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Sample records for gland stem cells

  1. Stem cells and the developing mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Maisam; Spike, Benjamin T; Dravis, Christopher; Kannan, Nagarajan; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dynamic changes throughout life. In the mouse, these begin with initial morphogenesis of the gland in the mid-gestation embryo followed by hormonally regulated changes during puberty and later in adulthood. The adult mammary gland contains a hierarchy of cell types with varying potentials for self-maintenance and differentiation. These include cells able to produce complete, functional mammary glands in vivo and that contain daughter cells with the same remarkable regenerative potential, as well as cells with more limited clonogenic activity in vitro. Here we review how applying in vitro and in vivo methods for quantifying these cells in adult mammary tissue to fetal mammary cells has enabled the first cells fulfilling the functional criteria of transplantable, isolated mammary stem cells to be identified a few days before birth. Thereafter, the number of these cells increases rapidly. Populations containing these fetal stem cells display growth and gene expression programs that differ from their adult counterparts but share signatures characteristic of certain types of breast cancer. Such observations reinforce growing evidence of important differences between tissue-specific fetal and adult cells with stem cell properties and emphasize the merits of investigating their molecular basis.

  2. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  3. Mammary gland stem cells and their application in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Baowei

    2017-02-07

    The mammary gland is an organ comprising two primary lineages, specifically the inner luminal and the outer myoepithelial cell layers. Mammary gland stem cells (MaSCs) are highly dynamic and self-renewing, and can give rise to these mammary gland lineages. The lineages are responsible for gland generation during puberty as well as expansion during pregnancy. In recent years, researchers have focused on understanding how MaSCs are regulated during mammary gland development and transformation of breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, and how they are regulated by the signaling transduction pathways, mammary gland microenvironment, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Moreover, we debate the evidence for their serving as the origin of breast cancer, and discuss the therapeutic perspectives of targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In conclusion, a better understanding of the key regulators of MaSCs is crucial for the clinical treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Sweat gland regeneration after burn injury: is stem cell therapy a new hope?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuiping; Chen, Yan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-05-01

    Stem cells are the seeds of tissue repair and regeneration and a promising source for novel therapies. The skin of patients with an extensive deep burn injury is repaired by a hypertrophic scar without regeneration of sweat glands and therefore loses the function of perspiration. Stem cell therapy provides the possibility of sweat gland regeneration. In particular, recent studies have reported the reprogramming of mesenchymal stromal cells into sweat gland-like (SGL) cells. We present an overview of recent researches into sweat gland regeneration with stem cells. Difficulties of sweat gland regeneration after deep burns have been elaborated. The advantage and disadvantage of several stem cell types in sweat gland regeneration have been discussed. Additionally, the possible mechanisms for reprogramming stem cells to SGL cells are summarized. A brief discussion on clinical application of stem cell-derived SGL cells is also presented. This review may possibly provide some implications for sweat gland regeneration.

  5. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  6. Human Salivary Gland Stem Cells Functionally Restore Radiation Damaged Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Sarah; Maimets, Martti; van der Zwaag, Marianne; Stokman, Monique A; van Gosliga, Djoke; Zwart, Erik; Witjes, Max J H; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald; Coppes, Rob P

    2016-03-01

    Adult stem cells are often touted as therapeutic agents in the regenerative medicine field, however data detailing both the engraftment and functional capabilities of solid tissue derived human adult epithelial stem cells is scarce. Here we show the isolation of adult human salivary gland (SG) stem/progenitor cells and demonstrate at the single cell level in vitro self-renewal and differentiation into multilineage organoids. We also show in vivo functionality, long-term engraftment, and functional restoration in a xenotransplantation model. Indeed, transplanted human salisphere-derived cells restored saliva production and greatly improved the regenerative potential of irradiated SGs. Further selection for c-Kit expression enriched for cells with enhanced regenerative potencies. Interestingly, interaction of transplanted cells with the recipient SG may also be involved in functional recovery. Thus, we show for the first time that salispheres cultured from human SGs contain stem/progenitor cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation and rescue of saliva production. Our study underpins the therapeutic promise of salisphere cell therapy for the treatment of xerostomia.

  7. Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Embryonic Mouse Submandibular Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Isabelle. M.A.; Hoffman, Matthew. P.

    2012-01-01

    Salivary gland organogenesis involves the specification, maintenance, lineage commitment, and differentiation of epithelial stem/progenitor cells. Identifying how stem/progenitor cells are directed along a series of cell fate decisions to form a functional salivary gland will be necessary for future stem cell regenerative therapy. The identification of stem/progenitor cells within the salivary gland has focused on their role in postnatal glands and little is known about them in embryonic glands. Here, we have reviewed the information available for other developing organ systems and used it to determine whether similar cell populations exist in the mouse submandibular gland. Additionally, using growth factors that influence salivary gland epithelial morphogenesis during development, we have taken a simple experimental approach asking whether any of these growth factors influence early developmental lineages within the salivary epithelium on a transcriptional level. These preliminary findings show that salivary epithelial stem/progenitor populations exist within the gland, and that growth factors that are reported to control epithelial morphogenesis may also impact cell fate decisions. Further investigation of the signaling networks that influence stem/progenitor cell behavior will allow us to hypothesize how we might induce autologous stem cells to regenerate damaged salivary tissue in a therapeutic context. PMID:20428013

  8. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells migrate to healthy and damaged salivary glands following stem cell infusion

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Silke; Huss, Ralf; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Vogel, Breda; Brandau, Sven; Lang, Stephan; Rotter, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Xerostomia is a severe side effect of radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. To date, no satisfactory treatment option has been established. Because mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as a potential treatment modality, we aimed to evaluate stem cell distribution following intravenous and intraglandular injections using a surgical model of salivary gland damage and to analyse the effects of MSC injections on the recruitment of immune cells. The submandibular gland ducts of rats were surgically ligated. Syngeneic adult MSCs were isolated, immortalised by simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and characterized by flow cytometry. MSCs were injected intravenously and intraglandularly. After 1, 3 and 7 days, the organs of interest were analysed for stem cell recruitment. Inflammation was analysed by immunohistochemical staining. We were able to demonstrate that, after intravenous injection, MSCs were recruited to normal and damaged submandibular glands on days 1, 3 and 7. Unexpectedly, stem cells were recruited to ligated and non-ligated glands in a comparable manner. After intraglandular injection of MSCs into ligated glands, the presence of MSCs, leucocytes and macrophages was enhanced, compared to intravenous injection of stem cells. Our data suggest that injected MSCs were retained within the inflamed glands, could become activated and subsequently recruited leucocytes to the sites of tissue damage. PMID:24810808

  9. Single Cell Clones Purified from Human Parotid Glands Display Features of Multipotent Epitheliomesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, TacGhee; Lee, Songyi; Choi, Nahyun; Shin, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Junghee; Lim, Jae-Yol

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the biology of tissue-resident stem cell populations is essential to development of therapeutic strategies for regeneration of damaged tissue. Here, we describe the isolation of glandular stem cells (GSCs) from a small biopsy specimen from human parotid glands. Single colony-forming unit-derived clonal cells were isolated through a modified subfractionation culture method, and their stem cell properties were examined. The isolated clonal cells exhibited both epithelial and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like features, including differentiation potential and marker expression. The cells transiently displayed salivary progenitor phenotypes during salivary epithelial differentiation, suggesting that they may be putative multipotent GSCs rather than progenitor cells. Both epithelial and mesenchymal-expressing putative GSCs, LGR5+CD90+ cells, were found in vivo, mostly in inter-secretory units of human salivary glands. Following in vivo transplantation into irradiated salivary glands of mice, these cells were found to be engrafted around the secretory complexes, where they contributed to restoration of radiation-induced salivary hypofunction. These results showed that multipotent epitheliomesenchymal GSCs are present in glandular mesenchyme, and that isolation of homogenous GSC clones from human salivary glands may promote the precise understanding of biological function of bona fide GSCs, enabling their therapeutic application for salivary gland regeneration. PMID:27824146

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells for sweat gland regeneration after burns: From possibility to reality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kui; Tan, Zhijun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    Sweat glands play important roles in homeostasis maintenance and body temperature regulation. In patients with deep burns, the injury can reach the muscle tissues and damage sweat glands. However, the plasticity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may offer the possibility to regenerate sweat glands after severe burn. In particular, recent studies have changed the possibility to reality. Here, we analyze the barriers of sweat gland regeneration in situ after deep burns, propose the possibilities of MSCs in regeneration of sweat glands, summarize the recent researches into sweat gland regeneration with MSCs, and sum up the possible mechanisms during this process. In addition, the advantage and disadvantage of sweat gland regeneration with MSCs from different tissues have been discussed. So this review will provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for sweat gland regeneration with MSCs.

  11. PREPARATION OF EPITHELIAL AND MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS FROM MURINE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Guest, I.; Ilic, Z.; Ma, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a complex organ consisting of multiple cell types that undergo extensive remodeling during pregnancy and involution, cyclical changes that suggest the existence of a resident stem cell population that is responsible for this remarkable tissue regeneration. The basic functional unit of the mammary gland is the terminal duct lobular unit, which invades the stromal tissue (fat, connective tissue, blood vessels, etc.). Luminal epithelial cells line the ducts while outer myoepithelial cells secrete the basal lamina that separates the mammary gland parenchyma from the mesenchymal cells of the stroma. Within the epithelial cell population of the ducts resides the mammary gland stem cells and it is believed that this population is the origin of the mammary gland cancer stem cells as well. In the mouse, epithelial stem cells can be separated from mesenchymal cells on the basis of CD24, CD44 and CD49f expression. This allows for the determination of both normal and cancer stem cell potential of these two populations and permits investigation into their interaction in tumour development. PMID:22058055

  12. Clonal proliferation of multipotent stem/progenitor cells in the neonatal and adult salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Teruki; Takao, Tukasa; Fujita, Kiyohide; Taniguchi, Hideki . E-mail: rtanigu@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp

    2006-02-10

    Salivary gland stem/progenitor cells are thought to be present in intercalated ductal cells, but the fact is unclear. In this study, we sought to clarify if stem/progenitor cells are present in submandibular glands using colony assay, which is one of the stem cell assay methods. Using a low-density culture of submandibular gland cells of neonatal rats, we developed a novel culture system that promotes single cell colony formation. Average doubling time for the colony-forming cells was 24.7 (SD = {+-}7.02) h, indicating high proliferative potency. When epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) were added to the medium, the number of clonal colonies increased greater than those cultured without growth factors (13.2 {+-} 4.18 vs. 4.5 {+-} 1.73). The RT-PCR and immunostaining demonstrated expressing acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cell lineage markers. This study demonstrated the presence of the salivary gland stem/progenitor cells that are highly proliferative and multipotent in salivary glands.

  13. Stem cells in the canine pituitary gland and in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sarah J; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Hanson, Jeanette M; Penning, Louis C; Meij, Björn P

    2013-12-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) or pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism is a common endocrinopathy in dogs, with an estimated prevalence of 1 or 2 in 1000 dogs per year. It is caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenoma in the pars distalis or pars intermedia of the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland is a small endocrine gland located in the pituitary fossa. In the postnatal individual, the hypothalamus-pituitary axis plays a central role in maintaining homeostatic functions, like control of metabolism, reproduction, and growth. Stem cells are suggested to play a role in the homeostatic adaptations of the adult pituitary gland, such as the rapid specific cell-type expansion in response to pregnancy or lactation. Several cell populations have been suggested as pituitary stem cells, such as Side Population cells and cells expressing Sox2 or Nestin. These cell populations are discussed in this review. Also, stem and progenitor cells are thought to play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis, such as the development of pituitary adenomas in dogs. There are limited reports on the role of stem cells in pituitary adenomas, especially in dogs. Further studies are needed to identify and characterize this cell population and to develop specific cell targeting therapeutic strategies as a new way of treating canine CD.

  14. Maintenance of sweat glands by stem cells located in the acral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Shuichi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Kanno, Shohei; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Atsumi, Naho; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Yamazaki, Fumikazu; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Hiroo

    2015-10-23

    The skin is responsible for a variety of physiological functions and is critical for wound healing and repair. Therefore, the regenerative capacity of the skin is important. However, stem cells responsible for maintaining the acral epithelium had not previously been identified. In this study, we identified the specific stem cells in the acral epithelium that participate in the long-term maintenance of sweat glands, ducts, and interadnexal epidermis and that facilitate the regeneration of these structures following injury. Lgr6-positive cells and Bmi1-positive cells were found to function as long-term multipotent stem cells that maintained the entire eccrine unit and the interadnexal epidermis. However, while Lgr6-positive cells were rapidly cycled and constantly supplied differentiated cells, Bmi1-positive cells were slow to cycle and occasionally entered the cell cycle under physiological conditions. Upon irradiation-induced injury, Bmi1-positive cells rapidly proliferated and regenerated injured epithelial tissue. Therefore, Bmi1-positive stem cells served as reservoir stem cells. Lgr5-positive cells were rapidly cycled and maintained only sweat glands; therefore, we concluded that these cells functioned as lineage-restricted progenitors. Taken together, our data demonstrated the identification of stem cells that maintained the entire acral epithelium and supported the different roles of three cellular classes.

  15. Generation of murine sympathoadrenergic progenitor-like cells from embryonic stem cells and postnatal adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS.

  16. Generation of Murine Sympathoadrenergic Progenitor-Like Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells and Postnatal Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS. PMID:23675538

  17. Are folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary gland supportive cells or organ-specific stem cells?

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Mogi, C; Ogawa, S; Tomida, M; Miyai, S

    2002-04-01

    Folliculo-stellate cells (FS-cells) in the anterior pituitary gland are star-shaped cells and form tiny follicles. FS-cells are positive for S-100 protein and produce many cytokines or growth factors, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, it is generally accepted that FS-cells regulate endocrine cells through these growth factors. FS-cells also exhibit a phagocytotic activity and are known to work as scavenger cells. In addition to these functions, FS-cells are considered to have some unknown functions. In order to reveal the biological significance of FS-cells in the anterior pituitary gland, we performed a morphological study and obtained some new findings. First, we were interested in the colloid formation in the senescent porcine pituitary gland. We analyzed the colloids and found that clusterin is a major protein in them. We also found that the accumulation of clusterin in the colloids is related to the phagocytotic activity of FS-cells. In our next study, we found that FS-cells have the potential to differentiate into striated muscle cells. From FS-cells show multi-potent cell character and other cytological evidence, we propose that FS-cells are candidate of organ-specific stem cells in the anterior pituitary gland.

  18. Identification of stem cell populations in sweat glands and ducts reveals roles in homeostasis and wound repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Catherine P; Polak, Lisa; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chen, Shann-Ching; Sharma, Neha; Blanpain, Cedric; Fuchs, Elaine

    2012-07-06

    Sweat glands are abundant in the body and essential for thermoregulation. Like mammary glands, they originate from epidermal progenitors. However, they display few signs of cellular turnover, and whether they have stem cells and tissue-regenerative capacity remains largely unexplored. Using lineage tracing, we here identify in sweat ducts multipotent progenitors that transition to unipotency after developing the sweat gland. In characterizing four adult stem cell populations of glandular skin, we show that they display distinct regenerative capabilities and remain unipotent when healing epidermal, myoepithelial-specific, and lumenal-specific injuries. We devise purification schemes and isolate and transcriptionally profile progenitors. Exploiting molecular differences between sweat and mammary glands, we show that only some progenitors regain multipotency to produce de novo ductal and glandular structures, but that these can retain their identity even within certain foreign microenvironments. Our findings provide insight into glandular stem cells and a framework for the further study of sweat gland biology.

  19. Stem/progenitor cells in non-lactating versus lactating equine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Spaas, Jan H; Chiers, Koen; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2012-11-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Based on the facts that (i) mammary stem/progenitor cells (MaSC) are proposed to be the driving forces behind mammary growth and function and (ii) variation exists between mammalian species with regard to physiological and pathological functioning of this organ, we believe that studying MaSC from different mammals is of great comparative interest. Over the years, important data has been gathered on MaSC of men and mice, although knowledge on MaSC in other mammals remains limited. Therefore, the aim of this work was to isolate and characterize MaSC from the mammary gland of horses. Hereby, our salient findings were that the isolated equine cells met the 2 in vitro hallmark properties of stem cells, namely the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, the cells were immunophenotyped using markers for CD29, CD44, CD49f, and Ki67. Finally, we propose the mammosphere assay as a valuable in vitro assay to study MaSC during different physiological phases since it was observed that equine lactating mammary gland contains significantly more mammosphere-initiating cells than the inactive, nonlactating gland (a reflection of MaSC self-renewal) and, moreover, that these spheres were significantly larger in size upon initial cultivation (a reflection of progenitor cell proliferation). Taken together, this study not only extends the current knowledge of mammary gland biology, but also benefits the comparative approach to study and compare MaSC in different mammalian species.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for normal mammary gland development and stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Pond, Adam C; Bin, Xue; Batts, Torey; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling plays an important role in embryonic stem cells and adult tissue homeostasis, but the function of FGFs in mammary gland stem cells is less well defined. Both FGFR1 and FGFR2 are expressed in basal and luminal mammary epithelial cells (MECs), suggesting that together they might play a role in mammary gland development and stem cell dynamics. Previous studies have demonstrated that the deletion of FGFR2 resulted only in transient developmental defects in branching morphogenesis. Using a conditional deletion strategy, we investigated the consequences of FGFR1 deletion alone and then the simultaneous deletion of both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in the mammary epithelium. FGFR1 deletion using a keratin 14 promoter-driven Cre-recombinase resulted in an early, yet transient delay in development. However, no reduction in functional outgrowth potential was observed following limiting dilution transplantation analysis. In contrast, a significant reduction in outgrowth potential was observed upon the deletion of both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in MECs using adenovirus-Cre. Additionally, using a fluorescent reporter mouse model to monitor Cre-mediated recombination, we observed a competitive disadvantage following transplantation of both FGFR1/R2-null MECs, most prominently in the basal epithelial cells. This correlated with the complete loss of the mammary stem cell repopulating population in the FGFR1/R2-attenuated epithelium. FGFR1/R2-null MECs were partially rescued in chimeric outgrowths containing wild-type MECs, suggesting the potential importance of paracrine mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the basal epithelial stem cells. These studies document the requirement for functional FGFR signaling in mammary stem cells during development.

  1. Notch-Dependent Pituitary SOX2(+) Stem Cells Exhibit a Timed Functional Extinction in Regulation of the Postnatal Gland.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Tollkuhn, Jessica; Taylor, Havilah; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2015-12-08

    Although SOX2(+) stem cells are present in the postnatal pituitary gland, how they are regulated molecularly and whether they are required for pituitary functions remain unresolved questions. Using a conditional knockout animal model, here we demonstrate that ablation of the canonical Notch signaling in the embryonic pituitary gland leads to progressive depletion of the SOX2(+) stem cells and hypoplastic gland. Furthermore, we show that the SOX2(+) stem cells initially play a significant role in contributing to postnatal pituitary gland expansion by self-renewal and differentiating into distinct lineages in the immediate postnatal period. However, we found that within several weeks postpartum, the SOX2(+) stem cells switch to an essentially dormant state and are no longer required for homeostasis/tissue adaptation. Our results present a dynamic tissue homeostatic model in which stem cells provide an initial contribution to the growth of the neonatal pituitary gland, whereas the mature gland can be maintained in a stem cell-independent fashion.

  2. Wnt Signaling Regulates Airway Epithelial Stem Cells in Adult Murine Submucosal Glands.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Thomas J; Anderson, Preston J; Xie, Weiliang; Crooke, Adrianne K; Liu, Xiaoming; Tyler, Scott R; Luo, Meihui; Kusner, David M; Zhang, Yulong; Neff, Traci; Burnette, Daniel C; Walters, Katherine S; Goodheart, Michael J; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-06-24

    Wnt signaling is required for lineage commitment of glandular stem cells (SCs) during tracheal submucosal gland (SMG) morphogenesis from the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Whether similar Wnt-dependent processes coordinate SC expansion in adult SMGs following airway injury remains unknown. We found that two Wnt-reporters in mice (BAT-gal and TCF/Lef:H2B-GFP) are coexpressed in actively cycling SCs of primordial glandular placodes and in a small subset of adult SMG progenitor cells that enter the cell cycle 24 hours following airway injury. At homeostasis, these Wnt reporters showed nonoverlapping cellular patterns of expression in the SAE and SMGs. Following tracheal injury, proliferation was accompanied by dynamic changes in Wnt-reporter activity and the analysis of 56 Wnt-related signaling genes revealed unique temporal changes in expression within proximal (gland-containing) and distal (gland-free) portions of the trachea. Wnt stimulation in vivo and in vitro promoted epithelial proliferation in both SMGs and the SAE. Interestingly, slowly cycling nucleotide label-retaining cells (LRCs) of SMGs were spatially positioned near clusters of BAT-gal positive serous tubules. Isolation and culture of tet-inducible H2B-GFP LRCs demonstrated that SMG LRCs were more proliferative than SAE LRCs and culture expanded SMG-derived progenitor cells outcompeted SAE-derived progenitors in regeneration of tracheal xenograft epithelium using a clonal analysis competition assay. SMG-derived progenitors were also multipotent for cell types in the SAE and formed gland-like structures in xenografts. These studies demonstrate the importance of Wnt signals in modulating SC phenotypes within tracheal niches and provide new insight into phenotypic differences of SMG and SAE SCs. Stem Cells 2016.

  3. Sparing the region of the salivary gland containing stem cells preserves saliva production after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Luijk, Peter; Pringle, Sarah; Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali V.; Faber, Hette; Hovan, Allan; Baanstra, Mirjam; van der Laan, Hans P.; Kierkels, Roel G. J.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Witjes, Max J.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wu, Jonn; Coppes, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Each year, 500,000 patients are treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, resulting in relatively high survival rates. However, in 40% of patients, quality of life is severely compromised because of radiation-induced impairment of salivary gland function and consequent xerostomia (dry mouth). New radiation treatment technologies enable sparing of parts of the salivary glands. We have determined the parts of the major salivary gland, the parotid gland, that need to be spared to ensure that the gland continues to produce saliva after irradiation treatment. In mice, rats, and humans, we showed that stem and progenitor cells reside in the region of the parotid gland containing the major ducts. We demonstrated in rats that inclusion of the ducts in the radiation field led to loss of regenerative capacity, resulting in long-term gland dysfunction with reduced saliva production. Then we showed in a cohort of patients with head and neck cancer that the radiation dose to the region of the salivary gland containing the stem/progenitor cells predicted the function of the salivary glands one year after radiotherapy. Finally, we showed that this region of the salivary gland could be spared during radiotherapy, thus reducing the risk of post-radiotherapy xerostomia. PMID:26378247

  4. Stem cells in the development and differentiation of the human adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    There are no studies on stem cells (SCs) and development and differentiation (DD) of the human adrenal glands. The SCs in DD of the adrenal glands were herein investigated histochemically and immunohistochemically in 18 human embryonic adrenal glands at gestational week (GW) 7-40. At 7 GW, the adrenal glands were present, and at 7 GW, numerous embryonic SCs (ESCs) are seen to create the adrenal cortex. The ESCs were composed exclusively of small cells with hyperchromatic nuclei without nucleoli. The ESCs were positive for neural cell adhesion molecule, KIT, neuron-specific enolase, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α, synaptophysin, and MET. They were negative for other SC antigens, including chromogranin, ErbB2, and bcl-2. They were also negative for lineage antigens, including cytokeratin (CK)7, CK8, CK18, and CK19, carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, epithelial membrane antigen, HepPar1, mucin core apoprotein (MUC)1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6, and cluster differentiation (CD)3, CD45, CD20, CD34, and CD31. The Ki-67 labeling index (LI) was high (Ki-67 LI = around 20%). α-Fetoprotein was positive in the ESCs and adrenal cells. The ESC was first seen in the periphery of the adrenal cortex at 7-10 GW. The ESC migrates into the inner part of the adrenal cortex. Huge islands of ESC were present near the adrenal, and they appeared to provide the ESC of the adrenal. At 16 GW, adrenal medulla appeared, and the adrenal ESCs were present in the periphery or the cortex, in the cortical parenchyma, corticomedullary junctions, and in the medulla. The adrenal essential architecture was established around 20 GW; however, there were still ESCs. At term, there are a few ESCs. These data suggest that the adrenal glands were created by ESCs.

  5. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-04-25

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors.

  6. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  7. Expression of Putative Stem Cell Marker, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha, in Mammary Gland of Water Buffalo.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ratan K; Choudhary, Shanti; Kaur, Harmanjot; Pathak, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Buffaloes account for more than 56% of total milk production in India. Cyclic remodeling of mammary glands of human, mice, cow, sheep, and goat is determined by mammary stem cells. It is logical to assume that buffalo mammary gland will have mammary stem/progenitor cells. Thus far, no report exists on identification of buffalo mammary stem cells. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) is a candidate marker for hepatic progenitor cells and has recently been suggested as a marker of bovine mammary stem/progenitor cells. We hypothesized that ( 1 ) HNF4A identifies putative buffalo mammary stem/progenitor cells and ( 2 ) the number of HNF4A-positive cells increases during mastitis. Sixteen buffalo mammary samples were collected from a local slaughterhouse. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were performed on 5-micron thick sections and on the basis of gross examination and histomorphology of the mammary glands, physiological stages of the animals were estimated as non-lactating (n = 4), mastitis (n = 9), and prepubertal (n = 3). In total, 24048 cells were counted (5-10 microscopic fields/animal; n = 16 animals) of which, 40% cells were mammary epithelial cells (MEC) and 60% cells were the stromal cells. The percentage of MEC in non-lactating animals was higher compared to mastitic animals (47.3% vs. 37.3%), which was likely due to loss of MEC in mastitis. HNF4A staining was observed in nuclei of MEC of ducts, alveoli, and stromal cells. Basal location and low frequency of HNF4A-positive MEC (ranges from 0.4-4.5%) were consistent with stem cell characteristics. Preliminary study showed coexpression of HNF4A with MSI1 (a mammary stem cell marker in sheep), suggesting HNF4A was likely to be a putative mammary stem/progenitor cell marker in buffalo. HNF4A-positive MEC (basal and luminal; light and dark stained) tended to be higher in non-lactating than the mastitic animals (8.73 ± 1.71% vs. 4.29 ± 1.19%; P = 0.07). The first hypothesis that HNF4A identify

  8. Multipotent nestin-positive stem cells reside in the stroma of human eccrine and apocrine sweat glands and can be propagated robustly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Sabine; Rohr, Franziska; Weber, Caroline; Kier, Janina; Siemers, Frank; Kruse, Charli; Danner, Sandra; Brandenburger, Matthias; Matthiessen, Anna Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Human skin harbours multiple different stem cell populations. In contrast to the relatively well-characterized niches of epidermal and hair follicle stem cells, the localization and niches of stem cells in other human skin compartments are as yet insufficiently investigated. Previously, we had shown in a pilot study that human sweat gland stroma contains Nestin-positive stem cells. Isolated sweat gland stroma-derived stem cells (SGSCs) proliferated in vitro and expressed Nestin in 80% of the cells. In this study, we were able to determine the precise localization of Nestin-positive cells in both eccrine and apocrine sweat glands of human axillary skin. We established a reproducible isolation procedure and characterized the spontaneous, long-lasting multipotent differentiation capacity of SGSCs. Thereby, a pronounced ectodermal differentiation was observed. Moreover, the secretion of prominent cytokines demonstrated the immunological potential of SGSCs. The comparison to human adult epidermal stem cells (EpiSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) revealed differences in protein expression and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, we found a coexpression of the stem cell markers Nestin and Iα6 within SGSCs and human sweat gland stroma. In conclusion the initial results of the pilot study were confirmed, indicating that human sweat glands are a new source of unique stem cells with multilineage differentiation potential, high proliferation capacity and remarkable self renewal. With regard to the easy accessibility of skin tissue biopsies, an autologous application of SGSCs in clinical therapies appears promising.

  9. Single-cell lineage tracing in the mammary gland reveals stochastic clonal dispersion of stem/progenitor cell progeny

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Felicity M.; Lloyd-Lewis, Bethan; Harris, Olivia B.; Kozar, Sarah; Winton, Douglas J.; Muresan, Leila; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes cycles of growth and regeneration throughout reproductive life, a process that requires mammary stem cells (MaSCs). Whilst recent genetic fate-mapping studies using lineage-specific promoters have provided valuable insights into the mammary epithelial hierarchy, the true differentiation potential of adult MaSCs remains unclear. To address this, herein we utilize a stochastic genetic-labelling strategy to indelibly mark a single cell and its progeny in situ, combined with tissue clearing and 3D imaging. Using this approach, clones arising from a single parent cell could be visualized in their entirety. We reveal that clonal progeny contribute exclusively to either luminal or basal lineages and are distributed sporadically to branching ducts or alveoli. Quantitative analyses suggest that pools of unipotent stem/progenitor cells contribute to adult mammary gland development. Our results highlight the utility of tracing a single cell and reveal that progeny of a single proliferative MaSC/progenitor are dispersed throughout the epithelium. PMID:27779190

  10. Dpp dependent Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to Hh dependent blood progenitors in larval lymph gland of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dey, Nidhi Sharma; Ramesh, Parvathy; Chugh, Mayank; Mandal, Sudip; Mandal, Lolitika

    2016-10-26

    Drosophila hematopoiesis bears striking resemblance with that of vertebrates, both in the context of distinct phases and the signaling molecules. Even though, there has been no evidence of Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in Drosophila, the larval lymph gland with its Hedgehog dependent progenitors served as an invertebrate model of progenitor biology. Employing lineage-tracing analyses, we have now identified Notch expressing HSCs in the first instar larval lymph gland. Our studies clearly establish the hierarchical relationship between Notch expressing HSCs and the previously described Domeless expressing progenitors. These HSCs require Decapentapelagic (Dpp) signal from the hematopoietic niche for their maintenance in an identical manner to vertebrate aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) HSCs. Thus, this study not only extends the conservation across these divergent taxa, but also provides a new model that can be exploited to gain better insight into the AGM related Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

  11. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting Nanotechnologies towards Clinical Application of Stem Cells and Their Secretome in Salivary Gland Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rungarunlert, Sasitorn; Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Adine, Christabella; Souza, Glauco R.

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland (SG) functional damage and severe dry mouth (or xerostomia) are commonly observed in a wide range of medical conditions from autoimmune to metabolic disorders as well as after radiotherapy to treat specific head and neck cancers. No effective therapy has been developed to completely restore the SG functional damage on the long-term and reverse the poor quality of life of xerostomia patients. Cell- and secretome-based strategies are currently being tested in vitro and in vivo for the repair and/or regeneration of the damaged SG using (1) epithelial SG stem/progenitor cells from salispheres or explant cultures as well as (2) nonepithelial stem cell types and/or their bioactive secretome. These strategies will be the focus of our review. Herein, innovative 3D bioprinting nanotechnologies for the generation of organotypic cultures and SG organoids/mini-glands will also be discussed. These bioprinting technologies will allow researchers to analyze the secretome components and extracellular matrix production, as well as their biofunctional effects in 3D mini-glands ex vivo. Improving our understanding of the SG secretome is critical to develop effective secretome-based therapies towards the regeneration and/or repair of all SG compartments for proper restoration of saliva secretion and flow into the oral cavity. PMID:28090208

  12. Irradiation of juvenile, but not adult, mammary gland increases stem cell self-renewal and estrogen receptor negative tumors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Vijayakumar, Sangeetha; Martinez-Ruis, Haydeliz; Illa-Bochaca, Irineu; Nguyen, David H; Mao, Jian-Hua; Costes, Sylvain V; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2014-03-01

    Children exposed to ionizing radiation have a substantially greater breast cancer risk than adults; the mechanism for this strong age dependence is not known. Here we show that pubertal murine mammary glands exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation exhibit enrichment of mammary stem cell and Notch pathways, increased mammary repopulating activity indicative of more stem cells, and propensity to develop estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors thought to arise from stem cells. We developed a mammary lineage agent-based model (ABM) to evaluate cell inactivation, self-renewal, or dedifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as mechanisms by which radiation could increase stem cells. ABM rejected cell inactivation and predicted increased self-renewal would only affect juveniles while dedifferentiation could act in both juveniles and adults. To further test self-renewal versus dedifferentiation, we used the MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line, which recapitulates ductal morphogenesis in humanized fat pads, undergoes EMT in response to radiation and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and contains rare stem-like cells that are Let-7c negative or express both basal and luminal cytokeratins. ABM simulation of population dynamics of double cytokeratin cells supported increased self-renewal in irradiated MCF10A treated with TGFβ. Radiation-induced Notch concomitant with TGFβ was necessary for increased self-renewal of Let-7c negative MCF10A cells but not for EMT, indicating that these are independent processes. Consistent with these data, irradiating adult mice did not increase mammary repopulating activity or ER-negative tumors. These studies suggest that irradiation during puberty transiently increases stem cell self-renewal, which increases susceptibility to developing ER-negative breast cancer.

  13. Label retaining cells (LRCs) with myoepithelial characteristic from the proximal acinar region define stem cells in the sweat gland.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yvonne; Kandyba, Eve; Chen, Yi-Bu; Ruffins, Seth; Kobielak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Slow cycling is a common feature shared among several stem cells (SCs) identified in adult tissues including hair follicle and cornea. Recently, existence of unipotent SCs in basal and lumenal layers of sweat gland (SG) has been described and label retaining cells (LRCs) have also been localized in SGs; however, whether these LRCs possess SCs characteristic has not been investigated further. Here, we used a H2BGFP LRCs system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells. This system allowed us to specifically localize and isolate SCs with label-retention and myoepithelial characteristics restricted to the SG proximal acinar region. Using an alternative genetic approach, we demonstrated that SG LRCs expressed keratin 15 (K15) in the acinar region and lineage tracing determined that K15 labeled cells contributed long term to the SG structure but not to epidermal homeostasis. Surprisingly, wound healing experiments did not activate proximal acinar SG cells to participate in epidermal healing. Instead, predominantly non-LRCs in the SG duct actively divided, whereas the majority of SG LRCs remained quiescent. However, when we further challenged the system under more favorable isolated wound healing conditions, we were able to trigger normally quiescent acinar LRCs to trans-differentiate into the epidermis and adopt its long term fate. In addition, dissociated SG cells were able to regenerate SGs and, surprisingly, hair follicles demonstrating their in vivo plasticity. By determining the gene expression profile of isolated SG LRCs and non-LRCs in vivo, we identified several Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway genes to be up-regulated and confirmed a functional requirement for BMP receptor 1A (BMPR1A)-mediated signaling in SG formation. Our data highlight the existence of SG stem cells (SGSCs) and their primary importance in SG homeostasis. It also emphasizes SGSCs as an alternative source of cells in wound healing and their plasticity for regenerating

  14. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  15. Uncovering stem cell differentiation factors for salivary gland regeneration by quantitative analysis of differential proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun-Jong; Koh, Jin; Kwon, Jin Teak; Park, Yong-Seok; Yang, Lijun; Cha, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    Severe xerostomia (dry mouth) compromises the quality of life in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome or radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. A clinical management of xerostomia is often unsatisfactory as most interventions are palliative with limited efficacy. Following up our previous study demonstrating that mouse BM-MSCs are capable of differentiating into salivary epithelial cells in a co-culture system, we further explored the molecular basis that governs the MSC reprogramming by utilizing high-throughput iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomics. Our data revealed the novel induction of pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1α), muscle, intestine and stomach expression-1 (MIST-1), and achaete-scute complex homolog 3 (ASCL3) in 7 day co-cultured MSCs but not in control MSCs. More importantly, a common notion of pancreatic-specific expression of PTF1 α was challenged for the first time by our verification of PTF1 α expression in the mouse salivary glands. Furthermore, a molecular network simulation of our selected putative MSC reprogramming factors demonstrated evidence for their perspective roles in salivary gland development. In conclusion, quantitative proteomics with extensive data analyses narrowed down a set of MSC reprograming factors potentially contributing to salivary gland regeneration. Identification of their differential/synergistic impact on MSC conversion warrants further investigation. PMID:28158262

  16. Uncovering stem cell differentiation factors for salivary gland regeneration by quantitative analysis of differential proteomes.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun-Jong; Koh, Jin; Kwon, Jin Teak; Park, Yong-Seok; Yang, Lijun; Cha, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    Severe xerostomia (dry mouth) compromises the quality of life in patients with Sjögren's syndrome or radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. A clinical management of xerostomia is often unsatisfactory as most interventions are palliative with limited efficacy. Following up our previous study demonstrating that mouse BM-MSCs are capable of differentiating into salivary epithelial cells in a co-culture system, we further explored the molecular basis that governs the MSC reprogramming by utilizing high-throughput iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomics. Our data revealed the novel induction of pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1α), muscle, intestine and stomach expression-1 (MIST-1), and achaete-scute complex homolog 3 (ASCL3) in 7 day co-cultured MSCs but not in control MSCs. More importantly, a common notion of pancreatic-specific expression of PTF1 α was challenged for the first time by our verification of PTF1 α expression in the mouse salivary glands. Furthermore, a molecular network simulation of our selected putative MSC reprogramming factors demonstrated evidence for their perspective roles in salivary gland development. In conclusion, quantitative proteomics with extensive data analyses narrowed down a set of MSC reprograming factors potentially contributing to salivary gland regeneration. Identification of their differential/synergistic impact on MSC conversion warrants further investigation.

  17. Dpp dependent Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to Hh dependent blood progenitors in larval lymph gland of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nidhi Sharma; Ramesh, Parvathy; Chugh, Mayank; Mandal, Sudip; Mandal, Lolitika

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila hematopoiesis bears striking resemblance with that of vertebrates, both in the context of distinct phases and the signaling molecules. Even though, there has been no evidence of Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in Drosophila, the larval lymph gland with its Hedgehog dependent progenitors served as an invertebrate model of progenitor biology. Employing lineage-tracing analyses, we have now identified Notch expressing HSCs in the first instar larval lymph gland. Our studies clearly establish the hierarchical relationship between Notch expressing HSCs and the previously described Domeless expressing progenitors. These HSCs require Decapentapelagic (Dpp) signal from the hematopoietic niche for their maintenance in an identical manner to vertebrate aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) HSCs. Thus, this study not only extends the conservation across these divergent taxa, but also provides a new model that can be exploited to gain better insight into the AGM related Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18295.001 PMID:27782877

  18. Expression of novel, putative stem cell markers in prepubertal and lactating mammary glands of bovine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) are essential for growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium. Two main phases of mammary growth include ductal elongation prior to puberty and lobulo-alveolar growth and development during pregnancy. Some studies have utilized morphological characteristics and retenti...

  19. Biliary tree stem/progenitor cells in glands of extrahepatic and intraheptic bile ducts: an anatomical in situ study yielding evidence of maturational lineages.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Guido; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Onori, Paolo; Franchitto, Antonio; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Rossi, Massimo; Wang, Yunfang; Semeraro, Rossella; Anceschi, Maurizio; Brunelli, Roberto; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2012-02-01

    Stem/progenitors have been identified intrahepatically in the canals of Hering and extrahepatically in glands of the biliary tree. Glands of the biliary tree (peribiliary glands) are tubulo-alveolar glands with mucinous and serous acini, located deep within intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. We have shown that biliary tree stem/progenitors (BTSCs) are multipotent, giving rise in vitro and in vivo to hepatocytes, cholangiocytes or pancreatic islets. Cells with the phenotype of BTSCs are located at the bottom of the peribiliary glands near the fibromuscular layer. They are phenotypically heterogeneous, expressing transcription factors as well as surface and cytoplasmic markers for stem/progenitors of liver (e.g. SOX9/17), pancreas (e.g. PDX1) and endoderm (e.g. SOX17, EpCAM, NCAM, CXCR4, Lgr5, OCT4) but not for mature markers (e.g. albumin, secretin receptor or insulin). Subpopulations co-expressing liver and pancreatic markers (e.g. PDX1(+)/SOX17(+)) are EpCAM(+/-), and are assumed to be the most primitive of the BTSC subpopulations. Their descendants undergo a maturational lineage process from the interior to the surface of ducts and vary in the mature cells generated: pancreatic cells in hepatopancreatic ducts, liver cells in large intrahepatic bile ducts, and bile duct cells along most of the biliary tree. We hypothesize that there is ongoing organogenesis throughout life, with BTSCs giving rise to hepatic stem cells in the canals of Hering and to committed progenitors within the pancreas. The BTSCs are likely to be central to normal tissue turnover and injury repair and to be key elements in the pathophysiology of liver, pancreas and biliary tree diseases, including oncogenesis.

  20. Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Modulated in Hypoxia for Remodeling of Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    PubMed Central

    An, Hye-Young; Shin, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Hun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether a secretome from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) modulated by hypoxic conditions to contain therapeutic factors contributes to salivary gland (SG) tissue remodeling and has the potential to improve irradiation (IR)-induced salivary hypofunction in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSC) were isolated, expanded, and exposed to hypoxic conditions (O2 < 5%). The hypoxia-conditioned medium was then filtered to a high molecular weight fraction and prepared as a hAdMSC secretome. The hAdMSC secretome was subsequently infused into the tail vein of C3H mice immediately after local IR once a day for seven consecutive days. The control group received equal volume (500 μL) of vehicle (PBS) only. SG function and structural tissue remodeling by the hAdMSC secretome were investigated. Human parotid epithelial cells (HPEC) were obtained, expanded in vitro, and then irradiated and treated with either the hypoxia-conditioned medium or a normoxic control medium. Cell proliferation and IR-induced cell death were examined to determine the mechanism by which the hAdMSC secretome exerted its effects. Results The conditioned hAdMSC secretome contained high levels of GM-CSF, VEGF, IL-6, and IGF-1. Repeated systemic infusion with the hAdMSC secretome resulted in improved salivation capacity and increased levels of salivary proteins, including amylase and EGF, relative to the PBS group. The microscopic structural integrity of SG was maintained and salivary epithelial (AQP-5), endothelial (CD31), myoepithelial (α-SMA) and SG progenitor cells (c-Kit) were successfully protected from radiation damage and remodeled. The hAdMSC secretome strongly induced proliferation of HPEC and led to a significant decrease in cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic effects of the hAdMSC secretome were found to be promoted after hypoxia-preconditioning relative to normoxia

  1. Role of Keratinocyte Growth Factor in the Differentiation of Sweat Gland-Like Cells From Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongan; Hong, Yucai; Xu, Mengyan; Ma, Kui; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) have higher proliferation potency and lower immune resistance than human bone marrow MSCs and can differentiate into various functional cells. Many regulatory factors, including keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), are involved in the development of skin and cutaneous appendages. Although KGF is important in wound healing, the role of KGF in hUC-MSC differentiation remains unknown. In our previous work, we found the mixing medium (nine parts of basic sweat-gland [SG] medium plus one part of conditioned heat-shock SG medium) could induce hUC-MSC differentiation to sweat gland-like cells (SGCs). In this study, we further improved the inducing medium and determined the effects of KGF in hUC-MSC differentiation. We found KGF expression in the SGCs and that recombinant human KGF could induce hUC-MSC differentiation into SGCs, suggesting KGF plays a pivotal role in promoting hUC-MSC differentiation to SGCs. Furthermore, the SGCs differentiated from hUC-MSCs were applied to severely burned skin of the paw of an in vivo severe combined immunodeficiency mouse burn model. Burned paws treated with SGCs could regenerate functional sparse SGs 21 days after treatment; the untreated control paws could not. Collectively, these results demonstrated that KGF is a critical growth factor for SGC differentiation from hUC-MSCs and the differentiated SGCs from hUC-MSCs may have a potential therapeutic application for regeneration of destroyed SGs and injured skin. Significance There is growing evidence demonstrating a potential therapeutic application of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) in injured skin. In the current study, conditioned media and chemically defined media with recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) could induce hUC-MSC differentiation into sweat gland-like cells (SGCs). Moreover, the differentiated SGCs from hUC-MSCs could regenerate functional sparse sweat glands in a

  2. Pituitary Gland Development and Disease: From Stem Cell to Hormone Production

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Shannon W.; Ellsworth, Buffy S.; Peréz Millan, María Inés; Gergics, Peter; Schade, Vanessa; Foyouzi, Nastaran; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Mortensen, Amanda H.

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of pituitary development have become better understood in the last two decades. The signaling pathways regulating pituitary growth and shape have emerged, and the balancing interactions between the pathways are now appreciated. Markers for multi-potent progenitor cells are being identified, and signature transcription factors have been discovered for most hormone producing cell types. We now realize that pulsatile hormone secretion involves a 3-D integration of cellular networks. About a dozen genes are known to cause pituitary hypoplasia when mutated due to their essential roles in pituitary development. Similarly, a few genes are known that predispose to familial endocrine neoplasia, and several genes mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas are documented. In the next decade we anticipate gleaning a deeper appreciation of these processes at the molecular level, insight into the development of the hypophyseal portal blood system, and evolution of better therapeutics for congenital and acquired hormone deficiencies and for common craniopharyngiomas and pituitary adenomas. PMID:24290346

  3. Pituitary gland development and disease: from stem cell to hormone production.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Ellsworth, Buffy S; Peréz Millan, María Inés; Gergics, Peter; Schade, Vanessa; Foyouzi, Nastaran; Brinkmeier, Michelle L; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of pituitary development have become better understood in the past two decades. The signaling pathways regulating pituitary growth and shape have emerged, and the balancing interactions between the pathways are now appreciated. Markers for multipotent progenitor cells are being identified, and signature transcription factors have been discovered for most hormone-producing cell types. We now realize that pulsatile hormone secretion involves a 3D integration of cellular networks. About a dozen genes are known to cause pituitary hypoplasia when mutated due to their essential roles in pituitary development. Similarly, a few genes are known that predispose to familial endocrine neoplasia, and several genes mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas are documented. In the next decade, we anticipate gleaning a deeper appreciation of these processes at the molecular level, insight into the development of the hypophyseal portal blood system, and evolution of better therapeutics for congenital and acquired hormone deficiencies and for common craniopharyngiomas and pituitary adenomas.

  4. Stem cells.

    PubMed

    Behr, Björn; Ko, Sae Hee; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-10-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines and are classified according to their origin and their ability to differentiate. Enormous potential exists in use of stem cells for regenerative medicine. To produce effective stem cell-based treatments for a range of diseases, an improved understanding of stem cell biology and better control over stem cell fate are necessary. In addition, the barriers to clinical translation, such as potential oncologic properties of stem cells, need to be addressed. With renewed government support and continued refinement of current stem cell methodologies, the future of stem cell research is exciting and promises to provide novel reconstructive options for patients and surgeons limited by traditional paradigms.

  5. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  6. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  7. Isolation and characterization of sweat gland myoepithelial cells from human skin.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Ryuichiro; Futaki, Sugiko; Nakano, Itsuko; Tanemura, Atsushi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells routinely maintain the main epidermal components, i.e. the interfollicular epidermis, hair follicles, and sweat glands. Human sweat glands present throughout the body are glandular exocrine organs that mainly play a role in thermoregulation by sweating. Emerging evidence points to the presence of stem cells in sweat glands, but it remains unclear whether such stem cells exist in human sweat glands. Here, we attempted to gather evidence for stem cells in human sweat glands, which would be characterized by self-renewal ability and multipotency. First, we explored human sweat gland cells for expression of stem cell markers. CD29 and Notch, epidermal stem cell markers, were found to reside among α-smooth muscle actin-positive myoepithelial cells in human sweat glands. Next, sweat gland myoepithelial cells were isolated from human skin as a CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) subpopulation. The myoepithelial cell-enriched CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) subpopulation possessed the ability to differentiate into sweat gland luminal cells in sphere-forming assays. Furthermore, CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) subpopulation-derived sphere-forming cells exhibited long-term proliferative potential upon multiple passaging, indicating that the CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) myoepithelial subpopulation includes stem cells with self-renewal ability. These findings provide evidence that human sweat gland myoepithelial cells contain stem cells that possess both self-renewal ability and multipotency to differentiate into sweat glands.

  8. Mammary extracellular matrix directs differentiation of testicular and embryonic stem cells to form functional mammary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Fleming, Jodie M.; George, Andrea L.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Schedin, Pepper; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the ability of the normal mammary microenvironment (niche) to direct non-mammary cells including testicular and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to adopt a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) fate. These studies relied upon the interaction of transplanted normal MECs with non-mammary cells within the mammary fat-pads of recipient mice that had their endogenous epithelium removed. Here, we tested whether acellular mammary extracellular matrix (mECM) preparations are sufficient to direct differentiation of testicular-derived cells and ESCs to form functional mammary epithelial trees in vivo. We found that mECMs isolated from adult mice and rats were sufficient to redirect testicular derived cells to produce normal mammary epithelial trees within epithelial divested mouse mammary fat-pads. Conversely, ECMs isolated from omental fat and lung did not redirect testicular cells to a MEC fate, indicating the necessity of tissue specific components of the mECM. mECM preparations also completely inhibited teratoma formation from ESC inoculations. Further, a phenotypically normal ductal outgrowth resulted from a single inoculation of ESCs and mECM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a tissue specific ECM driving differentiation of cells to form a functional tissue in vivo. PMID:28071703

  9. Salivary gland progenitor cell biology provides a rationale for therapeutic salivary gland regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, I M A; Knox, S M; Hoffman, M P

    2011-07-01

    An irreversible loss of salivary gland function often occurs in humans after removal of salivary tumors, after therapeutic radiation of head and neck tumors, as a result of Sjögren's syndrome and in genetic syndromes affecting gland development. The permanent loss of gland function impairs the oral health of these patients and broadly affects their quality of life. The regeneration of functional salivary gland tissue is thus an important therapeutic goal for the field of regenerative medicine and will likely involve stem/progenitor cell biology and/or tissue engineering approaches. Recent reports demonstrate how both innervation of the salivary gland epithelium and certain growth factors influence progenitor cell growth during mouse salivary gland development. These advances in our understanding suggest that developmental mechanisms of mouse salivary gland development may provide a paradigm for postnatal regeneration of both mice and human salivary glands. Herein, we will discuss the developmental mechanisms that influence progenitor cell biology and the implications for salivary gland regeneration.

  10. Human eccrine sweat gland cells can reconstitute a stratified epidermis.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Thomas; Pontiggia, Luca; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Tharakan, Sasha; Braziulis, Erik; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2010-08-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are generally considered to be a possible epidermal stem cell source. Here we compared the multilayered epithelia formed by epidermal keratinocytes and those formed by eccrine sweat gland cells. We demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo the capability of human eccrine sweat gland cells to form a stratified interfollicular epidermis substitute on collagen hydrogels. This is substantiated by the following findings: (1) a stratified epidermis consisting of 10-12 cell layers is formed by sweat gland cells; (2) a distinct stratum corneum develops and is maintained after transplantation onto immuno-incompetent rats; (3) proteins such as filaggrin, loricrin, involucrin, envoplakin, periplakin, and transglutaminases I and III match with the pattern of the normal human skin; (4) junctional complexes and hemidesmosomes are readily and regularly established; (5) cell proliferation in the basal layer reaches homeostatic levels; (6) the sweat gland-derived epidermis is anchored by hemidesmosomes within a well-developed basal lamina; and (7) palmo-plantar or mucosal markers are not expressed in the sweat gland-derived epidermis. These data suggest that human eccrine sweat glands are an additional source of keratinocytes that can generate a stratified epidermis. Our findings raise the question of the extent to which the human skin is repaired and/or permanently renewed by eccrine sweat gland cells.

  11. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  12. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells (skeletal stem cells) Cell-based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed differentiation DNA Ectoderm Embryo Embryoid ...

  13. Pituitary stem cells: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Vankelecom, Hugo; Chen, Jianghai

    2014-03-25

    Some 5 years ago, the stem cells of the adult pituitary gland were discovered. Subsequent in-depth characterization revealed expression of several stemness markers and embryo-typical factors. Now, the quest is open to decipher their role in the gland. When and how pituitary stem cells differentiate to contribute to the mature hormone-producing cell populations is not known. New research models support their involvement in cell regeneration after injury in the gland, and suggest a possible role in pituitary tumor formation. From their expression phenotype, pituitary stem cells seem to re-use embryonic developmental programs during the creation of new hormonal cells. Here, we will review the latest progression in the domain of pituitary stem cells, including the uncovering of some new molecular flavors and of the first potential functions. Eventually, we will speculate on their differentiation programs towards hormonal cells, with a particular focus on gonadotropes.

  14. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  15. Lacrimal Gland Repair Using Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Anastasia; Voronov, Dmitry A; Yoshida, Miya; Thotakura, Suharika; Meech, Robyn; Dartt, Darlene A; Makarenkova, Helen P

    2017-01-01

    In humans, the lacrimal gland (LG) is the primary contributor to the aqueous layer of the tear film. Production of tears in insufficient quantity or of inadequate quality may lead to aqueous-deficiency dry eye (ADDE). Currently there is no cure for ADDE. The development of strategies to reliably isolate LG stem/progenitor cells from the LG tissue brings great promise for the design of cell replacement therapies for patients with ADDE. We analyzed the therapeutic potential of epithelial progenitor cells (EPCPs) isolated from adult wild-type mouse LGs by transplanting them into the LGs of TSP -1(-/-) mice, which represent a novel mouse model for ADDE. TSP-1(-/-) mice are normal at birth but progressively develop a chronic form of ocular surface disease, characterized by deterioration, inflammation, and secretory dysfunction of the lacrimal gland. Our study shows that, among c-kit-positive epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(+) ) populations sorted from mouse LGs, the c-kit(+) dim/EpCAM(+) /Sca1 (-) /CD34 (-) /CD45 (-) cells have the hallmarks of an epithelial cell progenitor population. Isolated EPCPs express pluripotency factors and markers of the epithelial cell lineage Runx1 and EpCAM, and they form acini and ducts when grown in reaggregated three-dimensional cultures. Moreover, when transplanted into injured or "diseased" LGs, they engraft into acinar and ductal compartments. EPCP-injected TSP-1(-/-) LGs showed reduction of cell infiltration, differentiation of the donor EPCPs within secretory acini, and substantial improvement in LG structural integrity and function. This study provides the first evidence for the effective use of adult EPCP cell transplantation to rescue LG dysfunction in a model system. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:88-98.

  16. New Insights into Thyroid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells exhibit an extraordinary ability for self-renewal. They also give rise to many specialized cells. The potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and drug discovery has been well documented. Although advances in stem cell science have raised broad ethical concerns, it is clear that stem cell technology has revolutionized our thinking in modern biology and medicine and provided the basis for understanding many of the mechanisms controlling basic biological processes and disease mechanisms. This review details the nascent field of thyroid stem cell research, exploring the current status of thyroid stem cell differentiation from the perspectives of both developmental biology and cell replacement therapy. It highlights successes to date in the generation of thyroid follicular cells from embryonic stem cells in the laboratory and the identification and characterization of adult stem cells from human thyroid glands and thyroid cancers. Finally, it outlines future challenges with a focus on potential stem cell therapy for thyroid patients. PMID:17727339

  17. ΔNp63 promotes stem cell activity in mammary gland development and basal-like breast cancer by enhancing Fzd7 expression and Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Rumela; Wei, Yong; Hwang, Julie; Hang, Xiang; Andres Blanco, Mario; Choudhury, Abrar; Tiede, Benjamin; Romano, Rose-Anne; DeCoste, Christina; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Amadori, Dino; Kannan, Nagarajan; Eaves, Connie J; Sinha, Satrajit; Kang, Yibin

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cancer is populated and maintained by tumour-initiating cells (TICs) with stem-like properties similar to those of adult tissue stem cells. Despite recent advances, the molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be shared between normal and malignant stem cells remain poorly understood. Here we show that the ΔNp63 isoform of the Trp63 transcription factor promotes normal mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity by increasing the expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd7, thereby enhancing Wnt signalling. Importantly, Fzd7-dependent enhancement of Wnt signalling by ΔNp63 also governs tumour-initiating activity of the basal subtype of breast cancer. These findings establish ΔNp63 as a key regulator of stem cells in both normal and malignant mammary tissues and provide direct evidence that breast cancer TICs and normal MaSCs share common regulatory mechanisms.

  18. Lacrimal Gland Repair Using Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Anastasia; Voronov, Dmitry A; Yoshida, Miya; Thotakura, Suharika; Meech, Robyn; Dartt, Darlene A; Makarenkova, Helen P

    2016-08-15

    : In humans, the lacrimal gland (LG) is the primary contributor to the aqueous layer of the tear film. Production of tears in insufficient quantity or of inadequate quality may lead to aqueous-deficiency dry eye (ADDE). Currently there is no cure for ADDE. The development of strategies to reliably isolate LG stem/progenitor cells from the LG tissue brings great promise for the design of cell replacement therapies for patients with ADDE. We analyzed the therapeutic potential of epithelial progenitor cells (EPCPs) isolated from adult wild-type mouse LGs by transplanting them into the LGs of TSP-1(-/-) mice, which represent a novel mouse model for ADDE. TSP-1(-/-) mice are normal at birth but progressively develop a chronic form of ocular surface disease, characterized by deterioration, inflammation, and secretory dysfunction of the lacrimal gland. Our study shows that, among c-kit-positive epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(+)) populations sorted from mouse LGs, the c-kit(+)dim/EpCAM(+)/Sca1(-)/CD34(-)/CD45(-) cells have the hallmarks of an epithelial cell progenitor population. Isolated EPCPs express pluripotency factors and markers of the epithelial cell lineage Runx1 and EpCAM, and they form acini and ducts when grown in reaggregated three-dimensional cultures. Moreover, when transplanted into injured or "diseased" LGs, they engraft into acinar and ductal compartments. EPCP-injected TSP-1(-/-) LGs showed reduction of cell infiltration, differentiation of the donor EPCPs within secretory acini, and substantial improvement in LG structural integrity and function. This study provides the first evidence for the effective use of adult EPCP cell transplantation to rescue LG dysfunction in a model system.

  19. Stem Cell Sciences plc.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sebnem

    2006-09-01

    Stem Cell Sciences' core objective is to develop safe and effective stem cell-based therapies for currently incurable diseases. In order to achieve this goal, Stem Cell Sciences recognizes the need for multiple technologies and a globally integrated stem cell initiative. The key challenges for the successful application of stem cells in the clinic is the need for a reproducible supply of pure, fully characterized stem cells that have been grown in suitable conditions for use in the clinic.

  20. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  2. Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  3. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  4. Nail stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sellheyer, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Our knowledge on stem cells of the hair follicle has increased exponentially after the bulge was characterized as the stem cell niche two decades ago. In contrast, little is known about stem cells in the nail unit. Whereas hair follicles are plentiful and easy to access, the human body has only twenty nails and they are rarely biopsied. Therefore, examining fetal material offers unique advantages. In the following mini-review, our current knowledge on nail stem cells is summarized and analogies to the hair follicle stem cells are drawn.

  5. Notch signaling regulates gastric antral LGR5 stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, Elise S; Gifford, Gail B; Keeley, Theresa M; Carulli, Alexis J; VanDussen, Kelli L; Thomas, Dafydd; Giordano, Thomas J; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Samuelson, Linda C

    2015-10-14

    The major signaling pathways regulating gastric stem cells are unknown. Here we report that Notch signaling is essential for homeostasis of LGR5(+) antral stem cells. Pathway inhibition reduced proliferation of gastric stem and progenitor cells, while activation increased proliferation. Notch dysregulation also altered differentiation, with inhibition inducing mucous and endocrine cell differentiation while activation reduced differentiation. Analysis of gastric organoids demonstrated that Notch signaling was intrinsic to the epithelium and regulated growth. Furthermore, in vivo Notch manipulation affected the efficiency of organoid initiation from glands and single Lgr5-GFP stem cells, suggesting regulation of stem cell function. Strikingly, constitutive Notch activation in LGR5(+) stem cells induced tissue expansion via antral gland fission. Lineage tracing using a multi-colored reporter demonstrated that Notch-activated stem cells rapidly generate monoclonal glands, suggesting a competitive advantage over unmanipulated stem cells. Notch activation was associated with increased mTOR signaling, and mTORC1 inhibition normalized NICD-induced increases in proliferation and gland fission. Chronic Notch activation induced undifferentiated, hyper-proliferative polyps, suggesting that aberrant activation of Notch in gastric stem cells may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis.

  6. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... develops and ages, the number and type of stem cells changes. Totipotent cells are no longer present after dividing into the cells that generate the placenta and umbilical cord. Pluripotent cells ... organs and tissues. The stem cells that stay in your body throughout your ...

  7. Pathophysiology of myoepithelial cells in salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha Ashok Kumar; Mulla, Aamera Farouq; Mayank, Mrinal

    2016-01-01

    Myoepithelial cells (MECs) are considered to be a key participant in most salivary gland diseases, particularly tumors. MECs structurally resemble both epithelial cells and smooth muscles. Diagnostic dilemmas caused are due to inadequacy of characterizing the wide spectrum of morphologic and immunologic features which are different for both normal and neoplastic MECs. This article discusses the development, functions and structure of both normal and neoplastic MECs, their staining properties and differences in the morphologic and immunophenotypic properties of the MEC in detail. It also describes the role of MEC in pathogenesis and morphogenesis of various nonneoplastic and neoplastic salivary gland lesions and thereby are responsible for the myriad histopathology of salivary gland tumors. PMID:27721615

  8. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands.

  9. Stress and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress.

  10. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  11. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  12. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  13. Cell hierarchy and lineage commitment in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2012-01-01

    The bovine mammary gland is a favorable organ for studying mammary cell hierarchy due to its robust milk-production capabilities that reflect the adaptation of its cell populations to extensive expansion and differentiation. It also shares basic characteristics with the human breast, and identification of its cell composition may broaden our understanding of the diversity in cell hierarchy among mammals. Here, Lin⁻ epithelial cells were sorted according to expression of CD24 and CD49f into four populations: CD24(med)CD49f(pos) (putative stem cells, puStm), CD24(neg)CD49f(pos) (Basal), CD24(high)CD49f(neg) (putative progenitors, puPgt) and CD24(med)CD49f(neg) (luminal, Lum). These populations maintained differential gene expression of lineage markers and markers of stem cells and luminal progenitors. Of note was the high expression of Stat5a in the puPgt cells, and of Notch1, Delta1, Jagged1 and Hey1 in the puStm and Basal populations. Cultured puStm and Basal cells formed lineage-restricted basal or luminal clones and after re-sorting, colonies that preserved a duct-like alignment of epithelial layers. In contrast, puPgt and Lum cells generated only luminal clones and unorganized colonies. Under non-adherent culture conditions, the puPgt and puStm populations generated significantly more floating colonies. The increase in cell number during culture provides a measure of propagation potential, which was highest for the puStm cells. Taken together, these analyses position puStm cells at the top of the cell hierarchy and denote the presence of both bi-potent and luminally restricted progenitors. In addition, a population of differentiated luminal cells was marked. Finally, combining ALDH activity with cell-surface marker analyses defined a small subpopulation that is potentially stem cell-enriched.

  14. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2, CALR, or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC.

  15. The Emerging Cell Biology of Thyroid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Rauf; Minsky, Noga C.; Ma, Risheng

    2011-01-01

    Context: Stem cells are undifferentiated cells with the property of self-renewal and give rise to highly specialized cells under appropriate local conditions. The use of stem cells in regenerative medicine holds great promise for the treatment of many diseases, including those of the thyroid gland. Evidence Acquisition: This review focuses on the progress that has been made in thyroid stem cell research including an overview of cellular and molecular events (most of which were drawn from the period 1990–2011) and discusses the remaining problems encountered in their differentiation. Evidence Synthesis: Protocols for the in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells, based on normal developmental processes, have generated thyroid-like cells but without full thyrocyte function. However, agents have been identified, including activin A, insulin, and IGF-I, which are able to stimulate the generation of thyroid-like cells in vitro. In addition, thyroid stem/progenitor cells have been identified within the normal thyroid gland and within thyroid cancers. Conclusions: Advances in thyroid stem cell biology are providing not only insight into thyroid development but may offer therapeutic potential in thyroid cancer and future thyroid cell replacement therapy. PMID:21778219

  16. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  17. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants A ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  18. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants.

  19. Stem Cell Organoid Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E.; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies. PMID:26748754

  20. Engineering Stem Cell Organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-07

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies.

  1. [On plant stem cells and animal stem cells].

    PubMed

    You, Yun; Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of plant and animal stem cells can highlight core aspects of stem-cell biology. In both kingdoms, stem cells are defined by their clonogenic properties and are maintained by intercellular signals. The signaling molecules are different in plants and animals stem cell niches, but the roles of argonaute and polycomb group proteins suggest that there are some molecular similarities.

  2. Implications of Stem Cell Growth Regulation for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    during development and maintenance of the gland could determine the growth potential, differentiation and senescence of the mammary epithelial cell...described the fractions of mature and stem/progenitor cells in developing and adult mammary gland, that took into account well-understood biological...aging and senescence of the mammary population. Mice with a null mutation in syndecan-1 (Sdc1) resist tumor development in a number of different

  3. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  4. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  5. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  6. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  7. Multipotent Stem Cell and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Khanlarkhani, Neda; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Najafi, Atefeh; Mehdinejadiani, Shayesteh; Sobhani, Aligholi

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing and undifferentiated cell types that can be differentiate into functional cells. Stem cells can be classified into two main types based on their source of origin: Embryonic and Adult stem cells. Stem cells also classified based on the range of differentiation potentials into Totipotent, Pluripotent, Multipotent, and Unipotent. Multipotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types within one particular lineage. There are plentiful advantages and usages for multipotent stem cells. Multipotent Stem cells act as a significant key in procedure of development, tissue repair, and protection. The accessibility and adaptability of these amazing cells create them a great therapeutic choice for different part of medical approaches, and it becomes interesting topic in the scientific researches to found obvious method for the most advantageous use of MSC-based therapies. Recent studies in the field of stem cell biology have provided new perspectives and opportunities for the treatment of infertility disorders.

  8. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most common form of endocrine cancer and that thyroid hormone is needed for the growth and metabolism of each cell in the body, understanding the molecular and the cellular aspects of thyroid stem cell biology will ultimately provide insights into mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:18310275

  9. Stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cottler-Fox, Michele H; Lapidot, Tsvee; Petit, Isabelle; Kollet, Orit; DiPersio, John F; Link, Dan; Devine, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Successful blood and marrow transplant (BMT), both autologous and allogeneic, requires the infusion of a sufficient number of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells (HPCs) capable of homing to the marrow cavity and regenerating a full array of hematopoietic cell lineages in a timely fashion. At present, the most commonly used surrogate marker for HPCs is the cell surface marker CD34, identified in the clinical laboratory by flow cytometry. Clinical studies have shown that infusion of at least 2 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg recipient body weight results in reliable engraftment as measured by recovery of adequate neutrophil and platelet counts approximately 14 days after transplant. Recruitment of HPCs from the marrow into the blood is termed mobilization, or, more commonly, stem cell mobilization. In Section I, Dr. Tsvee Lapidot and colleagues review the wide range of factors influencing stem cell mobilization. Our current understanding focuses on chemokines, proteolytic enzymes, adhesion molecules, cytokines and stromal cell-stem cell interactions. On the basis of this understanding, new approaches to mobilization have been designed and are now starting to undergo clinical testing. In Section II, Dr. Michele Cottler-Fox describes factors predicting the ability to mobilize the older patient with myeloma. In addition, clinical approaches to improving collection by individualizing the timing of apheresis and adjusting the volume of blood processed to achieve a desired product are discussed. Key to this process is the daily enumeration of blood CD34(+) cells. Newer methods of enumerating and mobilizing autologous blood HPCs are discussed. In Section III, Dr. John DiPersio and colleagues provide data on clinical results of mobilizing allogeneic donors with G-CSF, GM-CSF and the combination of both as relates to the number and type of cells collected by apheresis. Newer methods of stem cell mobilization as well as the relationship of graft composition on immune reconstitution

  10. CELL CONTACTS IN THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Pitelka, Dorothy R.; Hamamoto, Susan T.; Duafala, Joan G.; Nemanic, Michael K.

    1973-01-01

    The nature and distribution of cell contacts have been examined in thin sections and freeze-fracture replicas of mammary gland samples from female C3H/Crgl mice at stages from birth through pregnancy, lactation, and postweaning involution. Epithelial cells of major mammary ducts at all stages examined are linked at their luminal borders by junctional complexes consisting of tight junctions, variable intermediate junctions, occasional small gap junctions, and one or more series of desmosomes. Scattered desmosomes and gap junctions link ductal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in all combinations; hemidesmosomes attach myoepithelial cells to the basal lamina. Freeze-fracture replicas confirm the erratic distribution of gap junctions and reveal a loose, irregular network of ridges comprising the continuous tight-junctional belts. Alveoli develop early in gestation and initially resemble ducts. Later, as alveoli and small ducts become actively secretory, they lose all desmosomes and most intermediate junctions, whereas tight and gap junctions persist, The tight-junctional network becomes compact and orderly, its undulating ridges oriented predominantly parallel to the luminal surface. It is suggested that these changes in junctional morphology, occurring in secretory cells around parturition, may be related to the greatly enhanced rate of movement of milk precursors and products through the lactating epithelium, or to the profound and recurrent changes in shape of secretory cells that occur in relation to myoepithelial cell contraction, or to both. PMID:4569313

  11. Cloning of Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    these parity-induced cells do represent a totipotent mammary stem cell population per se, but these cells might support stem cell maintenance as... Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 68198-6810 REPORT...Mammary Stem Cells DAMD17-00-1-0641 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  12. Isolation, culture and phenotypic characterization of human sweat gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunhe; Li, Meiying; Zhang, Xueyan; Bai, Tingting; Chi, Guanfan; Liu, Jin Yu; Li, Yulin

    2014-10-01

    Sweat gland epithelial cells (SGECs) have been identified as essential for the regeneration of sweat glands and for the construction of skin substitutes containing skin appendages. Consequently, the isolation, culture and phenotypic characterization of SGECs are of paramount importance. In the present study study, human sweat glands were isolated by pipetting under a phase contrast microscope following digestion with collagenase type I. Subsequently, a microscopic organ culture technique was used for the primary culture of human SGECs, and the culture conditions were modified in order to achieve optimal cell growth status. Primary SGECs were identified based on their expression of markers specific for sweat glands, including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CK7, CK8, CK14, CK15, CK18 and CK19. We explored the possible presence of stem cells in human sweat glands by detecting their expression of leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5). Primary SGECs achieved a good growth state when cultured under serum-free conditions. After one passage, the cells cultured in keratinocyte serum-free medium with 1% fetal bovine serum (FBS) still showed a prominent proliferative activity. Phenotypic analysis by immunofluorescence microscopy, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of sweat gland-specific markers, including CEA, CK7, CK8, CK14, CK15, CK18 and CK19. In addition, RT-PCR and immunochemistry detected the expression of LGR5. In comparison with traditional serum-containing conditions, serum-free culture provides the preferred culture conditions for human SGECs. LGR5 is a novel marker that identifies human sweat gland-derived stem cells.

  13. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  14. Fifth Annual Stem Cell Summit.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    The Fifth Annual Stem Cell Summit, held in New York, included topics covering new commercial developments in the research field of stem cell-based therapies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on embryonic and adult stem cells, stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of orthopedic and cardiovascular indications and inflammatory diseases, as well as technologies for processing and storing stem cells. Investigational therapies discussed include placental expanded (PLX) cells (Pluristem Therapeutics Inc), StemEx (Gamida-Teva Joint Venture/Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd) and remestemcel-L (Osiris Therapeutics Inc/Genzyme Corp/JCR Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd/ Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd).

  15. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants A A A What's in this article? ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  16. STUDIES ON AN EPITHELIAL (GLAND) CELL JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Werner R.; Kanno, Yoshinobu

    1964-01-01

    Membrane permeability of an epithelial cell junction (Drosophila salivary gland) was examined with intracellular microelectrodes and with fluorescent tracers. In contrast to the non-junctional cell membrane surface, which has a low permeability to ions (10-4 mho/cm2), the junctional membrane surface is highly permeable. In fact, it introduces no substantial restriction to ion flow beyond that in the cytoplasm; the resistance through a chain of cells (150 Ω cm) is only slightly greater than in extruded cytoplasm (100 Ω cm). The diffusion resistance along the intercellular space to the exterior, on the other hand, is very high. Here, there exists an ion barrier of, at least, 104Ω cm2. As a result, small ions and fluorescein move rather freely from one cell to the next, but do not leak appreciably through the intercellular space to the exterior. The organ here, rather than the single cell, appears to be the unit of ion environment. The possible underlying structural aspects are discussed. PMID:14206423

  17. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  18. Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0719 TITLE: Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse 5b. GRANT NUMBER Mammary Epithelium...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT SEE PAGE 4 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , Stem Cell niche, Immunohistochemistry, mammary gland, breast cancer 16

  19. Differentiation of primary human submandibular gland cells cultured on basement membrane extract.

    PubMed

    Szlávik, Vanda; Szabó, Bálint; Vicsek, Tamás; Barabás, József; Bogdán, Sándor; Gresz, Veronika; Varga, Gábor; O'Connell, Brian; Vág, János

    2008-11-01

    There is no effective treatment for the loss of functional salivary tissue after irradiation for head and neck cancer or the autoimmune disease Sjögren's syndrome. One possible approach is the regeneration of salivary glands from stem cells. The present study aimed to investigate whether small pieces of human submandiblar gland tissue contain elements necessary for the reconstruction of salivary rudiments in vitro via acinar and ductal cell differentiation. Primary submandibular gland (primary total human salivary gland; PTHSG) cells were isolated from human tissue and cultured in vitro using a new method in which single cells form an expanding epithelial monolayer on plastic substrates. Differentiation, morphology, number, and organization of these cells were then followed on basement membrane extract (BME) using RNA quantitation (amylase, claudin-1 (CLN1), CLN3, kallikrein, vimentin), immunohistochemistry (amylase and occludin), viability assay, and videomicroscopy. On the surface of BME, PTHSG cells formed acinotubular structures within 24 h, did not proliferate, and stained for amylase. In cultures derived from half of the donors, the acinar markers amylase and CLN3 were upregulated. The PTHSG culture model suggests that human salivary gland may be capable of regeneration via reorganization and differentiation and that basement membrane components play a crucial role in the morphological and functional differentiation of salivary cells.

  20. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  1. [Stem cell colloquy: conclusion].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, Maurice

    2002-10-01

    The stem cell data presented and discussed during the symposium raise the hope that important medical progress can be made in several fields: neuro-degenerative diseases, those linked to cellular deficit, some aspects of aging linked to cellular degeneration, and the treatment of cancers that may harm normal tissues at risk of being infiltrated by malignant cells. Three main types of stem cells are available. (i) Those present in normal adult tissue: contrary to what was believed, some data suggest that certain adult stem cells have a great plasticity (they can differentiate into cells different from those in tissues from which they were taken) and can proliferate in vitro without losing their properties. Nevertheless, their use faces several obstacles: in ill or elderly subjects, then these cells can be limited in number or not multiply well in vitro. In this case, auto-grafting of the cells cannot be used. They must be sought in another subject, and allo-grafting causes difficult and sometimes insoluble problems of immunological tolerance. (ii) Embryonic stem cells from surplus human embryos, obtained by in vitro fertilisation, which the parents decide not to use: these cells have a great potential for proliferation and differentiation, but can also encounter problems of immunological intolerance. (iii) Cells obtained from cell nuclear transfer in oocytes: these cells are well tolerated, since they are genetically and immunologically identical to those of the host. All types of stem cells can be obtained with them. However, they do present problems. For obtaining them, female oocytes are needed, which could lead to their commercialization. Moreover, the first steps for obtaining these cells are identical to those used in reproductive cloning. It therefore appears that each type of cell raises difficult scientific and practical problems. More research is needed to overcome these obstacles and to determine which type of stem cell constitutes the best solution for

  2. Neural stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parati, E A; Pozzi, S; Ottolina, A; Onofrj, M; Bez, A; Pagano, S F

    2004-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells are present in the majority of mammalian tissues where they are a renewable source of specialized cells. According to the several biological portions from which multipotent stem cells can be derived, they are characterized as a) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolated from the pluripotent inner-cell mass of the pre-implantation blastocyste-stage embryo; b) multipotent fetal stem cells (FSCs) from aborted fetuses; and c) adult stem cells (ASCs) localized in small zones of several organs known as "niche" where a subset of tissue cells and extracellular substrates can indefinitely house one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny production in vivo. ECSs have an high self-renewing capacity, plasticity and pluripotency over the years. Pluripotency is a property that makes a stem cell able to give rise to all cell type found in the embryo and adult animals.

  3. Stem cells and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Margaret A; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-12-04

    Research into stem cells and aging aims to understand how stem cells maintain tissue health, what mechanisms ultimately lead to decline in stem cell function with age, and how the regenerative capacity of somatic stem cells can be enhanced to promote healthy aging. Here, we explore the effects of aging on stem cells in different tissues. Recent research has focused on the ways that genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and the extrinsic environmental milieu influence stem cell functionality over time. We describe each of these three factors, the ways in which they interact, and how these interactions decrease stem cell health over time. We are optimistic that a better understanding of these changes will uncover potential strategies to enhance stem cell function and increase tissue resiliency into old age.

  4. Stem Cells and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent findings in stem cell biology have resulted in new opportunities for the treatment of reproductive disease. Endometrial regeneration can be driven by bone marrow derived stem cells. This finding has potential implications for the treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the etiology of endometriosis. The ovaries have been shown to contain stem cells that form oocytes in adults and can be cultured in vitro to develop mature oocytes. Stem cells from the fetus have been demonstrated to lead to microchimerism in the mother and implicated in several maternal diseases. Additionally the placenta may be another source of hematopoietic stem cell. Finally endometrial derived stem cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into non-reproductive tissues. While we are just beginning to understand stem cells and many key questions remain, the potential advantages of stem cells in reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:19208782

  5. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  6. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  7. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  8. Materials as stem cell regulators

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  9. Materials as stem cell regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  10. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate into many ... they also retain the ability to produce more stem cells, a process termed self-renewal. There are multiple ...

  11. Reprogramming stem cells is a microenvironmental task

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Inman, Jamie

    2008-10-14

    That tumor cells for all practical purposes are unstable and plastic could be expected. However, the astonishing ability of the nuclei from cells of normal adult tissues to be reprogrammed - given the right embryonic context - found its final truth even for mammals in the experiments that allowed engineering Dolly (1). The landmark experiments showed that nuclei originating from cells of frozen mammary tissues were capable of being reprogrammed by the embryonic cytoplasm and its microenvironment to produce a normal sheep. The rest is history. However, whether microenvironments other than those of the embryos can also reprogram adult cells of different tissue origins still containing their cytoplasm is of obvious interest. In this issue of PNAS, the laboratory of Gilbert Smith (2) reports on how the mammary gland microenvironment can reprogram both embryonic and adult stem neuronal cells. The work is a follow-up to their previous report on testis stem cells that were reprogrammed by the mammary microenvironment (3). They demonstrated that cells isolated from the seminiferous tubules of the mature testis, mixed with normal mammary epithelial cells, contributed a sizable number of epithelial progeny to normal mammary outgrowths in transplanted mammary fat pads. However, in those experiments they were unable to distinguish which subpopulation of the testis cells contributed progeny to the mammary epithelial tree. The current work adds new, compelling, and provocative information to our understanding of stem cell plasticity. Booth et al. (2) use neuronal stem cells (NSCs) isolated from WAP-cre/R26R mice combined with unlabeled mammary epithelial cells that subsequently are implanted in cleared mammary fat pads. In this new microenvironment, the NSCs that are incorporated into the branching mammary tree make chimeric glands (Fig. 1) that remarkably can also express the milk protein {beta}-casein, progesterone receptor, and estrogen receptor {alpha}. Remarkably, the

  12. De novo epidermal regeneration using human eccrine sweat gland cells: higher competence of secretory over absorptive cells.

    PubMed

    Pontiggia, Luca; Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Oliveira, Carol; Braziulis, Erik; Klar, Agnieszka S; Meuli-Simmen, Claudia; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2014-06-01

    In our previous work, we showed that human sweat gland-derived epithelial cells represent an alternative source of keratinocytes to grow a near normal autologous epidermis. The role of subtypes of sweat gland cells in epidermal regeneration and maintenance remained unclear. In this study, we compare the regenerative potential of both secretory and absorptive sweat gland cell subpopulations. We demonstrate the superiority of secretory over absorptive cells in forming a new epidermis on two levels: first, the proliferative and colony-forming efficiencies in vitro are significantly higher for secretory cells (SCs), and second, SCs show a higher frequency of successful epidermis formation as well as an increase in the thickness of the formed epidermis in the in vitro and in vivo functional analyses using a 3D dermo-epidermal skin model. However, the ability of forming functional skin substitutes is not limited to SCs, which supports the hypothesis that multiple subtypes of sweat gland epithelial cells hold regenerative properties, while the existence and exact localization of a keratinocyte stem cell population in the human eccrine sweat gland remain elusive.

  13. Un(MaSC)ing Stem Cell Dynamics in Mammary Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Erin; Wrenn, Emma D; Cheung, Kevin J

    2017-02-27

    The properties of stem cells that participate in mammary gland branching morphogenesis remain contested. Reporting in Nature, Scheele et al. (2017) establish a model for post-pubertal mammary branching morphogenesis in which position-dependent, lineage-restricted stem cells undergo cell mixing in order to contribute to long-term growth.

  14. Skin stem cells: rising to the surface.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Elaine

    2008-01-28

    The skin epidermis and its appendages provide a protective barrier that is impermeable to harmful microbes and also prevents dehydration. To perform their functions while being confronted with the physicochemical traumas of the environment, these tissues undergo continual rejuvenation through homeostasis, and, in addition, they must be primed to undergo wound repair in response to injury. The skin's elixir for maintaining tissue homeostasis, regenerating hair, and repairing the epidermis after injury is its stem cells, which reside in the adult hair follicle, sebaceous gland, and epidermis. Stem cells have the remarkable capacity to both self-perpetuate and also give rise to the differentiating cells that constitute one or more tissues. In recent years, scientists have begun to uncover the properties of skin stem cells and unravel the mysteries underlying their remarkable capacity to perform these feats. In this paper, I outline the basic lineages of the skin epithelia and review some of the major findings about mammalian skin epithelial stem cells that have emerged in the past five years.

  15. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    9 Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 10 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A...Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turashvili, Samuel Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human...Eirew, Afshin Raouf, John Stingl, Gulisa Turashvili, Allen Delaney, Joanne Emerman, Marco Marra and Samuel Aparicio . “Stem Cells in the Mammary Gland

  16. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties.

  17. Mammary Stem Cell Research in Veterinary Science: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Borena, Bizunesh M.; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an organ with a remarkable regenerative capacity that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Growing evidence suggests that these changes are driven by the coordinated division and differentiation of mammary stem cell populations (MaSC). Whereas information regarding MaSC and their role in comparative mammary gland physiology is readily available in human and mice, such information remains scarce in most veterinary mammal species such as cows, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, and dogs. We believe that a better knowledge on the MaSC in these species will not only help to gain more insights into mammary gland (patho) physiology in veterinary medicine, but will also be of value for human medicine. Therefore, this review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell isolation and characterization in different mammals of veterinary importance. PMID:23360296

  18. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  19. BRCA1--conductor of the breast stem cell orchestra: the role of BRCA1 in mammary gland development and identification of cell of origin of BRCA1 mutant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Niamh E; Mullan, Paul B

    2012-09-01

    Breast cancer treatment has been increasingly successful over the last 20 years due in large part to targeted therapies directed against different subtypes. However, basal-like breast cancers still represent a considerable challenge to clinicians and scientists alike since the pathogenesis underlying the disease and the target cell for transformation of this subtype is still undetermined. The considerable similarities between basal-like and BRCA1 mutant breast cancers led to the hypothesis that these cancers arise from transformation of a basal cell within the normal breast epithelium through BRCA1 dysfunction. Recently, however, a number of studies have called this hypothesis into question. This review summarises the initial findings which implicated the basal cell as the cell of origin of BRCA1 related basal-like breast cancers, as well as the more recent data which identifies the luminal progenitor cells as the likely target of transformation. We compare a number of key studies in this area and identify the differences that could explain some of the contradictory findings. In addition, we highlight the role of BRCA1 in breast cell differentiation and lineage determination by reviewing recent findings in the field and our own observations suggesting a role for BRCA1 in stem cell regulation through activation of the p63 and Notch pathways. We hope that through an increased understanding of the BRCA1 role in breast differentiation and the identification of the cell(s) of origin we can improve treatment options for both BRCA1 mutant and basal-like breast cancer subgroups.

  20. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  1. (Re)defining stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shostak, Stanley

    2006-03-01

    Stem-cell nomenclature is in a muddle! So-called stem cells may be self-renewing or emergent, oligopotent (uni- and multipotent) or pluri- and totipotent, cells with perpetual embryonic features or cells that have changed irreversibly. Ambiguity probably seeped into stem cells from common usage, flukes in biology's history beginning with Weismann's divide between germ and soma and Haeckel's biogenic law and ending with contemporary issues over the therapeutic efficacy of adult versus embryonic cells. Confusion centers on tissue dynamics, whether stem cells are properly members of emerging or steady-state populations. Clarity might yet be achieved by codifying differences between cells in emergent populations, including embryonic stem and embryonic germ (ES and EG) cells in tissue culture as opposed to self-renewing (SR) cells in steady-state populations.

  2. Immune cell location and function during post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Reed, Johanna R; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2010-09-01

    Post-natal mammary gland development requires complex interactions between the epithelial cells and various cell types within the stroma. Recent studies have illustrated the importance of immune cells and their mediators during the various stages of mammary gland development. However, the mechanisms by which these immune cells functionally contribute to mammary gland development are only beginning to be understood. This review provides an overview of the localization of immune cells within the mammary gland during the various stages of post-natal mammary gland development. Furthermore, recent studies are summarized that illustrate the mechanisms by which these cells are recruited to the mammary gland and their functional roles in mammary gland development.

  3. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  4. Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Promote Formation of the Ex Vivo Niche for Salivary Gland Epithelial Cell Growth, Matrix Formation, and Retention of Differentiated Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin-Xian; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Lin, Alan L.; Wang, Hanzhou; Pilia, Marcello; Ong, Joo L.; Dean, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland hypofunction often results from a number of causes, including the use of various medications, radiation for head and neck tumors, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, and aging. Since treatments for this condition are lacking and adult salivary glands have little regenerative capacity, there is a need for cell-based therapies to restore salivary gland function. Development of these treatment strategies requires the establishment of a system that is capable of replicating the salivary gland cell “niche” to support the proliferation and differentiation of salivary gland progenitor cells. In this study, a culture system using three-dimensional silk fibroin scaffolds (SFS) and primary salivary gland epithelial cells (pSGECs) from rat submandibular (SM) gland and parotid gland (PG) was established and characterized. pSGECs grown on SFS, but not tissue culture plastic (TCP), formed aggregates of cells with morphological features resembling secretory acini. High levels of amylase were released into the media by both cell types after extended periods in culture on SFS. Remarkably, cultures of PG-derived cells on SFS, but not SM cells, responded to isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, with increased enzyme release. This behavior mimics that of the salivary glands in vivo. Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) formed by pSGECs in culture on SFS contained type IV collagen, a major component of the basement membrane. These results demonstrate that pSGECs grown on SFS, but not TCP, retain important functional and structural features of differentiated salivary glands and produce an ECM that mimics the native salivary gland cell niche. These results demonstrate that SFS has potential as a scaffold for creating the salivary gland cell niche in vitro and may provide an approach for inducing multipotent stem cells to provide therapeutically meaningful numbers of salivary gland progenitor cells for regenerating these tissues in patients. PMID:25625623

  5. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2014-01-25

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programmed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer.

  6. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  7. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    PubMed

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  8. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosinetreatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine (Xs) treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo ...

  9. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population.

  10. Stem Cells, Redox Signaling, and Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional stem cell decline has been postulated to result in loss of maintenance of tissue homeostasis leading to organismal decline and diseases of aging. Recent Advances: Recent findings implicate redox metabolism in the control of stem cell pool and stem cell aging. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their damaging properties to DNA, proteins and lipids, recent findings suggest that ROS may also be an integral physiological mediator of cellular signaling in primary cells. Critical Issues: Here we review recent published work on major signaling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by ROS and mediate ROS regulation of stem cell fate. We will specifically focus on how alterations in this regulation may be implicated in disease and particularly in diseases of stem cell aging. In general, based on the work described here we propose a model in which ROS function as stem cell rheostat. Future Directions: Future work in elucidating how ROS control stem cell cycling, apoptotic machinery, and lineage determination should shed light on mechanisms whereby ROS may control stem cell aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1902–1916. PMID:24383555

  11. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  12. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  13. Stem cells for spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer’s disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  14. Stem Cells behind the Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cangkrama, Michael; Ting, Stephen B.; Darido, Charbel

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells sustain the adult skin for a lifetime through self-renewal and the production of committed progenitors. These stem cells generate progeny that will undergo terminal differentiation leading to the development of a protective epidermal barrier. Whereas the molecular mechanisms that govern epidermal barrier repair and renewal have been extensively studied, pathways controlling stem cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Asymmetric cell divisions, small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), chromatin remodeling complexes, and multiple differentiation factors tightly control the balance of stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, and disruption of this balance leads to skin diseases. In this review, we summarize and discuss current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating epidermal stem and progenitor cell differentiation, and explore new relationships for maintenance of skin barrier function. PMID:23812084

  15. [Stem cell therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2009-03-01

    Medicine will be faced with a major challenge in coming years, namely how to treat for tissue dysfunction due to disease and aging There are two basic options: drug therapy and cell therapy. Stem cells have been the subject of intense speculation and controversy for several years, as they open up radically new therapeutic possibilities. Classical drugs can only smoothen consequences of tissue dysfunction, whereas cell therapy has the potential to restore tissue function by providing fresh cells. Cell therapy is totally different from organ transplantation, which can only benefit a limited number of patients. The use of the generic term "stem cells" to designate a whole variety of cell types that are present throughout life, is a source of confusion and ambiguity. It will take years of cognitive research to unravel the molecular mechanisms that govern a stem cell's multi- or totipotent status before we can fully exploit this therapeutic tool to the full. The younger a stem cell the greater its potential and, probably, the more durable its benefits, but the use of embryonic stem cells raises ethical issues. The redundancy or equivalence of diferent categories of cells is another source of controversy, yet researchers must be able to study stem cells in all their diversity, as complementary rather than competitive alternatives, in an acceptable ethical and regulatory environment. We briefly describe the three types of stem cells: pluripotent embryonic stem cells, fetal and adult stem cells, and pluripotent reprogrammed adult somatic cells. Only the former two categories have physiological functions: the first gives rise to tissues and organs while the second maintains tissue function during adulthood

  16. Stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Józkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2011-11-01

    Multiple populations of stem cells have been indicated to potentially participate in regeneration of injured organs. Especially, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and recently inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS) receive a marked attention from scientists and clinicians for regenerative medicine because of their high proliferative and differentiation capacities. Despite that ESC and iPS cells are expected to give rise into multiple regenerative applications when their side effects are overcame during appropriate preparation procedures, in fact their most recent application of human ESC may, however, reside in their use as a tool in drug development and disease modeling. This review focuses on the applications of stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology. We discuss possible relevance of pluripotent cell stem populations in developing physiological models for any human tissue cell type useful for pharmacological, metabolic and toxicity evaluation necessary in the earliest steps of drug development. The present models applied for preclinical drug testing consist of primary cells or immortalized cell lines that show limitations in terms of accessibility or relevance to their in vivo counterparts. The availability of renewable human cells with functional similarities to their in vivo counterparts is the first landmark for a new generation of cell-based assays. We discuss the approaches for using stem cells as valuable physiological targets of drug activity which may increase the strength of target validation and efficacy potentially resulting in introducing new safer remedies into clinical trials and the marketplace. Moreover, we discuss the possible applications of stem cells for elucidating mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The knowledge about the mechanisms governing the development and progression of multitude disorders which would come from the cellular models established based on stem cells, may give rise to new therapeutical strategies for such diseases. All

  17. BrdU-label-retaining cells in rat eccrine sweat glands over time.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Li, Xuexue; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bingna; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Cell proliferation and turnover are fueled by stem cells. In a previous study, we demonstrated that rat eccrine sweat glands contained abundant bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-label-retaining cells (LRCs). However, morphological observations showed that eccrine sweat glands usually show little or no signs of homeostatic change. In this study, we account for why the homeostatic change is rare in eccrine sweat glands based on cytokinetic changes in BrdU-LRC turnover, and also determine the BrdU-labeled cell type. Thirty-six newborn SD rats, were injected intraperitoneally with 50mg/kg BrdU twice daily at a 2h interval for 4 consecutive days. After a chase period of 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 32 weeks, rats were euthanized, and the hind footpads were removed and processed for BrdU immunostaining, and BrdU/α-SMA and BrdU/K14 double-immunostaining. BrdU-LRCs were observed in the ducts, secretory coils and mesenchymal cells at all survival time points. The percentage of BrdU(+) cells in rat eccrine sweat glands averaged 4.2±1.2% after 4 weeks of chase, increased slightly by the 6th week, averaging 4.4±0.9%, and peaked at 8 weeks, averaging 5.3±1.0%. Subsequently, the average percentage of BrdU(+) cells declined to 3.2±0.8% by the 32nd week. There was no difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs among the different survival time points except that a significant difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs detected at 24 weeks versus 8 weeks, and 32 weeks versus 8 weeks, was observed. We concluded that the BrdU-LRCs turnover is slow in eccrine sweat glands.

  18. Three-dimensional co-culture of BM-MSCs and eccrine sweat gland cells in Matrigel promotes transdifferentiation of BM-MSCs.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bingna; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-10-01

    Victims with extensive and deep burns are unable to regenerate eccrine sweat glands. Combining of stem cells and biomimetic ECM to generate cell-based 3D tissues is showing promise for tissue repair and regeneration. We co-cultured BrdU-labeled bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and eccrine sweat gland cells in Matrigel for 2 weeks in vitro and then evaluated for BM-MSCs differentiation into functional eccrine sweat gland cells by morphological assessment and immunohistochemical double staining for BrdU/pancytokeratin, BrdU/ZO-2, BrdU/E-cadherin, BrdU/desmoglein-2, BrdU/Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α, BrdU/NHE1 and BrdU/CFTR. Cells formed spheroid-like structures in Matrigel, and BrdU-labeled BM-MSCs were involved in the 3D reconstitution of eccrine sweat gland tissues, and the incorporated BM-MSCs expressed an epithelial cell marker (pancytokeratin), epithelial cell junction proteins (ZO-2, E-cadherin and desmoglein-2) and functional proteins of eccrine sweat glands (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α, NHE1 and CFTR). In conclusion, three-dimensional co-culture of BM-MSCs and eccrine sweat gland cells in Matrigel promotes the transdifferentiation of BM-MSCs into potentially functional eccrine sweat gland cells.

  19. The advantages of hair follicle pluripotent stem cells over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Multipotent adult stem cells have many potential therapeutic applications. Our recent findings suggest that hair follicles are a promising source of easily accessible multipotent stem cells. Stem cells in the hair follicle area express the neural stem cell marker nestin, suggesting that hair-follicle stem cells and neural stem cells have common features. Nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can form neurons and other cell types, and thus adult hair follicle stem cells could have important therapeutic applications, particularly for neurologic diseases. Transplanted hair follicle stem cells promote the functional recovery of injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Recent findings suggest that direct transplantation of hair-follicle stem cells without culture can promote nerve repair, which makes them potentially clinically practical. Human hair follicle stem cells as well as mouse hair follicle stem cells promote nerve repair and can be applied to test the hypothesis that human hair follicle stem cells can provide a readily available source of neurologically therapeutic stem cells. The use of hair follicle stem cells for nerve regeneration overcomes critical problems of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells in that the hair follicle stem cells are multipotent, readily accessible, non-oncogenic, and are not associated with ethical issues.

  20. Mammary cancer and epithelial stem cells: a problem or a solution?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert H

    2002-01-01

    The existing paradigms for stem cells in adult tissues include the integument, the alimentary canal, the lung, the liver, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. The mammary gland, by contrast, is the 'new kid on the block'. What little is known about stem cells in the mammary gland indicates that they possess a prodigious capacity for self-renewal. More importantly, in rodents, they persist with undiminished reproductive vigor throughout the organism's lifetime without regard to age or reproductive history. Do these stem cells represent primary targets for mammary neoplasia? If so, what are the implications for prevention/therapy?

  1. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    PubMed

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future.

  2. Neuropeptides degranulate serous cells of ferret tracheal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gashi, A.A.; Borson, D.B.; Finkbeiner, W.E.; Nadel, J.A.; Basbaum, C.B.

    1986-08-01

    To determine whether serous or mucous cells in tracheal submucosal glands respond to the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The authors studied the peptide-induced changes in gland cell morphology accompanying release of TVSO4-labeled macromolecules from tracheal explants of ferrets. Explants were labeled for 1 h in medium containing TVSO4 and washed for 3.5 additional hours. Base-line secretion in the absence of drugs declined between 1.5 and 3.5 h after the pulse. Between 2.5 and 3.5 h, the average percent change in counts per minute recovered per sample period was not significantly different from zero. Substance P and VIP added 4 h after labeling each increased greatly the release of TVSO4-labeled macromolecules above base line. Bethanechol, a muscarinic-cholinergic agonist, increased secretion by an average of 142% above base line. Light and electron microscopy of the control tissues showed glands with narrow lumens and numerous secretory granules. Glands treated with SP or VIP had enlarged lumens and the serous cells were markedly degranulated. These phenomena were documented by morphometry and suggest that SP and VIP cause secretion from glands at least partially by stimulating exocytosis from serous cells.

  3. Development of Causative Treatment Strategies for Lacrimal Gland Insufficiency by Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy. Part 1: Regeneration of Lacrimal Gland Tissue: Can We Stimulate Lacrimal Gland Renewal In Vivo?

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jana; Massie, Isobel; Roth, Mathias; Geerling, Gerd; Mertsch, Sonja; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Severe dry eye syndrome (DES) is a complex disease that is commonly caused by inflammatory and degenerative changes in the lacrimal gland, and can result in severe pain and disruption to visual acuity. In healthy subjects, the ocular surface is continually lubricated by the tear film that ensures that the ocular surface remains moist and free of debris, enabling normal vision. The lacrimal fluid, mid-layer of the tear film, is mainly produced by the lacrimal gland and if this is dysfunctional for any reason, severe DES can develop. Currently, only palliative treatments for DES exist that aim to either replace or retain tears and/or minimize inflammation. A curative approach that aims to trigger the regeneration of existing lacrimal gland tissue in situ may, therefore, be very beneficial to DES patients. This article reviews the different approaches that have been explored toward lacrimal gland regeneration. Progress to date in vitro, in vivo, and in man is described with a focus on clinical feasibility and efficacy. Promising candidates for drug-dependent treatment of DES are growth factors and cytokines, such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated gene 6 protein (TSG-6). Only a few studies have evaluated gene therapy for lacrimal gland deficiencies, but with promising results. However gene therapy carries a variety of risks regarding carcinogenesis and therefore a treatment in the near future using this approach seems to be unlikely. Cell therapies utilizing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seem to be more applicable than those using human amniotic membrane (hAM) epithelial cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, since MSCs combine the favorable traits of both (multipotency, capability to stimulate regeneration immunomodulatory and non-immunogenic properties).

  4. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The medical use of low level laser (LLL) irradiation has been occurring for decades, primarily in the area of tissue healing and inflammatory conditions. Despite little mechanistic knowledge, the concept of a non-invasive, non-thermal intervention that has the potential to modulate regenerative processes is worthy of attention when searching for novel methods of augmenting stem cell-based therapies. Here we discuss the use of LLL irradiation as a "photoceutical" for enhancing production of stem cell growth/chemoattractant factors, stimulation of angiogenesis, and directly augmenting proliferation of stem cells. The combination of LLL together with allogeneic and autologous stem cells, as well as post-mobilization directing of stem cells will be discussed. PMID:20158898

  5. Immune privilege of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ichiryu, Naoki; Fairchild, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Immune privilege provides protection to vital tissues or cells of the body when foreign antigens are introduced into these sites. The modern concept of relative immune privilege applies to a variety of tissues and anatomical structures, including the hair follicles and mucosal surfaces. Even sites of chronic inflammation and developing tumors may acquire immune privilege by recruiting immunoregulatory effector cells. Adult stem cells are no exception. For their importance and vitality, many adult stem cell populations are believed to be immune privileged. A preimplantation-stage embryo that derives from a totipotent stem cell (i.e., a fertilized oocyte) must be protected from maternal allo-rejection for successful implantation and development to occur. Embryonic stem cells, laboratory-derived cell lines of preimplantation blastocyst-origin, may, therefore, retain some of the immunological properties of the developing embryo. However, embryonic stem cells and their differentiated tissue derivatives transplanted into a recipient do not necessarily have an ability to subvert immune responses to the extent required to exploit their pluripotency for regenerative medicine. In this review, an extended definition of immune privilege is developed and the capacity of adult and embryonic stem cells to display both relative and acquired immune privilege is discussed. Furthermore, we explore how these intrinsic properties of stem cells may one day be harnessed for therapeutic gain.

  6. On hematopoietic stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Multipotential hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood-cell formation throughout life. Here, Metcalf considers the origin and heterogeneity of HSCs, their ability to self-generate, and their commitment to the various hematopoietic lineages.

  7. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    PubMed

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  8. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    PubMed

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  9. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  10. Germline and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Reik, Wolf; Surani, M Azim

    2015-11-02

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in the germline and imprinting cycle. Germ cells show extensive epigenetic programming in preparation for the generation of the totipotent state, which in turn leads to the establishment of pluripotent cells in blastocysts. The latter are the cells from which pluripotent embryonic stem cells are derived and maintained in culture. Following blastocyst implantation, postimplantation epiblast cells develop, which give rise to all somatic cells as well as primordial germ cells, the precursors of sperm and eggs. Pluripotent stem cells in culture can be induced to undergo differentiation into somatic cells and germ cells in culture. Understanding the natural cycles of epigenetic reprogramming that occur in the germline will allow the generation of better and more versatile stem cells for both therapeutic and research purposes.

  11. Bone repair and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-01

    Bones are an important component of vertebrates; they grow explosively in early life and maintain their strength throughout life. Bones also possess amazing capabilities to repair-the bone is like new without a scar after complete repair. In recent years, a substantial progress has been made in our understanding on mammalian bone stem cells. Mouse genetic models are powerful tools to understand the cell lineage, giving us better insights into stem cells that regulate bone growth, maintenance and repair. Recent findings about these stem cells raise new questions that require further investigations.

  12. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  13. GPCRs in Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    DOZE, VAN A.; PEREZ, DIANNE M.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissues of the body cannot only repair themselves, but also self-renew, a property mainly due to stem cells and the various mechanisms that regulate their behavior. Stem cell biology is a relatively new field. While advances are slowly being realized, stem cells possess huge potential to ameliorate disease and counteract the aging process, causing its speculation as the next panacea. Amidst public pressure to advance rapidly to clinical trials, there is a need to understand the biology of stem cells and to support basic research programs. Without a proper comprehension of how cells and tissues are maintained during the adult life span, clinical trials are bound to fail. This review will cover the basic biology of stem cells, the various types of stem cells, their potential function, and the advantages and disadvantages to their use in medicine. We will next cover the role of G-protein coupled receptors in the regulation of stem cells and their potential in future clinical applications. PMID:23415095

  14. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  15. Canine mammary tumors contain cancer stem-like cells and form spheroids with an embryonic stem cell signature.

    PubMed

    Ferletta, Maria; Grawé, Jan; Hellmén, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of tentative stem-like cells in the canine mammary tumor cell line CMT-U229. This cell line is established from an atypical benign mixed mammary tumor, which has the property of forming duct-like structures in collagen gels. Stem cells in mammary glands are located in the epithelium; therefore we thought that the CMT-U229 cell line would be suitable for detection of tentative cancer stem-like cells. Side population (SP) analyses by flow cytometry were performed with cells that formed spheroids and with cells that did not. Flow cytometric, single sorted cells were expanded and re-cultured as spheroids. The spheroids were paraffin embedded and characterized by immunohistochemistry. SP analyses showed that spheroid forming cells (retenate) as well as single cells (filtrate) contained SP cells. Sca1 positive cells were single cell sorted and thereafter the SP population increased with repeated SP analyses. The SP cells were positively labeled with the cell surface-markers CD44 and CD49f (integrin alpha6); however the expression of CD24 was low or negative. The spheroids expressed the transcription factor and stem cell marker Sox2, as well as Oct4. Interestingly, only peripheral cells of the spheroids and single cells were positive for Oct4 expression. SP cells are suggested to correspond to stem cells and in this study, we have enriched for tentative tumor stem-like cells derived from a canine mammary tumor. All the used markers indicate that the studied CMT-U229 cell line contains SP cells, which in particular have cancer stem-like cell characteristics.

  16. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDIES ON SALIVARY GLAND CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, J.; Sirlin, J. L.

    1963-01-01

    Salivary glands were fixed in cold 1 per cent osmium tetroxide in veronal-acetate buffer containing sucrose and embedded in methacrylate mixture or Araldite. The salivary gland nuclei of sciarids show a continuous production of nucleoli, which remain multiple and not consolidated into a single structure. The earliest recognizable nucleoli, which we call "elementary nucleoli," are aggregations of a few paired 40 A fibrils and a few 150 A particles, at many points within chromosome bands. Further development consists of the detachment of the elementary nucleoli from their points of origin and their subsequent mutual coalescence. As a result, dense patches of nucleolar material are formed which become large nucleoli at the surface of chromosomes, either attached to the band or free. The fully formed nucleoli have a characteristic dual structure with a narrow dense periphery and a broader less dense internum. Fibrils and particles are present in both regions, and the difference in density reflects differences in the packing of the two structural elements. The duality in structure is lost in later stages. The nucleolar fibrils appear to be similar to the chromosomal fibrils. The 150 A particles in nucleoli, chromosomes, and nuclear sap seem identical. The significance of these observations is discussed for nucleologenesis in general. PMID:13964284

  17. Stem cells and combinatorial science.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yue Qin; Wong, Wan Qing; Yap, Yan Wen; Orner, Brendan P

    2007-09-01

    Stem cell-based technologies have the potential to help cure a number of cell degenerative diseases. Combinatorial and high throughput screening techniques could provide tools to control and manipulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review chronicles historic and recent progress in the stem cell field involving both pluripotent and multipotent cells, and it highlights relevant cellular signal transduction pathways. This review further describes screens using libraries of soluble, small-molecule ligands, and arrays of molecules immobilized onto surfaces while proposing future trends in similar studies. It is hoped that by reviewing both the stem cell and the relevant high throughput screening literature, this paper can act as a resource to the combinatorial science community.

  18. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Maggie Y.; Lee, Tammy L.; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease. PMID:27764770

  19. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Maggie Y; Lee, Tammy L; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M; Donoghue, Daniel J; Haas, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease.

  20. Replication of Oral BK Virus in Human Salivary Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Madden, Victoria; Hallett, Ryan A.; Gingerich, Aaron D.; Nickeleit, Volker

    2014-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is the most common viral pathogen among allograft patients. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to the human oral compartment and to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). To date, few studies have analyzed orally derived BKPyV. This study aimed to characterize BKPyV isolated from throat wash (TW) samples from HIVSGD patients. The replication potential of HIVSGD-derived clinical isolates HIVSGD-1 and HIVSGD-2, both containing the noncoding control region (NCCR) architecture OPQPQQS, were assessed and compared to urine-derived virus. The BKPyV isolates displayed significant variation in replication potential. Whole-genome alignment of the two isolates revealed three nucleotide differences that were analyzed for a potential effect on the viral life cycle. Analysis revealed a negligible difference in NCCR promoter activity despite sequence variation and emphasized the importance of functional T antigen (Tag) for efficient replication. HIVSGD-1 encoded full-length Tag, underwent productive infection in both human salivary gland cells and kidney cells, and expressed viral DNA and Tag protein. Additionally, HIVSGD-1 generated DNase-resistant particles and by far surpassed the replication potential of the kidney-derived isolate in HSG cells. HIVSGD-2 encoded a truncated form of Tag and replicated much less efficiently. Quantitation of infectious virus, via the fluorescent forming unit assay, suggested that HIVSGD BKPyV had preferential tropism for salivary gland cells over kidney cells. Similarly, the results suggested that kidney-derived virus had preferential tropism for kidney cells over salivary gland cells. Evidence of HIVSGD-derived BKPyV oral tropism and adept viral replication in human salivary gland cells corroborated the potential link between HIVSGD pathogenesis and BKPyV. PMID:24173219

  1. Stem Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The lung is composed of two major anatomically distinct regions—the conducting airways and gas-exchanging airspaces. From a cell biology standpoint, the conducting airways can be further divided into two major compartments, the tracheobronchial and bronchiolar airways, while the alveolar regions of the lung make up the gas-exchanging airspaces. Each of these regions consists of distinct epithelial cell types with unique cellular physiologies and stem cell compartments. This chapter focuses on model systems with which to study stem cells in the adult tracheobronchial airways, also referred to as the proximal airway of the lung. Important in such models is an appreciation for the diversity of stem cell niches in the conducting airways that provide localized environmental signals to both maintain and mobilize stem cells in the setting of airway injury and normal cellular turnover. Because cellular turnover in airways is relatively slow, methods for analysis of stem cells in vivo have required prior injury to the lung. In contrast, ex vivo and in vitro models for analysis of airway stem cells have used genetic markers to track lineage relationships together with reconstitution systems that mimic airway biology. Over the past decades, several widely acceptable methods have been developed and used in the characterization of adult airway stem/ progenitor cells. These include localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), retroviral tagging of epithelial cells seeded into xenografts, air–liquid interface cultures to track clonal proliferative potential, and multiple transgenic mouse models. This chapter reviews the biologic context and use of these models while providing detailed methods for several of the more broadly useful models for studying adult airway stem/progenitor cell types. PMID:17141060

  2. Dental stem cells and their sources.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, Christine M; Botero, Tatiana M

    2012-07-01

    The search for more accessible mesenchymal stem cells than those found in bone marrow has propelled interest in dental tissues. Human dental stem/progenitor cells (collectively termed dental stem cells [DSCs]) that have been isolated and characterized include dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. Common characteristics of these cell populations are the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. In vitro and animal studies have shown that DSCs can differentiate into osseous, odontogenic, adipose, endothelial, and neural-like tissues.

  3. Identification of Regulatory Factors for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Salivary Epithelial Cells in a Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun-Jong; Koh, Jin; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Chen, Sixue; Cha, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Sjögren’s syndrome or head and neck cancer patients who have undergone radiation therapy suffer from severe dry mouth (xerostomia) due to salivary exocrine cell death. Regeneration of the salivary glands requires a better understanding of regulatory mechanisms by which stem cells differentiate into exocrine cells. In our study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with primary salivary epithelial cells from C57BL/6 mice. Co-cultured bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells clearly resembled salivary epithelial cells, as confirmed by strong expression of salivary gland epithelial cell-specific markers, such as alpha-amylase, muscarinic type 3 receptor, aquaporin-5, and cytokeratin 19. To identify regulatory factors involved in this differentiation, transdifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells were analyzed temporarily by two-dimensional-gel-electrophoresis, which detected 58 protein spots (>1.5 fold change, p<0.05) that were further categorized into 12 temporal expression patterns. Of those proteins only induced in differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, ankryin-repeat-domain-containing-protein 56, high-mobility-group-protein 20B, and transcription factor E2a were selected as putative regulatory factors for mesenchymal stem cell transdifferentiation based on putative roles in salivary gland development. Induction of these molecules was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blotting on separate sets of co-cultured mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify differentially expressed proteins that are implicated in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into salivary gland epithelial cells. Further investigation to elucidate regulatory roles of these three transcription factors in mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming will provide a critical foundation for a novel cell-based regenerative therapy for patients with xerostomia. PMID:25402494

  4. Modeling Stem Cell Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv S.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of stem cell myogenesis (transformation into skeletal muscle cells) includes several stages characterized by the expression of certain combinations of myogenic factors. The first part of this process is accompanied by cell division, while the second part is mainly associated with direct differentiation. The mechanical cues are known to enhance stem cell myogenesis, and the paper focuses on the stem cell differentiation under the condition of externally applied strain. The process of stem cell myogenic differentiation is interpreted as the interplay among transcription factors, targeted proteins and strain-generated signaling molecule, and it is described by a kinetic multi-stage model. The model parameters are optimally adjusted by using the available data from the experiment with adipose-derived stem cells subjected to the application of cyclic uniaxial strains of the magnitude of 10%. The modeling results predict the kinetics of the process of myogenic differentiation, including the number of cells in each stage of differentiation and the rates of differentiation from one stage to another for different strains from 4% to 16%. The developed model can help better understand the process of myogenic differentiation and the effects of mechanical cues on stem cell use in muscle therapies. PMID:28106095

  5. Mist1 Expressing Gastric Stem Cells Maintain the Normal and Neoplastic Gastric Epithelium and Are Supported by a Perivascular Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Stancikova, Jitka; Sakitani, Kosuke; Asfaha, Samuel; Renz, Bernhard W; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida A; Shibata, Wataru; Wang, Hongshan; Westphalen, Christoph B; Chen, Xiaowei; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Kim, Woosook; Khurana, Shradha S; Tailor, Yagnesh; Nagar, Karan; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D; Saha, Subhrajit; Ding, Lei; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G; Friedman, Richard A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Worthley, Daniel L; Korinek, Vladimir; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-12-14

    The regulation and stem cell origin of normal and neoplastic gastric glands are uncertain. Here, we show that Mist1 expression marks quiescent stem cells in the gastric corpus isthmus. Mist1(+) stem cells serve as a cell-of-origin for intestinal-type cancer with the combination of Kras and Apc mutation and for diffuse-type cancer with the loss of E-cadherin. Diffuse-type cancer development is dependent on inflammation mediated by Cxcl12(+) endothelial cells and Cxcr4(+) gastric innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). These cells form the perivascular gastric stem cell niche, and Wnt5a produced from ILCs activates RhoA to inhibit anoikis in the E-cadherin-depleted cells. Targeting Cxcr4, ILCs, or Wnt5a inhibits diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis, providing targets within the neoplastic gastric stem cell niche.

  6. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  7. Stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun

    2007-06-01

    The aim of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease is to reconstruct nigro-striatal neuronal pathways using endogenous neural stem/precursor cells or grafted dopaminergic neurons. As an alternative, transplantation of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons into the striatum has been attempted, with the aim of stimulating local synapse formation and/or release of dopamine and cytokines from grafted cells. Candidate stem cells include neural stem/precursor cells, embryonic stem cells and other stem/precursor cells. Among these, embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that proliferate extensively, making them a good potential donor source for transplantation. However, tumor formation and ethical issues present major problems for embryonic stem cell therapy. This review describes the current status of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease, as well as future research approaches from a clinical perspective.

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of anterior pituitary hormones in S-100 protein-positive cells in the rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yatabe, Megumi; Tando, Yukiko; Yashiro, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In the anterior and intermediate lobes of the rat pituitary gland, non-hormone-producing cells that express S-100 protein coexist with various types of hormone-producing cells and are believed to function as phagocytes, supporting and paracrine-controlling cells of hormone-producing cells and stem cells, among other functions; however, their cytological characteristics are not yet fully understood. Using a transgenic rat that expresses green fluorescent protein under the promoter of the S100β protein gene, we immunohistochemically detected expression of the luteinizing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone and proopiomelanocortin by S-100 protein-positive cells located between clusters of hormone-producing cells in the intermediate lobe. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that S-100 protein-positive cells are capable of differentiating into hormone-producing cells in the adult rat pituitary gland.

  9. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neural cancer stem cells inside the tumour. The study is divided into three phases: removal of tumoral specimens in different areas of the tumour (centre, periphery, marginal zone) in an operative room equipped with a 1.5 T scanner; isolation and characterization of neural cancer stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme; identification of neural cancer stem cell distribution inside the tumour. PMID:24750704

  10. Stem cells, tissue engineering and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the clinical utility of stem cells in periodontal regeneration by reviewing relevant literature that assesses the periodontal-regenerative potential of stem cells. We consider and describe the main stem cell populations that have been utilized with regard to periodontal regeneration, including bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the main dental-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations: periodontal ligament stem cells, dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle precursor cells. Research into the use of stem cells for tissue regeneration has the potential to significantly influence periodontal treatment strategies in the future.

  11. [Progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Zhu, He; Hao, Jie; Zhou, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all types of cells in the body and therefore have great application potential in regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. In recent years, stem cell technology has made great progress, and induced pluripotent stem cell technology revolutionizes the whole stem cell field. At the same time, stem cell research in our country has also achieved great progress and becomes an indispensable power in the worldwide stem cell research field. This review mainly focuses on the research progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine in our country since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, including induced pluripotent stem cells, transdifferentiation, haploid stem cells, and new gene editing tools.

  12. Tracking stem cells in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chemaly, Elie R; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Frangioni, John V; Hajjar, Roger J

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells are a promising approach to cardiovascular therapeutics. Animal experiments have assessed the fate of injected stem cells through ex vivo methods on sacrificed animals. Approaches are needed for in vivo tracking of stem cells. Various imaging techniques and contrast agents for stem cell tracking will be reviewed.

  13. Melatonin as a promising agent of regulating stem cell biology and its application in disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Simon; Li, Yuan; Liu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Stem cells have emerged as an important approach to repair and regenerate damaged tissues or organs and show great therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. However, the low survival of engrafted stem cells still remains a major challenge for stem cell therapy. As a major hormone from the pineal gland, melatonin has been shown to play an important role in regulating the physiological and pathological functions of stem cells, such as promoting proliferation, migration and differentiation. Thus, melatonin combined with stem cell transplantation displayed promising application potential in neurodegenerative diseases, liver cirrhosis, wound healing, myocardial infarction, kidney ischemia injury, osteoporosis, etc. It exerts its physiological and pathological functions through its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptosis and anti-ageing properties. Here, we summarize recent advances on exploring the biological role of melatonin in stem cells, and discuss its potential applications in stem cell-based therapy.

  14. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  15. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing.

  16. Stem cell potential of the mammalian gonad

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Feng; Barsoum, Ivraym; Gupta, Rupesh; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Yao, Humphrey Hung-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential for therapeutic application because of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into different cell types. Gonads, which consist of somatic cells and germ cells, are the only organs capable of transmitting genetic materials to the offspring. Germ-line stem cells and somatic stem cells have been found in the testis; however, the presence of stem cells in the ovary remains controversial. In this review, we discuss studies focusing on whether stem cell properties are present in the different cell types of male and female gonads and their implications on stem cell research. PMID:19482665

  17. Transneuronal retrograde viral labeling in the brain stem and hypothalamus is more intense from the left than from the right adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Ida E; Wiesel, Ory; Tóth, Dorina E; Boldogkoi, Zsolt; Halász, Béla; Gerendai, Ida

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies using the viral transneuronal tracing technique demonstrated central autonomic circuits involved in the innervation of the adrenal gland. Since increasing number of data indicate laterality in the neuroendocrine system, we aimed to investigate whether the supraspinal innervation of the adrenal gland exhibits asymmetry or not. The central circuitry involved in the innervation of the left and the right adrenal gland was studied in individual rats by dual transneuronal tracing using isogenic recombinant strains (Ba-DupGreen and Ba-Duplac expressing lacZ) of Bartha strain of pseudorabies virus. Viral infection of brain nuclei (dorsal vagal nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, caudal raphe nuclei, A5 cell group, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus) from the left adrenal was more severe than that from the right organ. Dual-infected neurons were present both in the brain stem and in the hypothalamus. The results indicate a predominance in the supraspinal innervation of the left adrenal gland, and that each adrenal gland is innervated both by side-specific neurons and by neurons that project to both organs.

  18. Stem cell applications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and the World Health Organization (WHO) expects that the number of diabetic patients will increase to 300 million by the year 2025. Patients with diabetes experience decreased insulin secretion that is linked to a significant reduction in the number of islet cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology that, in addition to β cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β cell de-differentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. The success achieved over the last few years with islet transplantation suggests that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient β cells. These observations are proof of the concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes or other diseases not only by cell transplantation but also by stem cells. An increasing body of evidence indicates that, in addition to embryonic stem cells, several potential adult stem/progenitor cells derived from the pancreas, liver, spleen, and bone marrow could differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro or in vivo. However, significant controversy currently exists in this field. Pharmacological approaches aimed at stimulating the in vivo/ex vivo regeneration of β cells have been proposed as a way of augmenting islet cell mass. Overexpression of embryonic transcription factors in stem cells could efficiently induce their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. A new technology, known as protein transduction, facilitates the differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Recent progress in the search for new sources of β cells has opened up several possibilities for the development of new treatments for diabetes.

  19. Separation of cells from the rat anterior pituitary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Hatfield, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Data concerned with analyzing the cellular organization of the rat anterior pituitary gland are examined. The preparation of the cell suspensions and the methods used to separate pituitary cell types are described. Particular emphasis is given to velocity sedimentation at unit gravity, density gradient centrifugation, affinity methods, fluorescence activated cell sorting, and density gradient and continuous-flow electrophoresis. The difficulties encountered when attempting to compare data from different pituitary cell separation studies are discussed, and results from various experiments are presented. The functional capabilities of the separated cell populations can be tested in various culture systems.

  20. Normal adrenal glands in small cell lung carcinoma: CT-guided biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.

    1983-05-01

    Twenty-four small cell lung carcinoma patients with morphologically normal adrenal glands by computed tomographic (CT) criteria underwent percutaneous thin-needle biopsy of their adrenal glands. Of 43 glands biopsied, 29 had adequate cellular material for interpretation. Five (17%) of the 29 glands were positive for metastases; the rest had negative biopsies. This series indicates an approximate 17% false-negative diagnosis rate by CT when staging the adrenal glands in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. It also demonstrates the utility of percutaneous needle biopsy as an investigational tool to further evaluate normal-sized adrenal glands in the oncologic patient.

  1. Basal epithelial cells of human prostate gland are not myoepithelial cells. A comparative immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study with the human salivary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Srigley, J. R.; Dardick, I.; Hartwick, R. W.; Klotz, L.

    1990-01-01

    The hypothesis that basal epithelial cells of the human prostate are of myoepithelial origin was investigated using immunohistochemical and ultrastructural methodologies. The immunohistologic analyses show significant phenotypic differences between prostatic basal cells and myoepithelial cells of the salivary gland. Although both cell types stain intensely with the 312C8-1 monoclonal antibody, only true myoepithelial cells demonstrated significant amounts of muscle-specific actin as decorated by the HHF35 monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, using double-labeling experiments, the prostatic basal cells were strongly decorated with a fluorescein-tagged basal cell-specific keratin but were negative with the rhodamine-tagged phalloidin, a chemical that binds specifically to actin microfilaments. Ultrastructural studies also showed an absence of thin microfilament bundles, dense bodies, and micropinocytotic vesicles in the prostatic basal cells. The current investigations show that the prostatic acini do not have a basal myoepithelium. Although some authors have suggested a stem cell role for prostatic basal cells, the weight of experimental work argues against this hypothesis. The exact role of the basal epithelial cells of the prostate is not known, although they may serve endocrine, paracrine, or other regulatory functions and may be involved in modulating signals between prostatic stroma and epithelium. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1691595

  2. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-07

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells.

  3. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  4. Stem cells in pediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranali; Mital, Seema

    2013-10-01

    The ability to reprogram virtually any cell of human origin to behave like embryonic or pluripotent stem cells is a major breakthrough in stem cell biology. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provide a unique opportunity to study "disease in a dish" within a defined genetic and environmental background. Patient-derived iPSCs have been successfully used to model cardiomyopathies, rhythm disorders and vascular disorders. They also provide an exciting opportunity for drug discovery and drug repurposing for disorders with a known molecular basis including childhood onset heart disease, particularly cardiac genetic disorders. The review will discuss their use in drug discovery, efficacy and toxicity studies with emphasis on challenges in pediatric-focused drug discovery. Issues that will need to be addressed in the coming years include development of maturation protocols for iPSC-derived cardiac lineages, use of iPSCs to study not just cardiac but extra-cardiac phenotypes in the same patient, scaling up of stem cell platforms for high-throughput drug screens, translating drug testing results to clinical applications in the paradigm of personalized medicine, and improving both the efficiency and the safety of iPSC-derived lineages for future stem cell therapies.

  5. Ascl3 marks adult progenitor cells of the mouse salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Rugel-Stahl, Anastasia; Elliot, Marilyn; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    The Ascl3 transcription factor marks a subset of salivary gland duct cells present in the three major salivary glands of the mouse. In vivo, these cells generate both duct and secretory acinar cell descendants. Here, we have analyzed whether Ascl3-expressing cells retain this multipotent lineage potential in adult glands. Cells isolated from mouse salivary glands were cultured in vitro as non-adherent spheres. Lineage tracing of the Ascl3-expressing cells within the spheres demonstrates that Ascl3+ cells isolated from adult glands remain multipotent, generating both duct and acinar cell types in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the progenitor cells characterized by Keratin 5 expression are an independent population from Ascl3+ progenitor cells. We conclude that the Ascl3+ cells are intermediate lineage-restricted progenitor cells of the adult salivary glands. PMID:22370009

  6. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  7. [Therapeutic use of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-15

    Stem cells display important capacities of self renewing, proliferation and differentiation. Because those present in the embryo have the more remarkable properties, their potential use in the therapy of until now incurable degenerative diseases have been envisioned. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are located in the inner mass of the balstocyst at early stages of the development. Even in long-term cultures they still retain their undifferentiated features. Under specific culture conditions, ES cells can be committed into a variety of differentiation pathways, giving rise to large amounts of cells corresponding to different tissues (neurones, cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, etc.). However, producing these tissues from already established ES cell lines would lead to immune rejection when transplanted to patients. To prevent this pitfall and using the expertise accumulated by animal cloning by nucleus transfer, it has been proposed to adapt this technique to human ES cells. The therapeutic cloning consists in transferring the nucleus of somatic stem cells isolated from the patient into an enucleated oocyte, to allow blastocyst development from which ES cells will be derived. From these stem cells, compatible tissues will be then produced. The problem is that it is in theoretically possible to reimplant the cloned blastocyst into a surrogate mother for obtaining a baby genetically identical to the donor. This is called reproductive cloning. This worrying risk raises important ethic and legal questions.

  8. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  9. Comparison of proliferating cells between human adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Hong; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Gang

    2008-04-01

    Studies of sweat glands had demonstrated that there were degenerating cells and proliferating cells in the eccrine sweat glands. To compare the differences in the proliferating cells between human adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands, immunostaining of proliferating-associated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67 nuclear antigen (Ki67) was performed, and the location and the percentage of the positive staining cells were analyzed. The results showed that a few cells of the secretory and ductal portion in both the adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands stained positive with Ki67 and PCNA. The labeling index of PCNA in adult eccrine sweat glands was 34.71 +/- 8.37%, while that in the fetal was 62.72 +/- 6.54%. The labeling index of PCNA in fetal eccrine sweat glands was higher than that in adult. Myoepithelial cells were negative staining with anti-PCNA antibody in adult eccrine sweat glands, while in the fetal a few myoepithelial cells were positive staining. Labeling index of Ki67 in adult eccrine sweat glands was similar to that in the fetal, ranging from 0.5 to 4.3%. Myoepithelial cells of the adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands both were negative staining with anti-Ki67 antibody. We concluded that the myoepithelial cells had proliferating ability only in fetal eccrine sweat glands, and that the proliferating ability of fetal eccrine sweat glands was stronger than that of the adult.

  10. Stem cells' exodus: a journey to immortality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-28

    Stem cell niches provide a regulatory microenvironment that retains stem cells and promotes self-renewal. Recently in Developmental Cell, Rinkevich et al. (2013) showed that cell islands (CIs) of Botryllus schlosseri, a colonial chordate, provide niches for maintaining cycling stem cells that migrate from degenerated CIs to newly formed buds.

  11. Stem-cell ecology and stem cells in motion

    PubMed Central

    Scadden, David T.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights major scientific developments over the past 50 years or so in concepts related to stem-cell ecology and to stem cells in motion. Many thorough and eloquent reviews have been presented in the last 5 years updating progress in these issues. Some paradigms have been challenged, others validated, or new ones brought to light. In the present review, we will confine our remarks to the historical development of progress. In doing so, we will refrain from a detailed analysis of controversial data, emphasizing instead widely accepted views and some challenging novel ones. PMID:18398055

  12. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. PMID:26516408

  13. Introduction to stem cells and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kolios, George; Moodley, Yuben

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are a population of undifferentiated cells characterized by the ability to extensively proliferate (self-renewal), usually arise from a single cell (clonal), and differentiate into different types of cells and tissue (potent). There are several sources of stem cells with varying potencies. Pluripotent cells are embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of the embryo and induced pluripotent cells are formed following reprogramming of somatic cells. Pluripotent cells can differentiate into tissue from all 3 germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). Multipotent stem cells may differentiate into tissue derived from a single germ layer such as mesenchymal stem cells which form adipose tissue, bone, and cartilage. Tissue-resident stem cells are oligopotent since they can form terminally differentiated cells of a specific tissue. Stem cells can be used in cellular therapy to replace damaged cells or to regenerate organs. In addition, stem cells have expanded our understanding of development as well as the pathogenesis of disease. Disease-specific cell lines can also be propagated and used in drug development. Despite the significant advances in stem cell biology, issues such as ethical controversies with embryonic stem cells, tumor formation, and rejection limit their utility. However, many of these limitations are being bypassed and this could lead to major advances in the management of disease. This review is an introduction to the world of stem cells and discusses their definition, origin, and classification, as well as applications of these cells in regenerative medicine.

  14. Multipotent Stem Cell and Current Application.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Aligholi; Khanlarkhani, Neda; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Najafi, Atefeh; Mehdinejadiani, Shayesteh; Sargolzaei Aval, Fereydoon

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing and undifferentiated cell types that can be differentiate into functional cells. Stem cells can be classified into two main types based on their source of origin: Embryonic and Adult stem cells. Stem cells also classified based on the range of differentiation potentials into Totipotent, Pluripotent, Multipotent, and Unipotent. Multipotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types within one particular lineage. There are plentiful advantages and usages for multipotent stem cells. Multipotent Stem cells act as a significant key in procedure of development, tissue repair, and protection. Multipotent Stem cells have been applying in treatment of different disorders such as spinal cord injury, bone fracture, autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, hematopoietic defects, and fertility preservation.

  15. Stem cell cultivation in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, Maria Margarida; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have generated great interest in the scientific and medical communities, and stem cells in particular are very appealing for regenerative medicine, drug screening and other biomedical applications. These unspecialized cells have unlimited self-renewal capacity and the remarkable ability to produce mature cells with specialized functions, such as blood cells, nerve cells or cardiac muscle. However, the actual number of cells that can be obtained from available donors is very low. One possible solution for the generation of relevant numbers of cells for several applications is to scale-up the culture of these cells in vitro. This review describes recent developments in the cultivation of stem cells in bioreactors, particularly considerations regarding critical culture parameters, possible bioreactor configurations, and integration of novel technologies in the bioprocess development stage. We expect that this review will provide updated and detailed information focusing on the systematic production of stem cell products in compliance with regulatory guidelines, while using robust and cost-effective approaches.

  16. Stem cells in orthopaedics and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alwattar, Basil J; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell application is a burgeoning field of medicine that is likely to influence the future of orthopaedic surgery. Stem cells are associated with great promise and great controversy. For the orthopaedic surgeon, stem cells may change the way that orthopaedic surgery is practiced and the overall approach of the treatment of musculoskeletal disease. Stem cells may change the field of orthopaedics from a field dominated by surgical replacements and reconstructions to a field of regeneration and prevention. This review will introduce the basic concepts of stem cells pertinent to the orthopaedic surgeon and proceed with a more in depth discussion of current developments in the study of stem cells in fracture healing.

  17. Clear-Cell (Reticulated) Transformation of Eyelid Eccrine Sweat Glands.

    PubMed

    Jakobiec, Frederick A; Stagner, Anna M; Lee, Nahyoung Grace

    2016-07-21

    A 24-year-old man with a painful, recurrent left upper eyelid nodule underwent an excision. Histopathologic evaluation disclosed a granulomatous process, most likely in response to a ruptured epidermoid cyst. In the vicinity of the nodule were multiple eccrine sweat glands displaying a curious clear-cell appearance in the adlumenal cells, the first example of such a phenomenon in the eyelids. Alcian blue, periodic acid Schiff, and documented staining failed to disclose, respectively, any cytoplasmic mucosubstances, glycogen accumulation, or lipid in the adlumenal secretory cells. Cytokeratin 7 immunostained the adlumenal cells of the eccrine secretory coil, while cytokeratin 5/6 stained the ablumenal myoepithelial and ductular cells. Gross cystic disease fluid protein 15, normally demonstrable in the eccrine secretory cells, was not detectable. Clear-cell transformation should not be confused with syringoma of the lower eyelids, in which glycogen is responsible for the ablumenal clear-cell change.

  18. S100β-Positive Cells of Mesenchymal Origin Reside in the Anterior Lobe of the Embryonic Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Saishu; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kanno, Naoko; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Hiroto; Kato, Takako; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary gland develop through invagination of the oral ectoderm and as they are endocrine tissues, they participate in the maintenance of vital functions via the synthesis and secretion of numerous hormones. We recently observed that several extrapituitary cells invade the anterior lobe of the developing pituitary gland. This raised the question of the origin(s) of these S100β-positive cells, which are not classic endocrine cells but instead comprise a heterogeneous cell population with plural roles, especially as stem/progenitor cells. To better understand the roles of these S100β-positive cells, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using several markers in S100β/GFP-TG rats, which express GFP in S100β-expressing cells under control of the S100β promoter. GFP-positive cells were present as mesenchymal cells surrounding the developing pituitary gland and at Atwell's recess but were not present in the anterior lobe on embryonic day 15.5. These cells were negative for SOX2, a pituitary stem/progenitor marker, and PRRX1, a mesenchyme and pituitary stem/progenitor marker. However, three days later, GFP-positive and PRRX1-positive (but SOX2-negative) cells were observed in the parenchyma of the anterior lobe. Furthermore, some GFP-positive cells were positive for vimentin, p75, isolectin B4, DESMIN, and Ki67. These data suggest that S100β-positive cells of extrapituitary origin invade the anterior lobe, undergoing proliferation and diverse transformation during pituitary organogenesis. PMID:27695124

  19. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  20. Adult stem cell therapy: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Moraleda, Jose M; Blanquer, Miguel; Bleda, Patricia; Iniesta, Paqui; Ruiz, Francisco; Bonilla, Sonia; Cabanes, Carmen; Tabares, Lucía; Martinez, Salvador

    2006-12-01

    Adult stem cells may be an invaluable source of plastic cells for tissue regeneration. The bone marrow contains different subpopulations of adult stem cells easily accessible for transplantation. However the therapeutic value of adult stem cell is a question of debate in the scientific community. We have investigated the potential benefits of adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of demyelinating and motor neuron diseases. Our results suggest that transplantation of HSC have direct and indirect neuroregenerative and neuroprotective effects.

  1. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  2. Emerging molecular approaches in stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Jaishankar, Amritha; Vrana, Kent

    2009-04-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple adult cell types. Although substantial progress has been made over the last decade in understanding stem cell biology, recent technological advances in molecular and systems biology may hold the key to unraveling the mystery behind stem cell self-renewal and plasticity. The most notable of these advances is the ability to generate induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of molecular similarities and differences among various stem cell types. Moreover, we survey the current state of systems biology and forecast future needs and direction in the stem cell field.

  3. Three-dimensional culture of sebaceous gland cells revealing the role of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-induced activation of canonical Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Go J. Saya, Hideyuki

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Three-dimensional culture generates “semi-vivo” sebaceous glands. •Xenograft model failed to mimic the biology of sebaceous glands in vivo. •Proinflammatory cytokine PGE{sub 2} enhances Wnt signal activity in the organoids. •PGE{sub 2} influences on the mitochondrial and lipid metabolism in the organoids. •Considering 3R agenda, “semi-vivo” sebaceous glands are useful for research. -- Abstract: Background: Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) is a proinflammatory mediator and activates the canonical Wnt–β-catenin signaling pathway in hematopoietic stem cells. The SZ95 cell line was established from human sebaceous gland cells and is studied as a model system for these cells. Given that 2D culture of SZ95 cells does not recapitulate the organization of sebaceous glands in situ, we developed a 3D culture system for these cells and examined the effects of PGE{sub 2} on cell morphology and function. Results: SZ95 cells maintained in 3D culture formed organoids that mimicked the organization of sebaceous glands in situ, including the establishment of a basement membrane. Organoids exposed to PGE{sub 2} were larger and adopted a more complex organization compared with control organoids. PGE{sub 2} activated the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as well as increased cell viability and proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism, and lipid synthesis in the organoids. Conclusions: Culture of SZ95 cells in 3D culture system recapitulates the structure and susceptibility to PGE{sub 2} of sebaceous glands in situ and should prove useful for studies of the response of these glands to inflammation and other environmental stressors. Our results also implicate PGE{sub 2}-induced activation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in regulation of the morphology,proliferation, and function of “semi-vivo” sebaceous glands.

  4. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Parekkadan, Biju; Milwid, Jack M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are being clinically explored as a new therapeutic for treating a variety of immune-mediated diseases. First heralded as a regenerative therapy for skeletal tissue repair, MSCs have recently been shown to modulate endogenous tissue and immune cells. Preclinical studies of the mechanism of action suggest that the therapeutic effects afforded by MSC transplantation are short-lived and related to dynamic, paracrine interactions between MSCs and host cells. Therefore, representations of MSCs as drug-loaded particles may allow for pharmacokinetic models to predict the therapeutic activity of MSC transplants as a function of drug delivery mode. By integrating principles of MSC biology, therapy, and engineering, the field is armed to usher in the next generation of stem cell therapeutics. PMID:20415588

  6. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Booker, Evan; Kalathur, Madhuri; Rodewald, Rose; Lipianskaya, Julia; La, Justin; He, Marielle; Wright, Tracy; Klemke, Richard; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Gray, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers. PMID:24749068

  7. Separation of cells from the rat anterior pituitary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Hatfield, J. Michael

    1983-01-01

    Various techniques for separating the hormone-producing cell types from the rat anterior pituitary gland are examined. The purity, viability, and responsiveness of the separated cells depend on the physiological state of the donor, the tissue dissociation procedures, the staining technique used for identification of cell type, and the cell separation technique. The chamber-gradient setup and operation, the characteristics of the gradient materials, and the separated cell analysis of velocity sedimentation techniques (in particular Staput and Celsep) are described. Consideration is given to the various types of materials used in density gradient centrifugation and the operation of a gradient generating device. The use of electrophoresis to separate rat pituitary cells is discussed.

  8. Ethics and Governance of Stem Cell Banks.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Donald; Rathjen, Peter; Rathjen, Joy; Nicol, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines the ethical principles and governance frameworks for stem cell banks. Good governance of stem cell banks should balance facilitation of the clinical use of stem cells with the proper respect and protection of stem cell sample providers and stem cell recipients and ensure compliance with national regulatory requirements to foster public trust in the use of stem cell technology. Stem cell banks must develop with regard to the science, the needs of scientists, and the requirements of the public, which will benefit from this science. Given the international reach of this promising research and its clinical application, it is necessary for stem cell bank governance frameworks to be harmonized across jurisdictions.

  9. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... Considering becoming a bone marrow or a blood stem cell donor? View this video on YouTube. Follow a ...

  10. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  11. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  12. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. s-SHIP promoter expression marks activated stem cells in developing mouse mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lixia; Rohrschneider, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) play critical roles in normal development and perhaps tumorigenesis of the mammary gland. Using combined cell markers, adult MaSCs have been enriched in a basal cell population, but the exact identity of MaSCs remains unknown. We used the s-SHIP promoter to tag presumptive stem cells with GFP in the embryos of a transgenic mouse model. Here we show, in postnatal mammary gland development, that GFP+ cap cells in puberty and basal alveolar bud cells in pregnancy each exhibit self-renewal and regenerative capabilities for all mammary epithelial cells of a new functional mammary gland upon transplantation. Single GFP+ cells can regenerate the mammary epithelial network. GFP+ mammary epithelial cells are p63+, CD24mod, CD49fhigh, and CD29high; are actively proliferating; and express s-SHIP mRNA. Overall, our results identify the activated MaSC population in vivo at the forefront of rapidly developing terminal end buds (puberty) and alveolar buds (pregnancy) in the mammary gland. In addition, GFP+ basal cells are expanded in MMTV-Wnt1 breast tumors but not in ErbB2 tumors. These results enable MaSC in situ identification and isolation via a consistent single parameter using a new mouse model with applications for further analyses of normal and potential cancer stem cells. PMID:20810647

  14. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative for limbal deficiency were analyzed. Risk factors, clinical findings and sequelae were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight eyes of six patients with stem cell deficiency not secondary to a known diagnosis were described. All eyes had prior ocular surgery involving the corneoscleral limbus. Six eyes had been on chronic topical medications and all eyes had concurrent external disease such as pterygium, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, rosacea or herpes simplex virus keratitis. All eyes had superior quadrants affected corresponding to areas of prior limbal surgery. Sequelae of disease included corneal scarring and neo-vascularization, and five eyes had with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. CONCLUSIONS: Because the epitheliopathy started peripherally and extended centrally in all patients, we feel it represents a stem cell deficiency. The fact that all patients were affected superiorly, at sites of a prior limbal surgical incision, points to surgical trauma to the SC as the likely major etiologic factor for the deficiency. The surgical trauma to the limbal SC probably made these cells more susceptible to damage from other external disease influences and toxicity from chronic topical medications. Because the stem cell deficiency is secondary to prior ocular surgery and chronic topical medications, we propose the term "iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency". Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B PMID:9440165

  15. Modeling Stem Cell Induction Processes

    PubMed Central

    Grácio, Filipe; Cabral, Joaquim; Tidor, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Technology for converting human cells to pluripotent stem cell using induction processes has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However, the production of these so called iPS cells is still quite inefficient and may be dominated by stochastic effects. In this work we build mass-action models of the core regulatory elements controlling stem cell induction and maintenance. The models include not only the network of transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, but also important epigenetic regulatory features of DNA methylation and histone modification. We show that the network topology reported in the literature is consistent with the observed experimental behavior of bistability and inducibility. Based on simulations of stem cell generation protocols, and in particular focusing on changes in epigenetic cellular states, we show that cooperative and independent reaction mechanisms have experimentally identifiable differences in the dynamics of reprogramming, and we analyze such differences and their biological basis. It had been argued that stochastic and elite models of stem cell generation represent distinct fundamental mechanisms. Work presented here suggests an alternative possibility that they represent differences in the amount of information we have about the distribution of cellular states before and during reprogramming protocols. We show further that unpredictability and variation in reprogramming decreases as the cell progresses along the induction process, and that identifiable groups of cells with elite-seeming behavior can come about by a stochastic process. Finally we show how different mechanisms and kinetic properties impact the prospects of improving the efficiency of iPS cell generation protocols. PMID:23667423

  16. Quantifying Lgr5-positive stem cell behaviour in the pyloric epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Leushacke, Marc; Barker, Nick; Pin, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Using in-vivo lineage tracing data we quantified clonal expansion as well as proliferation and differentiation of the Lgr5-positive stem cell population in pyloric gastric glands. Fitting clone expansion models, we estimated that there are five effective Lgr5-positive cells able to give rise to monoclonal glands by replacing each other following a pattern of neutral drift dynamics. This analysis is instrumental to assess stem cell performance; however, stem cell proliferation is not quantified by clone expansion analysis. We identified a suitable mathematical model to quantify proliferation and differentiation of the Lgr5-positive population. As expected for populations in steady-state, the proliferation rate of the Lgr5-positive population was equal to its rate of differentiation. This rate was significantly faster than the rate at which effective cells are replaced, estimated by modelling clone expansion/contraction. This suggests that the majority of Lgr5-positive cell divisions serve to renew epithelial cells and only few result in the effective replacement of a neighbour to effect expansion to the entire gland. The application of the model under altered situations with uncoupled differentiation and proliferation was demonstrated. This methodology represents a valuable tool for quantifying stem cell performance in homeostasis and importantly for deciphering altered stem cell behaviour in disease. PMID:26916214

  17. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    PubMed

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  18. Stem cells in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soler, María José; José Tomas, Ortiz-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Circulating bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seem to play a crucial role in both vasculogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Chronic kidney disease is a state of endothelial dysfunction, accelerated progression of atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular risk. As a consequence, cardiovascular disorders are the main cause of death in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It has been shown that patients with advanced renal failure have decreased number of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells and impaired EPCs function. Moreover, in kidney transplant patients, renal graft function significantly correlated with EPC number. The reduced number of EPCs in patients with ESRD has been ascribed to the uremia. Therefore, therapies that improve the uremic status in dialysis patients such as nocturnal hemodialysis are associated with restoration of impaired EPCs number and migratory function. In fact, some of the common treatments for patients with chronic kidney disease such as erythropoietin, statins and angiotensin II receptor antagonist increase the number of EPCs. Nowadays, there is growing evidence indicating that, under pathophysiological conditions, stem cells (SCs) derived from bone marrow are able to migrate in the injured kidney, and they seem to play a role in glomerular and tubular regeneration. After acute tubular renal injury, surviving tubular epithelial cells and putative renal stem cells proliferate and differentiate into tubular epithelial cells to promote structural and functional repair. Moreover, bone marrow stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells can also participate in the repair process by proliferation and differentiation into renal lineages. For instance, mesenchymal SCs have been shown to decrease inflammation and enhance renal regeneration. The administration of ex vivo expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SCs have been proved to be beneficial in various experimental models of acute

  19. An introduction to stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Hemmat, Shirin; Lieberman, David M; Most, Sam P

    2010-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology has undergone tremendous expansion over the past two decades. Scientific investigation has continued to expand our understanding of these complex cells at a rapidly increasing rate. This understanding has produced a vast array of potential clinical applications. This article will serve as an overview of the current state of stem cell research as it applies to scientific and medical applications. Included in the discussion is a review of the many different types of stem cells, including but not limited to adult, embryonic, and perinatal stem cells. Also, this article describes somatic cell nuclear transfer, an exciting technology that allows the production of totipotent stem cells from fully differentiated cells, thereby eliminating the use of embryonic sources. This discussion should serve as a review of the field of stem cell biology and provide a foundation for the reader to better understand the interface of stem cell technology and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  20. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  1. Epidermal stem cells and their epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Jin, Hongchuan; Wang, Xian

    2013-08-30

    Stem cells play an essential role in embryonic development, cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. Tissue homeostasis in adults is maintained by adult stem cells resident in the niches of different tissues. As one kind of adult stem cell, epidermal stem cells have the potential to generate diversified types of progeny cells in the skin. Although its biology is still largely unclarified, epidermal stem cells are widely used in stem cell research and regenerative medicine given its easy accessibility and pluripotency. Despite the same genome, cells within an organism have different fates due to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we will briefly discuss the current understanding of epigenetic modulation in epidermal stem cells.

  2. TGFβ signaling regulates lipogenesis in human sebaceous glands cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands are components of the skin essential for its normal lubrication by the production of sebum. This contributes to skin health and more importantly is crucial for the skin barrier function. A mechanistic understanding of sebaceous gland cells growth and differentiation has lagged behind that for keratinocytes, partly because of a lack of an in vitro model that can be used for experimental manipulation. Methods We have developed an in vitro culture model to isolate and grow primary human sebocytes without transformation that display functional characteristics of sebocytes. We used this novel method to probe the effect of Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) signaling on sebocyte differentiation, by examining the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis upon treatment with TGFβ1. We also repressed TGFβ signaling through knockdown of the TGFβ Receptor II to address if the effect of TGFβ activation is mediated via canonical Smad signal transduction. Results We find that activation of the TGFβ signaling pathway is necessary and sufficient for maintaining sebocytes in an undifferentiated state. The presence of TGFβ ligand triggered decreased expression in genes required for the production of characteristics sebaceous lipids and for sebocyte differentiation such as FADS2 and PPARγ, thereby decreasing lipid accumulation through the TGFβ RII-Smad2 dependent pathway. Conclusion TGFβ signaling plays an essential role in sebaceous gland regulation by maintaining sebocytes in an undifferentiated state. This data was generated using a novel method for human sebocyte culture, which is likely to prove generally useful in investigations of sebaceous gland growth and differentiation. These findings open a new paradigm in human skin biology with important implications for skin therapies. PMID:23343495

  3. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  4. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:27713769

  5. [Cell transplant and regenerative stem cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Prosper, F

    2008-01-01

    The derivation of the first human embryonic stem cell lines as well as the notion of the unexpected plasticity and potential of the adult stem cells has significantly impacted the biomedical research. Many of the tissues long believe to lack any regenerative capacity has demonstrated otherwise. Patients alike physicians expectations for treatment of incurable diseases have also fuelled this field and in occasions have led to unrealistic expectations. In the next pages I review some of the tissue specific stem cells that have been used either in preclinical models or even in clinical research. Despite the effort of numerous investigators, more questions that answers remain in the field of cell therapy and only careful and independent -not biased- research will allow us to translate some of this findings into clinical application.

  6. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  7. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chien, Ke-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone) and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells). The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  8. Stem Cells for Neurovascular Repair in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Dailey, Travis; Tajiri, Naoki; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kim, Dae Won; Pabon, Mibel; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells exert therapeutic effects against ischemic stroke via transplantation of exogenous stem cells or stimulation of endogenous stem cells within the neurogenic niches of subventricular zone and subgranular zone, or recruited from the bone marrow through peripheral circulation. In this paper, we review the different sources of stem cells that have been tested in animal models of stroke. In addition, we discuss specific mechanisms of action, in particular neurovascular repair by endothelial progenitor cells, as key translational research for advancing the clinical applications of stem cells for ischemic stroke. PMID:24077523

  9. Somatic stem cell biology and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Yihan; Li, Dehua; Jin, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Somatic stem cells have been acknowledged for their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types and their capacity for self-renewal. Some mesenchymal stem cells play a dominant role in the repair and reconstruction of periodontal tissues. Both dental-derived and some non-dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells possess the capacity for periodontal regeneration under certain conditions with induced differentiation, proliferation, cellular secretion, and their interactions. Stem cell-based tissue engineering technology promises to bring improvements to periodontal regeneration, biologic tooth repair, and bioengineered implants. The present review discusses the roles and values of various somatic stem cells in periodontal regeneration.

  10. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  11. Mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Hector; Hinck, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development—pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation, and involution—occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone (GH) and estrogen, as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy, the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its prepregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease.

  12. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  13. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  14. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  15. Cytogenetic analysis of myoepithelial cell carcinoma of salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Elisabetta; Pragliola, Antonella; Farnedi, Anna; Betts, Christine M; Cocchi, Roberto; Foschini, Maria P

    2004-01-01

    Myoepithelial cell carcinoma (MCC) of the salivary gland is a rare entity. Here, we describe the karyotype of MCC. The patient was a 53-year-old man, with a rapidly growing lesion of the palate. Despite complete surgical excision, radio- and chemotherapy, the lesion rapidly harboured local and distant metastases leading to the death of the patient, 4 months after the diagnosis. On histological and ultrastructural examination, the primary tumour and the related metastases were composed of oval and spindle cells, with features of myoepithelial cell differentiation reported in the literature. Cytogenetic analysis showed a composite karyotype in the primary tumour: 45-46,XY, +3[cp3]/ 44-45,XY, -17[cp4]/ 46,XY[5]. The lymph-node metastasis was near-triploid and showed a complex karyotype. Our cytogenetic data differ from those described in benign or slowly growing salivary gland tumours showing myoepithelial cell differentiation. It is suggested that highly aggressive tumours might follow a different pathway of malignant transformation.

  16. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  17. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  18. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-11-26

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  19. Bone marrow-derived cells rescue salivary gland function in mice with head and neck irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Yoshinori; Liu, Younan; Khalili, Saeed; Maria, Ola M.; Xia, Dengsheng; Key, Sharon; Cotrim, Ana P.; Mezey, Eva; Tran, Simon D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for most patients with head and neck cancers includes ionizing radiation. A consequence of this treatment is irreversible damage to salivary glands (SGs), which is accompanied by a loss of fluid-secreting acinar-cells and a considerable decrease of saliva output. While there are currently no adequate conventional treatments for this condition, cell-based therapies are receiving increasing attention to regenerate SGs. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) can differentiate into salivary epithelial cells and restore SG function in head and neck irradiated mice. BMDCs from male mice were transplanted into the tail-vein of 18 Gy-irradiated female mice. Salivary output was increased in mice that received BMDCs transplantation at week 8 and 24 post-irradiation. At 24 weeks after irradiation (IR), harvested SGs (submandibular and parotid glands) of BMDC-treated mice had greater weights than those of non-treated mice. Histological analysis shows that SGs of treated mice demonstrated an increased level of tissue regenerative activity such as blood vessel formation and cell proliferation, while apoptotic activity was increased in non-transplanted mice. The expression of stem cell markers (Sca-1 or c-kit) was detected in BMDC-treated SGs. Finally, we detected an increased ratio of acinar-cell area and approximately 9% of Y-chromosome-positive (donor-derived) salivary epithelial cells in BMDC-treated mice. We propose here that cell therapy using BMDCs can rescue the functional damage of irradiated SGs by direct differentiation of donor BMDCs into salivary epithelial cells. PMID:20933096

  20. Stem cell strategies, future and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2003-01-01

    The use of stem cells for neuroreplacement therapy is no longer science fiction--it is science fact. We have succeeded in the development of neural and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation to produce neural cells in the brain. We have seen the improvement of cognitive function in a memory-impaired aged animal model following stem cell transplantation. These results may promise a bright future for stem cell strategies. Before we begin to think about clinical applications beyond the present preclinical studies or even consider the pathophysiological environments of individual diseases, we must address and weigh the factors that may affect stem cell biology. Here, we not only show the potential for therapeutic applications for stem cell strategies in neuropathological conditions, but we also discuss the effects on the biology of stem cells of those factors that are altered under disease conditions.

  1. Endometrial stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Verdi, Javad; Tan, Aaron; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    First described in 2004, endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) are adult stem cells isolated from the endometrial tissue. EnSCs comprise of a population of epithelial stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population stem cells. When secreted in the menstrual blood, they are termed menstrual stem cells or endometrial regenerative cells. Mounting evidence suggests that EnSCs can be utilized in regenerative medicine. EnSCs can be used as immuno-modulatory agents to attenuate inflammation, are implicated in angiogenesis and vascularization during tissue regeneration, and can also be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, EnSCs can be used in tissue engineering applications and there are several clinical trials currently in place to ascertain the therapeutic potential of EnSCs. This review highlights the progress made in EnSC research, describing their mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal potentials both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Stem cells: are we ready for therapy?

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy as a replacement for diseased or destroyed endogenous cells is a major component of regenerative medicine. Various types of stem cells are or will be used in clinical settings as autologous or allogeneic products. In this chapter, the progress that has been made to translate basic stem cell research into pharmaceutical manufacturing processes will be reviewed. Even if in public perception, embryonic stem (ES) cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells dominate the field of regenerative medicine and will be discussed in great detail, it is the adult stem cells that are used for decades as therapeutics. Hence, these cells will be compared to ES and iPS cells. Finally, special emphasis will be placed on the scientific, technical, and economic challenges of developing stem cell-based in vitro model systems and cell therapies that can be commercialized.

  3. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Gong, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI) is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1) improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2) identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3) development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress. PMID:22399855

  4. Embryonic stem cell patents and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2007-09-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells.

  5. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  6. Stem cell maintenance in a different niche

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Lee, Seung Tae

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the difficulty of controlling stem cell fate and function in applications to regenerative medicine, a number of alternative approaches have been made. Recent reports demonstrate that a non-cellular niche modulating the biophysical microenvironment with chemical factors can support stem cell self-renewal. In our previous studies, early establishment was executed to optimize biophysical factors and it was subsequently found that the microgeometry of the extracellular matrix made huge differences in stem cell behavior and phenotype. We review here a three-dimensional, non-cellular niche designed to support stem cell self-renewal. The characteristics of stem cells under the designed system are further discussed. PMID:23875159

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2015-04-01

    MSCs are an extensively used cell type in clinical trials today. The initial rationale for their clinical testing was based on their differentiation potential. However, the lack of correlation between functional improvement and cell engraftment or differentiation at the site of injury has led to the proposal that MSCs exert their effects not through their differentiation potential but through their secreted product, more specifically, exosomes, a type of extracellular vesicle. We propose here that MSC exosomes function as an extension of MSC's biological role as tissue stromal support cells. Like their cell source, MSC exosomes help maintain tissue homeostasis for optimal tissue function. They target housekeeping biological processes that operate ubiquitously in all tissues and are critical in maintaining tissue homeostasis, enabling cells to recover critical cellular functions and begin repair and regeneration. This hypothesis provides a rationale for the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs and their secreted exosomes in a wide spectrum of diseases. Here, we give a brief introduction of the biogenesis of MSC exosomes, review their physiological functions and highlight some of their biochemical potential to illustrate how MSC exosomes could restore tissue homeostasis leading to tissue recovery and repair.

  8. Mouse granulated metrial gland cells require contact with stromal cells to maintain viability

    PubMed Central

    STEWART, I. J.

    2000-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells differentiate in the uterine wall in pregnancy in mice but the mechanisms which control their differentiation and maintenance are unknown. In vivo, GMG cells share an intimate association with fibroblast-like stromal cells. The importance of this association has been assessed by examining the effects of withdrawal of stromal cell contact on GMG cell maintenance in vitro. When single cell suspensions of cells were prepared from mouse metrial glands there was a steady decline in numbers with days of culture but usually some remained at 7 d of culture. The ability of metrial gland cells to kill Wehi 164 target cells in 51Cr-release cytotoxicity assays was retained by cells cultured for at least 3 d. When explants of metrial gland were maintained in culture to allow GMG cell migration onto the culture flask, the attached GMG cells were lost by 1 d later. Overall, these results suggest that a juxtacrine regulatory mechanism maintains GMG cells. The rapid loss of unsupported GMG cells in culture has major implications in the design of assays to examine GMG cell function. PMID:11117633

  9. Klotho, stem cells, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ao; Neyra, Javier A; Zhan, Ming; Hu, Ming Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders. PMID:26346243

  10. Klotho, stem cells, and aging.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ao; Neyra, Javier A; Zhan, Ming; Hu, Ming Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders.

  11. Sustained telomere erosion due to increased stem cell turnover during triple autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Thomas; Kneer, Harald; König, Jochem; Herrmann, Markus; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres cap chromosomal ends and are shortened throughout a lifetime. Additional telomere erosion has been documented during conventional chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Previous studies of stem cell transplantation reported variable amounts of telomere shortening with inconsistent results regarding the persistence of telomere shortening. Here we have prospectively studied telomere length and proliferation kinetics of hematopoietic cells in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients who underwent a four-course high-dose chemotherapy protocol combined with triple autologous stem cell transplantation. We observed sustained telomere shortening in hematopoietic cells after triple stem cell transplantation with prolonged stem cell replication during the first year after stem cell transplantation.

  12. Plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, a number of cell culture and preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired by controversy and remained dormant. This chapter provides a brief review of evidence for HSC plasticity including our findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse. These studies strongly support the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and may be the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body.

  13. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun. PMID:21569277

  14. Stem Cells News Update: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, SC

    2013-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy. PMID:24778557

  15. Stem cells news update: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sc

    2013-12-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy.

  16. [Stem cells and tissue engineering techniques].

    PubMed

    Sica, Gigliola

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic use of stem cells and tissue engineering techniques are emerging in urology. Here, stem cell types, their differentiating potential and fundamental characteristics are illustrated. The cancer stem cell hypothesis is reported with reference to the role played by stem cells in the origin, development and progression of neoplastic lesions. In addition, recent reports of results obtained with stem cells alone or seeded in scaffolds to overcome problems of damaged urinary tract tissue are summarized. Among others, the application of these biotechnologies in urinary bladder, and urethra are delineated. Nevertheless, apart from the ethical concerns raised from the use of embryonic stem cells, a lot of questions need to be solved concerning the biology of stem cells before their widespread use in clinical trials. Further investigation is also required in tissue engineering utilizing animal models.

  17. Secretory and basal cells of the epithelium of the tubular glands in the male Mullerian gland of the caecilian Uraeotyphlus narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    George, Jancy M; Smita, Matthew; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Girija, Ramankutty; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2004-12-01

    Caecilians are exceptional among the vertebrates in that males retain the Mullerian duct as a functional glandular structure. The Mullerian gland on each side is formed from a large number of tubular glands connecting to a central duct, which either connects to the urogenital duct or opens directly into the cloaca. The Mullerian gland is believed to secrete a substance to be added to the sperm during ejaculation. Thus, the Mullerian gland could function as a male accessory reproductive gland. Recently, we described the male Mullerian gland of Uraeotyphlus narayani using light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and histochemistry. The present TEM study reports that the secretory cells of both the tubular and basal portions of the tubular glands of the male Mullerian gland of this caecilian produce secretion granules in the same manner as do other glandular epithelial cells. The secretion granules are released in the form of structured granules into the lumen of the tubular glands, and such granules are traceable to the lumen of the central duct of the Mullerian gland. This is comparable to the situation prevailing in the epididymal epithelium of several reptiles. In the secretory cells of the basal portion of the tubular glands, mitochondria are intimately associated with fabrication of the secretion granules. The structural and functional organization of the epithelium of the basal portion of the tubular glands is complicated by the presence of basal cells. This study suggests the origin of the basal cells from peritubular tissue leukocytes. The study also indicates a role for the basal cells in acquiring secretion granules from the neighboring secretory cells and processing them into lipofuscin material in the context of regression of the Mullerian gland during the period of reproductive quiescence. In these respects the basal cells match those in the epithelial lining of the epididymis of amniotes.

  18. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can…

  19. Stem cells, mitochondria and aging.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Kati J; Suomalainen, Anu; Hämäläinen, Riikka H

    2015-11-01

    Decline in metabolism and regenerative potential of tissues are common characteristics of aging. Regeneration is maintained by somatic stem cells (SSCs), which require tightly controlled energy metabolism and genomic integrity for their homeostasis. Recent data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction may compromise this homeostasis, and thereby contribute to tissue degeneration and aging. Progeroid Mutator mouse, accumulating random mtDNA point mutations in their SSCs, showed disturbed SSC homeostasis, emphasizing the importance of mtDNA integrity for stem cells. The mechanism involved changes in cellular redox-environment, including subtle increase in reactive oxygen species (H₂O₂and superoxide anion), which did not cause oxidative damage, but disrupted SSC function. Mitochondrial metabolism appears therefore to be an important regulator of SSC fate determination, and defects in it in SSCs may underlie premature aging. Here we review the current knowledge of mitochondrial contribution to SSC dysfunction and aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging.

  20. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  1. Effects of nanotopography on stem cell phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Liao, Susan; Ng, Clarisse CH; Chan, Casey K; Raghunath, Michael; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can self renew indefinitely and differentiate into several somatic cells given the correct environmental cues. In the stem cell niche, stem cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are crucial for different cellular functions, such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Recently, in addition to chemical surface modifications, the importance of nanometric scale surface topography and roughness of biomaterials has increasingly becoming recognized as a crucial factor for cell survival and host tissue acceptance in synthetic ECMs. This review describes the influence of nanotopography on stem cell phenotypes. PMID:21607108

  2. Stem cell directed gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, B C; Kohn, D B

    1999-05-01

    A potential therapeutic approach to HIV-1 infection is the genetic modification of cells of a patient to make them resistant to HIV-1. Hematopoietic stem cells are an attractive target for gene therapy of AIDS because of their ability to generate a broad repertoire of mature T lymphocytes, as well as the monocytic cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia) which are also involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A number of synthetic "anti-HIV-1 genes" have been developed which inhibit HIV-1 replication. However, current methods for gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells, using retroviral vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus, have been minimally effective. Clinical trials performed to date in which hematopoietic cells from HIV-1-positive patients have been transduced with retroviral vectors and then reinfused have produced low to undetectable levels of gene-containing peripheral blood leukocytes. New vector delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors, need to be developed to ensure efficient gene transfer and persistent transgene expression to provide life-long resistance to the cells targeted by HIV-1.

  3. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  4. Embryonic stem cells: testing the germ-cell theory.

    PubMed

    Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2011-10-25

    The exact cellular origin of embryonic stem cells remains elusive. Now a new study provides compelling evidence that embryonic stem cells, established under conventional culture conditions, originate from a transient germ-cell state.

  5. Haematopoietic stem cells: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ashley P; Alexander, Warren S

    2017-01-01

    The discovery and characterisation of haematopoietic stem cells has required decades of research. The identification of adult bone marrow as a source of haematopoietic cells capable of protecting an organism from otherwise lethal irradiation led to the intense search for their identity and characteristics. Using functional assays along with evolving techniques for isolation of haematopoietic cells, haematopoietic stem cell populations were able to be enriched and their characteristics analysed. The key haematopoietic stem cell characteristics of pluripotentiality and the ability for self-renewal have emerged as characteristics of several haematopoietic stem cell populations, including those that have recently challenged the conventional concepts of the haematopoietic hierarchy. Human allogeneic stem cell therapy relies on these functional characteristics of haematopoietic stem cells that can be isolated from peripheral blood, bone marrow or cord blood, with the additional requirement that immunological barriers need to be overcome to allow sustained engraftment while minimising risk of graft-versus-host disease developing in the recipient of transplanted stem cells. Current and future research will continue to focus on the identification of haematopoietic stem cell regulators and methods for in vitro and in vivo stem cell manipulation, including genome editing, to expand the scope, potential and safety of therapy using haematopoietic stem cells. PMID:28180000

  6. Making new beta cells from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Colman, Alan

    2004-06-01

    In 2000, Shapiro et al. provided compelling "proof of principle" data showing that the transplantation of human islets, purified from cadaveric material, could restore severely diabetic, Type 1 patients to insulin independence. This demonstration prompted renewed efforts to find an alternative and sustainable source of surrogate islet cells for cell therapy. Experiments involving adult ductal and liver "stem" cells, or embryonic stem cells, are prominent amongst these endeavors and are reviewed in this article. Whilst there are many published claims to success in converting ES cells into insulin secreting, glucose responsive cells, all require careful reinterpretation in the light of findings that cells can adsorb insulin present in growth media. It is likely that work with adult cells is less prone to this potential artifact and significant progress has been made in producing insulin-secreting cells. Assessment of in vivo function in the surrogate cells is most frequently made using cell transplantation into toxin-induced, diabetic mice, but this model is rarely used to maximal advantage. In many cases, it remains unclear whether reductions in the hyperglycemia result from insulin secretion from the transplanted cells or are due to recovery of endogenous islet function. In this latter context, experiments are reviewed where endogenous stimulation of recovery is engendered even by irradiated donor cells.

  7. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    stimulated by antiestrogens. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor involve changes of both proliferation and...self-renewal capabilities of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER- positive breast cancer stem/progenitor...potent tumor-seeding efficiency. . Fig 3. The effects of antiestrogens on the differentiation of ER-positive breast cancer stem cells expressing

  8. Stem Cells in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Soto, Angel R.; Oakley, Derek H.; Wichterle, Hynek; Stein, Joel; Doetsch, Fiona K.; Henderson, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Given their capacity to regenerate cells lost through injury or disease, stem cells offer new vistas into possible treatments for degenerative diseases and their underlying causes. As such, stem cell biology is emerging as a driving force behind many studies in the field of regenerative medicine. This review focuses on our current understanding of the applications of stem cells in treating ailments of the human brain, with an emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases. Two types of neural stem cells are discussed: endogenous neural stem cells residing within the adult brain, and pluripotent stem cells capable of forming neural cells in culture. Endogenous neural stem cells give rise to neurons throughout life, but they are restricted to specialized regions in the brain. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms regulating these cells is key in determining their therapeutic potential, as well as finding mechanisms to activate dormant stem cells outside of these specialized microdomains. In parallel, patient-derived stem cells can be used to generate neural cells in culture, providing new tools for disease modeling, drug testing and cell-based therapies. Turning these technologies into viable treatments will require the integration of basic science with clinical skills in rehabilitation. PMID:24800720

  9. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Han, Edward; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-01-07

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer.

  10. Reforming craniofacial orthodontics via stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pritam; Prasad, N K K; Sahoo, Nivedita; Kumar, Gunjan; Mohanty, Debapreeti; Sah, Sushila

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are the most interesting cells in cell biology. They have the potential to evolve as one of the most powerful technologies in the future. The future refers to an age where it will be used extensively in various fields of medical and dental sciences. Researchers have discovered a number of sources from which stem cells can be derived. Craniofacial problems are very common and occur at all ages. Stem cells can be used therapeutically in almost every field of health science. In fact, many procedures will be reformed after stem cells come into play. This article is an insight into the review of the current researches being carried out on stem cells and its use in the field of orthodontics, which is a specialized branch of dentistry. Although the future is uncertain, there is a great possibility that stem cells will be used extensively in almost all major procedures of orthodontics.

  11. Lung stem cell update: promise and controversy.

    PubMed

    Neuringer, I P; Randell, S H

    2006-03-01

    Currently, there is great enthusiasm about potential stem cell therapies for intractable diseases. We previously reviewed the topic of stem cells in lung injury and repair, including the role of endogenous, tissue (somatic) stem cells and the contribution of circulating cells to the lung parenchyma. Our purpose here is to provide a concise update in this fast-moving field. New information and ongoing debate focus attention on basic issues in lung stem cell biology and highlight the need for additional studies to establish the feasibility of cell therapies to prevent or treat lung diseases.

  12. Stem Cells for Augmenting Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gulotta, Lawrence V.; Chaudhury, Salma; Wiznia, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Tendon healing is fraught with complications such as reruptures and adhesion formation due to the formation of scar tissue at the injury site as opposed to the regeneration of native tissue. Stem cells are an attractive option in developing cell-based therapies to improve tendon healing. However, several questions remain to be answered before stem cells can be used clinically. Specifically, the type of stem cell, the amount of cells, and the proper combination of growth factors or mechanical stimuli to induce differentiation all remain to be seen. This paper outlines the current literature on the use of stem cells for tendon augmentation. PMID:22190960

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  14. Stem Cells in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Hertsenberg, Andrew J.; Funderburgh, James L.

    2017-01-01

    The cornea is the tough, transparent tissue through which light first enters the eye and functions as a barrier to debris and infection as well as two-thirds of the refractive power of the eye. Corneal damage that is not promptly treated will often lead to scarring and vision impairment. Due to the limited options currently available to treat corneal scars, the identification and isolation of stem cells in the cornea has received much attention, as they may have potential for autologous, cell-based approaches to the treatment of damaged corneal tissue. PMID:26310147

  15. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as hematopoietic stem cell transplant, hematopoietic cell transplant, autologous transplant, or allogeneic ... or bone marrow transplant replaces abnormal blood-forming stem cells with healthy cells. When the healthy stem cells ...

  16. PEDF & stem cells: niche vs. nurture.

    PubMed

    Fitchev, Philip; Chung, Chuhan; Plunkett, Beth A; Brendler, Charles B; Crawford, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional 50kD secreted glycoprotein emerging as a key factor in stem cell renewal. Characteristics of the stem cell niche can be highly dependent on location, access to the vasculature, oxygen tension and neighboring cells. In the neural stem cell (NSC) niche, specifically the subventricular zone, PEDF actively participates in the self renewal process and promotes stemness by upregulating Notch signaling effectors Hes1 and Hes5. The local vascular endothelial cells and ependymal cells are the likely sources of PEDF for the NSC while mesenchymal and retinal stem cells can actually produce PEDF. The opposing actions of PEDF and VEGF on various cells are recapitulated in the NSC niche. Intraventricular injection of PEDF promotes stem cell renewal, while injection of VEGF prompts differentiation and neurogenesis in the subventricular zone. Enhancing the expression of PEDF in stem cells has promising therapeutic implications. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing PEDF effectively inhibited pathologic angiogenesis in the murine eye and these same cells suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma growth. As a protein with bioactivities in nearly all normal organ systems, it is likely that PEDF will continue to gain visibility as an essential component in the development and delivery of novel stem cell-based therapies to combat disease.

  17. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Francisco-Javier; Insausti, Carmen-Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María-del-Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer-Henarejos, Ana-Belén; Marín, Noemí; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda, José-María

    2012-11-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in the known of growth factors and signalling molecules implicated in tooth development and regeneration of different structures of teeth. Furthermore, these cells need a fabulous scaffold that facility their integration, differentiation, matrix synthesis and promote multiple specific interactions between cells. In this review, we give a brief description of tooth development and anatomy, definition and classification of stem cells, with special attention of mesenchymal stem cells, commonly used in the cellular therapy for their trasdifferentiation ability, non ethical problems and acceptable results in preliminary clinical trials. In terms of tissue engineering, we provide an overview of different types of mesenchymal stem cells that have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs), and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs), growth factors implicated in regeneration teeth and types of scaffolds for dental tissue regeneration.

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantz, Tobias; Martin, Ulrich

    The induction of pluripotency in somatic cells is widely considered as a major breakthrough in regenerative medicine, because this approach provides the basis for individualized stem cell-based therapies. Moreover, with respect to cell transplantation and tissue engineering, expertise from bioengineering to transplantation medicine is now meeting basic research of stem cell biology.

  19. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  20. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    stem cells (CSCs)- stem cell like cells in tumors that have stem cell properties and tumor initiating ability- retain epigenetic memories of their...months showing megacephaly. Abb: ctx=cortex, cb= cerebellum, hp= hippocampus Page 5 of 12 To circumvent early lethality associated with PIK3CA

  1. Concise Review: Paracrine Role of Stem Cells in Pituitary Tumors: A Focus on Adamantinomatous Craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Andoniadou, Cynthia L

    2016-02-01

    The existence of tissue-specific progenitor/stem cells in the adult pituitary gland of the mouse has been demonstrated recently using genetic tracing experiments. These cells have the capacity to differentiate into all of the different cell lineages of the anterior pituitary and self-propagate in vitro and can therefore contribute to normal homeostasis of the gland. In addition, they play a critical role in tumor formation, specifically in the etiology of human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma, a clinically relevant tumor that is associated with mutations in CTNNB1 (gene encoding β-catenin). Mouse studies have shown that only pituitary embryonic precursors or adult stem cells are able to generate tumors when targeted with oncogenic β-catenin, suggesting that the cell context is critical for mutant β-catenin to exert its oncogenic effect. Surprisingly, the bulk of the tumor cells are not derived from the mutant progenitor/stem cells, suggesting that tumors are induced in a paracrine manner. Therefore, the cell sustaining the mutation in β-catenin and the cell-of-origin of the tumors are different. In this review, we will discuss the in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrating the presence of stem cells in the adult pituitary and analyze the evidence showing a potential role of these stem cells in pituitary tumors.

  2. Medaka haploid embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yunhan

    2010-01-01

    The appearance of diploidy, the presence of two genomes or chromosome sets, is a fundamental hallmark of eukaryotic evolution and bisexual reproduction, because diploidy offers the basis for the bisexual life cycle, allowing for oscillation between diploid and haploid phases. Meiosis produces haploid gametes. At fertilization, male and female gametes fuse to restore diploidy in a zygote, which develops into a new life. At sex maturation, diploid cells enter into meiosis, culminating in the production of haploid gametes. Therefore, diploidy ensures pluripotency, cell proliferation, and functions, whereas haploidy is restricted only to the post-meiotic gamete phase of germline development and represents the end point of cell growth. Diploidy is advantageous for evolution. Haploidy is ideal for genetic analyses, because any recessive mutations of essential genes will show a clear phenotype in the absence of a second gene copy. Recently, my laboratory succeeded in the generation of medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells capable of whole animal production. Therefore, haploidy in a vertebrate is able to support stable cell culture and pluripotency. This finding anticipates the possibility to generate haploid ES cells in other vertebrate species such as zebrafish. These medaka haploid ES cells elegantly combine haploidy and pluripotency, offering a unique yeast-like system for in vitro genetic analyses of molecular, cellular, and developmental events in various cell lineages. This chapter is aimed to describe the strategy of haploid ES cell derivation and their characteristics, and illustrate the perspectives of haploid ES cells for infertility treatment, genetic screens, and analyses.

  3. Establishment of a Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bank

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Khushnuma; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells have generated great amount of interest amongst the scientific community for their potential therapeutic applications for unmet medical needs. We have demonstrated the plasticity of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the umbilical cord matrix. Their immunological profile makes it even more interesting. We have demonstrated that the umbilical cord is an inexhaustible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Being a very rich source, instead of discarding this tissue, we worked on banking these cells for regenerative medicine application for future use. The present paper gives a detailed account of our experience in the establishment of a mesenchymal stem cell bank at our facility. PMID:21826152

  4. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  5. Effect of aging on stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Sheng, Matilda HC; Wasnik, Samiksha; Baylink, David J; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the remarkable self-renewal ability and are capable of differentiating into multiple diverse cells. There is increasing evidence that the aging process can have adverse effects on stem cells. As stem cells age, their renewal ability deteriorates and their ability to differentiate into the various cell types is altered. Accordingly, it is suggested aging-induced deterioration of stem cell functions may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the various aging-associated disorders. Understanding the role of the aging process in deterioration of stem cell function is crucial, not only in understanding the pathophysiology of aging-associated disorders, but also in future development of novel effective stem cell-based therapies to treat aging-associated diseases. This review article first focuses on the basis of the various aging disease-related stem cell dysfunction. It then addresses the several concepts on the potential mechanism that causes aging-related stem cell dysfunction. It also briefly discusses the current potential therapies under development for aging-associated stem cell defects. PMID:28261550

  6. Patenting human genes and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Rendon, Enca; Blake, Derek J

    2007-01-01

    Cell lines and genetically modified single cell organisms have been considered patentable subjects for the last two decades. However, despite the technical patentability of genes and stem cell lines, social and legal controversy concerning their 'ownership' has surrounded stem cell research in recent years. Some granted patents on stem cells with extremely broad claims are casting a shadow over the commercialization of these cells as therapeutics. However, in spite of those early patents, the number of patent applications related to stem cells is growing exponentially. Both embryonic and adult stem cells have the ability to differentiate into several cell lineages in an organism as a result of specific genetic programs that direct their commitment and cell fate. Genes that control the pluripotency of stem cells have been recently identified and the genetic manipulation of these cells is becoming more efficient with the advance of new technologies. This review summarizes some of the recent published patents on pluripotency genes, gene transfer into stem cells and genetic reprogramming and takes the hematopoietic and embryonic stem cell as model systems.

  7. Shh promotes sweat gland cell maturation in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhijian; Zhen, Yunfang; Yin, Wei; Ma, Zhourui; Zhang, Liya

    2016-06-01

    Sweat gland (SG) cells forming SG tubule-like structures in 3D culture, this is one of the most important methods to identify the biological function of SG cells and stem cells-derived SG-like cells, but also the important way on research of SG regeneration in vitro. In this study, we seeded human fibroblasts and SG cells in gels and used immunohistochemistry to confirm whether SG tubule-like structures formed. Fibroblasts are necessary factor in the process of SG cells maturation and forming SG's secretory region in 3D culture. Further experimentation revealed that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) was secreted by fibroblasts within the 3D culture. By adding Shh protein to 3D culture, there had more SG tubule-like structures formed. These results suggest that Shh is an important factor during the process of forming SG tubule-like structures in 3D cultures, and adding Shh recommbinant protein could promote SG cell maturation and enhance the efficiency of structure formation.

  8. Stem cell niche engineering through droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Allazetta, Simone; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells reside in complex niches in which their behaviour is tightly regulated by various biochemical and biophysical signals. In order to unveil some of the crucial stem cell-niche interactions and expedite the implementation of stem cells in clinical and pharmaceutical applications, in vitro methodologies are being developed to reconstruct key features of stem cell niches. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as a promising strategy to build stem cell niche models in a miniaturized and highly precise fashion. This review highlights current advances in using droplet microfluidics in stem cell biology. We also discuss recent efforts in which microgel technology has been interfaced with high-throughput analyses to engender screening paradigms with an unparalleled potential for basic and applied biological studies.

  9. Stem cells in the light of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2012-01-01

    All organisms depend on stem cells for their survival. As a result, stem cells may be a prerequisite for the evolution of specific characteristics in organisms that include regeneration, multicellularity and coloniality. Stem cells have attracted the attention of biologists and medical scientists for a long time. These provide materials for regenerative medicine. We review in this paper, the link between modern stem cell research and early studies in ancient organisms. It also outlines details on stem cells in the light of evolution with an emphasis on their regeneration potential, coloniality and multicellularity. The information provided might be of use to molecular biologists, medical scientists and developmental biologists who are engaged in integrated research involving the stem cells. PMID:22825600

  10. [Bioethical challenges of stem cell tourism].

    PubMed

    Ventura-Juncá, Patricio; Erices, Alejandro; Santos, Manuel J

    2013-08-01

    Stem cells have drawn extraordinary attention from scientists and the general public due to their potential to generate effective therapies for incurable diseases. At the same time, the production of embryonic stem cells involves a serious ethical issue concerning the destruction of human embryos. Although adult stem cells and induced pluripotential cells do not pose this ethical objection, there are other bioethical challenges common to all types of stem cells related particularly to the clinical use of stem cells. Their clinical use should be based on clinical trials, and in special situations, medical innovation, both of which have particular ethical dimensions. The media has raised unfounded expectations in patients and the public about the real clinical benefits of stem cells. At the same time, the number of unregulated clinics is increasing around the world, making direct offers through Internet of unproven stem cell therapies that attract desperate patients that have not found solutions in standard medicine. This is what is called stem cells tourism. This article reviews this situation, its consequences and the need for international cooperation to establish effective regulations to prevent the exploitation of patients and to endanger the prestige of legitimate stem cell research.

  11. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  12. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  13. The secretory clear cell of the eccrine sweat gland as the probable source of excess sweat production in hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Bovell, Douglas L; MacDonald, Alison; Meyer, Barbara A; Corbett, Alistair D; MacLaren, William M; Holmes, Susan L; Harker, Mark

    2011-12-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is characterized by excessive sweating in palmar, plantar and axillary body regions. Gland hypertrophy and the existence of a third type of sweat gland, the apoeccrine gland, with high fluid transporting capabilities have been suggested as possible causes. This study investigated whether sweat glands were hypertrophied in axillary hyperhidrotic patients and if mechanisms associated with fluid transport were found in all types of axillary sweat glands. The occurrence of apoeccrine sweat glands was also investigated. Axillary skin biopsies from control and hyperhidrosis patients were examined using immunohistochemistry, image analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed that glands were not hypertrophied and that only the clear cells in the eccrine glands expressed proteins associated with fluid transport. There was no evidence of the presence of apoeccrine glands in the tissues investigated. Preliminary findings suggest the eccrine gland secretory clear cell as the main source of fluid transport in hyperhidrosis.

  14. Stem cells: classifications, controversies, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Lisa A

    2005-01-01

    The application of stem cells in regenerative and reparative therapies is emerging in surgery. Published information can lead to an over simplified view of stem cells with respect to their definitions, tissues of origin, abilities to differentiate into tissue lineages, and their capacity for functional tissue regeneration. The goals of this review article are to define embryonic and adult stem cells, compare differences between them, and summarize their potential clinical applications.

  15. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    to program human stem cells directly into cones. Using RNA -seq, we identified several genes that are upregulated in advance of the earliest...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA -seq., transcription factors, and...1 Keywords: 1. Cone photoreceptor 2. Retina 3. Retinal stem cell 4. Otx2 5. Onecut1 6. Blimp1 7. RNA -seq. 8. Transcription factors 9

  16. Telomeres, stem cells, and hematology

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are highly dynamic structures that adjust the cellular response to stress and growth stimulation based on previous cell divisions. This critical function is accomplished by progressive telomere shortening and DNA damage responses activated by chromosome ends without sufficient telomere repeats. Repair of critically short telomeres by telomerase or recombination is limited in most somatic cells, and apoptosis or cellular senescence is triggered when too many uncapped telomeres accumulate. The chance of the latter increases as the average telomere length decreases. The average telomere length is set and maintained in cells of the germ line that typically express high levels of telomerase. In somatic cells, the telomere length typically declines with age, posing a barrier to tumor growth but also contributing to loss of cells with age. Loss of (stem) cells via telomere attrition provides strong selection for abnormal cells in which malignant progression is facilitated by genome instability resulting from uncapped telomeres. The critical role of telomeres in cell proliferation and aging is illustrated in patients with 50% of normal telomerase levels resulting from a mutation in one of the telomerase genes. Here, the role of telomeres and telomerase in human biology is reviewed from a personal historical perspective. PMID:18263784

  17. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  18. Ocular stem cells: a status update!

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have been a major focus of the field of regenerative medicine, opening new frontiers and regarded as the future of medicine. The ophthalmology branch of the medical sciences was the first to directly benefit from stem cells for regenerative treatment. The success stories of regenerative medicine in ophthalmology can be attributed to its accessibility, ease of follow-up and the eye being an immune-privileged organ. Cell-based therapies using stem cells from the ciliary body, iris and sclera are still in animal experimental stages but show potential for replacing degenerated photoreceptors. Limbal, corneal and conjunctival stem cells are still limited for use only for surface reconstruction, although they might have potential beyond this. Iris pigment epithelial, ciliary body epithelial and choroidal epithelial stem cells in laboratory studies have shown some promise for retinal or neural tissue replacement. Trabecular meshwork, orbital and sclera stem cells have properties identical to cells of mesenchymal origin but their potential has yet to be experimentally determined and validated. Retinal and retinal pigment epithelium stem cells remain the most sought out stem cells for curing retinal degenerative disorders, although treatments using them have resulted in variable outcomes. The functional aspects of the therapeutic application of lenticular stem cells are not known and need further attention. Recently, embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium has been used for treating patients with Stargardts disease and age-related macular degeneration. Overall, the different stem cells residing in different components of the eye have shown some success in clinical and animal studies in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:25158127

  19. Plant stem cells as innovation in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Moruś, Martyna; Baran, Monika; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena; Skotnicka-Graca, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells thanks to their ability of unlimited division number or transformation into different cell types creating organs, are responsible for regeneration processes. Depending on the organism in which the stem cells exists, they divide to the plant or animal ones. The later group includes the stem cells existing in both embryo's and adult human's organs. It includes, among others, epidermal stem cells, located in the hair follicle relieves and also in its basal layers, and responsible for permanent regeneration of the epidermis. Temporary science looks for method suitable for stimulation of the epidermis stem cells, amongst the other by delivery of e.g., growth factors for proliferation that decrease with the age. One of the methods is the use of the plant cell culture technology, including a number of methods that should ensure growth of plant cells, issues or organs in the environment with the microorganism-free medium. It uses abilities of the different plant cells to dedifferentiation into stem cells and coming back to the pluripotent status. The extracts obtained this way from the plant stem cells are currently used for production of both common or professional care cosmetics. This work describes exactly impact of the plant stem cell extract, coming from one type of the common apple tree (Uttwiler Spätlauber) to human skin as one of the first plant sorts, which are used in cosmetology and esthetic dermatology.

  20. Alternative splicing modulates stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Ou, Chen-Wei; Yu, Hsiu-Hui; Li, Kuo-Wei; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the surprising potential to develop into many different cell types. Therefore, major research efforts have focused on transplantation of stem cells and/or derived progenitors for restoring depleted diseased cells in degenerative disorders. Understanding the molecular controls, including alternative splicing, that arise during lineage differentiation of stem cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapeutic approaches in regeneration medicine. Alternative splicing to allow a single gene to encode multiple transcripts with different protein coding sequences and RNA regulatory elements increases genomic complexities. Utilizing differences in alternative splicing as a molecular marker may be more sensitive than simply gene expression in various degrees of stem cell differentiation. Moreover, alternative splicing maybe provide a new concept to acquire induced pluripotent stem cells or promote cell-cell transdifferentiation for restorative therapies and basic medicine researches. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of alternative splicing regulation in stem cells and their progenitors. It will hopefully provide much needed knowledge into realizing stem cell biology and related applications.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells, aging and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Chiara; Berardi, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue maintenance and regeneration is dependent on stem cells and increasing evidence has shown to decline with age. Stem cell based-aging is thought to influence therapeutic efficacy. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in tissue regeneration. Here, we discuss the effects of age-related changes on MSC properties considering their possible use in research or regenerative medicine. PMID:23738303

  2. Collision tumor of the thyroid gland: primary squamous cell and papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warman, Meir; Lipschitz, Noga; Ikher, Sergey; Halperin, Doron

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Collision tumor of the thyroid gland is defined when independent and histologically distinct tumors coexist within the gland. The presence of both papillary and squamous cell carcinoma in the thyroid gland is unusual. Suggested etiologies include embryonic remanents of squamous epithelium, chronic inflammation, or thyroid malignancies promoting squamous metaplasia. Case Presentation. An elderly patient presented with a rapid enlargement of a long-standing right thyroid nodule. The tumor was locally invasive and unresectable. Pathology revealed the diagnosis of papillary and squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. Possible primary sites for squamous cell carcinoma in upper aerodigestive tract were excluded. The patient outcome was fatal although palliative chemoradiotherapy. Discussion. Collision tumor of papillary and squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland is a rare entity that may imply bad prognosis, as to the presence of the squamous portion. The best treatment includes resection of the tumor; unfortunately it is not possible in most cases.

  3. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  4. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms.

  5. Paediatric idiopathic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Stephen J; Lee, Graham A

    2017-03-20

    Acquired limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) describes a condition in which the corneal limbal stem cells are altered or destroyed, typically due to ocular trauma, chronic allergy or inflammation. Idiopathic LSCD is a term used to describe limbal stem cell failure in the absence of any identifiable causative factor. While several cases of adult-onset LSCD have been identified previously, this case report describes a rare presentation of bilateral asymmetric idiopathic paediatric limbal stem cell deficiency in a sixteen-year-old male with an otherwise unremarkable ocular history.

  6. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  7. Genetic and epigenetic instability of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Karthyayani; Li, Yuan-Sheng; Hsieh, Dean-Kuo; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, research on stem cells has been receiving an increasing amount of attention, both for its advantages and disadvantages. Genetic and epigenetic instabilities among stem cells have been a recurring obstacle to progress in regenerative medicine using stem cells. Various reports have stated that these instabilities can transform stem cells when transferred in vivo and thus have the potential to develop tumors. Previous research has shown that various extrinsic and intrinsic factors can contribute to the stability of stem cells. The extrinsic factors include growth supplements, growth factors, oxygen tension, passage technique, and cryopreservation. Controlling these factors based on previous reports may assist researchers in developing strategies for the production and clinical application of "safe" stem cells. On the other hand, the intrinsic factors can be unpredictable and uncontrollable; therefore, to ensure the successful use of stem cells in regenerative medicine, it is imperative to develop and implement appropriate strategies and technique for culturing stem cells and to confirm the genetic and epigenetic safety of these stem cells before employing them in clinical trials.

  8. Endometriosis impairs bone marrow-derived stem cell recruitment to the uterus whereas bazedoxifene treatment leads to endometriosis regression and improved uterine stem cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Sakr, Sharif; Naqvi, Hanyia; Komm, Barry; Taylor, Hugh S

    2014-04-01

    Endometriosis is a disease defined by the ectopic growth of uterine endometrium. Stem cells contribute to the generation of endometriosis as well as to repair and regeneration of normal endometrium. Here we demonstrate that the selective estrogen receptor modulator bazedoxifene (BZA), administered with conjugated estrogens (CEs), leads to regression of endometriosis lesions as well as reduction in stem cell recruitment to the lesions. Female mice underwent transplantation of male bone marrow. Endometrium was transplanted in the peritoneal cavity of half to create experimental endometriosis. Mice with or without experimental endometriosis were randomized to BZA/CE or vehicle treatment. Endometriosis lesions, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell engraftment of the lesions, and eutopic endometrium as well as ovarian stimulation were assessed. BZA treatment significantly reduced lesion size, gland number, and expression of proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Ovarian weight was not affected. Stem cells were recruited to the endometriosis lesions, and this recruitment was dramatically reduced by BZA/CE treatment. Stem cell engraftment was reduced in the uterus of animals with endometriosis; however the number of stem cells engrafting the uterus was completely restored by treatment with BZA/CE. Competition between endometriosis and the eutopic endometrium for a limited supply of stem cells and depletion of normal stem cells flux to the uterus is a novel mechanism by which endometriosis interferes with endometrial function and fertility. BZA/CE not only treats lesions of endometriosis, it also dramatically reduces stem cell recruitment to the lesions and restores stem cell engraftment of the uterine endometrium.

  9. Matrigel-induced tubular morphogenesis of human eccrine sweat gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Liu, Bo; Wu, Jinjin; Lu, Yuangang; Yang, Yadong

    2011-09-01

    Human eccrine sweat glands are tubule-structured glands of the skin that are vital in thermoregulation, secretion, and excretion of water and electrolytes. A study of tubular morphogenesis in vitro would facilitate the development of a tissue engineering model for eccrine sweat glands and other tubule-structured glands. Matrigel, a basement membrane matrix, has been shown to promote differentiation and morphogenesis of many different cell types, including tubular cells. This study investigated the growth, differentiation, and tubular morphogenesis of human eccrine sweat gland epithelial cells cultured in Matrigel. Human eccrine gland epithelial cells were isolated and cultured in vitro. The cell growth in Matrigel was evidenced by the formation of cell clusters, which were observed under an inverted microscope. The internal structure of the cell clusters was further investigated by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of propidium iodide-stained nuclei. The results demonstrated that although on a plastic surface or in a collagen gel the cells could not form tubular structures, they formed tubular structures when cultured in Matrigel. Consequently, we conclude that Matrigel can promote tubular morphogenesis of human eccrine sweat gland epithelial cells.

  10. Current Biosafety Considerations in Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinejad, Masoumeh; Andrews, Peter W.; Shoraki, Elham Kargar

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells can be valuable model systems for drug discovery and modelling human diseases as well as to investigate cellular interactions and molecular events in the early stages of development. Controlling the differentiation of stem cells into specific germ layers provides a potential source of highly specialized cells for therapeutic applications. In recent years, finding individual properties of stem cells such as their ultimate self-renewal capacity and the generation of particular cell lines by differentiation under specific culture conditions underpins the development of regenerative therapies. These futures make stem cells a leading candidate to treat a wide range of diseases. Nevertheless, as with all novel treatments, safety issues are one of the barriers that should be overcome to guarantee the quality of a patient’s life after stem cell therapy. Many studies have pointed to a large gap in our knowledge about the therapeutic applications of these cells. This gap clearly shows the importance of biosafety concerns for the current status of cell-based therapies, even more than their therapeutic efficacy. Currently, scientists report that tumorigenicity and immunogenicity are the two most important associated cell-based therapy risks. In principle, intrinsic factors such as cell characteristics and extrinsic elements introduced by manufacturing of stem cells can result in tumor formation and immunological reactions after stem cell transplantation. Therapeutic research shows there are many biological questions regarding safety issues of stem cell clinical applications. Stem cell therapy is a rapidly advancing field that needs to focus more on finding a comprehensive technology for assessing risk. A variety of risk factors (from intrinsic to extrinsic) should be considered for safe clinical stem cell therapies. PMID:27540533

  11. Lineage tracing quantification reveals symmetric stem cell division in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Viktoria; Inaba, Mayu; Cheng, Jun; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2013-12-01

    In the homeostatic state, adult stem cells divide either symmetrically to increase the stem cell number to compensate stem cell loss, or asymmetrically to maintain the population while producing differentiated cells. We have investigated the mode of stem cell division in the testes of Drosophila melanogaster by lineage tracing and confirm the presence of symmetric stem cell division in this system. We found that the rate of symmetric division is limited to 1-2% of total germline stem cell (GSC) divisions, but it increases with expression of a cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, or a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, Moesin, which may modulate adhesiveness of germ cells to the stem cell niche. Our results indicate that the decision regarding asymmetric vs. symmetric division is a dynamically regulated process that contributes to tissue homeostasis, responding to the needs of the tissue.

  12. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  13. Quantitative single cell analysis of cell population dynamics during submandibular salivary gland development and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Deirdre A.; Manhardt, Charles; Kamath, Vidya; Sui, Yunxia; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Can, Ali; Bello, Musodiq; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean R.; Lazare, Michael; Gervais, Elise M.; Sequeira, Sharon J.; Peters, Sarah B.; Ginty, Fiona; Gerdes, Michael J.; Larsen, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Summary Epithelial organ morphogenesis involves reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cell types to balance progenitor cell retention and expansion with cell differentiation for evolution of tissue architecture. Underlying submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis is the regulated proliferation and differentiation of perhaps several progenitor cell populations, which have not been characterized throughout development, and yet are critical for understanding organ development, regeneration, and disease. Here we applied a serial multiplexed fluorescent immunohistochemistry technology to map the progressive refinement of the epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations throughout development from embryonic day 14 through postnatal day 20. Using computational single cell analysis methods, we simultaneously mapped the evolving temporal and spatial location of epithelial cells expressing subsets of differentiation and progenitor markers throughout salivary gland development. We mapped epithelial cell differentiation markers, including aquaporin 5, PSP, SABPA, and mucin 10 (acinar cells); cytokeratin 7 (ductal cells); and smooth muscle α-actin (myoepithelial cells) and epithelial progenitor cell markers, cytokeratin 5 and c-kit. We used pairwise correlation and visual mapping of the cells in multiplexed images to quantify the number of single- and double-positive cells expressing these differentiation and progenitor markers at each developmental stage. We identified smooth muscle α-actin as a putative early myoepithelial progenitor marker that is expressed in cytokeratin 5-negative cells. Additionally, our results reveal dynamic expansion and redistributions of c-kit- and K5-positive progenitor cell populations throughout development and in postnatal glands. The data suggest that there are temporally and spatially discreet progenitor populations that contribute to salivary gland development and homeostasis. PMID:23789091

  14. Microfluidic Isolation of CD34-Positive Skin Cells Enables Regeneration of Hair and Sebaceous Glands In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Beili; Nahmias, Yaakov; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Skin stem cells resident in the bulge area of hair follicles and at the basal layer of the epidermis are multipotent and able to self-renew when transplanted into full-thickness defects in nude mice. Based on cell surface markers such as CD34 and the α6-integrin, skin stem cells can be extracted from tissue-derived cell suspensions for engraftment using the gold standard cell separation technique of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This paper describes an alternative separation method using microfluidic devices coated with degradable antibody-functionalized hydrogels. The microfluidic method allows direct injection of tissue digestate (no preprocessing tagging of cells is needed), is fast (45 minutes from injected sample to purified cells), and scalable. This method is used in this study to isolate CD34-positive (CD34+) cells from murine skin tissue digestate, and the functional capability of these cells is demonstrated by transplantation into nude mice using protocols developed by other groups for FACS-sorted cells. Specifically, the transplantation of microfluidic isolated CD34+ cells along with dermal and epidermal cells was observed to generate significant levels of hair follicles and sebaceous glands consistent with those observed previously with FACS-sorted cells. PMID:25205844

  15. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Michaela E.; Morton, Daniel; Rossi, Annamaria

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  16. Cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Justin D.; Mack, Stephen C.; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Valentim, Claudia L.L.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues with defined cellular hierarchies in development and homeostasis give rise to tumors with cellular hierarchies, suggesting that tumors recapitulate specific tissues and mimic their origins. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor and contains self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor initiation and therapeutic resistance. As normal stem and progenitor cells participate in tissue development and repair, these developmental programs re-emerge in CSCs to support the development and progressive growth of tumors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern CSCs has informed the development of novel targeted therapeutics for GBM and other brain cancers. CSCs are not self-autonomous units; rather, they function within an ecological system, both actively remodeling the microenvironment and receiving critical maintenance cues from their niches. To fulfill the future goal of developing novel therapies to collapse CSC dynamics, drawing parallels to other normal and pathological states that are highly interactive with their microenvironments and that use developmental signaling pathways will be beneficial. PMID:26109046

  17. Isolation of canine mammary cells with stem cell properties and tumour-initiating potential.

    PubMed

    Cocola, C; Anastasi, P; Astigiano, S; Piscitelli, E; Pelucchi, P; Vilardo, L; Bertoli, G; Beccaglia, M; Veronesi, M C; Sanzone, S; Barbieri, O; Reinbold, R A; Luvoni, G C; Zucchi, I

    2009-07-01

    Recent data suggest that mammary carcinogenesis may be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs) derived from mutated adult stem cells, which have acquired aberrant cell self-renewal or by progenitor cells that have acquired the capacity for cell self-renewal. Spontaneous mammary cancers in cats and dogs are important models for the understanding of human breast cancer and may represent alternative species model systems that can significantly contribute to the study of human oncogenesis. With the goal of identifying markers for isolating human breast CSCs, we have generated a canine model system to isolate and characterize normal and CSCs from dog mammary gland. Insight into the hierarchical organization of canine tumours may contribute to the development of universal concepts in oncogenesis by CSCs. Cells with stem cell properties were isolated from normal and tumoural canine breast tissue and propagated as mammospheres and tumourspheres in long-term non-adherent culture conditions. We showed that cells obtained from spheres that display self-renewing properties, have multi-lineage differentiation potential, could generate complex branched tubular structures in vitro and form tumours in NOD/SCID mice. We analysed these cells for the expression of human stem and CSC markers and are currently investigating the tumour-initiating properties of these cells and the hierarchical organization of normal and neoplastic canine mammary tissue.

  18. Models of breast morphogenesis based on localization of stem cells in the developing mammary lobule.

    PubMed

    Honeth, Gabriella; Schiavinotto, Tommaso; Vaggi, Federico; Marlow, Rebecca; Kanno, Tokuwa; Shinomiya, Ireneusz; Lombardi, Sara; Buchupalli, Bharath; Graham, Rosalind; Gazinska, Patrycja; Ramalingam, Vernie; Burchell, Joy; Purushotham, Anand D; Pinder, Sarah E; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Dontu, Gabriela

    2015-04-14

    Characterization of normal breast stem cells is important for understanding their role in breast development and in breast cancer. However, the identity of these cells is a subject of controversy and their localization in the breast epithelium is not known. In this study, we utilized a novel approach to analyze the morphogenesis of mammary lobules, by combining one-dimensional theoretical models and computer-generated 3D fractals. Comparing predictions of these models with immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections for candidate stem cell markers, we defined distinct areas where stem cells reside in the mammary lobule. An increased representation of stem cells was found in smaller, less developed lobules compared to larger, more mature lobules, with marked differences in the gland of nulliparous versus parous women and that of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers versus non-carriers.

  19. Dynamics of Lgr6+ Progenitor Cells in the Hair Follicle, Sebaceous Gland, and Interfollicular Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Füllgrabe, Anja; Joost, Simon; Are, Alexandra; Jacob, Tina; Sivan, Unnikrishnan; Haegebarth, Andrea; Linnarsson, Sten; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; Toftgård, Rune; Kasper, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Summary The dynamics and interactions between stem cell pools in the hair follicle (HF), sebaceous gland (SG), and interfollicular epidermis (IFE) of murine skin are still poorly understood. In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to mark Lgr6-expressing basal cells in the HF isthmus, SG, and IFE. We show that these Lgr6+ cells constitute long-term self-renewing populations within each compartment in adult skin. Quantitative analysis of clonal dynamics revealed that the Lgr6+ progenitor cells compete neutrally in the IFE, isthmus, and SG, indicating population asymmetry as the underlying mode of tissue renewal. Transcriptional profiling of Lgr6+ and Lgr6− cells did not reveal a distinct Lgr6-associated gene expression signature, raising the question of whether Lgr6 expression requires extrinsic niche signals. Our results elucidate the interrelation and behavior of Lgr6+ populations in the IFE, HF, and SG and suggest population asymmetry as a common mechanism for homeostasis in several epithelial skin compartments. PMID:26607954

  20. Making artificial honey using yeast cells from salivary glands of honey bees.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, K; Srinivasan, K

    2005-07-01

    The salivary glands of a honey bee, Apis cerana and the yeast cells isolated from these glands were studied for their effects on sucrose solution. This solution exhibited lowered pH and increased levels of fructose and total amino acids as the time of incubation proceeded. The solution thus made was similar to the natural honey.

  1. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G

    2009-02-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an increased gradient of expression from the neck to the base of the glands. In addition, the staining pattern of moesin revealed a branched morphology for the gastric lumen. This pattern of short branches extending from the glandular lumen was confirmed by using antibody against zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) to stain tight junctions. With a mucous neck cell probe (lectin GSII, from Griffonia simplicifolia) and a chief cell marker (pepsinogen C), immunohistochemistry revealed that the mucous neck cells at the top of the glands do not express moesin, but, progressing toward the base, mucous cells showing decreased GSII staining had low or moderate level of moesin expression. The level of moesin expression continued to increase toward the base of the glands and reached a plateau in the base where chief cells and parietal cells abound. The level of pepsinogen expression also increased toward the base. Pepsinogen C was located on cytoplasmic granules and/or more generally distributed in chief cells, whereas moesin was exclusively expressed on the apical membrane. This is a clear demonstration of distinctive cellular expression of two ERM family members in the same tissue. The results provide the first evidence that moesin is involved in the cell biology of chief cells. Novel insights on gastric gland morphology revealed by the moesin and ZO-1 staining provide the basis for a model of cell maturation and migration within the gland.

  2. Enhancing spontaneous stem cell healing (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAGUIRE, GREG; FRIEDMAN, PETER

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells are distributed throughout the human body and are responsible to a great extent for the body’s ability to maintain and heal itself. Accumulating data since the 1990s regarding stem cells have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells are not restricted to their ability to differentiate and are more likely due to their ability to release a multitude of molecules. Recent studies indicated that ≤80% of the therapeutic benefit of adult stem cells is manifested by the stem cell released molecules (SRM) rather than the differentiation of the stem cells into mature tissue. Stem cells may release potent combinations of factors that modulate the molecular composition of the cellular milieu to evoke a multitude of responses from neighboring cells. A multitude of pathways are involved in cellular and tissue function and, when the body is in a state of disease or trauma, a multitude of pathways are involved in the underlying mechanisms of that disease or trauma. Therefore, stem cells represent a natural systems-based biological factory for the production and release of a multitude of molecules that interact with the system of biomolecular circuits underlying disease or tissue damage. Currently, efforts are aimed at defining, stimulating, enhancing and harnessing SRM mechanisms, in order to develop systems-based methods for tissue regeneration, develop drugs/biologics or other therapeutics and enhance the release of SRM into the body for natural healing through proper dietary, exercise and other lifestyle strategies. PMID:24649089

  3. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  4. Stem cells of the skin epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Laura; Fuchs, Elaine

    2003-01-01

    Tissue stem cells form the cellular base for organ homeostasis and repair. Stem cells have the unusual ability to renew themselves over the lifetime of the organ while producing daughter cells that differentiate into one or multiple lineages. Difficult to identify and characterize in any tissue, these cells are nonetheless hotly pursued because they hold the potential promise of therapeutic reprogramming to grow human tissue in vitro, for the treatment of human disease. The mammalian skin epithelium exhibits remarkable turnover, punctuated by periods of even more rapid production after injury due to burn or wounding. The stem cells responsible for supplying this tissue with cellular substrate are not yet easily distinguishable from neighboring cells. However, in recent years a significant body of work has begun to characterize the skin epithelial stem cells, both in tissue culture and in mouse and human skin. Some epithelial cells cultured from skin exhibit prodigious proliferative potential; in fact, for >20 years now, cultured human skin has been used as a source of new skin to engraft onto damaged areas of burn patients, representing one of the first therapeutic uses of stem cells. Cell fate choices, including both self-renewal and differentiation, are crucial biological features of stem cells that are still poorly understood. Skin epithelial stem cells represent a ripe target for research into the fundamental mechanisms underlying these important processes. PMID:12913119

  5. Transdifferentiation of Stem Cells: A Critical View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruh, Ina; Martin, Ulrich

    Recently a large amount of new data on the plasticity of stem cells of various lineages have emerged, providing new perspectives especially for the therapeutic application of adult stem cells. Previously unknown possibilities of cell differentiation beyond the known commitment of a given stem cell have been described using keywords such as "blood to liver," or "bone to brain." Controversies on the likelihood, as well as the biological significance, of these conversions almost immediately arose within this young field of stem cell biology. This chapter will concentrate on these controversies and focus on selected examples demonstrating the technical aspects of stem cell transdifferentiation and the evaluation of the tools used to analyze these events.

  6. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  7. Isolation and Culture of Embryonic Stem Cells, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Dendritic Cells from Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Kar, Srabani; Mitra, Shinjini; Banerjee, Ena Ray

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are cells capable of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into specific phenotypes. They are an essential part of tissue engineering, which is used in regenerative medicine in case of degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we describe the methods of isolating and culturing various types of stem cells, like human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs), murine bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBM-MSCs), murine adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (mAD-MSCs), and murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (mBMDCs). All these cell types can be used in tissue engineering techniques.

  8. Characterization of muscarinic receptors on isolated swine tracheal submucosal gland cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.M.; Dwyer, T.M.; Farley, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    Muscarinic receptors play an important role in the regulation of tracheobronchial secretion. Tracheal epithelium was cut into small pieces (approx.10 mm/sup 2/) and dissociated using collagenase in HEPES-Ringer solution at 37/sup 0/C. After dissociation the glands cells were isolated by discontinuous Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Submucosal gland cells concentrated above the layers with densities of 1.084 and 1.057 g/ml after centrifugation at x 500 g for 10 min at 15/sup 0/C. Cell viability was > 95% as determined by exclusion of trypan blue. Over 98% of the isolated cells were identified by periodic acid Schiff staining method to be gland cells. Muscarinic receptors on intact gland cells were characterized using the binding of specific muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) binding. Scatchard plot analysis of saturation isotherms, showed that the maximal receptor density (B/sub max/) and dissociation constant (K/sub D/) were 7400 +/- 200 sites/cell and 100 +/- 20 pM, respectively (n = 3). These two parameters were less than those from cat tracheal gland cells, B/sub max/ = 42,000 sites/cell and K/sub D/ = 200 pM. In conclusion, this study provided a useful method to isolate tracheal gland cells and characterized the presence of muscarinic receptors on isolated intact cells.

  9. Isolation of dendritic-cell-like S100β-positive cells in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kanno, Naoko; Yashiro, Takashi; Tateno, Kozue; Osako, Shunji; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    S100β-protein-positive cells in the anterior pituitary gland appear to possess multifunctional properties. Because of their pleiotropic features, S100β-positive cells are assumed to be of a heterogeneous or even a non-pituitary origin. The observation of various markers has allowed these cells to be classified into populations such as stem/progenitor cells, epithelial cells, astrocytes and dendritic cells. The isolation and characterization of each heterogeneous population is a prerequisite for clarifying the functional character and origin of the cells. We attempt to isolate two of the subpopulations of S100β-positive cells from the anterior lobe. First, from transgenic rats that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the S100β protein promoter, we fractionate GFP-positive cells with a cell sorter and culture them so that they can interact with laminin, a component of the extracellular matrix. We observe that one morphological type of GFP-positive cells possesses extended cytoplasmic processes and shows high adhesiveness to laminin (process type), whereas the other is round in shape and exhibits low adherence to laminin (round type). We successfully isolate cells of the round type from the cultured GFP-positive cells by taking advantage of their low affinity to laminin and then measure mRNA levels of the two cell types by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The resultant data show that the process type expresses vimentin (mesenchymal cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte marker). The round type expresses dendritic cell markers, CD11b and interleukin-6. Thus, we found a method for isolating dendritic-cell-like S100β-positive cells by means of their property of adhering to laminin.

  10. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

  11. Epigenetic Targeting of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer (OC). As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cell (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC towards a differentiated phenotype, by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH+ OC cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH+ cells, including their tumor initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced re-expression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by re-programming residual cancer stem-like cells. Further, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  12. Improving Stem Cell Therapeutics with Mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Won; Mooney, David J.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that mechanical cues play an integral role in maintaining stem cell functions. Here we discuss how integrating physical approaches and engineering principles in stem cell biology, including culture systems, preclinical models, and functional assessment, may improve clinical application in regenerative medicine. PMID:26748752

  13. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the…

  14. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n = 363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients.

  15. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  16. Stem cell banking: between traceability and identifiability.

    PubMed

    Knoppers, Bartha M; Isasi, Rosario

    2010-10-05

    Stem cell banks are increasingly seen as an essential resource of biological materials for both basic and translational research. Stem cell banks support transnational access to quality-controlled and ethically sourced stem cell lines from different origins and of varying grades. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, advances in regenerative medicine are leading to the development of a bioeconomy, 'a world where biotechnology contributes to a significant share of economic output'. Consequently, stem cell banks are destined to constitute a pillar of the bioeconomy in many countries. While certain ethical and legal concerns are specific to the nature of stem cells, stem cell banking could do well to examine the approaches fostered by tissue banking generally. Indeed, the past decade has seen a move to simplify and harmonize biological tissue and data banking so as to foster international interoperability. In particular, the issues of consent and of traceability illustrate not only commonalities but the opportunity for stem cell banking to appreciate the lessons learned in biobanking generally. This paper analyzes convergence and divergence in issues surrounding policy harmonization, transnational sharing, informed consent, traceability and return of results in the context of stem cell banks.

  17. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  18. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  19. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene expression profiles of...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0106 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve

  20. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion. We have used FAC sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0107 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic

  1. Stem cells and lineages of the intestine: a developmental and evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Gold, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition, migratory, multipotent stem cells (interstitial cells) contribute to the production of intestinal cells. In other phyla, intestinal cell replacement is solely the function of stem cells entering the gut from the outside (such as in case of the neoblasts of platyhelmints) or intestinal stem cells located within the midgut epithelium (as in both vertebrates or arthropods). We will attempt in the following to review important aspects of midgut stem cells in different animal groups: where are they located, what types of lineages do they produce, and how do they develop. We will start out with a comparative survey of midgut cell types found across the animal kingdom; then briefly look at the specification of these cells during embryonic development; and finally focus on the stem cells that regenerate midgut cells during adult life. In a number of model systems, including mouse, zebrafish and Drosophila, the molecular pathways controlling ISC proliferation and the specification of intestinal cell types are under intensive investigation. We will highlight findings of the recent literature, focusing on aspects that are shared between the different models and that point at evolutionary ancient mechanisms of intestinal cell formation. PMID:23179635

  2. Distinct expression profile of stem cell markers, LGR5 and LGR6, in basaloid skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Gun; Lee, Cheol; Kim, Hye Sung; Shin, Myung Soo; Cheon, Min Seok; Kim, Jae Wang; Kim, Woo Ho

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian epidermis, which is composed of hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and interfollicular epidermis, is maintained by discrete stem cells. In vivo lineage tracing demonstrated that murine LGR5 cells are mainly responsible for hair follicle regeneration whereas LGR6 cells generate sebaceous glands and interfollicular epidermis. However, little is known about their expression in the human skin tumors. In this study, we investigated the expression profile of LGR5 and LGR6 in a variety of human skin tumors including basaloid tumors with follicular differentiation (94 basal cell carcinomas, 18 trichoepitheliomas, 3 basaloid follicular hamartomas, and 12 pilomatricomas) and tumors with ductal differentiation (7 eccrine poromas, 8 hidradenomas, and 5 spiradenomas). LGR5 expression was highest in basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) followed by trichoepitheliomas (TEs) and basaloid follicular hamartomas. LGR6 had the same expression pattern as LGR5, even though its expression was lower. Interestingly, LGR6 expression was detected in stromal cells around the tumor and papillary mesenchymal bodies of TEs but not in stromal cells of BCCs, suggesting different characteristics of tumor-associated fibroblasts between TEs and BCCs. It was unexpected to find that pilomatricomas exclusively expressed LGR6, and its expression was limited to the basaloid cells. Notably, LGR6-positive cells were observed in sweat gland ductal cells in normal skin. This might explain, in part, the finding that LGR6 expression was relatively higher in basaloid tumors with ductal differentiation than in those with follicular differentiation. In particular, spiradenomas displayed the same distribution pattern of LGR6 as normal sweat glands, suggesting the possibility of LGR6-positive cells as tumor stem cells. In conclusion, we documented the different expression patterns of stem cell markers, LGR5 and LGR6 in various skin tumors. These data may provide important insights to understand the origin and

  3. Computational Tools for Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Bian, Qin; Cahan, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    For over half a century, the field of developmental biology has leveraged computation to explore mechanisms of developmental processes. More recently, computational approaches have been critical in the translation of high throughput data into knowledge of both developmental and stem cell biology. In the past several years, a new subdiscipline of computational stem cell biology has emerged that synthesizes the modeling of systems-level aspects of stem cells with high-throughput molecular data. In this review, we provide an overview of this new field and pay particular attention to the impact that single cell transcriptomics is expected to have on our understanding of development and our ability to engineer cell fate.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Fatima; Omenetti, Alessia; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2011-01-01

    Because cell turnover occurs in all adult organs, stem/progenitor cells within the stem-cell niche of each tissue must be appropriately mobilized and differentiated to maintain normal organ structure and function. Tissue injury increases the demands on this process, and thus may unmask defective regulation of pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh), that modulate progenitor cell fate. Hh pathway dysregulation has been demonstrated in many types of cancer, including pancreatic and liver cancers, in which defective Hh signaling has been linked to outgrowth of Hh-responsive cancer stem-initiating cells and stromal elements. Hence, the Hh pathway might be a therapeutic target in such tumors. PMID:21188169

  5. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  6. [Application prospect of adult stem cells in male infertility].

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Feng; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2013-05-01

    The study on stem cells is a hot field in biomedical science in recent years, and has furthered from laboratory to clinical application. Stem cells, according to their developmental stage and differential properties, can be divided into embryonic stem cells, induced PS cells and adult stem cells, among which, adult stem cells have already been applied to the clinical treatment of many systemic diseases. Currently, the study of spermatogonial stem cells and adult stem cells is in the front of the basic researches on the treatment of male infertility, but the time has not yet arrived for their clinical application. This paper outlines the application prospect of adult stem cells in male infertility.

  7. CD44 integrates signaling in normal stem cell, cancer stem cell and (pre)metastatic niches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karin; Motiani, Karan; Giridhar, Premkumar Vummidi; Kasper, Susan

    2013-03-01

    The stem cell niche provides a regulatory microenvironment for cells as diverse as totipotent embryonic stem cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs) which exhibit stem cell-like characteristics and have the capability of regenerating the bulk of tumor cells while maintaining self-renewal potential. The transmembrane glycoprotein CD44 is a common component of the stem cell niche and exists as a standard isoform (CD44s) and a range of variant isoforms (CD44v) generated though alternative splicing. CD44 modulates signal transduction through post-translational modifications as well as interactions with hyaluronan, extracellular matrix molecules and growth factors and their cognate receptor tyrosine kinases. While the function of CD44 in hematopoietic stem cells has been studied in considerable detail, our knowledge of CD44 function in tissue-derived stem cell niches remains limited. Here we review CD44s and CD44v in both hematopoietic and tissue-derived stem cell niches, focusing on their roles in regulating stem cell behavior including self-renewal and differentiation in addition to cell-matrix interactions and signal transduction during cell migration and tumor progression. Determining the role of CD44 and CD44v in normal stem cell, CSC and (pre)metastatic niches and elucidating their unique functions could provide tools and therapeutic strategies for treating diseases as diverse as fibrosis during injury repair to cancer progression.

  8. Management of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arslanoğlu, Seçil; Eren, Erdem; Özkul, Yılmaz; Ciğer, Ejder; Kopar, Aylin; Önal, Kazım; Etit, Demet; Tütüncü, G Yazgı

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma; and the association between clinicopathological parameters and thyroid gland invasion. Medical records of 75 patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent total laryngectomy with thyroidectomy were reviewed, retrospectively. Preoperative computed tomography scans, clinical and operative findings, and histopathological data of the specimens were evaluated. There were 73 male and two female patients with an age range of 41-88 years (mean 60.4 years). Hemithyroidectomy was performed in 62 (82.7 %) and total thyroidectomy was performed in 13 patients (17.3 %). Four patients had histopathologically proven thyroid gland invasion (5.3 %). In three patients, thyroid gland involvement was by means of direct invasion. Thyroid gland invasion was significantly correlated with thyroid cartilage invasion. Therefore, prophylactic thyroidectomy should not be a part of the treatment policy for these tumors.

  9. [Stem cells--cloning, plasticity, bioethic].

    PubMed

    Pflegerl, Pamina; Keller, Thomas; Hantusch, Brigitte; Hoffmann, Thomas Sören; Kenner, Lukas

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells with certain characteristics have become promising tools for molecular medicine. They have the potential to self-regenerate and to differentiate into specific tissues. Besides their great potential, embryonic stem cells (ESC) run the risk of enhanced tumorigenesis. The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is ethically problematic because their isolation involves the destruction of human embryos. Recently developed methods generate are able to pluripotent stem cells from fibroblasts. Alternatives for ESC are adult stem cells (ASC) derived from bone marrow, cord blood, amniotic fluid and other tissues. The following article is on the basis of testimony of Lukas Kenner for the German Bundestag about the use of ESC for research, therapy and drug development. Ethical aspects are taken into consideration.

  10. [Biological properties of spermatogonial stem cell niches].

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Ling; Liu, Yang; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Xue-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are closely related to their niches. Naturally, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the only adult stem cells in the body, which can transfer genetic information into the offspring. An insight into the modulation of the self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs can help elucidate the mechanisms of spermatogenesis and investigate the proliferation and differentiation of other adult stem cells. Therefore, the SSC system provides an ideal model for researches on the adult stem cell niche. More and more evidence indicates that the self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are regulated by their niches. Based on our previous work and other related findings recently reported, this article presents an overview on the biological properties of SSC niches and their relationship with the self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs, focusing on the basic properties and components of SSC niches and various regulatory factors they produce.

  11. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization failure.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, Fatih; Kaynar, Leylagül

    2015-08-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an important and often life saving treatment for many hematological malignancies and selected solid tumors. To rescue hematopoiesis after high-dose chemotherapy in autologous HSCT depends on maintaining sufficient stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells expressing CD34 in the BM are mobilized into the circulation with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor ± chemotherapy prior to autologous HSCT. One of the most important factors for success of autologous HSCT is hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) count. Minimum threshold for the engraftment of hematopoietic cells is accepted as 2 × 10(6) CD34 + cells/kg especially for platelet engraftment. Below this level it is defined as stem cell mobilization failure. There are several factors affecting stem cell mobilization: prior chemotherapy (such as fludarabine, melphalan, lenalidomide) and radiotherapy, age, type of disease, bone marrow cellularity. We tried to summarize the reasons of peripheral stem cell mobilization failure.

  12. Planarians, a tale of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, L; Salvetti, A; Batistoni, R; Deri, P; Gremigni, V

    2008-01-01

    Planarians possess amazing abilities to regulate tissue homeostasis and regenerate missing body parts. These features reside on the presence of a population of pluripotent/totipotent stem cells, the neoblasts, which are considered as the only planarian cells able to proliferate in the asexual strains. Neoblast distribution has been identified by mapping the cells incorporating bromodeoxyuridine, analyzing mitotic figures and using cell proliferation markers. Recently identified molecular markers specifically label subgroups of neoblasts, revealing thus the heterogeneity of the planarian stem cell population. Therefore, the apparent totipotency of neoblasts probably reflects the composite activities of multiple stem cell types. First steps have been undertaken to understand how neoblasts and differentiated cells communicate with each other to adapt the self-renewal and differentiation rates of neoblasts to the demands of the body. Moreover, the introduction of molecular resource database on planarians now paves the way to renewed strategies to understand planarian regeneration and stem cell-related issues.

  13. Functional ion channels in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Bioelectrical signals generated by ion channels play crucial roles in excitation genesis and impulse conduction in excitable cells as well as in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in proliferative cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that multiple ion channels are heterogeneously present in different stem cells; however, patterns and phenotypes of ion channels are species- and/or origin-dependent. This editorial review focuses on the recent findings related to the expression of functional ion channels and the roles of these channels in regulation of cell proliferation in stem cells. Additional effort is required in the future to clarify the ion channel expression in different types of stem cells; special attention should be paid to the relationship between ion channels and stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. PMID:21607133

  14. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  15. An introduction to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Joanna; Rastegarlari, Ghasem; Nathwani, Amit C

    2010-10-01

    Recent landmark studies show that it is now possible to convert somatic cells, such as skin fibroblasts and B lymphocytes, into pluripotent stem cells that closely resemble embryonic stem cells. These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated without using human embryos or oocytes, thus bypassing some of the ethical issues that have limited the use of human embryonic stems (hES) cells. Additionally, they can be derived from the patient to be treated, thereby overcoming problems of immunological rejection associated with the use of allogeneic hES cell derived progenitors. Whilst these patient-specific iPS cells have great clinical potential, their immediate utility is likely to be in drug screening and for understanding the disease process. This review discusses the promise of iPS cells as well as the challenges to their use in the clinic.

  16. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-11-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  17. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  18. Stem cells and liver engineering.

    PubMed

    Ordovás, Laura; Park, Yonsil; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2013-11-15

    Human hepatocytes, suitable for treatment of patients with liver failure, for the creation of bioartificial (BAL) devices, or for studies for toxicity and metabolization studies in the pharmaceutical industry, are in short supply due to the lack of donor organs. Therefore, methods that allow ex vivo expansion of hepatocytes with mature function are being pursued. One cell source, believed to be a possible inexhaustible source of hepatocytes, is pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). However, directed differentiation of PSCs to cells with features of adult hepatocytes is not yet possible. Differentiated progeny remains mixed and PSC progeny does not have a number of the functional features of mature hepatocytes. In this review article, we will address tools being developed that allow for the identification of mature hepatocytes, in a non-invasive manner; to perform lineage tracing of PSC progeny; and novel culture systems being created for the in vitro differentiation of PSCs to hepatocyte like cells, and for the maintenance of primary liver derived hepatocytes or PSC-derived hepatic progeny in culture. As conventional two-dimensional (2D) static culture conditions poorly recapitulate the in vivo cellular environment, we will discuss bioreactor systems for liver tissue engineering, both macro-scale and micro-scale culture systems.

  19. Stem cells from oral niches: a review

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Guido; La Monaca, Gerardo; Annibali, Susanna; Cicconetti, Andrea; Ottolenghi, Livia

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aim Stem cell research in recent years have been considered the most advanced sort of medical-scientific research and early results have aroused great expectations. Also in dentistry many studies were performed with the final aim of obtaining new bone and new teeth. In this work we describe the state of the art in dental science stem cell research. Methods We have performed a web-based research on MEDLINE within (www.pubmed.gov). We have used “stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth” (24 paper found), “periodontal ligament stem cells” (32 paper found), “stem cell apical papilla” (16 paper found), “dental pulp stem cells” (136 paper found) as keywords for research. For each keyword we have performed a complete review focusing on knowledge upgrade. Results For each topic was created a selection of papers in chronological order of publication date so to give a timetable of the development of the research for each niche. Conclusion Research about stem cell from oral niches began in 2000 and every year papers publicated were more than the precedent. This review analysed about 180 articles most of which in the last 5 years. Dentla pulp from adult as from deciduous teeth seems to be the most valuable font of stem cells due to the pluripotential type of cells. PMID:22238715

  20. The Influence of 13-cis Retinoic Acid on Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Kam, Wendy R.; Dieckow, Julia; Sullivan, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a primary cause of dry eye disease. One of the risk factors for MGD is exposure to 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), a metabolite of vitamin A. However, the mechanism is not well understood. We hypothesize that 13-cis RA inhibits cell proliferation, promotes cell death, alters gene and protein expressions, and attenuates cell survival pathways in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. To test our hypotheses, immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured with or without 13-cis RA for varying doses and time. Cell proliferation, cell death, gene expression, and proteins involved in proliferation/survival and inflammation were evaluated. Results. We found that 13-cis RA inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death, and significantly altered the expression of 6726 genes, including those involved in cell proliferation, cell death, differentiation, keratinization, and inflammation, in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Further, 13-cis RA also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and increased the generation of interleukin-1β and matrix metallopeptidase 9. Conclusions. Exposure to 13-cis RA inhibits cell proliferation, increases cell death, alters gene expression, changes signaling pathways, and promotes inflammatory mediator and protease expression in meibomian gland epithelial cells. These effects may be responsible, at least in part, for the 13-cis RA–related induction of MGD. PMID:23722388

  1. [Stem cells of mammalian brain: biology of the stem cells in vivo and in vitro].

    PubMed

    Viktorov, I V

    2001-01-01

    Stem cells are totipotent cells of the blastocyst (embryonal stem cells) and multipotent germinative cells of ento-, ecto-, and mesoderm that give rise to all tissues during embryogenesis. The stem cells have high proliferation activity and an unlimited capacity for self-production by symmetrical mitosis. Asymmetrical mitosis of the stem cells generates daughter cells ("progenitor cells") with unlimited proliferation potential. During differentiation, the progenitor cells give rise to definitive somatic cells. The stem and progenitor cells are preserved in most tissues of adult organism and provide for the constant replacement of the cells after their physiological death and damage. At the end of last century, stem cells were found in the brain of the adult mouse and rat and later in the brain of other mammals including humans. The subependymal zone of the lateral ventricles is considered the site of stem cells localization; however, there are indications of stem cells origination from ependyma while the subependymal zone serves as a collector of the progenitor cells where these cells divide. The problem of the localization of stem cells in a mature brain has not yet been resolved and is actively discussed. The stem and progenitor cells, as well as neuro- and gliogenesis, are most explored in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The progenitor cells migrate to the olfactory bulb from the subependymal zone of the lateral ventricles via a rostral migratory stream formed by the astrocytes, and then they differentiate to neural and glial cells. In the hippocampus, the neurons are formed in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus. The discovery of stem and progenitor cells in the mature brain and their subsequent investigation point to an ongoing neuro- and gliogenesis in all periventricular sections of the brain and spinal cord during the whole animal or human lifespan. These processes proved to be related to the functional condition of CNS, and the de novo formed neural

  2. Regenerative medicine for the kidney: renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Akito; Nakasatomi, Masao; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney has the capacity for regeneration and repair after a variety of insults. Over the past few decades, factors that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. By using kidney injury animal models, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic growth factors, transcription factors, and extracellular matrix in this process has been examined. The identification of renal stem cells in the adult kidney as well as in the embryonic kidney is an active area of research. Cell populations expressing putative stem cell markers or possessing stem cell properties have been found in the tubules, interstitium, and glomeruli of the normal kidney. Cell therapies with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have been highly effective for the treatment of acute or chronic renal failure in animals. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are also utilized for the construction of artificial kidneys or renal components. In this review, we highlight the advances in regenerative medicine for the kidney from the perspective of renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapies and discuss the issues to be solved to realize regenerative therapy for kidney diseases in humans.

  3. Curbing stem cell tourism in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Stem cells have received much attention globally due in part to the immense therapeutic potential they harbor. Unfortunately, malpractice and exploitation (financial and emotional) of vulnerable patients have also drawn attention to this field as a result of the detrimental consequences experienced by some individuals that have undergone unproven stem cell therapies. South Africa has had limited exposure to stem cells and their applications and, while any exploitation is detrimental to the field of stem cells, South Africa is particularly vulnerable in this regard. The current absence of adequate legislation and the inability to enforce existing legislation, coupled to the sea of misinformation available on the Internet could lead to an increase in illegitimate stem cell practices in South Africa. Circumstances are already precarious because of a lack of understanding of concepts involved in stem cell applications. What is more, credible and easily accessible information is not available to the public. This in turn cultivates fears born out of existing superstitions, cultural beliefs, rituals and practices. Certain cultural or religious concerns could potentially hinder the effective application of stem cell therapies in South Africa and novel ways of addressing these concerns are necessary. Understanding how scientific progress and its implementation will affect each individual and, consequently, the community, will be of cardinal importance to the success of the fields of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine in South Africa. A failure to understand the ethical, cultural or moral ramifications when new scientific concepts are introduced could hinder the efficacy and speed of bringing discoveries to the patient. Neglecting proper procedure for establishing the field would lead to long delays in gaining public support in South Africa. Understanding the dangers of stem cell tourism - where vulnerable patients are subjected to unproven stem cell therapies that

  4. Stem cells for the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2007-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and over 6% of the population is affected worldwide. The success achieved over the last few years with islet transplantation suggest that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient beta cells. These observations are proof of concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes or other diseases not only by cell transplantation but also by stem cells. Work with ES cells has not yet produced cells with the phenotype of true beta cells, but there has been recent progress in directing ES cells to the endoderm. Bone marrow-derived stem cells could initiate pancreatic regeneration. Pancreatic stem/progenitor cells have been identified, and the formation of new beta cells from duct, acinar and liver cells is an active area of investigation. Some agents including glucagon-like peptide-1/exendin-4 can stimulate the regeneration of beta cells in vivo. Overexpression of embryonic transcription factors in stem cells could efficiently induce their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. New technology, known as protein transduction technology, facilitates the differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Recent progress in the search for new sources of beta cells has opened up several possibilities for the development of new treatments for diabetes.

  5. From adult stem cells to cancer stem cells: Oct-4 Gene, cell-cell communication, and hormones during tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2006-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is characterized by "initiation," "promotion," and "progression" phases. The "stem cell theory" and "de-differentiation" theories are used to explain the origin of cancer. Growth control for stem cells, which lack functional gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), involves negative soluble or niche factors, while for progenitor cells, it involves GJIC. Tumor promoters, hormones, and growth factors inhibit GJIC reversibly. Oncogenes stably inhibit GJIC. Cancer cells, which lack growth control and the ability to terminally differentiate and to apoptose, lack GJIC. The Oct3/4 gene, a POU (Pit-Oct-Unc) family of transcription factors was thought to be expressed only in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells. With the availability of normal adult human stem cells, tests for the expression of Oct3/4 gene and the stem cell theory in human carcinogenesis became possible. Human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme, and gastric stem cells, HeLa and MCF-7 cells, and canine tumors were tested with antibodies and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for Oct3/4. Adult human breast stem cells, immortalized nontumorigenic and tumor cell lines, but not the normal differentiated cells, expressed Oct3/4. Adult human differentiated cells lose their Oct-4 expression. Oct3/4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that normal adult stem cells and cancer stem cells maintain expression of Oct3/4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis. These Oct-4 positive cells might represent the "cancer stem cells." A strategy to target "cancer stem cells" is to suppress the Oct-4 gene in order to cause the cells to differentiate.

  6. Stem cells and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Handberg-Thorsager, Mette; Fernandez, Enrique; Salo, Emili

    2008-05-01

    Understanding stem cells is a major goal of current research because of its potential medical applications. Although great advances have been made, such as the culturing and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and reprogramming of cell fates, many basic questions remain unanswered. Describing the mechanisms underlying regeneration will help to understand the biology of stem cells and therefore to control their behavior. While regeneration is being studied in a variety of models, the planarian is particularly noteworthy. In this model system a fragment as small as 1/279 of the animal can regenerate completely within a few weeks. These animals can also grow and degrow--specifically degenerating certain tissues--according to environmental conditions, thus demonstrating a complete control of their stem cell dynamics. However, one of the most interesting aspects of the planarian model system is the presence of a unique type of stem cell that can differentiate into all cell types found in the organism, including the germ line. This represents a simple, extremely powerful, and accessible stem cell system in which to address a variety of important questions. In the last ten years, molecular, cellular, and bioinformatics tools have been established for use in this model, making it ideally placed for in vivo analysis of stem cells in their natural environment without ethical complications.

  7. [Stem cells: limitations and opportunities in Peru].

    PubMed

    Amiel-Pérez, José; Casado, Fanny

    2015-10-01

    Stem cells are defined as rare cells that are characterized by asymmetric division, a process known as self-renewal, and the potential to differentiate into more than one type of terminally differentiated cell. There is a diversity of stem cells including embryonic stem cells, which exist only during the first stages of human development, and many adult stem cells depending on the specific tissues from where they derive or the ones derived from mesenchymal or stromal tissues. On the other hand, there are induced pluripotent stem cells generated by genetic engineering with similar properties to embryonic stem cells that are derived from adult tissues without the ethical and legal limitations. In all cases, there are many questions that are being addressed by research in basic sciences to better inform clinical practice. In Peru, there is much to do refining techniques and improving methodologies, which requires experience, proper facilities and highly specialized human resources. However, there are interesting efforts to place Peruvian stem cell research in the international scientific arena.

  8. The Hagfish Gland Thread Cell: A Fiber-Producing Cell Involved in Predator Defense

    PubMed Central

    Fudge, Douglas S.; Schorno, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Fibers are ubiquitous in biology, and include tensile materials produced by specialized glands (such as silks), extracellular fibrils that reinforce exoskeletons and connective tissues (such as chitin and collagen), as well as intracellular filaments that make up the metazoan cytoskeleton (such as F-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments). Hagfish gland thread cells are unique in that they produce a high aspect ratio fiber from cytoskeletal building blocks within the confines of their cytoplasm. These threads are elaborately coiled into structures that readily unravel when they are ejected into seawater from the slime glands. In this review we summarize what is currently known about the structure and function of gland thread cells and we speculate about the mechanism that these cells use to produce a mechanically robust fiber that is almost one hundred thousand times longer than it is wide. We propose that a key feature of this mechanism involves the unidirectional rotation of the cell’s nucleus, which would serve to twist disorganized filaments into a coherent thread and impart a torsional stress on the thread that would both facilitate coiling and drive energetic unravelling in seawater. PMID:27258313

  9. PLURIPOTENT STEM CELL APPLICATIONS FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Angelos, Mathew G.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review In this review, we summarize the current status of clinical trials using therapeutic cells produced from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We also discuss combined cell and gene therapy via correction of defined mutations in human pluripotent stem cells and provide commentary on key obstacles facing wide-scale clinical adoption of pluripotent stem cell-based therapy. Recent Findings Initial data suggest hESC/hiPSC-derived cell products used for retinal repair and spinal cord injury are safe for human use. Early stage studies for treatment of cardiac injury and diabetes are also in progress. However, there remain key concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of these cells that need to be addressed in additional well-designed clinical trials. Advances using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system offer an improved tool for more rapid and on-target gene correction of genetic diseases. Combined gene and cell therapy using human pluripotent stem cells may provide an additional curative approach for disabling or lethal genetic and degenerative diseases where there are currently limited therapeutic opportunities. Summary Human pluripotent stem cells are emerging as a promising tool to produce cells and tissues suitable for regenerative therapy for a variety of genetic and degenerative diseases. PMID:26536430

  10. Stem cells in pediatric heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pillekamp, F; Khalil, M; Emmel, M; Brockmeier, K; Hescheler, J

    2008-06-01

    Pediatric heart failure could be a target for regenerative therapy. Stem cell-based therapy has the potential to provide functional cardiomyocytes. Whereas adult stem cells have shown no or only minimal therapeutic benefit in adults with no evidence of transdifferentiation, embryonic stem cells can differentiate to any cell type, including cardiomyocytes. However, ethical concerns and immunological problems are associated with embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Recently, somatic cells could be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state (i.e. induced pluripotent stem cells) with the help of transcription factors. This technique removes ethical and probably also immunological concerns. Nevertheless extensive experimental research will be necessary before cell replacement strategies become clinically applicable. Because the underlying pathophysiology differs significantly with age, caution is warranted extrapolating data obtained in experimental models of cardiac ischemia and clinical studies in adults to the pediatric population. Pediatric heart failure has a good prognosis if causal therapy is possible. However, some forms of congenital heart disease and especially dilated cardiomyopathy still have limited therapeutic options. Almost half of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy receive a transplant or die within two years. The authors will review the relevant stem cell sources for cell-based treatments. And, given the differences of the underlying diseases between adult and pediatric patients with heart failure, it is contemplated which condition of pediatric patients with heart failure is most likely to benefit and which cell type would be appropriate.

  11. Signal propagation in stem-cell niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2009-09-01

    Stem cells, maintaining tissue homeostasis, are nurtured in microscopic niches formed of so-called environmental cells. The kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of stem cells in such niches depend on their interaction with the messenger proteins secreted by environmental cells. We propose a generic mean-field kinetic model of the propagation of such signals. To motivate our study, we briefly describe a stem-cell niche in the Drosophila ovary. Our model is however applicable to other niches as well. In particular, it helps one to understand the necessary conditions for the niche function. For example, the model predicts that in the case of the Drosophila ovary each germline stem cell should have in the external membrane at least 700 receptors interacting with the signaling Dpp and Gpp proteins emanating from the cap cells.

  12. Multipotent Stem Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karra, Ravi; Wu, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The potential for stem cells to ameliorate or cure heart diseases has galvanized a cadre of cardiovascular translational and clinical scientists to take a “first-in-man” approach using autologous stem cells from a variety of tissues. However, recent clinical trial data show that when these cells are given by intracoronary infusion or direct myocardial injection, limited improvement in heart function occurs with no evidence of cardiomyogenesis. These studies illustrate the great need to understand the logic of cell-lineage commitment and the principles of cardiac differentiation. Recent identification of stem/progenitor cells of embryological origin with intrinsic competence to differentiate into multiple lineages within the heart offers new possibilities for cardiac regeneration. When combined with developments in nuclear reprogramming and provided that tumor risks and other challenges of embryonic cell transplantation can be overcome, the prospect of achieving autologous, cardiomyogenic, stem cell-based therapy may be within reach. PMID:18307403

  13. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed.

  14. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  16. Stem cell applications in military medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are many similarities between health issues affecting military and civilian patient populations, with the exception of the relatively small but vital segment of active soldiers who experience high-energy blast injuries during combat. A rising incidence of major injuries from explosive devices in recent campaigns has further complicated treatment and recovery, highlighting the need for tissue regenerative options and intensifying interest in the possible role of stem cells for military medicine. In this review we outline the array of tissue-specific injuries typically seen in modern combat - as well as address a few complications unique to soldiers - and discuss the state of current stem cell research in addressing each area. Embryonic, induced-pluripotent and adult stem cell sources are defined, along with advantages and disadvantages unique to each cell type. More detailed stem cell sources are described in the context of each tissue of interest, including neural, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and sensory tissues, with brief discussion of their potential role in regenerative medicine moving forward. Additional commentary is given to military stem cell applications aside from regenerative medicine, such as blood pharming, immunomodulation and drug screening, with an overview of stem cell banking and the unique opportunity provided by the military and civilian overlap of stem cell research. PMID:22011454

  17. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bull, Elizabeth; Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Sheth, Roosey; Seifalian, Amelia; Green, Mark; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored.

  18. Stem cell applications in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Gregory T; Nesti, Leon J

    2011-10-19

    There are many similarities between health issues affecting military and civilian patient populations, with the exception of the relatively small but vital segment of active soldiers who experience high-energy blast injuries during combat. A rising incidence of major injuries from explosive devices in recent campaigns has further complicated treatment and recovery, highlighting the need for tissue regenerative options and intensifying interest in the possible role of stem cells for military medicine. In this review we outline the array of tissue-specific injuries typically seen in modern combat - as well as address a few complications unique to soldiers--and discuss the state of current stem cell research in addressing each area. Embryonic, induced-pluripotent and adult stem cell sources are defined, along with advantages and disadvantages unique to each cell type. More detailed stem cell sources are described in the context of each tissue of interest, including neural, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and sensory tissues, with brief discussion of their potential role in regenerative medicine moving forward. Additional commentary is given to military stem cell applications aside from regenerative medicine, such as blood pharming, immunomodulation and drug screening, with an overview of stem cell banking and the unique opportunity provided by the military and civilian overlap of stem cell research.

  19. Time to reconsider stem cell induction strategies.

    PubMed

    Denker, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    Recent developments in stem cell research suggest that it may be time to reconsider the current focus of stem cell induction strategies. During the previous five years, approximately, the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells, i.e., the generation of so-called 'induced pluripotent stem cells' (iPSCs), has become the focus of ongoing research in many stem cell laboratories, because this technology promises to overcome limitations (both technical and ethical) seen in the production and use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). A rapidly increasing number of publications suggest, however, that it is now possible to choose instead other, alternative ways of generating stem and progenitor cells bypassing pluripotency. These new strategies may offer important advantages with respect to ethics, as well as to safety considerations. The present communication discusses why these strategies may provide possibilities for an escape from the dilemma presented by pluripotent stem cells (self-organization potential, cloning by tetraploid complementation, patenting problems and tumor formation risk).

  20. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  1. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  2. Current stem cell based therapies in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith A; Davis, Meghan F; Fabie, Josh E; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Gallicano, G Ian

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease with wide-ranging personal and societal impacts that has been managed medicinally for over half a century. Since the discovery of stem cells, pancreatic islet regeneration has become a central target for clinical application that has the potential to decrease or eliminate the need for insulin administration and adjunctive medications. The discovery of alternative routes to pluripotency that bypass the ethical implications of embryonic stem cells has significantly expanded the horizons of stem cell based therapy. Engraftment of mature insulin producing cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells may represent the most promising treatment strategy for diabetic patients with impaired β-cell function. These cells are easily accessible and have been shown to closely mimic endogenous β-cell function in vivo. While the risks of oncogenesis and transplant rejection are still of great concern, large strides have been made on both fronts with the application of integration free induction strategies and the ongoing development of microcapsules that cloak implanted cells from an autoimmune response. This review will focus on the progress and remaining obstacles in diabetes related stem cell research, and will specifically discuss approaches using embryonic, induced pluripotent, germline and mesenchymal derived stem cells. PMID:27853630

  3. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed.

  4. Cellular quiescence in mammary stem cells and breast tumor stem cells: got testable hypotheses?

    PubMed

    Harmes, David C; DiRenzo, James

    2009-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is a state of reversible cell cycle arrest and has more recently been shown to be a blockade to differentiation and to correlate with resistance to cancer chemotherapeutics and other xenobiotics; features that are common to adult stem cells and possibly tumor stem cells. The biphasic kinetics of mammary regeneration, coupled to its cyclic endocrine control suggest that mammary stem cells most likely divide during a narrow window of the regenerative cycle and return to a state of quiescence. This would enable them to retain their proliferative capacity, resist differentiation signals and preserve their prolonged life span. There is accumulating evidence that mammary stem cells and other adult stem cells utilize quiescence for this purpose, however the degree to which tumor stem cells do so is largely unknown. The retained proliferative capacity of mammary stem cells likely enables them to accumulate and harbor mutations that lead to breast cancer initiation. However it is currently unclear if these causative lesions lead to defective or deranged quiescence in mammary stem cells. Evidence of such effects could potentially lead to the development of diagnostic systems that monitor mammary stem cell quiescence or activation. Such systems may be useful for the evaluation of patients who are at significant risk of breast cancer. Additionally quiescence has been postulated to contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. This review aims to evaluate what is known about the mechanisms governing cellular quiescence and the role of tumor stem cell quiescence in breast cancer recurrence.

  5. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response.

  6. Distinct FAK activities determine progenitor and mammary stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Song; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Mammary stem (MaSCs) and progenitor cells are important for mammary gland development and maintenance and may give rise to mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs). Yet there remains limited understanding of how these cells contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we show that conditional deletion of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in embryonic mammary epithelial cells (MaECs) decreases luminal progenitors (LPs) and basal MaSCs, reducing their colony-forming and regenerative potentials in a cell autonomous manner. Loss of FAK kinase activity in MaECs specifically impaired LP proliferation and alveologenesis, whereas a kinase-independent activity of FAK supported ductal invasion and basal MaSC activity. Deficiency in LPs suppressed tumorigenesis and MaCSC formation in a mouse model of breast cancer. In contrast to the general inhibitory effect of FAK attenuation, inhibitors of FAK kinase preferentially inhibited proliferation and tumorsphere formation of LP-like, but not MaSC-like, human breast cancer cells. Our findings establish distinct kinase dependent and independent activities of FAK that differentially regulate LPs and basal MaSCs. We suggest that targeting these distinct functions may tailor therapeutic strategies to address breast cancer heterogeneity more effectively. PMID:23832665

  7. Signet-ring cell (mucin-producing) adenocarcinomas of minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, Julien E; Freedman, Paul D

    2004-01-01

    We report seven cases of minor salivary gland carcinomas characterized by the marked presence of mucin-containing signet-ring cells. These tumors were distinctive in their microscopic appearance and displayed features not seen in any other type of salivary gland malignancy. They typically exhibited invasive growth by narrow parallel strands, randomly scattered small nests, or individually infiltrating cells. Solid, cribriform, or targetoid areas were absent, as well as papillary components. Ductal differentiation was minimal, and seen in only four cases. Degrees of cellularity varied from one area to another. The tumors were cytologically bland. We think that these tumors represent a unique subset of intraoral minor salivary gland carcinomas.

  8. Estimation of parenchymal cell content of human parathyroid glands using the image analyzing computer technique.

    PubMed Central

    Grimelius, L.; Akerström, G.; Johansson, H.; Lundqvist, H.

    1978-01-01

    By means of the image analyzing computer technique, a complete determination of the parenchymal tissue distribution in serially sectioned parathyroid glands were accomplished. The technique had good reproducibility. Taking into account the shrinkage of the different tissue components during histotechnical procedures and the tissue densities, it was possible to calculate the parenchymal cell mass of unfixed glands. The cell distribution varied considerably, and in most glands as many as 10 sections at different levels had to be examined to get a reliable ratio between the parenchymal and fat cell tissue. The results seriously question the validity of histopathologic examination of one or a few sections of parathyroid glands in evaluation of the parenchymal cell mass, as well as diagnoses based on examination of partial glandular biopsy specimens. PMID:717545

  9. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from human fetal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Pascale V

    2016-02-01

    Pluripotency defines the ability of stem cells to differentiate into all the lineages of the three germ layers and self-renew indefinitely. Somatic cells can regain the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells following ectopic expression of a set of transcription factors or, in certain circumstances, via modulation of culture conditions and supplementation with small molecule, that is, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Here, we discuss the use of fetal tissues for reprogramming, focusing in particular on stem cells derived from human amniotic fluid, and the development of chemical reprogramming. We next address the advantages and disadvantages of deriving pluripotent cells from fetal tissues and the potential clinical applications.

  11. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0115 TITLE: Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kyuson Yun...of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...some oncogene function in determining molecular phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we proposed to transform neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural

  12. Cancer Secretome May Influence BSP and DSP Expression in Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Samantha Lynn; Ferando, Blake; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Yu, Jennifer Chian; Joy, Anita Rose

    2017-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges in managing head and neck cancers, especially salivary gland cancers, is the identification of secreted biomarkers of the disease that can be evaluated noninvasively. A relevant source of enriched tumor markers could potentially be found in the tumor secretome. Although numerous studies have evaluated secretomes from various cancers, the influence of the cancer secretome derived from salivary gland cancers on the behavior of normal cells has not yet been elucidated. Our data indicate that secretome derived from salivary gland cancer cells can influence the expression of two potential biomarkers of oral cancer-namely, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP)-in normal salivary gland cells. Using routine immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting techniques, we demonstrate an enrichment of BSP and DSP in human salivary gland (HSG) cancer tissue, unique localizations of BSP and DSP in HSG cancer cells, and enriched expression of BSP and DSP in normal salivary gland cells exposed to a cancer secretome. The secretome domain of the cancer microenvironment could alter signaling cascades responsible for normal cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, thus enhancing cancer cell survival and the potential for cancer progression. The cancer secretome may be critical in maintaining and stimulating "cancer-ness," thus potentially promoting specific hallmarks of metastasis.

  13. Relapsed Acinic Cell Carcinoma of the Parotid Gland With Diffuse Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Khelfa, Yousef; Mansour, Munthir; Abdel-Aziz, Yousef; Raufi, Ali; Denning, Krista; Lebowicz, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Acinic cell carcinoma (ACC) is an uncommon salivary gland neoplasm that generally displays an indolent growth pattern. Most cases arise in the major glands, particularly the parotid. However, it can arise from minor salivary glands in the oral cavity and aero-digestive tract. Although ACC is generally a low-grade malignant tumor, poorly differentiated and high-grade transformed variants exhibit a propensity for late recurrence and metastasis. There are no adequate clinical trials that define the optimal approach to patients with metastatic salivary gland tumors due to its rarity. Systemic therapy is reserved for cases where local therapy, such as radiation or metastasectomy, is not appropriate. Nevertheless, there is insufficient data in the literature regarding the chemotherapy of choice for metastatic ACC. In this article, we report a case of metastatic ACC of the right parotid gland that progressed on carboplatin and paclitaxel after partial response followed by doxorubicin and is currently on checkpoint inhibitor treatment. PMID:27847831

  14. Function of RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 in stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Hideyuki . E-mail: hidokano@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp; Kawahara, Hironori; Toriya, Masako; Nakao, Keio; Shibata, Shinsuke; Imai, Takao

    2005-06-10

    Musashi is an evolutionarily conserved family of RNA-binding proteins that is preferentially expressed in the nervous system. The first member of the Musashi family was identified in Drosophila. This protein plays an essential role in regulating the asymmetric cell division of ectodermal precursor cells known as sensory organ precursor cells through the translational regulation of target mRNA. In the CNS of Drosophila larvae, however, Musashi is expressed in proliferating neuroblasts and likely has a different function. Its probable mammalian homologue, Musashi-1, is a neural RNA-binding protein that is strongly expressed in fetal and adult neural stem cells (NSCs). Mammalian Musashi-1 augments Notch signaling through the translational repression of its target mRNA, m-Numb, thereby contributing to the self-renewal of NSCs. In addition to its functions in NSCs, the role of mammalian Musashi-1 protein in epithelial stem cells, including intestinal and mammary gland stem cells, is attracting increasing interest.

  15. Minireview: Nuclear Receptors, Hematopoiesis, and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chute, John P.; Ross, Joel R.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate a panoply of biological processes, including the function and development of cells within the hematopoietic and immune system, such as erythrocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. Significantly less is known regarding the function of NRs in regulating the fate of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the self-renewing, pluripotent cells that give rise to the entirety of the blood and immune systems throughout the lifetime of an individual. Several recent studies suggest, either directly or indirectly, a role for members of the NR family in regulating the differentiation and self-renewal of HSCs, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we review in detail the function of specific NRs in controlling HSC and other stem cell fate and propose a framework through which these observations can be translated into therapeutic amplification of HSCs for clinical purposes. PMID:19934345

  16. Analytical strategies for studying stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James M.; Choi, William T.; Sreekumar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency, stem cells possess untold potential for revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine through the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Central to developing these strategies is improving our understanding of biological mechanisms responsible for governing stem cell fate and self-renewal. Increasing attention is being given to the significance of metabolism, through the production of energy and generation of small molecules, as a critical regulator of stem cell functioning. Rapid advances in the field of metabolomics now allow for in-depth profiling of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo, providing a systems perspective on key metabolic and molecular pathways which influence stem cell biology. Understanding the analytical platforms and techniques that are currently used to study stem cell metabolomics, as well as how new insights can be derived from this knowledge, will accelerate new research in the field and improve future efforts to expand our understanding of the interplay between metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:26213533

  17. Analytical strategies for studying stem cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arnold, James M; Choi, William T; Sreekumar, Arun; Maletić-Savatić, Mirjana

    2015-04-01

    Owing to their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency, stem cells possess untold potential for revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine through the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Central to developing these strategies is improving our understanding of biological mechanisms responsible for governing stem cell fate and self-renewal. Increasing attention is being given to the significance of metabolism, through the production of energy and generation of small molecules, as a critical regulator of stem cell functioning. Rapid advances in the field of metabolomics now allow for in-depth profiling of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo, providing a systems perspective on key metabolic and molecular pathways which influence stem cell biology. Understanding the analytical platforms and techniques that are currently used to study stem cell metabolomics, as well as how new insights can be derived from this knowledge, will accelerate new research in the field and improve future efforts to expand our understanding of the interplay between metabolism and stem cell biology.

  18. Time to Reconsider Stem Cell Induction Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Hans-Werner

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in stem cell research suggest that it may be time to reconsider the current focus of stem cell induction strategies. During the previous five years, approximately, the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells, i.e., the generation of so-called ‘induced pluripotent stem cells’ (iPSCs), has become the focus of ongoing research in many stem cell laboratories, because this technology promises to overcome limitations (both technical and ethical) seen in the production and use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). A rapidly increasing number of publications suggest, however, that it is now possible to choose instead other, alternative ways of generating stem and progenitor cells bypassing pluripotency. These new strategies may offer important advantages with respect to ethics, as well as to safety considerations. The present communication discusses why these strategies may provide possibilities for an escape from the dilemma presented by pluripotent stem cells (self-organization potential, cloning by tetraploid complementation, patenting problems and tumor formation risk). PMID:24710555

  19. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  20. Determination of telomerase activity in stem cells and non-stem cells of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; He, Yanli; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Jinghui; Huang, Tao

    2007-07-01

    Although all normal tissue cells, including stem cells, are genetically homologous, variation in gene expression patterns has already determined the distinct roles for individual cells in the physiological process due to the occurrence of epigenetic modification. This is of special importance for the existence of tissue stem cells because they are exclusively immortal within the body, capable of self-replicating and differentiating by which tissues renew and repair itself and the total tissue cell population maintains a steady-state. Impairment of tissue stem cells is usually accompanied by a reduction in cell number, slows down the repair process and causes hypofunction. For instance, chemotherapy usually leads to depression of bone marrow and hair loss. Cellular aging is closely associated with the continuous erosion of the telomere while activation of telomerase repairs and maintains telomeres, thus slowing the aging process and prolonging cell life. In normal adults, telomerase activation mainly presents in tissue stem cells and progenitor cells giving them unlimited growth potential. Despite the extensive demonstration of telomerase activation in malignancy (> 80%), scientists found that heterogeneity also exists among the tumor cells and only minorities of cells, designated as cancer stem cells, undergo processes analogous to the self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells while the rest have limited lifespans. In this study, telomerase activity was measured and compared in breast cancer stem cells and non-stem cells that were phenotypically sorted by examining surface marker expression. The results indicated that cancer stem cells show a higher level of enzyme activity than non-stem cells. In addition, associated with the repair of cancer tissue (or relapse) after chemotherapy, telomerase activity in stem cells was markedly increased.

  1. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  4. Morphological Changes of Myoepithelial Cells in the Rat Submandibular Gland Following the Application of Surgical Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Yoshihiro; Mizobe, Kenich; Bando, Yasuhiko; Sakiyama, Koji; Taira, Fuyoko; Tomomura, Akito; Araki, Hisao; Amano, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Myoepithelial cells (MECs) exist on the basal surface of acini in major exocrine glands, include myofilaments and various constructive proteins, and share characteristics with smooth muscle and epithelial cells. MECs project several ramified processes to invest acini, and possibly contract to compress acini to support the secretion by the glandular cells. However, the functional roles of MECs in salivary secretion are still unclear. We investigated morphological changes in immunostained MECs using the anti-α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) antibody in operated or non-operated contralateral (NC) submandibular glands after partial or total resection. Furthermore, we investigated and discuss other salivary glands of rats. MECs in the parotid, sublingual and submandibular gland of adult rats exhibited different shapes and localizations. After surgery, in both operated and NC glands, the number of MECs and αSMA-immunopositive areas increased significantly. Three-dimensional analysis using a confocal laser-scanning microscope revealed that substantial and significant enhancement became evident in the number, length, and thickness of MEC-processes covering acini of the operated and NC submandibular glands. The preset findings indicate that MECs alter the morphology of their processes in operated and NC glands after surgery of the partial or total resection. It is suggested that MECs promote salivary secretion using elongated, thickened, and more ramified processes. PMID:28127104

  5. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

  6. PAR-2 receptor-induced effects on human eccrine sweat gland cells.

    PubMed

    L Bovell, Douglas; Kofler, Barbara; Lang, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Serine proteases can induce cell signaling by stimulating G-protein-coupled receptors, called proteinase-activated receptors (PAR's) on a variety of epithelial cells. While PAR-2, one such receptor, activates cell signaling in a secretory cell line derived from human sweat glands, there was no information on their presence and effects on intact sweat glands. PAR-2 presence and activation of eccrine sweat glands isolated from human skin samples was investigated using Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy (EM) and Ca(2+) imaging. Anti-human PAR-2 antibody demonstrated the presence of these receptors in eccrine sweat glands. EM showed that PAR-2 activation resulted in degranulation of secretory cells. Ca(2+) imaging using PAR-2 activators demonstrated a two phase increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) for the second phase, and that the response could be blocked by prior incubation with xestospongin, the IP(3) receptor blocker. The results demonstrated that PAR-2 receptors are present in human sweat gland secretory cells and that these receptors are functionally active and can induce changes associated with secretory events in eccrine glands.

  7. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  8. Evidence for Human Lung Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Hall, Sean R.; Hosoda, Toru; D’Amario, Domenico; Sanada, Fumihiro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ogórek, Barbara; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Ferreira-Martins, João; Matsuda, Alex; Arranto, Christian; Goichberg, Polina; Giordano, Giovanna; Haley, Kathleen J.; Bardelli, Silvana; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Liu, Xiaoli; Quaini, Federico; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa; Perrella, Mark A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although progenitor cells have been described in distinct anatomical regions of the lung, description of resident stem cells has remained elusive. METHODS Surgical lung-tissue specimens were studied in situ to identify and characterize human lung stem cells. We defined their phenotype and functional properties in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS Human lungs contain undifferentiated human lung stem cells nested in niches in the distal airways. These cells are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent in vitro. After injection into damaged mouse lung in vivo, human lung stem cells form human bronchioles, alveoli, and pulmonary vessels integrated structurally and functionally with the damaged organ. The formation of a chimeric lung was confirmed by detection of human transcripts for epithelial and vascular genes. In addition, the self-renewal and long-term proliferation of human lung stem cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays. CONCLUSIONS Human lungs contain identifiable stem cells. In animal models, these cells participate in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. They have the undemonstrated potential to promote tissue restoration in patients with lung disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:21561345

  9. Growing vascularized heart tissue from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shiang Y; Hernández, Damián; Dusting, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    The promise of stem cells to repair the heart after damage or heart attack has not been realized because most such cells are lost after transplantation. A new approach is to grow substantial viable pieces of cardiac tissue from human stem cells by cardiac tissue engineering. Such constructs must be fully vascularized and perfused to ensure the viability of clinically relevant volumes of tissue. This requires careful choice of cells, culture conditions, a biomaterial to act as scaffold, and crucial strategies for vascularization. Autologous stem cells with high plasticity, which would avoid the need for antirejection therapies after transplantation, are an attractive source of both cardiomyocytes and vascular cells. Most stem cells also have inherent paracrine activity, releasing cytoprotective factors and growth-promoting cytokines that can further stimulate tissue regeneration and neovascularization through recruitment of endogenous stem and progenitor cells. Current advances for growing vascularized and functional cardiac constructs with human stem cells are described, bringing us a step closer to the engineering of complex cardiac tissues such as pacemaker, conducting tissue, or contractile myocardial flaps ideal for transplantation. From studies in rats successful transplantation of thin constructs to the ventricle has been reported, but there remain further issues to resolve before larger human constructs will be available to test in the clinic.

  10. Cell therapy for diabetes mellitus: an opportunity for stem cells?

    PubMed

    Soria, B; Bedoya, F J; Tejedo, J R; Hmadcha, A; Ruiz-Salmerón, R; Lim, S; Martin, F

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by a deficit in beta cell mass and a failure of glucose homeostasis. Both circumstances result in a variety of severe complications and an overall shortened life expectancy. Thus, diabetes represents an attractive candidate for cell therapy. Reversal of diabetes can be achieved through pancreas and islet transplantation, but shortage of donor organs has prompted an intensive search for alternative sources of beta cells. This achievement has stimulated the search for appropriate stem cell sources. Both embryonic and adult stem cells have been used to generate surrogate beta cells or otherwise restore beta cell functioning. In this regard, several studies have reported the generation of insulin-secreting cells from embryonic and adult stem cells that normalized blood glucose values when transplanted into diabetic animal models. Due to beta cell complexity, insulin-producing cells generated from stem cells do not possess all beta cell attributes. This indicates the need for further development of methods for differentiation and selection of completely functional beta cells. While these problems are overcome, diabetic patients may benefit from therapeutic strategies based on autologous stem cell therapies addressing late diabetic complications. In this article, we discuss the recent progress in the generation of insulin-producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells, together with the challenges for the clinical use of diabetes stem cell therapy.

  11. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the embryonic form. Consequently, there is public confusion over the benefits currently being derived from the use of stem cells and what can potentially be expected from their use in the future. The health educator’s role is to give an unbiased account of the current state of stem cell research. This paper provides the groundwork by discussing the types of cells currently identified, their potential use, and some of the political and ethical pitfalls resulting from such use. PMID:19672471

  12. Cancer stem cells: mirage or reality?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Piyush B; Chaffer, Christine L; Weinberg, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    The similarities and differences between normal tissue stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been the source of much contention, with some recent studies calling into question the very existence of CSCs. An examination of the literature indicates, however, that the CSC model rests on firm experimental foundations and that differences in the observed frequencies of CSCs within tumors reflect the various cancer types and hosts used to assay these cells. Studies of stem cells and the differentiation program termed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) point to the possible existence of plasticity between stem cells and their more differentiated derivatives. If present, such plasticity would have major implications for the CSC model and for future therapeutic approaches.

  13. Epithelial stem cells and intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawna; Barker, Nick

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian intestine is comprised of an epithelial layer that serves multiple functions in order to maintain digestive activity as well as intestinal homeostasis. This epithelial layer contains highly proliferative stem cells which facilitate its characteristic rapid regeneration. How these stem cells contribute to tissue repair and normal homeostasis are actively studied, and while we have a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cellular locations that underlie stem cell regulation in this tissue, much still remains undiscovered. This review describes epithelial stem cells in both intestinal and non-intestinal tissues, as well as the strategies that have been used to further characterize the cells. Through a discussion of the current understanding of intestinal self-renewal and tissue regeneration in response to injury, we focus on how dysregulation of critical signaling pathways results in potentially oncogenic aberrations, and highlight issues that should be addressed in order for effective intestinal cancer therapies to be devised.

  14. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically.

  15. On the stem cell origin of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-06-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer-field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change-the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth.

  16. Stem cells and somatic cells: reprogramming and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Estrov, Zeev

    2009-01-01

    Recent seminal discoveries have significantly advanced the field of stem cell research and received worldwide attention. Improvements in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology, enabling the cloning of Dolly the sheep, and the derivation and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells raised hopes that normal cells could be generated to replace diseased or injured tissue. At the same time, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that somatic cells of one tissue are capable of generating cells of another tissue. It was theorized that any cell might be reprogrammed, by exposure to a new environment, to become another cell type. This concept contradicts two established hypotheses: (1) that only specific tissues are generated from the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm and (2) that tissue cells arise from a rare population of tissue-specific stem cells in a hierarchical fashion. SCNT, cell fusion experiments, and most recent gene transfer studies also contradict these hypotheses, as they demonstrate that mature somatic cells can be reprogrammed to regain pluripotent (or even totipotent) stem cell capacity. On the basis of the stem cell theory, hierarchical cancer stem cell differentiation models have been proposed. Cancer cell plasticity is an established phenomenon that supports the notion that cellular phenotype and function might be altered. Therefore, mechanisms of cellular plasticity should be exploited and the clinical significance of the cancer stem cell theory cautiously assessed.

  17. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  18. Stem cell systems and regeneration in planaria.

    PubMed

    Rink, Jochen C

    2013-03-01

    Planarians are members of the Platyhelminthes (flatworms). These animals have evolved a remarkable stem cell system. A single pluripotent adult stem cell type ("neoblast") gives rise to the entire range of cell types and organs in the planarian body plan, including a brain, digestive-, excretory-, sensory- and reproductive systems. Neoblasts are abundantly present throughout the mesenchyme and divide continuously. The resulting stream of progenitors and turnover of differentiated cells drive the rapid self-renewal of the entire animal within a matter of weeks. Planarians grow and literally de-grow ("shrink") by the food supply-dependent adjustment of organismal turnover rates, scaling body plan proportions over as much as a 50-fold size range. Their dynamic body architecture further allows astonishing regenerative abilities, including the regeneration of complete and perfectly proportioned animals even from tiny tissue remnants. Planarians as an experimental system, therefore, provide unique opportunities for addressing a spectrum of current problems in stem cell research, including the evolutionary conservation of pluripotency, the dynamic organization of differentiation lineages and the mechanisms underlying organismal stem cell homeostasis. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of neoblasts as pluripotent stem cells. The second part examines the fascinating mechanistic and conceptual challenges posed by a stem cell system that epitomizes a universal design principle of biological systems: the dynamic steady state.

  19. Stem cell genome-to-systems biology.

    PubMed

    Chia, Na-Yu; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of extended proliferation and concomitantly differentiating into a plethora of specialized cell types that render them apropos for their usage as a form of regenerative medicine for cell replacement therapies. The molecular processes that underlie the ability for stem cells to self-renew and differentiate have been intriguing, and elucidating the intricacies within the genome is pertinent to enhance our understanding of stem cells. Systems biology is emerging as a crucial field in the study of the sophisticated nature of stem cells, through the adoption of multidisciplinary approaches which couple high-throughput experimental techniques with computational and mathematical analysis. This allows for the determination of the molecular constituents that govern stem cell characteristics and conjointly with functional validations via genetic perturbation and protein location binding analysis necessitate the construction of the complex transcriptional regulatory network. With the elucidation of protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA regulation, microRNA involvement as well as the epigenetic modifications, it is possible to comprehend the defining features of stem cells at the system level.

  20. Prion potency in stem cells biology.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marilene H; Santos, Tiago G

    2012-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) can be considered a pivotal molecule because it interacts with several partners to perform a diverse range of critical biological functions that might differ in embryonic and adult cells. In recent years, there have been major advances in elucidating the putative role of PrP in the basic biology of stem cells in many different systems. Here, we review the evidence indicating that PrP is a key molecule involved in driving different aspects of the potency of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells in self-perpetuation and differentiation in many cell types. It has been shown that PrP is involved in stem cell self-renewal, controlling pluripotency gene expression, proliferation, and neural and cardiomyocyte differentiation. PrP also has essential roles in distinct processes that regulate tissue-specific stem cell biology in nervous and hematopoietic systems and during muscle regeneration. Results from our own investigations have shown that PrP is able to modulate self-renewal and proliferation in neural stem cells, processes that are enhanced by PrP interactions with stress inducible protein 1 (STI1). Thus, the available data reveal the influence of PrP in acting upon the maintenance of pluripotent status or the differentiation of stem cells from the early embryogenesis through adulthood.

  1. Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Norihisa; Chou, Yu-Chien; Galvez, Jose J; de-Candia, Paola; Cardiff, Robert D; Benezra, Robert; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2003-01-01

    Background The family of inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id) proteins is known to regulate development in several tissues. One member of this gene family, Id-1, has been implicated in mammary development and carcinogenesis. Mammary glands contain various cell types, among which the luminal epithelial cells are primarily targeted for proliferation, differentiation and carcinogenesis. Therefore, to assess the precise significance of Id-1 in mammary biology and carcinogenesis, we examined its cellular localization in vivo using immunohistochemistry. Methods Extracts of whole mammary glands from wild type and Id-1 null mutant mice, and tissue sections from paraffin-embedded mouse mammary glands from various developmental stages and normal human breast were subjected to immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. In both these procedures, an anti-Id-1 rabbit polyclonal antibody was used for detection of Id-1. Results In immunoblot analyses, using whole mammary gland extracts, Id-1 was detected. In immunohistochemical analyses, however, Id-1 was not detected in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands during any stage of development, but it was detected in vascular endothelial cells. Conclusion Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands. PMID:12631395

  2. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  3. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy.

  4. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  5. Alveolar progenitor cells develop in mouse mammary glands independent of pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brian W; Boulanger, Corinne A; Smith, Gilbert H

    2007-09-01

    We have previously described pluripotent, parity-induced mammary epithelial cells (PI-MEC) marked by Rosa26-lacZ expression in the mammary glands of parous females. PI-MEC act as lobule-limited epithelial stem/progenitor cells. To determine whether parity is necessary to generate PI-MEC, we incubated mammary explant cultures from virgin mice in vitro with insulin alone (I), hydrocortisone alone (H), prolactin alone (Prl), or a combination of these lactogenic hormones (IHPrl). Insulin alone activated the WAP-Cre gene. Hydrocortisone and prolactin alone did not. Any combination of hormones that included insulin was effective. Only I, H and Prl together were able to induce secretory differentiation and milk protein synthesis. In addition, EGF, IGF-2 and IGF-1 added individually produced activated (lacZ(+)) PI-MEC in explant cultures. Neither estrogen nor progesterone induced WAP-Cre expression in the explants. None of these positive initiators of WAP-Cre expression in PI-MEC were effective in mammospheres or two-dimensional cultures of mammary epithelium, indicating the indispensability of epithelial-stromal interaction in PI-MEC activation. Like PI-MEC, lacZ(+) cells from virgin explants proliferated and contributed progeny to mammospheres in vitro and to epithelial outgrowths in vivo after transplantation. LacZ(+) cells induced in virgin mouse mammary explants were multipotent (like PI-MEC) in impregnated hosts producing lacZ(+) mammary alveolar structures comprised of both myoepithelial and luminal progeny. These data demonstrate PI-MEC, a mammary epithelial sub-population of lobule-limited progenitor cells, are present in nulliparous female mice before parity and, like the PI-MEC observed following parity, are capable of proliferation, self-renewal and the capacity to produce progeny of diverse epithelial cell fates.

  6. Regulation of breast cancer stem cell features.

    PubMed

    Czerwinska, Patrycja; Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are rare, tumour-initiating cells that exhibit stem cell properties: capacity of self-renewal, pluripotency, highly tumorigenic potential, and resistance to therapy. Cancer stem cells have been characterised and isolated from many cancers, including breast cancer. Developmental pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin, Notch/γ-secretase/Jagged, Shh (sonic hedgehog), and BMP signalling pathways, which direct proliferation and differentiation of normal stem cells, have emerged as major signalling pathways that contribute to the self-renewal of stem and/or progenitor cells in a variety of organs and cancers. Deregulation of these signalling pathways is frequently linked to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and breast CSCs often possess properties of cells that have undergone the EMT process. Signalling networks mediated by microRNAs and EMT-inducing transcription factors tie the EMT process to regulatory networks that maintain "stemness". Recent studies have elucidated epigenetic mechanisms that control pluripotency and stemness, which allows an assessment on how embryonic and normal tissue stem cells are deregulated during cancerogenesis to give rise to CSCs. Epigenetic-based mechanisms are reversible, and the possibility of "resetting" the abnormal cancer epigenome by applying pharmacological compounds targeting epigenetic enzymes is a promising new therapeutic strategy. Chemoresistance of CSCs is frequently driven by various mechanisms, including aberrant expression/activity of ABC transporters, aldehyde dehydrogenase and anti-oncogenic proteins (i.e. BCL2, B-cell lymphoma-2), enhanced DNA damage response, activation of pro-survival signalling pathways, and epigenetic deregulations. Despite controversy surrounding the CSC hypothesis, there is substantial evidence for their role in cancer, and a number of drugs intended to specifically target CSCs have entered clinical trials.

  7. Comparison of the transcriptpmes of long-tern label retaining-cells and C cells microdissected from mammary epithelium: an initial study to character potential stem/progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) account for the cell lineage of mammary epithelia and provide for mammary growth, development and tissue homeostasis. The presence of MaSC was clearly demonstrated by the generation of an entire mammary gland from a single cell implanted into epithelium-ablated mammary fat...

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient’s medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future. PMID:27390452

  9. Ethical issues in stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2009-05-01

    Stem cell research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and myocardial infarction. However, human stem cell (hSC) research also raises sharp ethical and political controversies. The derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from oocytes and embryos is fraught with disputes about the onset of human personhood. The reprogramming of somatic cells to produce induced pluripotent stem cells avoids the ethical problems specific to embryonic stem cell research. In any hSC research, however, difficult dilemmas arise regarding sensitive downstream research, consent to donate materials for hSC research, early clinical trials of hSC therapies, and oversight of hSC research. These ethical and policy issues need to be discussed along with scientific challenges to ensure that stem cell research is carried out in an ethically appropriate manner. This article provides a critical analysis of these issues and how they are addressed in current policies.

  10. Ethical Issues in Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and myocardial infarction. However, human stem cell (hSC) research also raises sharp ethical and political controversies. The derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from oocytes and embryos is fraught with disputes about the onset of human personhood. The reprogramming of somatic cells to produce induced pluripotent stem cells avoids the ethical problems specific to embryonic stem cell research. In any hSC research, however, difficult dilemmas arise regarding sensitive downstream research, consent to donate materials for hSC research, early clinical trials of hSC therapies, and oversight of hSC research. These ethical and policy issues need to be discussed along with scientific challenges to ensure that stem cell research is carried out in an ethically appropriate manner. This article provides a critical analysis of these issues and how they are addressed in current policies. PMID:19366754

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient's medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future.

  12. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePlus

    ... perpetrators who expose the American public to the dangers of unapproved stem cells and ensure that they ... You Need to Know More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food ...

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... views 10:58 Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells - Duration: 14:59. TED 61, ...

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-02-02

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead.

  15. De Novo Kidney Regeneration with Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported on techniques to mobilize and activate endogenous stem-cells in injured kidneys or to introduce exogenous stem cells for tissue repair. Despite many recent advantages in renal regenerative therapy, chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality and the number of CKD patients has been increasing. When the sophisticated structure of the kidneys is totally disrupted by end stage renal disease (ESRD), traditional stem cell-based therapy is unable to completely regenerate the damaged tissue. This suggests that whole organ regeneration may be a promising therapeutic approach to alleviate patients with uncured CKD. We summarize here the potential of stem-cell-based therapy for injured tissue repair and de novo whole kidney regeneration. In addition, we describe the hurdles that must be overcome and possible applications of this approach in kidney regeneration. PMID:23251079

  16. Will embryonic stem cells change health policy?

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be.

  17. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  18. Cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells or somatic stem cells: this is the question.

    PubMed

    Somoza, Rodrigo A; Rubio, Francisco J

    2012-05-01

    A lot of effort has been developed to bypass the use of embryonic stem cells (ES) in human therapies, because of several concerns and ethical issues. Some unsolved problems of using stem cells for human therapies, excluding the human embryonic origin, are: how to regulate cell plasticity and proliferation, immunological compatibility, potential adverse side-effects when stem cells are systemically administrated, and the in vivo signals to rule out a specific cell fate after transplantation. Currently, it is known that almost all tissues of an adult organism have somatic stem cells (SSC). Whereas ES are primary involved in the genesis of new tissues and organs, SSC are involved in regeneration processes, immuno-regulatory and homeostasis mechanisms. Although the differentiating potential of ES is higher than SSC, several studies suggest that some types of SSC, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), can be induced epigenetically to differentiate into tissue-specific cells of different lineages. This unexpected pluripotency and the variety of sources that they come from, can make MSC-like cells suitable for the treatment of diverse pathologies and injuries. New hopes for cell therapy came from somatic/mature cells and the discovery that could be reprogrammed to a pluripotent stage similar to ES, thus generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). For this, it is necessary to overexpress four main reprogramming factors, Sox2, Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc. The aim of this review is to analyze the potential and requirements of cellular based tools in human therapy strategies, focusing on the advantage of using MSC over iPS.

  19. Establishment of a cell line (MCM-B2) from a benign mixed tumour of canine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Priosoeryanto, B P; Tateyama, S; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K

    1995-05-01

    A cell line was established from a benign mixed tumour of the canine mammary gland. Light microscopy of the cells cultured on plastic dishes revealed monolayer colonies. Cells that grew within the collagen gel matrix formed large three-dimensional colonies with a branching pattern. Immunohistochemically, these cells reacted intensely with anti-vimentin antiserum and mildly with anti-desmin antiserum. Ultrastructural examination revealed a large nucleus, intracytoplasmic organelles and intermediate filaments, which varied among cells. The cells possessed an abnormal chromosome number, an average of 80 per cell. Histologically, the xenografted tumour of cultured cells was similar to anaplastic carcinoma and reacted strongly with anti-vimentin antiserum, mildly with anti-desmin antiserum, and weakly with anti-keratin antiserum. The average chromosome number of cells form the xenografted tumour was the same as that of the original cultured cells. These findings suggest that the cell line might be derived from stem cells or atypical cells, and that it should be useful as model for the study of cell differentiation and proliferation in canine mammary tumours.

  20. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of stem cells - like most cells - is not just a membrane phenomenon. Most tissue cells need to adhere to a ``solid'' for viability, and over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that the physical ``elasticity'' of that solid is literally ``felt'' by cells. Here we show that Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) specify lineage and commit to phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to the elasticity typical of tissues [1]. In serum only media, soft matrices that mimic brain appear neurogenic, stiffer matrices that mimic muscle are myogenic, and comparatively rigid matrices that mimic collagenous bone prove osteogenic. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activity blocks all elasticity directed lineage specification, which indicates that the cytoskeleton pulls on matrix through adhesive attachments. Results have significant implications for `therapeutic' stem cells and have motivated development of a proteomic-scale method to identify mechano-responsive protein structures [2] as well as deeper physical studies of matrix physics [3] and growth factor pathways [4]. [4pt] [1] A. Engler, et al. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell (2006).[0pt] [2] C.P. Johnson, et al. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells. Science (2007).[0pt] [3] A.E.X. Brown, et al. Multiscale mechanics of fibrin polymer: Gel stretching with protein unfolding and loss of water. Science (2009).[0pt] [4] D.E. Discher, et al. Growth factors, matrices, and forces combine and control stem cells. Science (2009).

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells: the fibroblasts’ new clothes?

    PubMed Central

    Haniffa, Muzlifah A.; Collin, Matthew P.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Dazzi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are adherent stromal cells, initially isolated from the bone marrow, characterized by their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues such as bone, cartilage and fat. They have also been shown to suppress immune responses in vitro. Because of these properties, mesenchymal stem cells have recently received a very high profile. Despite the dramatic benefits reported in early phase clinical trials, their functions remain poorly understood. Particularly, several questions remain concerning the origin of mesenchymal stem cells and their relationship to other stromal cells such as fibroblasts. Whereas clear gene expression signatures are imprinted in stromal cells of different anatomical origins, the anti-proliferative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts and their potential to differentiate appear to be common features between these two cell types. In this review, we summarize recent studies in the context of historical and often neglected stromal cell literature, and present the evidence that mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts share much more in common than previously recognized. PMID:19109217

  2. Stem Cell Therapy for the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, perception of sound, motion, and balance is mediated through mechanosensory hair cells located within the inner ear. In mammals, hair cells are only generated during a short period of embryonic development. As a result, loss of hair cells as a consequence of injury, disease, or genetic mutation, leads to permanent sensory deficits. At present, cochlear implantation is the only option for profound hearing loss. However, outcomes are still variable and even the best implant cannot provide the acuity of a biological ear. The recent emergence of stem cell technology has the potential to open new approaches for hair cell regeneration. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of inner ear stem cell research from a viewpoint of its clinical application for inner ear disorders to illustrate how complementary studies have the potential to promote and refine stem cell therapies for inner ear diseases. The review initially discusses our current understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate hair cell formation from inner ear progenitors during normal development. Subsequent sections discuss the possible use of endogenous inner ear stem cells to induce repair as well as the initial studies aimed at transplanting stem cells into the ear. PMID:22514095

  3. Measuring the Aging Process in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Van Zant, Gary; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cells persist in replenishing functional mature cells throughout life by self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are among the best-characterized and understood stem cells, and they are responsible for the life-long production of all lineages of blood cells. HSCs are a heterogeneous population containing lymphoid-biased, myeloid-biased and balanced subsets. HSCs undergo age-associated phenotypic and functional changes, and the composition of the HSC pool alters with aging. HSCs and their lineage-biased subfractions can be identified and analyzed by flow cytometry based on cell surface makers. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) enables the isolation and purification of HSCs that greatly facilitates the mechanistic study of HSCs and their aging process at both cellular and molecular levels. The mouse model has been extensively used in HSC aging study. Bone marrow cells are isolated from young and old mice and stained with fluorescence-conjugated antibodies specific for differentiated and stem cells. HSCs are selected based on the negative expression of lineage markers and positive selection for several sets of stem cell markers. Lineage-biased HSCs can be further distinguished by the level of SLAM/CD150 expression and the extent of Hoechst efflux. PMID:25388383

  4. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the...

  5. Deriving blood stem cells from pluripotent stem cells for research and therapy.

    PubMed

    Daley, George Q

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells offer promise for research and treatment of hematologic diseases. While broad clinical application in humans is still a distant prospect, there are promising near-term applications in transfusion of platelets and red blood cells.

  6. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  7. When stem cells grow old: phenotypes and mechanisms of stem cell aging

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Michael B.; Sinclair, David A.

    2016-01-01

    All multicellular organisms undergo a decline in tissue and organ function as they age. An attractive theory is that a loss in stem cell number and/or activity over time causes this decline. In accordance with this theory, aging phenotypes have been described for stem cells of multiple tissues, including those of the hematopoietic system, intestine, muscle, brain, skin and germline. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of why adult stem cells age and how this aging impacts diseases and lifespan. With this increased understanding, it is feasible to design and test interventions that delay stem cell aging and improve both health and lifespan. PMID:26732838

  8. Development in intracerebral stem cell grafts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Stephanny; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2015-01-01

    The field of stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising research area for brain repair. Optimizing the safety and efficacy of the therapy for clinical trials will require revisiting transplantation protocols. The cell delivery route stands as a key translational item that warrants careful consideration in facilitating the success of stem cell therapy in the clinic. Intracerebral administration, compared to peripheral route, requires an invasive procedure to directly implant stem cells into injured brain. Although invasive, intracerebral transplantation circumvents the prohibitive blood brain barrier in allowing grafted cells when delivered peripherally to penetrate the brain and reach the discreet damaged brain tissues. This review will highlight milestone discoveries in cell therapy for neurological disorders, with emphasis on intracerebral transplantation in relevant animal models and provide insights necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25739415

  9. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  10. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Capuco, Anthony V; Ellis, Steven E

    2013-01-01

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals, and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally, and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, differentiation, lactation, and regression that are coordinated to provide nutrients for offspring or are driven by strategies to manage reproduction and milk production of domesticated species. Growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium depends on the function of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. In this review, we provide an overview of postnatal mammary gland development, cyclical phases of mammary gland regression (regression during lactation and between successive lactations), and mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. Where possible, these processes are related to animal production and compared across species, particularly bovine, porcine, murine, and human.

  11. Perspectives and controversies in the field of stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano

    2006-09-01

    The fourth annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research focused on a number of pressing issues, including: (I) the need to better characterize the biology of stem cells; (II) the need to exploit and optimize the great therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration; (III) ethical and safety considerations related to the use of human embryonic stem cells; (IV) the contribution of adult stem cells to carcinogenesis; (V) the need to investigate the biology of cancer stem cells. The purpose of this report is to summarize the current status of stem cell research, as surmised by the proceedings of this meeting.

  12. An essential role for Gα(i2) in Smoothened-stimulated epithelial cell proliferation in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Hugo; Visbal, Adriana P; Obeid, Nadine F; Ta, Andrew Q; Faruki, Adeel A; Wu, Meng-Fen; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Shaw, Chad A; Yu, Peng; Plummer, Nicholas W; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lewis, Michael T

    2015-09-15

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for organogenesis, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell maintenance. The gene encoding Smoothened (SMO), the primary effector of Hh signaling, is expressed aberrantly in human breast cancer, as well as in other cancers. In mice that express a constitutively active form of SMO that does not require Hh stimulation in mammary glands, the cells near the transgenic cells proliferate and participate in hyperplasia formation. Although SMO is a seven-transmembrane receptor like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), SMO-mediated activation of the Gli family of transcription factors is not known to involve G proteins. However, data from Drosophila and mammalian cell lines indicate that SMO functions as a GPCR that couples to heterotrimeric G proteins of the pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive Gαi class. Using genetically modified mice, we demonstrated that SMO signaling through G proteins occurred in the mammary gland in vivo. SMO-induced stimulation of proliferation was PTX-sensitive and required Gαi2, but not Gαi1, Gαi3, or activation of Gli1 or Gli2. Our findings show that activated SMO functions as a GPCR to stimulate proliferation in vivo, a finding that may have clinical importance because most SMO-targeted agents have been selected based largely on their ability to block Gli-mediated transcription.

  13. [Limbal stem cell deficiency management. A review].

    PubMed

    Kocaba, V; Damour, O; Auxenfans, C; Burillon, C

    2016-11-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency is predominantly caused by severe eye burns resulting in a decreased or a complete ablation of the regenerative potential of these stem cells. The inability to reconstruct the corneal epithelium further leads conjunctivalization of the gimbal-epithelial barrier. These abnormalities collectively result in the progressive opacification of the cornea responsible for blindness that is driven by chronic corneal ulceration and neovascularization. The underlying pathology of the cornea affects the homeostasis of the neighboring conjunctiva, eyelids, and tear film. Therefore, the ocular reconstruction to treat limbal stem cell deficiency is quite prolonged and involves a continued treatment plan. The management of limbal stem cell deficiency has undergone a multitude of changes over the past several decades. The understanding of limbal anatomy and physiology, as well as therapeutic advances in the stem cell field have propelled the development of new treatments offering new hope to severely disabled patients. Cultivated limbal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial transplantations are therefore viable alternatives that could be utilized for the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency.

  14. Stem cell technologies: regulation, patents and problems.

    PubMed

    Then, Shih-Ning

    2004-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research promises to deliver in the future a whole range of therapeutic treatments, but currently governments in different jurisdictions must try to regulate this burgeoning area. Part of the problem has been, and continues to be, polarised community opinion on the use of human embryonic stem cells for research. This article compares the approaches of the Australian, United Kingdom and United States governments in regulating human embryonic stem cell research. To date, these governments have approached the issue through implementing legislation or policy to control research. Similarly, the three jurisdictions have viewed the patentability of human embryonic stem cell technologies in their own ways with different policies being adopted by the three patent offices. This article examines these different approaches and discusses the inevitable concerns that have been raised due to the lack of a universal approach in relation to the regulation of research; the patenting of stem cell technologies; and the effects patents granted are having on further human embryonic stem cell research.

  15. Building Epithelial Tissues from Skin Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, E.; Nowak, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The skin epidermis and its appendages provide a protective barrier that guards against loss of fluids, physical trauma, and invasion by harmful microbes. To perform these functions while confronting the harsh environs of the outside world, our body surface undergoes constant rejuvenation through homeostasis. In addition, it must be primed to repair wounds in response to injury. The adult skin maintains epidermal homeostasis, hair regeneration, and wound repair through the use of its stem cells. What are the properties of skin stem cells, when do they become established during embryogenesis, and how are they able to build tissues with such remarkably distinct architectures? How do stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis and repair wounds and how do they regulate the delicate balance between proliferation and differentiation? What is the relationship between skin cancer and mutations that perturbs the regulation of stem cells? In the past 5 years, the field of skin stem cells has bloomed as we and others have been able to purify and dissect the molecular properties of these tiny reservoirs of goliath potential. We report here progress on these fronts, with emphasis on our laboratory’s contributions to the fascinating world of skin stem cells. PMID:19022769

  16. Stem cell treatment for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a common chronic disease in children, characterized by a loss of β cells, which results in defects in insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia causes diabetic complications, including diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Curative therapies mainly include diet and insulin administration. Although hyperglycemia can be improved by insulin administration, exogenous insulin injection cannot successfully mimic the insulin secretion from normal β cells, which keeps blood glucose levels within the normal range all the time. Islet and pancreas transplantation achieves better glucose control, but there is a lack of organ donors. Cell based therapies have also been attempted to treat T1DM. Stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and tissue stem cells (TSCs) such as bone marrow-, adipose tissue-, and cord blood-derived stem cells, have been shown to generate insulin-producing cells. In this review, we summarize the most-recently available information about T1DM and the use of TSCs to treat T1DM. PMID:25364717

  17. EFFECT OF IRRADIATION ON MICROVASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS OF PAROTID GLANDS IN THE MINIATURE PIG

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junji; Yan, Xing; Gao, Runtao; Mao, Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng, Changyu; Zhang, Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang, Songlin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg2+-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage. PMID:20832188

  18. Effect of Irradiation on Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Parotid Glands in the Miniature Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junji; Yan Xing; Gao Runtao; Mao Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng Changyu; Zhang Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials: A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg{sup 2+}-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results: Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions: Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage.

  19. Apoptosis, stem cells, and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Andreas; Steller, Hermann

    2010-10-26

    Most metazoans have at least some ability to regenerate damaged cells and tissues, although the regenerative capacity varies depending on the species, organ, or developmental stage. Cell replacement and regeneration occur in two contexts: renewal of spent cells during tissue homeostasis (homeostatic growth), and in response to external injury, wounding, or amputation (epimorphic regeneration). Model organisms that display remarkable regenerative capacity include amphibians, planarians, Hydra, and the vertebrate liver. In addition, several mammalian organs--including the skin, gut, kidney, muscle, and even the human nervous system--have some ability to replace spent or damaged cells. Although the regenerative response is complex, it typically involves the induction of new cell proliferation through formation of a blastema, followed by cell specification, differentiation, and patterning. Stem cells and undifferentiated progenitor cells play an important role in both tissue homeostasis and tissue regeneration. Stem cells are typically quiescent or passing slowly through the cell cycle in adult tissues, but they can be activated in response to cell loss and wounding. A series of studies, mostly performed in Drosophila as well as in Hydra, Xenopus, and mouse, has revealed an unexpected role of apoptotic caspases in the production of mitogenic signals that stimulate the proliferation of stem and progenitor cells to aid in tissue regeneration. This Review summarizes some of the key findings and discusses links to stem cell biology and cancer.

  20. Current overview on dental stem cells applications in regenerative dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are the most natural, noninvasive source of stem cells. Dental stem cells, which are easy, convenient, and affordable to collect, hold promise for a range of very potential therapeutic applications. We have reviewed the ever-growing literature on dental stem cells archived in Medline using the following key words: Regenerative dentistry, dental stem cells, dental stem cells banking, and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Relevant articles covering topics related to dental stem cells were shortlisted and the facts are compiled. The objective of this review article is to discuss the history of stem cells, different stem cells relevant for dentistry, their isolation approaches, collection, and preservation of dental stem cells along with the current status of dental and medical applications. PMID:25810631

  1. Limbal stem cell transplantation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Atallah, Marwan Raymond; Palioura, Sotiria; Perez, Victor L; Amescua, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the corneal surface after an epithelial insult involves division, migration, and maturation of a specialized group of stem cells located in the limbus. Several insults, both intrinsic and extrinsic, can precipitate destruction of the delicate microenvironment of these cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). In such cases, reepithelialization fails and conjunctival epithelium extends across the limbus, leading to vascularization, persistent epithelial defects, and chronic inflammation. In partial LSCD, conjunctival epitheliectomy, coupled with amniotic membrane transplantation, could be sufficient to restore a healthy surface. In more severe cases and in total LSCD, stem cell transplantation is currently the best curative option. Before any attempts are considered to perform a limbal stem cell transplantation procedure, the ocular surface must be optimized by controlling causative factors and comorbid conditions. These factors include adequate eyelid function or exposure, control of the ocular surface inflammatory status, and a well-lubricated ocular surface. In cases of unilateral LSCD, stem cells can be obtained from the contralateral eye. Newer techniques aim at expanding cells in vitro or in vivo in order to decrease the need for large limbal resection that may jeopardize the “healthy” eye. Patients with bilateral disease can be treated using allogeneic tissue in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Another emerging option for this subset of patients is the use of noncorneal cells such as mucosal grafts. Finally, the use of keratoprosthesis is reserved for patients who are not candidates for any of the aforementioned options, wherein the choice of the type of keratoprosthesis depends on the severity of the disease. In summary, limbal stem cell transplantation improves both vision and quality-of-life in patients with ocular surface disorders associated with LSCD, and overall, the use of autologous tissue offers

  2. European stem cell research in legal shackles.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Myrthe G; de Vries, Sybe A; Geijsen, Niels

    2013-12-11

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brüstle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent was challenged and put before the European Court of Justice, which ruled that inventions involving the prior destruction of human embryos cannot be patented. The legal maneuvering around this case demonstrates that the future of stem cell-based patents in Europe remains unsettled. Furthermore, owing to the European Court's broad definition of hESC as 'any cell that is capable of commencing development into a human being,' novel technologies that could eliminate the need for hESCs, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are at risk of being included under the same ruling. Advances in the in vitro development of germ cells from pluripotent stem cells may one day provide a direct developmental path from iPSC to oocyte and sperm, and, according to the European Court's reasoning, legally equate iPSCs with human embryos. In this review, we will briefly discuss the Brüstle v Greenpeace case and the implications of the European Court of Justice's ruling. We will identify potential risks for stem cell research and future therapeutics resulting from the broad legal definition of the human embryo. Finally, we will broach the current legal landscape, as this broad definition has also created great uncertainty about the status of human iPSCs.

  3. Ewing's sarcoma cancer stem cell targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Roumiana

    2014-01-01

    Ewing`s sarcoma (ES) family of tumors (ESFTs) are round cell tumors of bone and soft tissues, afflicting children and young adults. This review summarizes the present findings about ES cancer stem cell (CSC) targeted therapy: prognostic factors, chromosomal translocations, initiation, epigenetic mechanisms, candidate cell of ES origin (Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs)). The ES CSC model, histopathogenesis, histogenesis, pathogenesis, ES mediated Hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) senescence are also discussed. ESFTs therapy is reviewed concerning CSCs, radiotherapy, risk of subsequent neoplasms, stem cell (SC) support, promising therapeutic targets for ES CSCs (CSC markers, immune targeting, RNAi phenotyping screens, proposed new drugs), candidate EWS-FLI1 target genes and further directions (including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)). Bone marrow-derived human MSCs are permissive for EWS-FLI1 expression with transition to ESFT-like cellular phenotype. ESFTs are genetically related to NCSC, permissive for EWS-FLI1 expression and susceptible to oncogene-induced immortalization. Primitive neuroectodermal features and MSC origin of ESFTs provide a basis of immune targeting. The microRNAs profile of ES CSCs is shared by ESCs and CSCs from divergent tumor types. Successful reprogramming of differentiated human somatic cells into a pluripotent state allows creation of patient- and disease-specific SCs. The functional role of endogenous EWS at stem cell level on both senescence and tumorigenesis is a link between cancer and aging. The regulatory mechanisms of oncogenic activity of EWS fusions could provide new prognostic biomarkers, therapeutic opportunities and tumor-specific anticancer agents against ESFTs.

  4. Targeted transfection of stem cells with sub-20 femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten; Bueckle, Rainer; Isemann, Andreas; Tempea, Gabriel

    2008-06-23

    Multiphoton microscopes have become important tools for non-contact sub-wavelength three-dimensional nanoprocessing of living biological specimens based on multiphoton ionization and plasma formation. Ultrashort laser pulses are required, however, dispersive effects limit the shortest pulse duration achievable at the focal plane. We report on a compact nonlinear laser scanning microscope with sub-20 femtosecond 75 MHz near infrared laser pulses for nanosurgery of human stem cells and two-photon high-resolution imaging. Single point illumination of the cell membrane was performed to induce a transient nanopore for the delivery of extracellular green fluorescent protein plasmids. Mean powers of less than 7 mW (<93 pJ) and low millisecond exposure times were found to be sufficient to transfect human pancreatic and salivary gland stem cells in these preliminary studies. Ultracompact sub-20 femtosecond laser microscopes may become optical tools for nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine including optical stem cell manipulation.

  5. Breast cancer stem cells are regulated by mesenchymal stem cells through cytokine networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Ginestier, Christophe; Ou, Sing J.; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Patel, Shivani H.; Monville, Florence; Korkaya, Hasan; Heath, Amber; Dutcher, Julie; Kleer, Celina G.; Jung, Younghun; Dontu, Gabriela; Taichman, Russell; Wicha, Max S.

    2011-01-01

    We have utilized in vitro and mouse xenograft models to examine the interaction between breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We demonstrate that both of these cell populations are organized in a cellular hierarchy in which primitive aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) expressing mesenchymal cells regulate breast CSCs through cytokine loops involving IL6 and CXCL7. In NOD/SCID mice, labeled MSCs introduced into the tibia traffic to sites of growing breast tumor xenografts where they accelerate tumor growth by increasing the breast cancer stem cell population. Utilizing immunochemistry, we identified “MSC-CSC niches” in these tumor xenografts as well as in frozen sections from primary human breast cancers. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell may accelerate human breast tumor growth by generating cytokine networks that regulate the cancer stem cell population. PMID:21224357

  6. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation. PMID:25486871

  7. Epidermal stem cells: interactions in developmental environments.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Jackie R; Grinnell, Katie L

    2004-10-01

    Homeostasis of continuously renewing adult tissues, such as the epidermis of the skin, is maintained by epidermal stem cells (EpiSC), which are a small population of undifferentiated, self-renewing basal keratinocyte cells that produce daughter transit amplifying (TA) cells to make up the majority of the proliferative basal cell population in the epidermis. We have isolated EpiSC from neonatal and adult skin, and shown that these cells can regenerate an epidermis that lasts long term in vitro and in vivo, and that permanently expresses a recombinant gene in the regenerated tissue (Bickenbach and Dunnwald, 2000; Dunnwald et al., 2001). When we injected murine EpiSC into the developing blastocyst environment of the mouse, we found that both neonatal and adult EpiSC retained some ability to participate in the formation of tissues from all three germ layers (Liang and Bickenbach, 2002; Bickenbach and Chinnathambi, 2004; Liang et al., 2004). Although it appears evident that EpiSC act as pluripotent stem cells, how this reprogramming takes place is not understood. EpiSC might directly transdifferentiate into other cell types or they might first dedifferentiate into a more primitive cell type, and then proceed to develop along a cell lineage pathway. To begin to unravel this, we co-cultured EpiSC with embryonic stem (ES) cells, and found that EpiSC could alter their cell lineage protein expression to that of a more primitive cell type. We also placed EpiSC in a wounded environment and found that EpiSC interacted with the mesenchymal cells repopulating the wound bed. Our findings indicate that the population of cells that we isolate as EpiSC has a pluripotent capability. This has led us to postulate a paradigm shift for somatic stem cells. We propose that tissues maintain a sequestered population of uncommitted stem cells that retain a regenerative response which is enhanced when the cells are exposed to developmental or stress influences.

  8. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  9. Snapshots of mammary gland interstitial cells: methylene-blue vital staining and c-kit immunopositivity.

    PubMed

    Popescu, L M; Andrei, F; Hinescu, M E

    2005-01-01

    We show here that methylene-blue supravital staining of specimens from normal human mammary gland reveals (selectively) interstitial (stromal) cells, with 2-3 long (20-80 microm), thin, moniliform processes. Such cells appear c-kit/CD117 positive, either by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or immunofluorescence (IF). Since these features (affinity for methylene blue, c-kit positivity, and characteristic processes) define archetypal interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in light microscopy, our results suggest the existence of Cajal-like cells in the interstitium of human normal mammary gland.

  10. The adult pituitary shows stem/progenitor cell activation in response to injury and is capable of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuli; Gremeaux, Lies; Luque, Raul M; Liekens, Daisy; Chen, Jianghai; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Kineman, Rhonda; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The pituitary gland constitutes, together with the hypothalamus, the regulatory core of the endocrine system. Whether the gland is capable of cell regeneration after injury, in particular when suffered at adult age, is unknown. To investigate the adult pituitary's regenerative capacity and the response of its stem/progenitor cell compartment to damage, we constructed a transgenic mouse model to conditionally destroy pituitary cells. GHCre/iDTR mice express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor after transcriptional activation by Cre recombinase, which is driven by the GH promoter. Treatment with DT for 3 d leads to gradual GH(+) (somatotrope) cell obliteration with a final ablation grade of 80-90% 1 wk later. The stem/progenitor cell-clustering side population promptly expands after injury, concordant with the immediate increase in Sox2(+) stem/progenitor cells. In addition, folliculo-stellate cells, previously designated as pituitary stem/progenitor cells and significantly overlapping with Sox2(+) cells, also increase in abundance. In situ examination reveals expansion of the Sox2(+) marginal-zone niche and appearance of remarkable Sox2(+) cells that contain GH. When mice are left after the DT-provoked lesion, GH(+) cells considerably regenerate during the following months. Double Sox2(+)/GH(+) cells are observed throughout the regenerative period, suggesting recovery of somatotropes from stem/progenitor cells, as further supported by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) pulse-chase lineage tracing. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the adult pituitary gland holds regenerative competence and that tissue repair follows prompt activation and plausible involvement of the stem/progenitor cells.

  11. Adipose stem cells and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Ho

    2010-06-01

    With the discovery of adipose stem cells (ASCs), 40 years after the identification of bone marrow stem cells, a new era of active stem cell therapy has opened. The abundance of stem cells harvested from adipose tissue enables us to instantly apply primary cells without culture expansion. ASCs are already clinically applied in many other purposes such as cell-enriched lipotransfer, wound healing, skin rejuvenation, scar remodeling and skin tissue engineering. Although cellular mechanism of ASCs is not completely understood, recent researches have disclosed some of their unique functions as mesenchymal stem cells. There have been increasing numbers of scientific reports on the therapeutic effect of ASCs on skin repair, scar remodeling and rejuvenation. Wound healing and scar remodeling are complex, multi-cellular processes that involve coordinated efforts of many cell types and various cytokines. Recent reports showed ASCs as a powerful source of skin regeneration because of their capability to provide not only cellular elements, but also numerous cytokines. Currently, other attractive functions of ASCs in the recovery of extrinsic aging and radiation damage are under active investigation. It seems that autologous ASCs have great promise for applications in repair of skin, rejuvenation of aging skin and aging-related skin lesions. This review will focus on the specific roles of ASCs in skin tissue, especially related with wound healing, radiation injury, scar remodeling, skin rejuvenation and skin engineering.

  12. Genome integrity, stem cells and hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Balazs, Endre A.

    2012-01-01

    Faithful preservation of genome integrity is the critical mission of stem cells as well as of germ cells. Reviewed are the following mechanisms involved in protecting DNA in these cells: (a) The efflux machinery that can pump out variety of genotoxins in ATP-dependent manner; (b) the mechanisms maintaining minimal metabolic activity which reduces generation of reactive oxidants, by-products of aerobic respiration; (c) the role of hypoxic niche of stem cells providing a gradient of variable oxygen tension; (d) (e) the presence