composite signal of tectonic shortening and unloading after deglaciation and concomitant erosion. Deciphering the contributions of tectonics and crustal unloading to present-day uplift rates in formerly-glaciated mountain belts is a prerequisite to using uplift data to estimate the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle, a key variable in geodynamics. We evaluate the post-LGM glacial-isostatic rebound of the Alps following a 4-tiered procedure. First, we estimated the thickness distribution of sedimentary valley fills to create a bedrock map of the entire mountain belt. Second, this map was used as topographic basis for the reconstruction of the Alpine icecap using a numerical ice-flow model. Third, we estimated the equilibrium deflection of the Alpine lithosphere, using the combined loads of ice and sediments with a variable effective elastic thickness. Finally, we used an exponential decay function to infer the residual deflection and the present-day uplift rate for a range of upper mantle viscosities. Our analysis shows that virtually all of the geodetically measured surface uplift in the Swiss and the Austrian Alps can be attributed to glacial unloading and redistribution of sediments, assuming an upper-mantle viscosity lower than that inferred for an old craton (e.g., Fennoscandia), but higher than that for a region with recent crustal thinning (e.g., Basin and Range province).

  2. A study of carbon-14 of paleoatmospheric methane for the last glacial termination from ancient glacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, Vasilii Victorovich

    Ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica reveal large and rapid variations in atmospheric methane concentrations ([CH4]) in response to abrupt climate change. Two such events occurred at the Oldest Dryas (OD) - Bolling and Younger Dryas (YD) - Preboreal (PB) climatic transitions during the last glacial termination. A record of 14C of atmospheric CH4 (14CH4) through these transitions can help to identify the sources of the [CH4] increases and constrain the fossil fraction of paleo CH4 budgets. Very large (˜100 L STP) samples of paleoatmospheric air are needed for such 14CH4 measurements. To obtain these samples, ancient ice outcropping at an ice-margin ablation site in West Greenland was explored. Ice sections dating to the last glacial termination were identified and found to contain high-quality gas records. A new method for large-scale air extraction from glacial ice was developed and twelve large air samples from the YD-PB and the OD-Bolling transitions were obtained. New methods were also developed for processing this air for 14CH4 . 14CH4 procedural blanks were greatly reduced through the construction of a new CH4 conversion line utilizing platinized quartz wool for CH4 combustion and the use of an ultra high purity iron catalyst for graphitization. The overall 14CH 4 processing blank was 0.75 +/- 0.38 pMC. Measured 14CH4 values were too high by 14--38% as compared to the highest expected values based on paleoatmospheric 14CO2. In-situ production of CH4 and direct cosmogenic production of 14CH4 molecules in ablating ice were identified as the two most likely mechanisms that elevated 14CH4. Sample 14CH4 was then corrected for both mechanisms, however these corrections are speculative and do not allow any definite conclusions to be drawn from the results. Corrected 14CH4 results suggest that there was a 7% increase in the fossil CH4 fraction from the YD to the PB. The corrected 14CH4 results also suggest no large changes in the fossil fraction between the

  3. Local Communities and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood Mitigation: Lessons from Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Discourse in recent years among scientists and non-scientists increasingly promotes the involvement of local people in hazard mitigation, including inhabitants of floodplains in valleys below moraine-dammed glacial lakes. Despite advances in understanding human vulnerability to glacial lake outburst floods, there has been much less research on how these vulnerable populations are involved (or ignored) in the actual outburst flood mitigation process. Which groups should be involved? Are they in fact participating? Is that involvement successful? Peru's Cordillera Blanca mountain range provides an ideal site to help answer these questions because its moraine-dammed glacial lakes have produced more than a dozen outburst floods since ~1860. After floods in 1941, 1945, and 1950 killed approximately 6,000, the national government created a state agency, which still exists today, to monitor glacial lakes and prevent future outburst floods. Using this region as a case study to answer the above questions, this paper has three components. First, it provides historical examples of local people's participation in disaster mitigation, but shows that the outcome of such local involvement frequently turned out differently than scientists, engineers, and planners anticipated. Second, it shows the challenges and difficulties of involving local groups. Recent efforts in workshops, aid projects, and government programs show only limited success in community participation in disaster mitigation agendas. Third, the paper suggests that in many cases local indigenous people, as icons of the Andean region but often not the most vulnerable group, are disproportionately victimized and tacitly invited into disaster mitigation discussions. Poor urban residents inhabiting floodplains are often neglected, even though they are the most vulnerable to outburst floods. As other world regions such as the Himalayas increasingly contend with potential glacial lake outburst floods, these lessons from

  4. Mapping Glacial Weathering Processes with Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing: A Case Study at Robertson Glacier, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Christensen, P. R.; Shock, E.; Canovas, P. A., III

    2014-12-01

    Geologic weathering processes in cold environments, especially subglacial chemical processes acting on rock and sediment, are not well characterized due to the difficulty of accessing these environments. Glacial weathering of geologic materials contributes to the solute flux in meltwater and provides a potential source of energy to chemotrophic microbes, and is thus an important component to understand. In this study, we use Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data to map the extent of glacial weathering in the front range of the Canadian Rockies using remotely detected infrared spectra. We ground-truth our observations using laboratory infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and geochemical analyses of field samples. The major goals of the project are to quantify weathering inputs to the glacial energy budget, and to link in situ sampling with remote sensing capabilities. Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada is an excellent field site for this technique as it is easily accessible and its retreating stage allows sampling of fresh subglacial and englacial sediments. Infrared imagery of the region was collected with the ASTER satellite instrument. At that same time, samples of glacially altered rock and sediments were collected on a downstream transect of the glacier and outwash plain. Infrared laboratory spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to determine the composition and abundance of minerals present. Geochemical data were also collected at each location, and ice and water samples were analyzed for major and minor elements. Our initial conclusion is that the majority of the weathering seems to be occurring at the glacier-rock interface rather than in the outwash stream. Results from both laboratory and ASTER data indicate the presence of leached weathering rinds. A general trend of decreasing carbonate abundances with elevation (i.e. residence time in ice) is observed, which is consistent with increasing calcium ion

  5. Cosmogenic 10Be constraints on Little Ice Age glacial advances in the eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon; Liu, Gengnian; Yi, Chaolu; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-04-01

    Presumed Little Ice Age (LIA) glacial advances, represented by a set of fresh, sharp-crested, boulder covered and compact moraines a few hundred meters downstream from modern glaciers, have been widely recognized in the Central Asian highlands. However, few studies have constrained the formation ages of these moraines. We report 31 10Be exposure ages from presumed LIA moraines in six glacial valleys in the Urumqi River headwater area and the Haxilegen Pass area of the eastern Tian Shan, China. Our results reveal that the maximum LIA glacial extent occurred mainly around 430 ± 100 yr, a cold and wet period as indicated by proxy data from ice cores, tree rings, and lake sediments in Central Asia. We also dated a later glacial advance to 270 ± 55 yr. However, 10Be exposure ages on several presumed LIA moraines in front of small, thin glaciers are widely scattered and much older than the globally recognized timing of the LIA. Historical topographic maps indicate that most glaciers were more extensive in the early 1960s, and two of our 10Be sample sites were located close to the ice front at that time. Boulders transported by these small and thin glaciers may be reworked from deposits originally formed prior to the LIA glacial advances, producing apparently old and widely scattered exposure ages due to varied nuclide inheritance. Other published ages indicated an earlier LIA advance around 790 ± 300 yr in the easternmost Tian Shan, but in our study area the more extensive advance around 430 ± 100 yr likely reworked or covered deposits from this earlier event.

  6. Holocene hillslope development in glacially formed valley systems in Nordfjord, western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2013-04-01

    Large areas of the Norwegian fjord landscapes are covered by hillslopes that reflect the influence of glacial inheritance from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The focus of this paper is two-fold: (1) analyze the spatio-temporal variability of relevant denudational slope processes and process intensities over the Holocene; and (2) detect Holocene modification of the glacial valley morphometry. Research was performed on hillslope systems within two steep, parabolic-shaped and glacier-fed tributary valleys, Erdalen and Bødalen located on the western side of the Jostedalsbreen ice cap in western Norway. Orthophoto delineation, high resolution mapping (TLS), detailed geomorphological information and spatial data analysis were combined with dating techniques and geophysical investigations. Calculated Holocene rockwall retreat rates at selected slope test sites range from 0.38 to 0.67 mm yr- 1, with a mean value of 0.53 mm yr- 1. Slightly higher values were found in Erdalen, with a mean rockwall retreat rate of 0.57 mm yr- 1 compared to 0.50 mm yr- 1 in Bødalen. Valley-wide Holocene rockwall retreat rates of 0.38-0.50 mm yr- 1 are consistent with other estimates of Holocene rockwall retreat rates in cold mountain environments. It is shown that the glacial inheritance of topography is the most important factor controlling valley development since the LGM and that sediment storage capacity is primarily conditioned by valley morphometry. Compared to contemporary rates, the results indicate enhanced denudation activity and intensity immediately following deglaciation and during the 'Little Ice Age'. The overall tendency of landscape development is postglacial widening of the parabolic-shaped valley morphometry through rockwall retreat with associated debris accumulation beneath rockwalls. As a result, the glacially sculpted topography has not yet adapted to denudational processes acting under Holocene environmental conditions.

  7. The role of meltwater in glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nick

    2006-08-01

    Water plays a dominant role in many glacial processes and the erosional, depositional and climatic significance of meltwaters and associated fluvioglacial processes cannot be overemphasized. At its maximum extent c. 20,000 years ago, the volume of the Laurentide ice sheet was 33 × 10 6 km 3 (about the same as the volume of all ice present today on planet Earth). The bulk of this was released as water in little more than 10,000 years. Pulses of meltwater flowing to the Atlantic Ocean from large ice dammed lakes altered thermohaline circulation of the world's oceans and global climate. One such discharge event via Hudson Bay at 8200 years BP released 160,000 km 3 of water in 12 months. Global sea levels recovered from glacial maximum low stands reached at about 20,000 years ago at an average rate of 15 m per thousand years but estimates of shorter term rates suggest as much as 20 m sea level rise in 1000 years and for short periods, rates as high as 4 m per hundred years. Meltwaters played a key role in lubricating ice sheet motion (and thus areal abrasion) across the inner portions of the ice sheet where it slid over rigid crystalline bedrock of the Canadian Shield. The recharge of meltwater into the ice sheets bed was instrumental in generating poorly sorted diamict sediments (till) by sliding-induced shearing and deformation of overpressured sediment and soft rock. The transformation of overpressured till into hyperconcentrated slurries in subglacial channels may have generated a highly effective erosional tool for selective overdeepening and sculpting of bedrock substrates. Some workers credit catastrophic subglacial 'megafloods' with the formation of drumlins and flutes on till surfaces. Subglacial melt river systems were instrumental in reworking large volumes of glaciclastic sediment to marine basins; it has been estimated that less than 6% of the total volume of glaciclastic sediment produced during the Pleistocene remains on land. Fluvioglacial and

  8. New mechanism proposed for glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Alan

    Were the ice ages triggered by an influx of extraterrestrial dust or meteoroids hitting Earth's upper atmosphere? A controversial and still unproven new theory recently described by Muller and MacDonald [1995] in Nature links the 100,000 year glacial cycle with changes in Earth's orbital inclination relative to the plane of the solar system. And, say the theory developers, the only logical mechanism they can find for the connection is increasing amounts of extraterrestrial material entering the atmosphere whenever Earth's orbit sweeps through the solar plane. Climate researchers are just beginning to test the model's predictions.

  9. Geological constraints on Earth system sensitivity to CO2 during glacial and non-glacial times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, D. L.; Park, J. J.; Pagani, M.; Beerling, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Earth system climate sensitivity (ESS) is the long-term (>103 yr) response of global surface temperature to doubled CO2 that integrates fast and slow climate feedbacks. ESS has energy policy implications because global temperatures are not expected to decline appreciably for many centuries, even if anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions drop to zero. We report ESS estimates for the last 420 Myr of Earth history of 3 °C or higher during many non-glacial times and ~6-8 °C during glacial times. Analyses include both direct comparison of CO2 and temperature records, and fitting Berner's long-term carbon cycle model GEOCARBSULFvolc to proxy CO2 records while using ESS as a tunable parameter (Park & Royer, 2011, American Journal of Science 311: 1-26). Our ESS estimates are generally higher than climate sensitivities simulated from global climate models for the same ancient periods (~3 °C). Our two-fold amplification during glacial times is probably caused by long-term continental ice-sheet dynamics, a mechanism consistent with other studies. Even for non-glacial times, climate models do not capture the full suite of positive climate feedbacks. These absent feedbacks may be related to clouds, trace greenhouse gases, seasonal snow cover, and/or vegetation, especially in polar regions. Better characterization and quantification of these feedbacks is a priority given the current accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases.

  10. Influence of North Pacific Intermediate Water on biological productivity in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific under glacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, L.; Rippert, N.; Lembke-Jene, L.; Tiedemann, R.; Cacho Lascorz, I.; Mackensen, A.; Nuernberg, D.

    2015-12-01

    The most important oceanic source of atmospheric CO2 is the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP), where carbon fixation by siliceous phytoplankton is limited nowadays by low silicic acid and iron availability. Several studies propose that the biological carbon pump in the EEP operated more efficiently under glacial conditions due to relaxed nutrient limitation, which has been explained by enhanced Southern Ocean nutrient delivery into the low latitudes. Recent studies, however, suggest a greater glacial "trapping" of nutrients in the Pacific Sector of the Southern Ocean. Thus, the reason for a relaxed nutrient limitation in the EEP remains enigmatic. Here we reconstruct the mid-depth ventilation history of the subarctic Pacific by using the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of epibenthic foraminifera Cibicides lobatulus from western Bering Sea core SO201-2-101KL (58°52.52'N, 170°41.45'E; 630 m water depth). We compare the reconstructed intermediate water characteristics of the subarctic Pacific to thermocline water masses upwelled in the EEP derived from δ13C of deep-dwelling planktic foraminifera Globorotaloides hexagonus at ODP Site 1240 (00°01.31'N, 82°27.76'W; 2921 m water depth) to trace glacial changes in thermocline nutrient availability and export productivity in the EEP. We found that foraminiferal δ13C proxy records from the subarctic Pacific and EEP show concomitant changes in nutrient- and ventilation dynamics under full glacial conditions. We propose that these changes are linked to Glacial North Pacific Intermediate Water. Enhanced injection of relatively nutrient-replete GNPIW into low-latitude thermocline waters coincides with times of relaxed nutrient limitation in the glacial EEP. We conclude that our results might help to explain a stimulated biological carbon pump in the EEP, which may have contributed to the glacial atmospheric CO2 drawdown.

  11. Glacial and periglacial geomorphology and its paleoclimatological significance in three North Ethiopian Mountains, including a detailed geomorphological map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Hanne; Jacob, Miro; Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Geomorphological investigations and detailed mapping of past and present (peri)glacial landforms are required in order to understand the impact of climatic anomalies. The Ethiopian Highlands show a great variety in past and contemporary climate, and therefore, in the occurrence of glacial and periglacial landforms. However, only a few mountain areas have been studied, and detailed geomorphological understanding is lacking. In order to allow a fine reconstruction of the impact of the past glacial cycle on the geomorphology, vegetation complexes, and temperature anomalies, a detailed geomorphological map of three mountain areas (Mt. Ferrah Amba, 12°51‧N 39°29‧E; Mt. Lib Amba, 12°04‧N 39°22‧; and Mt. Abuna Yosef, 12°08‧N 39°11‧E) was produced. In all three study areas, inactive solifluction lobes, presumably from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), were found. In the highest study area of Abuna Yosef, three sites were discovered bearing morainic material from small late Pleistocene glaciers. These marginal glaciers occurred below the modeled snowline and existed because of local topo-climatic conditions. Evidence of such Pleistocene avalanche-fed glaciers in Ethiopia (and Africa) has not been produced earlier. Current frost action is limited to frost cracks and small-scale patterned ground phenomena. The depression of the altitudinal belts of periglacial and glacial processes during the last cold period was assessed through periglacial and glacial landform mapping and comparisons with data from other mountain areas taking latitude into account. The depression of glacial and periglacial belts of approximately 600 m implies a temperature drop around 6 °C in the last cold period. This cooling is in line with temperature depressions elsewhere in East Africa during the LGM. This study serves as a case study for all the intermediate mountains (3500-4200 m) of the North Ethiopian highlands.

  12. Tree ring and glacial records of Holocene climate change, northern Gulf of Alaska region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, David J.

    1998-11-01

    Tree-ring cross-dates of glacially overrun trees at eight sites around western Prince William Sound show ice margins advanced in the early (late 12th through 13th centuries AD) and middle (17th to early 18th centuries) Little Ice Age. Tree-ring dates of 22 moraines at 13 glaciers in the same region indicate an early period of moraine stabilization in the early 18th century. This overlaps with the second period of glaciers overrunning trees and marks culmination of this middle Little Ice Age advance. Moraine stabilization on nine of the study forefields in the latter 19th century delineates a third interval of Little Ice Age glacial expansion. These intervals of land-terminating glacier advance are synchronous with other tree-ring dated glacial histories from around the northern Gulf of Alaska, suggesting common climatic forcing across this region. Ring-widths in a 1119-year long tree-ring-width chronology developed from subfossil and living trees on glacial forefields around western Prince William Sound are primarily controlled by May through July temperatures of the growth year. Multi-decadal length warm periods in western Prince William Sound during the past 750 years were centered on 1300, 1440, 1730 and 1950 AD. Major cool periods were centered on 1400, 1660 and 1870 AD. Surficial mapping and 52 radiocarbon ages enable reconstruction of the Holocene glacial history of Yakutat Bay and Russell Fiord. Following an early to middle Holocene non-glacial interval, Hubbard Glacier began an advance at ~5600 cal. BP that culminated between ~4300 and 3474 cal. BP. Retreat by ~3200 cal. BP preceded readvance to Holocene maxima in Yakutat Bay and Russell Fiord at ~725 cal. BP (1225 cal. AD). The Hubbard ice margin in Yakutat Bay retreated by 1245 cal. AD, and was behind its modern position by 1791 AD. Ice from the Brabazon Range kept the Russell Fiord glacier lobe at its maximum until retreat during the late 18th and 19th centuries AD. The extent and timing of specific

  13. Glacial heritage: knowledge, inventory and promotion in the Chablais area (France, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, A.; Reynard, E.; Delannoy, J.-J.

    2012-04-01

    This study is part of an Interreg IVA project (www.123chablais.com) dealing with the promotion of different types of natural and cultural heritage in the Chablais area (French and Swiss Prealps) and is linked to the candidature of the French Chablais territory for the European Geoparks Network. The objective of the study is to develop a strategy for the promotion of the glacial heritage (landforms, deposits) in an area where the geomorphological features are highly influenced by glacial history and where key concepts in the Quaternary sciences were developed (e.g. the theory of multiple glaciations by Morlot in 1859), but that is now nearly completely deglaciated. The challenge is to find solutions to explain why the glacial heritage is so important for the regional economy and how it influences the life of inhabitants (e.g. Evian and Thonon mineral water, extraction industry, landscape and tourism), even if glaciers are not so impressive than in other parts of the Alps. The research is divided in three parts. (1) The first one aims to enhance knowledge on glacial landforms and deposits. The study area, that is quite large, has been intensively studied for more than two centuries; nevertheless, some parts have been only poorly studied. Intensive field survey was carried out to fill in the gaps of knowledge and some landforms, such as erratic boulders, have been dated in order to establish a chronology of deglaciation. All of these different elements have been included in a Geographic Information System with the aim of establishing maps of glacial stages in the Chablais area. (2) From this, an inventory of glacial geosites has been carried out, using the assessment method developed by Reynard et al. (2007). A specific focus has been on the assessment of the potential of the selected sites for educational purposes and geotourist promotion. (3) The last part has been the preparation of adapted educational and promotional supports. In particular, an exhibition will be

  14. Vegetation responses to climate changes during the penultimate glacial period (marine isotope stage 6) in southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roucoux, Katy; Margari, V.; Lawson, I. T.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2010-05-01

    Like the last glacial, the penultimate glacial interval (MIS 6, 185,000 to 132,000 years before present) was characterised by increasing continental ice volume and decreasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. However, greater orbital eccentricity during MIS 6 resulted in precessional-scale insolation changes of higher amplitude. This led to some unexpected combinations of climatic boundary conditions such as the high northern hemisphere summer insolation but relatively large ice volume and low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations of marine isotopic event 6.5. Records of regional climatic responses to different combinations of climatic forcing factors, in the form of pollen records of vegetation change, can contribute to our understanding of which factors determine conditions at the Earth's surface. Few palaeoecological records cover the penultimate glacial in detail and hence environmental and climatic responses during this interval are not yet well known. At Lake Ioannina, NW Greece, records of the last two glacial intervals are preserved at the same site enabling comparisons of vegetation responses to be made between periods with differing orbital configurations while keeping site variables constant. Our new palynological record spans the penultimate glacial interval at centennial scale resolution and represents the most detailed terrestrial record of this interval to date. Vegetation development throughout the glacial period indicates long-term cooling and drying reflecting the overall decline of northern hemisphere summer insolation and accumulation of large-northern hemisphere ice sheets, as expected. Conditions in NW Greece at the penultimate glacial maximum (PGM) appear to have been colder and drier than during the Last Glacial Maximum, consistent with records of lower Mediterranean sea surface temperature and greater extent of the European ice sheet at the PGM. During the early part of MIS 6, however, it appears that the high amplitude

  15. Range persistence during the last glacial maximum: Carex macrocephala was not restricted to glacial refugia.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew G; Horning, Matthew E; Roalson, Eric H

    2009-10-01

    The distribution of many species inhabiting northwestern North America has been heavily influenced by the climatic changes during the late Pleistocene. Several studies have suggested that species were restricted to glacial refugia north and/or south of the continental ice sheet front. It is also hypothesized that the coast of northwestern North America could have been a prime location for glacial refugia because of the lowering of the eustatic sea level and the concomitant rise of the continental shelf because of tectonic rebound. Alternatively, some coastal species distributions and demographics may have been unaffected in the long-term by the last glacial maximum (LGM). We tested the glacial refugium hypothesis on an obligate coastal plant species, Carex macrocephala by sampling 600 individuals from 41 populations with 11 nuclear microsatellite loci and the rpL16 plastid intragenic spacer region. The microsatellite data sets suggest a low level of population differentiation with a standardized G'(ST) = 0.032 and inbreeding was high with an F = 0.969. The homogenization of the populations along the coast was supported by a principal coordinate analysis, amovas and samova analyses. Analyses using the rpL16 data set support the results of the microsatellite analyses, with a low F(ST) of 0.042. Coalescent and mismatch analyses using rpL16 suggest that C. macrocephala has not gone through a significant bottleneck within the past 100,000 years, although a much earlier population expansion was indicated by the mismatch analysis. Carex macrocephala exhibits the characteristics of metapopulation dynamics and on the basis of these results, we concluded that it was not restricted to glacial refugia during the LGM, but that it existed as a large metapopulation.

  16. Interhemispheric Correlation of Late Pleistocene Glacial Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, T. V.; Heusser, C. J.; Andersen, B. G.; Moreno, P. I.; Hauser, A.; Heusser, L. E.; Schluchter, C.; Marchant, D. R.; Denton, G. H.

    1995-09-01

    A radiocarbon chronology shows that piedmont glacier lobes in the Chilean Andes achieved maxima during the last glaciation at 13,900 to 14,890, 21,000, 23,060, 26,940, 29,600, and >=33,500 carbon-14 years before present (14C yr B.P.) in a cold and wet Subantarctic Parkland environment. The last glaciation ended with massive collapse of ice lobes close to 14,000 14C yr B.P., accompanied by an influx of North Patagonian Rain Forest species. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, additional glacial maxima are registered at 17,720 14C yr B.P., and at the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 11,050 14C yr B.P. These glacial maxima in mid-latitude mountains rimming the South Pacific were coeval with ice-rafting pulses in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, the last termination began suddenly and simultaneously in both polar hemispheres before the resumption of the modern mode of deep-water production in the Nordic Seas. Such interhemispheric coupling implies a global atmospheric signal rather than regional climatic changes caused by North Atlantic thermohaline switches or Laurentide ice surges.

  17. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  18. Ground movement at Somma-Vesuvius from Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Fedele, Lorenzo; Morra, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Detailed micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from two boreholes drilled at the archaeological excavations of Herculaneum, ~ 7 km west of the Somma -Vesuvius crater, allowed reconstruction of the Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental evolution of the site. The data provide clear evidence for ground uplift movements involving the studied area. The Holocenic sedimentary sequence on which the archaeological remains of Herculaneum rest has risen several meters at an average rate of ~ 4 mm/yr. The uplift has involved the western apron of the volcano and the Sebeto-Volla Plain, a populous area including the eastern suburbs of Naples. This is consistent with earlier evidence for similar uplift for the areas of Pompeii and Sarno valley (SE of the volcano) and the Somma -Vesuvius eastern apron. An axisimmetric deep source of strain is considered responsible for the long-term uplift affecting the whole Somma -Vesuvius edifice. The deformation pattern can be modeled as a single pressure source, sited in the lower crust and surrounded by a shell of Maxwell viscoelastic medium, which experienced a pressure pulse that began at the Last Glacial Maximum.

  19. Groundwater Transport of Strontium 90 in a Glacial Outwash Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, Kenneth L., Jr.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Grove, David B.

    1986-04-01

    As part of the investigation of groundwater contamination at a uranium-scrap recovery plant at Wood River Junction, Rhode Island, laboratory experiments led to the development of a model for predicting the transport of strontium 90 in glacial outwash sediments based on an approximate mechanism for ion exchange. The multicomponent system was simplified to two components by regarding all exchangeable cations other than strontium 90 as a single component. The binary ion-exchange parameter was a function of the variable, total ion concentration. A one-dimensional solute transport model was formulated to evaluate the time necessary for natural groundwater flow to remove the strontium 90 contamination plume from the groundwater system to the Pawcatuck River. The finite difference transport equations were solved sequentially for total ion concentrations, then strontium 90 concentrations. Clay-free quartz and feldspar sands at the study site have little potential for strontium 90 sorption, and high calcium, magnesium, and sodium concentrations compete for the few ion exchange sites. As the total ion concentration plume moves out of the system, ion exchange of strontium 90 increases, reducing the strontium 90 concentration in the groundwater. Cleanout times predicted using the binary ion exchange mechanism were about two thirds of those predicted using a constant distribution coefficient. It is suggested that this type of model can simulate solute transport more realistically in many groundwater systems where the total ion concentration is not constant.

  20. The RECAP ice core - recovering a full Glacial record from Eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Bo

    2016-04-01

    During May-June 2015 the 584m an international team drilled the RECAP (REnland ice CAp Project) ice core to bedrock on the Renland ice cap in Eastern Greenland. The exact drill site selection was determined from a detailed radio echo sounding (RES) grid, that had been measured from the ice cap surface right before drilling operations began. The RES data suggested that the ice cap internal layers are horizontal almost right down to the bed at the selected site, and that ice from the Glacial period was present some 30-50m above bedrock. The RES results have now been confirmed by measurements on the RECAP core that shows the entire Glacial being nicely preserved in the 20m section indicated by the RES measurements. The RECAP core thus yields the first undisturbed ice core record from Eastern Greenland covering the last Glacial, a marked improvement compared to the landmark 1988 Renland ice core that was disturbed by ice flow features both during the mid-Holocene and especially during Marine Isotope Stages 4 and 5.

  1. A post-glacial sea level hinge on the central Pacific coast of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Duncan; Fedje, Daryl; Hay, Murray B.; Mackie, Quentin; Walker, Ian J.; Shugar, Dan H.; Eamer, Jordan B. R.; Lian, Olav B.; Neudorf, Christina

    2014-08-01

    Post-glacial sea level dynamics during the last 15,000 calendar years are highly variable along the Pacific coast of Canada. During the Last Glacial Maximum, the Earth's crust was depressed by ice loading along the mainland inner coast and relative sea levels were as much as 200 m higher than today. In contrast, some outer coastal areas experienced a glacial forebulge (uplift) effect that caused relative sea levels to drop to as much as 150 m below present levels. Between these inner and outer coasts, we hypothesize that there would have been an area where sea level remained relatively stable, despite regional and global trends in sea level change. To address this hypothesis, we use pond basin coring, diatom analysis, archaeological site testing, sedimentary exposure sampling, and radiocarbon dating to construct sea level histories for the Hakai Passage region. Our data include 106 newly reported radiocarbon ages from key coastal sites that together support the thesis that this area has experienced a relatively stable sea level over the last 15,000 calendar years. These findings are significant in that they indicate a relatively stable coastal environment amenable to long-term human occupation and settlement of the area. Our results will help inform future archaeological investigations in the region.

  2. Quaternary glacial geomorphosites from the Cantabrian Mountains (northern Iberian Peninsula): the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2013-04-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains is a mountain range 480 km-long and up to 2,648 m altitude (Torre Cerredo Peak) trending parallel to the Cantabrian Coastline between Pyrenees and the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula (~43oN 5oW). This mountain range is an outstanding area to research the climatic patterns across South Europe during the Quaternary glaciations since well-preserved glacial features evidence the occurrence of past mountain glaciations in a climatic environment marked by the transition from a maritime climate (Atlantic) to Mediterranean one across the mountain range. The available studies in the Cantabrian Mountains stand that the regional glacial maximum recorded here is prior to ca 38, and that glaciers were in some locations remarkably retreated by the time of the global Last Glacial Maximum (Jiménez-Sánchez et al., in press; Serrano et al., in press). This study is focused on an area about 800 km2 that includes 36 peaks over 2,000 m (Pico Mampodre; 2,192 m) and partially covers the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park. A geomorphologic database in ArcGIS was produced for this area as a previous step to reconstruct in detail the extent, flow pattern and chronology of the former glaciers (PhD under progress). Here we present a selection of 18 glacial geomorphosites classified according to genetic criteria in sites that show: (i) a nicely preserved moraine sequence recording the transition from glacial to periglacial conditions; (ii) glacial erosion features; (iii) glacial and ice related deposits (like moraines, ice-dammed deposits, erratic boulders or fluvio-glacial deposits); (iv) slope instability related to glacial debuttressing (complex landslides and rock avalanches); and (v) the interaction between the landscape and human activity. The interest of the geomorphosites is supported by its good quality of preservation, allowing its use as a basis to reconstruct the glacial and paraglacial processes in this region during

  3. Quaternary Glacial Mapping in Western Wisconsin Using Soil Survey Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oehlke, Betsy M.; Dolliver, Holly A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of soils in the western Wisconsin have developed from glacial sediments deposited during the Quaternary Period (2.6 million years before present). In many regions, multiple advances and retreats have left a complex landscape of diverse glacial sediments and landforms. The soils that have developed on these deposits reflect the nature…

  4. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  5. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-03-16

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  6. Hydrogeology of glacial drift, Mesabi Iron Range, northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.

    1973-01-01

    Practical sustained yield of aquifers in glacial drift is estimated to be as much as 40 million gallons per day from known aquifers. Assuming that the ratio of area underlain by aquifer to total area is constant for the study area (about 20 percent where mapped in detail), as much as 80 million gallons per day could be developed from glacial-drift aquifers.

  7. Glacial-interglacial vegetation change in the Zambezi catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, L. M.; Kuhlmann, H.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in the environment are thought to have had strong impact on human evolution. The pollen record of GeoB9311, retrieved offshore of the Zambezi River mouth, indicates glacial-interglacial changes in the vegetation of southern East Africa with enhanced forests in the coastal area during interglacials, more Afromontane forest and ericaceous bushland during glacials and an increase in mopane woodland during the transitional periods. C4 swamps, probably with papyrus, might have spread during the more humid phases of the glacial, while mangroves responded sensitively to changes in sea level. The spread of open ericaceous bushland and Afromontane forest during glacials is found for most of Southern Africa with the exception of the extreme south and southwest regions. In contrast to the western part of the continent, forest and woodland in East Africa did not completely disappear during the glacial. It seems that on a regional scale climatic perturbations of the vegetation are less severe than in West Africa.

  8. Glacial isostatic uplift of the European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Mey, Jürgen; Scherler, Dirk; Wickert, Andrew D.; Egholm, David L.; Tesauro, Magdala; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-01-01

    Following the last glacial maximum (LGM), the demise of continental ice sheets induced crustal rebound in tectonically stable regions of North America and Scandinavia that is still ongoing. Unlike the ice sheets, the Alpine ice cap developed in an orogen where the measured uplift is potentially attributed to tectonic shortening, lithospheric delamination and unloading due to deglaciation and erosion. Here we show that ∼90% of the geodetically measured rock uplift in the Alps can be explained by the Earth's viscoelastic response to LGM deglaciation. We modelled rock uplift by reconstructing the Alpine ice cap, while accounting for postglacial erosion, sediment deposition and spatial variations in lithospheric rigidity. Clusters of excessive uplift in the Rhône Valley and in the Eastern Alps delineate regions potentially affected by mantle processes, crustal heterogeneity and active tectonics. Our study shows that even small LGM ice caps can dominate present-day rock uplift in tectonically active regions. PMID:27830704

  9. Measurements of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Bamber, Jonathan; Bevis, Michael; Wahr, John; van dam, Tonie; Wouters, Bert; Willis, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The Greenland GPS network (GNET) was constructed to provide a new means to assess viscoelastic and elastic adjustments driven by past and present-day changes in ice mass. Here we assess existing glacial isostatic adjustments (GIA) models by analysing 1995-present data from 61 continuous GPS receivers located along the edge of the Greenland ice sheet. Since GPS receivers measure both the GIA and elastic signal, we isolate the GIA signal, by removing the elastic adjustments of the crust due to present-day mass loss using high-resolution ice surface elevation change grids derived from satellite and airborne altimetry measurements (ERS1/2, ICESat, ATM, ENVISAT, and CryoSat-2). In general, our observed GIA rates contradict models, suggesting GIA models and hence their ice load history for Greenland are not well constrained.

  10. Bacterial recovery from ancient glacial ice.

    PubMed

    Christner, Brent C; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; Thompson, Lonnie G; Reeve, John N

    2003-05-01

    Ice that forms the bottom 18 m of a 308 m ice core drilled from the Guliya ice cap on the Qinghan-Tibetan plateau in Western China is over 750000 years old and is the oldest glacial ice known to date. Fourteen bacterial isolates have been recovered from samples of this ice from approximately 296 m below the surface (mbs). Based on 16S rDNA sequences, these are members of the alpha- and beta-proteobacterial, actinobacterial and low-G + C Gram-positive bacterial lineages. 16S rDNA molecules have also been amplified directly, cloned and sequenced from the ice-core melt water. These originated from Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter gamma-proteobacterial species. These results demonstrate that bacteria can be recovered from water ice that has frozen for time periods relevant to biological survival through terrestrial ice ages or during interplanetary transport.

  11. Quaternary glacial stratigraphy and chronology of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Sidney E.

    The volcano Iztaccihuatl in central Mexico was glaciated twice during the middle Pleistocene, once probably in pre-Illinoian (or pre-Bull Lake) time, and once in late Illinoian (or Bull Lake) time. Glaciation during the late Pleistocene was restricted to the late Wisconsin (or Pinedale). A maximum advance and one readvance are recorded in the early part, and one readvance in the latter part. Three or four small neoglacial advances occurred during the Holocene. Two other volcanoes nearby, Ajusco and Malinche, have a partial record of late Pleistocene and Holocene glaciations. Three others, Popocatépetl, Pico de Orizaba, and Nevado de Toluca, have a full Holocene record of three to five glacial advances during Neoglaciation.

  12. Glacial isostatic uplift of the European Alps.

    PubMed

    Mey, Jürgen; Scherler, Dirk; Wickert, Andrew D; Egholm, David L; Tesauro, Magdala; Schildgen, Taylor F; Strecker, Manfred R

    2016-11-10

    Following the last glacial maximum (LGM), the demise of continental ice sheets induced crustal rebound in tectonically stable regions of North America and Scandinavia that is still ongoing. Unlike the ice sheets, the Alpine ice cap developed in an orogen where the measured uplift is potentially attributed to tectonic shortening, lithospheric delamination and unloading due to deglaciation and erosion. Here we show that ∼90% of the geodetically measured rock uplift in the Alps can be explained by the Earth's viscoelastic response to LGM deglaciation. We modelled rock uplift by reconstructing the Alpine ice cap, while accounting for postglacial erosion, sediment deposition and spatial variations in lithospheric rigidity. Clusters of excessive uplift in the Rhône Valley and in the Eastern Alps delineate regions potentially affected by mantle processes, crustal heterogeneity and active tectonics. Our study shows that even small LGM ice caps can dominate present-day rock uplift in tectonically active regions.

  13. Glacial isostatic uplift of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Jürgen; Scherler, Dirk; Wickert, Andrew D.; Egholm, David L.; Tesauro, Magdala; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-11-01

    Following the last glacial maximum (LGM), the demise of continental ice sheets induced crustal rebound in tectonically stable regions of North America and Scandinavia that is still ongoing. Unlike the ice sheets, the Alpine ice cap developed in an orogen where the measured uplift is potentially attributed to tectonic shortening, lithospheric delamination and unloading due to deglaciation and erosion. Here we show that ~90% of the geodetically measured rock uplift in the Alps can be explained by the Earth's viscoelastic response to LGM deglaciation. We modelled rock uplift by reconstructing the Alpine ice cap, while accounting for postglacial erosion, sediment deposition and spatial variations in lithospheric rigidity. Clusters of excessive uplift in the Rhône Valley and in the Eastern Alps delineate regions potentially affected by mantle processes, crustal heterogeneity and active tectonics. Our study shows that even small LGM ice caps can dominate present-day rock uplift in tectonically active regions.

  14. Dissolved organic matter export in glacial and non-glacial streams along the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E. W.; Scott, D.; Jeffery, A.; Schreiber, S.; Heavner, M.; Edwards, R.; D'Amore, D. V.; Fellman, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Gulf of Alaska drainage basin contains more than 75,000 km2 of glaciers, many of which are rapidly thinning and receding. We are using a paired watershed approach to evaluate how changes in glacier ecosystems will impact the export dissolved organic matter (DOM) into the Gulf of Alaska. Our primary study watersheds, Lemon Creek and Montana Creek, are similar in size, bedrock lithology and elevation range and extend from near sea level to the margin or interior of the Juneau Icefield. Lemon Creek has a glacial coverage of ~60%, while Montana Creek is free of glacier ice. Our goal is to evaluate seasonal differences in the quantity, chemical character and reactivity of DOM being exported from these watersheds to downstream near-shore marine ecosystems. In addition, we are monitoring a variety of physical parameters that influence instream DOM metabolism in both watersheds. Our initial results from the 2009 runoff season indicate that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are substantially higher in the non-glacial watershed. However, fluorescence analyses indicate that DOM from the glacier watershed has a higher protein and lower humic material content compared to DOM from the non-glacial watershed. After the spring snowmelt season, physical parameters between the two watersheds diverged, with higher streamflow and turbidity as well as colder water temperatures in the glacial watershed. Although our previous yield calculations show significantly higher DOC fluxes from the forested watershed, our results here suggest that glacier watersheds may be an important source of labile carbon to the near shore marine ecosystem. The contrast in the physical habitat between the two rivers (e.g glacier stream = cold, low light penetration, unstable substrate) supports the hypothesis that that in-stream DOM processing is limited within glacier dominated rivers, therefore delivering a higher percentage of labile DOM downstream.

  15. Numerical simulation of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's crust, stress can be subdivided into tectonic background stress, overburden pressure, and pore-fluid pressure. The superposition of the first two and the variation of the third part are key factors in controlling movement along faults. Furthermore, stresses due to sedimentation and erosion contribute to the total stress field. In deglaciated regions, an additional stress must be considered: the rebound stress, which is related to rebounding of the crust and mantle after deglaciation. During the growth of a continental ice sheet, the lithosphere under the iceload is deformed and the removal of the ice load during deglaciation initiates a rebound process. The uplift is well known in formerly glaciated areas, e.g.North America and Scandinavia, and in currently deglaciating areas, e.g.Alaska, Antarctica, and Greenland. The whole process of subsiding and uplifting during the growth and melting of an iceload and all related phenomena is known as glacial isostatic adjustment. During the process of glaciation, the surface of the lithosphere is depressed underneath the ice load and compressional flexural stresses are induced in the upper lithosphere, whereas the bottom of the lithosphere experiences extensional flexural stresses; an additional vertical stress due to the ice load is present and it decreases to zero during deglaciation. During rebound, flexural stresses relax slowly. These stresses are able to change the original stress directions and regime.In this work we aim to study the effect of the GIA process in the context of petroleum engineering. The main aspect we will focus on is the mathematical and numerical modeling of the GIA including thermal effects. We plan also to include a preliminary study of the effect of the glacial erosion. All these phenomena are of paramount importance in petroleum engineering: for example some reservoir have been depleted due to tilting caused by both GIA, erosion and thermal effects.

  16. Glacial onset predated Late Ordovician climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Le Hir, Guillaume; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Ordovician glaciation represents the acme of one of only three major icehouse periods in Earth's Phanerozoic history and is notorious for setting the scene for one of the "big five" mass extinction events. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that drove ice sheet growth remain poorly understood and the final extent of the ice sheet crudely constrained. Here using an Earth system model with an innovative coupling method between ocean, atmosphere, and land ice accounting for climate and ice sheet feedback processes, we report simulations portraying for the first time the detailed evolution of the Ordovician ice sheet. We show that the emergence of the ice sheet happened in two discrete phases. In a counterintuitive sequence of events, the continental ice sheet appeared suddenly in a warm climate. Only during the second act, and set against a background of decreasing atmospheric CO2, followed steeply dropping temperatures and extending sea ice. The comparison with abundant sedimentological, geochemical, and micropaleontological data suggests that glacial onset may have occurred as early as the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian, in agreement with recent studies reporting third-order glacioeustatic cycles during the same period. The second step in ice sheet growth, typified by a sudden drop in tropical sea surface temperatures by ˜8°C and the further extension of a single, continental-scale ice sheet over Gondwana, marked the onset of the Hirnantian glacial maximum. By suggesting the presence of an ice sheet over Gondwana throughout most of the Middle and Late Ordovician, our models embrace the emerging paradigm of an "early Paleozoic Ice Age."

  17. Phase 2 Site Investigations Report. Volume 2 of 3: site-Specific Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    drumlin to the northeast. A broad, flat valley of glacial outwash separates these four topographic highs. Taylor Brook and Puffer Pond bisect the...laboratory is built. Honey Brook also drains the area between the laboratory and an unnamed hill formed by a drumlin aligned north-south just south of...side of a drumlin or glacially formed hill. The surface elevation at Site A2 is approximately 195 feet AMSL. Groundwater elevation is approximately

  18. Glacial induced closure of the Panamanian Gateway during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 95-100 (∼2.5 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, J.; Hathorne, E. C.; Steinke, S.; DeBey, H.; Mackensen, A.; Tiedemann, R.

    2014-10-01

    The final phase of the closure of the Panamanian Gateway and the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) both occurred during the Late Pliocene. Glacial-interglacial (G-IG) variations in sea level might, therefore, have had a significant impact on the remaining connections between the East Pacific and the Caribbean. Here, we present combined foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1241 from the East Pacific and ODP Site 999 from the Caribbean. The studied time interval covers the first three major G-IG Marine Isotope Stages (MIS 95-100, ∼2.5 Ma) after the intensification of NHG. Analyses were performed on the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei and Globigerinoides sacculifer, representing water mass properties in the thermocline and the mixed-layer, respectively. Changes in sea water temperature, relative salinity, and water column stratification strongly suggest that the Panamanian Gateway temporarily closed during glacial MIS 98 and 100, as a result of changes in ice volume equivalent to a drop in sea level of 60-90 m. Reconstructed sea surface temperatures (SST) from G. sacculifer show a glacial decrease of 2.5 °C at Site 1241, but increases of up to 3 °C at Site 999 during glacial MIS 98 and 100 suggesting that the Panamanian Gateway closed during these glacial periods. The Mg/Ca-temperatures of N. dutertrei remain relatively stable in the East Pacific, but do show a 3 °C warming in the Caribbean at the onset of these glacial periods suggesting that the closing of the gateway also changed the water column stratification. We infer that the glacial closure of the gateway allowed the Western Atlantic Warm Pool to extend into the southern Caribbean, increasing SST (G. sacculifer) and deepening the thermocline (N. dutertrei). Additionally, ice volume appears to have become large enough during MIS 100 to survive the relatively short lasting interglacial MIS 99 so that the gateway remained

  19. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (February-April 1998) drilled two sites (Sites 1097 and 1103) on the outer Antarctic Peninsula Pacific continental shelf. Recovered strata are no older than late Miocene or early Pliocene (<4.6 Ma). Recovery at shallow depths in loosely consolidated and iceberg-turbated bouldery sediment was poor but improved with increasing depth and consolidation to allow description of lithofacies and biofacies and interpretation of depositional environment. Site 1097 lies on the outer shelf within Marguerite Trough which is a major outlet for ice expanding seaward from the Antarctic Peninsula and reached a maximum depth drilled of 436.6 m below the sea floor (mbsf). Seismic stratigraphic data show flat-lying upper strata resting on strata that dip gently seaward. Uppermost strata, to a depth of 150 mbsf, were poorly recovered, but data suggest they consist of diamictites containing reworked and abraded marine microfauna. This interval is interpreted as having been deposited largely as till produced by subglacial cannibalization of marine sediments (deformation till) recording ice sheet expansion across the shelf. Underlying gently dipping strata show massive, stratified and graded diamictite facies with common bioturbation and slump stuctures that are interbedded with laminated and massive mudstones with dropstones. The succession contains a well-preserved in situ marine microfauna typical of open marine and proglacial marine environments. The lower gently dipping succession at Site 1097 is interpreted as a complex of sediment gravity flows formed of poorly sorted glacial debris. Site 1103 was drilled in that part of the continental margin that shows uppermost flat-lying continental shelf topsets overlying steeper dipping slope foresets seaward of a structural mid-shelf high. Drilling reached a depth of 363 mbsf with good recovery in steeply dipping continental slope foreset strata. Foreset strata are dominated by massive and chaotically

  20. Assimilation of aged organic carbon in a glacial river food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, J.; Hood, E. W.; Raymond, P. A.; Bozeman, M.; Hudson, J.; Arimitsu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying the key sources of organic carbon supporting fish and invertebrate consumers is fundamental to our understanding of stream ecosystems. Recent laboratory bioassays highlight that aged organic carbon from glacier environments is highly bioavailable to stream bacteria relative to carbon originating from ice-free areas. However, there is little evidence suggesting that this aged, bioavailable organic carbon is also a key basal carbon source for stream metazoa. We used natural abundance of Δ14C, δ13C, and δ15N to determine if fish and invertebrate consumers are subsidized by aged organic carbon in a glacial river in southeast Alaska. We collected biofilm, leaf litter, three different species of macroinvertebrates, and resident juvenile salmonids from a reference stream and two sites (one site is directly downstream of the glacial outflow and one site is upstream of the tidal estuary) on the heavily glaciated Herbert River. Key producers, fish, and invertebrate consumers in the reference stream had carbon isotope values that ranged from -26 to -30‰ for δ13C and from -12 to 53‰ for Δ14C, reflecting a food web sustained mainly on contemporary primary production. In contrast, biofilm in the two glacial sites was highly Δ14C depleted (-203 to -215‰) relative to the reference site. Although biofilm may consist of both bacteria and benthic algae utilizing carbon depleted in Δ14C, δ13C values for biofilm (-24.1‰), dissolved inorganic carbon (-5.9‰), and dissolved organic carbon (-24.0‰) suggest that biofilm consist of bacteria sustained in part by glacier-derived, aged organic carbon. Invertebrate consumers (mean Δ14C of -80.5, mean δ13C of -26.5) and fish (mean Δ14C of -63.3, mean δ13C of -25.7) in the two glacial sites had carbon isotope values similar to biofilm. These results similarly show that aged organic carbon is incorporated into the metazoan food web. Overall, our findings indicate that continued watershed deglaciation and

  1. Glacial-interglacial shifts in global and regional precipitation δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Lechler, A.; Pausata, F. S. R.; Fawcett, P. J.; Gleeson, T.; Cendón, D. I.; Galewsky, J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Risi, C.; Sharp, Z. D.; Welker, J. M.; Werner, M.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-03-01

    Previous analyses of past climate changes have often been based on site-specific isotope records from speleothems, ice cores, sediments and groundwaters. However, in most studies these dispersed records have not been integrated and synthesized in a comprehensive manner to explore the spatial patterns of precipitation isotope changes from the last ice age to more recent times. Here we synthesize 88 globally-distributed groundwater, cave calcite, and ice core isotope records spanning the last ice age to the late-Holocene. Our data-driven review shows that reconstructed precipitation δ18O changes from the last ice age to the late-Holocene range from -7.1‰ (ice age δ18O < late-Holocene δ18O) to +1.8‰ (ice age δ18O > late-Holocene δ18O) with wide regional variability. The majority (75%) of reconstructions have lower ice age δ18O values than late-Holocene δ18O values. High-magnitude, negative glacial-interglacial precipitation δ18O shifts (ice age δ18O < late-Holocene δ18O by more than 3‰) are common at high latitudes, high altitudes and continental interiors. Conversely, lower-magnitude, positive glacial-interglacial precipitation δ18O shifts (ice age δ18O > late-Holocene δ18O by less than 2‰) are most common along subtropical coasts. Broad, global patterns of glacial-interglacial precipitation δ18O shifts are consistent with stronger-than-modern isotopic distillation of air masses during the last ice age, likely impacted by larger global temperature differences between the tropics and the poles. Further, to complement our synthesis of proxy-record precipitation δ18O, we compiled isotope enabled general circulation model simulations of recent and last glacial maximum climate states. Simulated precipitation δ18O from five general circulation models show better inter-model and model-observation agreement in the sign of δ18O changes from the last ice age to present day in temperate and polar regions than in the tropics. Further model precipitation

  2. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    of glacial lakes and their hazard potential. This phase of glacial lake hazard assessment aims to be geographically comprehensive in order to identify potentially dangerous lakes that may have previously been ignored. A second phase of analysis that includes site visits will be necessary for a thorough analysis at each lake to determine the potential hazard for downstream communities. The objective of the work presented here is to identify potentially dangerous lakes that warrant further study rather than provide a final hazard assessment for each lake of the glacial lake inventory in the Cordillera Blanca. References: Emmer, A. and Vilímek, V.: New method for assessing the potential hazardousness of glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 11, 2391-2439, 2014. UGRH - Unidad de Glaciologia y Recursos Hidricos. Inventario de Lagunas Glaciares del Peru. Ministerio de Agricultura y Riego, Autoridad Nacional del Agua, Direcccion de Conservacion y Planeamiento de Recursos Hidricos, Huaraz, Peru, 2014. Wang, W., Yao, T., Gao, Y., Yang, X., and Kattel, D. B.: A first-order method to identify potentially dangerous glacial lakes in a region of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, Mountain Res. Develop., 31, 122-130, 2011.

  3. Variations in glacial and interglacial marine conditions over the last two glacial cycles off northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwemark, Ludvig; Chao, Weng-Si; Gyllencreutz, Richard; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiu, Pin-Yao; Yang, Tien-Nan; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chuang, Chih-Kai; León Dominguez, Dora Carolina; Jakobsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Five sediment cores from the Lomonosov Ridge and the Morris Jesup Rise north of Greenland show the history of sea-ice coverage and primary productivity over the last two glacial cycles. Variations in Manganese content, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, bioturbation, and trace fossil diversity are interpreted to reflect differences in sea-ice cover and sediment depositional conditions between the identified interglacials. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1 and MIS 2 are represented by thin (<<5 cm) sediment units while the preceding interglacial MIS 5 and glacial MIS 6 are characterized by thick (10-20 cm) deposits. Foraminiferal abundances and bioturbation suggest that MIS 1 was generally characterized by severe sea-ice conditions north of Greenland while MIS 5 appears to have been considerably warmer with more open water, higher primary productivity, and higher sedimentation rates. Strengthened flow of Atlantic water along the northern continental shelf of Greenland rather than development of local polynyas is here suggested as a likely cause for the relatively warmer marine conditions during MIS 5 compared to MIS 1. The cores also suggest distinct differences between the glacial intervals MIS 2 and MIS 6. While MIS 6 is distinguished by a relatively thick sediment unit poor in foraminifera and with low Mn values, MIS 2 is practically missing. We speculate that this could be the effect from a paleocrystic sea-ice cover north of Greenland during MIS 2 that prevented sediment delivery from sea ice and icebergs. In contrast, the thick sequence deposited during MIS 6 indicates a longer glacial period with dynamic intervals characterized by huge drifting icebergs delivering ice rafted debris (IRD). A drastic shift from thinner sedimentary cycles where interglacial sediment parameters indicate more severe sea-ice conditions gave way to larger amplitude cycles with more open water indicators was observed around the boundary between MIS 7/8. This shift is in agreement with a

  4. High-resolution Geophysical Mapping of Submarine Glacial Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Todd, B. J.; Dowdeswell, E. K.; Hogan, K. A.; Mayer, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial landforms are generated from the activity of glaciers and display spatial dimensions ranging from below one meter up to tens of kilometers. Glacial landforms are used as diagnostic features of past activity of ice sheets and glaciers; they are specifically important in the field of palaeoglaciology. Mapping of submarine glacial landforms is largely dependent on geophysical survey methods capable of imaging the seafloor and sub-bottom through the water column. Full "global" seafloor mapping coverage, equivalent to what exists for land elevation, is to-date only achieved by the powerful method of deriving bathymetry from altimeters on satellites like GEOSAT and ERS-1. The lateral resolution of satellite derived bathymetry is, however, limited by the footprint of the satellite and the need to average out local wave and wind effects resulting in values of around 15 km. Consequently, mapping submarine glacial landforms requires for the most part higher resolution than is achievable by satellite derived bathymetry. The most widely-used methods for mapping submarine glacial landforms are based on echo-sounding principles. This presentation shows how the evolution of marine geophysical mapping techniques, in particular the advent of side-scan and multibeam bathymetric sonars, has made it possible to study submarine glacial landforms in unprecedented detail. Examples are shown from the Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient, which will be published in late 2015 in the Memoir Series of the Geological Society of London.

  5. Glacial and periglacial buzzsaws: fitting mechanisms to metaphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adrian M.; Kleman, Johan

    2014-03-01

    The buzzsaw hypothesis refers to the potential for glacial and periglacial processes to rapidly denude mountains at and above glacier Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs), irrespective of uplift rates, rock type or pre-existing topography. Here the appropriateness of the buzzsaw metaphor is examined alongside questions of the links between glacial erosion and ELAs, and whether the glacial system can produce low-relief surfaces or limit summit heights. Plateau fragments in mountains on both active orogens and passive margins that have been cited as products of glacial and periglacial buzzsaw erosion instead generally represent dissected remnants of largely inherited, pre-glacial relief. Summit heights may correlate with ELAs but no causal link need be implied as summit erosion rates are low, cirque headwalls may not directly abut summits and, on passive margins, cirques are cut into pre-existing mountain topography. Any simple links between ELAs and glacial erosion break down on passive margins due to topographic forcing of ice-sheet growth, and to the km-scale vertical swaths through which ELAs have shifted through the Quaternary. Glaciers destroy rather than create low-relief rock surfaces through the innate tendency for ice flow to be faster, thicker and warmer along valleys. The glacial buzzsaw cuts down.

  6. Evidence of late glacial runoff in the lower Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucier, Roger T.

    Thousands of cubic kilometers of massive coarse-grained glacial outwash underlie the alluvial plain of the Lower Mississippi Valley between Cairo, Illinois, and the Gulf of Mexico. However, valley trains deposited by braided streams characterize less than one-third of the valley area, and those attributable to runoff from the Laurentide Ice Sheet cover less than 15,000 km2, mostly in the St. Francis Basin segment of the valley. There they form a series of subdued terraces that reflect episodes of meltwater release and possibly catastrophic flood events. Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores establish that the initial runoff entered the basin about 16.3 ka BP and continued without a significant lull for about 5000 years. The distribution of archeological sites tends to support an effective brief cessation of runoff to the valley about 11.0 ka BP when meltwater is thought to have been diverted from the Mississippi River Valley to the St. Lawrence Valley. Both radiocarbon dates and archeological evidence document a final pulse of outwash to the (Lower) Mississippi Valley about 10.0 ka BP when the Mississippi River occupied Thebes Gap near Cairo and created the Charleston Fan. All outwash deposition ended, and the river adopted a meandering regime not later than 9.8 ka BP.

  7. Glacial biogeography of North American coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Smith, C T; Nelson, R J; Wood, C C; Koop, B F

    2001-12-01

    To study the glacial biogeography of coho we examined 20 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA D-loop sequence in samples from Alaska to California. Microsatellite data divided our samples among five biogeographic regions: (1) Alaska and northern coastal British Columbia; (2) the Queen Charlotte Islands; (3) the mainland coast of British Columbia and northern Washington State; (4) the Thompson River; and (5) Oregon and California. The D-loop sequence data suggested three geographical regions: (1) Oregon and California; (2) the Thompson River; and (3) all the other sites north of the southern ice margin. Microsatellite data revealed no difference in the number of alleles in different regions, but mitochondrial DNA data revealed a cline of decreasing diversity from south to north. We suggest that the two signals presented by these different marker types illuminate two time frames in the history of this species. Endemic microsatellite diversity in Alaska and on the Queen Charlotte Islands provides evidence in favour of Fraser Glaciation refugia in these regions. The loss of mitochondrial variation from south to north suggests that one of the earlier, more extensive, Pleistocene glaciations eliminated coho from its northern range.

  8. Late Glacial to Holocene paleoenvironmental change on the northwestern Pacific seaboard, Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendea, Ionel Florin; Ponomareva, Vera; Bourgeois, Joanne; Zubrow, Ezra B. W.; Portnyagin, Maxim; Ponkratova, Irina; Harmsen, Hans; Korosec, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    We used a new sedimentary record from a small kettle wetland to reconstruct the Late Glacial and Holocene vegetation and fire history of the Krutoberegovo-Ust Kamchatsk region in eastern Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia). Pollen and charcoal data suggest that the Late Glacial landscape was dominated by a relatively fire-prone Larix forest-tundra during the Greenland Interstadial complex (GI 1) and a subarctic steppe during the Younger Dryas (GS1). The onset of the Holocene is marked by the reappearance of trees (mainly Alnus incana) within a fern and shrub dominated landscape. The Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) features shifting vegetational communities dominated by Alnus shrubs, diverse forb species, and locally abundant aquatic plants. The HTM is further defined by the first appearance of stone birch forests (Betula ermanii) - Kamchatka's most abundant modern tree species. The Late Holocene is marked by shifts in forest dynamics and forest-graminoid ratio and the appearance of new non-arboreal taxa such as bayberry (Myrica) and meadow rue (Filipendula). Kamchatka is one of Earth's most active volcanic regions. During the Late Glacial and Holocene, Kamchatka's volcanoes spread large quantities of tephra over the study region. Thirty-four tephra falls have been identified at the site. The events represented by most of these tephra falls have not left evidence of major impacts on the vegetation although some of the thicker tephras caused expansion of grasses (Poaceae) and, at least in one case, forest die-out and increased fire activity.

  9. Climate versus geological controls on glacial meltwater micronutrient production in southern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aciego, S. M.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Low concentrations of micronutrients in subarctic North Atlantic surface waters limit phytoplankton growth. Iron, phosphorous, and silicon are all potentially bio-limiting nutrients; iron is the most well documented in the subarctic North Atlantic. Manganese, nickel, copper and zinc are also essential trace metals for phytoplankton cell function. However, the spatial and temporal variability in the flux of these elements to the subarctic North Atlantic is undercharacterized. Here we show new data from the meltseason peak in 2013 indicating that glacial meltwater from the southern tip of Greenland has elevated dissolved major and trace metal concentrations compared to glacial meltwater draining shorter melt season glacial catchments to the north. Fe concentrations range from 0.13 to 6.97 μM, Zn from 4 to 95 μM, and Si from 4 to 36 μM, all higher than the depleted surface waters of the subarctic North Atlantic. Measured hydrochemical data modeled by PHREEQC indicates meltwater is undersaturated in pyrite and silicate phases but supersaturated with respect to oxyhydroxides, hematite and goethite, all phases that precipitate Fe as colloids, of which the nanoparticle phases should remain biologically available. The variability in geologic units between the sites indicates that subglacial lithology is a minor but not the dominant control on meltwater chemistry. The disparity in concentrations is directly correlated with climate, and an extended melt season, suggesting that future warming in Greenland will lead to increased trace element, and potential micronutrient, flux to the subarctic North Atlantic surface waters.

  10. Glacial magnetite dissolution in abyssal NW Pacific sediments - evidence for carbon trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Lucia; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The abyssal North Pacific Ocean's large volume, depth, and terminal position on the deep oceanic conveyor make it a candidate site for deep carbon trapping as postulated by climate theory to explain the massive glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2. As the major basins of the North Pacific have depths of 5500-6500m, far below the modern and glacial Calcite Compensation Depths (CCD), these abyssal sediments are carbonate-free and therefore not suitable for carbonate-based paleoceanographic proxy reconstructions. Instead, paleo-, rock and environmental magnetic methods are generally well applicable to hololytic abyssal muds and clays. In 2009, the international paleoceanographic research cruise SO 202 INOPEX ('Innovative North Pacific Experiment') of the German RV SONNE collected two ocean-spanning EW sediment core transects of the North Pacific and Bering Sea recovering a total of 50 piston and gravity cores from 45 sites. Out of seven here considered abyssal Northwest Pacific piston cores collected at water depths of 5100 to 5700m with mostly coherent shipboard susceptibility logs, the 20.23m long SO202-39-3, retrieved from 5102 m water depth east of northern Shatsky Rise (38°00.70'N, 164°26.78'E), was rated as the stratigraphically most promising record of the entire core transect and selected for detailed paleo- and environmental magnetic, geochemical and sedimentological investigations. This core was dated by correlating its RPI and Ba/Ti records to well-dated reference records and obviously provides a continuous sequence of the past 940 kyrs. The most striking orck magnetic features are coherent magnetite-depleted zones corresponding to glacial periods. In the interglacial sections, detrital, volcanic and even submicron bacterial magnetite fractions are excellently preserved. These alternating magnetite preservation states seem to reflect dramatic oxygenation changes in the deep North Pacific Ocean and hint at large-scale benthic glacial carbon trapping

  11. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle.

  12. Isotopic evidence for reduced productivity in the glacial Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A. ); Macko, S.A. ); Charles, C.D. ); Rau, G.H. )

    1993-10-15

    Records of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in biogenic silica and carbon isotopes in planktonic foraminifera from deep-sea sediment cores from the Southern Ocean reveal that the primary production during the last glacial maximum was lower than Holocene productivity. These observations conflict with the hypothesis that the low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were introduced by an increase in the efficiency of the high-latitude biological pump. Instead, different oceanic sectors may have had high glacial productivity, or alternative mechanisms that do not involve the biological pump must be considered as the primary cause of the low glacial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  13. Probability of moraine survival in a succession of glacial advances.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbons, A.B.; Megeath, J.D.; Pierce, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Emplacement of glacial moraines normally results in obliteration of older moraines deposited by less extensive glacial advances, a process we call 'obliterative overlap'. Assuming randomness and obliterative overlap, after 10 glacial episodes the most likely number of surviving moraines is only three. The record of the Pleistocene is in agreement with the probability analysis: the 10 glaciations during the past 0.9 Myr inferred from the deep-sea record resulted in moraine sequences in which only two or three different-aged moraine belts can generally be distinguished. -from Authors

  14. Cyclic 100-ka (glacial-interglacial) migration of subseafloor redox zonation on the Peruvian shelf

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sergio; Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Khalili, Arzhang; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of subseafloor microbial life to oceanographic and atmospheric conditions is poorly understood. We examined diagenetic imprints and lipid biomarkers of past subseafloor microbial activity to evaluate its response to glacial-interglacial cycles in a sedimentary section drilled on the Peruvian shelf (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1229). Multiple and distinct layers of diagenetic barite and dolomite, i.e., minerals that typically form at the sulfate−methane transition (SMT), occur at much shallower burial depth than the present SMT around 30 meters below seafloor. These shallow layers co-occur with peaks of 13C-depleted archaeol, a molecular fossil of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea. Present-day, non-steady state distributions of dissolved sulfate also suggest that the SMT is highly sensitive to variations in organic carbon flux to the surface shelf sediments that may lead to shoaling of the SMT. Reaction-transport modeling substantiates our hypothesis that shallow SMTs occur in response to cyclic sediment deposition with a high organic carbon flux during interglacials and a low organic carbon flux during glacial stages. Long diffusion distances expectedly dampen the response of deeply buried microbial communities to changes in sediment deposition and other oceanographic drivers over relatively short geological time scales, e.g., glacial-interglacial periods. However, our study demonstrates how dynamically sediment biogeochemistry of the Peru Margin has responded to glacial-interglacial change and how these changes are now preserved in the geological record. Such changes in subsurface biogeochemical zonation need to be taken into account to assess the role of the subseafloor biosphere in global element and redox cycling. PMID:24145422

  15. Reconstruction of Hydrologic Variability at Lake Elsinore, California, During the Late-Glacial to Holocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantozzi, J. M.; Bonuso, N.; Kirby, M. E.; Zimmerman, S. R.; Hiner, C.

    2011-12-01

    A multi-proxy sedimentological study was completed on a section of a sediment core from Lake Elsinore, California, that spans the late-Glacial to Holocene transition (17,619-9,587 calendar years before present [cy BP]). The results of the study provide the first high resolution terrestrial climate record from Southern California that spans this interesting interval in Earth's climate history. The sedimentological observations and proxy results indicate that the depositional and climatic environments of Lake Elsinore changed significantly across the late-Glacial to Holocene transition. Interpretation of the results suggests that the lake was relatively deep during the last glacial period, but then became relatively shallow and less stable near the beginning of the Holocene interglacial. Interpretation of the results also suggests that the Lake Elsinore deglaciation sequence was characterized by two step-wise decreases in precipitation. Here, this two step drying trend is explained by changes in the extent of the North American ice sheet and variations in the intensity of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Together, the latter two forcings acted to modulate the average position of the circumpolar jet stream, the mean latitude of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and their combined impacts on the Northern Hemisphere winter storm tracks, which determine the annual hydrologic budget of Southern California. A comparison of the Lake Elsinore deglaciation sequence with other regional paleoclimate records shows strong evidence for synchronous hydrologic change between study sites throughout southwestern North America. Additionally, a comparison of the Lake Elsinore record with the Greenland ice core record provides evidence for a coupling between changes in climate over the North Atlantic and Southern California during the late-Glacial to Holocene transition.

  16. Future Implications of Climate-driven Vegetation Change in North America Since the Last Glacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, C.; Jackson, S. T.; Overpeck, J. T.; Betancourt, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Climate projections for the next century include increases in average global temperature that are likely to cause changes in plant community composition and structure across the globe. Characterizing the magnitude of impending climate-driven vegetation changes is important for conservation planning and adaptation, but difficult because climate-driven vegetation change is the result of interacting processes operating on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Paleoecological records from all the vegetated continents offer a proxy record of the vegetation during the last glacial period (defined here as 14,000 to 21,000 years before present). Assessment of the degree of change between glacial-age and modern vegetation provides a metric for assessing impacts of future climate change. A global comparison is underway, in which regional experts are compiling all available pollen and plant macrofossil records with coverage during the last glacial period, and comparing glacial-age vegetation with modern (or late Holocene) vegetation, assessing the magnitude of compositional and structural change. Here we present results from North America (excepting Beringia). Nearly all sites assessed show large changes in composition and structure, all attributable to climate change associated with a sub-continental annual surface air warming of ca. 4 to 10+ °C. Current rates of atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions promise comparable magnitudes of climate change over the next one to two centuries, and at a rate much faster than over the last deglaciation. Our results thus suggest that this future climate change will drive major changes in vegetation distributions everywhere in North America.

  17. Detection of Microbial Life in Glacial Samples - Laboratories Studies and Development for Field use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, M. J.; Cullen, D. C.; Telling, J.; Wadham, J. L.; Holt, J.; Sims, M.

    2007-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is frequently used as a proxy for bulk microbial biomass in environmental sciences and, in the food and health industries. Despite successful ATP detection in a variety of ecosystems, very little data are available on ATP levels in the glacial system. In this study, protocols for ATP detection on glacial ice and sediment samples are investigated, in order to aid in the development of a single-use device for in-field life detection, and also to increase the available data on biomass estimates in the cryosphere. ATP detection in two glacial samples reveals concentrations indistinguishable from internal blanks. Therefore, the samples were centrifuged and their particulate loads were subjected to four different extraction processes. Applying these extraction methods resulted in higher ATP concentration than samples with no extraction process; the different techniques increase the ATP detected between 5 and 15 times (also relative to an internal standard). Concurrent with the laboratory based development of extraction protocols is the development of a single-use device for the detection of ATP at the sampling site, in icy environments. The device is microfluidic-based, using commercially available reagents for the detection of ATP by bioluminescence. In order to produce a robust measure of biomass, both laboratory and field based analyses need to be carried out. This work shows the potential of ATP detection in glacial samples and the early development of a device for in situ life detection. The quantification of ATP in microfluidic format is being developed as the preliminary target for an integrated life detection and characterisation device.

  18. Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 96-101: Glacial induced closure of the Panamanian Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, Jeroen; Debey, Henry; Hathorne, Ed C.; Steinke, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    We present combined Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements from ODP Site 1241 from the east Pacific and ODP Site 999 from the Caribbean. The studied time interval covers the first major glacial-interglacial cycles (MIS96-101) after intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation. Analyses were performed on the planktic foraminifers Neogloboquadrina dutertrei and Globigerinoides sacculifer, representing water mass properties in the thermocline and the mixed layer respectively. Data resolution is aimed to be able to resolve millennial scale variations to constrain the changes in water mass conditions during MIS96-101. Aim of the study is to test the theory that the Panamanian Gateway temporarily closed during glacial MIS 96, 98, and 100 due to a drop in sea level of 50-80 m. This was first suggested in Groeneveld et al., (in prep.) and might have provided the necessary conditions to allow the Great American Biotic Interchange, the large scale migration of mammals from South to North America and vice versa. As this exchange would have required more arid conditions in Central America to allow the fauna, which was mainly adapted to a savannah-like environment, to cross, a glacial period would have provided the right conditions. Reconstruction of sea water temperatures can indicate if and when the gateway closed. With an open Panamanian Gateway relatively cold water flowed from the Pacific into the Caribbean. With the onset of glacial conditions sea surface temperatures (SST) expectedly would show a decrease in the east Pacific (Site 1241). But, SSTs in the Caribbean (Site 999) are expected to rise as no longer relatively cold Pacific water is entering the Caribbean, but rather the warmer waters from the Western Atlantic Warm Pool advanced from the north to the core location. Indeed, reconstructed SSTs from G. sacculifer show a decrease of 2.5° C at Site 1241 and an increase of 3° C at Site 999 suggesting that the Panamanian Gateway truly was closed during the glacial stage

  19. Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Clark, P. U.; Ricken, W.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Hostetler, S. W.; Kuhn, G.

    2012-04-01

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood because only a few findings with robust chronologies exist for Antarctic ice sheets. We developed a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic ice sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates the advance to their maximum extent at 29 -28 ka, and retreat from their maximum extent at 19 ka was nearly synchronous with Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (Weber, M.E., Clark, P. U., Ricken, W., Mitrovica, J. X., Hostetler, S. W., and Kuhn, G. (2011): Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum. - Science, 334, 1265-1269, doi: 10.1126:science.1209299). As for the deglaciation, modeling studies suggest a late ice-sheet retreat starting around 14 ka BP and ending around 7 ka BP with a large impact of an unstable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and a small impact of a stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). However, the Weddell Sea sites studied here, as well as sites from the Scotia Sea, provide evidence that specifically the EAIS responded much earlier, possibly provided a significant contribution to the last sea-level rise, and was much more dynamic than previously thought. Using the results of an atmospheric general circulation we conclude that surface climate forcing of Antarctic ice mass balance would likely cause an opposite response, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. Furthermore, our new data support teleconnections involving a sea-level fingerprint forced from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets as indicated by gravitational modeling. Also, changes in North Atlantic Deepwater formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines may have contributed to synchronizing the hemispheric ice sheets.

  20. Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle along the Iberian Margin based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.; Sangiorgi, F.; Reichart, G. J.; Lourens, L. J.; Sluijs, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated millennial-scale dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from the Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct upwelling, sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity across the last two glacial-interglacial cycles. We quantify the validity of dinocyst-based paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on multivariate statistics on dinocyst assemblages and multi-proxy data from regional core-tops and the last glacial cycle. This allows us to conclude that the strength of the West Iberian Margin upwelling system changed from relatively intense upwelling during the last glacial to upwelling relaxation during the Holocene as a result of reduced (strength of the) Portuguese trade winds. Secondly, SST, productivity/upwelling, strength of Portuguese trade winds and climate on the Iberian Peninsula co-vary on stadial-interstadial timescales and correspond to Greenland stadial-interstadial variability (δ18O). Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down to ~120 ka.

  1. The taphonomy of human remains in a glacial environment.

    PubMed

    Pilloud, Marin A; Megyesi, Mary S; Truffer, Martin; Congram, Derek

    2016-04-01

    A glacial environment is a unique setting that can alter human remains in characteristic ways. This study describes glacial dynamics and how glaciers can be understood as taphonomic agents. Using a case study of human remains recovered from Colony Glacier, Alaska, a glacial taphonomic signature is outlined that includes: (1) movement of remains, (2) dispersal of remains, (3) altered bone margins, (4) splitting of skeletal elements, and (5) extensive soft tissue preservation and adipocere formation. As global glacier area is declining in the current climate, there is the potential for more materials of archaeological and medicolegal significance to be exposed. It is therefore important for the forensic anthropologist to have an idea of the taphonomy in this setting and to be able to differentiate glacial effects from other taphonomic agents.

  2. Glacial Erosion Rates from Bayesian Inversion of Cosmogenic Nuclide Concentrations in a Bedrock Core, Streaked Mtn., ME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploskey, Z. T.; Stone, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial erosion is an important source of sediment and could be an important coupling to glacier and ice sheet models that track sediment. However, glacial erosion is difficult to quantify, and models of glacial erosion can benefit from independent erosion rate estimates. Here we present the results of a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion of a cosmogenic nuclide (CN) geomorphic model for glacial erosion rates on a bedrock landform formerly eroded beneath the Laurentide ice sheet. The CN 10Be was measured in quartz to 8 m depth in a bedrock core from the summit of Streaked Mountain, ME. The accumulation of 10Be was modeled over multiple glacial cycles of alternating exposure and glacial erosion. This model was invertedfor glacial erosion rates and burial history using MCMC algorithms implemented in PyMC (Patil et al., 2010). This Bayesian approach allows us to incorporate prior constraints on ice cover history, including oxygen isotope records and radiometric dates, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate from erosion in rapidly eroding areas. We compare these results to depth profile and surface CN measurements elsewhere in Maine (Ploskey and Stone, 2013).The forward model of CN production used in the inversion is part of Cosmogenic (github.com/cosmolab/cosmogenic), an open-source Python-based software library we developed for modeling the growth and decay of in-situ CN inventories in rock during geomorphic evolution. It includes calibrated production rates for 10Be and 26Al in quartz and 36Cl in K-feldspar by both neutrons and muons, with more isotopic production pathways and material targets to be added in the future. Production rates are scaled to the site altitude and latitude using modular scaling schemes. Cosmogenic includes a variety of functions representing common geomorphic histories, and can be used to model any arbitrary exposure, erosion and burial history that can be defined as Python function.ReferencesPatil, A., D. Huard and C

  3. Enigmatic sediment ridges in the German Bight - glacial vs post-glacial morphologies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnithan, Vikram; Pio Rossi, Angelo; Praeg, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The German Wadden Sea extends over 1000 km from the Dutch coast to that of Sweden and consists of a long chain of barrier islands and ephemeral sand banks punctuated by estuaries and rivers. The sedimentary environment is currently shaped and characterised by storm surges, high tidal and wave energy levels. However, this part of the North Sea has been repeatedly covered by continental ice sheets, and it remains unclear how glacial to interglacial sedimentary processes may have influenced seabed morphology in the region. The study area is situated approximately 70 km north of Cuxhaven, and 5 km due east of the islands of Helgoland and Dune. It covers an approximate area of 5 km square with water depths ranging from 50 m in the south to about 20 m in the north. High resolution multibeam (Simrad EM710) and parametric echosounder (Innomar SES2000) data were acquired during graduate and undergraduate teaching excursions on the RV Heincke in Spring 2010 (HE-324) and 2011 (HE-349). The seabed swath bathymetric data reveal distinctive linear seabed ridges. The ridges trend NNW-SSE, are 1-5 m in height, have wavelengths on the order of 100 m and crest lengths ranging from 100-2500 m. The ridge crests are broadly anastomosing. They bifurcate towards the north to form more subdued structures, while they converge and disappear to the south. Profiles across the ridges show an asymmetric structure, with steeper slopes trending west in the western part of the study area but trending east in the eastern part. These enigmatic sedimentary structures have not been previously mapped in the Wadden Sea, and their origin remains uncertain. Possible interpretations to be tested include sub-crop structural control on seabed morphology, relict glacial or glaciofluvial landforms and post-glacial marine bedforms linked to processes of sediment redistribution.

  4. Oceanographic gradients and seabird prey community dynamics in glacial fjords

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Piatt, John F.; Madison, Erica N.; Conaway, Jeff; Hillgruber, N.

    2012-01-01

    Glacial fjord habitats are undergoing rapid change as a result of contemporary global warming, yet little is known about how glaciers influence marine ecosystems. These ecosystems provide important feeding, breeding and rearing grounds for a wide variety of marine organisms, including seabirds of management concern. To characterize ocean conditions and marine food webs near tidewater glaciers, we conducted monthly surveys of oceanographic variables, plankton, fish and seabirds in Kenai Fjords, Alaska, from June to August of 2007 and 2008. We also measured tidal current velocities near glacial features. We found high sediment load from glacial river runoff played a major role in structuring the fjord marine ecosystem. Submerged moraines (sills) isolated cool, fresh, stratified and silt-laden inner fjord habitats from oceanic influence. Near tidewater glaciers, surface layers of turbid glacial runoff limited availability of light to phytoplankton, but macrozooplankton were abundant in surface waters, perhaps due to the absence of a photic cue for diel migration. Fish and zooplankton community structure varied along an increasing temperature gradient throughout the summer. Acoustic measurements indicated that low density patches of fish and zooplankton were available in the surface waters near glacial river outflows. This is the foraging habitat occupied most by Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris), a rare seabird that appears to be specialized for life in glacially influenced environments. Kittlitz's murrelets were associated with floating glacial ice, and they were more likely to occur near glaciers, in deeper water, and in areas with high acoustic backscatter. Kittlitz's murrelet at-sea distribution was limited to areas influenced by turbid glacial outflows, and where prey was concentrated near the surface in waters with low light penetration. Tidewater glaciers impart unique hydrographic characteristics that influence marine plankton and fish

  5. Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is a limiting nutrient for primary productivity, but little is known about past atmospheric fluxes to the open ocean. In this study, phosphate and phosphorus concentrations have been determined in the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling Project ice core for selected periods during the last glacial. Phosphate was determined continuously by using a molybdenum blue spectroscopic absorption method and discretely using an ion chromatograph. Total P was determined discretely using an inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometer. For the last glacial period, we found concentrations of between 3 and 62 nM PO43- and 7 and 929 nM P. We find glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus to Greenland were 4 to 11 times higher than in the past century, with the highest input during the cold glacial stadials (GS). Changes in P and PO43- fluxes between mild glacial interstadials (GI) and GS correlate positively with dust variability. The soluble fraction of P is larger in the mild GIs as compared to the dust-rich GSs. For the very high phosphate and phosphorus loads during the Last Glacial Maximum, the relationship between phosphate and dust is weaker than in GIs and milder GSs, suggesting either secondary phosphate sources or multiple dust sources. Based on crustal abundances, we find that dust inputs are sufficient to account for all P deposited during all periods investigated except the Last Glacial Maximum. During the glacial, sea salts contributed 10-3 nM P, while land biogenic emissions were a minor source of P.

  6. Rapid loss of glacial ice reveals stream community assembly processes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lee E; Milner, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    Glacial retreat creates new habitat which is colonized and developed by plants and animals during the process of primary succession. While there has been much debate about the relative role of deterministic and stochastic processes during terrestrial succession, evidence from freshwater ecosystems remains minimal and a general consensus is lacking. Using a unique 27 years record of community assembly following glacial recession in southeast Alaska, we demonstrate significant change in the trait composition of stream invertebrate communities as catchment glacial cover decreased from ∼70% to zero. Functional diversity increased significantly as glacier cover decreased and taxonomic richness increased. Null modelling approaches led to a key finding that niche filtering processes were dominant when glacial cover was extensive, reflecting water temperature and dispersal constraints. Thereafter the community shifted towards co-occurrence of stochastic and deterministic assembly processes. A further novel discovery was that intrinsic functional redundancy developed throughout the study, particularly because new colonizers possessed similar traits to taxa already present. Rapid glacial retreat is occurring in Arctic and alpine environments worldwide and the assembly processes observed in this study provide new fundamental insights into how glacially influenced stream ecosystems will respond. The findings support tolerance as a key primary successional mechanism in this system, and have broader value for developing our understanding of how biological communities in river ecosystems assemble or restructure in response to environmental change.

  7. The Last Interglacial to Glacial Transition, Togiak Bay, Southwestern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Darrell S.; Manley, William F.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Preece, Shari J.; Westgate, John A.; Forman, Steve L.

    2001-03-01

    An 18-m-high coastal bluff at Togiak Bay (northwestern Bristol Bay, southwestern Alaska) exposes marine, lacustrine, fluvial, glacial, volcanic, and organic deposits that record the ∼50,000-year-long transition from the peak of the last interglaciation to the early Wisconsin glaciation. The base of the section is dominated by stratified sand and silt extending up to 4.3 m above sea level; marine diatoms are present, and pollen assemblages are characterized by relatively high percentages of Picea, Alnus, and Betula and low percentages of Poaceae and Cyperaceae. The marine sediment was probably deposited during the peak of marine oxygen-isotope stage (OIS) 5e. An infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) age of 151,000±13,000 yr from near the base of the exposure is permissive of this correlation. The marine sand and silt are overlain by 0.8 m of peaty silt with diatoms that record a transition from marine to lacustrine conditions. During this interval, Poaceae and Cyperaceae dominate the pollen assemblages, and Picea and shrubs are nearly absent, suggesting that herb tundra occupied the landscape. This interval probably encompasses OIS 5d on the basis of the herb tundra and an IRSL age of 119,000±10,000 yr from 60 cm below the marine/lacustrine transition. The organic mud is overlain by 3.1 m of stratified sand and organic silt that apparently record shallowing of the lake; reappearance of spruce and shrubs (=OIS 5c?); and subsequent deepening of the lake (=OIS 5b?); followed by aggradation of a floodplain (=OIS 5a?), which was dry at the time basaltic lava buried the site. Thermoluminescence analyses on lava-baked sediment indicate that the eruption occurred 70,000±10,000 yr ago. Sometime thereafter, but prior to 53,600 14C yr B.P. an outlet of the Ahklun Mountains ice cap advanced over the site and deposited ∼7 m of bouldery ice-contact drift. The sedimentary sequence contains at least four tephra beds. Major- and trace-element chemistry provide a basis for

  8. Glacial geology and stratigraphy of Western New York Nuclear Service Center and vicinity, Cattaraugus and Erie Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaFleur, Robert G.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed glacial geologic map at a scale of 1:24,000, embracing a 165 square-mile area in Erie and Cattaraugus Counties, NY, shows 27 mapping units, including the till complex in which the West Valley radioactive-waste burial site is located. Stratigraphic relationships at 24 boreholes at the burial site and 6 newly described exposures indicate the age of the till complex to be early late Woodfordian (post-Kent, pre-Lake Escarpment, Valley Heads), equivalent to the Lavery glacial advance. Correlations of mapping units and measured sections with Woodfordian and older glacial and deglacial episodes are proposed. The Lavery till is confined to the valleys of Cattaraugus Creek and its major tributaries. At the waste-burial site in Buttermilk Creek Valley, the Lavery is an interfingering complex of clayey-silt till and thinner beds of deformed, poorly stratified lacustrine clay and silt. Ice readvance after the Kent glacial recession and Erie Interstade erosion imponded proglacial lake water in Buttermilk Creek Valley and covered post-Kent kame deltas and Erie channel gravels with as much as 130 feet of till. The Lavery till thins southward to a thickness of 80 feet at the waste-burial site and to less than 16 feet near the hamlet of West Valley. Water from the Lavery till may flow through subjacent Erie channel gravel and Kent-recessional kame delta sand to the bluffs along Buttermilk Creek, where discharge of water from these exposed pervious deposits appears to cause major slumps. (USGS)

  9. Neoproterozoic Glacial Extremes: How Plausible is the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    2004-05-01

    The suggestion that the glaciation events of the Neoproterozoic could have been global in extent, so-called "snowball" glaciations, during which the oceans were entirely covered by sea ice and the continents by massive continental ice sheets, is an idea tha is recurrent in the geological and climate dynamics literature. It is an idea that haa both critics and defenders but concensus concerning it's plausiblity has yet to emerge. Previous work on this problem has led to the suggestion that a more likely scenario than the "hard snowball" is one in which open water continues to persist at the equator, thus enabling biological evolution into the Cambrian to proceed, perhaps stimulated by the transition from the cold conditions of the Neoproterozoic to the warm condition of the Cambrian, thus leading to the Cambrian "explosion of life". We will discuss recent extensions of our previous efforts to model the extreme climate of the Neoproterozoic, using both the University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model and the NCAR Community Climate System Model. With an appropriate choice for the albedo of sea ice, the former model conntinues to deliver hysteresis in the surface temperature vs. CO2 concentration space when solar luminosity is reduced by 6% below modern, and thus continues to suggest the existence of the previously hypothesized "CO2 attractor". We argue here that the system could be locked onto this attractor by the strong "out of equilibrium" effects of the carbon cycle recently discussed by Rothman et al. (PNAS, 2003). The open water solution is confirmed as the preferred mode of the system by the detailed CCSM integrations that we have performed.

  10. Precipitation Isotopes Reveal Intensified Indonesian Monsoon Circulation During the Dry Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecky, B. L.; Russell, J. M.; Vogel, H.; Bijaksana, S.; Huang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) invigorates the oceanic-atmospheric circulation in the tropics, with far-reaching climate impacts that extend into the high latitudes. A growing number of deglacial proxy reconstructions from the region have revealed the importance of both high- and low-latitude climate processes to IPWP rainfall during the late Pleistocene. Many of these proxies reconstruct the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of rainfall (δ18Oprecip, δDprecip), a powerful tool for understanding changes in climate. However, an increasing number of studies from the region have highlighted the tendency for δ18Oprecip and δDprecip to reflect regional and/or remote circulation processes rather than local rainfall amounts, complicating the reconstruction of IPWP hydroclimate. To better understand high- and low-latitude drivers of late Pleistocene hydroclimate in the IPWP, precipitation isotopic reconstructions must be constrained with both modern observations and independent proxies for rainfall amount. We present a reconstruction of δDprecip using leaf wax compounds preserved in the sediments of Lake Towuti, Sulawesi, from 60,000 years before present to today. We interpret our proxy record with the aid of a new precipitation isotopic dataset from our study site, with daily rainfall isotope measurements to constrain the processes controlling δDprecip. Our Lake Towuti δDwax record is strikingly similar to a speleothem δ18O record from southern Indonesia (Ayliffe et al., 2013) and shares features with other nearby records spanning the Last Glacial Maximum to present. Together, these records indicate that monsoon circulation was intensified in central and southern Indonesia during the glacial period. However, other independent rainfall proxies from Lake Towuti indicate that dry conditions accompanied the intensified monsoon. Regional-scale isotopic depletion during the dry glacial period may have arisen from dynamical and other fractionating processes that

  11. Geochemical Weathering in Glacial and Proglacial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranter, M.

    2003-12-01

    It seems counterintuitive that chemical erosion in glaciated regions proceeds at rates comparable to those of temperate catchments with comparable specific runoff (Anderson et al., 1997). All the usual factors that are associated with elevated rates of chemical weathering ( Drever, 1988, 1994), such as water, soil, and vegetation, are either entirely absent or absent for much of the year. For example, glaciated regions are largely frozen for significant periods each year, the residence time of liquid water in the catchment is low ( Knight, 1999), there are thin, skeletal soils at best, and vegetation is either absent or limited ( French, 1997). Other chapters in this volume have highlighted how these factors are important in other, more temperate and tropical environments. Even so, chemical erosion rates in glaciated terrain are usually near to or greater than the continental average ( Sharp et al., 1995; Wadham et al., 1997; Hodson et al., 2000). This is because glaciated catchments usually have high specific runoff, there are high concentrations of freshly comminuted rock flour, which is typically silt sized and coated with microparticles, and adsorbed organic matter or surface precipitates that may hinder water-rock interactions are largely absent ( Tranter, 1982). In short, the rapid flow of water over fine-grained, recently crushed, reactive mineral surfaces maximizes both the potential rates of chemical weathering and chemical erosion.A range of both lab- and field-based studies of glacial chemical weathering have been undertaken, mainly on the smaller glaciers of Continental Europe (e.g., Brown et al., 1993a, b), Svalbard (e.g., Hodson et al., 2002), and North America (e.g., Anderson et al., 2000). The field-based studies typically generate hydrographs of glacier runoff, which show a characteristic diurnal cycle during summer in low latitudes ( Figure 1), and more subdued diurnal cycles at high latitudes (Figure 2 and Figure 3). The concentration of ions in

  12. Deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica from glacial geomorphology and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Shanks, R.; Xu, S.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.

    2017-02-01

    The retreat history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is important for understanding rapid deglaciation, as well as to constrain numerical ice sheet models and ice loading models required for glacial isostatic adjustment modelling. There is particular debate about the extent of grounded ice in the Weddell Sea embayment at the Last Glacial Maximum, and its subsequent deglacial history. Here we provide a new dataset of geomorphological observations and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages of erratic samples that constrain the deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, adjacent to the present day Foundation Ice Stream and Academy Glacier in the southern Weddell Sea embayment. We show there is evidence of at least two glaciations, the first of which was relatively old and warm-based, and a more recent cold-based glaciation. During the most recent glaciation ice thickened by at least 450 m in the Williams Hills and at least 380 m on Mt Bragg. Progressive thinning from these sites was well underway by 10 ka BP and ice reached present levels by 2.5 ka BP, and is broadly similar to the relatively modest thinning histories in the southern Ellsworth Mountains. The thinning history is consistent with, but does not mandate, a Late Holocene retreat of the grounding line to a smaller-than-present configuration, as has been recently hypothesized based on ice sheet and glacial isostatic modelling. The data also show that clasts with complex exposure histories are pervasive and that clast recycling is highly site-dependent. These new data provide constraints on a reconstruction of the retreat history of the formerly-expanded Foundation Ice Stream, derived using a numerical flowband model.

  13. Uncertainty in the Himalayan energy-water nexus: estimating regional exposure to glacial lake outburst floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus; Korup, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Himalayan water resources attract a rapidly growing number of hydroelectric power projects (HPP) to satisfy Asia’s soaring energy demands. Yet HPP operating or planned in steep, glacier-fed mountain rivers face hazards of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) that can damage hydropower infrastructure, alter water and sediment yields, and compromise livelihoods downstream. Detailed appraisals of such GLOF hazards are limited to case studies, however, and a more comprehensive, systematic analysis remains elusive. To this end we estimate the regional exposure of 257 Himalayan HPP to GLOFs, using a flood-wave propagation model fed by Monte Carlo-derived outburst volumes of >2300 glacial lakes. We interpret the spread of thus modeled peak discharges as a predictive uncertainty that arises mainly from outburst volumes and dam-breach rates that are difficult to assess before dams fail. With 66% of sampled HPP are on potential GLOF tracks, up to one third of these HPP could experience GLOF discharges well above local design floods, as hydropower development continues to seek higher sites closer to glacial lakes. We compute that this systematic push of HPP into headwaters effectively doubles the uncertainty about GLOF peak discharge in these locations. Peak discharges farther downstream, in contrast, are easier to predict because GLOF waves attenuate rapidly. Considering this systematic pattern of regional GLOF exposure might aid the site selection of future Himalayan HPP. Our method can augment, and help to regularly update, current hazard assessments, given that global warming is likely changing the number and size of Himalayan meltwater lakes.

  14. Radar remote sensing of glacial features, Malaspina Glacier, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Molnia, B.F.; Jones, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Two types of radar investigations were conducted at Malaspina glacier, the largest piedmont glacier lobe in North America. Digital x-band side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) data were collected to image surface features; ice-surface, ice-penetrating radar was employed to measure ice thickness and to identify the configuration of subglacial bed rock SLAR revealed a complex pattern of surface backscatter responses related to three types of channellike features on the glacier surface, which mimic the configuration of its underlying bed rock. The features resemble (1) glacially eroded valleys with cirque-like indentations, (2) dendritic stream valleys, and (3) a greater than 40-km-long, arcuate, east-west lineament that corresponds to the Fairweather fault. Field examinations of the three types of features were made to determine relief, slope, and other conditions. The channel-like features had elevations as much as 40 m lower than adjacent high areas and were characterized by fewer crevasses, minimal surface relief, a sediment veneer, and standing and running water. Hundred-m-spaced ice-penetrating radar soundings showed that the ice thickness over these low areas is much greater than over adjacent highs. About 50 ice-thickness measurements were made elsewhere on the glacier. The maximum ice thickness measured exceeded 850 m, whereas the minimum thickness was less than 150 m. Comparison of ice-thickness measurements and ice-surface elevations at each site suggests that the Malaspina Glacier occupies a deep basin or series of basins extending well below sea level.

  15. Oxygen isotopic composition of the Mediterranean Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum: constraints from pore water analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Hilary A.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Schmid, Daniel W.; McKenzie, Judith A.

    2001-09-01

    Interstitial waters recovered from Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 161, site 976 in the western Mediterranean Sea are used in conjunction with a numerical model to constrain the δ 18O of seawater in the basin since the Last Glacial Maximum, including Sapropel Event 1. To resolve the oxygen isotopic composition of the deep Mediterranean, we use a model that couples fluid diffusion with advective transport, thus producing a profile of seawater δ 18O variability that is unaffected by glacial-interglacial variations in marine temperature. Comparing our reconstructed seawater δ 18O to recent determinations of 1.0‰ for the mean ocean change in glacial-interglacial δ 18O due to the expansion of global ice volume, we calculate an additional 0.2‰ increase in Mediterranean δ 18O caused by local evaporative enrichment. This estimate of δ 18O change, due to salinity variability, is smaller than previous studies have proposed and demonstrates that Mediterranean records of foraminiferal calcite δ 18O from the last glacial period include a strong temperature component. Paleotemperatures determined in combination with a stacked record of foraminiferal calcite depict almost 9°C of regional cooling for the Last Glacial Maximum. Model results suggest a decrease of ˜1.1‰ in seawater δ 18O relative to the modern value caused by increased freshwater input and reduced salinity accompanying the formation of the most recent sapropel. The results additionally indicate the existence of isotopically light water circulating down to bottom water depths, at least in the western Mediterranean, supporting the existence of an 'anti-estuarine' thermohaline circulation pattern during Sapropel Event 1.

  16. Evidence for enhanced convection of North Pacific Intermediate Water to the low-latitude Pacific under glacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, L.; Rippert, N.; Lembke-Jene, L.; Mackensen, A.; Nürnberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.

    2017-01-01

    We provide high-resolution foraminiferal stable carbon isotope (δ13C) records from the subarctic Pacific and Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) to investigate circulation dynamics between the extratropical and tropical North Pacific during the past 60 kyr. We measured the δ13C composition of the epibenthic foraminiferal species Cibicides lobatulus from a shallow sediment core recovered from the western Bering Sea (SO201-2-101KL; 58°52.52'N, 170°41.45'E; 630 m water depth) to reconstruct past ventilation changes close to the source region of Glacial North Pacific Intermediate Water (GNPIW). Information regarding glacial changes in the δ13C of subthermocline water masses in the EEP is derived from the deep-dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globorotaloides hexagonus at ODP Site 1240 (00°01.31'N, 82°27.76'W; 2921 m water depth). Apparent similarities in the long-term evolution of δ13C between GNPIW, intermediate waters in the eastern tropical North Pacific and subthermocline water masses in the EEP suggest the expansion of relatively 13C-depleted, nutrient-enriched, and northern sourced intermediate waters to the equatorial Pacific under glacial conditions. Further, it appears that additional influence of GNPIW to the tropical Pacific is consistent with changes in nutrient distribution and biological productivity in surface waters of the glacial EEP. Our findings highlight potential links between North Pacific mid-depth circulation changes, nutrient cycling, and biological productivity in the equatorial Pacific under glacial boundary conditions.

  17. Glacial interglacial sediment transport to the Meiji Drift, northwest Pacific Ocean: Evidence for timing of Beringian outwashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanLaningham, Sam; Pisias, Nicklas G.; Duncan, Robert A.; Clift, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    A large sediment deposit known as the Meiji Drift, located in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, is thought to have formed from deep water exiting the Bering Sea, although no notable deep water forms there presently. We determine the terrigenous sources since 140 ka to the drift using bulk sediment 40Ar- 39Ar and Nd isotopic analyses on the silt-sized (20-63 μm) terrigenous fraction from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 884 to reconstruct paleo-circulation patterns. There are large changes in both isotopic tracers, varying on glacial-interglacial cycles. During glacial intervals, bulk sediment 40Ar- 39Ar ages range between 40 and 80 Ma, while Nd isotopic values range from ɛNd = - 1 to + 2. During interglacial intervals, sediments become much younger and more radiogenic, with bulk sediment ages falling to 2-15 Ma and Nd isotopic values ranging between ɛNd = + 5 and + 9. These data and quantitative comparison to potential source rocks indicate that the young Kamchatkan and Aleutian Arcs, lying NW and NE of the Meiji Drift, contribute the majority of sediment during interglacials. Conversely, older source rocks, such as those drained by the Yukon River and northeast Russia are the dominant origin of sediments during glacials. Mixing model calculations suggest that as much as 35-45% of the sediment deposited in the Meiji Drift during glacials is from the Bering Sea. It remains unclear whether thermohaline-type circulation or focussing of Bering Sea flow lead to the glacial-interglacial sediment source changes observed here.

  18. Obliquity pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial terminations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-03-24

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past approximately 700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth's orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth's obliquity (approximately 40,000 yr; approximately 40 kyr), orbital eccentricity (approximately 100 kyr) and precessional (approximately 20 kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primarily because of random internal climate variability. Taking these two perspectives together, there are currently more than thirty different models of the seven late-Pleistocene glacial cycles. Here we present a statistical test of the orbital forcing hypothesis, focusing on the rapid deglaciation events known as terminations. According to our analysis, the null hypothesis that glacial terminations are independent of obliquity can be rejected at the 5% significance level, whereas the corresponding null hypotheses for eccentricity and precession cannot be rejected. The simplest inference consistent with the test results is that the ice sheets terminated every second or third obliquity cycle at times of high obliquity, similar to the original proposal by Milankovitch. We also present simple stochastic and deterministic models that describe the timing of the late-Pleistocene glacial terminations purely in terms of obliquity forcing.

  19. Glacial ocean circulation and stratification explained by reduced atmospheric temperature.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Malte F

    2017-01-03

    Earth's climate has undergone dramatic shifts between glacial and interglacial time periods, with high-latitude temperature changes on the order of 5-10 °C. These climatic shifts have been associated with major rearrangements in the deep ocean circulation and stratification, which have likely played an important role in the observed atmospheric carbon dioxide swings by affecting the partitioning of carbon between the atmosphere and the ocean. The mechanisms by which the deep ocean circulation changed, however, are still unclear and represent a major challenge to our understanding of glacial climates. This study shows that various inferred changes in the deep ocean circulation and stratification between glacial and interglacial climates can be interpreted as a direct consequence of atmospheric temperature differences. Colder atmospheric temperatures lead to increased sea ice cover and formation rate around Antarctica. The associated enhanced brine rejection leads to a strongly increased deep ocean stratification, consistent with high abyssal salinities inferred for the last glacial maximum. The increased stratification goes together with a weakening and shoaling of the interhemispheric overturning circulation, again consistent with proxy evidence for the last glacial. The shallower interhemispheric overturning circulation makes room for slowly moving water of Antarctic origin, which explains the observed middepth radiocarbon age maximum and may play an important role in ocean carbon storage.

  20. Glacial ocean circulation and stratification explained by reduced atmospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Malte F.

    2017-01-01

    Earth’s climate has undergone dramatic shifts between glacial and interglacial time periods, with high-latitude temperature changes on the order of 5–10 °C. These climatic shifts have been associated with major rearrangements in the deep ocean circulation and stratification, which have likely played an important role in the observed atmospheric carbon dioxide swings by affecting the partitioning of carbon between the atmosphere and the ocean. The mechanisms by which the deep ocean circulation changed, however, are still unclear and represent a major challenge to our understanding of glacial climates. This study shows that various inferred changes in the deep ocean circulation and stratification between glacial and interglacial climates can be interpreted as a direct consequence of atmospheric temperature differences. Colder atmospheric temperatures lead to increased sea ice cover and formation rate around Antarctica. The associated enhanced brine rejection leads to a strongly increased deep ocean stratification, consistent with high abyssal salinities inferred for the last glacial maximum. The increased stratification goes together with a weakening and shoaling of the interhemispheric overturning circulation, again consistent with proxy evidence for the last glacial. The shallower interhemispheric overturning circulation makes room for slowly moving water of Antarctic origin, which explains the observed middepth radiocarbon age maximum and may play an important role in ocean carbon storage.

  1. Reconciling Glacial Snow Lines With Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, S. J.; Lohmann, G.

    Reconstructions of tropical snow lines during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago are incompatible with the sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions of the CLIMAP project, when assuming present day atmospheric lapse rates (e.g. Pe- teet and Rind 1985). Since proxy data for the vertical structure of the atmosphere during glacial times do not exist, numerical experiments with an atmospheric gen- eral circulation model for glacial and interglacial climates have been performed. Our model experiments reveal that slightly cooler tropical SSTs relative to the ones by CLIMAP (1981) are sufficient to simulate proper glacial freezing temperature levels. The depression of tropical snow lines in our LGM experiment can be attributed to two effects: Less moisture content provides an increased environmental lapse rate in the free atmosphere. This effect is strongest in the tropical middle troposphere where we observe an additional two degrees cooling. Secondly, the surface temperature near tropical glaciers is further cooled by a longer duration of snow cover. Our model result provides a consistent view of the last glacial maximum climate with much colder tem- peratures than today in the tropical mountains in concordance with moderate lowering of tropical SSTs.

  2. Evaluating Object-Based Image Analysis on Glacial Micromorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, K. S.; Sjogren, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Micromorphology has recently been applied more in analyzing glacial sediments at a microscopic level. It provides additional information and details that may help to explain glacial processes in areas where macro- scale observations cannot yield sufficient information. However, the process of interpreting thin sections has been very subjective, and reaching general consensus about glacial processes is difficult. Remote sensing technology is increasingly helpful in the development and advancement of many sciences; the concepts that lie behind the technology in object cognition used in other fields, such as landscape ecology, can be applied to micromorphology. Similar to what has been done to landscape ecology in the past, automating the process of interpreting objects in glacial sediments may potentially simplify and decrease the subjectivity of the process. Definiens Professional 5 is an object-based image analysis program that imitates human cognitive methods; it is used in this study to identify objects apart from background matrices in multiple thin section images of glacial sediments. The program's initial results proved that more work was needed to be done for better results, but overall the software produced promising results. The method is repeatable and continues to generate consistent results with no bias or ambiguity, so the application of this method to micromorphology and other areas alike will be valuable.

  3. Full-glacial paleosols in perennially frozen loess sequences, Klondike goldfields, Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanborn, Paul T.; Smith, C. A. Scott; Froese, Duane G.; Zazula, Grant D.; Westgate, John A.

    2006-07-01

    Perennially frozen loess deposits in the Klondike goldfields include paleosols formed in full-glacial environments, correlated by Alaskan distal tephra with Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 2 and 4. Patterns of organic and inorganic carbon and clay distribution, microstructures, and profile morphologies indicate that soil formation occurred in a base-rich environment in which organic matter accreted predominantly as root detritus. At sites approximately 20 km apart, the expression of cryoturbation and ice wedge development decreases in strength upward in loess-paleosol sequences correlated with MIS 4, suggesting increasing aridity. Configurations of cryoturbation features and ice-wedge thaw unconformities, the presence of numerous ground squirrel burrows, and an absence of peat accumulation suggest that these substrates were predominantly well-drained, with active layers of equal or greater thickness than in modern soils on similar sites in the west-central Yukon. Some characteristics of these paleosols are similar to those of modern steppe and tundra soils, consistent with plant macrofossil evidence for local ecological diversity during full-glacial conditions in eastern Beringia.

  4. Modern glacial outwash sand along the Denali Fault: Thermochronological constraints on strike-slip fault and glacier interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, J.; Layer, P. W.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Vanlaningham, S.; Herreid, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    The interplay between tectonic and climatic processes on exhumation patterns is a fundamental question in current tectonic research. There has been a special focus on the affect of glacial processes on exhumation patterns in tectonically active orogens. Conclusions about exhumation extent related to late Cenozoic climatic forcing are often complicated by the possibility of movement along unknown ice-covered faults in glaciated mountain belts. In this study we investigate the interaction between glacial processes and the ice-covered Denali fault through detrital geochronology of modern glacier outwash sediments. The narrow high-relief Alaska Range provides a unique opportunity to examine the interaction of Pliocene-Quaternary glaciation with a known large-scale intercontinental strike-slip fault on long term exhumation patterns. Key attributes of the research area are a comprehensive bedrock thermochronology record of long-term rapid/deep exhumation (~24 Ma to present/~14 km), the orogen’s tectonic relationship with the ice covered Denali Fault, a preponderance of highly erosive surge-type glaciers along the Fault trace and a ~350 km transect of easily accessible sampling sites. By comparing U-Pb zircon emplacement ages (~70 Ma to ~38 Ma) and 40Ar/39Ar mica exhumation ages (~33 Ma to ~18 Ma) from bedrock samples with sub-glacial 40Ar/39Ar mica single grain fusion age distributions from glacial outwash sand we can differentiate between predicted cooling age patterns. We can distinguish between three different scenarios from the full data set: a) Outwash data slightly younger than bedrock data set-This would imply same trend as bedrock samples, where as biotite and muscovite samples get younger as you approach the Denali Fault in agreement with dip-slip on the Denali Fault is a significant contributor to topographic development in the region. b) Outwash data same or older then bedrock data set-This would imply structures splaying off the Denali Fault are

  5. The vegetation cover of New Zealand at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, Rewi; McGlone, Matt; Moar, Neville; Wilmshurst, Janet; Vandergoes, Marcus

    2013-08-01

    A new reconstruction of the vegetation cover for New Zealand at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is presented, based primarily on a database of 66 pollen site records and a more limited range of plant macrofossil and coleopteran records. Extensive forest is evident only from Auckland northwards. Conifer-broadleaf forest similar to that in the region today, but with Agathis australis scarce, persisted in the far north, whilst Nothofagus trees and a range of shrub taxa characterised the more open forests elsewhere in Northland. Survival of Nothofagus-dominated forest in coastal and exposed continental shelf locations to the southwest of Auckland and northwestern South Island is also indicated. Beyond these regions, vegetation cover comprised shrubland- and grassland-dominant communities, with the latter more prominent in eastern areas, to the south and presumably at higher altitudes. Nevertheless the survival of forest trees is indicated unambiguously in most regions apart from the eastern South Island. Thus the concept of 'micro glacial forest refugia' in New Zealand remains supported by this latest glacial vegetation reconstruction and we draw possible parallels with the developing but contentious concept of 'northern cryptic refugia' in Europe. Recent assertions that pollen and beetle reconstructions of the New Zealand LGM vegetation patterns diverge significantly are not supported by this analysis. Rather, the two proxies are readily reconciled if the term 'woody' as indicated by coleoptera is not restricted to tall forest trees but extended to the widespread woody shrub and small tree elements of the New Zealand flora. Regional distinctions in the LGM vegetation reconstruction concur broadly with the contemporary vegetation pattern, suggesting that, along with temperature depression and likely drier growing conditions, a zonal circulation regime with prominent southern westerly winds was important at 21 ka, as it is today. Pollen-climate modelling of the extent of

  6. Erosion and transport by Byrd Glacier, Antarctica during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, K. J.; Palmer, E. F.

    2013-02-01

    Glacial till samples from seven, modern-Holocene Byrd Glacier moraines were characterized using particle size analysis, sand petrography and detrital zircon geochronology and compared to Ross Sea tills deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum. The goal was to identify the paleoflow path for Byrd Glacier and assess the use of multiple provenance techniques. The coarse sand fraction of Byrd Glacier tills is dominated by lithic fragments of adjacent bedrock outcrops, except samples from the Lonewolf Nunataks, which have a higher proportion of mineral to lithic fragments, as well as a recognizable exotic component. Cluster analysis shows that Byrd Glacier tills, with the exception of the two Lonewolf Nunataks sites, do not cluster strongly with Ross Sea samples because they have a higher proportion of lithic fragments. This indicates that comminution must be an active subglacial process beneath East Antarctic outlet glaciers. Byrd Glacier tills are also typically coarser grained that Ross Sea tills and their maturity is a reflection of both glacial processes and rock type. Measured U/Pb ages of detrital zircons from Byrd Glacier tills range from Triassic to Archean (240-3540 Ma) with a dominance of grains 530-600 Ma. Ross Sea till samples show spatial variability in U/Pb age distributions, with the core sites west of the 180° longitude line showing similarity to most Byrd Glacier tills, whereas core NBP9407-39, east of 180° long., is dominated by ˜100 Ma grains. Ross Sea tills also contain a recognizable detrital zircon fraction eroded inland of the Transantarctic Mountains. Both provenance methods indicate that the ice flow line for Byrd Glacier during the LGM was to the east of Ross Island and extended on either side of Ross Bank, with the majority of ice flowing to the Ross Sea's Central Basin. Our analysis shows that sand petrography and detrital zircon U/Pb age spectra provide complementary datasets that produce similar ice flow reconstructions and reveal

  7. Ice Sheet Influences on the Pacific Northwest Marine Environment during the Last Glacial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, I. L.; Cosma, T.; Chang, A.; Pedersen, T.

    2006-12-01

    MD02-2496, retrieved from the continental slope of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (48°58.47N: 127°02.14W; 1190m water depth) is presently the highest resolution paleoclimatic record of the last glacial advance from the Pacific northwest. Detailed records of sediment grainsize, composition and flux alongside foraminiferal stable isotopes demonstrate that physical processes associated with ice sheet advance and retreat as well as proximity had a significant impact on the marine environment. Non-glacial sedimentation on the continental shelf during MIS 3 and the Holocene was dominated by biological processes, with high bulk sediment δ15N and organic carbon deposition occurring during warm intervals. This response is similar to other sites along the North American margin. At 30 Ka this relationship disappears when the first glacial-marine sediments of the Fraser Glaciation reach the continental slope. Regional δ18Owater shifted toward lighter values at 28.5 Ka either in response to a 1‰ decrease in local salinity or the shift of dominant precipitation from rain to snow in southern British Columbia. As the ice sheet became proximal to the site at 19 Ka, sedimentation rates increased from ~20-80cm kyr-1 to 200-460cm kyr-1 and relatively more medium to coarse silt was deposited. This interval is also distinguished by cyclic sedimentation with a periodicity of ~80 years suggestive of solar or lunar cycles, however, the proximity to ice filled fjords also make jokulhlaups a possibility. Extremely high sedimentation rates suggest coastal waters were highly turbidduring this interval. which must have affected phytoplankton growth. Yet high carbonate fluxes demonstrate there was sufficient food available for zooplankton such as foraminifera to thrive. Ice sheet retreat began around 17 Ka marked by the appearance of ice rafted detritus (IRD) that increased in abundance until 16.2 when IRD deposition abruptly ceased and % fine silt increased. During this same

  8. Timing of Pleistocene glacial oscillations recorded in the Cantabrian Mountains (North Iberia): correlation of glacial and periglacial sequences from both sides of the range using a multiple-dating method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimón; Bourlès, Didier

    2015-04-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains is a coastal mountain range up to 2648 m altitude located at 43oN latitude and directly influenced by the North Atlantic climate oscillations. Although nowadays it is fully deglaciatied, glacial sediments and landforms are clearly preserved elsewhere above 1600 m. Particularly, glacial evidence in the central Cantabrian Mountains suggests the formation of an icefield in the headwaters of the Porma and Esla catchments drained by glaciers up to 1-6 km in length in the northern slope and 19 km-long in the southern slope, with their fronts at minimum altitudes of 900 and 1150 m asl respectively (Rodríguez-Rodríguez et al., 2014). Numerical ages obtained from the base of the Brañagallones ice-dammed deposit and one of the lateral moraines that are damming this deposit suggest that the local glacial maximum was prior to ca 33.5 cal ka BP in the Monasterio Valley (see data compiled in Rodriguez-Rodríguez et al., in press). Currently, our research is focused on developing a full chronology of glacial oscillations in both sides of the range and investigating their paleoclimate significance and relationship with glacial asymmetry through the combined use of surface exposure, OSL and radiocarbon dating methods. In this work, we present 47 10Be surface exposure ages obtained from boulders in moraines, glacial erratic boulders and rock glaciers in the Monasterio and Porma valleys. The glacial record of these valleys was chosen because of: (i) its good preservation state; (ii) the occurrence of a quartz-rich sandstone formation; and (iii) the availability of previous 14C and OSL numerical ages. Sampling sites were selected considering the relative age of glacial stages to cover as complete as possible the history of Pleistocene glaciations in the studied area, from the glacial maximum stage to the prevalence of periglacial conditions. Preliminary results suggest the occurrence of several glacial advances of similar extent at ca 150 - 50 ka followed

  9. Glacial geology of the Hellas region on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Robert G.; Johnson, Natasha

    1991-01-01

    A glacial geologic interpretation was recently presented for Argyre, which is herein extended to Hellas. This glacial event is believed to constitute an important link in a global cryohydric epoch of Middle Amazonian age. At glacial maximum, ice apparently extended far beyond the regions of Argyre and Hellas, and formed what is termed as the Austral Ice Sheet, an agglomeration of several ice domes and lobes including the Hellas Lobe. It is concluded that Hellas was apparently heavily glaciated. Also glaciation was young by Martian standards (Middle Amazonian), and ancient by terrestrial standards. Glaciation appears to have occurred during the same period that other areas on Mars were experiencing glaciation and periglacial activity. Glaciation seems to have occurred as a geological brief epoch of intense geomorphic activity in an era characterized by long periods of relative inactivity.

  10. GLOF, Glacial Lake Mapping an ESA DUE Innovator 2 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmann, Andreas; Strozzi, Tazio; Kaab, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Glacier lake outbursts have repeatedly been the cause of major fatal events and damage in, for instance, the Himalayas, Central Asia, Andes, Caucasus, and the European Alps. The related hazards may even currently increase due to climate change as glaciers worldwide retreat and leave under certain circumstances glacier lakes behind. As a particularly far-reaching glacier- related hazard, glacier lake outburst floods may have devastating impact on populated areas that are located far downstream of the source area. Glacial lakes are often located in inaccessible areas, or can only be accessed with a substantial effort and cost to investigate their condition. While e.g. in Switzerland a network is setup to monitor glacier changes and help prevent glacial hazards, large and inaccessible areas e.g. in the Pamir and Himalayan mountains cannot be easily monitored from ground and air. Spaceborne remote sensing data are therefore a valuable and important information source to collect information on glacial lakes in these areas.

  11. Is rate of glacial retreat accelerated in Indian Himalaya? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya has one of the largest concentration of glaciers and rivers like Indus, Ganga and Bramhputra originate from this region. The snow and glacier melt is an important source of water for these rivers. However, this source of water may get affected in the near future due to changes in the cryosphere. Therefore, retreat of Himalayan glaciers are discussed extensively in scientific and public forums in India. Conventionally health of glaciers is assessed using changes in glacial length, as it is widely measured. However changes in glacial length and loss in areal extent near terminus needs to be interpreted carefully, as these changes can be influenced by numerous terrain and climatically sensitive parameters. The terrain parameters which can influence glacial retreat are slope, area altitude distribution, debris cover and orientation. In addition, climatically sensitive parameters like mass balance, glacial lakes and black carbon can also influence glacier retreat. These multiple influences can produce a complex pattern of glacial retreat. In this paper long-term glacier retreat in three river basins in the Indian Himalaya as Tista, Baspa and Parbati will be discussed. These basins are located in different climatically sensitive regions and each basin has unique dominant process of mass wasting. In addition to terrain parameters, influence of process like formation and expansion of moraine dammed lakes in Tista basin, deposition of black carbon on accumulation area in Baspa basin and debris cover in Parbati basin will also be discussed. This will provide understanding on varying influence of different mass wasting processes on glacial retreat during last five decades in the Indian Himalaya.

  12. Productivity of the glacial ocean: Discussion of the iron hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, W.H. ); Wefer, G. )

    1991-12-01

    An increase in the productivity of the glacial-age Southern Ocean has been postulated to explain the decrease in pCO{sub 2} of the atmosphere observed in ice cores. A plausible mechanism has been proposed elsewhere that productivity is limited by the availability of Fe in this region and that the greater supply of eolian dust during glacial time removed this limit. Recently published evidence from cores from the Southern Ocean suggests that in fact there was no change in productivity in the assumed manner. Glacial-age productivity was indeed greatly increased in the equatorial Pacific and in the eastern boundary upwelling systems. The cause, presumably, was the mechanical action of glacial-age winds rather than a greater supply of Fe. However, a role of increased supply of micronutrients from the continents in the increase of equatorial productivity during glacial time cannot be excluded. Such enhancement from increased supply of dust would have the interesting corollary of more efficient export transfer to depth, possibly contributing to nutrient depletion in glacial-age, deep intermediate waters. There is some indication, as well, of a general decrease in nutrient content in the tropical thermocline in the western Pacific during the last several million years, a depletion that may have been fostered by increasing supply of dust from emerging Asian highlands. Alternative explanations are available. The case for Fe as a major modifier of productivity and biogenic sedimentation on geological time scales cannot be made in the absence of criteria diagnostic for Fe supply as opposed to stirring and upwelling.

  13. Geometric dependency of Tibetan lakes on glacial runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, V. H.; Lindenbergh, R. C.; Menenti, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is an essential source of water for Southeast Asia. The runoff from its ~34 000 glaciers, which occupy an area of ~50 000 km2, feeds Tibetan lakes and major Asian rivers like the Indus and Brahmaputra. Reported glacial shrinkage likely has an impact on the runoff. Unfortunately, accurate quantification of glacial changes is difficult over the high-relief Tibetan Plateau. However, it has recently been shown that it is possible to directly assess water level changes of a significant number of the ~900 Tibetan lakes with an area over 1 km2. This paper exploits different remote sensing products to create drainage links between Tibetan glaciers, lakes and rivers. The results allow us to differentiate between lakes with and without outlet. In addition, we introduce the notion of geometric dependency of a lake on glacial runoff, defined as the ratio between the total area of glaciers draining into a lake and the total area of the lake catchment. We determined these dependencies for all ~900 sufficiently large Tibetan lakes. To do so, we combined three remote sensing products: the CAREERI glacier mask product, a lake mask product based on the MODIS MOD44W water product and the HydroSHEDS river network product derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data. Using a drainage network analysis, we determined all drainage links between glaciers and lakes. The results show that 25.3% of the total glacier area directly drains into one of 244 Tibetan lakes. The results also give the geometric dependency of each lake on glacial runoff. For example, there are ten lakes with direct glacial runoff from at least 240 km2 of glacier. Three case studies, including one of the well-studied Nam Tso Lake, demonstrate how the geometric dependency of a lake on glacial runoff can be directly linked to hydrological processes.

  14. Geometric dependency of Tibetan lakes on glacial runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, V. H.; Lindenbergh, R. C.; Menenti, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan plateau is an essential source of water for South-East Asia. The run-off from its ~ 34 000 glaciers, which occupy an area of ~ 50 000 km2, feed Tibetan lakes and major Asian rivers like Indus and Brahmaputra. Reported glacial shrinkage likely has its impact on the run-off. Unfortunately, accurate quantification of glacial changes is difficult over the high relief Tibetan plateau. However, it has been recently shown that it is possible to directly assess water level changes of a significant part of the ~ 900 Tibetan lakes greater than one square kilometer. This paper exploits different remote sensing products to explicitly create links between Tibetan glaciers, lakes and rivers. The results allow us first to differentiate between lakes with and without outlet. In addition, we introduce the notion of geometric dependency of a lake on glacial runoff, defined as the ratio between the total area of glaciers draining into a lake and the area of the catchment of the lake. These dependencies are determined for all ~ 900 Tibetan lakes. To obtain these results, we combine the so-called CAREERI glacier mask, a lake mask based on the MODIS MOD44W water product and the HydroSHEDS river network product derived from SRTM elevation data. Based on a drainage network analysis, all drainage links between glaciers and lakes are determined. The results show that 25.3% of the total glacier area directly drains into one of 244 Tibetan lakes. The results also give the geometric dependency of each lake on glacial runoff. For example, there are 10~lakes with direct glacial runoff from at least 240 km2 of glacier. Three case studies, including one over the well-studied Nam Tso, demonstrate how the geometric dependency of a lake on glacial runoff can be directly linked to hydrological processes.

  15. Noble Gas Signatures in Greenland - Tracing Glacial Meltwater Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    This study is meant to explore the information noble gases can provide in glacial environments with respect to glacial meltwater sources, relative source contributions, water residence times, and spatial location where this glacial meltwater originates in the ice sheet. Ultimately, we seek to improve our understanding on the dynamics of these massive ice sheets, critical for the major role they play on climate change. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) allowing for calculation of noble gas temperatures (NGTs) and, under certain assumptions, estimation of the altitude at which glacial meltwater originated. In addition, crustally produced isotopes such as He accumulate in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. Glacial meltwater samples were collected and analyzed for noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios at five different locations in southern Greenland, between sea level and 1221 m. All samples are enriched in He with respect to ASW and are depleted in all other noble gases. Two patterns are apparent. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, a pattern first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands. The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, a pattern first observed in Michigan rainwater samples. Most samples point to equilibration temperatures at ~0°C and altitudes between 1000 m and 2000 m, values which are consistent with both temperatures and elevations in Greenland. He concentrations vary between 1.1 and 7 times that of ASW and suggest glacial meltwater ages between ~170 and 1150 yrs, a result which is consistent with a preliminary tritium analysis. He isotopes point to surface (precipitation as snow and rainfall) contributions for most samples between ~60% and 90% with a ~10% - 40% crustal contribution from groundwater.

  16. Retreat history of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Verleyen, Elie; O'Brien, Philip E.; White, Duanne A.; Jones, R. Selwyn; McKay, Robert; Dunbar, Robert; Gore, Damian B.; Fink, David; Post, Alexandra L.; Miura, Hideki; Leventer, Amy; Goodwin, Ian; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Lilly, Katherine; Crosta, Xavier; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Wagner, Bernd; Berg, Sonja; van Ommen, Tas; Zwartz, Dan; Roberts, Stephen J.; Vyverman, Wim; Masse, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) is the largest continental ice mass on Earth, and documenting its evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is important for understanding its present-day and future behaviour. As part of a community effort, we review geological evidence from East Antarctica that constrains the ice sheet history throughout this period (˜30,000 years ago to present). This includes terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dates from previously glaciated regions, 14C chronologies from glacial and post-glacial deposits onshore and on the continental shelf, and ice sheet thickness changes inferred from ice cores and continental-scale ice sheet models. We also include new 14C dates from the George V Land - Terre Adélie Coast shelf. We show that the EAIS advanced to the continental shelf margin in some parts of East Antarctica, and that the ice sheet characteristically thickened by 300-400 m near the present-day coastline at these sites. This advance was associated with the formation of low-gradient ice streams that grounded at depths of >1 km below sea level on the inner continental shelf. The Lambert/Amery system thickened by a greater amount (800 m) near its present-day grounding zone, but did not advance beyond the inner continental shelf. At other sites in coastal East Antarctica (e.g. Bunger Hills, Larsemann Hills), very little change in the ice sheet margin occurred at the LGM, perhaps because ice streams accommodated any excess ice build up, leaving adjacent, ice-free areas relatively unaffected. Evidence from nunataks indicates that the amount of ice sheet thickening diminished inland at the LGM, an observation supported by ice cores, which suggest that interior ice sheet domes were ˜100 m lower than present at this time. Ice sheet recession may have started ˜18,000 years ago in the Lambert/Amery glacial system, and by ˜14,000 years ago in Mac.Robertson Land. These early pulses of deglaciation may have been responses to abrupt sea-level rise

  17. Environmental transformations and cultural changes: A multidisciplinary case study for the Late Glacial and Final Palaeolithic from Northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, F.; Tolksdorf, J. F.; Viehberg, F.; Schwarz, A.; von Bramann, U.; Bittmann, F.; Kaiser, K.; Schwalb, A.; Staesche, U.; Breest, K.; Pott, R.; Veil, S.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to younger periods, studies integrating archaeological and environmental records for the Palaeolithic are still rare. Especially our knowledge about interactions between the drastic climatic/environmental changes and cultural developments during the Late Glacial is very limited. This multidisciplinary case study from river Jeetzel, a western Elbe tributary in Northern Germany, combines high resolution palaeoenvironmental investigations with fine-scaled archaeological research on stratified and surface sites. Various dating methods (palynostratigraphy, radiocarbon- and OSL-dating) and analyses of environmental and climatological proxies (pollen and plant macro-remains, ostracods, diatoms and green algae) on river palaeochannel sediments allow detailed reconstruction of interactions between Late Glacial climate, vegetation and fluvial developments. Biostratigraphical analyses on stratified archaeological sites and dating of charcoal / bone fragments from artefact scatters place the Late Palaeolithic occupation of Early Federmesser groups in an environmental context. Thus the former production of hitherto unknown amber art (amongst others a figurine representing a moose) can be ascribed to the Older Dryas and Early Allerød, which are the periods of main Late Glacial afforestation. Therewith our investigations suggest that Final Palaeolithic cultural changes may have been triggered by climatic and environmental transformations.

  18. Incomplete separability of Antarctic plate rotation from glacial isostatic adjustment deformation within geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Matt A.; Whitehouse, Pippa L.; van der Wal, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Geodetic measurements of Antarctic solid Earth deformation include signals from plate rotation and glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Through simulation, we investigate the degree to which these signals are separable within horizontal GPS site velocities that commonly define plate rotation estimates and that promise new constraints on models of GIA. Using a suite of GIA model predictions that incorporate both 1-D and 3-D Earth rheologies, we show that, given the present location of GPS sites within East Antarctica, unmodelled or mismodelled GIA signal within GPS velocities produces biased estimates of plate rotation. When biased plate rotation is removed from the GPS velocities, errors as large as 0.8 mm yr-1 are introduced; a value commonly larger than the predicted GIA signal magnitude. In the absence of reliable forward models of plate rotation or GIA then Antarctic geodetic velocities cannot totally and unambiguously constrain either process, especially GIA.

  19. The role of ocean-atmosphere reorganizations in glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.

    A case is made that glacial-to-interglacial transitions involve major reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. Such reorganizations constitute jumps between stable modes of operation which cause changes in the greenhouse gas content and albedo of the atmosphere. Only in this way can the rapidity of glacial terminations, the hemispheric synchroneity and symmetry of mountain glaciation, and the large polar air temperature and dustiness variations be accounted for. If these reorganizations are driven in some fashion by orbitally induced seasonal insolation changes, then the connection between insolation and climate is most likely through impacts of fresh water transport on the ocean's salinity distribution.

  20. The role of ocean-atmosphere reorganizations is glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.

    1989-10-01

    A case is made that glacial-to-interglacial transitions involve major reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. Such reorganizations constitute jumps between stable modes of operation which cause changes in the greenhouse gas content and albedo of the atmosphere. Only in this way can the rapidity of glacial terminations, the hemispheric synchroneity and symmetry of mountain glaciation, and the large polar air temperature and dustiness variations be accounted for. If these reorganizations are driven in some fashion by orbitally induced seasonal insolation changes, then the connection between insolation and climate is most likely through impacts of fresh water transport on the ocean's salinity distribution.

  1. The last glacial-Holocene transition in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Bennett, K D; Haberle, S G; Lumley, S H

    2000-10-13

    Warming at the last glacial termination in the North Atlantic region was interrupted by a period of renewed glacial activity during the Younger Dryas chronozone (YDC). The underlying mechanism of this cooling remains elusive, but hypotheses turn on whether it was a global or a North Atlantic phenomenon. Chronological, sedimentological, and palaeoecological records from sediments of small lakes in oceanic southern Chile demonstrate that there was no YDC cooling in southern Chile. It is therefore likely that there was little or no cooling in southern Pacific surface waters and hence that YDC cooling in the North Atlantic was a regional, rather than global, phenomenon.

  2. Variability of neodymium isotopes associated with planktonic foraminifera in the Pacific Ocean during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Bostock, Helen C.; Crowhurst, Simon; Rennie, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The deep Pacific Ocean holds the largest oceanic reservoir of carbon which may interchange with the atmosphere on climatologically important timescales. The circulation of the deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), however, is not well understood. Neodymium (Nd) isotopes of ferromanganese oxide coatings precipitated on planktonic foraminifera are a valuable proxy for deep ocean water mass reconstruction in paleoceanography. In this study, we present Nd isotope compositions (εNd) of planktonic foraminifera for the Holocene and the LGM obtained from 55 new sites widely distributed in the Pacific Ocean. The Holocene planktonic foraminiferal εNd results agree with the proximal seawater data, indicating that they provide a reliable record of modern bottom water Nd isotopes in the deep Pacific. There is a good correlation between foraminiferal εNd and seawater phosphate concentrations (R2 = 0.80), but poorer correlation with silicate (R2 = 0.37). Our interpretation is that the radiogenic Nd isotope is added to the deep open Pacific through particle release from the upper ocean during deep water mass advection and aging. The data thus also imply the Nd isotopes in the Pacific are not likely to be controlled by silicate cycling. In the North Pacific, the glacial Nd isotopic compositions are similar to the Holocene values, indicating that the Nd isotope composition of North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) remained constant (-3.5 to -4). During the LGM, the southwest Pacific cores throughout the water column show higher εNd corroborating previous studies which suggested a reduced inflow of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Pacific. However, the western equatorial Pacific deep water does not record a corresponding radiogenic excursion, implying reduced radiogenic boundary inputs during the LGM probably due to a shorter duration of seawater-particle interaction in a stronger glacial deep boundary current. A significant negative glacial εNd excursion is evident in

  3. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, K.L.; Betancourt, J.L.; Riddle, B.R.; Van Devender, T. R.; Cole, K.L.; Geoffrey, Spaulding W.

    2000-01-01

    1 A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26-10 14C kyr BP or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ???4.0 14C kyr BP. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr BP. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr BP in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (???37??N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr BP. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture. ?? 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  4. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Kimberly L.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Riddle, Brett R.; Van Devender, Thomas R.; Cole, K.L.; Spaulding, W.G.

    2001-01-01

    1. A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26a??10 14C kyr bp or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ~4.0 14C kyr bp. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr bp. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr bp in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (~37A?N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr bp. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture.

  5. Sensitivity of Last Glacial Maximum climate to uncertainties in tropical and subtropical ocean temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.; Pisias, N.; Mix, A.

    2006-01-01

    The faunal and floral gradients that underlie the CLIMAP (1981) sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstructions for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) reflect ocean temperature gradients and frontal positions. The transfer functions used to reconstruct SSTs from biologic gradients are biased, however, because at the warmest sites they display inherently low sensitivity in translating fauna to SST and they underestimate SST within the euphotic zones where the pycnocline is strong. Here we assemble available data and apply a statistical approach to adjust for hypothetical biases in the faunal-based SST estimates of LGM temperature. The largest bias adjustments are distributed in the tropics (to address low sensitivity) and subtropics (to address underestimation in the euphotic zones). The resulting SSTs are generally in better agreement than CLIMAP with recent geochemical estimates of glacial-interglacial temperature changes. We conducted a series of model experiments using the GENESIS general atmospheric circulation model to assess the sensitivity of the climate system to our bias-adjusted SSTs. Globally, the new SST field results in a modeled LGM surface-air cooling relative to present of 6.4 ??C (1.9 ??C cooler than that of CLIMAP). Relative to the simulation with CLIMAP SSTs, modeled precipitation over the oceans is reduced by 0.4 mm d-1 (an anomaly -0.4 versus 0.0 mm d-1 for CLIMAP) and increased over land (an anomaly -0.2 versus -0.5 mm d-1 for CLIMAP). Regionally strong responses are induced by changes in SST gradients. Data-model comparisons indicate improvement in agreement relative to CLIMAP, but differences among terrestrial data inferences and simulated moisture and temperature remain. Our SSTs result in positive mass balance over the northern hemisphere ice sheets (primarily through reduced summer ablation), supporting the hypothesis that tropical and subtropical ocean temperatures may have played a role in triggering glacial changes at higher latitudes.

  6. Trends in stomatal density and 13C/12C ratios of Pinus flexilis needles during last glacial-interglacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van De Water, Peter K.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Betancourt, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of stomatal density and ?? 13C of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) needles (leaves) preserved in pack rat middens from the Great Basin reveal shifts in plant physiology and leaf morphology during the last 30,000 years. Sites were selected so as to offset glacial to Holocene climatic differences and thus to isolate the effects of changing atmospheric CO2 levels. Stomatal density decreased ~17 percent and ?? 13C decreased ~1.5 per mil during deglaciation from 15,000 to 12,000 years ago, concomitant with a 30 percent increase in atmospheric CO2. Water-use efficiency increased ~15 percent during deglaciation, if temperature and humidity were held constant and the proxy values for CO2 and ?? 13C of past atmospheres are accurate. The ??13C variations may help constrain hypotheses about the redistribution of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere during the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  7. A method for selecting potential geosites. The case of glacial geosites in the Chablais area (French and Swiss Prealps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Amandine; Reynard, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009, an Interreg IVA project (123 Chablais), dealing with the promotion of natural and cultural heritage in the Chablais area, has been developed. It is linked to the creation of the Chablais Geopark. In a context of development of smart forms of tourism, the objective was to develop a strategy promoting the glacial heritage to a wide public in an area where the glaciers have almost disappeared. The recognition of specific places as geoheritage is the result of a double process: a scientific one, based on more or less sophisticated methods, and a social one, that is the acknowledgment by the society. One of the first scientific tasks is to produce a list of "potential geosites" that will be assessed in more details. However, this selection is often a weak point of inventories. It often seems like a "black box" without any transparency. In this project (123 Chablais) we carried out an inventory of glacial geosites, using the method developed by Reynard et al. (2007, 2012). However, a method has been created to enlighten the selection process, and to enhance choices in geoheritage management. As it was not possible to consider all sites in the Chablais area, a mixed selection approach was developed, halfway between completeness and specificity (Martin, 2012). The first step was the creation of a list of "points of interest", established using different sources: literature review, fieldwork and use of GIS to cross information. A selection was then performed according to two criteria: correspondence with a glacial stage (time axis) and belonging to a type of forms (spatial axis). Finally, selected sites aimed at providing a representative overview of the regional glacial witnesses. Therefore, representative sites of the regional geology were selected as well as sites presenting regional peculiarities Temporal and spatial attributes were given to the 101 points of interest identified. From a temporal point of view, this inventory aimed at presenting the main

  8. Measuring water accumulation rates using GRACE data in areas experiencing glacial isostatic adjustment: The Nelson River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Huang, J.; Kamp, G.; Henton, J.; Mazzotti, S.; James, T. S.; Courtier, N.; Barr, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite-derived total water storage can be obscured by glacial isostatic adjustment. In order to solve this problem for the Nelson River drainage basin in Canada, a gravity rate map from 110 months (June 2002 to October 2011) of GRACE gravity data was corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment using an independent gravity rate map derived from updated GPS vertical velocities. The GPS-based map was converted to equivalent gravity rate using a transfer function developed from GPS and absolute-g data at colocated sites. The corrected GRACE gravity rate map revealed a major positive anomaly within the drainage basin, which was independently shown by hydrological data to be due to changes in water storage. The anomaly represents a cumulative increase at its center of about 340 mm of water, reflecting a progression from extreme drought to extremely wet conditions.

  9. Reconstructing Oceanographic Conditions From the Holocene to the Last Glacial Maximum in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.

    2015-12-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 354 drilled 7 sites in the Bay of Bengal, providing a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of the link between glacial cycles, tropical oceanographic changes, and monsoon strength. Deep-sea sediment cores of the Bengal Fan fluctuate between sand, hemipelagic and terrestrial sediment layers. All but one of the sites (U1454) contain a layer of calcareous clay in the uppermost part of the core that is late Pleistocene in age. During Expedition 354 site U1452C was sampled at high resolution (every 2cm) by a broad group of collaborators with the goal of reconstructing monsoon strength and oceanographic conditions using a variety of proxies. The top 480 cm of site U1452C (8ºN, 87ºE, 3671m water depth) contains primarily nannofossil rich calcareous clay. The relatively high abundance of foraminifera will allow us to generate a high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) using standard foraminifera proxies. We will present oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mg/Ca data of mixed layer planktonic foraminifera from the top 70cm of the core, representing the Holocene to the last glacial maximum. δ18O of planktonic foraminifera records global ice volume and local SST and SSS, while Mg/Ca of foraminifera is a proxy for SST. The paired Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements on the same samples of foraminifera, together with published estimates with global ocean δ18O, can be used to reconstruct both SST and local δ18O of seawater, which is a function of the evaporation/precipitation balance. In future work, the local SSS and SST during the LGM will be paired with terrestrial and other oceanic proxies to increase our understanding of how global climate is connected to monsoon strength.

  10. Last Glacial - Present Glacial Activity in East Greenland Fjords Inferred from Swath Bathymetry and High-Resolution Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Laberg, J. S.; Husum, K.; Olsen, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    Swath bathymetry and high-resolution penetration echo sounder (chirp) data from fjords and sounds between Kong Oscars Fjord and Bredefjord, East Greenland, reveal glacial landforms and sedimentary processes that can be used to infer glacial activity from the last glacial to the present. Relatively straight, linear features oriented parallel to the fjord axes, as well as beyond the mouths of some fjords, are interpreted to be glacial lineations providing evidence of fast-flowing grounded ice draining the eastern parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial. In some areas, the glacial lineations are the only preserved glacigenic landfjorms (e.g. beyond the mouth of Bredefjord). However, in other areas, they are covered with multiple transverse ridges interpreted to be small terminal moraines (e.g. in Youngsund). Whereas the absence of such moraines is suggested to represent a rapid ice retreat due to lift-up and disintegration during parts of the deglaciation, their presence reflects that multiple halts and/or re-advances interrupted the retreat. Acoustically stratified sediment sequences dominate the fjord-fill stratigraphies (up to 180 ms two-way travel time). These deposits are suggested to reflect repeatedly changing lithological compositions in a glacimarine environment where deposition mainly occurred from suspension fall-out, in addition to ice rafting from icebergs calving off from tidewater glaciers, and sea ice. The stratified deposits form often relatively uniform drapes indicating that the tidewater glaciers were mainly located near the fjord heads since the last deglaciation. However, acoustically transparent bodies with irregular geometries, intercalated within the stratified deposits, occur in some of the inner fjords. These are suggested to be glacigenic sediment wedges (debris-flow lobes) that formed during relatively recent advances of tidewater glaciers (e.g. in Nordfjord and Moskusoksefjord).

  11. Morphologic Map of Glacial and Periglacial Features in the Northwestern Argyre Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, J.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.

    2010-03-01

    We produced a morphological map of the northwestern rim of the Argyre Basin with focus on glacial and periglacial features. We report on features such as gullies, pingo-like forms and glacial remnants which are observed.

  12. Glacial landforms of the southern Ungava Bay region (Canada): implications for the late-glacial dynamics and the damming of glacial Lake Naskaupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet played an important role in the late Pleistocene climate, notably through discharges of icebergs and meltwater. In this context, the Ungava Bay region in northern Quebec-Labrador appears particularly important, especially during the last deglaciation when the retreating ice margin dammed major river valleys, creating large proglacial lakes (e.g., McLean, aux Feuilles). The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador-Quebec ice dome. There are, however, large uncertainties regarding the position of its ice divide system through time, thereby limiting our understanding of the history of these glacial lakes. Here we focus on glacial and deglacial landforms present in the George River valley, south of Ungava Bay, in order to bring additional constraints on the late-glacial ice dynamics of this region, which also comprised glacial Lake Naskaupi. This work is based on surficial mapping using aerial photos and satellite imagery, combined with extensive fieldwork and sediment sampling. Our investigation showed significant differences in the distribution of glacial landforms across the region. The area east of the George River is characterized by well-developed Naskaupi shorelines while the elevated terrains show a succession of geomorphological features indicative of cold-based ice or ice with low basal velocities. In the easternmost part of this sector, ice flow directional data indicate that the ice was flowing towards ENE, against the regional slope. Eskers show paleocurrent directions indicating a general ice retreat from east to west. In the western part of this sector, near the George River valley, eskers are absent and the region is covered by felsenmeer and ground moraine that likely reflect the presence of a residual ice mass that was no longer dynamic. The presence of a stagnant ice represents the best mechanism to explain the formation of glacial lakes in the George River valley and its main

  13. Do post-glacial river valleys in northern New England store mill-dam legacy sediments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strouse, S.; Snyder, N. P.

    2010-12-01

    Dam-influenced floodplain morphology has not been studied extensively in post-glacial rivers with high densities of colonial-era milldams. Fluvial restoration in the eastern U.S. often focuses on understanding the natural, or pre-Colonial, floodplain processes. Recent work by Walter and Merritts (2008) in the piedmont of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region suggests milldams significantly impact sedimentation by creating surfaces composed of post-dam legacy sediment that are often abandoned by the river and function as fill terraces. This work has not yet been tested in a post-glacial environment. I analyze channel morphology and sedimentation patterns upstream of two breached dams on the Sheepscot River in Mid-Coastal Maine using lidar digital elevation models, historical aerial photographs, radiocarbon dating, and hydraulic modeling. In the past several decades, observable channel morphologic changes occurred at the two study sites: Maxcy’s Mills dam (built in 1809, it was 4-m high and breached in the late 1950s), and at Head Tide dam (built in the 1760s, it is 6-m high and was partially breached in 1952). The Sheepscot River is one of Maine’s eight rivers with native anadromous Atlantic salmon populations. Because Atlantic salmon are a federally listed endangered species, understanding the existence and transport of legacy sediment has become an important component of habitat restoration efforts in the region. The goal of this investigation is to determine the extent of legacy sediment in order to better understand how historical dam sites affect morphology and sediment transport in a post-glacial, low-gradient river system. Field and remote sensing analyses indicate that surfaces (up to 2-m high) composed of mud and sand function as floodplains 1.5-2.5 km upstream of both former dam sites. Preliminary analysis of seven radiocarbon dates from pieces of tree bark sampled from the stratigraphy (58-187 cm below the surface) of the two study sites suggest at least 1.8 m

  14. The vegetation and climate during the Last Glacial Cold Period, northern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, S. Louise; Newnham, Rewi M.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Smith, Carol

    2013-08-01

    Pollen assemblages from Howard Valley, South Island, New Zealand, were used to reconstruct the palaeovegetation and infer past climate during the period ca 38-21 cal. ka, which encompasses the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3/2 transition and Last Glacial Cold Period (LGCP). A glacier occupied the upper Howard Valley during the Last Glacial, whilst extensive glaciofluvial outwash surfaces were constructed in the lower valley. Episodic periods of fluvial aggradation and incision have produced a complex sequence of terraces flanking the main Howard River and its tributaries. Sedimentary sequences from three exposed valley fills, sampled for palynological analysis and radiocarbon dating, consist of a complex vertical and lateral arrangement of coarse textured cobbly sandy gravels interbedded with organic-rich silt deposits. Palynology of these organic-rich horizons was directly compared to an existing beetle record from these same horizons. During late MIS 3 the site was dominated by marshy shrubland vegetation interspersed with mixed beech forest, indicating temperatures ˜2-3 °C cooler than present. Climate cooling began as early as 35.7 cal. ka and coincides with evidence of cooling from other sites in New Zealand, South America and with an Antarctic cooling signature. A three phase vegetation and inferred climate pattern occurs at the site during the LGCP beginning with a transition to an alpine/sub-alpine grassland comparable to communities growing near treeline today marking the change to glacial conditions before 31 cal. ka. A small increase in tree abundance between ca 25.8 and 22.7 cal. ka suggests minor climate amelioration during the mid-LGCP. During this phase, a possible volcanically induced vegetation disruption caused by the deposition of the Kawakawa Tephra at 25 cal. ka is evident in the pollen record. This is followed by a further decline in tree pollen and increase in alpine grassland and herb pollen indicating further deterioration of conditions and a

  15. The Influence of Glacial Ice Sheets on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Through Atmospheric Circulation Change under Glacial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, S.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Oka, A.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that glacial ice sheets (Laurentide, Fennoscandian and Antarctic ice sheets) exert a large influence on the climate including the atmospheric circulation. Moreover, recent climate modeling studies suggest that glacial ice sheets have a large impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the process by which the ice sheets impact on the AMOC is not yet fully understood. On the other hand, recent studies showed that surface wind changes play a crucial role on changes to the AMOC under glacial climate. Therefore, in this study, we investigate in detail, the process by which the ice sheet modifies the AMOC through surface wind change. Here we conduct numerical experiments using an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) separately. Our method consists of 2 steps. First, from AGCM experiments, we evaluate the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind. Second, from OGCM experiments, we evaluate the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC by applying the surface wind change as a boundary condition, while leaving other boundary conditions (surface heat and water fluxes) unchanged. In addition, we conduct several sensitivity experiments. Using the AGCM, we explore individual ice sheet effect, ice sheet topography effect and albedo effect on surface wind change. Moreover, using the OGCM, we change the surface wind gradually or apply the surface wind change only at a specific region in order to explore the wind change effect in detail. We find that glacial ice sheets largely intensify the AMOC by surface wind change under glacial climate. Compare to other regions, it reveals that the wind change at the North Atlantic (NA) is a key region. There, the northern glacial ice sheet topography intensifies the Icelandic Low and anti-cyclonic circulation over the Laurentide ice sheet. However, this wind effect is effective only when the NA is not widely covered by sea ice

  16. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  17. Terrestrial glacial eskers: Analogs for Martian sinuous ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    A glacial model was introduced last year for the Argyre region, a concept which is now extended, and which was recently integrated with a Global Hydrologic Model incorporating many other aspects of Martian geology. Despite wide agreement that the Martian ridges strongly resemble glacial eskers, this hypothesis has been presented with great equivocation due to a perceived lack of other glacial landforms. Quite to the contrary, it is shown that the Martian ridges actually do occur in logical ordered sequences with many other types of characteristically glacial appearing landforms. Herein, the esker hypothesis is further supported in isolation from considerations of regional landform assemblages. It is concluded that Martian sinuous ridges are similar in every respect to terrestrial eskers: scale, morphology, planimetric pattern, and associations with other probable glaciogenic landforms. It is found that the esker hypothesis is well supported. Eskers are glaciofluvial structures, and owe their existence to large scale melting of stagnant temporate glaciers. Thus, eskers are indicators of an ameliorating climatic regime after a protracted episode of cold, humid conditions.

  18. Glacial melting: an overlooked threat to Antarctic krill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Verónica; Alurralde, Gastón; Meyer, Bettina; Aguirre, Gastón E.; Canepa, Antonio; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Hass, H. Christian; Williams, Gabriela N.; Schloss, Irene R.

    2016-06-01

    Strandings of marine animals are relatively common in marine systems. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We observed mass strandings of krill in Antarctica that appeared to be linked to the presence of glacial meltwater. Climate-induced glacial meltwater leads to an increased occurrence of suspended particles in the sea, which is known to affect the physiology of aquatic organisms. Here, we study the effect of suspended inorganic particles on krill in relation to krill mortality events observed in Potter Cove, Antarctica, between 2003 and 2012. The experimental results showed that large quantities of lithogenic particles affected krill feeding, absorption capacity and performance after only 24 h of exposure. Negative effects were related to both the threshold concentrations and the size of the suspended particles. Analysis of the stomach contents of stranded krill showed large quantities of large particles ( > 106 μm3), which were most likely mobilized by glacial meltwater. Ongoing climate-induced glacial melting may impact the coastal ecosystems of Antarctica that rely on krill.

  19. Ecology of invasive Melilotus alba on Alaskan glacial river floodplains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White sweetclover has recently invaded glacial river floodplains in Alaska. We sampled vegetation and measured environmental variables along transects located along the Nenana, Matanuska, and Stikine Rivers to describe plant communities and to determine the effects of white sweetclover on other plan...

  20. Glacial melting: an overlooked threat to Antarctic krill

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Verónica; Alurralde, Gastón; Meyer, Bettina; Aguirre, Gastón E.; Canepa, Antonio; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Hass, H. Christian; Williams, Gabriela N.; Schloss, Irene R.

    2016-01-01

    Strandings of marine animals are relatively common in marine systems. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We observed mass strandings of krill in Antarctica that appeared to be linked to the presence of glacial meltwater. Climate-induced glacial meltwater leads to an increased occurrence of suspended particles in the sea, which is known to affect the physiology of aquatic organisms. Here, we study the effect of suspended inorganic particles on krill in relation to krill mortality events observed in Potter Cove, Antarctica, between 2003 and 2012. The experimental results showed that large quantities of lithogenic particles affected krill feeding, absorption capacity and performance after only 24 h of exposure. Negative effects were related to both the threshold concentrations and the size of the suspended particles. Analysis of the stomach contents of stranded krill showed large quantities of large particles ( > 106 μm3), which were most likely mobilized by glacial meltwater. Ongoing climate-induced glacial melting may impact the coastal ecosystems of Antarctica that rely on krill. PMID:27250339

  1. Volcanic fire and glacial ice: Mount Rogers National Recreation Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    In addition to containing the highest point in Virginia (Mount Rogers, elevation 5,729 feet), the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area (NRA) of the Jefferson National Forest is a window on the history of ancient volcanic eruptions and glacial movement.

  2. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial

    PubMed Central

    Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344

  3. Glacial isostatic stress shadowing by the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Klemann, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous examples of fault slip that offset late Quaternary glacial deposits and bedrock polish support the idea that the glacial loading cycle causes earthquakes in the upper crust. A semianalytical scheme is presented for quantifying glacial and postglacial lithospheric fault reactivation using contemporary rock fracture prediction methods. It extends previous studies by considering differential Mogi-von Mises stresses, in addition to those resulting from a Coulomb analysis. The approach utilizes gravitational viscoelastodynamic theory and explores the relationships between ice mass history and regional seismicity and faulting in a segment of East Antarctica containing the great Antarctic Plate (Balleny Island) earthquake of 25 March 1998 (Mw 8.1). Predictions of the failure stress fields within the seismogenic crust are generated for differing assumptions about background stress orientation, mantle viscosity, lithospheric thickness, and possible late Holocene deglaciation for the D91 Antarctic ice sheet history. Similar stress fracture fields are predicted by Mogi-von Mises and Coulomb theory, thus validating previous rebound Coulomb analysis. A thick lithosphere, of the order of 150-240 km, augments stress shadowing by a late melting (middle-late Holocene) coastal East Antarctic ice complex and could cause present-day earthquakes many hundreds of kilometers seaward of the former Last Glacial Maximum grounding line.

  4. Alaskan mountain glacial melting observed by satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Tapley, B. D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2006-08-01

    We use satellite gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) as an indication of mass change to study potential long-term mountain glacial melting in southern Alaska and West Canada. The first 3.5 yr of GRACE monthly gravity data, spanning April 2002-November 2005, show a prominent glacial melting trend in the mountain regions around the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). GRACE-observed surface mass changes correlate remarkably well with available mass balance data at Gulkana and Wolverine, two benchmark glaciers of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), although the GRACE signals are smaller in magnitude. In addition, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes estimated from an advanced land surface model show significant mass loss in this region during the same period. After correcting for the leakage errors and removing TWS contributions using model estimates, we conclude that GRACE-observed glacial melting in the GOA mountain region is equivalent to ˜ - 101 ± 22 km 3/yr, which agrees quite well with the assessment of ˜ - 96 ± 35 km 3/yr based on airborne laser altimetry data, and is consistent with an earlier estimate based on the first 2 yr of GRACE data. This study demonstrates the significant potentials of satellite gravity measurements for monitoring mountain glacial melting and regional climate change.

  5. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, C J; Turney, C S M; Hutchinson, D K; Taschetto, A S; England, M H

    2015-06-26

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65 °N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5 °C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.

  6. Sulfur/Carbonate Springs and Life in Glacial Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Grasby, S.; Longazo, T.

    2001-01-01

    Glacial springs are useful analogs to channels and seeps issuing from frozen strata on Mars. Mineralized water can move through, and discharge from, solid ice. This water, even near freezing, can support microbial life and bring it to the surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Vegetation and climate changes in western Amazonia during a previous Interglacial- Glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. L.; Gosling, W. D.; Sherlock, S. C.; Poole, I.; Pennington, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Amazonia is one of the most biodiverse areas of the world and its vegetation plays a crucial role in controlling the global climate through the regulation of the levels of atmospheric CO2. However, Amazonian ecosystems and their role in the climate system are threatened by ongoing the human impact (already estimated loss of 60% of the species in western Amazonia) and predicted climate change (+1.1-6.4oC by 2100). Unfortunately, there is absence of data relating to the ecological baseline function and response to global climate change of western Amazonian ecosystems in the absence of humans. To help anticipate the impact of future climate change predictions an improved understanding of the natural responses of tropical vegetation to known past climate change is required. Here we present the first study that shows the response of pristine tropical ecosystems in western Amazonia biodiversity hotspot to a major global climate change event (a Quaternary Interglacial-Glacial transition). Pleistocene lake/swamp sediments preserved at the Erazo study site (Lat. 00o 33’S, Long. 077o 52’W, 1927m alt.) today within tropical cloud forest vegetation provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of past climate shifts. The sediment are >40,000 years old (radiocarbon infinite) and younger than 1 million years (presence of Alder biomarker) and consist of organic layers interbedded with volcanic ash (tephra). This study presents data from multiple proxies (fossil pollen, wood macrofossils and charcoal) to establish a comprehensive picture of regional and local vegetation change prior to human arrival. Our data show a change of vegetation from palm-dominated forest indicative of warm and wet conditions similar to the present at the base of this record, to a forest dominated by Podocarpus sp. suggesting cold and wet conditions at the top of the record. The transition between these two vegetation communities appears to be progressive with small sharp changes along the

  8. Oxygen-isotope variations in post-glacial Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyniuk, Ryan; Longstaffe, Fred J.

    2016-02-01

    The role of glacial meltwater input to the Atlantic Ocean in triggering the Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event has been the subject of controversy in recent literature. Lake Ontario is ideally situated to test for possible meltwater passage from upstream glacial lakes and the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) to the Atlantic Ocean via the lower Great Lakes. Here, we use the oxygen-isotope compositions of ostracode valves and clam shells from three Lake Ontario sediment cores to identify glacial meltwater contributions to ancient Lake Ontario since the retreat of the LIS (∼16,500 cal [13,300 14C] BP). Differences in mineralogy and sediment grain size are also used to identify changes in the hydrologic regime. The average lakewater δ18O of -17.5‰ (determined from ostracode compositions) indicates a significant contribution from glacial meltwater. Upon LIS retreat from the St. Lawrence lowlands, ancient Lake Ontario (glacial Lake Iroquois) lakewater δ18O increased to -12‰ largely because of the loss of low-18O glacial meltwater input. A subsequent decrease in lakewater δ18O (from -12 to -14‰), accompanied by a median sediment grain size increase to 9 μm, indicates that post-glacial Lake Ontario received a final pulse of meltwater (∼13,000-12,500 cal [11,100-10,500 14C] BP) before the onset of hydrologic closure. This meltwater pulse, which is also recorded in a previously reported brief freshening of the neighbouring Champlain Valley (Cronin et al., 2012), may have contributed to a weakening of thermohaline circulation in the Atlantic Ocean. After 12,900 cal [11,020 14C] BP, the meltwater presence in the Ontario basin continued to inhibit entry of Champlain seawater into early Lake Ontario. Opening of the North Bay outlet diverted upper Great Lakes water from the lower Great Lakes causing a period (12,300-8300 cal [10,400-7500 14C] BP) of hydrologic closure in Lake Ontario (Anderson and Lewis, 2012). This change is demarcated by a shift to higher δ18Olakewater

  9. Large spatial variations in glacial erosion detected with detrital thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, T. A.; Stock, G. M.; Farley, K. A.; Densmore, M. S.; Rushlow, C.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of drainage basin erosion and landform evolution are often limited by not knowing where sediment is sourced from and how climate change influences catchment erosion. Detrital thermochronometer cooling ages collected from Quaternary glacial moraines and modern river sediments provide a promising tool to address these problems. We present an application of detrital thermochronology to quantify spatial variations in alpine glacial erosion during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Results are compared to the distribution of recent erosion recorded in samples from modern river sediments. The elevation dependence of detrital apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) ages is used as a sediment tracer to track the elevations where glacially eroded sediment is produced from bedrock. We measured ~204 AHe single grain ages from three moraines located between 2.3 and 3.7 km elevation in the Lone Pine catchment, Sierra Nevada, California. Ages from the lowest elevation moraine were measured on fine (<250 um) and coarse (>250 um) grained fractions of the sample to assess potential variations in sediment supply from different erosional processes. Measured AHe age probability density functions (PDFs) were compared with predicted PDFs, calculated by convolving bedrock age-elevation relationships with catchment hypsometries clipped at different elevations to reflect variable source elevations of sediment. Statistical comparison of the PDFs using a Monte Carlo approach and Kuiper test are used to evaluate the spatial distribution of erosion in the catchments. Results from the lowest elevation moraine indicate sediment is produced from the lower ~50-70% of catchment elevations at the 95% confidence level, indicating erosion near the base and sides of the glacier proportionally outweigh erosion from higher elevation head wall retreat and rock fall onto the glacier. Furthermore, grain-age distributions from the fine and coarse grain fractions are virtually indistinguishable, suggesting either both

  10. Unprecedented last-glacial mass accumulation rates determined by luminescence dating of loess from western Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, H.M.; Muhs, D.R.; Wintle, A.G.; Duller, G.A.T.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A high-resolution chronology for Peoria (last glacial period) Loess from three sites in Nebraska, midcontinental North America, is determined by applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating to 35-50 ??m quartz. At Bignell Hill, Nebraska, an OSL age of 25,000 yr near the contact of Peoria Loess with the underlying Gilman Canyon Formation shows that dust accumulation occurred early during the last glacial maximum (LGM), whereas at Devil's Den and Eustis, Nebraska, basal OSL ages are significantly younger (18,000 and 21,000 yr, respectively). At all three localities, dust accumulation ended at some time after 14,000 yr ago. Mass accumulation rates (MARs) for western Nebraska, calculated using the OSL ages, are extremely high from 18,000 to 14,000 yr-much higher than those calculated for any other pre-Holocene location worldwide. These unprecedented MARs coincide with the timing of a mismatch between paleoenvironmental evidence from central North America, and the paleoclimate simulations from atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs). We infer that the high atmospheric dust loading implied by these MARs may have played an important role, through radiative forcing, in maintaining a colder-than-present climate over central North America for several thousand years after summer insolation exceeded present-day values. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  11. Potentially dangerous glacial lakes in Kyrgyzstan - Research overview of 2004-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansky, Bohumir; Yerokhin, Sergey; Sobr, Miroslav; Engel, Zbynek; Cerny, Michal; Falatkova, Kristyna; Kocum, Jan; Benes, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    Global warming causes intensive melting and retreat of glaciers in most of high mountains all over the world. This process is also evident in the mountain regions of central Tien Shan. Glacier melt water affects changes in hydrological regime of water streams and causes overfilling of high mountain lake basins. The dams of many lakes are very unstable and can burst open. To determine the degree of such risk, it is necessary to analyse the genesis of lakes, to characterize the morphology of the lake basins and to know the particularities of their hydrological regime. According to the latest inventory within territory of Kyrgyzstan, a total of 1328 lakes have been identified as potentially dangerous, 12 lakes are considered as currently dangerous, other 25 feature high potential hazard. Since 1952 more than 70 disastrous cases of lake outburst have been registered. The hazardous alpine lakes are studied in Kyrgyzstan systematically since 1966. Since 2004, Czech-Kyrgyz research team has been operating in Kyrgyzstan in the field of dangerous glacial lakes. Projects were focused primarily on high-mountain glacial lakes risk assessment, propositions of risk mitigation measures, establishment of permanent research station near one of the studied glacier complexes, preparation of risk analysis for selected endangered valleys, evaluation of climatic and hydrological data and glacier development within observed regions. The most significant portion of data and information has been gathered during field work, complemented by satellite image analysis and surveillance flights over the monitored sites.

  12. Interhemispheric climate links revealed by late-glacial cooling episode in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Moreno, P I; Jacobson, G L; Lowell, T V; Denton, G H

    2001-02-15

    Understanding the relative timings of climate events in the Northern and Southern hemispheres is a prerequisite for determining the causes of abrupt climate changes. But climate records from the Patagonian Andes and New Zealand for the period of transition from glacial to interglacial conditions--about 14.6-10 kyr before present, as determined by radiocarbon dating--show varying degrees of correlation with similar records from the Northern Hemisphere. It is necessary to resolve these apparent discrepancies in order to be able to assess the relative roles of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and oceanic, atmospheric and astronomical influences in initiating climate change in the late-glacial period. Here we report pollen records from three sites in the Lake District of southern Chile (41 degrees S) from which we infer conditions similar to modern climate between about 13 and 12.2 14C kyr before present (BP), followed by cooling events at about 12.2 and 11.4 14C kyr BP, and then by a warming at about 9.8 14C kyr BP. These events were nearly synchronous with important palaeoclimate changes recorded in the North Atlantic region, supporting the idea that interhemispheric linkage through the atmosphere was the primary control on climate during the last deglaciation. In other regions of the Southern Hemisphere, where climate events are not in phase with those in the Northern Hemisphere, local oceanic influences may have counteracted the effects that propagated through the atmosphere.

  13. Early and late Holocene glacial fluctuations and tephrostratigraphy, Cabin Lake, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zander, Paul D.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Kuehn, Stephen C.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Anderson, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Marked changes in sediment types deposited in Cabin Lake, near Cordova, Alaska, represent environmental shifts during the early and late Holocene, including fluctuations in the terminal position of Sheridan Glacier. Cabin Lake is situated to receive meltwater during periods when the outwash plain of the advancing Sheridan Glacier had aggraded. A brief early Holocene advance from 11.2 to 11.0 cal ka is represented by glacial rock flour near the base of the sediment core. Non-glacial lake conditions were restored for about 1000 years before the water level in Cabin Lake lowered and the core site became a fen. The fen indicates drier-than-present conditions leading up to the Holocene thermal maximum. An unconformity spanning 5400 years during the mid-Holocene is overlain by peat until 1110 CE when meltwater from Sheridan Glacier returned to the basin. Three intervals of an advanced Sheridan Glacier are recorded in the Cabin Lake sediments during the late Holocene: 1110–1180, 1260–1540 and 1610–1780 CE. The sedimentary sequence also contains the first five reported tephra deposits from the Copper River delta region, and their geochemical signatures suggest that the sources are the Cook Inlet volcanoes Redoubt, Augustine and Crater Peak, and possibly Mt Churchill in the Wrangell Volcanic field.

  14. Last Glacial mammals in South America: a new scenario from the Tarija Basin (Bolivia).

    PubMed

    Coltorti, M; Abbazzi, L; Ferretti, M P; Iacumin, P; Rios, F Paredes; Pellegrini, M; Pieruccini, P; Rustioni, M; Tito, G; Rook, L

    2007-04-01

    The chronology, sedimentary history, and paleoecology of the Tarija Basin (Bolivia), one of the richest Pleistocene mammalian sites in South America, are revised here based on a multidisciplinary study, including stratigraphy, sedimentology, geomorphology, paleontology, isotope geochemistry, and (14)C geochronology. Previous studies have indicated a Middle Pleistocene age for this classic locality. We have been able to obtain a series of (14)C dates encompassing all the fossil-bearing sequences previously studied in the Tarija Basin. The dated layers range in age from about 44,000 to 21,000 radiocarbon years before present (BP), indicating that the Tarija fauna is much younger than previously thought. Glacial advances correlated to marine isotopic stages (MIS) 4 and 2 (ca. 62 and 20 ka BP, respectively) are also documented at the base and at the very top of the Tarija-Padcaya succession, respectively, indicating that the Bolivian Altiplano was not dry but sustained an ice cap during the Last Glacial Maximum. The results of this multidisciplinary study enable us to redefine the chronological limits of the Tarija sequence and of its faunal assemblage and to shift this paleontological, paleoclimatological, and paleoecological framework to the time interval from MIS 4 to MIS 2.

  15. Authigenic uranium in Atlantic sediments of the last glacial stage — a diagenetic phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J.; Wallace, H. E.; Colley, S.; Toole, J.

    1990-05-01

    Cores from three different Atlantic localities (equatorial, Cape Verde Rise and Porcupine Abyssal Plain) are shown to have anomalous high U contents (5-8 ppm total) in sediments laid down during the last glacial stage (12-24 ky BP). Radiocarbon data demonstrate that the sediments hosting the peak U levels were accumulated at rates similar to those immediately above and below. All the cores exhibit maximum Mn levels, characteristic colour changes, and maximum U levels in the same sequence with increasing depth in core. On the evidence of the similarities between the cores, and pore water U data from a Porcupine Abyssal Plain site, it is proposed that the authigenic U enrichments are syndiagenetic and possibly active. No correlation is observed between sediment authigenic U and C org contents. The source of enrichment is bottom water U which has diffused downwards into the sediments to be sorbed at a particular redox level, located 10-30 cm below the oxic/post-oxic boundary marked by the colour change. The magnitude of the enrichments is caused by the persistence of this boundary at a particular level as a result of the decrease in mean sediment accumulation rate between the last glacial stage (5.2 up to at least 19.1 cm ky -1) and the Holocene (2.2-4.1 cm ky -1). Similar accumulation rate contrasts are expected to be widespread in the Atlantic, and the implications for previous reported work, particularly from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, are discussed.

  16. Evidence of late glacial paleoseismicity from submarine landslide deposits within Lac Dasserat, northwestern Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Gregory R.

    2016-09-01

    An integrated seismo- and chronostratigraphic investigation at Lac Dasserat, northwestern Quebec, identified 74 separate failures within eight event horizons. Horizons E and B, and H and G have strong or moderately-strong multi-landslide signatures, respectively, composed of 11-23 failures, while horizons F, D, C, and A have minor landslide signatures consisting of a single or pair of deposit(s). Cores collected at six sites recovered glacial Lake Ojibway varve deposits that are interbedded with the event horizons. The correlation of the varves to the regional Timiskaming varve series allowed varve ages or ranges of varve ages to be determined for the event horizons. Horizons H, G, E, and B are interpreted to be evidence of paleoearthquakes with differing levels of interpretative confidence, based on the relative strength of the multi-landslide signatures, the correlation to other disturbed deposits of similar age in the region, and the lack or possibility of alternative aseismic mechanisms. The four interpreted paleoearthquakes occurred between 9770 ± 200 and 8470 ± 200 cal yr BP, when glacial Lake Ojibway was impounded behind the Laurentide Ice Sheet during deglaciation. They probably represent an elevated period of seismicity at deglaciation that was driven by crustal unloading.

  17. Negligible glacial-interglacial variation in continental chemical weathering rates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Gavin L; Vance, Derek

    2006-12-14

    Chemical weathering of the continents is central to the regulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and hence global climate. On million-year timescales silicate weathering leads to the draw-down of carbon dioxide, and on millennial timescales chemical weathering affects the calcium carbonate saturation state of the oceans and hence their uptake of carbon dioxide. However, variations in chemical weathering rates over glacial-interglacial cycles remain uncertain. During glacial periods, cold and dry conditions reduce the rate of chemical weathering, but intense physical weathering and the exposure of carbonates on continental shelves due to low sea levels may increase this rate. Here we present high-resolution records of the lead isotope composition of ferromanganese crusts from the North Atlantic Ocean that cover the past 550,000 years. Combining these records with a simple quantitative model of changes in the lead isotope composition of the deep North Atlantic Ocean in response to chemical weathering, we find that chemical weathering rates were two to three times lower in the glaciated interior of the North Atlantic Region during glacial periods than during the intervening interglacial periods. This decrease roughly balances the increase in chemical weathering caused by the exposure of continental shelves, indicating that chemical weathering rates remained relatively constant on glacial-interglacial timescales. On timescales of more than a million years, however, we suggest that enhanced weathering of silicate glacial sediments during interglacial periods results in a net draw-down of atmospheric carbon dioxide, creating a positive feedback on global climate that, once initiated, promotes cooling and further glaciation.

  18. COMBINING COSMOGENIC BE, C, AL AND CL - Quantifying depth of glacial erosion and timing of deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsig, C.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Akcar, N.; Alfimov, V.; Kämpfer, C.; Schlüchter, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over the course of the next years, we are aiming to combine signals of cosmogenic Be-10, C-14, Al-26 and Cl-36 to constrain depth and rate of glacial erosion at several study sites in the Alps and to determine the timing of local deglaciation. Within this suite of nuclides, the system of Be is the best understood. It is routinely used and often combined with Al for various applications in Quaternary Geology, i.e. dating rock avalanches. Cl-36 is an important addition due to its unique depth profile: complicated production pathways cause the maximum concentration not to form at the top of the rock, but at a depth of some centimetres [1]. Furthermore, extending the suite by in-situ produced C-14 is crucial. Its short half-live enables the detection of brief periods of ice coverage that could not be noticed in the other nuclides. Measurement of in-situ produced C-14 in bedrock is not trivial, but has been achieved with reliable results [2]. Concentration-depth profiles for all of these nuclides can be modelled for diverse scenarios of past ice coverage. If the local Quaternary history is known independently, (glacial) erosion rates can be determined. As a first study site, Grueben glacier in the Grimsel region was chosen. The area was recently mapped in detail by C. Kämpfer allowing to draw robust conclusions based on field observations. Here we will present and discuss exposure ages of four bedrock samples taken to be analysed this winter for a first assessment of the local situation and to identify promising sites for intense examination in the future. [1] Alfimov and Ivy-Ochs, Quat. Geochr. 4, 2009 [2] Hippe et. al., Quat. Geochr. 4, 2009

  19. Late Glacial Tropical Savannas in Sundaland Inferred From Stable Carbon Isotope Records of Cave Guano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, C. M.; Bird, M. I.; Bull, I.; Dungait, J.; Bryant, C. L.; Ertunç, T.; Hunt, C.; Lewis, H. A.; Paz, V.

    2008-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Period (LGP), reduced global sea level exposed the continental shelf south of Thailand to Sumatra, Java, and Borneo to form the contiguous continent of Sundaland. However, the type and extent of vegetation that existed on much of this exposed landmass during the LGP remains speculative. Extensive bird and bat guano deposits in caves throughout this region span beyond 40,000 yr BP, and contain a wealth of untapped stratigraphic palaeoenvironmental information. Stable carbon isotope ratios of insectivorous bird and bat guano contain a reliable record of the animal's diet and, through non-specific insect predation, reflect the relative abundance of major physiological pathways in plants. Various physiological pathways of carbon fixation in plants yield differing stable carbon isotope ratios. Stable carbon isotope values of C3 plants are lower than C4 vegetation due to different enzymatic discriminations of the heavy isotope through the carbon fixing pathways. In tropical locales, grasses nearly always follow the C4 photosynthetic pathway, whereas tropical rainforest uses C3 photosynthesis, providing a proxy for vegetation and therefore climate change in the past. Here we discuss four guano stable-isotope records, based on insect cuticle and n-alkane analysis, supplemented by pollen analysis. All sites suggest a C3 dominated ecosystem for the Holocene, consistent with the wet tropical forest vegetation present at all locations. Two sites from Palawan Island, Philippines, record stable carbon isotope values of guano that document a drastic change from C3 (forest) to C4 (savanna) dominated ecosystems during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). A third location, at Niah Great Cave, Malaysia, indicates C3-dominant vegetation throughout the record, but does display variation in stable carbon isotope values likely linked to humidity changes. A fourth location, Batu Caves in Peninsular Malaysia, also indicates open vegetation during the LGM. Vegetation

  20. Thriving in the Cold: Glacial Expansion and Post-Glacial Contraction of a Temperate Terrestrial Salamander (Plethodon serratus)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Catherine E.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic geologic history of the southeastern United States has played a major role in shaping the geographic distributions of amphibians in the region. In the phylogeographic literature, the predominant pattern of distribution shifts through time of temperate species is one of contraction during glacial maxima and persistence in refugia. However, the diverse biology and ecology of amphibian species suggest that a “one-size-fits-all” model may be inappropriate. Nearly 10% of amphibian species in the region have a current distribution comprised of multiple disjunct, restricted areas that resemble the shape of Pleistocene refugia identified for other temperate taxa in the literature. Here, we apply genetics and spatially explicit climate analyses to test the hypothesis that the disjunct regions of these species ranges are climatic refugia for species that were more broadly distributed during glacial maxima. We use the salamander Plethodon serratus as a model, as its range consists of four disjunct regions in the Southeast. Phylogenetic results show that P. serratus is comprised of multiple genetic lineages, and the four regions are not reciprocally monophyletic. The Appalachian salamanders form a clade sister to all other P. serratus. Niche and paleodistribution modeling results suggest that P. serratus expanded from the Appalachians during the cooler Last Glacial Maximum and has since been restricted to its current disjunct distribution by a warming climate. These data reject the universal applicability of the glacial contraction model to temperate taxa and reiterate the importance of considering the natural history of individual species. PMID:26132077

  1. Thriving in the Cold: Glacial Expansion and Post-Glacial Contraction of a Temperate Terrestrial Salamander (Plethodon serratus).

    PubMed

    Newman, Catherine E; Austin, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic geologic history of the southeastern United States has played a major role in shaping the geographic distributions of amphibians in the region. In the phylogeographic literature, the predominant pattern of distribution shifts through time of temperate species is one of contraction during glacial maxima and persistence in refugia. However, the diverse biology and ecology of amphibian species suggest that a "one-size-fits-all" model may be inappropriate. Nearly 10% of amphibian species in the region have a current distribution comprised of multiple disjunct, restricted areas that resemble the shape of Pleistocene refugia identified for other temperate taxa in the literature. Here, we apply genetics and spatially explicit climate analyses to test the hypothesis that the disjunct regions of these species ranges are climatic refugia for species that were more broadly distributed during glacial maxima. We use the salamander Plethodon serratus as a model, as its range consists of four disjunct regions in the Southeast. Phylogenetic results show that P. serratus is comprised of multiple genetic lineages, and the four regions are not reciprocally monophyletic. The Appalachian salamanders form a clade sister to all other P. serratus. Niche and paleodistribution modeling results suggest that P. serratus expanded from the Appalachians during the cooler Last Glacial Maximum and has since been restricted to its current disjunct distribution by a warming climate. These data reject the universal applicability of the glacial contraction model to temperate taxa and reiterate the importance of considering the natural history of individual species.

  2. Timing of advance and basal condition of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the last glacial maximum in the Richardson Mountains, NWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacelle, Denis; Lauriol, Bernard; Zazula, Grant; Ghaleb, Bassam; Utting, Nicholas; Clark, Ian D.

    2013-09-01

    This study presents new ages for the northwest section of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) glacial chronology from material recovered from two retrogressive thaw slumps exposed in the Richardson Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. One study site, located at the maximum glacial limit of the LIS in the Richardson Mountains, had calcite concretions recovered from aufeis buried by glacial till that were dated by U/Th disequilibrium to 18,500 cal yr BP. The second site, located on the Peel Plateau to the east yielded a fossil horse (Equus) mandible that was radiocarbon dated to ca. 19,700 cal yr BP. These ages indicate that the Peel Plateau on the eastern flanks of the Richardson Mountains was glaciated only after 18,500 cal yr BP, which is later than previous models for the global last glacial maximum (LGM). As the LIS retreated the Peel Plateau around 15,000 cal yr BP, following the age of the Tutsieta phase, we conclude that the presence of the northwestern margin of the LIS at its maximum limit was a very short event in the western Canadian Arctic.

  3. Timing of maximum glacial extent and deglaciation from HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru), obtained with cosmogenic 36Cl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Vazquez, Lorenzo; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Andean glacial deposits are key records of climate fluctuations in the southern hemisphere. During the last decades, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have provided fresh and significant dates to determine past glacier behavior in this region. But still there are many important discrepancies such as the impact of Last Glacial Maximum or the influence of Late Glacial climatic events on glacial mass balances. Furthermore, glacial chronologies from many sites are still missing, such as HualcaHualca (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a high volcano of the Peruvian Andes located 70 km northwest of Arequipa. The goal of this study is to establish the age of the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) and deglaciation at HualcaHualca volcano. To achieve this objetive, we focused in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) characterized by a well-preserved sequence of moraines and roches moutonnées. The method is based on geomorphological analysis supported by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. 36Cl ages have been estimated with the CHLOE calculator and were compared with other central Andean glacial chronologies as well as paleoclimatological proxies. In Huayuray valley, exposure ages indicates that MGE occurred ~ 18 - 16 ka. Later, the ice mass gradually retreated but this process was interrupted by at least two readvances; the last one has been dated at ~ 12 ka. In the other hand, 36Cl result reflects a MGE age of ~ 13 ka in Mollebaya valley. Also, two samples obtained in Pujro-Huayjo and Mucurca valleys associated with MGE have an exposure age of 10-9 ka, but likely are moraine boulders affected by exhumation or erosion processes. Deglaciation in HualcaHualca volcano began abruptly ~ 11.5 ka ago according to a 36Cl age from a polished and striated bedrock in Pujro Huayjo valley, presumably as a result of reduced precipitation as well as a global increase of temperatures. The glacier evolution at HualcaHualca volcano presents a high correlation with

  4. Offset timing of climate oscillations during the last two glacial-interglacial transitions connected with large-scale freshwater perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Amat, Patricia; Zahn, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Multidecadal to centennial planktic δ18O and Mg/Ca records were generated at Ocean Drilling Program Site 976 (ODP976) in the Alboran Sea. The site is in the flow path of Atlantic inflow waters entering the Mediterranean and captured North Atlantic signals through the surface inflow and the atmosphere. The records reveal similar climatic oscillations during the last two glacial-to-interglacial transitions, albeit with a different temporal pacing. Glacial termination 1 (T1) was marked by Heinrich event 1 (H1), post-H1 Bølling/Allerød warming, and Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. During T2 the H11 δ18O anomaly was twice as high and lasted 30% longer than during H1. The post-H11 warming marked the start of MIS5e while the subsequent YD-style cooling occurred during early MIS5e. The post-H11 temperature increase at ODP976 matched the sudden Asian Monsoon Termination II at 129 ka B.P. Extending the 230Th-dated speleothem timescale to ODP976 suggests glacial conditions in the Northeast Atlantic region were terminated abruptly and interglacial warmth was reached in less than a millennium. The early-MIS5e cooling and freshening at ODP976 coincided with similar changes at North Atlantic sites suggesting this was a basin-wide event. By analogy with T1, we argue that this was a YD-type event that was shifted into the early stages of the last interglacial period. This scenario is consistent with evidence from northern North Atlantic and Nordic Sea sites that the continuing disintegration of the large Saalian Stage (MIS6) ice sheet in Eurasia delayed the advection of warm North Atlantic waters and full-strength convective overturn until later stages of MIS5e.

  5. A first 10Be cosmogenic glacial chronology from the High Atlas, Morocco, during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Hughes, Philip; Fenton, Cassie

    2014-05-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping, 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages of 21 erratics from cirque-valley systems and paleo-glacier climate modelling in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco (31.1° N, 7.9° W), provides new and novel insights as to the history and evolution of the largest desert region on Earth. The Atlas Mountains display evidence of extensive and multiple Late Pleistocene glaciations whose extent is significantly larger than that recognised by previous workers. The largest glaciers formed in the Toubkal massif where we find 3 distinct phases of glacial advances within the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraines occurring at the lowest elevations have yielded eight 10Be ages ranging from 30 to 88 ka. Six of eight samples from moraines at intermediate elevations gave ages of 19 to 25 ka (2 outliers) which correlates well with the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 26-21 ka) and the last termination during marine isotope stage 2. Five erratics from the youngest and most elevated moraines yielded a suite of normally distributed exposure ages from 11 to 13 ka which supports a correlation with the northern hemisphere Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glacial record of the High Atlas effectively reflects moisture supply to the north-western Sahara Desert and can provide an indication of shifts between arid and pluvial conditions. The plaeo equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) of these three glacier phases was more than 1000 m lower than the predicted ELA based on today's temperatures. Glacier-climate modelling indicates that for each of these glacier phases climate was not only significantly cooler than today, but also much wetter. The new evidence on the extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance of glaciations in this region has major implications for understanding moisture transfer between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sahara Desert during Pleistocene cold stages.

  6. Quaternary glacial and post-glacial depositional history associated with the Green Bay lobe, east-central Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, L.D.; Smith, G.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Multiple layers of peat and wood fragments indicate that Quaternary glaciation of the east-central region of Wisconsin was punctuated by at least two interglacial periods. Till, outwash, and glaciolacustrine deposits suggest that deposition took place in alternating glacial and non-glacial environments due to oscillations in the position of the Green Bay Lobe terminus. The data for this study consists of 36 auger borings, 70 geologic logs and 100 well-construction reports from water wells. Nine vibracores were taken at the northern margin of Lake Winnebago in order to document in detail the post-glacial history of Glacial Lake Oshkosh/Lake Winnebago. Local bedrock consists of limestones and dolomites of the Middle Ordovician Sinnipee Group. Bedrock elevations range from 211--237 m; bedding dips regionally to the southeast at 1--2 degrees. Bedrock is overlain by a 3--13 m-thick layer of alternating red clay and gray silty-clay (basal Kewaunee Formation ) perhaps deposited in a proglacial lake. These sediments are overlain by apeat/wood layer indicating marsh deposition. This peat/wood layer is overlain by more proglacial lake sediment, 3--10 m of gray brown clay to silty-clay. A second peat/wood layer overlies the gray/brown sediment and may correlate with the Two Creeks buried forest bed. The uppermost unit consists of 2--3 m red silty-clay till (Middle Inlet Member of the Kewaunee Formation). Along the northern margin of present-day Lake Winnebago, red silty-clay is overlain by silty-sand deposited by Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Future work includes obtaining radiocarbon dates from buried peat/wood layers to verify these tentative correlations between east-central Wisconsin and the Lake Michigan Basin.

  7. Last glacial-interglacial environments in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA and implications for Younger Dryas-age human occupation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briles, Christy E.; Whitlock, Cathy; Meltzer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The last glacial-interglacial transition (LGIT; 19-9 ka) was characterized by rapid climate changes and significant ecosystem reorganizations worldwide. In western Colorado, one of the coldest locations in the continental US today, mountain environments during the late-glacial period are poorly known. Yet, archaeological evidence from the Mountaineer site (2625 m elev.) indicates that Folsom-age Paleoindians were over-wintering in the Gunnison Basin during the Younger Dryas Chronozone (YDC; 12.9-11.7 ka). To determine the vegetation and fire history during the LGIT, and possible explanations for occupation during a period thought to be harsher than today, a 17-ka-old sediment core from Lily Pond (3208 m elev.) was analyzed for pollen and charcoal and compared with other high-resolution records from the southern Rocky Mountains. Widespread tundra and Picea parkland and low fire activity in the cold wet late-glacial period transitioned to open subalpine forest and increased fire activity in the Bølling-Allerød period as conditions became warmer and drier. During the YDC, greater winter snowpack than today and prolonged wet springs likely expanded subalpine forest to lower elevations than today, providing construction material and fuel for the early inhabitants. In the early to middle Holocene, arid conditions resulted in xerophytic vegetation and frequent fire.

  8. Fire and ice: volcanic and glacial impacts on the phylogeography of the New Zealand forest fern Asplenium hookerianum.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Lara D; Perrie, Leon R; Brownsey, Patrick J

    2007-11-01

    In the Southern Hemisphere there has been little phylogeographical investigation of forest refugia sites during the last glacial. Hooker's spleenwort, Asplenium hookerianum, is a fern that is found throughout New Zealand. It is strongly associated with forest and is a proxy for the survival of woody vegetation during the last glacial maximum. DNA sequence data from the chloroplast trnL-trnF locus were obtained from 242 samples, including c. 10 individuals from each of 21 focal populations. Most populations contained multiple, and in many cases unique, haplotypes, including those neighbouring formerly glaciated areas, while the predominant inference from nested clade analysis was restricted gene flow with isolation by distance. These results suggest that A. hookerianum survived the last glacial maximum in widespread populations of sufficient size to retain the observed phylogeography, and therefore that the sheltering woody vegetation must have been similarly abundant. This is consistent with palynological interpretations for the survival in New Zealand of thermophilous forest species at considerably smaller distances from the ice sheets than recorded for the Northern Hemisphere. Eastern and central North Island populations of A. hookerianum were characterized by a different subset of haplotypes to populations from the remainder of the country. A similar east-west phylogeographical pattern has been detected in a diverse array of taxa, and has previously been attributed to recurrent vulcanism in the central North Island.

  9. Full-glacial upland tundra vegetation preserved under tephra in the Beringia National Park, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetcheus, Victoria G.; Birks, Hilary H.

    2001-01-01

    The nature of the full-glacial vegetation of Beringia has been the subject of a great deal of investigation and debate. Here we present a reconstruction of an intact example of the full-glacial upland vegetation of part of the northern Seward Peninsula at one point in time. The area was blanketed by more than 1 m of tephra ca. 18,000 14C BP (ca. 21,500 cal. BP), and the former land-surface was preserved in the permafrost. The discovery of the land-surface provides a unique opportunity to study a fossil ecosystem preserved in situ. Macrofossils were used to reconstruct the vegetation growing at several sites on the buried land-surface. The macrofossil assemblages indicate a vegetation characterized by graminoids and forbs, with the occasional occurrence of Salix arctica. The vegetation was dominated by Kobresia myosuroides, other sedges ( Carex), and grasses, with a fine-scale mosaic related to snow accumulation and moisture availability. Overall, the vegetation was a closed, dry, herb-rich tundra-grassland with a continuous moss layer, growing on calcareous soil that was continuously supplied with loess. Nutrient renewal by loess deposition was probably responsible for the relatively fertile vegetation, and the occurrence of a continuous mat of acrocarpous mosses. Good physiognomic analogues can be suggested, but no exact modern vegetational analogues have been found, probably because the full-glacial environment and climate with loess deposition do not occur today.

  10. Glacially-developed weathering rinds at the micro-scale: Mineralogy and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Edwards, C. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial weathering of rock and sediment is difficult to study, but important to understand as it contributes to solute flux in meltwaters and provides potential energy sources to chemotrophic microbes. In this study we characterize weathering rinds present on samples from a glaciated silicate-carbonate system using microscopic thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and complementary electron microprobe analyses. The major goals of the project are to: 1) characterize the mineralogy and chemistry of glacially-derived weathering rinds at the micro-scale, 2) compare the microscopic spectroscopy measurements to previously measured bulk TIR spectra of the samples to assess the sensitivity of remote sensing data to small scale weathering rinds, and 3) to quantify weathering inputs to the glacial energy budget. Robertson Glacier in Alberta, Canada is our field site for this technique as its retreating stage allows sampling of fresh subglacial and englacial sediments. This site is significant to microbiology studies, as methanogenic and iron-reducing microbial communities have been identified in the local subglacial till. Samples of glacially altered rock and sediments were collected on a downstream transect of the glacier in 2011. In this work, we use an innovative laboratory technique, microscopic TIR emission spectroscopy, to investigate these weathering rinds. The MicroLab at Arizona State University was designed to quantitatively determine sample mineralogy at a spot size of ~85 μm. TIR spectroscopy is especially powerful for identifying crystalline minerals, as molecular bonds vibrate at specific wavelengths of light, creating absorption bands at characteristic TIR wavelengths. To first order, TIR spectra add linearly with area, making this technique especially useful for determining quantitative mineral abundances, especially when the number of areal components is small. We also measure the chemistry of these rinds using an electron microprobe, the JEOL JXA-8530F

  11. Hydrogeologic for the Saco River valley glacial aquifer from Bartlett, New Hampshire to Fryeburg, Maine; October 1983 through January 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.D.; Tepper, D.H.; Morrissey, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data was collected for a study of the Saco River valley glacial aquifer. The study area extends along the Saco River from Bartlett, New Hampshire to Fryeburg, Maine. The study was done in cooperation with the Maine Geological Survey (Department of Conservation), the New Hampshire Water Supply and Pollution Control Commission, the New Hampshire Water Resources Board, and the Town of Conway, New Hampshire. The data include information on 54 well-inventory sites, 69 exploration-hole logs , analyses of grain-size distribution in 130 samples of glacial sediments, monthly water-table measurements in 100 wells, and continuous water-table measurements in 7 wells. Discharge data are presented from 6 stream-gaging stations operated for this study during the 1984 and 1985 water years. Data from 50 sets of seepage runs and 15 miscellaneous discharge measurements conducted on the mainstream of the Saco River and on 7 tributary streams during the 1984 and 1985 water years are also presented. Water quality analyses of groundwater samples from 92 sites and surface water samples from 12 sites are presented. Field determinations include pH, temperature, and specific conductance. Laboratory determinations include nutrients, common inorganic anions and cations, selected volatile organic compounds, and detergents. Maps show the locations of data-collection sites. (USGS)

  12. Simulation and understanding the nature of Quaternary glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Calov, R.

    2012-04-01

    Although it is generally accepted that, as postulated by the Milankovitch theory, Earth's orbital variations play an important role in Quaternary climate dynamics, the mechanism of glacial cycles still remains poorly understood. Among remaining scientific challenges are an understanding of the nature of 100 kyr cycles that dominated global ice volume and climate variability over the late part of Quaternary and the causes of the transition from the "40 kyr world" to the "100 kyr world" around one million years ago. Using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2, we demonstrate that both strong 100 kyr periodicity in the ice volume variations and the timing of glacial terminations during past 800 kyr can be successfully simulated as direct, strong nonlinear responses of the climate-cryosphere system to orbital forcing alone. We show that the sharp 100 kyr peak in the power spectrum of ice volume results from the phase locking of the long glacial cycles to the corresponding eccentricity cycles. Variations in obliquity and CO2 concentration are not required to simulate strong 100 kyr cyclicity if the atmospheric CO2 concentration stays below its typical interglacial value. The existence of long glacial cycles is primarily attributed to the North American ice sheet and it requires the presence of a large continental area with exposed rocks. In case when the continents are completely covered by a thick sediment layer, for the realistic range of CO2 concentrations (180-300 ppm), the long glacial cycles can not be simulated. In the experiment with fixed CO2 concentration, ice volume variations contain both strong precessional and obliquity cycles, which apparently is in odd with empirical data that suggest complete dominance of the obliquity cycle. However, in the experiments with interactive carbon cycle, simulated obliquity component becomes much stronger, especially, in the deep ocean temperature. This is explained by the direct and indirect (via the

  13. The Glacial BuzzSaw, Isostasy, and Global Crustal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Oncken, O.; Niu, F.

    2015-12-01

    The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis predicts that maximum elevations in orogens at high latitudes are depressed relative to temperate latitudes, as maximum elevation and hypsography of glaciated orogens are functions of the glacial equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and the modern and last glacial maximum (LGM) snowlines. As a consequence crustal thickness, density, or both must change with increasing latitude to maintain isostatic balance. For Airy compensation crustal thickness should decrease toward polar latitudes, whereas for Pratt compensation crustal densities should increase. For similar convergence rates, higher latitude orogens should have higher grade, and presumably higher density rocks in the crustal column due to more efficient glacial erosion. We have examined a number of global and regional crustal models to see if these predictions appear in the models. Crustal thickness is straightforward to examine, crustal density less so. The different crustal models generally agree with one another, but do show some major differences. We used a standard tectonic classification scheme of the crust for data selection. The globally averaged orogens show crustal thicknesses that decrease toward high latitudes, almost reflecting topography, in both the individual crustal models and the models averaged together. The most convincing is the western hemisphere cordillera, where elevations and crustal thicknesses decrease toward the poles, and also toward lower latitudes (the equatorial minimum is at ~12oN). The elevation differences and Airy prediction of crustal thickness changes are in reasonable agreement in the North American Cordillera, but in South America the observed crustal thickness change is larger than the Airy prediction. The Alpine-Himalayan chain shows similar trends, however the strike of the chain makes interpretation ambiguous. We also examined cratons with ice sheets during the last glacial period to see if continental glaciation also thins the crust toward

  14. Glacially induced stresses in sedimentary rocks of northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    During the Pleistocene large continental ice sheets developed in Scandinavia and North America. Ice-loading caused bending of the lithosphere and outward flow in the mantle. Glacial loading is one of the most prominent tectono-mechanical event in the geological history of northern Poland. The Pomeranian region was subjected several times to a load equivalent of more than 1 km of rocks, which led to severe increase in both vertical and horizontal stresses in the upper crustal rocks. During deglaciation a rapid decrease in vertical stress is observed, which leads to destabilization of the crust - most recent postglacial faults scarps in northern Sweden indicate glacially induced earthquakes of magnitude ~Mw8. The presence of the ice-sheet altered as well the near-surface thermal structure - thermal gradient inversion is still observable in NW Poland. The glacially related processes might have left an important mark in the sedimentary cover of northern Poland, especially with regard to fracture reopening, changes in stress state, and damage development. In the present study, we model lithospheric bending caused by glacial load, but our point of interest lies in the overlying sediments. Typical glacial isostatic studies model the response of (visco-) elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic or viscous asthenosphere subjected to external loads. In our model, we introduce viscoelastic sedimentary layers at the top of this stack and examine the stress relaxation patterns therein. As a case study for our modelling, we used geological profiles from northern Poland, near locality of Wejherowo, which are considered to have unconventional gas potential. The Paleozoic profile of this area is dominated by almost 1 km thick Silurian-Ordovician shale deposits, which are interbedded with thin and strong limestone layers. This sequence is underlain by Cambrian shales and sandstones, and finally at ~3 km depth - Precambrian crystalline rocks. Above the Silurian there are approximately

  15. Geomorphic signatures of glacial activity in the Alba Patera volcanic province: Implications for recent frost accumulation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Rishitosh K.; Murty, Sripada V. S.

    2013-08-01

    landforms lying within impact craters on Mars have led to the identification of two mechanisms for their formation: (1) intermittent deposition of atmospherically emplaced snow/ice during past spin-axis/orbital conditions and (2) flow of debris-covered ice-rich deposits. The maximum presence of the young ice/snow-rich features (thermal contraction crack polygons, gullies, arcuate ridges, and lobate debris tongues) was observed on the pole-facing slope, indicating that this slope was the preferred site for ice/snow accumulation (during the last 10 Ma). In this study, we investigated 30 craters lying in the Alba Patera volcanic province in the latitudinal bands between 45°N and 32.4°N. Morphological comparison of the younger ice/snow-rich features in these craters led us to conclude that glacial/periglacial features in Alba Patera are mainly present within pole-facing slopes of craters lying within 45°N-39°N. The craters lying within 40.2°N-40°N did not show any glacial/periglacial features. We suggest that the formation of these young ice/snow-rich features follows the same orientation trends as those of other older (>10 Ma) glacial features (debris-covered ice/snow-rich large deposits at the base of the crater wall) in the region. The present work has revealed that the onset of physical processes that result in the formation of glacial/periglacial landforms is also dependent on the changes in elevation ranges of the investigated craters in Alba Patera. Our results confirm past inferences for accumulation of ice/snow on Mars and suggest that the period of ice/snow accumulation activity in Alba Patera occurred throughout the Amazonian and lasted until the recent past, i.e., 2.1-0.4 Ma.

  16. Ice-walled-lake plains: Implications for the origin of hummocky glacial topography in middle North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, L.; Attig, J.W.; Ham, N.R.; Johnson, M.D.; Jennings, C.E.; Syverson, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    Ice-walled-lake plains are prominent in many areas of hummocky-till topography left behind as the Laurentide Ice Sheet melted from middle North America. The formation of the hummocky-till topography has been explained by: (1) erosion by subglacial floods; (2) squeezing of subglacial till up into holes in stagnant glacial ice; or (3) slumping of supraglacial till. The geomorphology and stratigraphy of ice-walled-lake plains provide evidence that neither the lake plains nor the adjacent hummocks are of subglacial origin. These flat lake plains, up to a few kilometers in diameter, are perched as much as a few tens of meters above surrounding depressions. They typically are underlain by laminated, fine-grained suspended-load lake sediment. Many ice-walled-lake plains are surrounded by a low rim ridge of coarser-grained shore sediment or by a steeper rim ridge of debris that slumped off the surrounding ice slopes. The ice-walled lakes persisted for hundreds to thousands of years following glacial stagnation. Shells of aquatic molluscs from several deposits of ice-walled-lake sediment in south-central North Dakota have been dated from about 13 500 to 10 500??B.P. (calibrated radiocarbon ages), indicating a climate only slightly cooler than present. This is confirmed by recent palaeoecological studies in nearby non-glacial sites. To survive so long, the stagnant glacial ice had to be well-insulated by a thick cover of supraglacial sediment, and the associated till hummocks must be composed primarily of collapsed supraglacial till. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glacial landscape evolution on Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island, since the Last Glacial Maximum: insights into switching glacial dynamics and thermo-mechanical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Ross, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ice cover in north central Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island has evolved from full Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) cover during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to a thin ice cap that now covers about 800 km2 in the northeast sector. The exposed subglacial landscape consists of contrasting geomorphological zones which allude to complex spatial and temporal changes in basal ice dynamics and thermal regime since LGM. We used satellite imagery, field observations, a large till geochemical database, and terrestrial cosmogenic isotopes to get new insights into subglacial erosion intensity, ice flow dynamics, and glacial history. Fields of streamlined bedrock-cored ridges (e.g. drumlins) have been mapped and their elongation ratios calculated. The density of bedrock-controlled lakes, which has traditionally been used as a proxy for subglacial erosion intensity on Baffin Island, has been re-examined using modern GIS techniques. This work has revealed a mosaic of glacial terrain zones each consisting of characteristics that are distinct from the other zones. Five glacial terrain zones (GTZ) have been recognized. One zone (GTZ 1) is characterized by a broad flowset of northeast trending streamlined hills and parallel paleo-flow indicators. It also has the highest streamlined hill density, longest elongation ratios, and the highest lake density of the study area. This northeast flowset is crosscut locally by ice flow indicators that converge into troughs that now form a series of fjords. Landforms and ice flow indicators of this younger system (GTZ 2) are traced inland showing propagation of the channelized system into this portion of the LIS. The central area of the peninsula contains a zone of thicker till and rolling topography (GTZ 3) as well as a zone consisting of southeast trending features and associated perpendicular moraines (GTZ 4). The modern ice cap and its past extension form the last zone (GTZ 5). The preservation of the northeast system (GTZ 1) outside of the

  18. Reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Ford, Heather L; Ravelo, A Christina; Polissar, Pratigya J

    2015-01-16

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of global interannual variability, but its response to climate change is uncertain. Paleoclimate records from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provide insight into ENSO behavior when global boundary conditions (ice sheet extent, atmospheric partial pressure of CO2) were different from those today. In this work, we reconstruct LGM temperature variability at equatorial Pacific sites using measurements of individual planktonic foraminifera shells. A deep equatorial thermocline altered the dynamics in the eastern equatorial cold tongue, resulting in reduced ENSO variability during the LGM compared to the Late Holocene. These results suggest that ENSO was not tied directly to the east-west temperature gradient, as previously suggested. Rather, the thermocline of the eastern equatorial Pacific played a decisive role in the ENSO response to LGM climate.

  19. Reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Heather L.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Polissar, Pratigya J.

    2015-01-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of global interannual variability, but its response to climate change is uncertain. Paleoclimate records from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provide insight into ENSO behavior when global boundary conditions (ice sheet extent, atmospheric partial pressure of CO2) were different from those today. In this work, we reconstruct LGM temperature variability at equatorial Pacific sites using measurements of individual planktonic foraminifera shells. A deep equatorial thermocline altered the dynamics in the eastern equatorial cold tongue, resulting in reduced ENSO variability during the LGM compared to the Late Holocene. These results suggest that ENSO was not tied directly to the east-west temperature gradient, as previously suggested. Rather, the thermocline of the eastern equatorial Pacific played a decisive role in the ENSO response to LGM climate.

  20. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bay, R.C.; Bramall, N.E.; Price, P.B.; Clow, G.D.; Hawley, R.L.; Udisti, R.; Castellano, E.

    2006-01-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo pattern recognition analysis of the coincidence between three regional volcanic histories from ice coring of Greenland and Antarctica over the period 2 to 45 ka, using SO4 anomalies in Greenland and East Antarctica determined by continuous core chemistry, together with West Antarctic volcanic ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic record of volcanism correlates with Glacial abrupt climate change at a 95% to >99.8% (???3??) significance level and that volcanic depositions at the three locations match at levels exceeding 3??, likely indicating that many common horizons represent single eruptive events which dispersed material world wide. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden intensifications of millennial cold periods. The striking agreement between sites implies that the consistency of current timescales obtained by isotopic and glaciological dating methods is better than estimated. Copyright 2006 by the American Geogphysical Union.

  1. The unstable geomagnetic field during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowaczyk, Norbert; Frank, Ute; Kind, Jessica; Plessen, Birgit; Arz, Helge

    2013-04-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analyses of a sediment composite record from three different sites in the southeastern Black Sea yielded a high-resolution, well-dated paleomagnetic record of the past 14 to 68 ka. Age constraints are provided by 16 AMS 14C ages, identification of the Campanian Ignimbrite tephra (39.28±0.11 ka), and by detailed tuning of sedimentologic parameters of the Black Sea sediments to the oxygen isotope record from the Greenland NGRIP ice core. Dansgaard-Oeschger events 3 through 18 are very well expressed in the Black Sea sedimentary records of Ca-content, oxygen isotopes as well as in records of ice-rafted detritus. Though hampered by some larger hiatusses at one site, and patchy contaminations by diagenetically formed greigite, the paleomagnetic composite record obtained from the preserved primary detrital magnetite phase reflects a highly dynamic geomagnetic field during the last glacial period. Relative variations of paleointensity inferred from the sediments' magnetisations were converted into a record of the virtual axial dipole moment (VADM). Thus, the Black Sea paleomagnetic record comprises evidence for the Norwegian-Greenland-Sea excursion at 64.5 ka (VADM = 1.5×1022 Am2), a full reversal of the geomagnetic field during the Laschamp excursion at 41 ka and several subsequent excursions with low northern virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) latitudes, including the Mono Lake excursion at 34.5 ka (VADM = 3.0×1022 Am2). According to the derived age model, VGP positions during the Laschamp excursion persisted at high southern latitudes in Antarctica for an estimated 440 years, making the Laschamp excursion a short-lived event with fully reversed polarity directions. Recorded field reversals of the Laschamp excursion, lasting only an estimated ~250 years, are characterized by very low paleointensities with VADMs as low as 0.50×1022 Am2. The reversed phase of the Laschamp excursion is associated with a significant field recovery with a VADM of 2.0

  2. Palaeogeographic regulation of glacial events during the Cretaceous supergreenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Donnadieu, Yannick

    2016-09-01

    The historical view of a uniformly warm Cretaceous is being increasingly challenged by the accumulation of new data hinting at the possibility of glacial events, even during the Cenomanian-Turonian (~95 Myr ago), the warmest interval of the Cretaceous. Here we show that the palaeogeography typifying the Cenomanian-Turonian renders the Earth System resilient to glaciation with no perennial ice accumulation occurring under prescribed CO2 levels as low as 420 p.p.m. Conversely, late Aptian (~115 Myr ago) and Maastrichtian (~70 Myr ago) continental configurations set the stage for cooler climatic conditions, favouring possible inception of Antarctic ice sheets under CO2 concentrations, respectively, about 400 and 300 p.p.m. higher than for the Cenomanian-Turonian. Our simulations notably emphasize that palaeogeography can crucially impact global climate by modulating the CO2 threshold for ice sheet inception and make the possibility of glacial events during the Cenomanian-Turonian unlikely.

  3. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Crowley, John W; Katz, Richard F; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-13

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor.

  4. Hemispheric sea ice distribution sets the glacial tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Shen, Aaron; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Ming, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The proxy record of global temperature shows that the dominant periodicity of the glacial cycle shifts from 40 kyr (obliquity) to 100 kyr (eccentricity) about a million years ago. Using climate model simulations, here we show that the pace of the glacial cycle depends on the pattern of hemispheric sea ice growth. In a cold climate the sea ice grows asymmetrically between two hemispheres under changes to Earth's orbital precession, because sea ice growth potential outside of the Arctic Circle is limited. This difference in hemispheric sea ice growth leads to an asymmetry in absorbed solar energy for the two hemispheres, particularly when eccentricity is high, even if the annual average insolation is similar. In a warmer climate, the hemispheric asymmetry of the sea ice decreases as mean Arctic and Antarctic sea ice decreases, diminishing the precession and eccentricity signals and explaining the dominant obliquity signal (40 kyr) before the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  5. Migration Patterns of Subgenus Alnus in Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Douda, Jan; Doudová, Jana; Drašnarová, Alena; Kuneš, Petr; Hadincová, Věroslava; Krak, Karol; Zákravský, Petr; Mandák, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, new palaeoecological records supported by molecular analyses and palaeodistributional modelling have provided more comprehensive insights into plant behaviour during the last Quaternary cycle. We reviewed the migration history of species of subgenus Alnus during the last 50,000 years in Europe with a focus on (1) a general revision of Alnus history since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), (2) evidence of northern refugia of Alnus populations during the LGM and (3) the specific history of Alnus in particular European regions. Methodology We determined changes in Alnus distribution on the basis of 811 and 68 radiocarbon-dated pollen and macrofossil sites, respectively. We compiled data from the European Pollen Database, the Czech Quaternary Palynological Database, the Eurasian Macrofossil Database and additional literature. Pollen percentage thresholds indicating expansions or retreats were used to describe patterns of past Alnus occurrence. Principal Findings An expansion of Alnus during the Late Glacial and early Holocene periods supports the presence of alders during the LGM in southern peninsulas and northerly areas in western Europe, the foothills of the Alps, the Carpathians and northeastern Europe. After glaciers withdrew, the ice-free area of Europe was likely colonized from several regional refugia; the deglaciated area of Scandinavia was likely colonized from a single refugium in northeastern Europe. In the more northerly parts of Europe, we found a scale-dependent pattern of Alnus expansion characterised by a synchronous increase of Alnus within individual regions, though with regional differences in the times of the expansion. In southern peninsulas, the Alps and the Carpathians, by contrast, it seems that Alnus expanded differently at individual sites rather than synchronously in whole regions. Conclusions Our synthesis supports the idea that northern LGM populations were important sources of postglacial Alnus expansion. The

  6. Reaching and abandoning the furthest ice extent during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Wirsig, Christian; Zasadni, Jerzy; Hippe, Kristina; Christl, Marcus; Akçar, Naki; Schluechter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the European Alps (late Würm) local ice caps and extensive ice fields in the high Alps fed huge outlet glaciers that occupied the main valleys and extended onto the forelands as piedmont lobes. Records from numerous sites suggest advance of glaciers beyond the mountain front by around 30 ka (Ivy-Ochs 2015 and references therein). Reaching of the maximum extent occurred by about 27-26 ka, as exemplified by dates from the Rhein glacier area (Keller and Krayss, 2005). Abandonment of the outermost moraines at sites north and south of the Alps was underway by about 24 ka. In the high Alps, systems of transection glaciers with transfluences over many of the Alpine passes dominated, for example, at Grimsel Pass in the Central Alps (Switzerland). 10Be exposure ages of 23 ± 1 ka for glacially sculpted bedrock located just a few meters below the LGM trimline in the Haslital near Grimsel Pass suggest a pulse of ice surface lowering at about the same time that the foreland moraines were being abandoned (Wirsig et al., 2016). Widespread ice surface lowering in the high Alps was underway by no later than 18 ka. Thereafter, glaciers oscillated at stillstand and minor re-advance positions on the northern forelands for several thousand years forming the LGM stadial moraines. Final recession back within the mountain front took place by 19-18 ka. Recalculation to a common basis of all published 10Be exposure dates for boulders situated on LGM moraines suggests a strong degree of synchrony for the timing of onset of ice decay both north and south of the Alps. Ivy-Ochs, S., 2015, Cuadernos de investigación geográfica 41: 295-315. Keller, O., Krayss, E., 2005, Vierteljahrschr. Naturforsch. Gesell. Zürich 150: 69-85. Wirsig, C. et al., 2016, J. Quat. Sci. 31: 46-59.

  7. The Influence of True Polar Wander on Climate and Glacial Inception in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daradich, A.; Huybers, P. J.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Chan, N. H.

    2014-12-01

    While plate tectonic motions and dynamic topography of continents each reflect an active mantle convective regime, excursions of the Earth's rotation axis relative to a fixed hotspot reference frame are remarkably muted. Early studies of paleomagnetically inferred pole positions suggested excursions of less than a few degrees [Jurdy and Van Der Voo, 1975]. For this reason, long-term changes in Earth's rotation, or true polar wander (TPW), were thought to have a negligible role in the observed long-term secular cooling of Earth's climate through the Tertiary [Donn and Shaw, 1977]. This gradual cooling over the past 65 million years began at a time when much of Earth's climate was relatively warm and quiescent and culminated in dramatic glacial cycles of the Pleistocene. In contrast to earlier studies, recent reanalyses of paleomagnetic pole positions suggest a secular drift in Earth's rotation axis of greater than ten degrees in the last 40 million years [Torsvik et al., 2012; Doubrovine et al., 2012]. The direction of this drift brings North America, a site of advancing and retreating ice sheets throughout the Pleistocene, to increasingly higher latitudes. Using an orbital solution valid for the last 50 million years [Laskar et al., 2004], we compute the effect of TPW on insolation quantities for sites in Greenland and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Our results indicate that a three degree shift in latitude driven by TPW is comparable to a two degree change in obliquity in terms of its impact on summer energy (i.e. the total energy for the year on days surpassing a given insolation threshold; Huybers, 2006). In addition, we explore climatological gradients using modern climatological data and employ simple climate models to characterize reductions in positive degree days for the North American Arctic over the last 40 million years. We find that TPW and continental drift that moved arctic North America poleward could have driven cooling that contributed to glacial

  8. A vadose zone Transport Processes Investigation within the glacial till at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwing, J.; Roepke, Craig Senninger; Brainard, James Robert; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Mann, Michael J. A.; Holt, Robert M.; Kriel, Kelly

    2007-08-01

    This report describes a model Transport Processes Investigation (TPI) where field-scale vadose zone flow and transport processes are identified and verified through a systematic field investigation at a contaminated DOE site. The objective of the TPI is to help with formulating accurate conceptual models and aid in implementing rational and cost effective site specific characterization strategies at contaminated sites with diverse hydrogeologic settings. Central to the TPI are Transport Processes Characterization (TPC) tests that incorporate field surveys and large-scale infiltration experiments. Hypotheses are formulated based on observed pedogenic and hydrogeologic features as well as information provided by literature searches. The field and literature information is then used to optimize the design of one or more infiltration experiments to field test the hypothesis. Findings from the field surveys and infiltration experiments are then synthesized to formulate accurate flow and transport conceptual models. Here we document a TPI implemented in the glacial till vadose zone at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio, a US Department of Energy (DOE) uranium processing site. As a result of this TPI, the flow and transport mechanisms were identified through visualization of dye stain within extensive macro pore and fracture networks which provided the means for the infiltrate to bypass potential aquatards. Such mechanisms are not addressed in current vadose zone modeling and are generally missed by classical characterization methods.

  9. Sedimentary architecture of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf, West Antarctica, from pre-glacial to glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Larter, Robert; Nitsche, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Studies of the sedimentary architecture and characteristics of Antarctic shelves provide clues of past ice sheet advance-retreat cycles and help improve constraints for paleo-ice dynamic models since early glacial periods. A first seismostratigraphic analysis of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf and slope of West Antarctica reveals insights into the structural architecture of the continental margin and shows stages of sediment deposition, erosion and transport history from pre-glacial times to early glaciation and to the most recent glacial periods. The shelf geometry consists of a large pre- and syn-rift basin in the middle shelf region between outcropping basement of the inner shelf and basement ridges and highs beneath the outer shelf. A middle shelf sub-basin exists which may have formed as a result of motion along an early West Antarctic Rift System branch. At least 4 km of pre-glacial strata has been eroded from the present inner shelf and coastal hinterland by ice sheet advances since the onset of glaciation. Some of the eroded sediments were deposited as a progradational wedge extending the outer shelf by 25 to 65 km oceanward of the pre-glacial shelf-break. Comparing the observed seismic characteristics with those of other Antarctic shelf sequences, we assign an Early Cretaceous age for bottom sedimentary unit ASS-1, a Late Cretaceous to Oligocene age for unit ASS-2, an Early to Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-3, a Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-4, a Late Miocene to Early Pliocene age for unit ASS-5, and a Pliocene to Pleistocene age for the top unit ASS-6. The survival of buried grounding zone wedges in the upper part of unit ASS-5 of the outer shelf is consistent with the onset of a long warming phase and a retreated ice sheet in the early Pliocene as observed for the Ross Sea shelf and reconstructed from paleo-ice sheet models. Our data also reveal that the paleo-ice flow paths of the central Pine Island Trough system have remained stationary across the

  10. Pre-glacial, Early Glacial, and Ice Sheet Stratigraphy Cored During NBP1402, Sabrina Coast, East Antarctic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, E. W.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez-Vasquez, R. A.; Frederick, B.; Lavoie, C.; Leventer, A.; Shevenell, A.; Saustrup, S., Sr.; Bohaty, S. M.; Sangiorgi, F.

    2014-12-01

    Western Wilkes Land provides an unusual setting with regard to passive margin subsidence and exposure of Cenozoic sedimentary units across the continental shelf, due to the unique rift to drift history off of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and subsequent deep glacial erosion of the evolved continental shelf. The first factor has provided extensive accommodation space for the preservation of stratigraphic sequences that in turn represent critical periods in the climate evolution of Antarctica. Glacial erosion has then provided access to this stratigraphy that is usually inaccessible to all but deep drilling programs. Such stratigraphies are well exposed to within cm of the seafloor off the Sabrina Coast. Cruise NBP1402 investigated this region via a combination of multi-channel seismic imaging and innovative, strategic coring. The geophysical data imaged the geologic evolution of the margin, which exhibits a continuum from non-glacial, partly glaciated, to fully glaciated depo- and erosional systems. Based on the seismic stratigraphy, we collected dredges and one barrel Jumbo Piston Cores (JPCs) across areas of outcropping strata imaged seismically, a unique strategy that allowed us to identify and sample specific reflectors. The stratigraphically deepest coring targeted sections for which the seismic character suggested a pre-glacial context, with non-glaciated continental margin sequences including deltas. Coring recovered dark organic rich siltstones and sandy mudstones, and a large concretion whose center contained a cm-sized plant fossil. In addition, the sediments contain a fossil snail. These fossils provide a glimpse into the pre-glacial terrestrial environment in Antarctica. Overlying this section, coring recovered similar dark siltstones with a 20 cm thick horizon with abundant large angular clasts of variable lithology, interpreted to be ice-rafted debris and indicative of early glacial ice in Antarctica. Finally, JPCs targeting a younger part of

  11. Mercury fluxes out of glacial and non-glacial streams, as determined by continuous measurements of turbidity and CDOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermilyea, A.; Nagorski, S. A.; Lamborg, C. H.; Scott, D.; Hood, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    Glaciers and icefields along the Alaskan coast contribute nearly half of the freshwater discharge to the Gulf of Alaska and can play an important role in near-shore marine ecosystems. In southeastern Alaska, glaciers are rapidly thinning and retreating and are being replaced by temperate forests and wetlands. This ongoing landscape evolution is altering the sensitivity of coastal watersheds to atmospheric Hg inputs. The influence of glacial runoff with high suspended sediment loads on in-stream mercury fluxes and dynamics is poorly understood. In contrast, numerous studies have shown that streams with large contributions from wetlands typically carry high dissolved organic matter (DOM) and filtered methylmercury (FMHg) loads. This study compares and contrasts the mercury concentrations, fluxes, partitioning, and speciation in two coastal watersheds in southeastern Alaska. The two watersheds are separated by only 23 km and are relatively similar in area, however one is heavily glaciated (Lemon Creek) and one is dominated by temperate forest and wetlands (Peterson Creek). Grab samples for unfiltered total mercury (UTHg), particulate total mercury (PTHg), filtered total mercury (FTHg), and FMHg were taken during three, 4-day sampling periods within the glacial melt season (May-Sept) while continuously monitoring in-situ chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence and stream turbidity. While UTHg concentration-discharge relationships were poor (R2=0.38-0.55) in both streams, flux estimates for UTHg were greatly improved using CDOM fluorescence (R2=0.82) for Peterson Creek, and turbidity (R2=0.81) for Lemon Creek. UTHg concentrations were consistently greater in Peterson Creek (factor of 1.7-2.3); however, the watershed area normalized UTHg flux was 3-6 times greater in glacial Lemon Creek than Peterson Creek across all time periods. In Peterson Creek, the majority of the UTHg was in the filtered phase, whereas in Lemon Creek the majority of the mercury

  12. Application of the surface azimuthal electrical resistivity survey method to determine patterns of regional joint orientation in glacial tills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, D.

    2010-01-01

    Joints within unconsolidated material such as glacial till can be primary avenues for the flow of electrical charge, water, and contaminants. To facilitate the siting and design of remediation programs, a need exists to map anisotropic distribution of such pathways within glacial tills by determining the azimuth of the dominant joint set. The azimuthal survey method uses standard resistivity equipment with a Wenner array rotated about a fixed center point at selected degree intervals that yields an apparent resistivity ellipse. From this ellipse, joint set orientation can be determined. Azimuthal surveys were conducted at 21 sites in a 500-km2 (193 mi2) area around Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and more specifically, at sites having more than 30 m (98 ft) of glacial till (to minimize the influence of underlying bedrock joints). The 26 azimuthal surveys revealed a systematic pattern to the trend of the dominant joint set within the tills, which is approximately parallel to ice flow direction during till deposition. The average orientation of the joint set parallel with the ice flow direction is N77??E and N37??E for the Oak Creek and Ozaukee tills, respectively. The mean difference between average direct observation of joint set orientations and average azimuthal resistivity results is 8??, which is one fifth of the difference of ice flow direction between the Ozaukee and Oak Creek tills. The results of this study suggest that the surface azimuthal electrical resistivity survey method used for local in situ studies can be a useful noninvasive method for delineating joint sets within shallow geologic material for regional studies. Copyright ?? 2010 The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  13. Requirements for extracting mantle viscosity from glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Extracting mantle viscosity from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) data is challenging because it requires a correctly posed rheological model, an accurate description of the ice and water load redistributions that occurred over at least the last glacial cycle, and the ability to interact model predictions with a large amount of observational data. To address sealevel changes, models must be based on an appropriate rheology. Daly focused attention on this critical issue 78 years ago with his down-punching hypothesis. Observing the sympathetic uplift behavior of areas peripheral to continental glacial loads, he suggested a thick lithosphere was required to force this behavior on asthenosphere flow. At the same time Haskell pointed out that deep flow in a constant viscosity Newtonian mantle would produce the observed peripheral bulge behavior without a thick lithosphere. This debate is important today because sealevel changes are particularly impacted by deep mantle viscosity and mantle rheology. Lithosphere and asthenosphere properties are another much discussed topic. The commonly observed substantial short wavelength response requires both a thin (~40 km thick) lithosphere and an asthenosphere ~25 times more fluid than the mantle. Because the manner of local ice removal can affect rebound calculations greatly, it is critical to have accurate ice and water load redistributions. Load redistributions must include changes in the levels of large lakes. Recent studies indicate how important it is to take into account sediment redistribution over the last glacial cycle. Finally, evaluation of the calculated emergence requires the comparison to large amounts of accurate (or at least critically vetted) sea level, emergence, GPS, and other kinds of data. These issues will be discussed and illustrated with some recent calculations.

  14. Glacial History of the Pirrit Hills, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, P. E.; Stone, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    We present new ice-thickness constraints from the Pirrit Hills, a small, far-flung group of nunataks located in the Weddell Sector. At the Pirrit Hills, fresh glacial erratics indicate ice levels ~350-450 m above present during the last ice age. The highest erratics have preliminary 10Be exposure ages of ~16 ka, and the ages generally decrease with decreasing elevation, recording the thinning of the ice in the region. Despite the evidence of thicker ice, weathered bedrock extends down to the present ice level, implying prolonged subaerial weathering prior to the last ice age. These features, and the lack of evidence for wet-based glacial erosion, indicate cold-based and non-erosive ice cover. Over the elevation range in which we found glacial erratics, bedrock 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne concentrations are consistent with modest ice cover, and have exposure ages ranging from ~0.3-1.5 Myr. Around 450 m above the present ice level, bedrock 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne concentrations increase by a factor of ~4-5 and do not indicate past ice cover. This height coincides with a break in the otherwise steep slopes of the Pirrit Hills, and the bedrock above is more weathered than the bedrock below. This transition marks the height above which ice cover, if it has occurred in the past few million years, has been very rare, brief, and cold-based. This feature may relate to the trimline imprinted on ridges in the Ellsworth Mountains. In both cases, alpine landscapes have been preserved by a polar climate and glacial highstands rising only partway up the mountain flanks.

  15. An Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Todd, B. J.; Dowdeswell, E. K.; Hogan, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past two decades there have been several advances that make the production of an atlas of submarine glacial landforms timely. First is the development of high-resolution imaging technologies; multi-beam echo-sounding or swath bathymetry that allows the detailed mapping of the sea floor at water depths of tens to thousands of metres across continental margins, and 3-D seismic methods that enable the visualisation of palaeo-continental shelves in Quaternary sediments and ancient palaeo-glacial rocks (e.g. Late Ordovician of Northern Africa). A second technological development is that of ice-breaking or ice-strengthened ships that can penetrate deep into the ice-infested waters of the Arctic and Antarctic, to deploy the multibeam systems. A third component is that of relevance - through both the recognition that the polar regions, and especially the Arctic, are particularly sensitive parts of the global environmental system and that these high-latitude margins (both modern and ancient) are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon resources. An enhanced understanding of the sediments and landforms of these fjord-shelf-slope systems is, therefore, of increasing importance to both academics and industry. We are editing an Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms that presents a series of individual contributions that describe, discuss and illustrate features on the high-latitude, glacier-influenced sea floor. Contributions are organised in two ways: first, by position on a continental margin - from fjords, through continental shelves to the continental slope and rise; secondly, by scale - as individual landforms and assemblages of landforms. A final section provides discussion of integrated fjord-shelf-slope systems. Over 100 contributions by scientists from many countries contain descriptions and interpretation of swath-bathymetric data from both Arctic and Antarctic margins and use 3D seismic data to investigate ancient glacial landforms. The Atlas will be

  16. Sulfur/Carbonate Springs and Life in Glacial Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Grasby, Stephen; Longazo, Teresa

    2001-01-01

    Ice in the near subsurface of Mars apparently discharges liquid water on occasion. Cold-tolerant microorganisms are known to exist within terrestrial glacial ice, and may be brought to the surface as a result of melting events. We are investigating a set of springs that deposit sulfur and carbonate minerals, as well as evidence of microbial life, on the surface of a glacier in the Canadian arctic. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Uncovering the glacial history of the Irish continental shelf (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, P.; Benetti, S.; OCofaigh, C.

    2013-12-01

    In 1999 the Irish Government initiated a €32 million survey of its territorial waters known as the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS). The INSS is amongst the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken anywhere in the world and provides high-resolution multibeam, backscatter and seismic data of the seabed around Ireland. These data have been used to provide the first clear evidence for extensive glaciation of the continental shelf west and northwest of Ireland. Streamlined drumlins on the mid to outer shelf record former offshore-directed ice flow towards the shelf edge and show that the ice sheet was grounded in a zone of confluence where ice flowing onto the shelf from northwest Ireland merged with ice flowing across the Malin Shelf from southwest Scotland. The major glacial features on the shelf are well developed nested arcuate moraine systems that mark the position of the ice sheet margin and confirm that the former British Irish Ice Sheet was grounded as far as the shelf edge around 100 km offshore of west Donegal at the last glacial maximum. Distal to the moraines, on the outermost shelf, prominent zones of iceberg plough marks give way to the Barra/Donegal fan and a well developed system of gullies and canyons which incise the continental slope. Since 2008 several scientific cruises have retrieved cores from the shelf and slope to help build a more detailed understanding of glacial events in this region. This presentation will provide an overview of the glacial history of the Irish shelf and will discuss ongoing research programmes that are building on the initial research findings to produce a better understanding of the nature and timing of ice sheet events in this region.

  18. Tectonic stress feedback loop explains U-shaped glacial valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-03-01

    In the shadow of the Matterhorn, the broad form of the Matter Valley—like so many throughout the Alps—is interrupted by a deep U-shaped glacial trough. Carved into a landscape reflecting millennia of tectonic uplift and river erosion, growing evidence suggests the 100-meter-deep U-shaped groove was produced shortly after a shift toward major cycles of Alpine glaciation almost a million years ago. Subsequent glaciations may have therefore had little effect on the landscape.

  19. Ocean Cooling Pattern at the Last Glacial Maximum

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuang, Kelin; Giardino, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean temperature and ocean heat content change are analyzed based on four PMIP3 model results at the Last Glacial Maximum relative to the prehistorical run. Ocean cooling mostly occurs in the upper 1000 m depth and varies spatially in the tropical and temperate zones. The Atlantic Ocean experiences greater cooling than the rest of the ocean basins. Ocean cooling is closely related to the weakening of meridional overturning circulation and enhanced intrusion of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Atlantic.

  20. Comparative phylogeography of two North American 'glacial relict' crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Dooh, R T; Adamowicz, S J; Hebert, P D N

    2006-12-01

    The Pleistocene glaciations represent the most recent and dramatic series of habitat changes since the Cretaceous. The impact of these events was particularly acute for aquatic taxa with poor powers of dispersal, but few organisms have evolutionary histories more intimately entwined with the advance and retreat of ice than the 'glacial relicts'. In this study, we used a mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), to examine and compare the phylogeographical structure of two glacial relict crustaceans (Limnocalanus macrurus and members of the Mysis relicta species group) across North America. In both cases, we found a sharp phylogenetic division between populations from inland lakes formed during glacial retreat, and arctic lakes isolated from polar seas via isostatic rebound. However, the depth of this phylogenetic partition varied between taxa. In L. macrurus, nucleotide sequence divergence of 2.2% between these zones is consistent with its current status as a single morphologically variable species, but in Mysis the split occurred among recently described, morphologically conserved species, at a divergence of 8.2%. The disparity in the depth of divergence indicates a history of recurrent freshwater invasions from the arctic seas, in concordance with previous studies of Eurasian glacial relicts. However, we suggest further consideration of a largely overlooked explanation that could account for some of the discrepancies between molecular divergences and glaciation events. Many cladogenetic events could have occurred in arctic seas prior to the transition to inland waters, a possibility supported both by the complex physical and ionic history of arctic seas and by high marine and estuarine lineage diversity in the north.

  1. Floating glacial ice caps in the arctic ocean.

    PubMed

    Broecker, W S

    1975-06-13

    Two arguments are presented, one in favor of the existence of thicker ice in the Arctic Ocean during glacial time, and the other in favor of a full-fledged Arctic ice cap. The first is based on the Greenland air temperature record obtained from isotopic studies of the Camp Century ice core. The second is based on the oxygen isotope record of benthic foraminifera from a deep Pacific Ocean core.

  2. Evidence of strong ocean heating during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous hypotheses have addressed glacial-interglacial climatic dynamics, but none of them explain the sharp 25C temperature increase in Greenland in the last deglaciation (Cuffey et al. 1995; Dahl-Jensen et al. 1998). These robust data were obtained through analyzing the temperature profile in the Greenland ice sheet where cold from the last glaciation is preserved in the depth of the glacial sheet. We suggest that during glaciations the ocean accumulated energy: interior ocean water heated up to ~20-30C and during deglaciation this energy is released. In the analogy with reconstructing the ice sheet temperature profiles, the most reliable proof of ocean interior warming during the last glaciation is the heat flux profiles in the bottom sediments. In the final reports based on temperature measurements conducted during the DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) it is stated that heat flux in the bottom sediments doesn't vary with depth and consequently there were no substantial temperature changes in the ocean interior during the last glacial cycle, and heat flux on the surface of the ocean bottom is the geothermal heat flux (Erickson et al., 1975, Hyndman et al., 1987). However, we have critically investigated data in all initial reports of all deep sea drilling projects and have noticed that all temperature data show that heat flow decreases strongly with depth (a minimum of 40 mW/m2), i.e. most of the heat flux detected on the surface of the ocean floor is not the geothermal heat flux but remaining heat that bottom sediments release. Sharp shifts in heat flow are seen within boreholes at depths crossing gas hydrate bottom. All this means that during the last glacial period interior water temperature was on 25-30C degrees warmer. Conversely, in isolated seas heat flow in the sediments shows little change with depth.

  3. An interhemispheric mechanism for glacial abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, Rubén; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Robinson, Alexander; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-05-01

    The last glacial period was punctuated by abrupt climate changes that are widely considered to result from millennial-scale variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the origin of these AMOC reorganizations remains poorly understood. The climatic connection between both hemispheres indicated by proxies suggests that the Southern Ocean (SO) could regulate this variability through changes in winds and atmospheric CO concentration. Here, we investigate this hypothesis using a coupled climate model forced by prescribed CO and SO wind-stress variations. We find that the AMOC exhibits an oscillatory behavior between weak and strong circulation regimes which is ultimately caused by changes in the meridional density gradient of the Atlantic Ocean. The evolution of the simulated climatic patterns matches the amplitude and timing of the largest events that occurred during the last glacial period and their widespread climatic impacts. Our results suggest the existence of an internal interhemispheric oscillation mediated by the bipolar seesaw that could promote glacial abrupt climate changes through variations in atmospheric CO levels, the strength of the SO winds and AMOC reorganizations, and provide an explanation for the pervasive Antarctic-like climate signal found in proxy records worldwide.

  4. Intra-crater glacial processes in central Utopia Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Geoffrey; Osinski, Gordon R.; Soare, Richard J.

    2011-03-01

    We describe and interpret a series of previously unidentified glacial-like lobes (34-43°N; 107-125°E) that were discovered as part of a survey of large (D > 5 km) impact craters in Utopia Planitia, one of the great northern plains of Mars. The lobes have characteristics that are consistent with a glacial origin. Evidence includes curvilinearity of form, lineations and ridges, and surface textures that are thought to form by the sublimation of near-surface volatiles. The lobes display morphologies that range from wedge-shaped to near-circular to elongate. The flow directions are towards the northern walls in the case of craters with large single lobes, and in all directions in the case of the largest (D > 30 km) craters. Concentric crater fill is also interspersed within craters of our study region, with such craters having much higher filling rates than those with flow lobes. We suggest that the impact crater population in south-west Utopia Planitia demonstrates a spectrum of glacial modifications, from low levels of filling in the case of craters with elongate lobes at one extreme, to concentric crater fill in highly-filled craters at the other.

  5. Human population dynamics in Europe over the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Tallavaara, Miikka; Luoto, Miska; Korhonen, Natalia; Järvinen, Heikki; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    The severe cooling and the expansion of the ice sheets during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 27,000–19,000 y ago (27–19 ky ago) had a major impact on plant and animal populations, including humans. Changes in human population size and range have affected our genetic evolution, and recent modeling efforts have reaffirmed the importance of population dynamics in cultural and linguistic evolution, as well. However, in the absence of historical records, estimating past population levels has remained difficult. Here we show that it is possible to model spatially explicit human population dynamics from the pre-LGM at 30 ky ago through the LGM to the Late Glacial in Europe by using climate envelope modeling tools and modern ethnographic datasets to construct a population calibration model. The simulated range and size of the human population correspond significantly with spatiotemporal patterns in the archaeological data, suggesting that climate was a major driver of population dynamics 30–13 ky ago. The simulated population size declined from about 330,000 people at 30 ky ago to a minimum of 130,000 people at 23 ky ago. The Late Glacial population growth was fastest during Greenland interstadial 1, and by 13 ky ago, there were almost 410,000 people in Europe. Even during the coldest part of the LGM, the climatically suitable area for human habitation remained unfragmented and covered 36% of Europe. PMID:26100880

  6. Massive remobilization of permafrost carbon during post-glacial warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Muschitiello, F.; Smittenberg, R. H.; Jakobsson, M.; Vonk, J. E.; Hill, P.; Andersson, A.; Kirchner, N.; Noormets, R.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2016-11-01

    Recent hypotheses, based on atmospheric records and models, suggest that permafrost carbon (PF-C) accumulated during the last glaciation may have been an important source for the atmospheric CO2 rise during post-glacial warming. However, direct physical indications for such PF-C release have so far been absent. Here we use the Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean) as an archive to investigate PF-C destabilization during the last glacial-interglacial period. Our results show evidence for massive supply of PF-C from Siberian soils as a result of severe active layer deepening in response to the warming. Thawing of PF-C must also have brought about an enhanced organic matter respiration and, thus, these findings suggest that PF-C may indeed have been an important source of CO2 across the extensive permafrost domain. The results challenge current paradigms on the post-glacial CO2 rise and, at the same time, serve as a harbinger for possible consequences of the present-day warming of PF-C soils.

  7. Microbial genesis, life and death in glacial ice.

    PubMed

    Price, P Buford

    2009-01-01

    Arguments are given that terrestrial RNA and DNA may have originated in a frozen environment more than 4 billion years ago. Scenarios are developed for atmospheric transport of microbes onto glacial ice, their adaptation to subzero temperatures in the ice, and their incorporation into one of three habitats - liquid veins, mineral grain surfaces, or isolated inside 1 of the crystals that make up polycrystalline ice. The Arrhenius dependence of microbial metabolic rate on temperature is shown to match that required to repair damage owing to spontaneous DNA depurination and amino acid racemization. Even for the oldest glacial ice, microbial lifetime is shown not to be shortened by radiation damage from 238U, 232Th, or 40K in mineral dust in ice, by phage-induced lysis, or by penetrating cosmic radiation. Instead, death of those cells adapted to the hostile conditions in glacial ice is probably due to exhaustion of available nutrients. By contrast, in permafrost microbial death is more likely due to alpha-particle radiation damage from U and Th in the soil and rocks intermixed with ice. For residence times in ice longer than a million years, spore formers may be unable to compete in longevity with vegetative cells that are able to repair DNA damage via survival metabolism.

  8. Human population dynamics in Europe over the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Tallavaara, Miikka; Luoto, Miska; Korhonen, Natalia; Järvinen, Heikki; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-07-07

    The severe cooling and the expansion of the ice sheets during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 27,000-19,000 y ago (27-19 ky ago) had a major impact on plant and animal populations, including humans. Changes in human population size and range have affected our genetic evolution, and recent modeling efforts have reaffirmed the importance of population dynamics in cultural and linguistic evolution, as well. However, in the absence of historical records, estimating past population levels has remained difficult. Here we show that it is possible to model spatially explicit human population dynamics from the pre-LGM at 30 ky ago through the LGM to the Late Glacial in Europe by using climate envelope modeling tools and modern ethnographic datasets to construct a population calibration model. The simulated range and size of the human population correspond significantly with spatiotemporal patterns in the archaeological data, suggesting that climate was a major driver of population dynamics 30-13 ky ago. The simulated population size declined from about 330,000 people at 30 ky ago to a minimum of 130,000 people at 23 ky ago. The Late Glacial population growth was fastest during Greenland interstadial 1, and by 13 ky ago, there were almost 410,000 people in Europe. Even during the coldest part of the LGM, the climatically suitable area for human habitation remained unfragmented and covered 36% of Europe.

  9. Equatorial Moisture Transport in the Asia-Australia Region During the Last Glacial Maximum - Evidence from Paleoceanographic Observations and Modelling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A.; Hope, P.

    2007-05-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), about 20,000 years ago, was on average cooler and also drier across the globe. Northern Australia, however, has few appropriate sites from which to gain proxy evidence of the climatic conditions during the culmination of the last glacial. The sediment blown off the continent and deposited in marine cores can begin to provide such evidence. In Australia there are two preferred off-shore dust paths - one of which is to the north-west. Sediment cores from the Timor Trough show higher elemental ratios of Mg/Al, K/Al, and Ti/Al and the presence of an inorganic nitrogen fraction during the late glacial compared to the Holocene (the last 10,000 years). These changes indicate both greater amounts of material off the continent during glacial times and a weathering regime more common in arid, cold climates at the source region of the sediment. To complement the proxy evidence, the results from GCMs forced with LGM sea surface temperatures, ice-sheets and lower atmospheric CO2, were examined. They show cold and dry conditions across northern Australia and stronger off-shore winds in the north-west, conditions that match the climate reconstructions based on the sediment in the marine cores. Cross-equatorial moisture transport during this time does not extend as far south as in the present day, contributing to these dry conditions. However, further north there was limited change in that transport. The LGM sea surface temperature grids used to force these GCMs were based upon temperature reconstructions from cores such as the ones examined here. The fact that the proxy reconstructions of the continental climate from the marine cores matches the GCM simulations based on the surface temperatures reconstructed from such cores provides a consistent picture of the climate of northern Australia during glacial times. This provides evidence where there are few appropriate sites for direct proxy evidence to be obtained.

  10. How long do U-shaped valleys last? The lifespan of glacial topography set by tectonics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac; Montgomery, David

    2015-04-01

    More than 10 kyr after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges world-wide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but the transition from a glacial to a fluvial landscape is poorly constrained and it remains unclear how long glacial morphology persists following deglaciation. The longevity of glacial topography influences glacial extent and erosion in subsequent glaciations and hence the cumulative impact of Pleistocene glacial cycles on the evolution of mountain ranges. We tested whether tectonic forcing and erosional response control the timescale over which glacial topography persists into inter-glacial periods in the western Southern Alps of New Zealand and other mountain ranges worldwide, including the syntaxes of the Himalaya and Taiwan. We quantified the degree of glacial imprint by exploiting the conventional interpretation of V-shaped fluvial and U-shaped glacial valleys. Valley cross sections were automatically extracted from digital terrain models and power-laws were fitted to each cross section to quantify the shape of the valley flanks. A power-law exponent of 1 characterizes the straight valley flanks of a V-shaped cross section and greater exponents are indicative of progressively more U-shaped valleys. Our results show that tectonic forcing is a first-order control on landscape evolution and on the persistence of glacial morphology worldwide. In Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges the lifespan of glacial topography is on the order of one interglacial period, preventing the development of a cumulative glacial signal. In contrast, in most alpine landscapes more than 100 kyr are required for the transformation from glacial back to fluvial topography and glacial landforms have not or have only partially been erased during the current interglacial. Thus we suggest, emphasizing the influence of glacially preconditioned topography on glacial extent and erosion, that tectonic forcing

  11. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of pre-late Wisconsin catastrophic glacial flood sediments, western Walla Walla Valley, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.L.; Spencer, P.K. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The Cummins Bridge site in the western Walla Walla Valley exhibits clear evidence for pre-late Wisconsin catastrophic glacial flooding. The section consists of an unstratified, poorly sorted diamict with angular basaltic clasts in a matrix of sand and silt, and a large number of well-rounded clasts of exotic lithology in the coarse fraction, gradationally overlain by a coarse, angular gravel that is matrix poor and exotic-free; this unit grades upward into a matrix-rich diamict with a well-developed caliche in the upper portion. Above this is a sand and silt unit showing vague cross-stratification, lamination, and graded beds; this unit may represent local temporary ponding of the ancestral drainage. Overlying this on a pronounced erosional surface are rhythmically stratified sand-to-salt beds assigned to the late Wisconsin Toughet Beds. The section is capped by a thin bed of Holocene loess. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic criteria suggest that the lowermost units represent an indirect record of catastrophic glacial flooding. Flood sediments were deposited on an adjacent topographic high and subsequently mass-wasted via mudflow into their present position. Normal fluvial processes alternated with mass-wasting events to concentrate the angular, matrix-poor basaltic gravel. The lower diamict shows characteristics similar to documented pre-late Wisconsin catastrophic flood sediments at a nearby site, including rounded exotic clasts, angular basaltic clasts, lack of stratification, and poor sorting. The two sites may represent the same pre-late Wisconsin flood event.

  12. Climatic Instability and Regional Glacial Advances in the Late Ediacaran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, J. L.; Stein, H. J.; Marolf, N.; Bingen, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Ediacaran Period closed out the environmentally raucous Neoproterozoic Era with the last of multiple glacial events and the first ephemeral glimmer of multicellular life. As such, evolution of Earth's biosphere and the marine environments that nurtured this nascent biota are of particular interest. Because the Ediacaran biota appear in the stratigraphic record just above tillites in many localities, inferences are naturally drawn to link glaciation to bioevolution. Here we review known controls on the timing and extent of the late Ediacaran Gaskier and Varanger glacial events, bolstered by new constraints on the Moelv tillite of South Norway. The elusive mid-Ediacaran glacial strata are poorly dated, patchy in distribution, and relatively limited in thickness. The type Gaskier glaciogenic units in Newfoundland are 582 to 584 Ma, based on U-Pb zircon ages from intercalated ash beds [1]. The Varanger glaciogenic deposits in northern Norway, in contrast, remain only roughly constrained to ca. 630 to 560 Ma. Post-Gaskier negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) have been reported from multiple localities in both China and SW United States, suggesting climatic instability in the late Ediacaran. Although most localities lack solid geochronology, paleontologic constraints place the Hongtiegou glacial diamictite and accompanying CIE in the Chaidam Basin, NW China, in the latest Ediacaran, ca. 555 Ma [2]. We previously suggested that the Moelv tillite in south Norway was roughly equivalent to the Gaskier, based on an imprecise Re-Os age of ~560 Ma [3] for the underlying Biri shale. Reanalysis of these data shows that the upper part of the shale section was disturbed by a redox front during the Caledonian orogeny. The undisturbed lower part of the section yields a more precise Model 1 isochron age of 559.5 ± 6.2 Ma, clearly post-dating the Gaskier event well outside analytical uncertainty. These new results bolster arguments that the Gaskier glaciation was not a global

  13. Modelling of Gas Hydrate Dissociation During The Glacial-Inter-glacial Cycles, Case Study The Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwunmi, P.; Pecher, I. A.; Archer, R.; Moridis, G. J.; Reagan, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor depressions covering an area of >20,000 km2 on the Chatham Rise, south east of New Zealand, have been interpreted as pockmarks which are related to past fluid releases. It is proposed that the seafloor depressions were caused by sudden escape of overpressured gas generated by gas hydrate dissociation during glacial sea-level lowering. We are attempting to simulate the evolution of the gas hydrate system through glacial-interglacial cycles in the study area using TOUGH-Hydrate. The Chatham Rise offers a unique opportunity for studying the effect of depressurization from sealevel lowering to gas hydrate systems because it is a bathymetric barrier preventing the Subtropical Front separating subtropical and subantarctic waters from migrating during glacial-interglacial cycles. Hence, bottom-water temperatures can be assumed to remain constant. Recent results from paleoceanographic studies however, indicate that bottom-temperature may have varied locally. These temperature changes may have a more significant effect on the shallow gas hydrate system in the study area than the relatively gradual decrease of pressure associated with sealevel lowering.

  14. Holocene climate and glacial history of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula: the marine sedimentary record from a long SHALDRIL core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalchuk, Bradley R.; Anderson, John B.; Wellner, Julia S.; Manley, Patricia L.; Majewski, Wojciech; Bohaty, Steve

    2009-12-01

    A high-resolution record of Holocene deglacial and climate history was obtained from a 77 m sediment core from the Firth of Tay, Antarctic Peninsula, as part of the SHALDRIL initiative. This study provides a detailed sedimentological record of Holocene paleoclimate and glacial advance and retreat from the eastern side of the peninsula. A robust chronostratigraphy was derived from thirty-three radiocarbon dates on carbonate material. This chronostratigraphic framework was used to establish the timing of glacial and climate events derived from multiple proxies including: magnetic susceptibility, electric resistivity, porosity, ice-rafted debris content, organic carbon content, nitrogen content, biogenic silica content, and diatom and foraminiferal assemblages. The core bottomed-out in a stiff diamicton interpreted as till. Gravelly and sandy mud above the till is interpreted as proximal glaciomarine sediment that represents decoupling of the glacier from the seafloor circa 9400 cal. yr BP and its subsequent landward retreat. This was approximately 5000 yr later than in the Bransfield Basin and South Shetland Islands, on the western side of the peninsula. The Firth of Tay core site remained in a proximal glaciomarine setting until 8300 cal. yr BP, at which time significant glacial retreat took place. Deposition of diatomaceous glaciomarine sediments after 8300 cal. yr BP indicates that an ice shelf has not existed in the area since this time. The onset of seasonally open marine conditions between 7800 and 6000 cal. yr BP followed the deglacial period and is interpreted as the mid-Holocene Climatic Optimum. Open marine conditions lasted until present, with a minor cooling having occurred between 6000 and 4500 cal. yr BP and a period of minor glacial retreat and/or decreased sea ice coverage between 4500 and 3500 cal. yr BP. Finally, climatic cooling and variable sea ice cover occurred from 3500 cal. yr BP to near present and it is interpreted as being part of the

  15. Surface exposure dating of glacial lake shorelines: implications for constraining ice margin positions and meltwater outbursts during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin; Schaefer, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) played an important role in the climate variability of the last deglaciation, notably through large discharges of meltwater to the North Atlantic that disturbed the ocean's circulation and heat transport. Deglaciation of the northeastern sector of the LIS was complex and included the development of large ice-dammed lakes that were confined within the main river valleys draining northward into Ungava Bay. The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador ice dome, but large uncertainties regarding the position and dynamic of the ice margin through time currently limit our understanding of these glacial lakes. In the Ungava lowlands, glacial lake Naskaupi invaded the George River valley, leaving a series of well-developed shorelines and deltas. These spectacular raised shorelines are 10 to 20 meters wide and can be followed for several kilometers. Our field investigations and remote sensing analysis indicate that Lake Naskaupi experienced a complex history, as shown by the succession of shorelines that likely reflect the opening of new topographic outlets during ice retreat. Constraining the timing of the different phases of the lake and its drainage has traditionally been challenging, as organic material suitable for radiocarbon dating is scarce or lacking. Recent progress in Surface Exposure Dating (SED) by cosmogenic nuclides now inspires novel approaches to glacial and deglacial geomorphology. Here we apply 10Be SED to boulders that form part of these shorelines and mark the main (high-level) stage of Lake Naskaupi. We sampled 4-6 multi-meter size boulders at 4 different sites. Preliminary results show high internal consistency and, indicate that the main lake phase developed very late in the regional deglaciation, which extends from about 8500 to 6800 cal. yr BP (Dyke and Prest, 1987). We also present SED results from boulders deposited by a substantial outburst flood presumably associated with

  16. Interannual physiological responses of glacial trees to changes in atmospheric [CO2] since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, L. M.; Harris, J. M.; Ward, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, atmospheric [CO2] were as low as 180 ppm and have currently risen to a modern value of 385 ppm as a result of fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. In order to understand how changing [CO2] influenced the physiology of trees over the last 50,000 years, we analyzed carbon isotope ratios of individual tree rings from juniper wood specimens from the Rancho La Brea tar pits in southern California and kauri wood specimens from peat bogs in New Zealand (North Island). Modern trees from different altitudes were compared to account for changes in precipitation and temperature through time in order to isolate the effects of changing [CO2]. We hypothesized that over the last 50,000 years, the ratio of ci (intracellular [CO2]) to ca (atmospheric [CO2]) would be maintained within each species. Consequently, ci values would be significantly lower in glacial trees due to lower ca levels during the LGM. In addition, we hypothesized that low [CO2] (which does not vary between years during the LGM) dominated tree physiology during the LGM as evidenced by low levels of inter-annual variation in ci/ca ratios relative to modern trees (which are known to respond to high frequency variation in water and temperature between years). In both kauri and juniper trees, mean ci/ca values remained constant throughout 50,000 years despite major climatic and [CO2] changes, indicating that there is a long-term physiological set point in these species. Limitations on the ci values of glacial junipers suggest that 90 ppm CO2 represents a survival compensation point for this species. In addition, glacial trees showed very low inter-annual variation in ci/ca values compared to modern trees. This suggests that glacial tree physiology may have been dominated by low CO2 that was constant between years, whereas modern trees may be dominated by climatic factors that vary substantially between years. Consequently, while each species maintained mean ci/ca values over time

  17. Timing the last interglacial-glacial transition in glacial sedimentary sequences of the Hudson Bay lowlands (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M.; Allard, G.; Ghaleb, B.; Lamothe, M.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate records (oxygen isotopes and speleothems) indicate that the onset of the last glacial cycle was characterized by rapid and large-scale growth of continental ice sheets. The timing of the inception of the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) and its subsequent evolution (extent) remain, however, largely unconstrained. The depositional record of the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is of particular interest to these issues because this region is located near the former geographic center of the LIS. The presence of nonglacial deposits in HBL glacial sedimentary sequences thus implies drastic changes in ice sheet configuration, but constraining these ice volume changes through absolute dating of nonglacial sediments has been so far inconclusive. Here we use radiocarbon, U-series, and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) methods to constrain the age of an extensive nonglacial unit containing abundant wood fragments enclosed in compacted clay lying below several meters of glacial deposits along the Nottaway River, in the southeastern sector of the HBL. This region is particularly interesting because it lies near one of the inception centers of the LIS. Radiocarbon dating of a wood fragment yielded a nonfinite 14C age of >55.2 ka, in agreement with similar dating attempts throughout the HBL. Measurements of U and Th concentrations and isotope ratios on fossil wood samples revealed consistent 230Th/U ages, indicating that the wood fragments were subject to a single episode of uranium uptake, with apparently no subsequent disturbance of the geochemical system. Despite mechanical cleaning of the wood outer surfaces, non-authigenic 230Th was found in most samples and correction for this detrital contamination yielded an isochron age of 106.8 (+12.3, -10.3) ka, which represents a minimum age for this unit. The 230Th/U age constraint is nonetheless supported by a series of OSL ages obtained for the overlying fluvial sands, thereby assigning the Nottaway nonglacial unit to the end

  18. Lipid biomarkers in Holocene and glacial sediments from ancient Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtvoeth, J.; Vogel, H.; Wagner, B.; Wolff, G. A.

    2010-06-01

    Organic matter preserved in Lake Ohrid sediments originates from aquatic and terrestrial sources. Its variable composition reflects climate-controlled changes in the lake basin's hydrology and related organic matter export, i.e. changes in primary productivity, terrestrial plant matter input and soil erosion. Here, we present first results from lipid biomarker investigations of Lake Ohrid sediments from two near-shore settings: Site Lz1120 near the southern shore, with flat lands nearby and probably influenced by river discharge, and site Co1202 which is close to the steep eastern slopes. Variable proportions of terrestrial n-alkanoic acids and n-alkanols as well as compositional changes of ω-hydroxy acids document differences in soil organic matter supply between the sites and during different climate stages (glacial, Holocene, 8.2 ka cooling event). Changes in the vegetation cover are suggested by changes in the dominant chain length of terrestrial n-alkanols. Effective microbial degradation of labile organic matter and in situ contribution of organic matter derived from the microbes themselves are both evident in the sediments. We found evidence for anoxic conditions within the photic zone by detecting epicholestanol from sulphur-oxidising phototrophic bacteria and for the influence of an early human community from the occurrence of coprostanol, a biomarker for human and cattle faeces, in an early Holocene sample. This study illustrates the potential of lipid biomarkers for future environmental reconstructions using one of Europe's oldest continental climate archives, Lake Ohrid.

  19. Last glacial megafaunal death assemblage and early human occupation at Lake Menindee, southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupper, Matthew L.; Duncan, Jacqui

    2006-09-01

    The Tedford subfossil locality at Lake Menindee preserves a diverse assemblage of marsupials, monotremes and placental rodents. Of the 38 mammal taxa recorded at the site, almost a third are of extinct megafauna. Some of the bones are articulated or semi-articulated and include almost complete skeletons, indicating that aeolian sediments rapidly buried the animals following death. New optical ages show the site dates to the early part of the last glacial (55,700 ± 1300 yr weighted mean age). This is close to the 51,200-39,800 yr Australia-wide extinction age for megafauna suggested by Roberts et al. [2001, Science 292:1888-1892], but like all previous researchers, we cannot conclusively determine whether humans were implicated in the deaths of the animals. Although an intrusive hearth at the site dating to 45,100 ± 1400 yr ago is the oldest evidence of human occupation of the Darling River, no artifacts were identified in situ within the sub-fossil-bearing unit. Non-anthropogenic causes, such as natural senescence or ecosystem stress due to climatic aridity, probably explain the mortality of the faunal assemblage at Lake Menindee.

  20. Seasonal evolution of supra-glacial lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Malcolm; Nienow, Peter; Shepherd, Andrew; Benham, Toby; Sole, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    A survey of supra-glacial lakes on the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet reveals a seasonally-driven hydrological system, culminating in widespread lake drainage in late summer. We used satellite imagery to study the evolution of 292 lakes across two sites totalling 22 000 km 2 in area. During 2001, the lakes combined area increased to 75 ± 5 km 2 by the beginning of July. Over the following 25 days, an area totalling 36 ± 3.5 km 2 drained from 216 lakes. At one study site, we used meteorological data and a positive degree day model to calculate the volume of water generated by melting in the lake catchments. Based on this estimate, the mean depth of filling lakes surveyed rose from 1.5 ± 0.7 m on 7th July to 3.9 ± 1.1 m on 1st August, in agreement with a value for one lake of 4.4 ± 0.9 m we have derived from airborne altimetry. During this 25 day period, we estimate that 38 ± 18 × 10 7 m 3 of water drained from the surface at this site, and that there was an average water flux of 1.3 ± 0.3 m 3 s - 1 passing through each lake that drained completely.

  1. Millennial-scale climate variability in response to changing glacial and orbital boundary conditions during the Mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Patrizia; Crowhurst, Simon; Drysdale, Russell; Bajo, Petra; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene transition represents perhaps the most important climate transition in the Quaternary period, yet it is one of the most poorly understood. Although the exact timing and mechanism of the onset of the "100 kyr" regime remain a matter of debate, it is well established that the overall periodicity of the glacial-interglacial cycles changed from a dominant 41 kyr obliquity periodicity prior to ~0.9 Ma to a dominant late Pleistocene 100 kyr variance. This change in the frequency domain was associated with an increase in the amplitude of global ice volume variations that, superimposed on a long-term climatic trend towards more glacial conditions over millions of years, produced some of the most extreme glaciations recorded. This interval of time has often been considered to be important in relation to long-term Milankovitch-scale climate variability. In contrast, here, special emphasis will be placed on assessing the presence and the characteristics of the suborbital-scale variability, and reconstructing the evolution of millennial-scale climate variability as the average climate state evolve toward generally colder conditions with larger ice sheets, and the spectral character of climate variability shifted from dominantly 41 kyr to 100 kyr. Appealing evidence suggests that millennial-scale climate variability is amplified during times of intense forcing changes, but this rapid variability has not been thoroughly explored yet at the time when the major changes in climate periodicity occurred. To address these questions, we have examined the record of climatic conditions from Marine Isotope Stages 25 to 16 (~970-650 ka) using high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sedimentary sequence in the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 306, Site U1313) in order to assess millennial-scale changes in sea-surface and deep-water conditions, the dynamics of thermohaline deep-water circulation

  2. Turbidite megabeds in an Oceanic Rift Valley recording jokulhlaups of late Pleistocene glacial lakes of the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuffa, G.G.; Normark, W.R.; Serra, F.; Brunner, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Escanaba Trough is the southernmost segment of the Gorda Ridge and is filled by sandy turbidites locally exceeding 500 m in thickness. New results from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1037 and 1038 that include accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dates and revised petrographic evaluation of the sediment provenance, combined with high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, provide a lithostratigraphic framework for the turbidite deposits. Three fining-upward units of sandy turbidites from the upper 365 m at ODP Site 1037 can be correlated with sediment recovered at ODP Site 1038 and Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) Site 35. Six AMS 14C ages in the upper 317 m of the sequence at Site 1037 indicate that average deposition rates exceeded 10 m/k.yr. between 32 and 11 ka, with nearly instantaneous deposition of one ~60-m interval of sand. Petrography of the sand beds is consistent with a Columbia River source for the entire sedimentary sequence in Escanaba Trough. High-resolution acoustic stratigraphy shows that the turbidites in the upper 60 m at Site 1037 provide a characteristic sequence of key reflectors that occurs across the floor of the entire Escanaba Trough. Recent mapping of turbidite systems in the northeast Pacific Ocean suggests that the turbidity currents reached the Escanaba Trough along an 1100-km-long pathway from the Columbia River to the west flank of the Gorda Ridge. The age of the upper fining-upward unit of sandy turbidites appears to correspond to the latest Wisconsinan outburst of glacial Lake Missoula. Many of the outbursts, or jokulhlaups, from the glacial lakes probably continued flowing as hyperpycnally generated turbidity currents on entering the sea at the mouth of the Columbia River.

  3. The Salzach Valley overdeeping: A most precise bedrock model of a major alpine glacial basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomper, Johannes; Salcher, Bernhard; Eichkitz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    sedimentary succession, representing multiple cycles of massive gravels and lacustrine fines, indicate that the valley was not fully excavated during the last glacial coverage at the LGM. Through its model accuracy related to a comprehensive geodatabase and a relatively homogenous rock erodibility, the Salzach Valley overdeepening might be a highly suitable testing site for future numerical simulations.

  4. Southern Ocean Sea Ice Development Since the Last Glacial, a Combined Proxy Data-Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersonde, R.; Benz, V.; Esper, O.; Lohmann, G.; Xiao, W.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Southern Ocean (SO) sea ice plays a critical role in climate at global and regional scales. To advance our understanding of processes that drive and regulate sea ice there is a strong need to further extend sea ice records into the past covering a broad range of boundary conditions and time scales. We present the SO sea ice development since the last glacial using a new diatom-based transfer function (Esper and Gersonde 2014). We have enhanced a previous circumpolar reconstruction of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (Gersonde et al. 2005) by new estimates from the hitherto not well-explored Pacific sector. This corroborates earlier results that LGM winter sea ice was expanded by ca. 100% compared to present. Time-series documenting the past 30,000 yrs are available from 29 sites from the western Indian, the Atlantic and the Pacific sectors. In general, the records suggest a post-glacial sea ice retreat between 18,000-15,000 yrs followed by a slight expansion during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Minimum sea ice extent was reached in the early Holocene. Around 8.000 yrs ago we observe a re-expansion of sea ice, primarily in the Ross and the Weddell/Scotia Sea sectors. This general pattern is also mirrored by sea ice proxy records (ssNa flux) obtained from Antarctic ice cores. However, the marine records show that the sea ice development is subject to spatial heterogeneity related to SO circulation systems and bottom topography, and to land/ocean distribution. This may lead to area-specific expansions and latitudinal gradients in sea ice concentration with implications on climate-relevant factors e.g. albedo, ocean/atmosphere exchange, moisture distribution, water mass generation and biological productivity. The obtained proxy data are compared with scenarios from Earth system modelling (e.g. Zhang et al., 2013) to verify the outcome of numerical modeling, to test the potential of models to bridge gaps in the proxy-based record (e.g. summer sea ice extent, areas lacking

  5. The stratotype and facies of the glacial Lower Vendian Nichatka Formation, Chara River basin, Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, N. M.; Kernitskii, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Sediments of the Nichatka Formation are facially studied and thoroughly described, the sections are correlated, and the subformations are recognized. The formation represents a key stratigraphic unit to reveal the origin of the Central Siberian glacial horizon and to correlate it with glacial horizons in other regions of the world, namely, with the Laplandian Horizon of the Lower Vendian, Nantou and Marino tillites, etc. The Nichatka Formation is correlated with the glacial Bolshoi Patom (Dzhemkukan) Formation of the Vendian reference section at the Ura Uplift. Unlike the latter, it is mainly composed of continental glacial deposits and is marked by a complex facies composition. The glacial origin of the Nichatka Formation is reliably determined on the basis of a set of diagnostic characters. This permits a more complete reconstruction of the Early Vendian depositional environments. In addition to typical basal tillites and marginal moraine deposits, the formation includes glaciolacustrine and fluvioglacial sediments along with aquatillites, allotillites, and the glacial fan, including subaqueous, deposits.

  6. Glacial inception during the late Holocene without carbon emissions from early agriculture: lessons from the stage-19 glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Vavrus, S. J.; Kutzbach, J. E.; Ruddiman, W. F.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Decreases in orbitally-forced summer insolation along with downward trends in greenhouse gases (GHG) have been precursors to incipient glaciation in the past. In the last several thousand years of the current interglacial, while summer insolation has decreased, there was a reversal of the downward trends in CH4 and CO2 concentration within the Holocene around 5,000 and 7,000 years ago. While the cause of this reversal remains unresolved, a leading hypothesis is Ruddiman's Early Anthropogenic Hypothesis that early agriculture, starting several thousand years ago, caused emissions of GHG large enough to reverse natural downward trends in CO2 and CH4 and kept Earth's climate anomalously warm, with the corollary that this may have prevented incipient glaciation during the late Holocene. Here we use the 1-degree, fully coupled Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) with climate forcings (orbital parameters and GHG) of a previous glacial inception to investigate whether glacial inception should have occurred prior to the industrial revolution if the concentrations of CH4 and CO2 had followed their natural downward trends throughout the Holocene. Tzedakis et al. [2012] show that for the previous eight interglacials, Stage 11 and Stage 19 are the best analogs of the Holocene because of their low eccentricities, and Stage 19 is a better analog than Stage 11 for the Holocene due to the in-phase relationship between obliquity and precession. Furthermore, their study suggests that 777 ka BP (777,000 years before present) is the timing of glacial inception for Stage 19, based on the occurrence of the earliest bipolar seesaw event associated with glacial melting. Not only do the orbital parameters at 777 ka BP resemble pre-industrial conditions, but the concentrations of CO2 at that time were essentially the same as their expected 'natural' pre-industrial values in the absence of anthropogenic greenhouse emissions. Our multi-millennial coupled CCSM4 simulations show

  7. The state and their implication of Himalayan glacial lake changes from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y.; Sheng, Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, L.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.; Song, C.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs)generally result in catastrophic damages and fatalities. The Himalayas, the world's highest mountains hosting large number of glaciers, have frequently suffered from GLOFs events in the past decades. Climatic warming-induced melting and retreating glaciers make glacial lakes expand obviously and urge the potential risk of GLOFs in Himalayas. However, our knowledge on the state of glacial lakes in the entire Himalayas is still limited. This study conducts a systematically satellite-based inventory to firstly reveal the evolution complex, regional difference and causes of Himalayan glacial lake changes in the whole Himalayas. Hundreds of Landsat images and Google Earth high resolution imagery were employed to extract the extents of glacial lakes at four epochs (circa1990, circa 2000, circa 2005 and circa 2010). Object-oriented mapping method was used to automatically map the lakes. In association with published glacier data (e.g., China Glacier Inventory, Randolph and GLIMS Glacier data), visual inspections and iterative checks for individual lake guarantee the accuracy of our results. This study demonstrates the spatial and topographic distributions, differences, heterogeneity of glacial lake changes and their causes. Our results show that Himalayan glacial lakes present a rapidly expanding state in general. Both disappeared lakes and new-formed lakes were observed, however, pre-existing glacial lakes contributed most to the total areal expansion. Himalayan glacial lakes appeared a clear altitudinal difference between north side and south side of main range. Evolutions of glacial lakes between eastern, western and central Himalaya were different, and the most rapidly expanding areas need to be more concerned. Climatic and geomorphic controls result in the heterogeneity of glacial lake changes. This study will help assess the potential risk of GLOFs and promote the public awareness of glacial disasters in high mountain areas.

  8. Hydrological and vegetation shifts in the Wallacean region of central Indonesia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, Satrio A.; Russell, James M.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Precipitation is the most important variable of Indonesian climate, yet there are substantial uncertainties about past and future hydroclimate dynamics over the region. This study explores vegetation and rainfall and associated changes in atmospheric circulation during the past 26,000 years in Wallacea, a biogeographical area in central Indonesia, wedged between the Sunda and Sahul shelves and known for its exceptionally high rainforest biodiversity. We use terrestrial plant biomarkers from sediment cores retrieved from Mandar Bay, off west Sulawesi, to reconstruct changes in Wallacean vegetation and climate since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Enriched leaf wax carbon isotope (δ13Cwax) values recorded in Mandar Bay during the LGM, together with other regional vegetation records, document grassland expansion, implying a regionally dry, and possibly more seasonal, glacial climate. Depleted leaf wax deuterium isotope (δDwax) values in Mandar Bay during the LGM, and low reconstructed precipitation isotope compositions from nearby sites, reveal an intensified Austral-Asian summer monsoon circulation and a southward shift of the mean position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, likely due to strong southern hemisphere summer insolation and the presence of large northern hemisphere ice sheets. Mandar Bay δ13Cwax was anti-correlated with δDwax during the LGM and the last deglaciation, but was positively correlated during most of the Holocene, indicating time-varying controls on the isotopic composition of rainfall in this region. The inundation event of the Sunda Shelf and in particular the opening of the Java Sea and Karimata Strait between 9.4 and 11.1 thousand years ago might have provided new moisture sources for regional convection and/or influenced moisture source trajectories, providing the trigger for shifts in atmospheric circulation and the controls on precipitation isotope compositions from the LGM to the Holocene.

  9. Deepwater redox changes in the southern Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yanguang; Yang, Shouye; Li, Chao; Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Jihua; Bi, Lei

    2015-06-01

    In this study, rare earth element (REE) was treated as a paleo-redox proxy to investigate the changes of depositional environment in the southern Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum. The acid-leachable fraction (leachate) of the sediments recovered from the ODP Site 1202B is dominated by biogenic and authigenic components while detrital contamination is minor. The significant enrichment of middle REE suggests a large contribution from authigenic Mn oxyhydroxides and cerium (Ce) anomaly can indicate deepwater redox change. The REE parameters including Ce anomaly in the leachate exhibit remarkable and abrupt changes in the early Holocene (∼9.5 ka) and during LGM (∼20 ka). An increase of Ce anomaly at 28-22 ka implies the suboxic deepwater condition probably caused by increased primary productivity. Weak positive Ce anomalies during the last glacial maximum and deglaciation suggest an oxic depositional environment responding to the enhanced deepwater ventilation with the advection of the North Pacific Intermediate Water and/or South China Sea Intermediate Water into the trough. A decrease of Ce anomaly in the early Holocene might be caused by the intrusion and strengthening of the Kuroshio Current in the trough that enhanced the water stratification and induced a gradual development of suboxic depositional condition. Furthermore, an abrupt change of chemical composition at ca. 4 ka probably indicates a decrease of dissolved oxygen in deepwater and a weakening of ventilation in the Okinawa Trough. This study suggests that REE proxy can provide new insights into the linkage among surface current, deepwater circulation and sediment record in the continental margin where terrigenous input dominates.

  10. Carbonate chemistry of intermediate waters in the Southwest Pacific Ocean since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. A.; Sikes, E. L.; Elmore, A.; Hoenisch, B.; deMenocal, P. B.; Rosenthal, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Shifts in ocean circulation and marine carbon storage likely played an important role in the termination of the last ice age, but the mechanisms driving these changes have not yet been fully explained. It has been suggested that a greater amount of CO2 was stored in the deep sea during glacial periods via the biologic pump and/or increased uptake by a more alkaline ocean. To quantify the relative roles of such processes, more constraints on past deep ocean alkalinity are needed. Here, we present a new record of deep water carbonate chemistry for the last 30,000 years derived from a sediment core located at 1,627 meters depth in New Zealand's Bay of Plenty. Today, this core site lies at the boundary between relatively fresh Antarctic/Tasman Intermediate Water (above), and Circumpolar Deep Water (below) with more corrosive Pacific Deep Water also intruding from the north. Trace element and stable isotopic composition of foraminiferal calcite (the epibenthic species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi) reveal changes in bottom water carbonate chemistry during periods of atmospheric CO2 change. The boron to calcium ratio (B/Ca) in these shells indicates that deep water saturation (ΔCO32-) during the last glacial maximum (LGM) was only 5 μmol kg-1 less than the modern value of ~ 20 μmol/kg, consistent with previous work identifying the Pacific as a 'well-buffered' ocean basin on long timescales. However, reconstructed ΔCO32- values fluctuated by as much as 30 μmol/kg across the deglaciation, exhibiting the most pronounced changes between 17 and 13 ka. Together with shifts in carbon isotopes, these results imply changes in circulation and/or respired CO2 storage, and support a series of events in which major oceanographic changes are intimately linked with shifts in atmospheric circulation.

  11. Evolutionary divergence and possible incipient speciation in post-glacial populations of a cosmopolitan aquatic plant.

    PubMed

    Nies, G; Reusch, T B H

    2005-01-01

    Habitat configuration is expected to have a major influence on genetic exchange and evolutionary divergence among populations. Aquatic organisms occur in two fundamentally different habitat types, the sea and freshwater lakes, making them excellent models to study the contrasting effects of continuity vs. isolation on genetic divergence. We compared the divergence in post-glacial populations of a cosmopolitan aquatic plant, the pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus that simultaneously occurs in freshwater lakes and coastal marine sites. Relative levels of gene flow were inferred in 12 lake and 14 Baltic Sea populations in northern Germany using nine highly polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for P. pectinatus. We found highly significant isolation-by-distance in both habitat types (P < 0.001). Genetic differentiation increased approximately 2.5-times faster among freshwater populations compared with those from the Baltic Sea. As different levels of genetic drift or population history cannot explain these differences, higher population connectivity in the sea relative to freshwater populations is the most likely source of contrasting evolutionary divergence. These findings are consistent with the notion that freshwater angiosperms are more conducive to allopatric speciation than their life-history counterparts in the sea, the relative species poor seagrasses. Surprisingly, population pairs from different habitat types revealed almost maximal genetic divergence expected for complete reproductive isolation, regardless of their respective geographical distance. Hence, the barrier to gene flow between lake and sea habitat types cannot be due to dispersal limitation. We may thus have identified a case of rapid incipient speciation in post-glacial populations of a widespread aquatic plant.

  12. Glacial hazards: communicating the science and managing the risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    The recession of glaciers worldwide has received huge media coverage over the last few years in association with the issue of climate change. Young people at schools and colleges are increasingly aware of the environmental pressures due to ‘global warming'. Yet simultaneously, there appears to be an increasing move away from studying science both at pre-university and undergraduate levels. One of the oft cited reasons is that students cannot see the application of the subjects being taught them. Glacial hazards are one of the most obvious adverse effects of climate change, with many, often poor, communities in remote mountain areas being the most affected by frequently devastating Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs). When students are exposed to examples of these hazards and the science behind them, many become enthused by the subject and want to study it further. There has been a huge increase in the number of students selecting projects on glacial hazards as well as a large increase in the number of institutions offering to teach modules on this subject. In an effort to provide a basic visualisation, Peter Kennett has taken the principle of GLOFs and developed a cheap but highly visual demonstration of the potentially devastating effect of melting ice within a moraine leading to subsidence and subsequent dam failure. This is available on www.earthlearningidea.com as ‘Dam burst danger - modelling the collapse of a natural dam in the mountains - and the disaster that might follow'. Furthermore, the methods by which glacial hazards are assessed provide excellent applications of geophysics, geology, geography (physical and Human), engineering, mathematics, and glaciology. By exploring the potential vulnerability of communities downstream, the applications can be extended to include sociology, economics, geopolitics and even psychology. Glacial hazards have been the subject of presentations to the Earth Science Teachers Association (ESTA) in the UK to demonstrate

  13. Mid-late Pleistocene glacial evolution in the Grove Mountains, East Antarctica, constraints from cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of glacial erratic cobbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guocheng; Huang, Feixin; Yi, Chaolu; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Weijian; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-08-01

    Glacial histories from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) provide keys to understanding correlations between the EAIS and global climate. They are especially helpful in the assessment of global sea level change, and as a means of quantifying the magnitude of past glacial activity and the rate at which ice responded to climate change. Given the significance of EAIS glacial histories, it is imperative that more glacial chronologic data for this region be obtained, especially for the mid-to-late Pleistocene. We report cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating results from glacially transported cobbles embedded in blue-ice moraine material at Mount Harding, the Grove Mountains, EAIS. Forty exotic cobbles sampled along two profiles (A and B) on this blue-ice moraine present apparent exposure-ages ranging from 7.2 to 542.2 ka. We explore this scattered dataset by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify statistically significant trends in the data. We identify a correlation between exposure-age and distance of the cobbles from Mount Harding. In profile A, cobbles further from Mount Harding yield older exposure-ages than those that are relatively close. In profile B, cobbles closer to Mount Harding are found to have relatively older exposure-ages. In term of glacial history we suggest that the direction of ice flow changed during the period from ∼60 to 200 ka, and that multiple glacial fluctuations occurred in the mid-late Pleistocene.

  14. Beryllium-10 dating of the duration and retreat of the last pinedale glacial sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Gosse, J.C. |; Klein, J.; Evenson, E.B.

    1995-06-02

    Accurate terrestrial glacial chronologies are needed for comparison with the marine record to establish the dynamics of global climate change during transitions from glacial to interglacial regimes. Cosmogenic beryllium-10 measurements in the Wind River Range indicate that the last glacial maximum (marine oxygen isotope stage 2) was achieved there by 21,700 {+-} 700 beryllium-10 years and lasted 5900 years. Ages of a sequence of recessional moraines and striated bedrock surfaces show that the initial deglaciation was rapid and that the entire glacial system retreated 33 kilometers to the cirque basin by 12,100 {+-} 500 beryllium-10 years.

  15. Beryllium-10 dating of the duration and retreat of the last pinedale glacial sequence.

    PubMed

    Gosse, J C; Klein, J; Lawn, B; Middleton, R; Evenson, E B

    1995-06-02

    Accurate terrestrial glacial chronologies are needed for comparison with the marine record to establish the dynamics of global climate change during transitions from glacial to interglacial regimes. Cosmogenic beryllium-10 measurements in the Wind River Range indicate that the last glacial maximum (marine oxygen isotope stage 2) was achieved there by 21,700 +/- 700 beryllium-10 years and lasted 5900 years. Ages of a sequence of recessional moraines and striated bedrock surfaces show that the initial deglaciation was rapid and that the entire glacial system retreated 33 kilometers to the cirque basin by 12,100 +/- 500 beryllium-10 years.

  16. Glacial greenhouse-gas fluctuations controlled by ocean circulation changes.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Galbraith, Eric D

    2008-11-20

    Earth's climate and the concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) varied strongly on millennial timescales during past glacial periods. Large and rapid warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by more gradual cooling, and are highly correlated with fluctuations of N(2)O as recorded in ice cores. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were smaller and more gradual, showed warming during the Greenland cold phase and cooling while the North Atlantic was warm, and were highly correlated with fluctuations in CO(2). Abrupt changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) have often been invoked to explain the physical characteristics of these Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations, but the mechanisms for the greenhouse-gas variations and their linkage to the AMOC have remained unclear. Here we present simulations with a coupled model of glacial climate and biogeochemical cycles, forced only with changes in the AMOC. The model simultaneously reproduces characteristic features of the Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature, as well as CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations. Despite significant changes in the land carbon inventory, CO(2) variations on millennial timescales are dominated by slow changes in the deep ocean inventory of biologically sequestered carbon and are correlated with Antarctic temperature and Southern Ocean stratification. In contrast, N(2)O co-varies more rapidly with Greenland temperatures owing to fast adjustments of the thermocline oxygen budget. These results suggest that ocean circulation changes were the primary mechanism that drove glacial CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations on millennial timescales.

  17. Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation of the Iberian Central System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, D.; Andrés, N.; Vieira, G.; Marcos, J.; Vázquez-Selem, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Central System runs E-W across the centre of the Iberian Peninsula and is composed mainly of crystalline rocks. A glacial morphology is well preserved on many of its most important summit areas especially towards the Atlantic. Research has recently been carried out in three of the sierras of this mountain system, with the aim of establishing the absolute chronology of the maximum glacial advance and of the deglaciation in the whole system. The method used is cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and glacially polished outcrops. The selected areas are the Sierra de Guadarrama (Palacios et al. 2012) close to Peñalara Peak (40°51'N, 3°57'W; 2428 m), the Sierra de Gredos (Palacios et al. 2011) close to Almanzor Peak (40°14'N, 5°17'W; 2592 m), and the Sierra de la Estrela (Vieira and Palacios, 2010) close to Alto de la Torre summit (40°20'N, 7°34'W; 1993 m). These areas are representative of the whole Central System from west to east. The results are highly homogeneous. Moraines dating from earlier than the last glaciation were not found in any of the sierras. On the contrary, in all cases the oldest moraines from the last glaciation rest on intensely weathered crystalline surfaces. The oldest moraines date from between 31 and 26 ka. In most cases, the deposition of these moraine ridges was followed by minor advances and retreats which left a sequence of ridges very close together, lasting until 18-16 ka. A fast retreat occurred after 16-15 ka, when glaciers completely abandoned the valleys, disappearing in most cases by 13-14 ka. The ice lasted until 11-10 ka, but only in small cirques found on sheltered rock-walls below the highest peaks.

  18. SEM microfabric analysis of glacial varves, Geneseo, N. Y

    SciTech Connect

    Pietraszek, S.R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    A detailed study of the microfabric of Pleistocene varved silty-clay from Geneseo Valley (Geneseo, N.Y.) indicates rapid deposition of sediment in a flocculated state into a glacial lake. Ten varve couplets of a 10 cm thick sample were studied using the Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their microfabric. Each varve ranges from 0.5 cm to 2.0 cm and represents an annual ( ) deposit. Varves consists of a lower light colored, coarse zone of silt and clay, and an upper darker colored, organic fine clayey zone. Graded bedding is observed in each couplet, and random clay particle orientation is dominant throughout a varve, with the exception of the top 0.5 mm of the fine layer. The upper and lower contacts are sharp. Fabric features are instrumental in reconstructing a depositional environment. Microfabric results of the glacial unit indicate that an initial heavy concentration of clay and silt was introduced into the basin in a single pulse during spring runoff. The majority of silt settled together with clay in a flocculated or aggregated state, forming the lower coarse zone of random orientation. As the silt concentration diminished, the clay continued to flocculate and settled as a fine clay aggregate. It is proposed that the settling took place during the spring and summer months. Finally, during the winter months, the sediment surface of the varve was disturbed by nemotode burrows, which reoriented the clay flakes into a zone of preferred fabric. Microfabric analysis of these glacial varves, thus suggests that sediment was rapidly deposited in a flocculated state.

  19. Analysis of glacial and periglacial processes using structure from motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, L.; Carturan, L.; de Blasi, F.; Tarolli, P.; Dalla Fontana, G.; Vettore, A.; Pfeifer, N.

    2015-11-01

    Close-range photo-based surface reconstruction from the ground is rapidly emerging as an alternative to lidar (light detection and ranging), which today represents the main survey technique in many fields of geoscience. The recent evolution of photogrammetry, incorporating computer vision algorithms such as Structure from Motion (SfM) and dense image matching such as Multi-View Stereo (MVS), allows the reconstruction of dense 3-D point clouds for the photographed object from a sequence of overlapping images taken with a digital consumer camera. The objective of our work was to test the accuracy of the ground-based SfM-MVS approach in calculating the geodetic mass balance of a 2.1 km2 glacier in the Ortles-Cevedale Group, Eastern Italian Alps. In addition, we investigated the feasibility of using the image-based approach for the detection of the surface displacement rate of a neighbouring active rock glacier. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data were used as benchmarks to estimate the accuracy of the photogrammetric DTMs and the reliability of the method in this specific application. The glacial and periglacial analyses were performed using both range and image-based surveying techniques, and the results were then compared. The results were encouraging because the SfM-MVS approach enables the reconstruction of high-quality DTMs which provided estimates of glacial and periglacial processes similar to those achievable by ALS. Different resolutions and accuracies were obtained for the glacier and the rock glacier, given the different survey geometries, surface characteristics and areal extents. The analysis of the SfM-MVS DTM quality allowed us to highlight the limitations of the adopted expeditious method in the studied alpine terrain and the potential of this method in the multitemporal study of glacial and periglacial areas.

  20. Linking the Holocene glacial and oceanographic variability in northern Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Martin; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2015-04-01

    The Svalbard area can be considered as a key region for Arctic heat transfer. The archipelago is located where relatively warm Atlantic Water is reaching further north than at any other Arctic location at similar latitudes. The Holocene variability of Atlantic Water advection is well documented for the western coasts of Spitsbergen whereas records from northern Svalbard are still rare. Here we present a sedimentary record from Woodfjorden in northern Spitsbergen where the influence of Atlantic Water is fading out and glaciers are responding much more sensitive to oceanographic variations than at the western coasts of Spitsbergen. We analyzed the foraminiferal fauna and the distribution of Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) to trace the interplay between the oceanographic and glacial variability, respectively. The appearance of Nonionellina labradorica, a species which is adapted to warm Atlantic Water, shows that the advection of Atlantic-derived water correlates positively with summer insolation. The amount of IRD - increasing during the Allerød interstadial - diminished subsequently with intensifying inflow of Atlantic Water. During the Mid-Holocene, the strong influence of these relative warm water masses concurs with very low IRD values, possibly reflecting the retreat of tidewater glaciers from the coast to a further inland position disconnecting glacier dynamics from the respective marine archives at that time. With declining inflow of Atlantic Water during the late Holocene sea ice expanded, indicated by increased percentages of Islandiella norcrossi. The appearance of this species shows a similar trend as reported for sea-ice biomarkers in the eastern Fram Strait. Thus, variations of Atlantic Water inflow directly affected glacial activity as well as sea-ice coverage. Combining marine and terrestrial proxies enabled us to reconstruct regional (sea-ice) as well as local (glacial expansion) changes over time.

  1. Last Glacial vegetation and climate change in the southern Levant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, Andrea; Chen, Chunzhu; Litt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing past climatic and environmental conditions is a key task for understanding the history of modern mankind. The interaction between environmental change and migration processes of the modern Homo sapiens from its source area in Africa into Europe is still poorly understood. The principal corridor of the first human dispersal into Europe and also later migration dynamics crossed the Middle East. Therefore, the southern Levant is a key area to investigate the paleoenvironment during times of human migration. In this sense, the Last Glacial (MIS 4-2) is particularly interesting to investigate for two reasons. Firstly, secondary expansions of the modern Homo sapiens are expected to occur during this period. Secondly, there are ongoing discussions on the environmental conditions causing the prominent lake level high stand of Lake Lisan, the precursor of the Dead Sea. This high stand even culminated in the merging of Lake Lisan and Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee). To provide an independent proxy for paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the southern Levant during the Last Glacial, we investigated pollen assemblages of the Dead Sea/Lake Lisan and Lake Kinneret. Located at the Dead Sea Transform, the freshwater Lake Kinneret is nowadays connected via the Jordan with the hypersaline Dead Sea, which occupies Earth's lowest elevation on land. The southern Levant is a transition area of three different vegetation types. Therefore, also small changes in the climate conditions effect the vegetation and can be registered in the pollen assemblage. In contrast to the Holocene, our preliminary results suggest another vegetation pattern during the Last Glacial. The vegetation belt of the fragile Mediterranean biome did no longer exist in the vicinity of Lake Kinneret. Moreover, the vegetation was rather similar in the whole study area. A steppe vegetation with dwarf shrubs, herbs, and grasses predominated. Thermophilous elements like oaks occurred in limited amounts. The

  2. Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Luna B.

    1980-01-01

    On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9°C. PMID:16592797

  3. Dendroclimatic trend and glacial fluctuations in the Central Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelfini, M.; Santilli, M.; D Agata, C.; Diolaiuti, G.; Smiraglia, C.

    2003-04-01

    In the Alpine environment, one of the main limiting factors for tree growth is the thermal conditions of the vegetative season. The conifers at high altitude, if not subject to others disturbs, such as geomorphological processes or biological interferences, undergo a development, from which the width of annual rings depends. Five chronologies few centuries long, obtained for the species Larix decidua Mill. and Pinus cembra L. from different valleys of the Central Italian Alps (Alpisella, Valfurva, Gavia and Solda) in proximity of timberline (2000-2550 m of altitude), were analysed and their climatic signal gained; this last one was then related to the recent glacial fluctuations. The chronologies are the averages of many dendrochronological indicized curves obtained from dominant trees with regular growth and extended from 13th-17th century up to the present. The time intervals of the chronologies are the following ones: Pinus cembra: 1752-1999 for Valfurva; 1607-1999 for Gavia; 1593-1999 for Val Solda. With regard to Larix decidua: 1252-1998 for Val Solda; 1784-2001 for Alpisella. The good correspondence between the various chronologies allows to consider them representative of the climatic regional signal. In order to evidence climatic evolution, linear trends based on running mean with period of 11 years have been constructed. Those curves have been compared between them and then overlapped and mediated in order to obtain a climatic signal of regional value that excludes eventual local anomalies. Finally, the growth variations in the chronologies have been compared to known alpine climatic variations and glacial fluctuations. In particular time-distance curves (curves of cumulated frontal variations) of some glaciers from the Ortles-Cevedale Group were utilized. The periods of tree rings growth rate reduction appear well correlated to glacial advancing phases of the Little Ice Age and of the following phases. In particular, growth rate reductions are observable

  4. Bathymetry and temperature of some glacial lakes in Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Leopold, L B

    1980-04-01

    On the west flank of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, are several large lakes occupying glacially scoured depressions dammed by terminal moraines. Fremont, Willow, and New Fork Lakes, having maximal depths of 185, 85, and 62 m, respectively, are not only deep, but in 1970-1978 they had no measurable coliform. They have exceptionally low values of total dissolved solids; Fremont Lake has only 12.8 mg/liter, probably the second most dilute large lake in coterminus United States. Summer mixing is restricted to the uppermost 10 m, below which the lakes are essentially isothermal at the maximum density temperature, about 3.9 degrees C.

  5. Evidence of Macroalgal Colonization on Newly Ice-Free Areas following Glacial Retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands), Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Quartino, María Liliana; Deregibus, Dolores; Campana, Gabriela Laura; Latorre, Gustavo Edgar Juan; Momo, Fernando Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands) has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem. PMID:23484000

  6. Evidence of macroalgal colonization on newly ice-free areas following glacial retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands), Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Quartino, María Liliana; Deregibus, Dolores; Campana, Gabriela Laura; Latorre, Gustavo Edgar Juan; Momo, Fernando Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands) has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem.

  7. Rare Carboniferous and Permian glacial and non-glacial bryophytes and associated lycophyte megaspores of the Paraná Basin, Brazil: A new occurrence and paleoenvironmental considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricardi-Branco, Fresia; Rohn, Rosemarie; Longhim, Marcia Emilia; Costa, Juliana Sampaio; Martine, Ariel Milani; Christiano-de-Souza, Isabel Cortez

    2016-12-01

    Fossil bryophytes are rare because their preservation is compromised by the presence of a thin cuticle (if any) and a lack of lignin. Except for the occurrence of one bryophyte in the glacial Dwyka Group of the Karoo Basin, the other rare Late Paleozoic records in Gondwana are notably from the Paraná Basin in Southeast/South Brazil. Four bryophyte sites (including a newly discovered one) were found in the lower part of the thick Permo-Carboniferous glacial succession of the Itararé Group, and one was found in the Guadalupian Teresina Formation, which was roughly assigned to an epeiric sea (or "lake") dominated by a warm, semi-arid climate. This study describes the fossils from the new occurrence from the Itararé Group and discusses the context in which the bryophyte beds originated in the basin. The new samples confirm that all of the bryophytes of the Itararé Group can be classified as Dwykea araroii Ricardi-Branco et al. (a possible pleurocarp) and are associated with the lycophyte megaspore Sublagenicula brasiliensis (Dijkstra) Dybová-Jachowicz. In the much younger Teresina Formation, the bryophytes are Yguajemanus yucapirus Cristiano-de-Souza et al. and Capimirinus riopretensis Cristiano-de-Souza et al., and abundant charophytes and rare dwarf lycophyte stems and bracts are present in the same layers. Although the two stratigraphic units represent distinct paleoenvironments and climates, they seem to share some characteristics: a) the bryophyte assemblages were transported very little; b) they were deposited in very calm environments; c) they were the main components (along with some lycophytes) of local or poorly diversified regional vegetation. The low number of species, which is characteristic of opportunistic communities, can be explained by local or regional conditions that would have been stressful for the vascular plants in other areas. During the deposition of the Itararé Group, the main control was probably the cold climate in addition to a

  8. Glacial evolution of the Ampato Volcanic Complex (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Vázquez, L.

    2009-04-01

    Ice masses on the Western range of the Central Andes are a main source of water resources and act as a geoindicator of variations in the climate of the tropics (Mark, 2008). The study of their evolution is of particular interest since they are situated in the transition zone between the tropical and mid-latitude circulation areas of the atmosphere (Zech et al., 2007). The function of this transition area is currently under debate, and understanding it is essential for the development of global climate models (Kull et al, 2008; Mark, 2008). However our understanding of the evolution of glaciers and their paleoclimatic factors for this sector of the Central Andes is still at a very basic level. This paper presents initial results of a study on the glacial evolution of the Ampato volcanic complex (15°24´- 15° 51´ S, 71° 51´ - 73° W; 6288 m a.s.l.) located in the Western Range of the Central Andes in Southern Peru, 70 km NW of the city of Arequipa. The main objectives are to identify the number of glacial phases the complex has undergone using geomorphological criteria to define a time frame for each phase, based on cosmogenic 36Cl dating of a sequence of moraine deposits; and to estimate the glacier Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) of each phase. The Ampato volcanic complex is formed by 3 great andesitic stratovolcanoes, the Nevados HualcaHualca-Sabancaya-Ampato, which started forming between the late Miocene and early Quaternary (Bulmer et al., 1999), aligned N-S and with summits covered with glaciers. The Sabancaya volcano is fully active, with its latest eruption occurring in 2001. Glacial landforms were identified and mapped using photointerpretation of vertical aerial photographs from 1955 (1:35,000 scale, National Geographic Institute of Peru), oblique photographs from 1943 (Aerophotographical Service of Peru), and a geo-referenced high-resolution Mrsid satellite image from 2000 (NASA). This cartography was corrected and improved through fieldwork. It was

  9. Sensitivity of palaeotidal models of the northwest European shelf seas to glacial isostatic adjustment since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Sophie L.; Neill, Simon P.; Scourse, James D.; Bradley, Sarah L.; Uehara, Katsuto

    2016-11-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of relative sea-level change over the northwest European shelf seas has varied considerably since the Last Glacial Maximum, due to eustatic sea-level rise and a complex isostatic response to deglaciation of both near- and far-field ice sheets. Because of the complex pattern of relative sea level changes, the region is an ideal focus for modelling the impact of significant sea-level change on shelf sea tidal dynamics. Changes in tidal dynamics influence tidal range, the location of tidal mixing fronts, dissipation of tidal energy, shelf sea biogeochemistry and sediment transport pathways. Significant advancements in glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) modelling of the region have been made in recent years, and earlier palaeotidal models of the northwest European shelf seas were developed using output from less well-constrained GIA models as input to generate palaeobathymetric grids. We use the most up-to-date and well-constrained GIA model for the region as palaeotopographic input for a new high resolution, three-dimensional tidal model (ROMS) of the northwest European shelf seas. With focus on model output for 1 ka time slices from the Last Glacial Maximum (taken as being 21 ka BP) to present day, we demonstrate that spatial and temporal changes in simulated tidal dynamics are very sensitive to relative sea-level distribution. The new high resolution palaeotidal model is considered a significant improvement on previous depth-averaged palaeotidal models, in particular where the outputs are to be used in sediment transport studies, where consideration of the near-bed stress is critical, and for constraining sea level index points.

  10. Glacial sequence stratigraphy reveal the Weichselian glacial history of the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Matti

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructions of the last Weichselian glacial cycle 117,000-11,700 years (kyr) ago propose that S Finland, adjacent Russia and the Baltic countries in the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet (EIS), were glaciated during the Middle Weichselian time [marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, 71-57 kyr ago] and that this glaciation was preceded in S Finland by an Early Weichselian interstadial (MIS 5c, 105-93 kyr ago) with pine forest. Here glacial sequence stratigraphy (Powell and Cooper 2002) is applied to isolated Late Pleistocene onshore outcrop sections in S Finland. The analysed sedimentary records have traditionally been investigated, interpreted and published separately by different authors without an attempt to a methodologically more systematic survey. By putting new field data and old observations into a regional sequence stratigraphic framework it is shown how previously unnoticed regularities can be found in the lithofacies and fossil successions. It is shown that the proposed Middle Weichselian glaciation or the pine dominated interstadial did not take place at all (Räsänen et al. 2015). The one Late Weichselian glaciation (MIS 2, 29-11 kyr ago) at the SE sector of EIS was preceded in S Finland by a nearly 90 kyr long still poorly known non-glacial period, featuring tundra with permafrost and probably birch forest. The new Middle Weichselian paleoenvironmental scenario revises the configuration and hydrology of the S part of EIS and gives new setting for the evolution of Scandinavian biota. References Powell, R. D., and Cooper, J. M., 2002, A glacial sequence stratigraphic model for temperate, glaciated continental shelves, in Dowdeswell, J. A., and Cofaig, C. Ó. eds., Glacier-Influenced Sedimentation on High-Latitude Continental Margins: The Geological Society of London, London, Geological Society London, Special Publication v. 203, p. 215-244. Räsänen, M.E., Huitti, J.V., Bhattarai, S. Harvey, J. and Huttunen, S. 2015, The SE sector of the Middle

  11. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, L.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Fleitout, L.; Metivier, L.; Rouby, H.

    2014-12-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our first results indicate that compared to the Maxwell models, the Burgers models involve a larger lower mantle viscosity and thicker ice over Fennoscandia and Canada.

  12. Glacial Refugium of Pinus pumila (Pall.) Regel in Northeastern Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Shilo, N A; Lozhkin, A V; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Pakhomov, A Y; Solomatkina, T B

    2007-02-10

    One of the most glowing representatives of the Kolyma flora [1], ''Pinus pumila'' (Pall.) Regel (Japanese stone pine), is a typical shrub in larch forests of the northern Okhotsk region, basins of the Kolyma and Indigirka rivers, and high-shrub tundra of the Chukchi Peninsula. It also forms a pine belt in mountains above the forest boundary, which gives way to the grass-underbrush mountain tundra and bald mountains. In the southern Chukchi Peninsula, ''Pinus pumila'' along with ''Duschekia fruticosa'' (Rupr.) Pouzar and ''Betula middendorffii'' Trautv. et C. A. Mey form trailing forests transitional between tundra and taiga [2]. Pinus pumila pollen, usually predominating in subfossil spore-and-pollen spectra of northeastern Siberia, is found as single grains or a subordinate component (up 2-3%, rarely 10%) in spectra of lacustrine deposits formed during the last glacial stage (isotope stage 2) in the Preboreal and Boreal times of the Holocene. Sometimes, its content increases to 15-22% in spectra of lacustrine deposits synchronous to the last glacial stage near the northern coast of the Sea of Okhotsk [3], evidently indicating the proximity of Japanese stone pine thickets.

  13. A study of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jens Emil; Sandberg Sørensen, Louise; Adalgeirsdottir, Gudfinna; Spada, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) is the viscoelastic response of the Earth caused by changes in ice loads during glaciations and deglaciations. Knowledge of the GIA signal is particularly important in cryospheric applications of satellite gravimetry and altimetry, where the origin of the observed changes must be separated into past and present response. Modeling the present-day GIA signal must include knowledge of both the ice loading history and the Earth's rheology. Neither of these models are well constrained in Greenland, and hence the GIA estimates here are uncertain. In this paper we implement a loading history of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from the ice sheet model SICOPOLIS, and we study the present-day gravity changes and vertical crustal motion derived from using this ice history. The results are compared with those derived from the widely used ICE-5G ice history. For calculation of present day GIA signal, we assume the Earth's rheology to be a simplified version of the VM2 Earth model. The calculated GIA signal in Greenland, derived from the two ice loading histories are compared with geodetic measurements of vertical crustal motion from GPS time series and with repeated gravity measurements in Greenland. The free code SELEN is used for calculating the effects of the Earth model and different ice loading histories. This study is performed within the Working Group 4 of the ESF COST Action ES0701 "Improved constraints on models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment".

  14. Glacial-Age Dust Provenance in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borunda, A.; Winckler, G.; Goldstein, S. L.; Kaplan, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctic ice cores contain insoluble dust particles that may have been transported for thousands of miles, from distal continental sources, before being deposited on the ice sheet and incorporated into the ice core record. Knowing the dust sources, and observing how those sources have changed over time, informs our understanding of regional climate conditions in the potential source areas, as well as informing our reconstructions of atmospheric transport between the sources and the poles. Patagonia has been identified as a key dust source to East Antarctica during Ice Age climates; however, the dust sources to West Antarctica during these times have remained unknown. We present radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb isotopes) and trace element data of the insoluble dust extracted from 15 WAIS Divide ice core and 4 Byrd ice core samples between ~40ky and the end of the Last Glacial Maximum, and combine these with a novel set of observations on potential sources of dust from around the Pacific sector of the polar Southern Hemisphere. We use these geochemical tools to identify, in a multi-dimensional view, the source(s) of dust to West Antarctica. We also identify the sources of dust across two millennial-scale climate events. The data indicate that Patagonia was a dominant source of dust for West Antarctica during glacial periods, highlighting the importance of southern South America as a dust source for broad swaths of the polar and sub-polar Southern Hemisphere.

  15. Deep Arctic Ocean warming during the last glacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Farmer, J.; Bauch, H.A.; Spielhagen, R.F.; Jakobsson, M.; Nilsson, J.; Briggs, W.M.; Stepanova, A.

    2012-01-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, the cold and relatively fresh water beneath the sea ice is separated from the underlying warmer and saltier Atlantic Layer by a halocline. Ongoing sea ice loss and warming in the Arctic Ocean have demonstrated the instability of the halocline, with implications for further sea ice loss. The stability of the halocline through past climate variations is unclear. Here we estimate intermediate water temperatures over the past 50,000 years from the Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca values of ostracods from 31 Arctic sediment cores. From about 50 to 11 kyr ago, the central Arctic Basin from 1,000 to 2,500 m was occupied by a water mass we call Glacial Arctic Intermediate Water. This water mass was 1–2 °C warmer than modern Arctic Intermediate Water, with temperatures peaking during or just before millennial-scale Heinrich cold events and the Younger Dryas cold interval. We use numerical modelling to show that the intermediate depth warming could result from the expected decrease in the flux of fresh water to the Arctic Ocean during glacial conditions, which would cause the halocline to deepen and push the warm Atlantic Layer into intermediate depths. Although not modelled, the reduced formation of cold, deep waters due to the exposure of the Arctic continental shelf could also contribute to the intermediate depth warming.

  16. Massive remobilization of permafrost carbon during post-glacial warming

    PubMed Central

    Tesi, T.; Muschitiello, F.; Smittenberg, R. H.; Jakobsson, M.; Vonk, J. E.; Hill, P.; Andersson, A.; Kirchner, N.; Noormets, R.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I.; Gustafsson, Ö

    2016-01-01

    Recent hypotheses, based on atmospheric records and models, suggest that permafrost carbon (PF-C) accumulated during the last glaciation may have been an important source for the atmospheric CO2 rise during post-glacial warming. However, direct physical indications for such PF-C release have so far been absent. Here we use the Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean) as an archive to investigate PF-C destabilization during the last glacial–interglacial period. Our results show evidence for massive supply of PF-C from Siberian soils as a result of severe active layer deepening in response to the warming. Thawing of PF-C must also have brought about an enhanced organic matter respiration and, thus, these findings suggest that PF-C may indeed have been an important source of CO2 across the extensive permafrost domain. The results challenge current paradigms on the post-glacial CO2 rise and, at the same time, serve as a harbinger for possible consequences of the present-day warming of PF-C soils. PMID:27897191

  17. Palaeogeographic regulation of glacial events during the Cretaceous supergreenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Donnadieu, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The historical view of a uniformly warm Cretaceous is being increasingly challenged by the accumulation of new data hinting at the possibility of glacial events, even during the Cenomanian–Turonian (∼95 Myr ago), the warmest interval of the Cretaceous. Here we show that the palaeogeography typifying the Cenomanian–Turonian renders the Earth System resilient to glaciation with no perennial ice accumulation occurring under prescribed CO2 levels as low as 420 p.p.m. Conversely, late Aptian (∼115 Myr ago) and Maastrichtian (∼70 Myr ago) continental configurations set the stage for cooler climatic conditions, favouring possible inception of Antarctic ice sheets under CO2 concentrations, respectively, about 400 and 300 p.p.m. higher than for the Cenomanian–Turonian. Our simulations notably emphasize that palaeogeography can crucially impact global climate by modulating the CO2 threshold for ice sheet inception and make the possibility of glacial events during the Cenomanian–Turonian unlikely. PMID:27650167

  18. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-07-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0-1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time.

  19. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0–1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time. PMID:23486249

  20. Numerical modeling of glacial earthquakes induced by iceberg capsize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, A.; Yastrebov, V.; Castelnau, O.; Mangeney, A.; Stutzmann, E.; Montagner, J. P.; Burton, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial earthquakes is a class of seismic events of magnitude up to 5, occurring primarily in Greenland, in the margins of large marine-terminated glaciers with near-grounded termini. They are caused by calving of cubic-kilometer scale unstable icebergs which penetrate the full-glacier thickness and, driven by the buoyancy forces, capsize against the calving front. These phenomena produce seismic energy including surface waves with dominant energy between 10-150 s of period whose seismogenic source is compatible with the contact force exerted on the terminus by the iceberg while it capsizes. A reverse motion and posterior rebound of the terminus have also been measured and associated with the fluctuation of this contact force. Using a finite element model of iceberg and glacier terminus coupled with simplified fluid-structure interaction model, we simulate calving and capsize of icebergs. Contact and frictional forces are measured on the terminus and compared with laboratory experiments. We also study the influence of various factors, such as iceberg geometry, calving style and terminus interface. Being extended to field environments, the simulation results are compared with forces obtained by seismic waveform inversion of registered glacial earthquakes.

  1. Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keiswetter, D.; Black, R.; Steeples, D.

    1994-03-01

    This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick glacial till are clearly observable on field files at around 45 to 50 ms two-way traveltime and possess a dominant frequency of around 100 Hz. The bedrock reflection is confirmed by drill data. The seismic data are of sufficient quality to detect local bedrock topographic changes and to interpret discontinuities along the till-bedrock interface. Finite-difference synthetic seismograms substantiate the interpreted reflections and the diffraction signatures from faults observed on the field files. At some locations along the seismic line, intra-till reflections are apparent on the field files. These intra-till features are on the order of tens of meters in length along the line traverse and reflections from them are not enhanced by common depth point processing. Intra-till reflections could be indicative of gravels or other alluvial materials that may serve as local aquifers.

  2. Mapping Post-Glacial expansions: The Peopling of Southwest Asia

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Daniel E.; Haber, Marc; Dagher-Kharrat, Magda Bou; Douaihy, Bouchra; Khazen, Georges; Ashrafian Bonab, Maziar; Salloum, Angélique; Mouzaya, Francis; Luiselli, Donata; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Renfrew, Colin; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Zalloua, Pierre A.

    2017-01-01

    Archaeological, palaeontological and geological evidence shows that post-glacial warming released human populations from their various climate-bound refugia. Yet specific connections between these refugia and the timing and routes of post-glacial migrations that ultimately established modern patterns of genetic variation remain elusive. Here, we use Y-chromosome markers combined with autosomal data to reconstruct population expansions from regional refugia in Southwest Asia. Populations from three regions in particular possess distinctive autosomal genetic signatures indicative of likely refugia: one, in the north, centered around the eastern coast of the Black Sea, the second, with a more Levantine focus, and the third in the southern Arabian Peninsula. Modern populations from these three regions carry the widest diversity and may indeed represent the most likely descendants of the populations responsible for the Neolithic cultures of Southwest Asia. We reveal the distinct and datable expansion routes of populations from these three refugia throughout Southwest Asia and into Europe and North Africa and discuss the possible correlations of these migrations to various cultural and climatic events evident in the archaeological record of the past 15,000 years. PMID:28059138

  3. Intensified deep Pacific inflow and ventilation in Pleistocene glacial times.

    PubMed

    Hall, I R; McCave, I N; Shackleton, N J; Weedon, G P; Harris, S E

    2001-08-23

    The production of cold, deep waters in the Southern Ocean is an important factor in the Earth's heat budget. The supply of deep water to the Pacific Ocean is presently dominated by a single source, the deep western boundary current east of New Zealand. Here we use sediment records deposited under the influence of this deep western boundary current to reconstruct deep-water properties and speed changes during the Pleistocene epoch. In physical and isotope proxies we find evidence for intensified deep Pacific Ocean inflow and ventilation during the glacial periods of the past 1.2 million years. The changes in throughflow may be directly related to an increased production of Antarctic Bottom Water during glacial times. Possible causes for such an increased bottom-water production include increasing wind strengths in the Southern Ocean or an increase in annual sea-ice formation, leaving dense water after brine rejection and thereby enhancing deep convection. We infer also that the global thermohaline circulation was perturbed significantly during the mid-Pleistocene climate transition between 0.86 and 0.45 million years ago.

  4. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment and Contemporary Sea Level Rise: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) encompasses a suite of geophysical phenomena accompanying the waxing and waning of continental-scale ice sheets. These involve the solid Earth, the oceans and the cryosphere both on short (decade to century) and on long (millennia) timescales. In the framework of contemporary sea-level change, the role of GIA is particular. In fact, among the processes significantly contributing to contemporary sea-level change, GIA is the only one for which deformational, gravitational and rotational effects are simultaneously operating, and for which the rheology of the solid Earth is essential. Here, I review the basic elements of the GIA theory, emphasizing the connections with current sea-level changes observed by tide gauges and altimetry. This purpose is met discussing the nature of the "sea-level equation" (SLE), which represents the basis for modeling the sea-level variations of glacial isostatic origin, also giving access to a full set of geodetic variations associated with GIA. Here, the SLE is employed to characterize the remarkable geographical variability of the GIA-induced sea-level variations, which are often expressed in terms of "fingerprints". Using harmonic analysis, the spatial variability of the GIA fingerprints is compared to that of other components of contemporary sea-level change. In closing, some attention is devoted to the importance of the "GIA corrections" in the context of modern sea-level observations, based on tide gauges or satellite altimeters.

  5. Tentative correlation of midcontinent glacial sequence with marine chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    A tentative glacial-interglacial 3-million-year chronology is synthesized by regional correlation of Midcontinent tills and paleosols to marine paleotemperature/eustatic cycles and oxygen isotope stages. The paleotemperature curves of Beard et al. (1982), based on planktonic foraminiferal abundances, correspond directly with eustatic cycles during the last 3 Ma. These generalized curves are shown to correlate reasonably well with standard oxygen isotope stages at least for the past 900 ka. This indicates that paleotemperature and Vail-type eustatic cycles have been glacially induced during the last 3 Ma. The chronology developed here utilizes both paleotemperature and oxygen isotope stages; however, below the Jaramillo magnetic subchron, isotope curves are more variable and only paleotemperature stages are used. Tills and paleosols at type localities in the Midcontinent area of the US are correlated to the SPECMAP oxygen isotope time scale. Because mid-Brunhes events are poorly constrained by radiometric dates, alternative correlations are possible. The oldest known Midcontinent tills correlate to the first Plio-Pleistocene cold paleotemperature stage and drop in sea level at 2.4 Ma. This Late Pliocene event also corresponds to the first major isotopic enrichment and the onset of late Cenozoic ice-rafting in the North Atlantic region.

  6. Mapping of glacial landforms from Seasat radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Glacial landforms in the drumlin drift belt of Ireland and the Alaska Range can be identified and mapped from Seasat synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images. Drumlins cover 60 percent of the Ireland scene. The width/length ratio of individual drumlins can be measured on the SAR images, allowing regional differences in drumlin shape to be mapped. This cannot be done with corresponding Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images because of lower spatial resolution and because of shadowing effects that vary seasonally. The Alaska scene shows the extent and nature of morphological features such as medial and lateral moraines, stagnant ice, and fluted ground moraine in glaciated valleys. Perception of these features on corresponding Landsat MSS images is limited by seasonal diffrences in solar illumination. Because SAR is not affected by such differences or by cloud cover, it is particularly well suited for monitoring glacial movement. The disadvantage of distorted high-relief features on Seasat SAR images can be reduced in future SAR systems by modifying the radar illumination geometry.

  7. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment and Contemporary Sea Level Rise: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Giorgio

    2016-08-01

    Glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) encompasses a suite of geophysical phenomena accompanying the waxing and waning of continental-scale ice sheets. These involve the solid Earth, the oceans and the cryosphere both on short (decade to century) and on long (millennia) timescales. In the framework of contemporary sea-level change, the role of GIA is particular. In fact, among the processes significantly contributing to contemporary sea-level change, GIA is the only one for which deformational, gravitational and rotational effects are simultaneously operating, and for which the rheology of the solid Earth is essential. Here, I review the basic elements of the GIA theory, emphasizing the connections with current sea-level changes observed by tide gauges and altimetry. This purpose is met discussing the nature of the "sea-level equation" (SLE), which represents the basis for modeling the sea-level variations of glacial isostatic origin, also giving access to a full set of geodetic variations associated with GIA. Here, the SLE is employed to characterize the remarkable geographical variability of the GIA-induced sea-level variations, which are often expressed in terms of "fingerprints". Using harmonic analysis, the spatial variability of the GIA fingerprints is compared to that of other components of contemporary sea-level change. In closing, some attention is devoted to the importance of the "GIA corrections" in the context of modern sea-level observations, based on tide gauges or satellite altimeters.

  8. Detection of Supra-Glacial Lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet Using MODIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verin, Gauthier; Picard, Ghislain; Libois, Quentin; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Roux, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    During melt season, supra-glacial lakes form on the margins of the Greenland ice sheet. Because of their size exceeding several kilometers, and their concentration, they affect surface albedo leading to an amplification of the regional melt. Furthermore, they foster hydro-fracturing that propagate liquid water to the bedrock and therefore enhance the basal lubrication which may affect the ice motion. It is known that Greenland ice sheet has strongly responded to recent global warming. As air temperature increases, melt duration and melt intensity increase and surface melt area extends further inland. These recent changes may play an important role in the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. In this context, it is essential to better monitor and understand supra-glacial spatio-temporal dynamics in order to better assess future sea level rise. In this study MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) images have been used to detect supra-glacial lakes. The observation site is located on the West margin of the ice sheet, between 65°N and 70°N where the concentration of lake is maximum. The detection is performed by a fully automatic algorithm using images processing techniques introduced by Liang et al. (2012) which can be summarized in three steps: the selection of usable MODIS images, mainly we exclude images with too many clouds. The detection of lake and the automatic correction of false detections. This algorithm is capable to tag each individual lake allowing a survey of all lake geometrical properties over the entire melt season. We observed a large population of supra-glacial lakes over 14 melt seasons, from 2000 to 2013 on an extended area of 70.000 km2. In average, lakes are observed from June 9 ± 8.7 days to September 13 ± 13.9 days, and reach a maximum total area of 699 km2 ± 146 km2. As the melt season progresses, lakes form higher in altitude up to 1800 m above sea level. Results show a very strong inter-annual variability in term of

  9. Last glacial maximum environments in northwestern Patagonia revealed by fossil small mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammone, Mauro N.; Hajduk, Adan; Arias, Pablo; Teta, Pablo; Lacey, Eileen A.; Pardiñas, Ulyses F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Comparisons of historical and modern assemblages of mammals can yield important insights into patterns and processes of environmental change. Here, we present the first analyses of small mammal assemblages present in northern Patagonia during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Using remains obtained from owl pellets excavated from an archeological cave site (Arroyo Corral I, levels VII-V, carbon dates of 22,400-21,530 cal yr BP), we generate estimates of the minimum number of individuals for all species detected; these estimates, in turn are used to determine relative species abundances. Comparisons of these data with similar analyses of small mammal remains obtained from a second archeological site (ACoII, levels IV-V, carbon dates of 10,010-9220 cal yr BP) as well as from modern owl pellets reveal pronounced changes in relative species abundance since the LGM. In particular, Euneomys chinchilloides and Ctenomys sociabilis - the predominant species during the LGM - declined markedly, suggesting a change from open, bare habitat punctuated by patches of wet meadows and shrubs to the more densely vegetated mosaic of ecotone habitats found in this region today. These data provide important new insights into the environmental changes that have occurred in northern Patagonia over the last 20,000 years.

  10. Across-shelf sediment transport since the Last Glacial Maximum, southern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C.K.; Lee, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation of continental shelf-slope stratigraphy in Santa Monica Bay (southern California) with Ocean Drilling Program records for nearby slope-basin sites has illuminated the timing and scale of terrigenous sediment dispersal on margin since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Marine flooding surfaces preserved in a transgressive sequence on the Santa Monica Shelf provide a key link between base-level elevation and sediment transport across shelf. Sediment-accumulation rates at slope-basin sites were maximal ca. 15-10 ka, well after the LGM, decreased during the 12-9 ka transition from fluvial-estuarine to fully marine conditions on the shelf, and decelerated throughout the Holocene to 30%-75% of their values at the LGM. The deceleration is interpreted to manifest a landward shift in the margin depocenter with the onset of transgressive sedimentation beginning when sea level surmounted the shelf edge ca. 13 ka, as predicted by sequence-stratigraphic models. However, the records make clear that factors other than base level modulated slope-basin accumulation rates during the deglaciation. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  11. Causes of strong ocean heating during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the last deglaciation period, the strongest climate changes occurred across the North Atlantic regions. Analyses of borehole temperatures from the Greenland ice sheet have yielded air temperature change estimates of 25°C over the deglaciation period (Dahl-Jensen et al. 1998). Such huge temperature changes cannot currently be explained in the frames of modern knowledge about climate. We propose that glacial-interglacial cycles are connected with gradual warming of ocean interior waters over the course of glaciations and quick transport of accumulated heat from ocean to the atmosphere during the deglaciation periods. Modern day ocean circulation is dominated by thermal convection with cold waters subsiding in the Northern Atlantic and filling up the ocean interior with cold and heavy water. However during the glaciation thermal circulation stopped and ocean circulation was driven by 'haline pumps' -Red and Mediterranean seas connected with ocean with only narrow but deep straights acts as evaporative basins, separating ocean water into fresh water which returns to the ocean surface (precipitation) and warm but salty, and therefore heavy, water which flows down to the ocean floor. This haline pump is stratifying the ocean, allowing warmer water locate under the colder water and thus stopping thermal convection in the ocean. Additional ocean interior warming is driven by geothermal heat flux and decomposition of organic rain. To test the hypothesis we present simple ocean box model that describes thermohaline circulation in the World Ocean. The first box is the Red and Mediterranean sea, the second is united high-latitude seas, the third is the ocean surface, and the fourth the ocean interior. The volume of these water masses and straight cross-sections are taken to be close to real values. We have accepted that the exchange of water between boxes is proportional to the difference in water density in these boxes, Sun energy inputs to the ocean and sea surface

  12. Overdeepening development in a glacial landscape evolution model with quarrying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugelvig, S. V.; Egholm, D. L.; Brædstrup, C. F.; Iverson, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    In glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial erosion rates are often related to basal sliding or ice discharge by a power-law. This relation can be justified when considering bed abrasion, where rock debris transported in the basal ice drives erosion. However, the relation is not well supported when considering models for quarrying of rock blocks from the bed. Field observations indicate that the principal mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying, which emphasize the importance of a better way of implementing erosion by quarrying in glacial landscape evolution models. Iverson (2012) introduced a new model for subglacial erosion by quarrying that operates from the theory of adhesive wear. The model is based on the fact that cavities, with a high level of bedrock differential stress, form in the lee of bed obstacles when the sliding velocity is too high to allow for the ice to creep around the obstacles. The erosion rate is quantified by considering the likelihood of rock fracturing on topographic bumps. The model includes a statistical treatment of the bedrock weakness, which is neglected in previous quarrying models. Sliding rate, effective pressure, and average bedslope are the primary factors influencing the erosion rate of this new quarrying model [Iverson, 2012]. We have implemented the quarrying model in a depth-integrated higher-order ice-sheet model [Egholm et al. 2011], coupled to a model for glacial hydrology. In order to also include the effects of cavitation on the subglacial sliding rate, we use a sliding law proposed by Schoof (2005), which includes an upper limit for the stress that can be supported at the bed. Computational experiments show that the combined influence of pressure, sliding rate and bed slope leads to realistically looking landforms such as U-shaped valleys, cirques, hanging valleys and overdeepenings. The influence of the effective pressure leads naturally to overdeepenings. However, in contrast to previously used erosion models

  13. Terrestrial cosmogenic surface exposure dating of glacial and associated landforms in the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range of central Nevada and along the northeastern flank of the Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.; Briggs, Richard W.; Caffee, Marc W.; Ryerson, F. J.; Finkel, Robert C.; Owen, Lewis A.

    2016-09-01

    Deposits near Lamoille in the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range of central Nevada and at Woodfords on the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada each record two distinct glacial advances. We compare independent assessments of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure ages for glacial deposits that we have determined to those obtained by others at the two sites. At each site, TCN ages of boulders on moraines of the younger advance are between 15 and 30 ka and may be associated with marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 2. At Woodfords, TCN ages of boulders on the moraine of the older advance are younger than ~ 60 ka and possibly formed during MIS 4, whereas boulders on the correlative outwash surface show ages approaching 140 ka (~ MIS 6). The TCN ages of boulders on older glacial moraine at Woodfords thus appear to severely underestimate the true age of the glacial advance responsible for the deposit. The same is possibly true at Lamoille where clasts sampled from the moraine of the oldest advance have ages ranging between 20 and 40 ka with a single outlier age of ~ 80 ka. The underestimations are attributed to the degradation and denudation of older moraine crests. Noting that boulder ages on the older advances at each site overlap significantly with MIS 2. We speculate that erosion of the older moraines has been episodic, with a pulse of denudation accompanying the inception of MIS 2 glaciation.

  14. Measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity in fine-grained glacial tills in Iowa: Comparison of in situ and laboratory methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruner, D. Roger; Lutenegger, Alan J.

    1994-01-01

    Nested-standpipe and vibrating-wire piezometers were installed in Pre-Illinoian Wolf Creek and Albernett formations at the Eastern Iowa Till Hydrology Site located in Linn County, Iowa. These surficial deposits are composed of fine-grained glacial diamicton (till) with occasional discontinuous lenses of sand and silt. They overlie the Silurian (dolomite) aquifer which provides private, public, and municipal drinking water supplies in the region. The saturated hydraulic conductivity of the Wolf Creek Formation was investigated in a sub-area of the Eastern Iowa Till Hydrology Site. Calculations of saturated hydraulic conductivity were based on laboratoryflexible-wall permeameter tests, bailer tests, and pumping test data. Results show that bulk hydraulic conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude as the tested volume of till increases. Increasing values of saturated hydraulic conductivity at larger spatial scales conceptually support a double-porosity flow model for this till.

  15. Climate change as the dominant control on glacial-interglacial variations in C3 and C4 plant abundance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Street-Perrott, F A; Metcalfe, S E; Brenner, M; Moreland, M; Freeman, K H

    2001-08-31

    Although C4 plant expansions have been recognized in the late Miocene, identification of the underlying causes is complicated by the uncertainties associated with estimates of ancient precipitation, temperature, and partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (PCO2). Here we report the carbon isotopic compositions of leaf wax n-alkanes in lake sediment cores from two sites in Mesoamerica that have experienced contrasting moisture variations since the last glacial maximum. Opposite isotopic trends obtained from these two sites indicate that regional climate exerts a strong control on the relative abundance of C3 and C4 plants and that in the absence of favorable moisture and temperature conditions, low PCO2 alone is insufficient to drive an expansion of C4 plants.

  16. 21st century Himalayan hydropower: Growing exposure to glacial lake outburst floods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus; Korup, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    Primary energy demand in China and India has increased fivefold since 1980. To avoid power shortages and blackouts, the hydropower infrastructure in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya region is seeing massive development, a strategy supported by the policy of the World Bank and in harmony with the framework of the Kyoto Protocol. The targeted investments in clean energy from water resources, however, may trigger far-reaching impacts to downstream communities given that hydropower projects are planned and constructed in close vicinity to glaciated areas. We hypothesize that the location of these new schemes may be subject to higher exposure to a broad portfolio of natural hazards that proliferate in the steep, dissected, and tectonically active topography of the Himalayas. Here we focus on the hazard from glacial lake outburst floods (GLOF), and offer an unprecedented regional analysis for the Hindu Kush-Himalaya orogen. We compiled a database of nearly 4,000 proglacial lakes that we mapped from satellite imagery; and focus on those as potential GLOF sources that are situated above several dozen planned and existing hydropower plants. We implemented a scenario-based flood-wave propagation model of hypothetic GLOFs, and compared thus simulated peak discharges with those of the local design floods at the power plants. Multiple model runs confirm earlier notions that GLOF discharge may exceed meteorological, i.e. monsoon-fed, flood peaks by at least an order of magnitude throughout the Hindu Kush-Himalaya. We further show that the current trend in hydropower development near glaciated areas may lead to a >15% increase of projects that may be impacted by future GLOFs. At the same time, the majority of the projects are to be sited where outburst flood modelling produces its maximum uncertainty, highlighting the problem of locating minimum risk sites for hydropower. Exposure to GLOFs is not uniformly distributed in the Himalayas, and is particularly high in rivers draining the Mt

  17. Paleoceanographic history of the Lower Bengal Fan during the last glacial cycle - IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Lantzsch, H.; Das, S. K.; Williams, T.; Adhikari, R. R.; Jia, G.; Fox, L. R.; Ge, J.; Manoj, M. C.; Savian, J. F.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Sharma, B.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 drilled a ~320 km long transect of seven sites on the Lower Bengal Fan at 8o N in the Northern Indian Ocean. The sediments cores recovered record a complex relationship between turbiditic and hemipelagic environments. This variability offers a unique opportunity to link our understanding of tectonic and terrestrial processes with climate and oceanography. With the exception the westernmost Site U1454, all sites show a several meter thick, hemipelagic top layer, usually representing Late Quaternary sediment. We present physical, geochemical and stable isotopic properties of this interval to establish a time frame and assess the paleoceanographic development of the region during the last glacial cycle. We sampled Site U1452C-1H continuously for the uppermost 480 cm of hemipelagic sediment in 2-cm increments. Preliminary results indicate the Toba Ash 1 (0.74 ka) is a distinct time marker in all physical properties. Furthermore, wet-bulk density as well as color reflectance b* (the red-green component) and L* (the lightness) show a dominant precession cyclicity. Hence, we are able to provide an insolation-tuned chronology for the last 200 ka (MIS1 - 7) as a preliminary age model. These records agree well with d18O records retrieved from Chinese caves. We will present a preliminary paleoceanographic proxy data to reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface salinity (SSS), ice volume, marine biological productivity, nutrient supply, and deep-water circulation. These oceanographic and climate conditions are linked to changes in monsoonal strength and terrestrial input using sedimentary proxies to reconstruct chemical weathering and sediment sources and transport time. This work addresses one of the primary cruise objectives - linking monsoon variability, regional and global climate, and Bay of Bengal sediment deposition.

  18. Co-variation of nitrogen isotopes and redox states through glacial-interglacial cycles in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Tracy M.; Wright, James D.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-07-01

    In all aquatic environments, nitrogen cycling within the water column is strongly influenced by oxygen. We hypothesize that the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of organic matter deposited in the sediments is a proxy for the redox state of the water column at the time of deposition. We tested the hypothesis by measuring the bulk sedimentary δ15N values in a drill core from the Black Sea, a basin that alternates between oxic, less saline conditions and anoxic, marine conditions on glacial-interglacial time scales. We reconstructed these changes in Black Sea redox conditions using sedimentary δ15N, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), redox-sensitive metals, and micropaleontological data from a deep-sea core (DSDP Site 380). The sedimentary data reveal that during the transitions between oxic and anoxic conditions, δ15N values increased relative to the preceding and succeeding quasi-steady-state oxic and anoxic periods. The results indicate that the reciprocal transitional states from anoxic to oxic conditions were accompanied by intense denitrification; during the quasi-stable oxic and anoxic states (characterized by glacial fresh water and interglacial marine conditions) nitrification and complete nitrate utilization, respectively, dominate the nitrogen cycle. While other factors may influence the δ15N record, our results support the hypothesis that the variations in nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter are strongly influenced by changes in redox state in the Black Sea subphotic zone on glacial-interglacial time scales, and can be explained by a relatively simple model describing the effects of oxygen on the microbial processes that drive the nitrogen cycle in marine ecosystems. Our model suggests that the nitrogen isotopic composition of marine sediments, on geological time scales, can be used to reconstruct the redox state of the overlying water column.

  19. Glacial and post-glacial history of Lake Windermere, The Lake District, UK: integrating high resolution multibeam bathymetry, airborne LiDAR, and sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, H.; Bull, J. M.; Cotterill, C.; Vardy, M. E.; Dix, J. K.; Henstock, T.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution multibeam bathymetry and airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data, supplemented by geomorphological and geological field mapping have been used to investigate the glacial and post-glacial history of Windermere, the largest natural lake in England. In addition, recently acquired piston cores, supplemented with 2D and 3D seismic reflection data from previous surveys have been used to examine the well preserved sequence stratigraphy. The data is used to generate a present-day landscape map, revealing a complex landform record, characterised by nine sub-basins separated by steps, ridges and isolated topographic highs related to the retreat of the British and Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). Debris flows and anthropogenic features are superimposed on the general bathymetric framework formed since the Last Glacial Maximum. There is also evidence of glacial features preserved onshore, which identify a series of depositional environments that accompanied ice advance, ice retreat and post-glacial deposition within the Lake District. Core analysis has identified a sequence of sand with finely laminated sand, silt and clay, fining upwards into varved clays, overlain by organic rich lacustrine gyttja. The stratigraphic units correlate with existing seismic stratigraphic facies, suggesting the sequence extends through an overlying drape of Holocene gyttja into glaciolacustrine and lacustrine sediment fill relating to Interstadial/BIIS retreat, and further penetrates to the till surface. Analysis of geophysical core properties reveals coarser layers in the varved clay are correlated with peaks in magnetic susceptibility and iron, suggesting retreat was punctuated by surges in ice movement leading to the deposition of coarser layers rich in iron bearing minerals. This study indicates that an integrated approach, using high resolution geophysical datasets combined with sediment coring is capable of deriving an in-depth understanding of glacial and post-glacial

  20. 76 FR 50476 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Glacial Energy of Texas, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application To Export Electric Energy; Glacial Energy of Texas, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Application. SUMMARY: Glacial Energy of Texas,...

  1. 78 FR 3909 - Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, MN; Northern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge... conservation plans (CCP) and associated environmental documents for the Big Oaks, Glacial Ridge, Northern... refuge at the following addresses: Attention: Refuge Manager, Big Oaks NWR, 1661 West JPG Niblo...

  2. Tooth enamel stable isotopes of Holocene and Pleistocene fossil fauna reveal glacial and interglacial paleoenvironments of hominins in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Renée; Joordens, Josephine C. A.; Koutamanis, Dafne S.; Puspaningrum, Mika R.; de Vos, John; van der Lubbe, Jeroen H. J. L.; Reijmer, John J. G.; Hampe, Oliver; Vonhof, Hubert B.

    2016-07-01

    The carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope compositions of fossilized animal tissues have become important proxies of paleodiet and paleoenvironment, but such stable isotope studies have not yet been extensively applied to the fossil assemblages of Sundaland (the biogeographical region comprising most of the Indonesian Archipelago). Here, we use the isotope composition of tooth enamel to investigate the diet and habitat of bovids, cervids, and suids from several Holocene and Pleistocene sites on Java and Sumatra. Our carbon isotope results indicate that individual sites are strongly dominated by either C3-browsers or C4-grazers. Herbivores from the Padang Highlands (Sumatra) and Hoekgrot (Java) cave faunas were mainly C3-browsers, while herbivores from Homo erectus-bearing sites Trinil and Sangiran (Java) utilized an almost exclusive C4 diet. The suids from all sites show a wide range of δ13C values, corroborating their omnivorous diet. For the dataset as a whole, oxygen and carbon isotope values are positively correlated. This suggests that isotopic enrichment of rainwater and vegetation δ18O values coincides with an increase of C4-grasslands. We interpret this pattern to mainly reflect the environmental contrast between glacial (drier, more C4) and interglacial (wetter, more C3) conditions. Intermediate herbivore δ13C values indicating mixed C3/C4 feeding is relatively rare, which we believe to reflect the abruptness of the transition between glacial and interglacial precipitation regimes in Sundaland. For seven Homo erectus bone samples we were not able distinguish between diagenetic overprint and original isotope values, underlining the need to apply this isotopic approach to Homo erectus tooth enamel instead of bone. Importantly, our present results on herbivore and omnivore faunas provide the isotopic framework that will allow interpretation of such Homo erectus enamel isotope data.

  3. The Southern Glacial Maximum 65,000 years ago and its Unfinished Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Birkel, Sean; Doughty, Alice M.; Kelley, Sam; Barrell, David J. A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Ninneman, Ulysses S.; Barker, Stephen; Schwartz, Roseanne; Andersen, Bjorn G.; Schluechter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Glacial maxima and their terminations provide key insights into inter-hemispheric climate dynamics and the coupling of atmosphere, surface and deep ocean, hydrology, and cryosphere, which is fundamental for evaluating the robustness of earth's climate in view of ongoing climate change. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼26-19 ka ago) is widely seen as the global cold peak during the last glacial cycle, and its transition to the Holocene interglacial, dubbed 'Termination 1 (T1)', as the most dramatic climate reorganization during this interval. Climate records show that over the last 800 ka, ice ages peaked and terminated on average every 100 ka ('100 ka world'). However, the mechanisms pacing glacial-interglacial transitions remain controversial and in particular the hemispheric manifestations and underlying orbital to regional driving forces of glacial maxima and subsequent terminations remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for a full glacial maximum in the Southern Hemisphere 65.1 ± 2.7 ka ago and its 'Unfinished Termination'. Our 10Be chronology combined with a model simulation demonstrates that New Zealand's glaciers reached their maximum position of the last glacial cycle during Marine Isotope Stage-4 (MIS-4). Southern ocean and greenhouse gas records indicate coeval peak glacial conditions, making the case for the Southern Glacial Maximum about halfway through the last glacial cycle and only 15 ka after the last warm period (MIS-5a). We present the hypothesis that subsequently, driven by boreal summer insolation forcing, a termination began but remained unfinished, possibly because the northern ice sheets were only moderately large and could not supply enough meltwater to the North Atlantic through Heinrich Stadial 6 to drive a full termination. Yet the Unfinished Termination left behind substantial ice on the northern continents (about 50% of the full LGM ice volume) and after another 45 ka of cooling and ice sheet growth the earth was at inter

  4. Midlatitude land surface temperature impacts the timing and structure of glacial maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Elizabeth K.; Clemens, Steven C.; Sun, Youbin; Huang, Yongsong; Prell, Warren; Chen, Guangshan; Liu, Zhengyu; Loomis, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Orbitally modulated insolation is thought to be among the key mechanisms driving ice sheet change. Yet, late Pleistocene ice sheets attained maximum marginal extents prior to summer insolation minima, suggesting that additional mechanisms influenced ice growth and decay. Continuous orbital-scale terrestrial temperature records can help define the role that temperature near ice sheet margins plays on the timing and structure of glacial maxima. We hypothesize, based on a 360 kyr long air temperature record from the Chinese Loess Plateau and shorter records from North America and Europe, that midlatitude terrestrial temperature influenced the rate of ice sheet growth prior to and during glacial maxima; cold conditions prior to glacial maxima enhanced ice sheet growth, while warming during glacial maxima inhibited further growth, despite low summer insolation. Thus, the midlatitude surface energy budget may be an important component of understanding and modeling ice volume, particularly for intervals prior to and during glacial maxima, when ice sheet margins reached midlatitudes.

  5. Episodic speleothem deposition tracks the terrestrial impact of millennial-scale last glacial climate variability in SW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fankhauser, Adelheid; McDermott, Frank; Fleitmann, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    Eighty four new U-Th ages are presented for twenty randomly selected broken, displaced and reworked calcite speleothems retrieved from clastic sedimentary fill and from isolated bedding-plane shelves in Crag cave (SW Ireland). The dated pre-Holocene samples span much of the last glacial, ranging in age from 85.15 ± 0.60 to 23.45 ± 0.17 ka. Speleothem deposition requires the presence of liquid water, and because Crag cave is a shallow system, deposition is considered likely only when mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) exceed the freezing point of water. Deposition at this mid-latitude ocean-marginal site occurred episodically during MIS5a through to MIS2, synchronously within dating uncertainties, with the timing of Greenland Interstadials (GI). In the latter part of Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3), deposition was particularly intense, consistent with regional scale climate amelioration inferred previously from radiocarbon ages for sparse MIS3 organic and freshwater surficial deposits in N. Ireland. A brief episode of speleothem deposition at c.23.40 ± 0.22 ka coincides with GI-2, demonstrating the sensitivity of the site to brief climate amelioration episodes in Greenland during MIS2. Conditions favourable for speleothem deposition occurred periodically during the last glacial, indicating temperature changes of at least 10 °C between stadials and interstadials at this mid-latitude site. Deposition ceased during Greenland Stadials (GS), including during periods of ice-rafting in the adjacent N. Atlantic Ocean (Heinrich events). Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of the last glacial speleothems are generally elevated, reflecting non-equilibrium isotope fractionation effects. However, establishment of low δ13C values often occurred within a few decades of climate amelioration, indicating that biogenic CO2 production resumed rapidly at this site, particularly during MIS3. Speleothem δ18O variability was driven largely by long-term changes in the δ18O value of the

  6. Variability in surface and thermocline temperatures of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacho, I.; Ferretti, P.; Pena, L.; Shackleton, N.

    2005-05-01

    Here we present results from ODP Core Site 1240 (Leg 202, 0 ° 01.31'N, 86° 27.76'W, 2921 mbsl) located in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP), under the northern edge of the so-called "Cold Tongue". This frontal system separates the cold, salty waters of the Peru Current from warmer and fresher tropical waters of the Northern Hemisphere. This study is based on paired stable isotopes (δ18O, δ13C) and trace elements (Mg/Ca) from planktonic foraminifera. Multiple species with different dwelling preferential depths were studied to reconstruct both surface and thermocline characteristics. Core-top Mg/Ca inferred temperatures are in good agreement with current mean annual sea surface temperature (SST) and deep thermocline temperatures (DTT) as recorded from available data from hydrographical stations. Our reconstruction covers the last glacial period at centennial-time resolution. Age model has been constructed in base to eight AMS 14C dates for the last 20 kyr interval. The older section of Site 1240 has been dated after visual correlation of the δ18O record measured in the deep thermocline dwelling foraminifer N. dutertrei and the Deuterium record from the Antarctic. The resemblance of both records is very remarkable, as is confirmed by the high correlation coefficient (R=0.92) estimated for the tied interval. Results reveal the occurrence of several rapid oscillations of about 1-2° C are observed during MIS 3 in both, SST (G. ruber) and DTT (N. dutertrei) records. Apparently, most of the Heinrich Events correlate with short warming phases although they are not particularly large within the record. N. dutertrei record indicates a long term shallowing of the thermocline across the glacial period and the occurrence of some millennial events of deepening. These events correlate with intervals of relatively high salinity in the surface layer. These changes are likely to reflect short term oscillations in the ITCZ in relation to high latitude millennial

  7. Post-glacial sea-level history for NE Ireland (Belfast Lough) based on offshore evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, R.; Plets, R. M.; Callard, L.; Cooper, A.; Long, A. J.; Belknap, D. F.; Edwards, R.; Jackson, D.; Kelley, J. T.; Long, D.; Milne, G. A.; Monteys, X.

    2013-12-01

    Glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA) models suggest a complex relative sea-level (RSL) pattern around the Irish Sea Basin after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), with modelled sea-level lowstands ranging from -12 m in the north to greater than -60 m in the south of the Basin. However, these GIA models are poorly constrained by observational data offshore. Belfast Lough, on the NE coast of Ireland, is one of seven sites chosen to investigate this complex RSL history as part of the project ';Late Glacial Sea level minima in the Western British Isles' (NERC NE/H024301/1). Belfast Lough was chosen as one of the candidate sites on the basis of location (at the northern end of the Irish Sea Basin), sedimentary environment (grossly depositional) and the fact that the lowstand predicted for the Belfast Lough area by a recent version of the GIA model (-16.5 m) differs significantly from the (limited) extant observational data, which interprets the lowstand at -30 m. In 2011 and 2012 we gathered new multi-beam echo-sounder data, >200 km trackline pinger- and boomer- seismic reflection data and 46 vibrocores in Belfast Lough. Radiocarbon dating and palaeoenvironmental analysis are used to constrain the interpretation of the seismic and sediment data. Five seismo-stratigraphic units are interpreted, with a distinct erosional surface between U3 and U4 interpreted as a transgressive surface associated with sea level rise post-dating a RSL lowstand. Foraminiferal evidence indicates an increase in marine species (from lagoonal/estuarine to fully marine) from U4 to U5. Integration of the seismic and core data indicate an erosional event prior to 12.7 cal yr BP resulting in a planated surface in the inner Lough and wave-eroded drumlins at the mouth of the Lough between -15 and -22 m, interpreted as a possible slowstand. On the basis of seismic evidence in the outer Lough, an as yet undated lowstand at -42 m is tentatively interpreted to pre-date this stillstand. These results will be

  8. Post-glacial sea-level history for NE Ireland (Belfast Lough) based on offshore evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Rory; Plets, Ruth; Callard, Louise; Cooper, Andrew; Antony, Long; Daniel, Belknap; Robin, Edwards; Derek, Jackson; Joseph, Kelley; David, Long; Glenn, Milne; Xavier, Monteys

    2014-05-01

    Glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA) models suggest a complex relative sea-level (RSL) pattern around the Irish Sea Basin after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), with modelled sea-level lowstands ranging from -12 m in the north to greater than -60 m in the south of the Basin. However, these GIA models are poorly constrained by observational data offshore. Belfast Lough, on the NE coast of Ireland, is one of seven sites chosen to investigate this complex RSL history as part of the project 'Late Glacial Sea level minima in the Western British Isles' (NERC NE/H024301/1). Belfast Lough was chosen as one of the candidate sites on the basis of location (at the northern end of the Irish Sea Basin), sedimentary environment (grossly depositional) and the fact that the lowstand predicted for the Belfast Lough area by a recent version of the GIA model (-16.5 m) differs significantly from the (limited) extant observational data, which interprets the lowstand at -30 m. In 2011 and 2012 we gathered new multi-beam echo-sounder data, >200 km trackline pinger- and boomer- seismic reflection data and 46 vibrocores in Belfast Lough. Radiocarbon dating and palaeoenvironmental analysis are used to constrain the interpretation of the seismic and sediment data. Five seismo-stratigraphic units are interpreted, with a distinct erosional surface between U3 and U4 interpreted as a transgressive surface associated with sea level rise post-dating a RSL lowstand. Foraminiferal evidence indicates an increase in marine species (from lagoonal/estuarine to fully marine) from U4 to U5. Integration of the seismic and core data indicate an erosional event prior to 12.7 cal yr BP resulting in a planated surface in the inner Lough and wave-eroded drumlins at the mouth of the Lough between -15 and -22 m, interpreted as a possible slowstand. On the basis of seismic evidence in the outer Lough, an as yet undated lowstand at -42 m is tentatively interpreted to pre-date this stillstand. These results will be used

  9. Late Glacial and Late Holocene Paleohydrology of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aichner, B.; Feakins, S. J.; Mischke, S.; Herzschuh, U.; Liu, X.; Rajabov, I.; Wang, Y.; Heinecke, L.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to deepen the understanding of past climatological, ecological and hydrological changes in Central Asia, by means of organic geochemical proxies and in close cooperation with other work groups providing biological and sedimentological data. We analysed an 8 m sediment core from Lake Karakuli, a small open freshwater lake situated at an altitude of 3,657 m between the massifs of Muztagh Ata (7,546 m) and Kongur Shan (7,719 m) in western China. Additional work is in progress on a 12 m core derived from Lake Karakul in Tajikistan, a large closed saline lake situated in a tectonic graben structure at an altitude of 3,928 m. The distance between the two lakes is 130 km and basal ages of the cores are ca. 4.7 ka BP (China) and ca. 27 ka BP (Tajikistan). The lake catchments may be classified as alpine steppe to alpine deserts with mean annual temperature of ca. 0 °C and mean annual precipitation of ca. 100 mm, respectively. Summer precipitation, associated with the Indian monsoon, accounts for <30% of the annual total, whereas most precipitation is supplied by mid-latitude Westerlies between March and May. In the small Chinese lake long-chain fatty acids (FAs) were mainly attributed to terrestrial sources by compound-specific carbon isotopic analyses. In contrast δ13C values up to -14‰ for abundant mid-chain FAs suggest aquatic origins in the large Lake Karakul. Hydrogen isotopic variability is ca. 15‰ in the mid-Holocene record and ca. 60‰ in the first data derived from the Late Glacial record. In the latter, the most pronounced change from higher to lower δD-values of aquatic biomarkers is tentatively interpreted as change from arid to more humid conditions at the Late Glacial to Holocene transition. Since in Central Asia isotopic variability of precipitation mainly correlates with temperature, we interpret high resolution δD data of terrestrial long-chain FAs in the younger core to mainly reflect mid-Holocene temperature variations

  10. Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, P. B.

    2006-02-01

    Two classes of natural solid media, glacial ice and salt domes, are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy ≥1018 eV. Though insensitive to 1011 to 1016 eV neutrinos for which observatories (e.g., AMANDA and IceCube) that utilize optical Cherenkov radiation detectors are designed, radio and acoustic methods are suited for searches for the very low fluxes of neutrinos with energies >1017 eV. This is because owing to the very long attenuation lengths of radio and acoustic waves produced by interactions of such neutrinos in ice and salt, detection modules can be spaced at horizontal distances ˜1 km, in contrast to the 0.12 km distances between strings of IceCube modules. In this paper, I calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of frequency and grain size for acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes and show that experimental measurements on laboratory samples and in glacial ice and salt domes are consistent with theory. For South Pole ice with grain size ˜0.2 cm at depths ≤600 m, scattering lengths are calculated to be 2000 and 25 km at frequencies 10 and 30 kHz, respectively; for grain size ˜0.4 cm at 1500 m (the maximum depth to be instrumented acoustically), scattering lengths are calculated to be 250 and 3 km. These are within the range of frequencies where most of the energy of the acoustic wave is concentrated. The absorption length is calculated to be 9 ± 3 km at all frequencies above ˜100 Hz. For NaCl (rock salt) with grain size 0.75 cm, scattering lengths are calculated to be 120 and 1.4 km at 10 and 30 kHz, and absorption lengths are calculated to be 3 × 104 and 3300 km at 10 and 30 kHz. Existing measurements are consistent with theory. For ice, absorption is the limiting factor; for salt, scattering is the limiting factor. Both media would be suitable for detection of acoustic waves from ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions.

  11. Glacial lakes amplify glacier recession in the central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Owen; Quincey, Duncan; Carrivick, Jonathan; Rowan, Ann

    2016-04-01

    The high altitude and high latitude regions of the world are amongst those which react most intensely to climatic change. Across the Himalaya glacier mass balance is predominantly negative. The spatial and temporal complexity associated with this ice loss across different glacier clusters is poorly documented however, and our understanding of the processes driving change is limited. Here, we look at the spatial variability of glacier hypsometry and glacial mass loss from three catchments in the central Himalaya; the Dudh Koshi basin, Tama Koshi basin and an adjoining section of the Tibetan Plateau. ASTER and SETSM digital elevation models (2014/15), corrected for elevation dependant biases, co-registration errors and along or cross track tilts, are differenced from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) data (2000) to yield surface lowering estimates. Landsat data and a hypsometric index (HI), a classification scheme used to group glaciers of similar hypsometry, are used to examine the distribution of glacier area with altitude in each catchment. Surface lowering rates of >3 m/yr can be detected on some glaciers, generally around the clean-ice/debris-cover boundary, where dark but thin surface deposits are likely to enhance ablation. More generally, surface lowering rates of around 1 m/yr are more pervasive, except around the terminus areas of most glaciers, emphasising the influence of a thick debris cover on ice melt. Surface lowering is only concentrated at glacier termini where glacial lakes have developed, where surface lowering rates are commonly greater than 2.5 m/yr. The three catchments show contrasting hypsometric distributions, which is likely to impact their future response to climatic changes. Glaciers of the Dudh Koshi basin store large volumes of ice at low elevation (HI > 1.5) in long, debris covered tongues, although their altitudinal range is greatest given the height of mountain peaks in the catchment. In contrast, glaciers of the Tama Koshi

  12. Glacial Geomorphic Characteristics of the Antarctic Peninsula Fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Munoz, Y. P.; Mead, K. A.; Hardin, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    A distinctive suite of subglacial geomorphic features, representing the grounding of an ice sheet and its subsequent retreat, has been well documented for many parts of the Antarctic continental shelf. Geomorphic features include meltwater channels, drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations, and gullies cut into the upper slope. Many of these same features occur in more recently deglaciated fjords, but at different scales and in different combinations. We have surveyed twelve fjords on the Antarctic Peninsula, from the Graham Land Coast to Hope Bay as well as on Anvers Island and in the South Shetland Islands. Surveys include multibeam swath bathymetry, CHIRP 3.5 kHz seismic, and sediment cores. Recently, we have reprocessed much of the multibeam data using new software allowing higher-resolution imagery. Unlike on the outer continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula, where there is a relatively simple suite of geomorphic features and a uniform retreat history, the fjords on the inner shelf show a complex geomorphic pattern representing somewhat unique glacial retreat histories for each fjord. Several fjords have distinctive grounding zone wedge deposits, and some fjords have such wedges in multiple locations, representing multiple pauses in the retreat history, or a stepped retreat of the ice. Drumlins and mega-scale glacial lineations are present in the fjords, but extend for kms rather than the tens of kms that are typical of the outer shelf. If drumlins are interpreted to indicate acceleration of grounded ice, as they are on the outer shelf, then there must have been multiple zones of acceleration across the flow path of the ice as drumlin sets occur in multiple zones in a single flow path. The inner parts of many fjords along the coast of the peninsula are characterized by features interpreted as erosional meltwater channels, although such features are not common in fjords in the islands off the peninsula, despite the similar scale of the fjords themselves

  13. Edges and Blocks Matter on Hillslopes, Rivers, and Glacial Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many landforms display sharp corners, or edges, that are maintained as they migrate laterally. Our present landscape models, cast largely in terms of patterns of vertical erosion, fail to capture the essence of these landscapes, including flatirons, hogbacks, cliffs, and lumpy outcropped hillslopes; roche moutonée and glacial steps, and river knickpoints. Yet these are the very landscape signatures of rock type and structure. Block sizes, and the fracture distributions that bound the blocks, vary from one rock type or geological setting to another. Removal and transportation of discrete blocks of rock maintains a sharp edge, and results in their upvalley/upslope migration. Our challenge in developing numerical landscapes is to capture the essential variation, noisiness, and roughness of natural landscapes and their dependence on rock type and structure. The rate of lowering of the landscape is governed by the product of the spatial density of edges, their step height, and their rate of migration. I present cellular automata-like models in which I explicitly incorporate blocks, and utilize algorithms for the susceptibility of any block to motion, and the forces imposed on the surface by the environment. Susceptibility of a block to release is governed by its size, the geometry of the pocket in which it sits, the frictional properties of the bounding discontinuities, and the cohesion across these discontinuities. This is akin to coordination number and bond strengths of atoms in mineral dissolution studies; their atoms are our blocks. Removal of a block requires an event of sufficient magnitude to overcome its resistance. The relevant events include fluctuations in water pressure at the bed of glaciers, turbulence and sediment impacts in rivers, and root throw or earthquakes in hillslopes. Preliminary models capture the essence of migrating edges. The systems self-organize to produce suites of steps. In glacial beds, for example, migration of steps produces upvalley

  14. Glacial Lake Expansion in the Central Himalayas by Landsat Images, 1990–2010

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Liu, Qiao; Liu, Shiyin

    2013-01-01

    Glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) is a serious hazard in high, mountainous regions. In the Himalayas, catastrophic risks of GLOFs have increased in recent years because most Himalayan glaciers have experienced remarkable downwasting under a warming climate. However, current knowledge about the distribution and recent changes in glacial lakes within the central Himalaya mountain range is still limited. Here, we conducted a systematic investigation of the glacial lakes within the entire central Himalaya range by using an object-oriented image processing method based on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) or Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) images from 1990 to 2010. We extracted the lake boundaries for four time points (1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010) and used a time series inspection method combined with a consistent spatial resolution of Landsat images that consistently revealed lake expansion. Our results show that the glacial lakes expanded rapidly by 17.11% from 1990 to 2010. The pre-existing, larger glacial lakes, rather than the newly formed lakes, contributed most to the areal expansion. The greatest expansions occurred at the altitudinal zones between 4800 m and 5600 m at the north side of the main Himalayan range and between 4500 m and 5600 m at the south side, respectively. Based on the expansion rate, area and type of glacial lakes, we identified 67 rapidly expanding glacial lakes in the central Himalayan region that need to be closely monitored in the future. The warming and increasing amounts of light-absorbing constituents of snow and ice could have accelerated the melting that directly affected the glacial lake expansion. Across the main central Himalayas, glacial lakes at the north side show more remarkable expansion than those at the south side. An effective monitoring and warning system for critical glacial lakes is urgently needed. PMID:24376778

  15. Glacial lake expansion in the central Himalayas by Landsat images, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Liu, Qiao; Liu, Shiyin

    2013-01-01

    Glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) is a serious hazard in high, mountainous regions. In the Himalayas, catastrophic risks of GLOFs have increased in recent years because most Himalayan glaciers have experienced remarkable downwasting under a warming climate. However, current knowledge about the distribution and recent changes in glacial lakes within the central Himalaya mountain range is still limited. Here, we conducted a systematic investigation of the glacial lakes within the entire central Himalaya range by using an object-oriented image processing method based on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) or Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) images from 1990 to 2010. We extracted the lake boundaries for four time points (1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010) and used a time series inspection method combined with a consistent spatial resolution of Landsat images that consistently revealed lake expansion. Our results show that the glacial lakes expanded rapidly by 17.11% from 1990 to 2010. The pre-existing, larger glacial lakes, rather than the newly formed lakes, contributed most to the areal expansion. The greatest expansions occurred at the altitudinal zones between 4800 m and 5600 m at the north side of the main Himalayan range and between 4500 m and 5600 m at the south side, respectively. Based on the expansion rate, area and type of glacial lakes, we identified 67 rapidly expanding glacial lakes in the central Himalayan region that need to be closely monitored in the future. The warming and increasing amounts of light-absorbing constituents of snow and ice could have accelerated the melting that directly affected the glacial lake expansion. Across the main central Himalayas, glacial lakes at the north side show more remarkable expansion than those at the south side. An effective monitoring and warning system for critical glacial lakes is urgently needed.

  16. High resolution record of the Last Glacial Maximum in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Lynda; Moss, Patrick; McGowan, Hamish

    2010-05-01

    A continuous, high resolution (average ca. 22 year) record encompassing the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been developed using multiple proxies (aeolian sediment flux, grain size, pollen and charcoal) in lake sediment from Tortoise Lagoon (TOR), North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia. The presence of Asteraceae tubilifloreae and spineless Asteraceae (common indicators of glacial conditions in Australia) at TOR indicates significantly cooler temperatures (mean annual temperature up to 6oC lower than today). In addition to the palaeoclimatic reconstruction, a record of palaeodust transport pathways for eastern Australia was developed using ICP-MS trace element analysis and geochemical "fingerprinting" of TOR aeolian sediment to continental dust source areas. Vectors between dominant dust source areas and North Stradbroke Island allowed the reconstruction of the position and intensity of LGM dust transport pathways. Furthermore, changes in likely synpotic scale conditions can be postulated based on the position of the dust transport corridors. Similarities between the vegetation at TOR during the LGM and that at temperate sites e.g. Caledonia Fen, Victoria (Kershaw et al. 2007), Redhead Lagoon, New South Wales (Williams et al. 2006) and Barrington Tops, New South Wales (Sweller and Martin 2001) suggests that this record reflects regional conditions across southeastern Australia. The TOR record also correlates well with that from nearby Native Companion Lagoon which suggests that the LGM was actually an extended period of ca. 8 - 10 kyr, characterised by 2 periods of increased aridity (ca. 30 - 26.5 kyr and 21 - 19.5 kyr) (Petherick et al. 2008). A growing number of records from across the Southern Hemisphere e.g. New Zealand (Suggate and Almond 2003; Alloway et al. 2007; Newnham et al. 2007), Chile (Denton et al. 1999), Antarctica (Röthlisberger et al. 2002; EPICA 2006) and Australia (Smith 2009) also show evidence that the LGM encompassed a longer period of

  17. Multi-Proxy Approach to the Atlantic-Indian Water Interchange Along the Last Three Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Méndez, G.; Zahn, R.; Hall, I.; Rickaby, R.

    2005-12-01

    Multi-centennial mean grainsize (SS), paired planktonic ( G. bulloides) and benthic foraminifera ( C. wuellerstorfi ) stable isotope and trace element records of IMAGES core MD96-2080 are used to document surface and deep interchange of waters between the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The core is from the western slope of the Agulhas Bank, off the southern tip of Africa, within the main gateway of Atlantic-Indian ocean interbasin exchange. At a water depth of 2488 m it is currently located within the southern extension of NADW bounded above and below by Upper and Lower CDW. The records display prominent orbital modulation and faster sub-orbital variability that is linked to climate variability seen in marine records at high southern latitudes, and in Antarctic ice core records. Departures from the orbitally modulated pattern occur in benthic C-13 along MIS 5 suggesting an alternation between water masses with similar C-13 signature. Low C-13 levels during glacial periods point to a substitution of NADW by CDW, while flow speeds are increased as indicated by high values of SS. The pattern mimics that seen at a mid-depth SW Pacific core site (Hall et al., 2001) suggesting a hemisphere-wide significance for the southern hemisphere oceans. The combined benthic C-13 and Cd/Ca patterns are used to discriminate between water masses and to separate preformed from THC-related signals contained in the glacial-interglacial and millennial patterns. The data profiles show significant differences in the rate of change of ice volume (O-18), chemical ventilation (C-13) and physical circulation (SS) during glacial to interglacial transitions and interglacial to glacial transitions that suggest a large inertia of ocean physics but also confirm the significance of Southern Ocean THC water mass formation for changing deep ocean ventilation. Coherency between the planktonic and benthic isotope records points to the existence of a direct connection between Agulhas leakage and deep outflow

  18. Numerical studies on the Impact of the Last Glacial Cycle on recent borehole temperature profiles: implications for terrestrial energy balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; Matharoo, G. S.; Tarasov, L.; Rath, V.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2014-09-01

    Reconstructions of past climatic changes from borehole temperature profiles are important independent estimates of temperature histories over the last millennium. There remain, however, multiple uncertainties in the interpretation of these data as climatic indicators and as estimates of the changes in the heat content of the continental subsurface due to long-term climatic change. One of these uncertainties is associated with the often ignored impact of the last glacial cycle (LGC) on the subsurface energy content, and on the estimate of the background quasi steady-state signal associated with the diffusion of accretionary energy from the Earth's interior. Here, we provide the first estimate of the impact of the development of the Laurentide ice sheet on the estimates of energy and temperature reconstructions from measurements of terrestrial borehole temperatures in North America. We use basal temperature values from the data-calibrated Memorial University of Newfoundland glacial systems model (MUN-GSM) to quantify the extent of the perturbation to estimated steady-state temperature profiles, and to derive spatial maps of the expected impacts on measured profiles over North America. Furthermore, we present quantitative estimates of the potential effects of temperature changes during the last glacial cycle on the borehole reconstructions over the last millennium for North America. The range of these possible impacts is estimated using synthetic basal temperatures for a period covering 120 ka to the present day that include the basal temperature history uncertainties from an ensemble of results from the calibrated numerical model. For all the locations, we find that within the depth ranges that are typical for available boreholes (≈600 m), the induced perturbations to the steady-state temperature profile are on the order of 10 mW m-2, decreasing with greater depths. Results indicate that site-specific heat content estimates over North America can differ by as much

  19. Does Temperature (Rather than Precipitation) Dictate the Geomorphic Legacy of Glacial Intervals in Unglaciated Mid-Latitude Terrains?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Roering, J. J.; Bartlein, P. J.; Praskievicz, S. J.; Gavin, D. G.; Hales, T. C.; Granger, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Whereas glaciated landscapes record increased erosional efficiency through moraines and U-shaped valleys, unglaciated hillslopes and rivers lack a mechanistic theory for climate controls on their dynamics and form. Changes in precipitation and associated aggradation due to vegetation loss or incision due to increased river discharge are commonly invoked when considering the effect of glacial intervals on unglaciated terrains, but there is scant evidence supporting or discounting these hypotheses. Surprisingly, there is little consideration that temperature, rather than precipitation, may dictate the frequency, magnitude, or style of erosion in unglaciated landscapes during glacial intervals. Here, we present results combining a mechanistic frost-cracking model with downscaled general circulation model output to predict the extent and intensity of sediment production via frost processes across the unglaciated Oregon Coast Range (OCR) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our results show that in this mid-latitude region, well south of the Cordilleran ice sheet, frost-driven processes likely shaped 90% of the present-day landmass during the LGM. A suite of geomorphic and vegetation data from a 50-ky sediment core from a paleo landslide-dammed lake in the OCR support our model results. Our study site, Little Lake, is located in the central portion of the OCR, over 400 m south of the maximum extent of the Cordilleran ice sheet. Based on 10Be-derived erosion rates, present-day catchment erosion rates average 0.07 ± 0.03 mm/yr (mean ± sd), while LGM erosion rates remained constant around 0.19 ± 0.01 mm/yr. These LGM values are nearly 3X greater than present-day erosion rates and coincide with high frost cracking intensity predicted by our model. We also observe a transition from finely laminated lacustrine clays and sands to coarse lacustrine blue-grey sands at ~ 28 ka, during the transition to the LGM. The presence of Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) and Abies

  20. The tropical lapse rate steepened during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Shannon E.; Russell, James M.; Verschuren, Dirk; Morrill, Carrie; De Cort, Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Olago, Daniel; Eggermont, Hilde; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Kelly, Meredith A.

    2017-01-01

    The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become less steep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountain environments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate change is uncertain because of poor constraints on high-elevation temperature during past climate states. We present a 25,000-year temperature reconstruction from Mount Kenya, East Africa, which demonstrates that cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum was amplified with elevation and hence that the lapse rate was significantly steeper than today. Comparison of our data with paleoclimate simulations indicates that state-of-the-art models underestimate this lapse-rate change. Consequently, future high-elevation tropical warming may be even greater than predicted. PMID:28138544

  1. Post-glacial rebound and asthenosphere viscosity in Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmundsson, F. )

    1991-06-01

    During the Weichselian glaciation Iceland was covered with an ice cap which caused downward flexure of the Earth's surface. The post-glacial rebound in Iceland was very rapid, being completed in about 1,000 years. The length of this time interval constrains the maximum value of asthenosphere viscosity in Iceland to be 1 {times} 10{sup 19} Pa s or less. Further clarification of the ice retreat and uplift history may reveal lower viscosity. Current changes in the mass balance of Icelandic glaciers must lead to measurable elevation changes considering this low viscosity. Expected current elevation changes around the Vatnajoekull ice cap are of the order of 1 cm per year, due to mass balance change in this century.

  2. Magnetostratigraphy of continental glacial deposits in southernmost Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffing, C. Y.; Barendregt, R. W.; Clague, J. J.; Roberts, N. J.; Corbella, H.; Ercolano, B.; Rabassa, J.

    2012-12-01

    Southernmost Patagonia has well preserved records of continental and alpine glaciations. It is the only region in the Southern Hemisphere outside Antarctica where large Pleistocene ice sheets developed, thus it offers a unique opportunity to enhance understanding of global climate variability. Previous research on the glacial history of Patagonia is largely based on geomorphology, with limited study of stratigraphy and relatively few absolute ages. Consequently, the number, ages, and geographic extent of individual glaciations are not well understood. Geomorphic evidence of multiple Quaternary glaciations is widespread in the region and includes moraines, erratics, drumlin fields, and outwash plains. Exposures of glacial sediments are common along the Atlantic coast, the Strait of Magellan, meltwater channels, and in gravel pits. Most of the glacial deposits are beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. K-Ar and Ar-Ar dating have been used to determine the ages of basalt flows interlayered with till and outwash in the southern Andes to the west and in the Rio Gallegos valley near the Atlantic coast. These absolute ages suggest that glaciation in Patagonia began in the late Miocene and that the Pleistocene Patagonian ice sheet may have decreased in size with each successive advance. We conducted a paleomagnetic study of glacial sediments to further constrain the timing of continental glaciations. The sediments are stably magnetized, providing clear directional data from which polarity can be determined. Most sediments in the area are normally magnetized, but some sediments near the outer limit of glaciation, within areas covered by the Patagonian ice sheet during the Great Patagonian Glaciation (GPG), are reversely magnetized. Recent field work indicates that drift of the GPG comprises deposits of several glaciations. Our paleomagnetic results suggest that the first continental glaciation(s) in the region occurred during the Matuyama Reversed Chron (2.6 - 0.78 Ma) and

  3. Patagonian glacier response during the late glacial-Holocene transition.

    PubMed

    Ackert, Robert P; Becker, Richard A; Singer, Brad S; Kurz, Mark D; Caffee, Marc W; Mickelson, David M

    2008-07-18

    Whether cooling occurred in the Southern Hemisphere during the Younger Dryas (YD) is key to understanding mechanisms of millennial climate change. Although Southern Hemisphere records do not reveal a distinct climate reversal during the late glacial period, many mountain glaciers readvanced. We show that the Puerto Bandera moraine (50 degrees S), which records a readvance of the Southern Patagonian Icefield (SPI), formed at, or shortly after, the end of the YD. The exposure age (10.8 +/- 0.5 thousand years ago) is contemporaneous with the highest shoreline of Lago Cardiel (49 degrees S), which records peak precipitation east of the Andes since 13 thousand years ago. Absent similar moraines west of the Andes, these data indicate an SPI response to increased amounts of easterly-sourced precipitation-reflecting changes in the Southern Westerly circulation-rather than regional cooling.

  4. Deformation of Eemian and Glacial ice at NEEM, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, Kaitlin; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Montagnat, Maurine; Weikusat, Ilka; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2015-04-01

    New findings from deep Greenland ice cores and airborne radio echo sounding (RES) images show that basal ice flow is very unstable, and a basal layer of disturbed ice is often observed. At NEEM, Greenland this folding occurs at the boundary between the Eemian and glacial ice regimes, suggesting that differences in physical properties of the ice play a role in the disturbance. Past work in metallurgy (Burke, 1957) and ice (Hammer et al., 1978; Langway et al., 1988; Dahl-Jensen et al., 1997), suggests that impurity content controls grain evolution, and therefore deformation, which we hypothesize to be analogous to the differences in ice flow seen deep in the NEEM ice core. Here we present results of fabric, grain size, impurity content, and deformation studies from samples above and below this unstable boundary in the ice sheet.

  5. Mediterranean Ocean Climate for the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    To correctly reproduce past climate changes is one of the prerequistes for reliably predicting anthropogenic climate change. Here, results from an attempt to simulate the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21.000 years ago) for the Mediterranean Sea are pesented. For this time slice, precompiled proxy data sets exist. One key problem in regional ocean modelling for past time slices is to obtain atmospheric forcing data. A multi-step approach is used. A coarse resolution earth system model consisting of coupled atmospheric-oceanic general circulation models (ECHAM5_T31/MPIOM_GR3) with a dynamical vegetation model (LPJ) was integrated for several thousand years to steady state. The surface conditions derived from these model simulations (sea surface temperature (SST), sea ice and vegetation) were used as lower boundary conditions for a short (20 years plus 9 years of spinup) simulation with a high resolution stand-alone atmosphere model (ECHAM5_T106). The continental runoff was calculated using a hydrological discharge model. This procedure was performed both for the Last Glacial Maximum as well as for a preindustrial control simulation. Atmospheric composition, earth orbital parameters, topography and ice sheet distribution were prescribed following the protocol for the PMIP2 project. The simulations of the Mediterranean ocean climate were performed with a regional version of MPIOM. The model has a horizontal resolution of approximately 25 km and 29 levels. The surface heat fluxes are calculated with bulk fomulas using the model SST. Freshwater forcing consists of evaporation (calculated from the latent heat flux), precipitation and river runoff. The model uses daily forcing for the atmospheric input derived from the high resolution atmosphere model. In the Atlantic box a restoring to observed hydrography is applied. For the LGM the anomalies from the coupled model are added to observations. This model has been integrated in each of the cases for more than

  6. The tropical lapse rate steepened during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Loomis, Shannon E; Russell, James M; Verschuren, Dirk; Morrill, Carrie; De Cort, Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Olago, Daniel; Eggermont, Hilde; Street-Perrott, F Alayne; Kelly, Meredith A

    2017-01-01

    The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become less steep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountain environments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate change is uncertain because of poor constraints on high-elevation temperature during past climate states. We present a 25,000-year temperature reconstruction from Mount Kenya, East Africa, which demonstrates that cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum was amplified with elevation and hence that the lapse rate was significantly steeper than today. Comparison of our data with paleoclimate simulations indicates that state-of-the-art models underestimate this lapse-rate change. Consequently, future high-elevation tropical warming may be even greater than predicted.

  7. Inverse vertical migration and feeding in glacier lanternfish (Benthosema glaciale).

    PubMed

    Dypvik, Eivind; Klevjer, Thor A; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2012-01-01

    A bottom-mounted upward-facing 38-kHz echo sounder was deployed at ~400 m and cabled to shore in Masfjorden (~60(°)52'N, ~5(°)24'E), Norway. The scattering layers seen during autumn (September-October) 2008 were identified by trawling. Glacier lanternfish (Benthosema glaciale) were mainly distributed below ~200 m and displayed three different diel behavioral strategies: normal diel vertical migration (NDVM), inverse DVM (IDVM) and no DVM (NoDVM). The IDVM group was the focus of this study. It consisted of 2-year and older individuals migrating to ~200-270 m during the daytime, while descending back to deeper than ~270 m during the night. Stomach content analysis revealed increased feeding during the daytime on overwintering Calanus sp. We conclude that visually searching glacier lanternfish performing IDVM benefit from the faint daytime light in mid-waters when preying on overwintering Calanus sp.

  8. Global Ice-loading History Reconstructed Over Five Glacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, F. H.; Grant, K. M.; Tamisiea, M. E.; Rohling, E. J.; Hibbert, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution ice-loading reconstructions are a vital tool not only for palaeoclimate studies, but also for providing a palaeoenvironmental context to human development. Here we present a global ice-loading history developed using the high resolution, Red Sea relative sea-level (RSL) record. (Siddall et al. 2003, Rohling et al. 2009, Grant et al. in submission) We use glacial isostatic adjustment modelling to determine a set of corrections to the Red Sea RSL record, which is then translated into a global mean sea level. This global mean sea level allows us to calculate a global ice volume. Global ice volume is geographically distributed within our ice-loading history according to currently available data regarding ice margins, their timing, and constraints on maximum ice load. Where constraints are sparse we use a combination of ICE-5G (Peltier, 2004) and the de Boer coupled ice sheet model (de Boer et al, 2014) as a template for ice distribution. Although an ice-loading history for the past 5 Myr exists, this is the first time that geographic constraints have been applied to global ice volumes over 5 glacial cycles. Our ice-loading reconstruction is further supported by the high resolution of our source RSL data. Our ice-loading history is tested against a global compilation of coral sea-level indicators (Hibbert et al., in prep.), and compared with ice histories developed from alternate ice volume reconstructions or RSL records, including a global ice history based on that developed by de B