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Sample records for glare survey ii

  1. Evaluation of glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, C. K.; Sims, C. A.; Christian, J. M.

    2015-06-05

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I-15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. In addition, reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground-based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impacts ofmore » the glare. Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by heliostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (potential for after-image) up to a distance of ~6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage. Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after-image at all ground-based monitoring locations outside of the site boundaries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed.« less

  2. Evaluation of Glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford K.; Sims, Cianan; Christian, Joshua Mark

    2014-07-01

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I - 15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. Reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground - based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impact s of the glare . Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by he liostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (pot ential for after - image) up to a distance of %7E6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage . Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after - image at all ground - based monitoring locations outside of the site bound aries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed. This page intentionally left blank

  3. Evaluation of glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. K.; Sims, C. A.; Christian, J. M.

    2015-06-05

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I-15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. In addition, reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground-based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impacts of the glare. Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by heliostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (potential for after-image) up to a distance of ~6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage. Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after-image at all ground-based monitoring locations outside of the site boundaries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed.

  4. Rainbow glare by retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Han-Ying; Chiang, Yao-Ting; Yeh, Shang-Min; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Horng, Chi-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine whether IntraLase surgery can cause rainbow glare. Monte-Carlo ray tracing method is used to study visual conditions of an ordered microstructure array on the cornea. A corneal flap in the simulated eye model can generate numerous microbubbles caused by IntraLase surgery. Moreover, this study evaluates the visual performance under different conditions such as the size and interval of the microbubble structure on the cornea with vary incident angles and diameters of light. The results of this study can help elucidate the real cause of rainbow glare as a side effect of IntraLase.

  5. Discomfort Glare: What Do We Actually Know?

    SciTech Connect

    Clear, Robert D.

    2012-04-19

    We reviewed glare models with an eye for missing conditions or inconsistencies. We found ambiguities as to when to use small source versus large source models, and as to what constitutes a glare source in a complex scene. We also found surprisingly little information validating the assumed independence of the factors driving glare. A barrier to progress in glare research is the lack of a standardized dependent measure of glare. We inverted the glare models to predict luminance, and compared model predictions against the 1949 Luckiesh and Guth data that form the basis of many of them. The models perform surprisingly poorly, particularly with regards to the luminance-size relationship and additivity. Evaluating glare in complex scenes may require fundamental changes to form of the glare models.

  6. Mitigating the Impacts of Glint and Glare

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, Michael; Kandt, Alicen; Phillips, Steven

    2015-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, supporting the Department of the Navy Renewable Energy Program Office, has developed an innovative glint/glare analysis and visualization methodology to understand and mitigate the possible impacts of light reflecting off solar photovoltaic arrays.

  7. Manufacturing of GLARE Parts and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinke, J.

    2003-07-01

    GLARE is a hybrid material consisting of alternating layers of metal sheets and composite layers, requiring special attention when manufacturing of parts and structures is concerned. On one hand the applicable manufacturing processes for GLARE are limited, on the other hand, due to the constituents and composition of the laminate, it offers new opportunities for production. One of the opportunities is the manufacture of very large skin panels by lay-up techniques. Lay-up techniques are common for full composites, but uncommon for metallic structures. Nevertheless, large GLARE skin panels are made by lay-up processes. In addition, the sequences of forming and laminating processes, that can be selected, offer manufacturing options that are not applicable to metals or full composites. With respect to conventional manufacturing processes, the possibilities for Fibre Metal Laminates in general, are limited. The limits are partly due to the different failure modes, partly due to the properties of the constituents in the laminate. For machining processes: the wear of the cutting tools during machining operations of GLARE stems from the abrasive nature of the glass fibres. For the forming processes: the limited formability, expressed by a small failure strain, is related to the glass fibres. However, although these manufacturing issues may restrict the use of manufacturing processes for FMLs, application of these laminates in aircraft is not hindered.

  8. Full scale GLARE fuselage panel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercammen, Roland W. A.; Ottens, Harold H.

    1996-01-01

    A GLARE fuselage panel, representative of the crown section of the Fokker 100 fuselage in front of the wing, was tested. The panels were loaded by air pressure resulting in tangential stress in the panel by axial loading, representative of both the cabin pressure and the fuselage bending due to taxiing and gust loading. A fatigue test, simulating 180000 flights, followed by static tests were performed. The panel was loaded to failure at 1.32 ultimate load. The test set-up, the uniform strain distribution of the panel, and the fatigue loads applied at high test frequency are described. The use of GLARE leads to a substantial weight reduction without affecting the fatigue static strength.

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  10. MMT Survey for Intervening Mg II Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestor, Daniel B.; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results from a spectroscopic survey for intervening Mg II absorption in the spectra of 381 background QSOs conducted at the MMT telescope. This survey complements our earlier SDSS EDR Mg II survey, extending our results to lower redshift (z~=0.15) and weaker Mg II λ2796 rest equivalent width (Wλ27960~=0.1 Å). We confirm two major results from that survey: the transition in the Wλ27960 distribution at Wλ27960~0.3 Å, and the Wλ27960-dependent evolution of the incidence of systems. The nature of ∂2N/∂z∂Wλ27960 is consistent with the idea that multiple physically distinct components/processes contribute to the incidence of Mg II absorption systems in a W0-dependent manner and evolve at different rates. A significant decrease in the total proper absorption cross section is detected in our MMT data for systems as weak as 1.0 Å<=Wλ27960<1.5 Å at z<~0.4. We discuss this W0-dependent evolution in the context of the evolution of galaxy structures, processes including superwinds and interactions, and damped-Lyα absorbers. We also consider the possibility that the observed redshift and Wλ27960 dependence of the incidence of absorption in spectroscopic surveys for low-ionization/neutral gas results from the effects of dust-induced extinction. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  11. Macular pigment spatial distribution effects on glare disability

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher M.; Bassi, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This project explored the relationship of the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profile with measures of glare disability (GD) across the macula. Methods A novel device was used to measure MPOD across the central 16° of retina along four radii using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP)at eccentricities of 0°, 2°, 4°, 6° and 8°. MPOD was measured as discrete and integrated values at all measured retinal loci. GD was calculated as a difference in contrast sensitivity (CS) between no glare and glare conditions using identical stimuli presented at the same eccentricities. GD was defined as [(CSNo Glare − CSGlare)/CSNo Glare] in order to isolate the glare attenuation effects of MPOD by controlling for CS variability among the subject sample. Correlations of the discrete and integrated MPOD with GD were compared. Results The cHFP identified reliable MPOD spatial distribution maps demonstrating a 1st-order exponential decay as a function of increasing eccentricity. There was a significant negative correlation between both measures of foveal MPOD and GD using 6 cycles per degree (cpd) and 9 cpd stimuli. Significant correlations were found between corresponding parafoveal MPOD measures and GD at 2 and 4° of eccentricity using 9 cpd stimuli with greater MPOD associated with less glare disability. Conclusions These results are consistent with the glare attenuation effects of MP at higher spatial frequencies and support the hypothesis that discrete and integrated measures of MPOD have similar correlations with glare attenuation effects across the macula. Additionally, peak foveal MPOD appears to influence GD across the macula. PMID:25697374

  12. THE ARECIBO H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.

    2012-11-10

    We report the detection of radio recombination line (RRL) emission using the Arecibo Observatory at X band (9 GHz, 3 cm) from 37 previously unknown H II regions in the Galactic zone 66 Degree-Sign {>=} l {>=} 31 Degree-Sign and | b | {<=} 1 Degree-Sign . This Arecibo H II Region Discovery Survey (Arecibo HRDS) is a continuation of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) HRDS. The targets for the Arecibo HRDS have spatially coincident 24 {mu}m and 20 cm emission of a similar angular morphology and extent. To take advantage of Arecibo's sensitivity and small beam size, sources in this sample are fainter, smaller in angle, or in more crowded fields compared to those of the GBT HRDS. These Arecibo nebulae are some of the faintest H II regions ever detected in RRL emission. Our detection rate is 58%, which is low compared to the 95% detection rate for GBT HRDS targets. We derive kinematic distances to 23 of the Arecibo HRDS detections. Four nebulae have negative local standard of rest velocities and are thus unambiguously in the outer Galaxy. The remaining sources are at the tangent-point distance or farther. We identify a large, diffuse H II region complex that has an associated H I and {sup 13}CO shell. The {approx}90 pc diameter of the G52L nebula in this complex may be the largest Galactic H II region known, and yet it has escaped previous detection.

  13. Solar glare hazard analysis tool on account of determined points of time

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford K; Sims, Cianan Alexander

    2014-09-23

    Technologies pertaining to determining when glare will be perceived by a hypothetical observer from a glare source and the intensity of glare that will be perceived by the hypothetical observer from the glare source are described herein. A first location of a potential source of solar glare is received, and a second location of the hypothetical observer is received. Based upon such locations, including respective elevations, and known positions of the sun over time, a determination as to when the hypothetical observer will perceive glare from the potential source of solar glare is made. Subsequently, an amount of irradiance entering the eye of the hypothetical observer is calculated to assess potential ocular hazards.

  14. Aerosol particle microphotography and glare-spot absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, S; Holler, S; Li, J H; Serpengüzel, A; Auffermann, W F; Hill, S C

    1995-04-01

    The relative intensities of glare spots in the image of an electrodynamically trapped aerosol droplet are measured experimentally with an aerosol particle microscope and calculated theoretically. The theoretical calculations are in good agreement with these experiments and indicate that the intensities of these spots are extremely sensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index. Experimentally, we obtain the molecular absorption spectrum of an impurity within a droplet by recording the spectrum of an individual glare spot produced by broadband illumination.

  15. Discomfort glare with complex fenestration systems and the impact on energy use when using daylighting control

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Sabine; McNeil, Andrew; Lee, Eleanor S.; Kalyanam, Raghuram

    2015-11-03

    Glare is a frequent issue in highly glazed buildings. A modelling approach is presented that uses discomfort glare probability and discomfort glare index as metrics to determine occupants’ behaviour. A glare control algorithm that actuated an interior shade for glare protection based on the predicted perception was implemented in a building simulation program. A reference case with a state-of-the-art base glazing was compared to the same glazing but with five different complex fenestration systems, i.e., exterior shades. The windows with exterior shades showed significant variations in glare frequencies. Energy use intensity in a prototypical office building with daylighting controls was greatly influenced for the systems with frequent glare occurrence. While the base glazing could benefit from glare control, some of the exterior shades showed significantly greater energy use when discomfort glare-based operation of interior shades was considered.

  16. Glare-free optical system for fundus visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salakhutdinov, Viktor K.; Smetanin, Yuriy G.; Doroshenko, Jasser; Sivachenko, Eugene A.

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes results of development of fundus-camera with non-glare optical scheme. The scheme is based on multiple lenses with a light gathering power (D/F <= 1) substantially less than one. Illumination of fundus can be provided through eye's pupil less than 3 mm. And much attention was directed to method of calculation of the no-glare optical scheme. The key idea is that geometry of optic elements of the system provides that glare in the form of ghost reflection from optical surface of one element focuses on a small-size absorbing screen located on another optical surface. Shows the possibility of implementation and the experimental results. During experiments with B/W camera we got Full HD color image of fundus having the eye's pupil diameter of 1.5 mm and illumination of fundus tissue in accordance with sanitary rules.

  17. A note on image degradation, disability glare, and binocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Vandana; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2013-08-01

    Disability glare due to scattering of light causes a reduction in visual performance due to a luminous veil over the scene. This causes problem such as contrast detection. In this note, we report a study of the effect of this veiling luminance on human stereoscopic vision. We measured the effect of glare on the horopter measured using the apparent fronto-parallel plane (AFPP) criterion. The empirical longitudinal horopter measured using the AFPP criterion was analyzed using the so-called analytic plot. The analytic plot parameters were used for quantitative measurement of binocular vision. Image degradation plays a major effect on binocular vision as measured by the horopter. Under the conditions tested, it appears that if vision is sufficiently degraded then the addition of disability glare does not seem to significantly cause any further compromise in depth perception as measured by the horopter.

  18. Computation of glint, glare, and solar irradiance distribution

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Khalsa, Siri Sahib Singh

    2015-08-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. At least one camera captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed.

  19. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2) and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.

  20. Balancing solar shading, daylighting and glare with translucent louvers

    SciTech Connect

    Jackaway, A.; Davies, M.

    1997-12-31

    Successful design of comfortable low-energy office buildings implicitly requires careful consideration for solar shading, daylighting, and the control of glare. Yet these inherently intertwined issues often demand conflicting design responses that pose difficult challenges for designers who frequently discover that successfully addressing one issue means sacrificing the performance with another. This is most commonly observed when excessive shading and glare control strategies reduce interior daylighting so significantly that electric lighting is operated at full capacity directly adjacent to fully glazed facades. The new Phoenix office building at England`s Building Research Establishment (BRE) employs an operable external translucent louver system along its southern facade to achieve a reasonable balance of these issues without significantly sacrificing individual performance. This paper describes the configuration and developmental processes for this system.

  1. ARGOS - II. The Galactic bulge survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K.; Ness, M.; Wylie-de-Boer, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Asplund, M.; Lewis, G.; Yong, D.; Lane, R.; Kiss, L.; Ibata, R.

    2013-02-01

    We describe the motivation, field locations and stellar selection for the Abundances and Radial velocity Galactic Origins Survey (ARGOS) spectroscopic survey of 28 000 stars in the bulge and inner disc of the Milky Way galaxy across latitudes of b = -5° to -10°. The primary goal of this survey is to constrain the formation processes of the bulge and establish whether it is predominantly a merger or instability remnant. From the spectra (R = 11 000), we have measured radial velocities and determined stellar parameters, including metallicities and [α/Fe] ratios. Distances were estimated from the derived stellar parameters and about 14 000 stars are red giants within 3.5 kpc of the Galactic Centre. In this paper, we present the observations and analysis methods. Subsequent papers (III and IV) will discuss the stellar metallicity distribution and kinematics of the Galactic bulge and inner disc, and the implications for the formation of the bulge.

  2. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Matthew; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Alcock, Charles; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Castro, Joel; Chen, Wen Ping; Chu, You-Hua; Cook, Kem H.; Geary, John C.; Huang, Chung-Kai; Kim, Dae-Won; Norton, Timothy; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Yen, WeiLing; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Figueroa, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small (~1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare ($<0.001 events per star per year) and short in duration (~200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS II will operate three 1.3 meter telescopes at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional at San Pedro Martir in Baja California, Mexico. With a 2.3 square degree field of view and a high speed camera comprising CMOS imagers, the survey will monitor 10,000 stars simultaneously with all three telescopes at a readout cadence of 20 Hz. Construction of the site began in the fall of 2013, and the survey will begin in the summer of 2017. This poster will provide an update on the status of the survey development and the schedule leading to the beginning of survey operations.

  3. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Matthew J.; Wang, Shiang Yu; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Chu, You Hua; Lee, William; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Cook, Kem H.; Norton, Timothy; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Alcock, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small (~1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare (<10-3 events per star per year) and short in duration (~200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS II will operate three 1.3 meter telescopes at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir in Baja California, México. With a 2.3 square degree field of view and a high speed camera comprising CMOS imagers, the survey will monitor 10,000 stars simultaneously with all three telescopes at a nominal readout cadence of 20 Hz. Construction of the site began in the fall of 2013. We present here an update on the status of the TAOS II survey, including the site development, camera fabrication, and project schedule.

  4. Pajarito Plateau archaeological surveys and excavations. II

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, C R

    1982-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory continues its archaeological program of data gathering and salvage excavations. Sites recently added to the archaeological survey are described, as well as the results of five excavations. Among the more interesting and important discoveries are (1) the apparently well-established local use of anhydrous lime, and (2) a late pre-Columbian use of earlier house sites and middens for garden plots. Evidence indicated that the local puebloan population was the result of an expansion of upper Rio Grande peoples, not an influx of migrants.

  5. Loading-unloading response of circular GLARE fiber-metal laminates under lateral indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamasphyros, George J.; Bikakis, George S.

    2015-01-01

    GLARE is a Fiber-Metal laminated material used in aerospace structures which are frequently subjected to various impact damages. Hence, the response of GLARE plates subjected to lateral indentation is very important. In this paper, analytical expressions are derived and a non-linear finite element modeling procedure is proposed in order to predict the static load-indentation curves of circular GLARE plates during loading and unloading by a hemispherical indentor. We have recently published analytical formulas and a finite element procedure for the static indentation of circular GLARE plates which are now used during the loading stage. Here, considering that aluminum layers are in a state of membrane yield and employing energy balance during unloading, the unloading path is determined. Using this unloading path, an algebraic equation is derived for calculating the permanent dent depth of the GLARE plate after the indentor's withdrawal. Furthermore, our finite element procedure is modified in order to simulate the unloading stage as well. The derived formulas and the proposed finite element modeling procedure are applied successfully to GLARE 2-2/1-0.3 and to GLARE 3-3/2-0.4 circular plates. The analytical results are compared with corresponding FEM results and a good agreement is found. The analytically calculated permanent dent depth is within 6 % for the GLARE 2 plate, and within 7 % for the GLARE 3 plate, of the corresponding numerically calculated result. No other solution of this problem is known to the authors.

  6. European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey II: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Normand, Camilla; Anker, Stefan D; Auricchio, Angelo; Blomström, Carina Lundqvist; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström; Bogale, Nigussie; Cleland, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gasparini, Maurizio; Gitt, Anselm; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellbrink, Christoph; Ruschitzka, Frank; Linde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Survey II is a 6 months snapshot survey initiated by two ESC Associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, which is designed to describe clinical practice regarding implantation of CRT devices in a broad sample of hospitals in 47 ESC member countries. The large volume of clinical and demographic data collected should reflect current patient selection, implantation, and follow-up practice and provide information relevant for assessing healthcare resource utilization in connection with CRT. The findings of this survey should permit representative benchmarking both nationally and internationally across Europe.

  7. Ca II absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardane, Gendith M.; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a survey for Ca II λλ3934, 3969 absorption-line systems culled from ˜95 000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 and Data Release 9 quasar spectra. With 435 doublets identified in the catalogue, this list is the largest Ca II catalogue compiled to date, spanning redshifts z < 1.34, which corresponds to the most recent ˜8.9 Gyr of the history of the Universe. We derive statistics on the Ca II rest equivalent width distribution and incidence. We find that the λ3934 rest equivalent width (W0^{λ 3934}) distribution cannot be described by a single exponential function. A double exponential function is required to produce a satisfactory description. The function can be written as a sum of weak and strong components: {partial n}/{partial W0^{λ 3934}}= ({N_{wk}^{ast }}/{W_{wk}^{ast }}) exp ({ -{W0^{λ 3934}}/{W_{wk}^{ast } } }) + ({N_{str}^{ast }}/{W_{str}^{ast }}) exp ({ -{W0^{λ 3934}}/{W_{str}^{ast } } }). A maximum likelihood fit to the unbinned data indicates N_{wk}^{ast }=0.140± 0.029, W_{wk}^{ast }=0.165± 0.020 \\unicode{197}, N_{str}^{ast }=0.024± 0.020, and W_{str}^{ast }=0.427± 0.101 Å. This suggests that the Ca II absorbers are composed of at least two distinct populations. The incidence of the overall Ca II absorber population does not show evidence for evolution in the standard cosmology. The normalization of the no-evolution curve, i.e. the value of the Ca II incidence extrapolated to redshift z = 0, for W0^{λ 3934} ≥ 0.3 Å, is n0 = 0.017 ± 0.001. In comparison to Mg II surveys, we found that only 3 per cent of Mg II systems in the SDSS have Ca II, confirming that Ca II systems are rare. We also report on some preliminary investigations of the nature of the two populations of Ca II absorbers, and show that they can likely be distinguished using their Mg II properties.

  8. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Ho, P.; Yen, W.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Richer, M.; Cook, K.; Hsu, S.; Chen, H.; Chang, Y.; Hiriart, D.; Ricci, D.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Norton, T.; Geary, J.; Furesz, G.; Alcock, C.; Byun, Y.

    2014-07-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small (˜1 km diameter) objects in the Transneptunian region and beyond. Such events are very rare (<10^{-3} events per star per year) and short in duration (˜200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS II will operate three 1.3 meter telescopes at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir in Baja California, México. With a 2.3 square degree field of view and high-speed cameras comprising arrays of custom CMOS imagers, the survey will monitor 10,000 stars simultaneously with all three telescopes at a readout cadence of 20 Hz. The survey will begin operation in 2016. This poster presents an update on the status of the site preparation and the technical development.

  9. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 μm and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 ° <= ell <= 67° and |b| <= 1°, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow (~1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  10. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE GALACTIC H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 {mu}m and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 {sup 0} {<=} l {<=} 67{sup 0} and |b| {<=} 1{sup 0}, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow ({approx}1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  11. Dynamic illumination based system to remove the glare and improve the quality of medical images.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Venkatesan, Shankar; Seth, Subhendu; Keswarpu, Payal; Nalam, Asish; Sathpathy, Akash

    2013-01-01

    Medical images taken from camera based devices (e.g. laparoscope, colposcope, retinoscope, etc) are greatly affected by numerous bright reflection spots (called glare or specular reflections). This may affect the visibility of the abnormal features (if present in the glare locations). We have developed a novel solution to overcome this problem by incorporating a multi-LED lighting solution. This will intelligently and rapidly switch on and off the LED's in a pattern that dynamically and geometrically shifts/shuffles these glare spots back and forth in the image such that every glare-affected area of a single image frame can be reconstructed from a few adjacent time-frame images. We have built the prototype that successfully demonstrates how the glare problem in the medical video/image can be satisfactorily solved, significantly enhancing the accuracy of this vital procedure in the diagnosis of diseases. We achieve 65-95% reduction in specularity on phantom model using the proposed approach.

  12. Pattern glare: the effects of contrast and color

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Laura J.; Wilkins, Arnold J.; Allen, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To test a theory of visual stress by investigating the inter-relationships between (1) the threshold contrast/saturation at which individuals first report discomfort when viewing colored gratings of progressively increasing contrast and decreasing saturation; (2) the choice of a colored overlay for reading; (3) any increase in reading speed when the overlay is used. Method: Ninety-five young adults, with normal color vision, reported illusions from square-wave gratings (Pattern Glare Test), chose any colored overlays that improved clarity (Intuitive Color Overlays) and read aloud randomly ordered common words (Wilkins Rate of Reading Test). This was followed by an automated choice of tints for text using various screen colors on a tablet, and a test of discomfort from patterns of progressively increasing contrast and decreasing saturation, using software developed for this study. All participants wore their optimal refractive correction throughout the procedure. Results: Fifty-eight participants chose a colored overlay and reported that it made text easier and more comfortable to read. On average, these individuals had a greater improvement in reading speed with their overlays (p = 0.003), a lower contrast threshold at which discomfort from achromatic gratings was first reported (p = 0.015), and a tendency to report more pattern glare (p = 0.052), compared to the other participants. Participants who chose both a most and least preferred tint for text using the automated procedure reported discomfort from colored gratings at a significantly higher contrast with their most preferred color compared to their least preferred color (p = 0.003). The choice of a colored tint was moderately consistent across tests. The most and least preferred colors tended to be complementary. Conclusion: Colored tints that improved reading speed reduced pattern glare both in terms of the illusion susceptibility and in terms of discomfort contrast threshold, supporting a theory of

  13. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 µm [C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  14. SPECTRAL CONFUSION FOR COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS OF REDSHIFTED C II EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-06-20

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencil-beam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150–1300 μm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 μm [C ii] line and other lines. Although the [C ii] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C ii] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20″ and 10′, sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  15. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  16. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    TAOS II is a next generation occultation survey with the goal of measuring the size distribution of the small objects (diameters between 0.5 and 30 km) in the Kuiper Belt. The project is a collaboration between the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The survey will operate three 1.3 m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico. Each telescope will be equipped with a custom camera comprising a focal plane array of CMOS imagers. Each camera will be capable of reading out image data from 10,000 stars at a cadence of 20 Hz. All telescopes will monitor the same set of stars simultaneously to search for coincident occultation events while minimizing the false positive rate. This poster describes the project and reports on the progress of the development of the survey infrastructure.

  17. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 7, including the Legacy Survey

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3

  18. Catalina Sky Survey II, a Next-Generation Survey with Small Binocular Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Stephen M.; Beshore, E. C.

    2010-10-01

    The Congress has directed NASA to develop a Near-Earth Object (NEO) survey program to detect, track, catalog, and characterize NEOs ≥ 140 meters in diameter by 2020. We are studying one possible approach, the Catalina Sky Survey II (CSS-II), a dedicated, low-cost, rapid-response, advanced survey that could be quickly deployed. CSS-II will dovetail with the planned capabilities of LSST and Pan-STARRS (PS), and add important new capabilities for NEO characterization and follow up that other surveys will not have. At the core of our proposal is three Small Binocular Telescopes (SBTs) using existing mirrors from the former Multiple Mirror Telescope. Working individually from a single observing site, each SBT will have the light grasp of a 2.4-meter telescope. Working together, they will be equivalent to a single telescope with a 4.2-meter mirror. Our approach has many advantages, including economy, 100 percent commitment to NEO search, low risk relative to other approaches, the ability to provide characterization of threatening objects, scalability, and the addition of significant new search capacity. The characterization potential of the mixed-use survey programs of LSST and PS will be valuable, but limited. Determining impact energy is vital to mitigation strategies. Impact energy follows from mass and velocity. Velocity is obtained from the orbital solution, but mass requires size and composition. Both size (through albedo) and composition can be significantly constrained with low-resolution spectroscopy covering the region from 0.35 to 2.4 microns. Shapes and rotation rates can best be obtained through time-series studies during close approaches. We will describe some preliminary designs for the CSS-II, the flexibility afforded by its multiple, independently-targeted mount design, freedom to adopt new observing strategies, and the potential for generating valuable science through a systematic spectrographic study of the asteroid population as part of its search

  19. ColorChecker at the beach: dangers of sunburn and glare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John

    2014-01-01

    In High-Dynamic-Range (HDR) imaging, optical veiling glare sets the limits of accurate scene information recorded by a camera. But, what happens at the beach? Here we have a Low-Dynamic-Range (LDR) scene with maximal glare. Can we calibrate a camera at the beach and not be burnt? We know that we need sunscreen and sunglasses, but what about our cameras? The effect of veiling glare is scene-dependent. When we compare RAW camera digits with spotmeter measurements we find significant differences. As well, these differences vary, depending on where we aim the camera. When we calibrate our camera at the beach we get data that is valid for only that part of that scene. Camera veiling glare is an issue in LDR scenes in uniform illumination with a shaded lens.

  20. Spatial Mapping of Macular Pigment Optical Density and Its Relationship to Contrast Sensitivity and Glare Disability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Christopher

    This dissertation explored the relationship of the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profile with measures of contrast sensitivity (CS), glare disability (GD), relative glare disability (RGD) and intraocular light scatter. A novel device capable of measuring MPOD across the central 160 of retina along 8 principle meridians using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) at eccentricities of 00, 20, 40, 60 and 80 was built. MPOD was calculated as both discrete and integrated values at all measured retinal loci. CS was measured using vertical grating stimuli of 3, 6 and 9 cycles per degree (cpd) also presented at 00, 20, 4 0, 60 and 80 eccentricity. GD was calculated as a difference in CS between glare and no glare conditions (CSNo Glare - CSGlare) using the same vertical grating stimuli presented at the same eccentricities. RGD [(CSNo Glare - CSGlare) / CSNo Glare] was calculated to isolate the glare attenuation effects of MPOD by controlling for CS variability among the subject sample. Intraocular scatter was assessed through a direct compensation method using a commercially available device. Statistical analyses of the discrete and integrated MPOD associations with CS, GD, RGD and intraocular scatter were evaluated. The cHFP identified reliable MPOD spatial distribution maps demonstrating a 1 st order exponential decay curve as a function of increasing eccentricity. Foveal MPOD revealed the highest correlation coefficients with RGD using 9cpd stimuli. These results are consistent with the glare attenuation effects of MP at higher spatial frequencies. Further support may be seen from the significant correlations found between corresponding parafoveal MPOD measures and both GD and RGD at 20 and 40 of eccentricity using 9cpd stimuli with greater MPOD being associated with less glare disability. All calculated measures of foveal MPOD shared similar significant correlation coefficients with both GD and RGD using 6cpd and 9cpd stimuli. Discrete

  1. Development of a Headlight Glare Simulator for a Driving Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Alex D.; Peli, Eli

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and construction of a headlight glare simulator to be used with a driving simulator. The system combines a modified programmable off–the-shelf LED display board and a beamsplitter so that the LED lights, representing the headlights of oncoming cars, are superimposed over the driving simulator headlights image. Ideal spatial arrangement of optical components to avoid misalignments of the superimposed images is hard to achieve in practice and variations inevitably introduce some parallax. Furthermore, the driver’s viewing position varies with driver’s height and seating position preferences exacerbate such misalignment. We reduce the parallax errors using an intuitive calibration procedure (simple drag-and-drop alignment of nine LED positions with calibration dots on the screen). To simulate the dynamics of headlight brightness changes when two vehicles are approaching, LED intensity control algorithms based on both headlight and LED beam shapes were developed. The simulation errors were estimated and compared to real-world headlight brightness variability. PMID:24443633

  2. Evaluation of Anti-Glare Applications for a Tactical Helmet-Mounted Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    simulated sunlight condition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Helmet-Mounted Display, HMD, Glare, Anti-Reflective, Hood 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...legibility with each film and HMD hood covering under normal office lighting and under a simulated sunlight condition. In this test paradigm, participants had...impediment in the form of glare as sunlight is reflected into the user’s eye. Since operators can be expected to perform their missions at any time of

  3. Glare Recovery of a Two Dimensional Tracking Task with Respect to Various Colors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    transparent, yellowish tinged crystalline material of complex bio-chemical structure. Yellowing of the lens will continue with age, and thus increase... headlamps to remain on for approximately five seconds. After the end of the five seconds the timer will 29 turn off the headlamps and recycle for the...Comparator button 104 is then pressed high which activates the glare source which consists of two automotive type headlights. The glare source is

  4. The dark side of photovoltaic — 3D simulation of glare assessing risk and discomfort

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Thomas; Wollert, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems form an important force in the implementation of renewable energies, but as we all know, the force has always its dark side. Besides efficiency considerations and discussions about architectures of power distribution networks, the increasing numbers of installations of PV systems for implementing renewable energies have secondary effects. PV systems can generate glare due to optical reflections and hence might be a serious concern. On the one hand, glare could affect safety, e.g. regarding traffic. On the other hand, glare is a constant source of discomfort in vicinities of PV systems. Hence, assessment of glare is decisive for the success of renewable energies near municipalities and traffic zones for the success of solar power. Several courts decided on the change of PV systems and even on their de-installation because of glare effects. Thus, location-based assessments are required to limit potential reflections and to avoid risks for public infrastructure or discomfort of residents. The question arises on how to calculate reflections accurately according to the environment's topography. Our approach is founded in a 3D-based simulation methodology to calculate and visualize reflections based on the geometry of the environment of PV systems. This computational model is implemented by an interactive tool for simulation and visualization. Hence, project planners receive flexible assistance for adjusting the parameters of solar panels amid the planning process and in particular before the installation of a PV system. - Highlights: • Solar panels cause glare that impacts neighborhoods and traffic infrastructures. • Glare might cause disability and discomfort. • 3D environment for the calculation of glare • Interactive tool to simulate and visualize reflections • Impact assessment of solar power plant farms.

  5. A portable inspection system to estimate direct glare of various LED modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Li; Liao, Chun-Hsiang; Li, Hung-Chung; Jou, Shyh-Jye; Chen, Han-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Tang, Yu-Hsiang; Peng, Wei-Jei; Kuo, Hui-Jean; Sun, Pei-Li; Lee, Tsung-Xian

    2015-07-01

    Glare is caused by both direct and indirect light sources and discomfort glare produces visual discomfort, annoyance, or loss in visual performance and visibility. Direct glare is caused by light sources in the field of view whereas reflected glare is caused by bright reflections from polished or glossy surfaces that are reflected toward an individual. To improve visual comfort of our living environment, a portable inspection system to estimate direct glare of various commercial LED modules with the range of color temperature from 3100 K to 5300 K was developed in this study. The system utilized HDR images to obtain the illumination distribution of LED modules and was first calibrated for brightness and chromaticity and corrected with flat field, dark-corner and curvature by the installed algorithm. The index of direct glare was then automatically estimated after image capturing, and the operator can recognize the performance of LED modules and the possible effects on human being once the index was out of expecting range. In the future, we expect that the quick-response smart inspection system can be applied in several new fields and market, such as home energy diagnostics, environmental lighting and UGR monitoring and popularize it in several new fields.

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, Darren L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Portsmouth U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Bristol U. /Apache Point Observ. /Liverpool John Moores U., ARI /Columbia U., CBA /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Durham U. /Portsmouth U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Naval Academy, Annapolis /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /New Mexico State U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab /Apache Point Observ. /Gottingen U. /Chicago U. /San Francisco State U. /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Fermilab /Apache Point Observ. /Durham U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona U. /Stockholm U. /Apache Point Observ. /Lick Observ. /Sussex U. /Barcelona U. /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Fermilab /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Chicago U. /Fermilab /South African Astron. Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Fermilab

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  7. The sloan digital sky Survey-II supernova survey: search algorithm and follow-up observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Hogan, Craig J.; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Frieman, Joshua A.; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Depoy, D. L.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Dilday, Ben; Kessler, Richard; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; and others

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg{sup 2} region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the type Ia SNe, the main driver for the survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  8. Psychophysical investigations of discomfort and disability glare from underground coal mine illumination systems. Open File Report, May 1980-July 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, K.L.; Lindahl, P.; Vincent, R.; Crouch, C.

    1983-10-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify current light-control technology and hardware that may be applicable on underground lighting systems to minimize disability and discomfort glare. No research dealing specifically with mine lighting was found, but abstracts on research considered potentially applicable are included in the report. Information on several commercial light-control products for use in controlling glare are also included. Vision tests conducted on 137 mine personnel to determine their discomfort and disability glare sensitivity indicate their sensitivity to disability glare is about the same as the general population.

  9. Large area glare sources and their effect on discomfort and visual performance at computer workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhaus, W.K.E.; Bailey, I.L.

    1992-05-01

    This paper studies the effects of a large area light source of variable but uniform luminance surrounding a video display terminal (VDT) on the perceived glare discomfort and visual performance of computer operators. A set of criteria was established for rating the discomfort from glare as either ``intolerable,`` ``disturbing,`` ``noticeable,`` or ``imperceptible``. Source luminance adjustments by means of a variable transformer to match the subjective glare criteria, as well as ratings of preselected lighting conditions on a visual analog scale with the same criteria, were used to determine comfortable lighting conditions. Results from the experiment indicate that subjects reliably selected a preferred lighting condition at any time when asked to adjust the luminance to produce optimum visual comfort. There was considerable between-subject variation in the range of luminances over which the surround field was neither noticeably too dim nor noticeably too bright. Comfortable luminance ranges also varied with initial presentation luminances immediately preceding the adjustment. Subjects preferred higher luminances following high initial presentation luminances. Performance speed at a difficult letter-counting task suggests that visual performance was slightly impaired by the presence of glare discomfort. Counting errors also occurred slightly more frequently under higher surround source luminances. There was a tendency for subjects to become more susceptible to glare over the course of the experiment.

  10. Design and demonstration of high efficiency anti-glare LED luminaires for indoor lighting.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Che-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Kai; Pan, Jui-Wen

    2015-02-09

    An anti-glare luminaire design is proposed to reduce the effect of glare and the multi-shadow while preserving high optical efficiency, high illumination uniformity and low unified glare rating (UGR). Comparison to the traditional direct light emitting diode (LED) luminaire in optical simulations showed an enhancement of the illumination uniformity from 64.9% to 80.0%. The optical efficiency was 79.5%, and the UGR value was controlled under 18.8. For the actual measurement, the finished product had an illumination uniformity of 77.0%, optical efficiency of 76.0%, UGR value of 19.0, and efficacy of 81.4 lm/w. Through this design, the lighting performance was greatly enhanced.

  11. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; et al.

    2014-01-14

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.

  12. Mobile computing device configured to compute irradiance, glint, and glare of the sun

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Vipin P; Ho, Clifford K; Khalsa, Siri Sahib

    2014-03-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. A mobile computing device includes at least one camera that captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed by the mobile computing device.

  13. Corneal tattooing to reduce glare in cases of traumatic iris loss.

    PubMed

    Reed, J W

    1994-09-01

    The traumatic loss of iris is often associated with symptoms of glare, which can be debilitating. This symptom may be benefitted by wearing a contact lens with a clear, central optical zone and opacification of the remainder. The patient who is contact lens-intolerant may be helped by tattooing of all of the cornea except the central visual axis. Four patients who had traumatic iris loss and who were treated by this technique reported reduced glare as well as improvement in the cosmetic appearance of the eye. Although corneal tattooing is an ancient procedure, it continues to be of benefit for selected patients.

  14. The extended ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II) II. Construction and properties of the survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, H.; Chon, G.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.; Nowak, N.; Bobrovskyi, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. Therefore X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters are one of the best ways to obtain a statistical census of the galaxy cluster population. Aims: In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s cm (0.1-2.4 keV). Methods: We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. Results: The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is z = 0.102. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 90% complete with a contamination less than 10%. Conclusions: With this publication we give a comprehensive statistical description of the REFLEX II survey and provide all the complementary information necessary for a proper modeling of the survey for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory La Silla, ChileFull Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A30

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 6, including Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (see www.sdss.org for general information) will map one-quarter of the entire sky and perform a redshift survey of galaxies, quasars and stars. The DR6 is the sixth major data release and provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download. It is the first data release of SDSS-II, an extension of the original SDSS consisting of three subprojects: Legacy, SEGUE and a Supernova survey. Be sure to check out the separate page for SEGUE also at http://classic.sdss.org/dr6/start/aboutsegue.html.

  16. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) II: Early Variability Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Feldmeier, J.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Mihos, C.; Harding, P.; Knox, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Ciardi, D.; Rudick, C.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for the photometric time-series data obtained with the BOKS survey (see BOKS I poster Feldmeier et al.). The BOKS survey covers about 1 square degree in the constellation of Cygnus. We obtained nearly 2000 SDSS r-band images spanning a total time period of 39 days. Each point source in our BOKS survey is also present in the single epoch, 7-color photometric survey catalogue being produced by the NASA Discovery program Kepler mission. Light curves of approximately 60,000 point sources, spanning r=14 to 20, are examined and discussed. We will present variability demographics for the BOKS survey including characterization of the light curves into variable classes based on type, color, amplitude, and any extra-solar planet transit candidates.

  17. A Survey of Fertilizer Dealers: II. Sources of Agronomic Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a survey of fertilizer dealers that was conducted to assess how the dealers were obtaining their agronomic information, aside from formal training sessions, and determine if these sources of information were satisfactory in fulfilling the dealers' needs. (TW)

  18. GlaRe, a GIS tool to reconstruct the 3D surface of palaeoglaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellitero, Ramón; Rea, Brice R.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Bakke, Jostein; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Frew, Craig R.; Hughes, Philip; Ribolini, Adriano; Lukas, Sven; Renssen, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Glacier reconstructions are widely used in palaeoclimatic studies and this paper presents a new semi-automated method for generating glacier reconstructions: GlaRe, is a toolbox coded in Python and operating in ArcGIS. This toolbox provides tools to generate the ice thickness from the bed topography along a palaeoglacier flowline applying the standard flow law for ice, and generates the 3D surface of the palaeoglacier using multiple interpolation methods. The toolbox performance has been evaluated using two extant glaciers, an icefield and a cirque/valley glacier from which the subglacial topography is known, using the basic reconstruction routine in GlaRe. Results in terms of ice surface, ice extent and equilibrium line altitude show excellent agreement that confirms the robustness of this procedure in the reconstruction of palaeoglaciers from glacial landforms such as frontal moraines.

  19. Delays in Laser Glare Onset Differentially Affect Target-Location Performance in a Visual Search Task.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    incandescent central glare, lens opacity (Interzeag, Opacity Lensmeter), and color sensitivity (Farnsworth- Munsell 100- Hue Test , Kollmorgen Corp...Baltimore, MD). PROCEDURES Subjects were tested separately. Each subject sat in the cockpit-familiarization trainer in a completely darkened room for the...accuracy of target-location responses. All post-hoc pairwise comparisons among means were carried out using Tukey’s HSD test at the 0.05 probability level

  20. Review of Efforts to Develop a Low-Luminance-Level Disability Glare Tester

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    glare source, i. e., removal of a peripheral lens opacity from the pupil due to reduced pupil size, decrease in the effects of peripheral corneal ...permanent for larger pupil diameters. Seiler et al. (2000) measured corneal aberrations following PRK (6-7 mm ablation zones) with a Tscherning type...surface. These variations are called astigmatism and aberrations. The corneal stroma (the central layer of the cornea), scatters about 10 percent

  1. SKA weak lensing- II. Simulated performance and survey design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldi, Anna; Harrison, Ian; Camera, Stefano; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-12-01

    We construct a pipeline for simulating weak lensing cosmology surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), taking as inputs telescope sensitivity curves; correlated source flux, size and redshift distributions; a simple ionospheric model; source redshift and ellipticity measurement errors. We then use this simulation pipeline to optimize a 2-yr weak lensing survey performed with the first deployment of the SKA (SKA1). Our assessments are based on the total signal to noise of the recovered shear power spectra, a metric that we find to correlate very well with a standard dark energy figure of merit. We first consider the choice of frequency band, trading off increases in number counts at lower frequencies against poorer resolution; our analysis strongly prefers the higher frequency Band 2 (950-1760 MHz) channel of the SKA-MID telescope to the lower frequency Band 1 (350-1050 MHz). Best results would be obtained by allowing the centre of Band 2 to shift towards lower frequency, around 1.1 GHz. We then move on to consider survey size, finding that an area of 5000 deg2 is optimal for most SKA1 instrumental configurations. Finally, we forecast the performance of a weak lensing survey with the second deployment of the SKA. The increased survey size (3π steradian) and sensitivity improves both the signal to noise and the dark energy metrics by two orders of magnitude.

  2. The China Mental Health Survey: II. Design and field procedures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaorui; Huang, Yueqin; Lv, Ping; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Li, Qiang; Yan, Jie; Yu, Yaqin; Kou, Changgui; Xu, Xiufeng; Lu, Jin; Wang, Zhizhong; Qiu, Hongyan; Xu, Yifeng; He, Yanling; Li, Tao; Guo, Wanjun; Tian, Hongjun; Xu, Guangming; Xu, Xiangdong; Ma, Yanjuan; Wang, Linhong; Wang, Limin; Yan, Yongping; Wang, Bo; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Zhou, Liang; Li, Lingjiang; Tan, Liwen; Chen, Hongguang; Ma, Chao

    2016-11-01

    China Mental Health Survey (CMHS), which was carried out from July 2013 to March 2015, was the first national representative community survey of mental disorders and mental health services in China using computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI). Face-to-face interviews were finished in the homes of respondents who were selected from a nationally representative multi-stage disproportionate stratified sampling procedure. Sample selection was integrated with the National Chronic Disease and Risk Factor Surveillance Survey administered by the National Centre for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention in 2013, which made it possible to obtain both physical and mental health information of Chinese community population. One-stage design of data collection was used in the CMHS to obtain the information of mental disorders, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders, while two-stage design was applied for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, and dementia. A total of 28,140 respondents finished the survey with 72.9% of the overall response rate. This paper describes the survey mode, fieldwork organization, procedures, and the sample design and weighting of the CMHS. Detailed information is presented on the establishment of a new payment scheme for interviewers, results of the quality control in both stages, and evaluations to the weighting.

  3. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  4. Anthropometric Survey (ANSUR) II Pilot Study: Methods and Summary Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    SIZES( DIMENSIONS ) ARMY NATIONAL GUARD COMPARISON MEASUREMENTS WHOLE BODY SCAN ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASUREMENT TOOL INFORMATION RETRIEVAL...1 1.1 SELECTION OF SURVEY DIMENSIONS ........................................................................ 3 1.2 THE SAMPLE...to what extent, this epidemic has influenced body dimensions in the Army —active duty, National Guard, or Reserves. The A2P consisted of 3462

  5. The M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. II. Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; He, Shiyuan; Macri, Lucas M.; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2017-04-01

    We present the discovery of 1847 Mira candidates in the Local Group galaxy M33 using a novel semi-parametric periodogram technique coupled with a random forest classifier. The algorithms were applied to ∼2.4 × 105 I-band light curves previously obtained by the M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. We derive preliminary period–luminosity relations at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths and compare them to the corresponding relations in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Newly EGOs from GLIMPSE II survey. II. MoC (Chen+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Gan, C.-G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; He, J.-H.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Titmarsh, A.

    2013-10-01

    A survey for molecular lines in the 3mm band toward ~60% of the GLIMPSE II EGO catalog (Paper I, Cat. J/ApJS/206/9) was performed with the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Mopra 22m radio telescope in 2009 august 9-20. Fifty-five sites, which include fifty-seven of the GLIMPSE II EGOs were observed in the survey (the two EGO-pairs G352.52+0.76(a)/G352.52+0.76(b) and G358.46-0.39(a)/G358.46-0.39(b) were covered simultaneously within a single Mopra observation). (11 data files).

  7. A Type II Supernova Hubble Diagram from the CSP-I, SDSS-II, and SNLS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Folatelli, G.; Pritchet, C.; Basa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae (SNe II) combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Color Method (PCM) to 73 SNe II with a redshift range of 0.01–0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag, i.e., 13% in distance uncertainties, is derived. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat universe and using the PCM, we derive the universe’s matter density: {{{Ω }}}m={0.32}-0.21+0.30 providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program N-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GS-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, and GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  8. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  9. U.S. Air Force Turbine Engine Emission Survey. Volume II. Individual Engine Test Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    1» I MI HU III.I11M1,|IHIIPH|I»^^—»^ II 111.11 l|. I I | mi | . I I. I.,.L ENGINE J85 -5 17 ^ ^_._. rr •Wl...AD-AÜbl 665 UNCLASSIFIED SCOTT ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INC PLUMSTEAOVILLE PA F/G 21/5 U.S. AIR FORCE TURBINE ENGINE EMISSION SURVEY...i run’ LEVEL CEEDOTR-7834 U.S. AIR FORCE TURBINE ENGINE EMISSION SURVEY VOL II INDIVIDUAL ENGINE TEST REPORTS v o-< 3 „ fi-^\\^92 ANTHONY F

  10. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: REFLEX II. Properties of the survey (Boehringer+ 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, H.; Chon, G.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.; Nowak, N.; Bobrovskyi, S.

    2013-06-01

    Like REFLEX I, the extended survey covers the southern sky outside the band of the Milky Way (|bII|>=20°) with regions around the Magellanic clouds excised (3 in LMC, 3 in SMC). The total survey area after this excision amounts to 4.24 steradian (or 13924°2) which corresponds to 33.75% of the sky. Different from REFLEX I, we use the refined RASS product RASS III (Voges et al. 1999, Cat. IX/10). (2 data files).

  12. The Chandra Fornax Survey. II. The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Karen; Zurek, D.; Scharf, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fornax cluster of galaxies lies in the southern hemisphere and is second only to the richer and more well-studied Virgo cluster in its accessibility for high resolution multi-wavelength data collection. A deep \\emph{Chandra} survey of the inner one degree of this cluster was performed in 2003, with first results published in 2005 identifying 771 X-ray point sources. We present a catalog of these X-ray point sources. Possible and likely optical candidates were identified from ground-based, HST and GALEX images. This catalog will facilitate future investigations by enhancing our understanding of a cluster's fainter and smaller objects, calibrating distance rulers, and constraining cosmological models. This work was conducted by a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position at the American Museum of Natural History and funded by the NSF.

  13. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, Thomas M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, D. S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-05-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic HII regions by using the NRAO Green Bank Telescope to detect hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from these nebulae. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect HII regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24µm (Spitzer/MIPSGAL) and 21 cm (either from the VLA Galactic Plane Survey or the NRAO NVSS) continuum emission. For the Galactic zone, -16° < Lgal < 67° and |Bgal|<1°, we detected 602 discrete RRL components from 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known HII regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative RRL velocities, placing them beyond the Solar orbit in the Perseus arm. We plan to determine the distance to over 90% of our sources (for the region Lgal>18°) by using HI emission/absorption experiments to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the Solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing HII region catalogs, will give a more accurate census of Galactic HII regions and their properties. The distribution of HII regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow ( 1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. There is still an overall dearth of HII regions within 4 kpc radius. For the first time the longitude-velocity distribution of HII regions gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located in kinematic locus of the 3 kpc Arm.

  14. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Wallace, Matthew L.; Simpson, Robert J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D.; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-04-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2753 clusters and 2270 background galaxies within ˜0.5 deg2 of PHAT imaging searched, or ˜400 kpc2 in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ˜20,000 individual images (totaling ˜7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ˜6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ˜8 magnitudes in F475W (g-band) luminosity, equivalent to ˜4 decades in cluster mass. We perform catalog completeness analysis using >3000 synthetic cluster simulations to determine robust detection limits and demonstrate that the catalog is 50% complete down to ˜500 {{M}⊙ } for ages <100 Myr. We include catalogs of clusters, background galaxies, remaining unselected candidates, and synthetic cluster simulations, making all information publicly available to the community. The catalog published here serves as the definitive base data product for PHAT cluster science, providing a census of star clusters in an {{L}\\star } spiral galaxy with unmatched sensitivity and quality.

  15. Hα kinematics of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicaire, I.; Carignan, C.; Amram, P.; Hernandez, O.; Chemin, L.; Daigle, O.; de Denus-Baillargeon, M.-M.; Balkowski, C.; Boselli, A.; Fathi, K.; Kennicutt, R. C.

    2008-04-01

    This is the second part of an Hα kinematics follow-up survey of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) sample. The aim of this paper is to shed new light on the role of baryons and their kinematics and on the dark/luminous matter relation in the star-forming regions of galaxies, in relation with studies at other wavelengths. The data for 37 galaxies are presented. The observations were made using Fabry-Perot interferometry with the photon-counting camera FaNTOmM on four different telescopes, namely the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6-m, the ESO La Silla 3.6-m, the William Herschel 4.2-m and the Observatoire du mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescopes. The velocity fields are computed using custom IDL routines designed for an optimal use of the data. The kinematical parameters and rotation curves are derived using the GIPSY software. It is shown that non-circular motions associated with galactic bars affect the kinematical parameters fitting and the velocity gradient of the rotation curves. This leads to incorrect determinations of the baryonic and dark matter distributions in the mass models derived from those rotation curves. Based on observations made with the ESO 3.60-m telescope at La Silla Observatories under programme ID 076.B-0859 and on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: isabelle@astro.umontreal.ca (ID);claude.carignan@umontreal.ca (CC) ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de France and the University of Hawaii.

  16. A Combined MG II/CA II Survey of Stellar Magnetic Activity in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicklund, B. M.; Donahue, R. A.; Dobson, A. K.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1997-01-01

    We use nearly contemporaneus low-resolution IUE observations of Mg II h + k emission and Mount Wilson Observatory Ca II H + K S indices for 33 pairs of observations of lower main sequence stars to formulate a relationship that will permit accurate predictions of S values as a function of (B - V) color and Mg II h + k flux. The resulting relationship is useful because it will extend the set of solar neighborhood stars for which a uniform estimate of chromospheric activity is available to include stars that are not observable from Mount Wilson as well as providing additional estimates of activity levels for stars that are on the Mount Wilson HK Project observing list.

  17. Evaluation of anti-glare applications for a tactical helmet-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, Jason L.; Trew, Noel J. M.; Geis, Matthew R.; Havig, Paul R.

    2011-06-01

    Non see-through, monocular helmet mounted displays (HMDs) provide warfighters with unprecedented amounts of information at a glance. The US Air Force recognizes their usefulness, and has included such an HMD as part of a kit for ground-based, Battlefield Airmen. Despite their many advantages, non see-through HMDs occlude a large portion of the visual field when worn as designed, directly in front of the eye. To address this limitation, operators have chosen to wear it just above the cheek, angled up toward the eye. However, wearing the HMD in this position exposes the display to glare, causing a potential viewing problem. In order to address this problem, we tested several film and HMD hood applications for their effect on glare. The first experiment objectively examined the amount of light reflected off the display with each application in a controlled environment. The second experiment used human participants to subjectively evaluate display readability/legibility with each film and HMD hood covering under normal office lighting and under a simulated sunlight condition. In this test paradigm, participants had to correctly identify different icons on a map and different words on a white background. Our results indicate that though some applications do reduce glare, they do not significantly improve the HMD's readability/legibility compared with an uncovered screen. This suggests that these post-production modifications will not completely solve this problem and underscores the importance of employing a user-centered approach early in the design cycle to determine an operator's use-case before manufacturing an HMD for a particular user community.

  18. Potential energy savings with exterior shades in large office buildings and the impact of discomfort glare

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Lee, Eleanor

    2015-04-01

    Exterior shades are highly efficient for reducing solar load in commercial buildings. Their impact on net energy use depends on the annual energy balance of heating, cooling, fan and lighting energy. This paper discusses the overall energy use intensity of various external shading systems for a prototypical large office building split into the different types of energy use and for different orientations and window sizes. Lighting energy was calculated for a constant lighting power as well as for dimmed lighting fixtures (daylighting control). In Section 3, slat angles and solar cut-off angles were varied for fixed exterior slat shading systems. While the most light-blocking shades performed best for the case without daylighting controls, the optimum cut-off angle with daylighting controls was found to be 30 deg for the office building prototype used in Chicago and Houston. For large window-to-wall (WWR) ratios, window related annual energy use could be reduced by at least 70 % without daylighting control and by a minimum of 86 % with daylighting control in average over all orientations. The occurrence of discomfort glare was is considered in Section 4 of the paper, which looks at the performance of commercially available exterior shading systems when an interior shade is used in addition to the exterior shade during hours when occupants would experience discomfort glare. Glare control impacts overall energy use intensity significantly for exterior shades with high transmittance, especially when daylighting controls are used. In these cases, exterior shades are only beneficial for window-to-wall areas ≥ 45% in the hot Houston climate. For smaller windows and in a heating/cooling climate like Chicago, exterior shades can increase energy consumption

  19. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    AO-AI13 14𔃾 ERTEC WESTERN INC LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN ADDITI-ETC(U) JUN Al F04704-80-C-OGO6...DTIC-DDA-2 FORM DOCUMENT PROCESSING SHEET DTIC ocT :g 70A -- ~’ .9 ’I K ii I / "~1 - i~ / . . ..1’ ~ ~- .. ~ ~1 I E-TR-50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY...144 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY. SEVEN AOOITI-ETCIU) JUN 81 FON7O-80-C-0006

  20. A survey of recent EBR-II passive safety testing

    SciTech Connect

    Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Singer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Sevy, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    During the last two years, the testing program at EBR-II has investigated the capabilities of liquid metal reactors (LMRs) to perform vital safety functions passively. In particular the tests have examined post shutdown decay heat removal by natural circulation and passive shutdown of the reactor after accidents which lead to undercooling. The undercooling accidents have been divided into two categories - the loss of flow without scram (LOFWS) (a family of events involving a loss of forced flow through the reactor), and the loss of heat sink without scram (LOHSWS) (a family of events involving a loss of the ability to transfer reactor heat to down stream components which generate steam and electricity.) The type of ''passive shutdown'' that has been examined is caused by natural processes - principally thermal expansion of the reactor structures, fuel and coolant. As used in this paper the term excludes automatic control of power, operator intervention or negative reactivity generated by special in-core devices. 18 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Design of asymmetric freeform lens for low glared LED street light with total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Min-Feng; Chen, Yi-Chian; Anh, Nguyen Doan Quoc; Chen, Tsai-Yu; Ma, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Hsiao-Yi

    2016-01-25

    The study is focused on the asymmetric secondary freeform lens (ASFL) design for creating a low glared light-emitting diode (LED) street light. The lens is mounted on a chip on board (COB) LED as the new LED street light module to perform a non-axial symmetric light intensity distribution. The experimental results show that the street light can work without inclining lamps and reach Chinese National Standards (CNS) and Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) standards at the same time.

  2. Flicker-glare and visual-comfort assessments of light emitting diode billboards.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Wei; Hsieh, Pin-Hsuan; Chang, Erik C; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the discomfort glare produced by the high-brightness LED billboards in relation to four factors: flicker frequency, panel luminance, viewing angular sub-tense, and ambient illuminance. The results showed that visual comfort is not affected by ambient illuminance but by the other three factors. Also, interaction was found between luminance and viewing angle. The experimental data were curve fitted to construct visual comfort models of LED billboard displays. By modulating the operating conditions, comfort display with LED billboards can be achieved.

  3. Seroepidemiologic studies in Oaxaca, Mexico. II. Survey for arbovirus antibody.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, R S; Zarate, M L; Cedeño-Ferreira, J; Antonio Paz, E

    1979-01-01

    A serologic survey was conducted in south-western Mexico to obtain information on human experience with arbovirus infections. Sera were collected from two semitropical areas along the Pacific coast of Oaxaca State, two mountain areas above 1,700 meters and the interior valley at 1,500 meters. Of the 610 sera tested for group A antibody, 4.9 per cent were positive in the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test to Venezuelan (VE), 11 per cent to Eastern, and none to Western encephalitis viruses. In neutralization tests the antibody was shown to be probably due to VE virus infections. When sera were screened for group B antibodies in the HI test, 32 per cent were positive with St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), 19 per cent with Ilhéus, and 4 per cent with yellow fever viruses. The pattern of reactions suggested that SLE or an antigenically related virus was responsible for the antibody detected. An unusually high rate was found in a mountain area at 2,000 meters: 41 per cent of 113 persons tested were seropositive to SLE. Of 493 sera screened by complement-fixation test, 6 per cent were positive to Nepuyo, 4 per cent to Patois, and 3 per cent to Tlacotalpan viruses.

  4. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhaoyu; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Peng, Chien Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  5. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1991-92. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Senior Administrative Officers--Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    This report, which combined Part I and Part II of a benefit study, presents data from a survey of Ontario universities concerning fringe benefits offered in 1991-92. Part I is made up of a series of tables displaying the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution. The first five tables cover general aspects of benefits,…

  6. Biennial Survey of Education, 1916-18. Volume II. Bulletin, 1919, No. 89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1921

    1921-01-01

    Volume II of the Biennial Survey of Education, 1916-1918 includes the following chapters: (1) Education in Great Britain and Ireland (I. L. Kandel); (2) Education in parts of the British Empire: Educational Developments in the Dominion of Canada (Walter A. Montgomery), Public School System of Jamaica (Charles A. Asbury), Recent Progress of…

  7. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, D.L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Craig, Hogan, J.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New EGOs from Spitzer GLIMPSE II survey. I. (Chen+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Gan, C.-G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; He, J.-H.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Titmarsh, A.

    2013-10-01

    We have adopted methods similar to those used by Cyganowski et al. (2008, Cat. J/AJ/136/2391) to compile a catalog of EGOs in the GLIMPSE II survey region. We displayed the archived GLIMPSE II Image Atlas mosaics (Version 3.5). We have constructed images in each of the IRAC bands (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0um), as well as for the Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) 24um band (from the MIPS Galactic Plane Survey (MIPSGAL survey; Carey et al. 2009PASP..121...76C), and a three-color composite (3.6um-blue, 4.5um-green, and 8.0-m-red) for each of the 98 newly identified EGOs. To investigate the nature of the newly cataloged EGO sample from the GLIMPSE II survey region, we have performed a survey for molecular lines in the 3mm band toward ~60% of the sources with the ATNF Mopra 22m radio telescope. The Mopra observations consisted of a single pointing for each source and were undertaken in the period 2009 August 9-20. (5 data files).

  9. TYPE II CEPHEID CANDIDATES. IV. OBJECTS FROM THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Edward G.

    2013-09-15

    We have obtained VR photometry of 447 Cepheid variable star candidates with declinations north of -14 Degree-Sign 30', most of which were identified using the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) data archive. Periods and other photometric properties were derived from the combination of our data with the NSVS data. Atmospheric parameters were determined for 81 of these stars from low-resolution spectra. The identification of type II Cepheids based on the data presented in all four papers in this series is discussed. On the basis of spectra, 30 type II Cepheids were identified while 53 variables were identified as cool, main sequence stars and 283 as red giants following the definitions in Paper III. An additional 30 type II Cepheids were identified on the basis of light curves. The present classifications are compared with those from the Machine-learned All Sky Automated Survey Classification Catalog for 174 stars in common.

  10. PHYSICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF [O II] EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE HETDEX PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bridge, Joanna S.; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Greg; Malz, A. I.; Schneider, Donald P. E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: hagen@psu.edu E-mail: aimalz@psu.edu; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment pilot survey identified 284 [O II] λ3727 emitting galaxies in a 169 arcmin{sup 2} field of sky in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.57. This line flux limited sample provides a bridge between studies in the local universe and higher-redshift [O II] surveys. We present an analysis of the star formation rates (SFRs) of these galaxies as a function of stellar mass as determined via spectral energy distribution fitting. The [O II] emitters fall on the ''main sequence'' of star-forming galaxies with SFR decreasing at lower masses and redshifts. However, the slope of our relation is flatter than that found for most other samples, a result of the metallicity dependence of the [O II] star formation rate indicator. The mass-specific SFR is higher for lower mass objects, supporting the idea that massive galaxies formed more quickly and efficiently than their lower mass counterparts. This is confirmed by the fact that the equivalent widths of the [O II] emission lines trend smaller with larger stellar mass. Examination of the morphologies of the [O II] emitters reveals that their star formation is not a result of mergers, and the galaxies' half-light radii do not indicate evolution of physical sizes.

  11. Photometric properties of intermediate-redshift Type Ia supernovae observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Takanashi, N.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, N.; ...

    2016-12-06

    We have analyzed multi-band light curves of 328 intermediate redshift (0.05 <= z < 0.24) type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). The multi-band light curves were parameterized by using the Multi-band Stretch Method, which can simply parameterize light curve shapes and peak brightness without dust extinction models. We found that most of the SNe Ia which appeared in red host galaxies (u - r > 2.5) don't have a broad light curve width and the SNe Ia which appeared in blue host galaxies (u - r < 2.0) havemore » a variety of light curve widths. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the colour distribution of SNe Ia appeared in red / blue host galaxies is different (significance level of 99.9%). We also investigate the extinction law of host galaxy dust. As a result, we find the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia with medium light curve width is consistent with the standard Galactic value. On the other hand, the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia that appeared in red host galaxies becomes significantly smaller. Furthermore, these results indicate that there may be two types of SNe Ia with different intrinsic colours, and they are obscured by host galaxy dust with two different properties.« less

  12. Photometric properties of intermediate-redshift Type Ia supernovae observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, N.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, N.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Konishi, K.; Schneider, D. P.; Cinabro, D.; Marriner, J.

    2016-12-06

    We have analyzed multi-band light curves of 328 intermediate redshift (0.05 <= z < 0.24) type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). The multi-band light curves were parameterized by using the Multi-band Stretch Method, which can simply parameterize light curve shapes and peak brightness without dust extinction models. We found that most of the SNe Ia which appeared in red host galaxies (u - r > 2.5) don't have a broad light curve width and the SNe Ia which appeared in blue host galaxies (u - r < 2.0) have a variety of light curve widths. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the colour distribution of SNe Ia appeared in red / blue host galaxies is different (significance level of 99.9%). We also investigate the extinction law of host galaxy dust. As a result, we find the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia with medium light curve width is consistent with the standard Galactic value. On the other hand, the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia that appeared in red host galaxies becomes significantly smaller. Furthermore, these results indicate that there may be two types of SNe Ia with different intrinsic colours, and they are obscured by host galaxy dust with two different properties.

  13. A CLASS I AND CLASS II CH{sub 3}OH MASER SURVEY OF EGOs FROM THE GLIMPSE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Churchwell, E.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.

    2009-09-10

    We present the results of a high angular resolution Very Large Array (VLA) Class I 44 GHz and Class II 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser survey of a sample of {approx}20 massive young stellar object (MYSO) outflow candidates selected on the basis of extended 4.5 {mu}m emission in Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire images. These 4.5 {mu}m selected candidates are referred to as extended green objects (EGOs), for the common coding of this band as green in three-color Infrared Array Camera images. The detection rate of 6.7 GHz Class II CH{sub 3}OH masers, which are associated exclusively with massive YSOs, toward EGOs is {approx}>64%-nearly double the detection rate of surveys using other MYSO selection criteria. The detection rate of Class I 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers, which trace molecular outflows, is {approx}89% toward EGOs associated with 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers. The two types of CH{sub 3}OH masers exhibit different spatial distributions: 6.7 GHz masers are centrally concentrated and usually coincide with 24 {mu}m emission, while 44 GHz masers are widely distributed and generally trace diffuse 4.5 {mu}m features. We also present results of a complementary James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) single-pointing molecular line survey of EGOs in the outflow tracers HCO{sup +}(3-2) and SiO(5-4). The HCO{sup +} line profiles and high SiO detection rate (90%) are indicative of the presence of active outflows. No 44 GHz continuum emission is detected at the 5 mJy beam{sup -1} (5{sigma}) level toward 95% of EGOs surveyed, excluding bright ultracompact H II regions as powering sources for the 4.5 {mu}m outflows. The results of our surveys constitute strong evidence that EGOs are young, massive YSOs, with active outflows, presumably powered by ongoing accretion.

  14. Dazzling glare: Protection criteria versus visual performance. Interim report, September 1985-August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, J.B.

    1989-06-07

    Laser eye protection was first introduced into the U.S. Fleet when the need arose to protect aviators and aircrew from our own neodymium systems. This protection was designed to reduce the incidence energy below the maximum permissible exposure level established by the American National Standards Institute. Since range finders used an infrared wavelength, as defined and therefore not visible to the eye, there was no possibility of glare. With time more systems were developed employing lasers in both the visible and infrared portion of the spectrum. When the lasing of the police helicopter in Los Angeles was first reported in 1981 it immediately became apparent that for wavelengths in the visible portion of the spectrum substantial losses in visual performance could be encountered at safe exposure levels. The incident emphasized the need to develop laser eye protection based on criteria that encompassed both transient (glare) and permanent (burns, hemorraghic lesions) effects. The goal of this research project has been to establish protection levels based on performance rather than damage criteria.

  15. Color and contrast sensitivity after glare from high-brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, H.-D.

    2008-02-01

    The color contrast capability was investigated for 3 volunteers with 7 specially developed test charts in red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow and black as a reference, namely without and after glare from 4 colored high-brightness LEDs. Each subject completed 56 tests in order to check especially the ability to discriminate low contrast. It was found that a contrast decrease of one level is equivalent to an increase of about 4 s in the required identification time and in addition a delay time between about 14 s and 16 s has been measured at the beginning of the respective test as a result of the dazzling glare from an LED. In addition trials have been performed with 4 different pseudoisochromatic color plates designed by Ishihara for color vision. These plates have been used to determine temporary color deficiencies after an exposure from a high-brightness LED. For this purpose 40 volunteers have been included in a laboratory test. Color vision was impaired for periods between 27 s and 186 s depending on the applied color plate and respective LED color.

  16. A very deep IRAS survey at l(II) = 97 deg, b(II) = +30 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacking, Perry; Houck, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A deep far-infrared survey is presented using over 1000 scans made of a 4 to 6 sq. deg. field at the north ecliptic pole by the IRAS. Point sources from this survey are up to 100 times fainter than the IRAS point source catalog at 12 and 25 micrometers, and up to 10 times fainter at 60 and 100 micrometers. The 12 and 25 micrometer maps are instrumental noise-limited, and the 60 and 100 micrometer maps are confusion noise-limited. The majority of the 12 micrometer point sources are stars within the Milky Way. The 25 micrometer sources are composed almost equally of stars and galaxies. About 80% of the 60 micrometer sources correspond to galaxies on Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) enlargements. The remaining 20% are probably galaxies below the POSS detection limit. The differential source counts are presented and compared with what is predicted by the Bahcall and Soneira Standard Galaxy Model using the B-V-12 micrometer colors of stars without circumstellar dust shells given by Waters, Cote and Aumann. The 60 micrometer source counts are inconsistent with those predicted for a uniformly distributed, nonevolving universe. The implications are briefly discussed.

  17. RESIS-II: An Updated Version of the Original Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Katherine V.; Mixon, David M.; Sundquist, Eric T.; Stallard, Robert F.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Stewart, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) database, originally compiled by the Soil Conservation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service) in collaboration with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, is the most comprehensive compilation of data from reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The database is a cumulative historical archive that includes data from as early as 1755 and as late as 1993. The 1,823 reservoirs included in the database range in size from farm ponds to the largest U.S. reservoirs (such as Lake Mead). Results from 6,617 bathymetric surveys are available in the database. This Data Series provides an improved version of the original RESIS database, termed RESIS-II, and a report describing RESIS-II. The RESIS-II relational database is stored in Microsoft Access and includes more precise location coordinates for most of the reservoirs than the original database but excludes information on reservoir ownership. RESIS-II is anticipated to be a template for further improvements in the database.

  18. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. III. KINEMATIC DISTANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, Robert T.

    2012-07-20

    Using the H I emission/absorption method, we resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity and derive distances for 149 of 182 (82%) H II regions discovered by the Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS). The HRDS is an X-band (9 GHz, 3 cm) GBT survey of 448 previously unknown H II regions in radio recombination line and radio continuum emission. Here, we focus on HRDS sources from 67 Degree-Sign {>=} l {>=} 18 Degree-Sign , where kinematic distances are more reliable. The 25 HRDS sources in this zone that have negative recombination line velocities are unambiguously beyond the orbit of the Sun, up to 20 kpc distant. They are the most distant H II regions yet discovered. We find that 61% of HRDS sources are located at the far distance, 31% at the tangent-point distance, and only 7% at the near distance. 'Bubble' H II regions are not preferentially located at the near distance (as was assumed previously) but average 10 kpc from the Sun. The HRDS nebulae, when combined with a large sample of H II regions with previously known distances, show evidence of spiral structure in two circular arc segments of mean Galactocentric radii of 4.25 and 6.0 kpc. We perform a thorough uncertainty analysis to analyze the effect of using different rotation curves, streaming motions, and a change to the solar circular rotation speed. The median distance uncertainty for our sample of H II regions is only 0.5 kpc, or 5%. This is significantly less than the median difference between the near and far kinematic distances, 6 kpc. The basic Galactic structure results are unchanged after considering these sources of uncertainty.

  19. Spectroscopic CCD surveys for quasars at large redshift. II - A Pfuei transit survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Maarten; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.

    1986-01-01

    A CCD transit survey has been carried out with the 200 in. telescope of a strip of sky 5 arcmin wide and 9 hr long. Direct images and slitless spectra of over 43,000 objects were obtained on two successive nights. An automatic search for emission lines of given minimum equivalent width and signal-to-noise ratio yielded 52 candidate sources. Slit spectra revealed that 24 were emission-line galaxies with z less than 0.4 and eight were quasars with 2 between 1.00 and 2.76. The number of quasars detect agrees with that predicted from luminosity function models for z less than 2.9. The models also indicate that between 30 and 62 quasars with z less than 2.9 should have been found in this survey, but none were detected. This result reconfirms that there is a redshift cutoff near or below redshift three. The apparent conflict of this measurement with the known existence of dozens of quasars with redshifts larger than three is discussed.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-II for Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gonder-Frederick, Linda A.; Schmidt, Karen M.; Vajda, Karen A.; Greear, Megan L.; Singh, Harsimran; Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Cox, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To perform the first comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-II (HFS-II), a measure of the behavioral and affective dimensions of fear of hypoglycemia, using modern test-theory methods, including item-response theory (IRT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Surveys completed in four previous studies by 777 adults with type 1 diabetes were aggregated for analysis, with 289 subjects completing both subscales of the HFS-II and 488 subjects completing only the Worry subscale. The aggregated sample (53.3% female, 44.4% using insulin pumps) had a mean age of 41.9 years, diabetes duration of 23.8 years, HbA1c value of 7.7%, and 1.4 severe hypoglycemic episodes in the past year. Data analysis included exploratory factor analysis using polychoric correlations and IRT. Factors were analyzed for fit, trait-level locations, point-measure correlations, and separation values. RESULTS Internal and test-retest reliability was good, as well as convergent validity, as demonstrated by significant correlations with other measures of psychological distress. Scores were significantly higher in subjects who had experienced severe hypoglycemia in the past year. Factor analyses validated the two subscales of the HFS-II. Item analyses showed that 12 of 15 items on the Behavior subscale, and all of the items on the Worry subscale had good-fit statistics. CONCLUSIONS The HFS-II is a reliable and valid measure of the fear of hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes, and factor analyses and IRT support the two separate subscales of the survey. PMID:21346182

  1. Attenuating Photostress and Glare Disability in Pseudophakic Patients through the Addition of a Short-Wave Absorbing Filter

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Billy R.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of filtering short wavelength light on visual performance under intense light conditions among pseudophakic patients previously implanted with a clear intraocular lens (IOL). This was a patient-masked, randomized crossover study conducted at 6 clinical sites in the United States between September 2013 and January 2014. One hundred fifty-four bilaterally pseudophakic patients were recruited. Photostress recovery time and glare disability thresholds were measured with clip-on blue-light-filtering and placebo (clear; no blue-light filtration) glasses worn over patients' habitual correction. Photostress recovery time was quantified as the time necessary to regain sight of a grating target after intense light exposure. Glare disability threshold was assessed as the intensity of a white-light annulus necessary to obscure a central target. The order of filter used and test eye were randomized across patients. Photostress recovery time and glare disability thresholds were significantly improved (both P < 0.0001) when patients used blue-light-filtering glasses compared with clear, nonfiltering glasses. Compared with a nonfiltering placebo, adding a clip-on blue-absorbing filter to the glasses of pseudophakic patients implanted with clear IOLs significantly increased their ability to cope with glare and to recover normal viewing after an intensive photostress. This result implies that IOL designs with blue-light-filtering characteristics may be beneficial under intense light conditions. PMID:25838942

  2. Anniston Community Health Survey: Follow-Up and Dioxin Analyses (ACHS-II) - Methods

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, L.S.; Dutton, N.D.; Cusack, C.; Mennemeyer, S.T.; Pavuk, M.

    2015-01-01

    High serum concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been reported previously among residents of Anniston, Alabama, where a PCB production facility was located in the past. As the second of two cross-sectional studies of these Anniston residents, the Anniston Community Health Survey: Follow-Up and Dioxin Analyses (ACHS-II) will yield repeated measurements to be used to evaluate changes over time in ortho-PCB concentrations and selected health indicators in study participants. Dioxins, non-ortho PCBs, other chemicals, heavy metals, and a variety of additional clinical tests not previously measured in the original ACHS cohort will be examined in ACHS-II. The follow-up study also incorporates a questionnaire with extended sections on diet and occupational history for a more comprehensive assessment of possible exposure sources. Data collection for ACHS-II from 359 eligible participants took place in 2014, seven to nine years after ACHS. PMID:25982988

  3. Anniston community health survey: Follow-up and dioxin analyses (ACHS-II)--methods.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Dutton, N D; Cusack, C; Mennemeyer, S T; Pavuk, M

    2016-02-01

    High serum concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been reported previously among residents of Anniston, Alabama, where a PCB production facility was located in the past. As the second of two cross-sectional studies of these Anniston residents, the Anniston Community Health Survey: Follow-Up and Dioxin Analyses (ACHS-II) will yield repeated measurements to be used to evaluate changes over time in ortho-PCB concentrations and selected health indicators in study participants. Dioxins, non-ortho PCBs, other chemicals, heavy metals, and a variety of additional clinical tests not previously measured in the original ACHS cohort will be examined in ACHS-II. The follow-up study also incorporates a questionnaire with extended sections on diet and occupational history for a more comprehensive assessment of possible exposure sources. Data collection for ACHS-II from 359 eligible participants took place in 2014, 7 to 9 years after ACHS.

  4. Psychometric properties of the School Fears Survey Scale for preadolescents (SFSS-II).

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, José Manuel; Espada Sánchez, José Pedro; Orgilés Amorós, Mireia; Méndez Carrillo, Xavier

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the psychometric properties of a new children's self-report measure. The School Fears Survey Scale, Form II (SFSS-II) assesses school fears in children from ages 8 to 11. The factor solution with a Spanish sample of 3,665 children isolated four factors: Fear of academic failure and punishment, fear of physical discomfort, fear of social and school assessment and anticipatory and separation anxiety. The questionnaire was tested by confirmatory factor analysis, which accounted for 55.80% of the total variance. Results indicated that the SFSS-II has a high internal consistency (alpha= .89). The results revealed high test-retest reliability and appropriate relationship with other scales. The age by gender interaction was significant. Two-way analysis of variance found that older children and girls had higher anxiety. The instrument shows adequate psychometric guarantees and can be used for the multidimensional assessment of anxiety in clinical and educational settings.

  5. PLANETARY NEBULAE DETECTED IN THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE GLIMPSE II LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Sun Kwok E-mail: sunkwok@hku.h

    2009-11-20

    We report the result of a search for the infrared counterparts of 37 planetary nebulae (PNs) and PN candidates in the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire II (GLIMPSE II) survey. The photometry and images of these PNs at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 mum, taken through the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), are presented. Most of these nebulae are very red and compact in the IRAC bands, and are found to be bright and extended in the 24 mum band. The infrared morphology of these objects are compared with Halpha images of the Macquarie-AAO-Strasbourg (MASH) and MASH II PNs. The implications for morphological difference in different wavelengths are discussed. The IRAC data allow us to differentiate between PNs and H II regions and be able to reject non-PNs from the optical catalog (e.g., PNG 352.1 - 00.0). Spectral energy distributions are constructed by combing the IRAC and MIPS data with existing near-, mid-, and far-IR photometry measurements. The anomalous colors of some objects allow us to infer the presence of aromatic emission bands. These multi-wavelength data provide useful insights into the nature of different nebular components contributing to the infrared emission of PNs.

  6. A cross-polarized freeform illumination design for glare reduction in fruit quality inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Janos C.; Koshel, R. John; Chipman, Russel; Stover, John C.; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-09-01

    Common illumination systems in short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) include direct or indirect tungsten halogen lights. While direct lights provide more radiation onto the samples than dome setups, thus being more energy efficient, the acquired images often suffer from specular reflections and gloss. Glare artifacts in images increase variability in the data limiting the accuracy of machine vision algorithms for defect detection and quality inspection, or even providing false positives. Although domes are known to provide a near Lambertian illumination and glare free images, glossy regions and heterogeneities may remain in the data in practice. More particularly, in the field of fruit and vegetable quality inspection, due to their waxy surface, it remains challenging to design an efficient realistic lighting system. This paper suggests a new approach to optimize the illumination of fruit and vegetables based on measurements of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), shape and Stokes parameters. From these measured values, a BRDF model is loaded into ray-tracing software for realistic illumination engineering in order to determine the most suitable illumination scheme. This concept is applied to apples and a cross polarizer (CP) with freeform optics (FO) optical configuration is proposed, which allows the FO to be optimized to maximize uniformity in the field of view of the imager and removes the parallel polarized gloss on the apples. The performance of this CP illumination system was determined experimentally for a set of apples. This cross polarized (CP) illumination system provided a uniformity (U) of 92% and an efficiency (ν) of 90%, while U = 87% and ν = 14% for an ideal dome configuration when illuminating a rectangular target. The simulated imaged apples with assigned optical properties performed better with CP (U=80%) than when using a dome (U=73%) by 7%. Finally, the sensitivity of the design for the light

  7. Observations of Mg II Absorption near z ~ 1 Galaxies Selected from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    We study the frequency of Mg II absorption in the outer halos of galaxies at z = 0.6-1.4 (with median z = 0.87), using new spectra obtained of 10 background quasars with galaxy impact parameters of b < 100 kpc. The quasar sight lines were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 QSO catalog based on proximity to galaxies in the DEEP2 redshift survey. In addition to the 10 small impact systems, we examine 40 additional galaxies at 100 kpc < b < 500 kpc serendipitously located in the same fields. We detect Mg II absorbers with equivalent width Wr = 0.15-1.0 Å, though not all absorbers correlate with DEEP galaxies. We find five unique absorbers within Δv = 500 km s-1 and b < 100 kpc of a DEEP galaxy; this small sample contains both early- and late-type galaxies and has no obvious trends with star formation rate. No Mg II is detected more than 100 kpc from galaxies; inside this radius the covering fraction scales with impact parameter and galaxy luminosity in a very similar fashion to samples studied at lower redshift. In all but one case, when Mg II is detected without a spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, there exists a plausible photometric candidate which was excluded because of slit collision or apparent magnitude. We do not detect any strong absorbers with Wr > 1.0 Å, consistent with other samples of galaxy-selected Mg II systems. We speculate that Mg II systems with 0.3 < Wr < 1.0 trace old relic material from galactic outflows and/or the halo assembly process, and that in contrast, systems with large Wr are more likely to reflect the more recent star-forming history of their associated galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  8. The HK-II Survey: Kinematics of Metal-Poor Stars in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, J.; Beers, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The digitized HK-II survey (Rhee 2000, Ph.D. thesis, MSU) was originated as a follow-on to the HK-I survey of Beers and colleagues (e.g., Beers et al. 1992, AJ, 103, 1987). HK-I was based on visually-selected candidate metal-poor stars from objective-prism plates. Unfortunately, in the absence of color information, this selection technique introduced a rather severe temperature-related bias. As a result, the HK-I candidates do not include large numbers of metal-deficient giants. In HK-II, candidate metal-poor stars are quantitatively selected from digitized objective-prism spectra with JHK color information from the recently completeted 2MASS catalog. This approach eliminates much of the temperature bias. We have begun to survey candidate very metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≤ -2.0) giants from HK-II, over the magnitude range 11.0 ≤ B ≤ 16.0, covering some ˜7000 deg2 of intermediate to high Galactic-latitudes. Ongoing medium-resolution ( ˜ 1-2Å ) spectroscopic follow-up using NOAO observing facilities has allowed us to obtain, to date, some 1000 spectra (400, 450, and 150 spectra for red giants, subgiants near the main-sequence turnoff, and FHB/A stars, respectively) for the HK-II metal-poor star candidates. In particular, the detection rate of bona fide very metal-poor giants is about 45 %, which is quite encouraging. Most of the "mistakes" are slightly more metal-rich giants, with -2.0 < [Fe/H] < -1.0. Metallicities and radial velocities are determined from our spectroscopy, and proper motions for most of the program stars are obtained from the recently released UCAC2 astrometric survey catalog. Here we present an analysis of the full space motions for numerous metal-poor stars from the HK-II survey. A comparision of the chemical and kinematic properties between high- and low-halo populations (that is, giants vs. sub-giants) will aid us in understanding the formation history of the Milky Way. J.R. acknowledges partial support for this work by NASA through the AAS

  9. The VMC Survey - XIII. Type II Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepi, V.; Moretti, M. I.; Marconi, M.; Clementini, G.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; de Grijs, R.; Emerson, J. P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Ivanov, V. D.; Muraveva, T.; Piatti, A. E.; Subramanian, S.

    2015-01-01

    The VISTA (Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) survey of the Magellanic Clouds System (VMC) is collecting deep Ks-band time-series photometry of the pulsating variable stars hosted in the system formed by the two Magellanic Clouds and the Bridge connecting them. In this paper, we have analysed a sample of 130 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Type II Cepheids (T2CEPs) found in tiles with complete or near-complete VMC observations for which identification and optical magnitudes were obtained from the OGLE III (Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment) survey. We present J and Ks light curves for all 130 pulsators, including 41 BL Her, 62 W Vir (12 pW Vir) and 27 RV Tau variables. We complement our near-infrared photometry with the V magnitudes from the OGLE III survey, allowing us to build a variety of period-luminosity (PL), period-luminosity-colour (PLC) and period-Wesenheit (PW) relationships, including any combination of the V, J, Ks filters and valid for BL Her and W Vir classes. These relationships were calibrated in terms of the LMC distance modulus, while an independent absolute calibration of the PL(Ks) and the PW(Ks, V) was derived on the basis of distances obtained from Hubble Space Telescope parallaxes and Baade-Wesselink technique. When applied to the LMC and to the Galactic globular clusters hosting T2CEPs, these relations seem to show that (1) the two Population II standard candles RR Lyrae and T2CEPs give results in excellent agreement with each other; (2) there is a discrepancy of ˜0.1 mag between Population II standard candles and classical Cepheids when the distances are gauged in a similar way for all the quoted pulsators. However, given the uncertainties, this discrepancy is within the formal 1σ uncertainties.

  10. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the permanent dent depth and energy absorption of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  11. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the maximum deflection and impact load of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  12. Photometric properties of intermediate-redshift Type Ia supernovae observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, N.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, N.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Konishi, K.; Schneider, D. P.; Cinabro, D.; Marriner, J.

    2017-02-01

    We have analysed multiband light curves of 328 intermediate-redshift (0.05 ≤ z < 0.24) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. The multiband light curves were parametrized by using the multiband stretch method, which can simply parametrize light-curve shapes and peak brightness without dust extinction models. We found that most of the SNe Ia that appeared in red host galaxies (u - r > 2.5) do not have a broad light-curve width and the SNe Ia that appeared in blue host galaxies (u - r < 2.0) have a variety of light-curve widths. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the colour distribution of SNe Ia appearing in red/blue host galaxies is different (a significance level of 99.9 per cent). We also investigate the extinction law of host galaxy dust. As a result, we find that the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia with medium light-curve widths is consistent with the standard Galactic value, whereas the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia that appear in red host galaxies becomes significantly smaller. These results indicate that there may be two types of SNe Ia with different intrinsic colours, and that they are obscured by host galaxy dust with two different properties.

  13. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  14. A Large-Scale, Low-Frequency Murchison Widefield Array Survey of Galactic H ii Regions between 260 < l < 340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Callingham, J. R.; Su, H.; Morgan, J.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Mckinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Procopio, P.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-05-01

    We have compiled a catalogue of H ii regions detected with the Murchison Widefield Array between 72 and 231 MHz. The multiple frequency bands provided by the Murchison Widefield Array allow us identify the characteristic spectrum generated by the thermal Bremsstrahlung process in H ii regions. We detect 306 H ii regions between 260° < l < 340° and report on the positions, sizes, peak, integrated flux density, and spectral indices of these H ii regions. By identifying the point at which H ii regions transition from the optically thin to thick regime, we derive the physical properties including the electron density, ionised gas mass, and ionising photon flux, towards 61 H ii regions. This catalogue of H ii regions represents the most extensive and uniform low frequency survey of H ii regions in the Galaxy to date.

  15. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. IV. HELIUM AND CARBON RECOMBINATION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Anderson, L. D.

    2013-02-10

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here, we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average {sup 4}He{sup +}/H{sup +} abundance ratio by number, (y {sup +}), is 0.068 {+-} 0.023(1{sigma}). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y {sup +} upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y {sup +} less than 0.04 and another 12 with upper limits below this value. These H II regions must have either a very low {sup 4}He abundance or contain a significant amount of neutral helium. The HRDS has 20 nebulae with carbon RRL emission but no helium emission at its sensitivity level. There is no correlation between the carbon RRL parameters and the 8 {mu}m mid-infrared morphology of these nebulae.

  16. Large Magellanic Cloud Near-infrared Synoptic Survey. IV. Leavitt Laws for Type II Cepheid Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Macri, Lucas M.; Rejkuba, Marina; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Singh, Harinder P.

    2017-04-01

    We present time-series observations of Population II Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud at near-infrared (JHK s ) wavelengths. Our sample consists of 81 variables with accurate periods and optical (VI) magnitudes from the OGLE survey, covering various subtypes of pulsators (BL Herculis, W Virginis, and RV Tauri). We generate light-curve templates using high-quality I-band data in the LMC from OGLE and K s -band data in the Galactic bulge from VISTA Variables in Via Láctea survey and use them to obtain robust mean magnitudes. We derive period–luminosity (P–L) relations in the near-infrared and Period–Wesenheit (P–W) relations by combining optical and near-infrared data. Our P–L and P–W relations are consistent with published work when excluding long-period RV Tauris. We find that Pop II Cepheids and RR Lyraes follow the same P–L relations in the LMC. Therefore, we use trigonometric parallax from the Gaia DR1 for VY Pyx and the Hubble Space Telescope parallaxes for k Pav and 5 RR Lyrae variables to obtain an absolute calibration of the Galactic K s -band P–L relation, resulting in a distance modulus to the LMC of {μ }{LMC}=18.54+/- 0.08 mag. We update the mean magnitudes of Pop II Cepheids in Galactic globular clusters using our light-curve templates and obtain distance estimates to those systems, anchored to a precise late-type eclipsing binary distance to the LMC. We find that the distances to these globular clusters based on Pop II Cepheids are consistent (within 2σ ) with estimates based on the {M}V-[{Fe}/{{H}}] relation for horizontal branch stars.

  17. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P < 0·001). Median total attack duration was 5·0 h and 9·0 h for patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II, respectively.

  18. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Zanichelli, A.; Caballero, T.; Bouillet, L.; Aberer, W.; Maurer, M.; Fain, O.; Fabien, V.; Andresen, I.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1‐INH‐AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1‐INH‐AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6‐month intervals during patient follow‐up visits. In the icatibant‐treated population, 16 patients with C1‐INH‐AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1‐INH‐AAE versus C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33–64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70–15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1‐INH‐AAE versus C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1‐INH‐AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II versus C1‐INH‐AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P < 0·001). Median total attack duration was 5·0 h and 9·0 h for patients with C1‐INH‐AAE versus C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II, respectively. PMID:27936514

  19. Methodology to assess potential glint and glare hazards from concentrating solar power plants : analytical models and experimental validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-04-01

    With growing numbers of concentrating solar power systems being designed and developed, glint and glare from concentrating solar collectors and receivers is receiving increased attention as a potential hazard or distraction for motorists, pilots, and pedestrians. This paper provides analytical methods to evaluate the irradiance originating from specularly and diffusely reflecting sources as a function of distance and characteristics of the source. Sample problems are provided for both specular and diffuse sources, and validation of the models is performed via testing. In addition, a summary of safety metrics is compiled from the literature to evaluate the potential hazards of calculated irradiances from glint and glare. Previous safety metrics have focused on prevention of permanent eye damage (e.g., retinal burn). New metrics used in this paper account for temporary flash blindness, which can occur at irradiance values several orders of magnitude lower than the irradiance values required for irreversible eye damage.

  20. Measurement of the droplets sizes of a flash boiling spray using an improved extended glare point velocimetry and sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shiquan; Jia, Ming; Wang, Tianyou; Lü, Qieni; Sun, Kai

    2016-04-01

    An improved extended glare point velocimetry and sizing (EGPVS) is proposed to investigate the droplets sizes of a flash boiling spray. When a spherical droplet with a relative refractive index from 1.16 to 1.41 is illuminated by two opposite laser sheets and a charge-coupled device camera is used to collect the s-polarization light at an observation angle of 90°, the intensities of the reflected lights are much stronger than the other order scattering lights. If the intensity of incident laser is controlled appropriately, two glare points from the reflected lights for the droplet are formed at the focused plane, while the intensities of the other order scattering lights are too weak to form any glare points. Then, the droplet diameter can be derived from the distance between the two glare points. In addition, the focused image is relative small, making it possible to measure dense spray. First, the characteristics of the improved EGPVS are discussed, and a series of standard particles are measured for validating this technique. Then, the technique is applied to investigate the droplets sizes of flash boiling spray. It is found that the minimum measurable diameter of droplets is 7.1 μm, and the relative error is less than 4.7 %. The droplet size distributions of spray are different at different stages. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) of gasoline spray decreases gradually as the fuel temperature increases, which is different from that of a single-component fuel with a sharp decrease in SMD at the flash boiling stage.

  1. Mechanical Properties Characterization and Business Case Analysis of the Fiber Metal Laminate GLARE-3 for Use as Secondary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    static four-point bending and tensile testing and dynamic impact testing. Aggregate behavior of the constituent materials was predicted using a model...these second generation materials have been required to operate well beyond their initial design lifetimes . The number of critical cracks that have...theoretical model to be able to accurately predict how other GLARE lay-ups would perform under the same given loading and bending conditions. The material

  2. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts.

  3. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Sako, Masao; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S.; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kunz, Martin; and others

    2013-02-15

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey (VCS-II) (Gordon+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C.; Beasley, A.; Peck, A.; Gaume, R.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A.; Ma, C.; Titov, O.; Boboltz, D.

    2016-07-01

    Six Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) calibrator survey campaigns were run between 1994 and 2007 (VCS1, Beasley et al. 2002, cat. J/ApJS/141/13; VCS2, Fomalont et al. 2003, cat. J/AJ/126/2562; VCS3, Petrov et al. 2005, cat. J/AJ/129/1163; VCS4, Petrov et al. 2006, cat. J/AJ/131/1872; VCS5, Kovalev et al. 2007, cat. J/AJ/133/1236; VCS6, Petrov et al. 2008, cat. J/AJ/136/580) We report on the results of a second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey campaign (VCS-II) in which 2400 VCS sources were re-observed in the X and S bands. The VLBA S/X (S band~2.3GHz and X band~8.6GHz) dual frequency system was used. We used the VLBA RDBE/Mark5C system, which has 16 32MHz channels and records 2 Gbits/s using 2 bit sampling. Due to S-band filters below 2200MHz and above 2400MHz at most of the VLBA antennas, and a broad area of RFI from SiriusXM satellites (2320-2345MHz), only four channels could be deployed in the S band (2220.0, 2252.0, 2284.0, and 2348.0MHz). The other 12 channels were deployed in the X band (8460.0, 8492.0, 8524.0, 8556.0, 8620.0, 8652.0, 8716.0, 8748.0, 8812.0, 8844.0, 8876.0, and 8908.0MHz). We set a target of 300 sources per session, or 2400 total sources for the 8 VLBA sessions. We selected all sources from the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) S/X astrometric/geodetic catalog (available at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/solutions/ or by following the links at http://lupus.gsfc.nasa.gov/) between -50° and +90° decl. that had been observed in only 1 or 2 sessions as of mid 2013. This amounted to ~2060 sources. To fill out the list, we added ~340 additional sources that had been observed but not detected in the original VCS1-6 analysis. The eight schedules were run between 2014 January and 2015 March (VCS-II-A/BG219A on 2014 01/04 10:04-01/05 10:02; VCS-II-B/BG219B1 on 2014 05/31 17:12-06/01 17:05; VCS-II-D/BG219D on 2014 06/09 09:13-06/10 09:10; VCS-II-C/BG219C on 2014 08/05 13:03-08/06 13:00; VCS-II-E/BG219E on 2014 08/09 00:00-08/09 23:55; VCS-II-F/BG219F on 2014

  5. From bed topography to ice thickness: GlaRe, a GIS tool to reconstruct the surface of palaeoglaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellitero, Ramon; Rea, Brice; Spagnolo, Matteo; Bakke, Jostein; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Frew, Craig; Hughes, Philip; Ribolini, Adriano; Renssen, Hans; Lukas, Sven

    2016-04-01

    We present GlaRe, A GIS tool that automatically reconstructs the 3D geometry for palaeoglaciers given the bed topography. This tool utilises a numerical approach and can work using a minimum of morphological evidence i.e. the position of the palaeoglacier front. The numerical approach is based on an iterative solution to the perfect plasticity assumption for ice rheology, explained in Benn and Hulton (2010). The tool can be run in ArcGIS 10.1 (ArcInfo license) and later updates and the toolset is written in Python code. The GlaRe toolbox presented in this paper implements a well-established approach for the determination of palaeoglacier equilibrium profiles. Significantly it permits users to quickly run multiple glacier reconstructions which were previously very laborious and time consuming (typically days for a single valley glacier). The implementation of GlaRe will facilitate the reconstruction of large numbers of palaeoglaciers which will provide opportunities for such research addressing at least two fundamental problems: 1. Investigation of the dynamics of palaeoglaciers. Glacier reconstructions are often based on a rigorous interpretation of glacial landforms but not always sufficient attention and/or time has been given to the actual reconstruction of the glacier surface, which is crucial for the calculation of palaeoglacier ELAs and subsequent derivation of quantitative palaeoclimatic data. 2. the ability to run large numbers of reconstructions and over much larger spatial areas provides an opportunity to undertake palaeoglaciers reconstructions across entire mountain, ranges, regions or even continents, allowing climatic gradients and atmospheric circulation patterns to be elucidated. The tool performance has been evaluated by comparing two extant glaciers, an icefield and a cirque/valley glacier from which the subglacial topography is known with a basic reconstruction using GlaRe. Results from the comparisons between extant glacier surfaces and modelled

  6. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Chandler, C.; Churchwell, E. B.; Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fender, R. P.; Gledhill, T. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Hindson, L.; Jackson, J. M.; Kurtz, S. E.; Marti, J. [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  7. The Vulture Survey: Analyzing the Evolution of MgII and CIV Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathes, Nigel; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of an archival VLT/UVES and Keck/HIRES quasar absorption line survey. We examine over 600 quasar lines of sight in order to inventory the cosmic properties of MgII and CIV absorbers. We employ an accurate, automated approach to line detection which consistently detects absorption lines with rest-frame equivalent widths less than 0.02 Å in S/N > 40 spectra. We determine redshift path densities, equivalent width and column density distributions, and cosmic mass densities as a function of redshift. We find that the evolution in the universal distribution of this metal absorbing gas correlates strongly with the cosmic star formation history of galaxies. We measure a significant enhancement in the comoving opacity of strong MgII and CIV absorbers around z=2. We also measure the pixel two-point velocity correlation function and find broader, higher velocity signatures around z=2. We examine possible causes for these trends, and determine that at z=2 galaxies transport significantly higher quantities of metal enriched gas into and out of their halos through star formation than at other times.

  8. Characteristics and verification of a car-borne survey system for dose rates in air: KURAMA-II.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Yoshida, T; Tsutsumi, M; Saito, K

    2015-01-01

    The car-borne survey system KURAMA-II, developed by the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, has been used for air dose rate mapping after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. KURAMA-II consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector, a GPS device, and a control device for data processing. The dose rates monitored by KURAMA-II are based on the G(E) function (spectrum-dose conversion operator), which can precisely calculate dose rates from measured pulse-height distribution even if the energy spectrum changes significantly. The characteristics of KURAMA-II have been investigated with particular consideration to the reliability of the calculated G(E) function, dose rate dependence, statistical fluctuation, angular dependence, and energy dependence. The results indicate that 100 units of KURAMA-II systems have acceptable quality for mass monitoring of dose rates in the environment.

  9. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  10. The Unique Optical Design of the CTI-II Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, J. T.; MacFarlane, M.

    2006-12-01

    The CCD/Transit Instrument with Innovative Instrumentation (CTI-II) is being developed for precision ground-based astrometric and photometric astronomical observations. The 1.8m telescope will be stationary, near-zenith pointing and will feature a CCD-mosaic array operated in time-delay and integrate (TDI) mode to image a continuous strip of the sky in five bands. The heart of the telescope is a Nasmyth-like bent-Cassegrain optical system optimized to produce near diffraction-limited images with near zero distortion over a circular1.42 deg field. The optical design includes an f/2.2 parabolic ULE primary with no central hole salvaged from the original CTI telescope and adds the requisite hyperbolic secondary, a folding flat and a highly innovative all-spherical, five lens corrector which includes three plano surfaces. The reflective and refractive portions of the design have been optimized as individual but interdependent systems so that the same reflective system can be used with slightly different refractive correctors. At present, two nearly identical corrector designs are being evaluated, one fabricated from BK-7 glass and the other of fused silica. The five lens corrector consists of an air-spaced triplet separated from follow-on air-spaced doublet. Either design produces 0.25 arcsecond images at 83% encircled energy with a maximum of 0.0005% distortion. The innovative five lens corrector design has been applied to other current and planned Cassegrain, RC and super RC optical systems requiring correctors. The basic five lens approach always results in improved performance compared to the original designs. In some cases, the improvement in image quality is small but includes substantial reductions in distortion. In other cases, the improvement in image quality is substantial. Because the CTI-II corrector is designed for a parabolic primary, it might be especially useful for liquid mirror telescopes. We describe and discuss the CTI-II optical design with respect

  11. Thermal and optical design analyses, optimizations, and experimental verification for a novel glare-free LED lamp for household applications.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nisa

    2015-07-20

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technologies are undergoing very fast developments to enable household lamp products with improved energy efficiency and lighting properties at lower cost. Although many LED replacement lamps are claimed to provide similar or better lighting quality at lower electrical wattage compared with general-purpose incumbent lamps, certain lighting characteristics important to human vision are neglected in this comparison, which include glare-free illumination and omnidirectional or sufficiently broad light distribution with adequate homogeneity. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the thermal and lighting performance and trade-offs for several commercial LED replacement lamps for the most popular Edison incandescent bulb. We present simulations and analyses for thermal and optical performance trade-offs for various LED lamps at the chip and module granularity levels. In addition, we present a novel, glare-free, and production-friendly LED lamp design optimized to produce very desirable light distribution properties as demonstrated by our simulation results, some of which are verified by experiments.

  12. Urinary cadmium and blood pressure: results from the NHANES II survey.

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, A S; DiCiccio, Y; Provenzano, G

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure were examined in a sample of 951 adult men and women who participated in the Second National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES II). Among all participants, positive relationships were seen between urinary cadmium levels and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01, respectively), after adjusting for age, sex, race, relative body weight, smoking status, and hypertensive medication use. However, analyses for subgroups determined by sex and smoking status were inconsistent. Among current smokers, urinary cadmium levels were significantly positively associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure for women, and with diastolic blood pressure for men. Yet among former smokers and lifelong nonsmokers of both sexes, urinary cadmium was not significantly associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Evidence that some hypertensive medications increase urinary cadmium excretion suggests that the positive associations seen among current smokers may reflect high urinary cadmium levels among hypertensives induced by hypertensive treatment. After treated hypertensives were removed from the analysis, regression coefficients relating blood pressure to cadmium dropped by a factor of two and lost statistical significance. We conclude that the present data provide little support for a causal association between systemic cadmium and hypertension at nonoccupational exposure levels. Further, conflicting results of previous studies may reflect failure to control adequately for age, smoking status, and hypertensive treatment. PMID:2040243

  13. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  14. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  15. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. II. SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES IN THE EPOCH OF CLUSTER ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta; Gladders, Michael D.; Abramson, Louis

    2013-06-10

    The IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS) provides spectra of {approx}2200 galaxies 0.31 < z < 0.54 in five rich clusters (R {approx}< 5 Mpc) and the field. Infalling, dynamically cold groups with tens of members account for approximately half of the supercluster population, contributing to a growth in cluster mass of {approx}100% by the present day. The ICBS spectra distinguish non-star-forming (PAS) and poststarburst (PSB) from star-forming galaxies-continuously star-forming (CSF) or starbursts (SBH or SBO), identified by anomalously strong H{delta} absorption or [O II] emission. For the infalling cluster groups and similar field groups, we find a correlation between PAS+PSB fraction and group mass, indicating substantial ''preprocessing'' through quenching mechanisms that can turn star-forming galaxies into passive galaxies without the unique environment of rich clusters. SBH + SBO starburst galaxies are common, and they maintain an approximately constant ratio (SBH+SBO)/CSF Almost-Equal-To 25% in all environments-from field, to groups, to rich clusters. Similarly, while PSB galaxies strongly favor denser environments, PSB/PAS Almost-Equal-To 10%-20% for all environments. This result, and their timescale {tau} {approx} 500 Myr, indicates that starbursts are not signatures of a quenching mechanism that produces the majority of passive galaxies. We suggest instead that starbursts and poststarbursts signal minor mergers and accretions, in star-forming and passive galaxies, respectively, and that the principal mechanisms for producing passive systems are (1) early major mergers, for elliptical galaxies, and (2) later, less violent processes-such as starvation and tidal stripping, for S0 galaxies.

  16. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Nichol, Robert C.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  17. A COMPLETE ATLAS OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD H II REGIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY (SGPS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Dickey, J. M.; Dawson, J. R.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present a complete catalog of H I emission and absorption spectrum pairs, toward H II regions, detectable within the boundaries of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS I), a total of 252 regions. The catalog is presented in graphical, numerical, and summary formats. We demonstrate an application of this new data set through an investigation of the locus of the Near 3 kpc Arm.

  18. National databases and rheumatology research II: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    PubMed

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Krishnan, Eswar

    2004-11-01

    Three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were conducted in the United States between 1971 and 1994 to provide data on the nutritional and health status of the population and on specific target conditions. This article describes features of the surveys and provides examples of research on musculoskeletal disorders that used the survey data.

  19. The Alabama Adolescent Health Survey: Health Knowledge and Behaviors. Summary Report II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Stephen; Adcock, Anthony

    This survey is a follow-up to a comprehensive survey of eighth- and tenth-grade public school students conducted in 1988. The 1990 sample includes over 3,400 students from rural, metropolitan, and mixed school districts. Data were collected using a 120-item questionnaire and compared to available information from the 1988 survey. The study…

  20. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  1. A facile fabrication of light diffusing film with LDP/polyacrylates composites coating for anti-glare LED application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shisen; Sun, Yaojie; Lin, Yandan; You, Bo

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a facile coating technique to fabricate the light diffusing film with hemispherical surface convex micro-structure. The coating was prepared by different ratio of light-diffusing particles (LDP)/polyacrylates composites via in situ radical polymerization, with the H2SO4 and vinyl triethoxysilane (A-151) pretreatment made the LDP better dispersed and incorporated with polyacrylate polymer chains. When the mass ratio (LDP/polyacrylate) was 0.5, the film obtained the highest light-diffusing effect and more than 90% transmittance due to the formation of hemispherical surface convex micro-structure. The light diffusing films have excellent anti-glare property if applied to LED light system.

  2. Candidate type II quasars at 2 < z < 4.3 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Strauss, Michael A.; Greene, Jenny E.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Brandt, W. N.; Liu, Guilin; Smith, Paul S.; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Myers, Adam D.; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P.; Yesuf, Hassen; York, Donald G.

    2013-11-01

    At low redshifts, dust-obscured quasars often have strong yet narrow permitted lines in the rest-frame optical and ultraviolet, excited by the central active nucleus, earning the designation type II quasars. We present a sample of 145 candidate type II quasars at redshifts between 2 and 4.3, encompassing the epoch at which quasar activity peaked in the universe. These objects, selected from the quasar sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, are characterized by weak continuum in the rest-frame ultraviolet (typical continuum magnitude of i ≈ 22) and strong lines of C IV and Lyα, with full width at half-maximum less than 2000 km s-1. The continuum magnitudes correspond to an absolute magnitude of -23 or brighter at redshift 3, too bright to be due exclusively to the host galaxies of these objects. Roughly one third of the objects are detected in the shorter wavelength bands of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer survey; the spectral energy distributions of these objects appear to be intermediate between classic type I and type II quasars seen at lower redshift. Five objects are detected at rest frame 6 μm by Spitzer, implying bolometric luminosities of several times 1046 erg s-1. We have obtained polarization measurements for two objects; they are roughly 3 per cent polarized. We suggest that these objects are luminous quasars, with modest dust extinction (AV ˜ 0.5 mag), whose ultraviolet continuum also includes a substantial scattering contribution. Alternatively, the line of sight to the central engines of these objects may be obscured by optically thick material whose covering fraction is less than unity.

  3. The Isan Culture Maintenance and Revitalisation Programme's Multilingual Signage Attitude Survey: Phase II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John

    2016-01-01

    This article contextualises and presents to the academic community the full dataset of the Isan Culture Maintenance and Revitalisation Programme's (ICMRP) multilingual signage survey. The ICMRP is a four-year European Union co-sponsored project in Northeast Thailand. This article focuses on one aspect of the project, four surveys each of 1,500…

  4. What's for Lunch? II. A 1990 Survey of Options in the School Lunch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Patricia McGrath; And Others

    This report provides information on the content of school lunches offered to middle school children in the public schools. A total of 163 middle schools in 42 states responded to the school lunch survey. Survey findings are given on: (1) the contents of the main course, vegetable and fruit offerings, desserts, and beverages; and (2) lunches…

  5. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume II. Radiometric multi-variable stacked profile data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume II contains the 10-variable radiometric stacked profile data for the entire survey area.

  6. Waves Forecasters in World War II (with a Brief Survey of Other Women Meteorologists in World War II).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. M.

    1995-11-01

    Out of the nearly 6000 U.S. military officers who were trained to be weather forecasters during World War II, there wore approximately 100 women. They were recruited into the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) by the U.S. Navy and underwent training with the military men in the so-called cadet program. Letters of reminiscence from six WAVES forecasters are combined with official navy correspondence, archival information from universities, and newspaper articles of the period to reconstruct the recruitment, training, duty assignments, and postwar careers of these women.With limited information, an effort has also been made to document the training of civilian women in the cadet program, and to estimate the number of women who served as forecasters in foreign countries during the war. The status of women in meteorology prior to the United States' entry into the war is examined as a backdrop to the study. Principal results of the study are as follows:1) The recruitment of WAVES forecasters was in response to extreme shortages of weather officers at the Naval Air Stations (NAS) in early 1943 as the war escalated.2) Those recruited to be WAVES forecasters had previous experience as math/science teachers and had a lower than average attrition rate in the demanding cadet program.3) The WAVES were assigned as NAS forecasters stateside, and there is some evidence that they were differentially treated in comparison to the male naval forecasters.4) In addition to the women forecasters in the WAVES, approximately 50 civilian women were trained in the cadet program under the sponsorship of the Civilian Aeronautics Administration and the U.S. Weather Bureau; England also recruited an estimated 50 women into weather forecasting during the latter stages of WWII.5) Of the 200 women who were trained to be forecasters, it is estimated that less than 10% remained in meteorology.

  7. Type-II AGN population from the zCOSMOS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Mignoli, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zcosmos Team

    2008-10-01

    I'll present the first results on the type-II AGN population isolated from the zCOSMOS bright sample which consists of 10k sources, purely magnitude selected at I=22.5. The selected type-II AGN sample consists of about 200 AGN, selected using the diagnostic diagrams up to redshift ~1.0. I'll present the properties of this sample (i.e. SED and morphology) and some preliminary results on the evolution of type-II AGN, as well as on the evolution of their fraction with respect to the total AGN population (Type-I + Type-II), as a function of both luminosity and redshift.

  8. Snapshots of America's Families II: A View of the Nation and 13 States from the National Survey of America's Families, 1997-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppelman, Jane, Ed.

    This collection of snapshots examines the well-being of America's children and adults through the lens of the 1999 National Survey of America's Families. Snapshots include: "Foreword: Snapshots of America's Families II: A View of the Nation and 13 States from the National Survey of America's Families" (Alyssa Wigton and Alan Weil);…

  9. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: II. Exposure Monitoring Surveys and Development of Exposure Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Vermeulen, Roel; Yereb, Daniel; Stanevich, Rebecca; Blair, Aaron; Silverman, Debra T.; Attfield, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Air monitoring surveys were conducted between 1998 and 2001 at seven non-metal mining facilities to assess exposure to respirable elemental carbon (REC), a component of diesel exhaust (DE), for an epidemiologic study of miners exposed to DE. Personal exposure measurements were taken on workers in a cross-section of jobs located underground and on the surface. Air samples taken to measure REC were also analyzed for respirable organic carbon (ROC). Concurrent measurements to assess exposure to nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), two gaseous components of DE, were also taken. The REC measurements were used to develop quantitative estimates of average exposure levels by facility, department, and job title for the epidemiologic analysis. Each underground job was assigned to one of three sets of exposure groups from specific to general: (i) standardized job titles, (ii) groups of standardized job titles combined based on the percentage of time in the major underground areas, and (iii) larger groups based on similar area carbon monoxide (CO) air concentrations. Surface jobs were categorized based on their use of diesel equipment and proximity to DE. A total of 779 full-shift personal measurements were taken underground. The average REC exposure levels for underground jobs with five or more measurements ranged from 31 to 58 μg m−3 at the facility with the lowest average exposure levels and from 313 to 488 μg m−3 at the facility with the highest average exposure levels. The average REC exposure levels for surface workers ranged from 2 to 6 μg m−3 across the seven facilities. There was much less contrast in the ROC compared with REC exposure levels measured between surface and underground workers within each facility, as well as across the facilities. The average ROC levels underground ranged from 64 to 195 μg m−3, while on the surface, the average ROC levels ranged from 38 to 71 μg m−3 by facility, an ∼2- to 3-fold difference. The average NO and

  10. THE PRISM MULTI-OBJECT SURVEY (PRIMUS). II. DATA REDUCTION AND REDSHIFT FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Burles, Scott M.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Mendez, Alexander J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun; Bernstein, Rebecca A.

    2013-04-20

    The PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) is a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey to z {approx} 1 completed with a low-dispersion prism and slitmasks allowing for simultaneous observations of {approx}2500 objects over 0.18 deg{sup 2}. The final PRIMUS catalog includes {approx}130,000 robust redshifts over 9.1 deg{sup 2}. In this paper, we summarize the PRIMUS observational strategy and present the data reduction details used to measure redshifts, redshift precision, and survey completeness. The survey motivation, observational techniques, fields, target selection, slitmask design, and observations are presented in Coil et al. Comparisons to existing higher-resolution spectroscopic measurements show a typical precision of {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.005. PRIMUS, both in area and number of redshifts, is the largest faint galaxy redshift survey completed to date and is allowing for precise measurements of the relationship between active galactic nuclei and their hosts, the effects of environment on galaxy evolution, and the build up of galactic systems over the latter half of cosmic history.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer/IRS survey of Class II objects in Orion A. I. (Kim+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Furlan, E.; Najita, J.; Sargent, B.; Hernandez, J.; Calvet, N.; Adame, L.; Espaillat, C.; Megeath, S. T.; Muzerolle, J.; McClure, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    We present 319 Class II disks observed with Spitzer/IRS in the Orion A star-forming region. We described the Spitzer/IRS and IRTF/SpeX observations and data reduction process in Kim+ (2013, J/ApJ/769/149). The Orion A objects in this paper were selected based on the identification of young stars with disks by IRAC/Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) color-color diagrams (Megeath+ 2012, J/AJ/144/192). We observed them using Spitzer/IRS during campaigns 36, 39, 40, and 44 between 2006 November and 2007 October. To this group we added 16 additional objects (5 in the ONC; 11 in L1641) that were reclassified as Class II from Class 0/I sources observed in the Orion A protostar survey by C. Poteet et al. (2016, in preparation); 14 of these 16 were observed during campaigns 39 and 40, but 2 sources were observed in campaign 56 (see table 1). Of our IRS targets observed in both SL and LL modules in Orion A with Spitzer/IRS, we observed 120 at near-IR (0.8-2.4um) wavelengths with the medium-resolution spectrograph SpeX, on the NASA IRTF on Mauna Kea during the 2010A, 2011A, and 2011B semesters (see table 3). (9 data files).

  12. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Cohen, Martin

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  13. Mammalian Survey Techniques for Level II Natural Resource Inventories on Corps of Engineers Projects (Part 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    ungulates (hoofed mammals), carnivores , lagomorphs (rabbits and hares), squirrels, large aquatic rodents (beavers, muskrats, nutria), ground-dwelling...on Corps projects. Emphasis is placed on small mammal and carnivore surveys because inventory methods used for game species are generally conducted...current list includes six shrews and moles (Order Soricimorpha), 23 bats (Order Chiroptera), 21 carnivores (Order Carnivora), four hares and rabbits

  14. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1993-94, Part I, Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Senior Administrative Officers--Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    This report presents data from a survey of Ontario (Canada) universities concerning employment benefits offered in 1993-94. Part I covers benefits other than pensions. Tables display the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution including: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes,…

  15. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey 1994-96. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report presents data from a survey of Ontario (Canada) universities concerning employment benefits offered in 1994-96. Part 1 covers benefits other than pensions. Tables display the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution including: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes, life and…

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. II. (Rosolowsky+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolowsky, E.; Dunham, M. K.; Ginsburg, A.; Bradley, E. T.; Aguirre, J.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Cyganowski, C.; Dowell, D.; Drosback, M.; Evans, N. J.; Glenn, J.; Harvey, P.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Walawender, J.; Williams, J. P.

    2010-09-01

    The BGPS is described in full detail in Paper I, Aguirre et al., 2010, submitted. The survey uses the 144-element Bolocam array on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, which observes in a band centered at 268GHz (1.1mm) and a width of 46GHz. (1 data file).

  17. The Peat Marwick/AS&U Compensation Survey. Part II: For College and University Executives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1986

    1986-01-01

    A total of 375 responses were received from two- and four-year colleges nationwide to a survey of compensation packages for the following positions: president; professor; and chief officers for academic concerns, business, facilities, purchasing, and computer services. Tables display data sorted by two- and four-year institutions and enrollment…

  18. Linking a Medical User Survey to Management for Library Effectiveness: II, A Checkland Soft Systems Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brember, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents Checkland's soft systems methodology, discusses it in terms of the systems approach, and illustrates how it was used to relate evidence of user survey to practical problems of library management. Difficulties in using methodology are described and implications for library management and information science research are presented. (8…

  19. The Sub-Kilometer Asteroid Diameter Survey II: The debiased size distribution of main belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, R.; Gladman, B.; Davis, D.; Petit, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    The Sub-Kilometer Asteroid Diameter Survey (SKADS, [1]) imaged ˜8.6 square degrees of sky and detected 1277 main belt asteroids to a limiting magnitude of R˜23 (at which the efficiency is 50%). SKADS was performed in both V and R filters and allows a probabilistic assignment of an albedo, and therefore diameter, to each object. By planting synthetic objects directly into the images we have determined the moving object detection efficiency as a function of their rate and direction of motion and their apparent magnitude on each of the six survey nights. The surveying pattern was designed to provide recovery of the asteroids over intervals of >6 days and therefore provides a good orbit, distance and absolute magnitude for each of the objects. We have performed a high-resolution, high-accuracy simulation of the multi-night surveying procedure to compute the observational selection effects as a function of semi-major axis, eccentricity, inclination and absolute magnitude (see Figure 1). We will present the results of this simulation and provide the observationally corrected distributions of main belt objects as a function of their orbital parameters, absolute magnitude and diameter.

  20. A Survey of the Contemporary Indians of Canada: Economic, Political, Educational Needs and Policies. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, M. A.; And Others

    Two sets of issues are discussed in this volume of the survey. These issues are related to the provision and adequacy of schools for the Indian child and adult, and to leadership, organization and direction of reserves. Although mindful of the wider setting of culture and community in which these issues find their definition, they are abstracted…

  1. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kawamura, Akiko; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of {approx}10 deg{sup 2} of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R {approx} 20) spectra in 2-5 {mu}m for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 {mu}m, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 {mu}m. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 {mu}m can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the

  2. The Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky way Survey (MALT110): Completion of Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Fuller, Gary; Longmore, Steven; Whitney, Barbara; Mizuno, Norikazu; Schuller, Frederic; Brogan, Crystal; Benjamin, Bob; Indermuehle, Balthasar; Caselli, Paola; Molinari, Sergio; Hernandez, Audra; Lowe, Vicki; Nguyen-Luong, Quang; Crutcher, Richard; Wakker, Bart; Goodman, Alyssa; Chibueze, James Okwe; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; O'Dougherty, Stefan; Sharpe, Margaret; Pitts, Rebecca

    2014-04-01

    We propose to combine Mopra's very fast mapping and robotic observing capabilities to complete the expanded latitude coverage for a long-overdue (but previously technically forbidding) comprehensive survey, begun in 2011, of the southern Milky Way's molecular Interstellar Medium. ThrUMMS' goal is to obtain arcminute-resolution, 0.7 K sensitivity maps of 12CO, 13CO, C18O, and CN over most of the 4th quadrant, quickly and publicly. Together with other ongoing or planned surveys of the Milky Way's cold ISM, ThrUMMS' parsec-resolution maps will revolutionise our understanding of molecular cloud and star formation, the total ecology of the ISM and its relationship with our Galaxy's stars, and the dynamics, chemistry, structure and evolution of the Milky Way itself.

  3. Apples to apples A2 - II. Cluster selection functions for next-generation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Bartlett, J. G.; Benítez, N.

    2017-01-01

    We present the cluster selection function for three of the largest next-generation stage-IV surveys in the optical and infrared: Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). To simulate these surveys, we use the realistic mock catalogues introduced in the first paper of this series. We detected galaxy clusters using the Bayesian Cluster Finder in the mock catalogues. We then modelled and calibrated the total cluster stellar mass observable-theoretical mass (M^{*}_CL-M_h) relation using a power-law model, including a possible redshift evolution term. We find a moderate scatter of σ _{M^{*}_CL | M_h} of 0.124, 0.135 and 0.136 dex for Euclid-Optimistic, Euclid-Pessimistic and LSST, respectively, comparable to other work over more limited ranges of redshift. Moreover, the three data sets are consistent with negligible evolution with redshift, in agreement with observational and simulation results in the literature. We find that Euclid-Optimistic will be able to detect clusters with >80 per cent completeness and purity down to 8 × 1013 h-1 M⊙ up to z < 1. At higher redshifts, the same completeness and purity are obtained with the larger mass threshold of 2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ up to z = 2. The Euclid-Pessimistic selection function has a similar shape with ˜10 per cent higher mass limit. LSST shows ˜5 per cent higher mass limit than Euclid-Optimistic up to z < 0.7 and increases afterwards, reaching a value of 2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ at z = 1.4. Similar selection functions with only 80 per cent completeness threshold have also been computed. The complementarity of these results with selection functions for surveys in other bands is discussed.

  4. Physicians' attitudes toward homosexuality and HIV: survey of a California Medical Society- revisited (PATHH-II).

    PubMed

    Smith, Davey M; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2007-01-01

    In 1982, Mathews et al. surveyed San Diego County Medical Society's (SDCMS) physicians about their attitudes toward homosexuality. They found significant differences in prevalence of homophobic attitudes by gender, year of medical school graduation, specialty, and practice setting. To assess current physicians' attitudes toward homosexuality and persons with HIV infection, an anonymous, self-administered, 17-item survey was mailed to all 4,385 members of the SDCMS and 1,271 UCSD physicians. The survey included items measuring attitudes toward homosexuality and toward entry to medical school and referral patterns, conditional on sexual orientation and HIV status of hypothetical referents. Only 3% of respondents would not admit a highly qualified homosexual applicant to medical school compared with 30% in 1982. Similarly, 9% would discontinue referrals to a gay pediatrician compared with 46% of respondents in 1982. Forty-two percent would not admit a "highly qualified but asymptomatic HIV-infected applicant with excellent response to antiretroviral therapy to medical school" and 66% would discontinue referral to a general surgeon known to be HIV infected. In multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for sex and medical school affiliation, significant (p < 0.05) independent predictors of being in the highest 10% on an HIV-phobia scale were year of graduation from medical school and degree of homophobia (model ROC = 0.77). This survey suggests a substantial reduction in homophobia since 1982. However, attitudes toward homosexuals and year of graduation from medical school appear to be significant predictors of attitudes toward persons with HIV infection.

  5. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}˜ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ˜50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  6. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ∼25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  7. Cosmic shear results from the deep lens survey. II. Full cosmological parameter constraints from tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; ...

    2016-06-15

    Here, we present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitudemore » $${r}_{\\mathrm{lim}}\\sim 27$$ ($$5\\sigma $$), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing $$\\gt 10$$ deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives $${{\\rm{\\Omega }}}_{m}={0.293}_{-0.014}^{+0.012}$$, $${\\sigma }_{8}={0.833}_{-0.018}^{+0.011}$$, $${H}_{0}={68.6}_{-1.2}^{+1.4}\\;{\\text{km s}}^{-1}\\;{{\\rm{Mpc}}}^{-1}$$, and $${{\\rm{\\Omega }}}_{b}=0.0475\\pm 0.0012$$ for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ~50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint $${{\\rm{\\Omega }}}_{k}=-{0.010}_{-0.015}^{+0.013}$$ from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding $$w=-{1.02}_{-0.09}^{+0.10}$$ with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to $$w=-1.03\\pm 0.03$$. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.« less

  8. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  9. Cosmic shear results from the deep lens survey. II. Full cosmological parameter constraints from tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-15

    Here, we present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude ${r}_{\\mathrm{lim}}\\sim 27$ ($5\\sigma $), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing $\\gt 10$ deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives ${{\\rm{\\Omega }}}_{m}={0.293}_{-0.014}^{+0.012}$, ${\\sigma }_{8}={0.833}_{-0.018}^{+0.011}$, ${H}_{0}={68.6}_{-1.2}^{+1.4}\\;{\\text{km s}}^{-1}\\;{{\\rm{Mpc}}}^{-1}$, and ${{\\rm{\\Omega }}}_{b}=0.0475\\pm 0.0012$ for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ~50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint ${{\\rm{\\Omega }}}_{k}=-{0.010}_{-0.015}^{+0.013}$ from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding $w=-{1.02}_{-0.09}^{+0.10}$ with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to $w=-1.03\\pm 0.03$. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  10. A SUCCESSFUL BROADBAND SURVEY FOR GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULAE. II. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Ly{alpha} nebulae (or Ly{alpha} {sup b}lobs{sup )} at 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 within 8.5 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} h {sup -3} {sub 70} Mpc{sup 3}. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Ly{alpha} nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Ly{alpha} emission at 1.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Ly{alpha} nebulae span a range of Ly{alpha} equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Ly{alpha} nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Ly{alpha} nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.

  11. A Successful Broadband Survey for Giant Lyα Nebulae. II. Spectroscopic Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Lyα nebulae (or Lyα "blobs") at 2 <~ z <~ 3 within 8.5 deg2 of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Boötes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of ≈108 h -3 70 Mpc3. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Lyα nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Lyα emission at 1.7 <~ z <~ 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Lyα nebulae span a range of Lyα equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Lyα nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 <~ z <~ 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Lyα nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.

  12. New active galactic nuclei detected in ROSAT All Sky Survey galaxies. II. The complete dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollatschny, W.; Kotulla, R.; Pietsch, W.; Bischoff, K.; Zetzl, M.

    2008-06-01

    Aims: The ROSAT ALL Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC) has been correlated with the Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC) to identify new extragalactic counterparts. 550 reliable optical counterparts have been detected. However there existed no optical spectra for about 200 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) candidates before the ROSAT ALL Sky Survey (RASS) was completed. Methods: We took optical spectra of 176 X-ray candidates and companions at ESO, Calar Alto observatory and McDonald observatory. When necessary we used a line profile decomposition to measure line fluxes, widths and centers to classify their type of activity. Results: We discuss the redshift-, linewidth-, as well as optical and X-ray luminosity distribution of our ROSAT selected sample. 139 galaxies of our 166 X-ray counterparts have been identified as AGN with 93 being Seyfert 1 galaxies (61%). Eighteen of them (20%) are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. 34 X-ray candidates (21%) are LINERs and only eight candidates (5%) are Seyfert 2. The ratio of the number of Seyfert 1 galaxies to Seyfert 2 galaxies is about 11/1. Optical surveys result in ratios of 1/1.4. The high fraction of detected Seyfert 1 galaxies is explained by the sensitivity of the ROSAT to soft X-rays which are heavily absorbed in type 2 AGN. Two X-ray candidates are HII-galaxies and 25 candidates (15%) show no signs of spectral activity. The AGN in our RASS selected sample exhibit slightly higher optical luminosities (MB = (-20.71 ± 1.75) mag) and similar X-ray luminosities (log(LX [ erg s-1] ) = 42.9 ± 1.7) compared to other AGN surveys. The Hα line width distribution (FWHM) of our newly identified ROSAT AGN sample is similar to the line widths distribution based on SDSS AGN. However, our newly identified RASS AGN have rather reddish colors explaining why they have not been detected before in ultraviolet or blue excess surveys.

  13. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Kasen, Daniel; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble residuals in our

  14. Environmental Baseline Survey, Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado. Volume II - Appendices A-G.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    TERRANDER II CORP VINYL CHLORIDE 0 UNK DENV 90037882I BUCKLEY ANG BASE AURORA 11\\03\\94 80011 USAF- ELLSWORTH AFB JET FUEL: JP-4 1600 GAL ARAP 94401574 15950...sites D Dioxin after PRP search F Federal facility F Fund Lead G Groundwater FE Federal Enforcement H Housing area, farm ND No Determination I Industrial...80011 BEAR’S CAR WASH WASTE WATER FROM CAR WASH 4000 GAL ARAP 93319237 ** BUCKLEY APB AURORA 05\\12\\89 80011 BUCKLEY AFB JET FUELS: JP-1 (KEROSENE 50

  15. A survey for PAH emission in H II regions, planetary and proto-planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuizon, M.; Cox, P.; Lequeux, J.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a systematic investigation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in H II regions, planetary nebulae (PN), and proto-planetary nebulae (PNN), are reported. Data is obtained from the low resolution spectra (LRS) of IRAS. The results show that: PAHs are formed in carbon rich objects; and PAH emission is ubiquitous in general interstellar medium and requires the presence of ultraviolet photons, in planetary and proto-planetary nebulae, PAH emission is seen only where an ionizing flux is present and in carbon rich objects.

  16. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. II. The luminosity function and mean galaxy density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-10-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude b_J_=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams: spanning a volume of ~5x10^4^h^-3^Mpc^3^ at the sensitivity peak (z~0.1), it provides an accurate determination of the "local" luminosity function and the mean galaxy density. We find that, although a Schechter function (with α=-1.22, M^*^_bJ_=-19.61+5logh and φ^*^=0.020h^3^/Mpc^3^) is an acceptable representation of the luminosity function over the entire range of magnitudes (M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh), our data suggest the presence of a steepening of the luminosity function for M_bJ_>=-17+5logh. Such a steepening at the faint end of the luminosity function, well fitted by a power law with slope β~-1.6, is almost completely due to galaxies with emission lines: in fact, dividing our galaxies into two samples, i.e. galaxies with and without emission lines, we find significant differences in their luminosity functions. In particular, galaxies with emission lines show a significantly steeper slope and a fainter M^*^. The amplitude and the α and M^*^ parameters of our luminosity function are in good agreement with those of the AUTOFIB redshift survey (Ellis et al. 1996). Vice-versa, our amplitude is significantly higher, by a factor ~1.6 at M~M^*^, than that found for both the Stromlo-APM (Loveday et al. 1992) and the Las Campanas (Lin et al. 1996) redshift surveys. Also the faint end slope of our luminosity function is significantly steeper than that found in these two surveys. The galaxy number density for M_bJ_<=-16+5logh is well determined (n{bar}=0.08+/-0.015h^3^/Mpc^3^). Its estimate for M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh is more uncertain, ranging from n{bar}=0.28h

  17. Intrinsic galaxy shapes and alignments - II. Modelling the intrinsic alignment contamination of weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, B.; Semboloni, E.; Hilbert, S.; Bett, P. E.; Hartlap, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Schneider, P.

    2013-11-01

    Intrinsic galaxy alignments constitute the major astrophysical systematic of forthcoming weak gravitational lensing surveys but also yield unique insights into galaxy formation and evolution. We build analytic models for the distribution of galaxy shapes based on halo properties extracted from the Millennium Simulation, differentiating between early- and late-type galaxies as well as central galaxies and satellites. The resulting ellipticity correlations are investigated for their physical properties and compared to a suite of current observations. The best-faring model is then used to predict the intrinsic alignment contamination of planned weak lensing surveys. We find that late-type galaxy models generally have weak intrinsic ellipticity correlations, marginally increasing towards smaller galaxy separation and higher redshift. The signal for early-type models at fixed halo mass strongly increases by three orders of magnitude over two decades in galaxy separation, and by one order of magnitude from z = 0 to z = 2. The intrinsic alignment strength also depends strongly on halo mass, but not on galaxy luminosity at fixed mass, or galaxy number density in the environment. We identify models that are in good agreement with all observational data, except that all models overpredict alignments of faint early-type galaxies. The best model yields an intrinsic alignment contamination of a Euclid-like survey between 0.5 and 10 per cent at z > 0.6 and on angular scales larger than a few arcminutes. Cutting 20 per cent of red foreground galaxies using observer-frame colours can suppress this contamination by up to a factor of 2.

  18. THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GOSSS). II. BRIGHT SOUTHERN STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sota, A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Alfaro, E. J.; Barbá, R. H.; Arias, J. I.; Walborn, N. R.; Gamen, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ∼ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of δ = –20°, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of Paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic survey coordinated with GOSSS that is assembling the largest sample of Galactic spectroscopic massive binaries ever attained. The OWN data combined with additional information on spectroscopic and visual binaries from the literature indicate that only a very small fraction (if any) of the stars with masses above 15-20 M {sub ☉} are born as single systems. In the future we will publish the rest of the GOSSS survey, which is expected to include over 1000 Galactic O stars.

  19. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  20. The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey. II. Further results and analysis of the full sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Cuciti, V.; Macario, G.; Athreya, R.

    2015-07-01

    The intra-cluster medium contains cosmic rays and magnetic fields that are manifested through the large scale synchrotron sources, termed radio haloes, relics, and mini-haloes. The Extended Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS) is an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS) designed to search for radio haloes using GMRT 610/235 MHz observations. The GRHS and EGRHS consists of 64 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4 that have an X-ray luminosity larger than 5 × 1044 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band and declination, δ > -31° in the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray cluster catalogues. In this second paper in the series, GMRT 610/235 MHz data on the last batch of 11 galaxy clusters and the statistical analysis of the full sample are presented. A new mini-halo in RX J2129.6+0005 and candidate diffuse sources in Z5247, A2552, and Z1953 have been discovered. A unique feature of this survey are the upper limits on the detections of 1 Mpc sized radio haloes; 4 new are presented here, making a total of 31 in the survey. Of the sample, 58 clusters with adequately sensitive radio information were used to obtain the most accurate occurrence fractions so far. The occurrence fractions of radio haloes, mini-haloes and relics in our sample are ~22%, ~16% and ~5%, respectively. The P1.4 GHz-LX diagrams for the radio haloes and mini-haloes are presented. The morphological estimators - centroid shift (w), concentration parameter (c), and power ratios (P3/P0) derived from the Chandra X-ray images - are used as proxies for the dynamical states of the GRHS and EGRHS clusters. The clusters with radio haloes and mini-haloes occupy distinct quadrants in the c-w, c-P3/P0 and w-P3/P0 planes, corresponding to the more and less morphological disturbance, respectively. The non-detections span both the quadrants. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  2. Characterising the local void with the X-ray cluster survey REFLEX II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Chris A.; Böhringer, Hans; Bristow, Martyn; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    Claims of a significant underdensity or void in the density distribution on scales out to ~= 300 Mpc have recently been made using samples of galaxies. We present the results of an alternative test of the matter distribution on these scales using clusters of galaxies, which provide an independent and powerful probe of large-scale structure. We study the density distribution of X-ray clusters from the ROSAT-based REFLEX II catalogue, which covers a contiguous area of 4.24 steradians in the southern hempsphere (34% of the entire sky). Using the normalised comoving number density of clusters we find evidence for an underdensity (30-40%), out to z~ 0.04, equivalent to ~=170 Mpc and with a significance of 3.4σ. On scales between 300 Mpc and 1 Gpc the distribution of REFLEX II clusters is consistent with being uniform. We also confirm recent results that the underdensity has a large contribution from the direction of the South Galactic Cap region, but is not significant in the direction of the Northern Galactic Cap as viewed from the southern sky. Both the limited size of the detected underdensity and its lack of isotropy, argue against the idea that the Type Ia supernovae data can be explained without the need for dark energy.

  3. A Redshift Survey of IRAS Galaxies. II. Methods for Determining Self-consistent Velocity and Density Fields: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahil, Amos; Strauss, Michael A.; Davis, Marc; Huchra, John P.

    1991-11-01

    In the paper, "A Redshift Survey of IRAS Galaxies. II. Methods for Determining Self-consistent Velocity and Density Fields" by Amos Yahil, Michael A. Strauss, Marc Davis, and John P. Huchra (ApJ, 372,380 [1991]), Figures 14 and 15 were presented out of order, with their legends reversed. Thus, the figure at the bottom of page 391 is Figure 15, and should have the legend: "Fig. 15.-As in Fig. 13, for the method 3 results." The figure at the top of page 392 is Figure 14, and should have the legend: "Fig. 14.-Plot in Galactic coordinates of the quantity V_diff_ for galaxies within 3000 km s^-1^ of the LG. The symbol size is proportional to V_diff_ - 400 km s^-1^, which measures the deviation of the redshift- distance relation along the line of sight to that galaxy from pure Hubble flow."

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Marriner, John; Kessler, Richard; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Ben; Frieman, Joshua A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; /KICP, Chicago /Portsmouth U., ICG /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Portsmouth U., ICG /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-26

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modeling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  5. Preliminary Results of Detailed Chemical Abundance Analysis of Milky Way Satellite Galaxy Reticulum II Discovered in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Daniel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Li, Ting; Dark Energy Survey Milky Way Science Group

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from abundance analysis of stars in Milky Way satellite galaxies found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). DES has discovered 16 candidate satellite galaxies of the Milky Way in its first two years of operation. Since January 2015, three candidates have subsequently been revealed to be dark matter-dominated by spectroscopic follow-up studies of their kinematics, confirming their status as satellite galaxies. Spectroscopic follow-up of the remaining 13 candidates is underway. We have analyzed high resolution VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of member stars in one of these satellite galaxies, Reticulum II. Using equivalent width measurement and spectral synthesis methods, we measure the abundances of Iron and other species in order to begin to understand the chemical content of these Milky Way satellites.

  6. THE SWIFT UVOT STARS SURVEY. II. RR LYRAE STARS IN M3 AND M15

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Balzer, Benjamin G.; Hagen, Lea M. Z. E-mail: blp14@psu.edu E-mail: lea.zernow.hagen@gmail.com

    2015-10-15

    We present the first results of a near-ultraviolet (NUV) survey of RR Lyrae stars from the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Mission. It is well-established that RR Lyrae stars have large amplitudes in the far- and near-ultraviolet. We have used UVOT’s unique wide-field NUV imaging capability to perform the first systematic NUV survey of variable stars in the Galactic globular clusters M3 and M15. We identify 280 variable stars, comprised of 275 RR Lyrae, 2 anomalous Cepheids, 1 classical Cepheid, 1 SX Phoenicis star, and 1 possible long-period or irregular variable. Only two of these are new discoveries. We compare our results to previous investigations and find excellent agreement in the periods with significantly larger amplitudes in the NUV. We map out, for the first time, an NUV Bailey diagram from globular clusters, showing the usual loci for fundamental mode RRab and first overtone RRc pulsators. We show the unique sensitivity of NUV photometry to both the temperatures and the surface gravities of RR Lyrae stars. Finally, we show evidence of an NUV period–metallicity–luminosity relationship. Future investigations will further examine the dependence of NUV pulsation parameters on metallicity and Oosterhoff classification.

  7. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF THE COSMOS FIELD. II. SOURCE DETECTION AND PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Puccetti, S.; Vignali, C.; Cappelluti, N.; Brunner, H.; Brusa, M.; Fruscione, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Comastri, A.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Elvis, M.; Civano, F.; Miyaji, T.; Damiani, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Mainieri, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra program that covers the central contiguous {approx}0.92 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field. C-COSMOS is the result of a complex tiling, with every position being observed in up to six overlapping pointings (four overlapping pointings in most of the central {approx}0.45 deg{sup 2} area with the best exposure, and two overlapping pointings in most of the surrounding area, covering an additional {approx}0.47 deg{sup 2}). Therefore, the full exploitation of the C-COSMOS data requires a dedicated and accurate analysis focused on three main issues: (1) maximizing the sensitivity when the point-spread function (PSF) changes strongly among different observations of the same source (from {approx}1 arcsec up to {approx}10 arcsec half-power radius); (2) resolving close pairs; and (3) obtaining the best source localization and count rate. We present here our treatment of four key analysis items: source detection, localization, photometry, and survey sensitivity. Our final procedure consists of a two step procedure: (1) a wavelet detection algorithm to find source candidates and (2) a maximum likelihood PSF fitting algorithm to evaluate the source count rates and the probability that each source candidate is a fluctuation of the background. We discuss the main characteristics of this procedure, which was the result of detailed comparisons between different detection algorithms and photometry tools, calibrated with extensive and dedicated simulations.

  8. A Spectroscopic Survey of the ClassII YSO Population in the LkH(alpha)101 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott; Lada, Elizabeth; Marinas, Naibi; Ybarra, Jason

    2010-08-01

    We propose to use the FLAMINGOS multi-object, near-IR spectrograph on the KPNO 4-m telescope to conduct a spectroscopic survey of previously-identified ClassII (``T Tauri'') YSO's in the LkH(alpha)101 star forming region. LkH(alpha)101 is a Herbig star with an associated population of ~ 150 YSOs. It is a member of the California Nebula, recently determined to be of comparable distance and size to the Orion Nebula, yet with significantly less star formation. We will use pre- existing FLAMINGOS photometry, combined with these spectra, to determine effective temperatures and luminosities for 72 ClassII YSO's. We will search for any age or mass distributions amongst the YSOs using theoretical tracks on the HR diagram. Finally, we will use these spectroscopic observations to constrain the effective temperatures and luminosities of the central sources when performing SED analysis to derive disk properties. The spatial distribution and environmental dependence of T Tauri disk properties in LkH(alpha)101 will then be explored. Additional targets on each multi-object mask will be used to search for substellar objects in the region to explore the low-end of the mass function.

  9. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  10. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-11-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (~1.75 Mpc or 1°) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin2. The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ~73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 < M F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described in

  11. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey . II. Truncated dust disks in H I-deficient spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; Pohlen, M.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Boselli, A.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Verstappen, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Dariush, A.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    By combining Herschel-SPIRE observations obtained as part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey with 21 cm Hi data from the literature, we investigate the role of the cluster environment on the dust content of Virgo spiral galaxies. We show for the first time that the extent of the dust disk is significantly reduced in Hi-deficient galaxies, following remarkably well the observed “truncation” of the Hi disk. The ratio of the submillimetre-to-optical diameter correlates with the Hi-deficiency, suggesting that the cluster environment is able to strip dust as well as gas. These results provide important insights not only into the evolution of cluster galaxies but also into the metal enrichment of the intra-cluster medium. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Halo WD Local Space Density from the GSC-II-based Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, D.; Bucciarelli, B.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Lattanzi, M. G.; McLean, B.; Smart, R. L.; Spagna, A.

    2007-09-01

    Microlensing experiments (Alcock et al. 2000) have suggested that a significant part of the dark halo of the Milky Way could be composed of matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs). Cool ancient white dwarfs (WDs) are the natural candidates. Here we present the results of the GSC2 survey of halo WDs, including a description of the WD sample, and a derivation of the local space density of halo WDs by means of an accurate kinematic analysis. The local space density of these objects is shown to be only about ˜ 10-5M⊙pc-3, corresponding to 0.1%--0.2% of the local dark matter.

  13. The HST/ACS+WFC3 Survey for Lyman Limit Systems. II. Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Madau, Piero

    2013-03-01

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z < 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(X) =0.29 ± 0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z = 2.4 of λ912 mfp = 243(252) h -1 72 Mpc, with an error on the mean value of ±43 h -1 72 Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of λ912 mfp from Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of λ912 mfp with redshift, including an estimate of the "breakthrough" redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N H I <=1017.5 cm-2 with a value for the total Lyman opacity of τLyman eff = 0.40 ± 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N H I , X) at z ~ 2.4, find that f(N H I , X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z ~ 2.4 and z ~ 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N H I , X).

  14. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey. II. Cluster Confirmation with SDSS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ˜85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  15. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N. E-mail: xdai@ou.edu E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu

    2016-01-15

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  16. ExploreNEOs. II. THE ACCURACY OF THE WARM SPITZER NEAR-EARTH OBJECT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Hora, J. L.; Fazio, G.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Mueller, M.; Delbo, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Thomas, C. A.; Bhattacharya, B.; Chesley, S.; Mainzer, A.; Emery, J. P.; Penprase, B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2011-03-15

    We report on results of observations of near-Earth objects (NEOs) performed with the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope as part of our ongoing (2009-2011) Warm Spitzer NEO survey ('ExploreNEOs'), the primary aim of which is to provide sizes and albedos of some 700 NEOs. The emphasis of the work described here is an assessment of the overall accuracy of our survey results, which are based on a semi-empirical generalized model of asteroid thermal emission. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope has been operated in the so-called Warm Spitzer mission phase since the cryogen was depleted in 2009 May, with the two shortest-wavelength channels, centered at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m, of the Infrared Array Camera continuing to provide valuable data. The set of some 170 NEOs in our current Warm Spitzer results catalog contains 28 for which published taxonomic classifications are available, and 14 for which relatively reliable published diameters and albedos are available. A comparison of the Warm Spitzer results with previously published results ('ground truth'), complemented by a Monte Carlo error analysis, indicates that the rms Warm Spitzer diameter and albedo errors are {+-}20% and {+-}50%, respectively. Cases in which agreement with results from the literature is worse than expected are highlighted and discussed; these include the potential spacecraft target 138911 2001 AE{sub 2}. We confirm that 1.4 appears to be an appropriate overall default value for the relative reflectance between the V band and the Warm Spitzer wavelengths, for use in correction of the Warm Spitzer fluxes for reflected solar radiation.

  17. Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey. II. The Molecular Gas Content and Properties of a Subset of SPOGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lisenfeld, Ute; Lanz, Lauranne; Appleton, Philip N.; Ardila, Felipe; Cales, Sabrina L.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Medling, Anne M.; Nyland, Kristina; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Urry, C. Meg

    2016-08-01

    We present CO(1-0) observations of objects within the Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey taken with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30 m single dish and the Combined Array for Research for Millimeter Astronomy interferometer. Shocked poststarburst galaxies (SPOGs) represent a transitioning population of galaxies, with deep Balmer absorption ({{EW}}{{H}δ }\\gt 5 {\\mathring{{A}}} ), consistent with an intermediate-age (A-star) stellar population, and ionized gas line ratios inconsistent with pure star formation. The CO(1-0) subsample was selected from SPOGs detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with 22 μm flux detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 3. Of the 52 objects observed in CO(1-0), 47 are detected with S/N > 3. A large fraction (37%-46% ± 7%) of our CO-SPOG sample were visually classified as morphologically disrupted. The H2 masses detected were between {10}8.7-10.8 {M}⊙ , consistent with the gas masses found in normal galaxies, though approximately an order of magnitude larger than the range seen in poststarburst galaxies. When comparing the 22 μm and CO(1-0) fluxes, SPOGs diverge from the normal star-forming relation, having 22 μm fluxes in excess of the relation by a factor of < {ɛ }{{MIR}}> ={4.91}-0.39+0.42, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The Na i D characteristics of CO-SPOGs show that it is likely that many of these objects host interstellar winds. Objects with large Na i D enhancements also tend to emit in the radio, suggesting possible AGN driving of neutral winds.

  18. Spectroscopy of supernova host galaxies from the SDSS-II SN survey with the SDSS and BOSS spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Matthew Dwaune

    Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) have been used as standard candles to measure cosmological distances. The initial discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe was performed using ~50 SNe Ia. Large SNe surveys have increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia to over a thousand with redshift coverage beyond z = 1. We are now in the age of abundant photometry without the ability for full follow-up spectroscopy of all SN candidates. SN cosmology using these large samples will increasingly rely on robust photometric classification of SN candidates. Photometric classification will increase the sample by including faint SNe as these are preferentially not observed with follow-up spectroscopy. The primary concern with using photometrically classified SNe Ia in cosmology is when a core-collapse SNe is incorrectly classified as an SN Ia. This can be mitigated by obtaining the host galaxy redshift of each SN candidate and using this information as a prior in the photometric classification, removing one degree of freedom. To test the impact of redshift on photometric classification, I have performed an assessment on photometric classification of candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. I have tested the classification with and without redshift priors by looking at the change of photometric classification, the effect of data quality on photometric classification, and the effect of SN light curve properties on photometric classification. Following our suggested classification scheme, there are a total of 1038 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1002 SNe~Ia with the spectroscopic redshift. For 912 (91.0%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Finally, I investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2

  19. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Davies, Jonathan I.; Del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  20. THE HST/ACS+WFC3 SURVEY FOR LYMAN LIMIT SYSTEMS. II. SCIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Madau, Piero

    2013-03-10

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z < 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(X) =0.29 {+-} 0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z = 2.4 of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} = 243(252) h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc, with an error on the mean value of {+-}43 h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} from Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} with redshift, including an estimate of the ''breakthrough'' redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N{sub H{sub I}} {<=}10{sup 17.5} cm{sup -2} with a value for the total Lyman opacity of {tau}{sup Lyman}{sub eff} = 0.40 {+-} 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) at z {approx} 2.4, find that f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z {approx} 2.4 and z {approx} 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X).

  1. The COSMOS-[O II] survey: evolution of electron density with star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-03-01

    Star-forming galaxies at z > 1 exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of the star-forming conditions, we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.5 with emission-line measurements of the {[O II]}λ λ 3726,3729 doublet. By comparing our z ∼ 1.5 sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of 114_{-27}^{+28} cm^{-3} for our z ∼ 1.5 sample, a factor of 5 greater than the typical electron density of local star-forming galaxies. However, we find no offset between the typical electron densities of local and high-redshift galaxies with equivalent star formation rates. Our work indicates that the average electron density of a sample is highly sensitive to the star formation rates, implying that the previously observed evolution is mainly the result of selection effects.

  2. A seroepidemiological survey of HTLV-I/II carriers in the Puna Jujeña.

    PubMed

    Dipierri, J E; Tajima, K; Cartier Robirosa, L; Sonoda, S

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) carriers are clustered in limited groups in the world. One of these groups is the Andean native population of South America. As part of an international collaborative study devoted to explore the clustering of HTVL-I carriers in different countries, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the seroprevalence of HTLV-I/II virus in the native population of Puna Argentina in Jujuy. Blood samples of individuals of three populations of Puna Jujeña (Susques, Rinconada, Cochinoca) were screened with particle agglutination (PA), immunofluorescence (IF) and western immunoblotting analysis (WB) tests. Two out 86 (2.32%) individuals examined in the Puna Jujeña showed positive results for HTLV-I antibodies. It is concluded that the Province of Jujuy, in particular its less miscegenated highest altitude areas, constitute the northern and southern Andean natural geographical clustering of HTLV-I. This distribution is probably linked both to a history of prehistoric human dispersal in the Andes and to high mother- to-child transmission of the virus under close conditions of each group.

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 Spectroscopic M Dwarf Catalog. II. Statistical Parallax Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; West, Andrew A.

    2011-03-01

    We present a statistical parallax analysis of low-mass dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We calculate absolute r-band magnitudes (Mr ) as a function of color and spectral type and investigate changes in Mr with location in the Milky Way. We find that magnetically active M dwarfs are intrinsically brighter in Mr than their inactive counterparts at the same color or spectral type. Metallicity, as traced by the proxy ζ, also affects Mr , with metal-poor stars having fainter absolute magnitudes than higher metallicity M dwarfs at the same color or spectral type. Additionally, we measure the velocity ellipsoid and solar reflex motion for each subsample of M dwarfs. We find good agreement between our measured solar peculiar motion and previous results for similar populations, as well as some evidence for differing motions of early and late M-type populations in U and W velocities that cannot be attributed to asymmetric drift. The reflex solar motion and the velocity dispersions both show that younger populations, as traced by magnetic activity and location near the Galactic plane, have experienced less dynamical heating. We introduce a new parameter, the independent position altitude (IPA), to investigate populations as a function of vertical height from the Galactic plane. M dwarfs at all types exhibit an increase in velocity dispersion when analyzed in comparable IPA subgroups.

  4. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. II. STATISTICAL LENS SAMPLE FROM THETHIRD DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, N; Oguri, M; Becker, R H; Shin, M; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; White, R L; Pindor, B; Strauss, M A; Kochanek, C S; Johnston, D E; Gregg, M D; Kayo, I; Eisenstein, D; Hall, P B; Castander, F J; Clocchiatti, A; Chiu, K; Kawano, Y; Scranton, R; Frieman, J; Keeton, C R; Morokuma, T; Rix, H; Turner, E L; Burless, S; Brunner, R J; Sheldon, E S; Bahcall, N A; Fukugita, M

    2007-09-13

    We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 ({approx}4188 deg{sup 2}), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1-inch and 20-inch and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10{sup -0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations ({approx} 1-inch - 2-inch) and one is a large separation (15-inch) system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.

  5. The Gaia spectrophotometric standard stars survey: II. Instrumental effects of six ground-based observing campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, G.; Marinoni, S.; Pancino, E.; Galleti, S.; Ragaini, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Cocozza, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castro, A.; Di Fabrizio, L.; Federici, L.; Figueras, F.; Gebran, M.; Jordi, C.; Masana, E.; Schuster, W.; Valentini, G.; Voss, H.

    2015-08-01

    The Gaia SpectroPhotometric Standard Stars (SPSS) survey started in 2006, was awarded almost 450 observing nights and accumulated almost 100 000 raw data frames with both photometric and spectroscopic observations. Such large observational effort requires careful, homogeneous, and automatic data reduction and quality control procedures. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluate instrumental effects that might have a significant (i.e., ≥ 1 %) impact on the Gaia SPSS flux calibration. The measurements involve six different instruments, monitored over the eight years of observations dedicated to the Gaia flux standards campaigns: DOLORES@TNG in La Palma, EFOSC2@NTT and ROSS@REM in La Silla, CAFOS@2.2 m in Calar Alto, BFOSC@Cassini in Loiano, and LaRuca@1.5 m in San Pedro Mártir. We examine and quantitatively evaluate the following effects: CCD linearity and shutter times, calibration frames stability, lamp flexures, second order contamination, light polarization, and fringing. We present methods to correct for the relevant effects which can be applied to a wide range of observational projects at similar instruments. Based on data obtained with BFOSC@Cassini in Loiano, Italy; EFOSC2@NTT in La Silla, Chile; DOLORES@TNG in La Palma, Spain; CAFOS@2.2 m in Calar Alto, Spain; LaRuca@1.5 m in San Pedro Mártir, Mexico (see acknowledgements for more details).

  6. Urinary cadmium and blood pressure: Results from the NHANES II survey

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; DiCiccio, Y. ); Provenzano, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Relationships between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure were examined in a sample of 951 adult men and women who participated in the Second National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES 2). Among all participants, positive relationships were seen between urinary cadmium levels and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure after adjusting for age, sex, race, relative body weight, smoking status, and hypertensive medication use. However, analyses for subgroups determined by sex and smoking status were inconsistent. Among current smokers, urinary cadmium levels were significantly positively associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure for women, and with diastolic blood pressure for men. Yet among former smokers and lifelong nonsmokers of both sexes, urinary cadmium was not significantly associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Evidence that some hypertensive medications increase urinary cadmium excretion suggests that the positive associations seen among current smokers may reflect high urinary cadium levels among hypertensives induced by hypertensive treatment. After treated hypertensives were removed from the analysis, regression coefficients relating blood pressure to cadmium dropped by a factor of two and lost statistical significance. The authors conclude that the present data provide little support for a causal association between systemic cadmium and hypertension at nonoccupational exposure levels. Further, conflicting results of previous studies may reflect failure to control adequately for age, smoking status, and hypertensive treatment.

  7. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE PIPE NEBULA. II. DATA, METHODS, AND DUST EXTINCTION MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco

    2010-12-20

    We present a new set of high-resolution dust extinction maps of the nearby and essentially starless Pipe Nebula molecular cloud. The maps were constructed from a concerted deep near-infrared imaging survey with the ESO-VLT, ESO-NTT, CAHA 3.5 m telescopes, and 2MASS data. The new maps have a resolution three times higher than the previous extinction map of this cloud by Lombardi et al. and are able to resolve structures down to 2600 AU. We detect 244 significant extinction peaks across the cloud. These peaks have masses between 0.1 and 18.4 M{sub sun}, diameters between 1.2 and 5.7 x 10{sup 4} AU (0.06 and 0.28 pc), and mean densities of about 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, all in good agreement with previous results. From the analysis of the mean surface density of companions we find a well-defined scale near 1.4 x 10{sup 4} AU below which we detect a significant decrease in structure of the cloud. This scale is smaller than the Jeans length calculated from the mean density of the peaks. The surface density of peaks is not uniform but instead it displays clustering. Extinction peaks in the Pipe Nebula appear to have a spatial distribution similar to the stars in Taurus, suggesting that the spatial distribution of stars evolves directly from the primordial spatial distribution of high-density material.

  8. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7 SPECTROSCOPIC M DWARF CATALOG. II. STATISTICAL PARALLAX ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; West, Andrew A.

    2011-03-15

    We present a statistical parallax analysis of low-mass dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We calculate absolute r-band magnitudes (M{sub r} ) as a function of color and spectral type and investigate changes in M{sub r} with location in the Milky Way. We find that magnetically active M dwarfs are intrinsically brighter in M{sub r} than their inactive counterparts at the same color or spectral type. Metallicity, as traced by the proxy {zeta}, also affects M{sub r} , with metal-poor stars having fainter absolute magnitudes than higher metallicity M dwarfs at the same color or spectral type. Additionally, we measure the velocity ellipsoid and solar reflex motion for each subsample of M dwarfs. We find good agreement between our measured solar peculiar motion and previous results for similar populations, as well as some evidence for differing motions of early and late M-type populations in U and W velocities that cannot be attributed to asymmetric drift. The reflex solar motion and the velocity dispersions both show that younger populations, as traced by magnetic activity and location near the Galactic plane, have experienced less dynamical heating. We introduce a new parameter, the independent position altitude (IPA), to investigate populations as a function of vertical height from the Galactic plane. M dwarfs at all types exhibit an increase in velocity dispersion when analyzed in comparable IPA subgroups.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Robo-AO Kepler planetary candidate survey. II. (Baranec+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Ziegler, C.; Law, N. M.; Morton, T.; Riddle, R.; Atkinson, D.; Schonhut, J.; Crepp, J.

    2016-10-01

    We selected targets that we had not previously observed from the KOI Catalog based on the Q1-Q12 Kepler data (Rowe et al. 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/217/16). These targets were added to the Robo-AO intelligent observing queue and observed during the summer of 2013. We obtained high angular resolution images of 956 Kepler planet candidate host stars with the Robo-AO robotic laser AOs system over the course of 19 nights between 2013 July 21 and 2013 October 25, detailed in Table5. We also include 13 images from 2012 (2012 July 16-September 13) that required additional confirmation of the KOI position in the Robo-AO field of view. All the observations were performed in a queue-scheduled mode in combination with other science programs using the Robo-AO autonomous laser AO system mounted on the robotic 1.5m telescope at Palomar Observatory (exposure time: 90s; observation wavelengths: 600-950nm; FWHM resolution: 0.12''-0.15''; field of view: 44''*44''; pixel scale: 43.1mas/pix; detector format: 10242 pixels; targets observed/hour: 20). We obtained images of 50 KOIs with the NIRC2 instrument behind the Keck II AO system that were previously observed with Robo-AO and had evidence of a companion. Observations were conducted on 2013 June 25, 2013 August 24 and 25, 2014 August 17, and 2015 July 25 in the K, Ks, or Kp filters, and in the narrow mode of NIRC2 (9.952mas/pixel). (4 data files).

  10. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  11. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the discovery of a luminous, low-metallicity H II complex in the dwarf galaxy GAMA J141103.98-003242.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, S. N.; Schaefer, A. L.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Croom, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.; Sweet, S. M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Allen, J. T.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Brough, S.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Ho, I.-T.; Kewley, L. J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Owers, M. S.; Sadler, E. M.; Sharp, R.

    2014-12-01

    We present the discovery of a luminous unresolved H II complex on the edge of dwarf galaxy GAMA J141103.98-003242.3 using data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. This dwarf galaxy is situated at a distance of ˜100 Mpc and contains an unresolved region of H II emission that contributes ˜70 per cent of the galaxy's Hα luminosity, located at the top end of established H II region luminosity functions. For the H II complex, we measure a star formation rate of 0.147 ± 0.041 M⊙ yr-1and a metallicity of 12+log(O/H) = 8.01 ± 0.05 that is lower than the rest of the galaxy by ˜0.2 dex. Data from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) indicate the likely presence of neutral hydrogen in the galaxy to potentially fuel ongoing and future star-forming events. We discuss various triggering mechanisms for the intense star formation activity of this H II complex, where the kinematics of the ionized gas are well described by a rotating disc and do not show any features indicative of interactions. We show that SAMI is an ideal instrument to identify similar systems to GAMA J141103.98-003242.3, and the SAMI Galaxy Survey is likely to find many more of these systems to aid in the understanding of their formation and evolution.

  12. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. II. Newly discovered bright and remote clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Federici, L.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of candidate globular clusters located in the extreme outskirts of the nearby M 31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at ascertaining the nature of the selected candidates to increase the sample of confirmed M 31 clusters lying more that 2° away from the center of the galaxy. Methods: We obtained low resolution spectra (λ/Δλ ≃ 800-1300) of 48 targets selected from the Extended Source Catalogue of 2MASS, as in Galleti et al. (2005, A&A, 436, 535). The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and by verifying their extended/point-source nature from ground-based optical images. We have also obtained a spectrum and a radial velocity estimate for the remote M 31 globular discovered by Martin et al. (2006b, MNRAS, 371, 1983). Results: Among the 48 observed candidates clusters we found: 35 background galaxies, 8 foreground Galactic stars, and 5 genuine remote globular clusters. One of them has been already identified independently by Mackey et al. (2007, ApJ, 655, L85), their GC1; the other four are completely new discoveries: B516, B517, B518, B519. The newly discovered clusters lie at projected distance 40 kpc ≲ R_p≲ 100 kpc from the center of M 31, and have absolute integrated magnitude -9.5 ≲ MV ≲ -7.5. For all the observed clusters we have measured the strongest Lick indices and we have obtained spectroscopic metallicity estimates. Mackey-GC1, Martin-GC1, B517 and B518 have spectra typical of old and metal poor globular clusters ([Fe/H] ≲ -1.3); B519 appears old but quite metal-rich ([Fe/H]~≃ -0.5); B516 presents very strong Balmer absorption lines: if this is indeed a cluster it should have a relatively young age (likely < 2 Gyr). Conclusions: The present analysis nearly doubles the number of M 31 globulars at R_p≥ 40 kpc. At odds with the Milky Way, M 31 appears to have a significant population of very bright globular clusters in its extreme

  13. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. II. A Chemodynamical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela; Rossi, Silvia; Lee, Young Sun; Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E.; Dietz, Sarah; Masseron, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We obtain estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters for a previously published sample of 1777 relatively bright (9< B< 14) metal-poor candidates from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. The original Frebel et al. analysis of these stars was able to derive estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] only for a subset of the sample, due to limitations in the methodology then available. A new spectroscopic analysis pipeline has been used to obtain estimates of {T}{eff}, {log} g, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for almost the entire data set. This sample is very local—about 90% of the stars are located within 0.5 kpc of the Sun. We consider the chemodynamical properties of these stars in concert with a similarly local sample of stars from a recent analysis of the Bidelman and MacConnell “weak metal” candidates by Beers et al. We use this combined sample to identify possible members of the halo stream of stars suggested by Helmi et al. and Chiba & Beers, as well as stars that may be associated with stripped debris from the putative parent dwarf of the globular cluster Omega Centauri, suggested to exist by previous authors. We identify a clear increase in the cumulative frequency of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with declining metallicity, as well as an increase in the fraction of CEMP stars with distance from the Galactic plane, consistent with previous results. We also identify a relatively large number of CEMP stars with kinematics consistent with the metal-weak thick-disk population, with possible implications for its origin.

  14. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. II. SURVEY RESULTS: SPOTS ARE UBIQUITOUS ON L AND T DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Metchev, Stanimir A.; Heinze, Aren; Apai, Dániel; Flateau, Davin; Radigan, Jacqueline; Burgasser, Adam; Marley, Mark S.; Artigau, Étienne; Plavchan, Peter; Goldman, Bertrand

    2015-02-01

    We present results from the Weather on Other Worlds Spitzer Exploration Science program to investigate photometric variability in L and T dwarfs, usually attributed to patchy clouds. We surveyed 44 L3-T8 dwarfs, spanning a range of J – K{sub s} colors and surface gravities. We find that 14/23 (61%{sub −20%}{sup +17%}, 95% confidence) of our single L3-L9.5 dwarfs are variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 0.2% and 1.5%, and 5/16 (31%{sub −17%}{sup +25%}) of our single T0-T8 dwarfs are variable with amplitudes between 0.8% and 4.6%. After correcting for sensitivity, we find that 80%{sub −27%}{sup +20%} of L dwarfs vary by ≥0.2%, and 36%{sub −17%}{sup +26%} of T dwarfs vary by ≥0.4%. Given viewing geometry considerations, we conclude that photospheric heterogeneities causing >0.2% 3-5 μm flux variations are present on virtually all L dwarfs, and probably on most T dwarfs. A third of L dwarf variables show irregular light curves, indicating that L dwarfs may have multiple spots that evolve over a single rotation. Also, approximately a third of the periodicities are on timescales >10 hr, suggesting that slowly rotating brown dwarfs may be common. We observe an increase in the maximum amplitudes over the entire spectral type range, revealing a potential for greater temperature contrasts in T dwarfs than in L dwarfs. We find a tentative association (92% confidence) between low surface gravity and high-amplitude variability among L3-L5.5 dwarfs. Although we can not confirm whether lower gravity is also correlated with a higher incidence of variables, the result is promising for the characterization of directly imaged young extrasolar planets through variability.

  15. Occupational exposures and uncontrolled adult-onset asthma in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II.

    PubMed

    Le Moual, Nicole; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Siroux, Valérie; Radon, Katja; Norback, Dan; Torén, Kjell; Olivieri, Mario; Urrutia, Isabel; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Benke, Geza; Kromhout, Hans; Mirabelli, Maria C; Mehta, Amar J; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sigsgaard, Torben; Blanc, Paul D; Kogevinas, Manolis; Antó, Josep M; Zock, Jan-Paul

    2014-02-01

    Occupational exposure is a well-recognised modifiable risk factor for asthma, but the relationship between occupational exposure and asthma control has not been studied. We aimed to study this association among working-age adults from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Data were available for 7077 participants (mean age 43 years, 45% never-smokers, 5867 without asthma and 1210 with current asthma). Associations between occupational exposure to specific asthmagens and asthma control status (33% with uncontrolled asthma, based on the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines) were evaluated using logistic and multinomial regressions, adjusted for age, sex and smoking status, with study areas included as a random effect. Statistically significant positive associations were observed between uncontrolled adult-onset asthma and both past 12-month and 10-year exposure to any occupational asthmagens (OR (95% CI) 1.6 (1.0-2.40) and 1.7 (1.2-2.5), respectively); high (1.7 (1.0-2.8) and 1.9 (1.3-2.9), respectively) and low (1.6 (1.0-2.7) and 1.8 (1.2-2.7), respectively) molecular weight agents; and cleaning agents (2.0 (1.1-3.6) and 2.3 (1.4-3.6), respectively), with stronger associations for long-term exposures. These associations were mainly explained by the exacerbation domain of asthma control and no associations were observed between asthmagens and partly controlled asthma. These findings suggest that occupational exposure to asthmagens is associated with uncontrolled adult-onset asthma. Occupational risk factors should be quickly identified to prevent uncontrolled asthma.

  16. Chromospherically Active Stars in the RAVE Survey. II. Young Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Seabroke, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Wojno, J.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Conrad, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kunder, A.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2017-01-01

    A large sample of over 38,000 chromospherically active candidate solar-like stars and cooler dwarfs from the RAVE survey is addressed in this paper. An improved activity identification with respect to the previous study was introduced to build a catalog of field stars in the solar neighborhood with an excess emission flux in the calcium infrared triplet wavelength region. The central result of this work is the calibration of the age–activity relation for main-sequence dwarfs in a range from a few 10 {Myr} up to a few Gyr. It enabled an order of magnitude age estimation of the entire active sample. Almost 15,000 stars are shown to be younger than 1 {Gyr} and ∼2000 younger than 100 {Myr}. The young age of the most active stars is confirmed by their position off the main sequence in the J ‑ K versus {N}{UV}-V diagram showing strong ultraviolet excess, mid-infrared excess in the J ‑ K versus {W}1-{W}2 diagram, and very cool temperatures (J-K> 0.7). They overlap with the reference pre-main-sequence RAVE stars often displaying X-ray emission. The activity level increasing with the color reveals their different nature from the solar-like stars and probably represents an underlying dynamo-generating magnetic fields in cool stars. Of the RAVE objects from DR5, 50% are found in the TGAS catalog and supplemented with accurate parallaxes and proper motions by Gaia. This makes the database of a large number of young stars in a combination with RAVE’s radial velocities directly useful as a tracer of the very recent large-scale star formation history in the solar neighborhood. The data are available online in the Vizier database.

  17. The Effect of Three Levels of Laser Glare on the Speed and Accuracy of Target Location Performance When Viewing a Briefly Presented Visual Array.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    glare, lens opacity (Interzeag, Opacity Lensmeter), and color sensitivity (Farnsworth- Munsell 100- Hue Test , Kollmorgen Corp., Baltimore, MD). TABLE 2...this project including subject scheduling, administration of vision aspessment tests , and data collection. In addition, LCDR Larry Schoenberg is r...1.50 (0.05) 2.47 (0.06) 4 2ý06 (0.12) 1.36 (0.10) 2.26 (0.18) 5 1.72 (0.14) 1.20 (0.09) 1.92 (0.15) 7 PROCEDURES Subjects were tested separately. They

  18. SDSS-II Supernova survey. An analysis of the largest sample of type IA supernovae and correlations with host-galaxy spectral properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Rachel C.; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Fischer, John A.; Kessler, Rick; Jha, Saurabh W.; March, Marisa C.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Fischer, Johanna-Laina; Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2016-04-20

    Using the largest single-survey sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to date, we study the relationship between properties of SNe Ia and those of their host galaxies, focusing primarily on correlations with Hubble residuals (HR). Our sample consists of 345 photometrically-classified or spectroscopicallyconfirmed SNe Ia discovered as part of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-SNS). This analysis utilizes host-galaxy spectroscopy obtained during the SDSS-I/II spectroscopic survey and from an ancillary program on the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that obtained spectra for nearly all host galaxies of SDSS-II SN candidates. In addition, we use photometric hostgalaxy properties from the SDSS-SNS data release (Sako et al. 2014) such as host stellar mass and star-formation rate. We confirm the well-known relation between HR and host-galaxy mass and find a 3.6σ significance of a non-zero linear slope. We also recover correlations between HR and hostgalaxy gas-phase metallicity and specific star-formation rate as they are reported in the literature. With our large dataset, we examine correlations between HR and multiple host-galaxy properties simultaneously and find no evidence of a significant correlation. We also independently analyze our spectroscopically-confirmed and photometrically-classified SNe Ia and comment on the significance of similar combined datasets for future surveys.

  19. Lost in the Glare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Within our own solar system we can observe planetary transits of Mercury and Venus when they pass in front of the Sun as viewed from Earth. Kepler will observe the same phenomena in order to detect...

  20. Food consumption of adults in Germany: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II based on diet history interviews.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Thorsten; Krems, Carolin; Moon, Kilson; Brombach, Christine; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-05-28

    The second German National Nutrition Survey (NVS II) aimed to evaluate food consumption and other aspects of nutritional behaviour of a representative sample of the German population, using a modular design with three different dietary assessment methods. To assess usual food consumption, 15,371 German speaking subjects 14-80 years of age completed a diet history interview between November 2005 and November 2006. With reference to the guidelines of the German Nutrition Society (DGE), NVS II observed that the German population did not eat enough foods of plant origin, especially vegetables and consumed too much of meat and meat products. While generally similar food consumption is observed in other European countries, consumption of bread, fruit juices/nectars and beer is higher in Germany. On average, men consumed two times more meat and soft drinks as well as six times more beer than women did, whereas the consumption of vegetables, fruit as well as herbal/fruit tea was higher in women. Older participants showed a lower consumption of meat, fruit juice/nectars, soft drinks and spirits as well as a higher consumption of fish, vegetables, fruit, and herbal/fruit tea than adolescents and younger adults did. There are also differences in food consumption with regard to socio-economic status (SES). Persons with higher SES consumed more vegetables, fruit, fish, water, coffee/tea and wine, while persons with lower SES consumed more meat and meat products, soft drinks and beer. In general, the food consumption of women, the elderly and the higher SES group tends to be closer to the official dietary guidelines in Germany.

  1. Properties of galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Croton, Darren J.; Moore, Ben

    2006-11-01

    Successfully reproducing the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and the bimodality in the galaxy distribution requires a mechanism that can truncate star formation in massive haloes. Current models of galaxy formation consider two such truncation mechanisms: strangulation, which acts on satellite galaxies, and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, which predominantly affects central galaxies. The efficiencies of these processes set the blue fraction of galaxies, fblue(L, M), as a function of galaxy luminosity, L, and halo mass, M. In this paper, we use a galaxy group catalogue extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to determine fblue(L, M). To demonstrate the potential power of these data as a benchmark for galaxy formation models, we compare the results to the semi-analytical model for galaxy formation of Croton et al. Although this model accurately fits the global statistics of the galaxy population, as well as the shape of the conditional LF, there are significant discrepancies when the blue fraction of galaxies as a function of mass and luminosity is compared between the observations and the model. In particular, the model predicts (i) too many faint satellites in massive haloes, (ii) a blue fraction of satellites that is much too low, and (iii) a blue fraction of centrals that is too high and with an inverted luminosity dependence. In the same order, we argue that these discrepancies owe to (i) the neglect of tidal stripping in the semi-analytical model, (ii) the oversimplified treatment of strangulation, and (iii) improper modelling of dust extinction and/or AGN feedback. The data presented here will prove useful to test and calibrate future models of galaxy formation and, in particular, to discriminate between various models for AGN feedback and other star formation truncation mechanisms.

  2. Mechanistic study of the hydrodesulfurization of methanethiol over tungsten disulfide. II. A survey of rare earth sulfides for hydrodesulfurization activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, D.Q.

    1985-01-01

    I. Hydrodesulfurization is a process whereby sulfur bound in organic compounds is removed as hydrogen sulfide, and is important to the control of sulfur dioxide emissions in the combustion of petroleum and coal fuels. It involves the cleavage of carbon sulfur bonds, and is catalyzed by layered disulfides such as molybdenum and tungsten disulfide. The simplest example is the reaction CH/sub 3/SH + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/S. The mechanism of even this prototypical reaction is unclear. In an effort to clarify it, the kinetics of methanethiol hydro desulfurization over tungsten disulfide at low pressures was established, with partial pressures of methanethiol and hydrogen varied over a hundred fold. The kinetic order in each reactant was positive when its partial pressure was low, negative when its partial pressure was high. The negative order in hydrogen had not been previously seen. The product gases, methane and hydrogen sulfide, each exhibited negative kinetic orders at high partial pressures, zero kinetic orders at low partial pressures. A dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood type mechanism, which defines one active site as two adjacent edge sulfur vacancies and the second as a neighboring sulfur atom, describes these results quite well. II. Seventeen rare earth sulfides were surveyed for catalytic activity toward methanethiol hydrodesulfurization. These sulfides included both stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric compositions and four different morphologies. In general, nonconductors were inactive and conductors were active. This correlation extended to the nonstoichiometric ..gamma..-phase sesquisulfides which exhibit both insulating and conducting properties.

  3. GREAT II Fleeting Survey for the Commercial Transportation Work Group of the Great River Environmental Action Team (GREAT II) Rock Island District Corps of Engineers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    34State" means a State of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa . and the D)istrict of Columbia. (11...II-S OF I. .’.;!. (See Cummings v. Chicago, 188 U. S., 410.) PERMIT -: Rock Island District U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers. Rock Island, Illinois

  4. An Evaluative Survey Report on ESEA Title II: Fiscal Years 1966-1968. Part I, Analysis and Interpretation. Part II, Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report provides benchmark data on the effects that the provision of school library resources, textbooks, and other instructional materials under Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) has had on education in the nation's public and private elementary and secondary schools. The passage of Title II of ESEA set the stage…

  5. Investigations in Time and of Space Using the FIRST Survey: Radio Source Variability and the Evolution of FR II Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan

    The FIRST survey covered ∼10,000 deg2 of the sky over a decade, providing unprecedented levels of flux density sensitivity (∼ 1 mJy) at 1.4 GHz, uniformity to within 15% (at ∼0.15 mJy rms), 5.4" angular resolution, astrometric accuracy to better than 1" and has cataloged ≳ 800,000 sources. It has made enormous contributions to diverse scientific ends including such subjects as radio source populations, quasars, large-scale structure and clustering of radio sources, gravitational lensing, cosmology, etc. I present the motivation, analysis and results of two projects also intended to demonstrate the power and expand the scope of the FIRST survey's scientific reach. A comprehensive search for variable and transient radio sources has been conducted using the ∼55,000 snapshot images of the FIRST survey. An analysis leading to the discovery of 1,651 variable and transient objects down to mJy levels over a wide range of timescales (few minutes to years) is presented. The multi-wavelength matching for counterparts reveals the diverse classes of objects exhibiting variability. Interestingly, ∼ 60% of the objects in the sample have either no classified counterparts or no corresponding sources at any other wavelength and require multi-wavelength follow-up observations. I discuss these classes of variables and speculate on the identity of objects that lack multi-wavelength counterparts. Thus, the FIRST survey has yielded the largest sample by far of radio variables and transients to date to unprecedented levels of sensitivity and sky coverage and demonstrates the promise of future radio instruments which have transient-detection as one of their key science projects. For decades, radio astronomers have attempted to use double-lobed radio sources to constrain the angular size-redshift (θ - z ) relation and to derive cosmological parameters therefrom. Most of the early attempts have, embarrassingly, shown general consistency with a static Euclidean universe rather

  6. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  7. A MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, LluIs; Miquel, Ramon; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Ihara, Yutaka; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Marriner, John; Molla, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {<=} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sup +0.17+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.55{sup +0.13+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12} L {sup -1} {sub xsun} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sup +0.18+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.49{sup +0.15+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sup +1.99+0.07} {sub -1.11-0.04}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.36{sup +0.84+0.01} {sub -0.30-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sup +1.31+0.043} {sub -0.91-0.015} and 3.02{sup +1.31+0.062} {sub -1.03-0.048}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sup +0.15} {sub -0.14})+(0.91{sup +0.85} {sub -0.81}) x z] SNuB h {sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most three hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe

  8. Constraining Stellar Properties of Intervening Damped Lyα and Mg II Absorbing Galaxies toward GRB 050730

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Y.; Okoshi, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Takami, H.

    2012-09-01

    We performed multiband deep imaging of the field around GRB 050730 to identify the host galaxies of intervening absorbers, which consist of a damped Lyα absorption (DLA) system at z abs = 3.564, a sub-DLA system at z abs = 3.022, and strong Mg II absorption systems at z abs = 1.773 and 2.253. Our observations were performed after the gamma-ray burst afterglow had disappeared. Thus, our imaging survey has a higher sensitivity to the host galaxies of the intervening absorbers than the normal imaging surveys in the direction of QSOs, for which the QSO glare tends to hide the foreground galaxies. In this deep imaging survey, we could not detect any unambiguous candidates for the host galaxies of the intervening absorbers. Using the 3σ upper limit of the flux in the optical to mid-infrared observing bands, which corresponds to the UV to optical bands in the rest frame of the intervening absorbers, we constrained the star formation rates and stellar masses of the hosts. We estimated the star formation rates for the intervening absorbers to be <~ 2.5 M ⊙ yr-1 for z > 3 DLAs and <~ 1.0 M ⊙ yr-1 for z ~ 2 Mg II systems. Their stellar masses are estimated to be several times 109 M ⊙ or smaller for all intervening galaxies. These properties are comparable to dwarf galaxies, rather than the massive star-forming galaxies commonly seen in the z > 2 galaxy surveys based on emission-line selection or color selection.

  9. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Smith, Mathew; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  10. Early-time light curves of Type Ib/c supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Leloudas, G.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Valenti, S.; Galbany, L.; Kessler, R.; Schneider, D. P.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) have been investigated in several single-object studies; however, there is still a paucity of works concerning larger, homogeneous samples of these hydrogen-poor transients, in particular regarding the premaximum phase of their light curves. Aims: In this paper we present and analyze the early-time optical light curves (LCs, ugriz) of 20 SNe Ib/c from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) SN survey II, aiming to study their observational and physical properties, as well as to derive their progenitor parameters. Methods: High-cadence, multiband LCs are fitted with a functional model and the best-fit parameters are compared among the SN types. Bolometric LCs (BLCs) are constructed for the entire sample. We also computed the black-body (BB) temperature (TBB) and photospheric radius (Rph) evolution for each SN via BB fits on the spectral energy distributions. In addition, the bolometric properties are compared to both hydrodynamical and analytical model expectations. Results: Complementing our sample with literature data, we find that SNe Ic and Ic-BL (broad-line) have shorter rise times than those of SNe Ib and IIb. The decline rate parameter, Δm15, is similar among the different subtypes. SNe Ic appear brighter and bluer than SNe Ib, but this difference vanishes if we consider host galaxy extinction corrections based on colors. Templates for SN Ib/c LCs are presented. Our SNe have typical TBB of ~10 000 K at the peak and Rph of ~1015 cm. Analysis of the BLCs of SNe Ib and Ic gives typical ejecta masses Mej≈ 3.6-5.7 M⊙, energies EK≈ 1.5-1.7×1051 erg, and M(56Ni) ≈ 0.3 M⊙. Higher values for EK and M(56Ni) are estimated for SNe Ic-BL (Mej≈ 5.4 M⊙, EK≈ 10.7×1051 erg, M(56Ni) ≈ 1.1 M⊙). For the majority of SNe Ic and Ic-BL, we can put strong limits (<2-4 days) on the duration of the expected early-time plateau. Less stringent limits can be placed on the duration of the plateau for the sample of SNe Ib. In the

  11. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. II. Intrinsic LYα and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of K and M Dwarfs with Exoplanets*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Redfield, Seth; Schneider, P. Christian; Wood, Brian E.; Brown, Alexander; Froning, Cynthia; Miguel, Yamila; Rugheimer, Sarah; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2016-06-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of low-mass (K- and M-type) stars play a critical role in the heating and chemistry of exoplanet atmospheres, but are not observationally well-constrained. Direct observations of the intrinsic flux of the Lyα line (the dominant source of UV photons from low-mass stars) are challenging, as interstellar H i absorbs the entire line core for even the closest stars. To address the existing gap in empirical constraints on the UV flux of K and M dwarfs, the MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey has obtained UV observations of 11 nearby M and K dwarfs hosting exoplanets. This paper presents the Lyα and extreme-UV spectral reconstructions for the MUSCLES targets. Most targets are optically inactive, but all exhibit significant UV activity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to correct the observed Lyα profiles for interstellar absorption, and we employ empirical relations to compute the extreme-UV SED from the intrinsic Lyα flux in ˜100 Å bins from 100-1170 Å. The reconstructed Lyα profiles have 300 km s-1 broad cores, while >1% of the total intrinsic Lyα flux is measured in extended wings between 300 and 1200 km s-1. The Lyα surface flux positively correlates with the Mg ii surface flux and negatively correlates with the stellar rotation period. Stars with larger Lyα surface flux also tend to have larger surface flux in ions formed at higher temperatures, but these correlations remain statistically insignificant in our sample of 11 stars. We also present H i column density measurements for 10 new sightlines through the local interstellar medium. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  12. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 < z < 4.6 and to constrain the source of the hard ionizing continuum that powers the He II emission. Methods: We assembled a sample of 277 galaxies with a highly reliable spectroscopic redshift at 2 < z < 4.6 from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) Deep and Ultra-Deep data, and we identified 39 He II λ1640 emitters. We studied their spectral properties, measuring the fluxes, equivalent widths (EW), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for most relevant lines, including He II λ1640, Lyα line, Si II λ1527, and C IV λ1549. Results: About 10% of galaxies at z ~ 3 and iAB ≤ 24.75 show He II in emission, with rest frame equivalent widths EW0 ~ 1-7 Å, equally distributed between galaxies with Lyα in emission or in absorption. We find 11 (3.9% of the global population) reliable He II emitters with unresolved He II lines (FWHM0 < 1200 km s-1), 13 (4.6% of the global population) reliable emitters with broad He II emission (FWHM0 > 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by

  13. A 158 {mu}m [C II] LINE SURVEY OF GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1-2: AN INDICATOR OF STAR FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, G. J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Ferkinhoff, C.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Fiolet, N. E-mail: steve@mpe.mpg.d

    2010-12-01

    We have detected the 158 {mu}m [C II] line from 12 galaxies at z {approx} 1-2. This is the first survey of this important star formation tracer at redshifts covering the epoch of maximum star formation in the universe and quadruples the number of reported high-z [C II] detections. The line is very luminous, between <0.024% and 0.65% of the far-infrared (FIR) continuum luminosity of our sources, and arises from photodissociation regions on molecular cloud surfaces. An exception is PKS 0215+015, where half of the [C II] emission could arise from X-ray-dominated regions near the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). The L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub FIR} ratio in our star formation-dominated systems is {approx}8 times larger than that of our AGN-dominated systems. Therefore this ratio selects for star formation-dominated systems. Furthermore, the L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub FIR} and L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub (CO(1-0))} ratios in our star-forming galaxies and nearby starburst galaxies are the same, so that luminous star-forming galaxies at earlier epochs (z {approx} 1-2) appear to be scaled-up versions of local starbursts entailing kiloparsec-scale starbursts. Most of the FIR and [C II] radiation from our AGN-dominated sample (excepting PKS 0215+015) also arises from kiloparsec-scale star formation, but with far-UV radiation fields {approx}8 times more intense than in our star formation-dominated sample. We speculate that the onset of AGN activity stimulates large-scale star formation activity within AGN-dominated systems. This idea is supported by the relatively strong [O III] line emission, indicating very young stars, that was recently observed in high-z composite AGN/starburst systems. Our results confirm the utility of the [C II] line, and in particular, the L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub (FIR)} and L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios as tracers of star formation in galaxies at high redshifts.

  14. Survey II of Public and Leadership Attitudes Toward Nuclear Power Development in the United States. Study No. 2628.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    This publication details a national survey done by Louis Harris and Associates, similar to one done in 1975, to assess attitudes toward nuclear power in the United States. The survey consisted of three parts. The first part was in-person, door-to-door interviews with 1,597 randomly selected households nationwide. The second part was 309…

  15. A Survey of College Reading Programs in New York State, Part II: Diagnosis, Placement and Program Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinowski, Patricia A.

    During spring 1988, an initial survey was conducted among two- and four-year colleges in New York State to identify the primary reading test used for diagnosis and placement. In order to address several questions raised by the study, a follow-up survey of participating two-year colleges was conducted during fall 1989. Of the 28 two-year colleges…

  16. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  17. POISSON project. II. A multi-wavelength spectroscopic and photometric survey of young protostars in L 1641

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia Lopez, R.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Eislöffel, J.; Ray, T. P.; Lorenzetti, D.; Cabrit, S.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Characterising stellar and circumstellar properties of embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) is mandatory for understanding the early stages of the stellar evolution. This task requires the combination of both spectroscopy and photometry, covering the widest possible wavelength range, to disentangle the various protostellar components and activities. Aims: As part of the POISSON project (Protostellar Optical-Infrared Spectral Survey On NTT), we present a multi-wavelength spectroscopic and photometric investigation of embedded YSOs in L 1641, aimed to derive the stellar parameters and evolutionary stages and to infer their accretion properties. Methods: Our multi-wavelength database includes low-resolution optical-IR spectra from the NTT and Spitzer (0.6-40 μm) and photometric data covering a spectral range from 0.4 to 1100 μm, which allow us to construct the YSOs spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and to infer the main stellar parameters (visual extinction, spectral type, accretion, stellar, bolometric luminosity, mass accretion, and ejection rates). Results: The NTT optical-NIR spectra are rich in emission lines, which are mostly associated with YSO accretion, ejection, and chromospheric activities. A few emission lines, prominent ice (H2O and CO2), and amorphous silicate absorption features have also been detected in the Spitzer spectra. The SED analysis allows us to group our 27 YSOs into nine Class I, eleven Flat, and seven Class II objects. However, on the basis of the derived stellar properties, only six Class I YSOs have an age of ~105 yr, while the others are older (5 × 105-106 yr), and, among the Flat sources, three out of eleven are more evolved objects (5 × 106-107 yr), indicating that geometrical effects can significantly modify the SED shapes. Inferred mass accretion rates (Ṁacc) show a wide range of values (3.6 × 10-9 to 1.2 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1), which reflects the age spread observed in our sample well. Average values of mass

  18. Phase II. Environmental baseline survey of McCormick Ranch, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. Part 2. Final report, October 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaraty, G.; Johnson, J.; Middlebrooks, P.

    1996-01-31

    The Phase II EBS results document the extent of environmental contamination believed to be present on McCormick Ranch. Explosive test areas having the greatest potential for containing soil contaminants were identified using several geophysical survey methods: EM 31 terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer/gradiometer, and ground penetrating radar. From the geophysical surveys, five areas were selected to conduct further environmental analysis. A total of 310 soil samples were collected from the five areas and 13 specific high explosive test sites. The samples were screened for semi-volatile organic compounds, PETN, TNT, TNT-degradation products, nitrates and radioactivity. Laboratory analyses were performed and no explosives or degradation products were identified. Semi-volatile organic compounds were found in 2 samples, manganese was detected in 3 samples, nitrates were discovered below soil action levels, and radiation levels were below background. Consequently, it is unlikely that significant contamination exists.

  19. Phase II. Environmental baseline survey of McCormick Ranch, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. Part 1. Final report, October 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaraty, G.; Johnson, J.; Middlebrooks, P.

    1996-01-31

    The Phase II EBS results document the extent of environmental contamination believed to be present on McCormick Ranch. Explosive test areas having the greatest potential for containing soil contaminants were identified using several geophysical survey methods: EM 31 terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer/gradiometer, and ground penetrating radar. From the geophysical surveys, five areas were selected to conduct further environmental analysis. A total of 310 soil samples were collected from the and 13 specific high explosive test sites. The samples were screened for semi-volatile organic PETN, TNT, TNT-degradation products, nitrates and radioactivity. Laboratory analyses were and no explosives or degradation products were identified. Semi-volatile organic compounds were in 2 samples, manganese was detected in 3 samples, nitrates were discovered below soil action levels, and radiation levels were below background. Consequently, it is unlikely that significant contamination exists.

  20. Phase II. Environmental baseline survey of McCormick Ranch, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. Part 3. Final report, October 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaraty, G.; Johnson, J.; Middlebrooks, P.

    1996-01-31

    The Phase II EBS results document the extent of environmental contamination believed to be present on McCormick Ranch. Explosive test areas having the greatest potential for containing soil contaminants were identified using several geophysical survey methods: EM 31 terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer/gradiometer, and ground penetrating radar. From the geophysical surveys, five areas were selected to conduct further environmental analysis. A total of 310 soil samples were collected from the five areas and 13 specific high explosive test sites. The samples were screened for semi-volatile organic compounds, PETN, TNT, TNT-degradation products, nitrates and radioactivity. Laboratory analyses were and no explosives or degradation products were identified. Semi-volatile organic compounds were in 2 samples, manganese was detected in 3 samples, nitrates were discovered below soil action levels, and radiation levels were below background. Consequently, it is unlikely that significant contamination exists.

  1. Phase II. Environmental baseline survey of McCormick Ranch, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. Part 5. Final report, October 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaraty, G.; Johnson, J.; Middlebrooks, P.

    1996-01-31

    The Phase II EBS results document the extent of environmental contamination believed to be present on McCormick Ranch. Explosive test areas having the greatest potential for containing soil contaminants were identified using several geophysical survey methods: EM 31 terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer/gradiometer, and ground penetrating radar. From the geophysical surveys, five areas were selected to conduct further environmental analysis. A total of 310 soil samples were collected from the areas and 13 specific high explosive test sites. The samples were screened for semi-volatile organic compounds, PETN, TNT, TNT-degradation products, nitrates and radioactivity. Laboratory analyses were performed and no explosives or degradation products were identified. Semi-volatile organic compounds were in 2 samples, manganese was detected in 3 samples, nitrates were discovered below soil action levels and radiation levels were below background. Consequently, it is unlikely that significant contamination exists.

  2. Phase II. Environmental baseline survey of McCormick Ranch, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. Part 4. Final report, October 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaraty, G.; Johnson, J.; Middlebrooks, P.

    1996-01-31

    The Phase II EBS results document the extent of environmental contamination believed to be present on McCormick Ranch. Explosive test areas having the greatest potential for containing soil contaminants were identified using several geophysical survey methods: EM 31 terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer/gradiometer, and ground penetrating radar. From the geophysical surveys, five areas selected to conduct further environmental analysis. A total of 310 soil samples were collected from the five areas and 13 specific high explosive test sites. The samples were screened for semi-volatile organic compounds, PETN, TNT, TNT-degradation products, nitrates and radioactivity. Laboratory analyses were performed and no explosives or degradation products were identified. Semi-volatile organic compounds were in 2 samples, manganese was detected in 3 samples, nitrates were discovered below soil action levels, and radiation levels were below background. Consequently, it is unlikely that significant contamination exists.

  3. Relationship between radiological knee osteoarthritis and biochemical markers of cartilage and bone degradation (urine CTX-II and NTX-I): the Matsudai Knee Osteoarthritis Survey.

    PubMed

    Tanishi, Nobuchika; Yamagiwa, Hiroshi; Hayami, Tadashi; Mera, Hisashi; Koga, Yoshio; Omori, Go; Endo, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical markers of cartilage and bone degradation are becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of knee osteoarthritis (OA). To clarify the correlation between radiological knee OA and urine CTX-II (C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of collagen type II) or urine NTX-I (N-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen), we conducted a cross-sectional study in the cohorts of the epidemiological knee survey at the Matsudai district in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. Urine specimens were collected from 296 subjects, and CTX-II and NTX-I were measured using ELISA. Standing knee AP X-rays were obtained and graded according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. The subjects were then divided by gender, age (40- to 59-year-old group and 60- to 79-year-old group), and the X-ray grade (Grade 0, 1, Grade 2, and Grade 3, 4). In non-OA (Grade 0, 1) subjects, the 60- to 79-year-old group had significantly higher CTX-II values than the younger group only in females. The subjects of both genders aged over 60 years of age with OA Grade 3, 4 had significantly higher CTX-II values than the Grade 0, 1 group or the Grade 2 group. For NTX-I, there were no significant differences between each OA grade although the Grade 3, 4 group females from 60 to 79 years of age had higher values than the Grade 2 group. In addition, in the 60- to 79-year-old subjects of both genders, a positive correlation was observed between the urine CTX-II and urine NTX-I. For the subjects ranging from 60 to 79 years of age in both genders, the urine CTX-II values indicate the progression of OA. In addition, the weak but positive correlation between urine CTX-II and urine NTX-I in the subjects ranging from 60 to 79 years of age in both genders suggests that bone resorption and cartilage degradation appear to develop in parallel.

  4. The LAMOST survey of background quasars in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies. II. Results from the commissioning observations and the pilot surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Bing; Jia, Lei; Lei, Ya-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua; Yan, Lin; Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jiang, Fang-Hua; and others

    2013-06-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, also named the Guoshoujing Telescope, during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 m telescope, Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey optical, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer near-infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ∼135 deg{sup 2} from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey data sets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ∼100 deg{sup 2} that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning data sets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62, and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5, and 18.0, respectively, of which 5, 20, and 75 are newly discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable collection with which to probe the kinematics and chemistry of the interstellar/intergalactic medium in the Local Group of galaxies. A total of 93 quasars are now known with locations within 2.°5 of M31, of which 73 are newly discovered. Tens of quasars are now known to be located behind the Giant Stellar Stream, and hundreds are behind the extended halo and its associated substructures of M31. The much enlarged sample of known quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33 can potentially be utilized to construct a perfect astrometric reference frame to measure the minute proper motions (PMs) of M31 and M33, along with the PMs of substructures associated with the Local Group of galaxies. Those PMs are some of the most fundamental properties of the Local

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: First Broad-line Hβ and Mg ii Lags at z ≳ 0.3 from Six-month Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Horne, Keith; Grier, C. J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Denney, Kelly D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Sun, Mouyuan; Brandt, W. N.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ho, Luis C.; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; McGreer, Ian D.; Petitjean, Patrick; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tao, Charling; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zu, Ying; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Ge, Jian; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2016-02-01

    Reverberation mapping (RM) measurements of broad-line region (BLR) lags in z\\gt 0.3 quasars are important for directly measuring black hole masses in these distant objects, but so far there have been limited attempts and success given the practical difficulties of RM in this regime. Here we report preliminary results of 15 BLR lag measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project, a dedicated RM program with multi-object spectroscopy designed for RM over a wide redshift range. The lags are based on the 2014 spectroscopic light curves alone (32 epochs over six months) and focus on the Hβ and Mg ii broad lines in the 100 lowest-redshift (z\\lt 0.8) quasars included in SDSS-RM; they represent a small subset of the lags that SDSS-RM (including 849 quasars to z˜ 4.5) is expected to deliver. The reported preliminary lag measurements are for intermediate-luminosity quasars at 0.3≲ z\\lt 0.8, including nine Hβ lags and six Mg ii lags, for the first time extending RM results to this redshift-luminosity regime and providing direct quasar black hole mass estimates over approximately half of cosmic time. The Mg ii lags also increase the number of known Mg ii lags by several fold and start to explore the utility of Mg ii for RM at high redshift. The location of these new lags at higher redshifts on the observed BLR size-luminosity relationship is statistically consistent with previous Hβ results at z\\lt 0.3. However, an independent constraint on the relationship slope at z\\gt 0.3 is not yet possible owing to the limitations in our current sample. Our results demonstrate the general feasibility and potential of multi-object RM for z\\gt 0.3 quasars.

  6. The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large, Nearby, Interstellar Clouds. X. The Chamaeleon II Pre-Main-Sequence Population as Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Juan M.; Spezzi, Loredana; Chapman, Nicholas; Evans, Neal J., II; Huard, Tracy L.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Merín, Bruno; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Covino, Elvira; Frasca, Antonio; Gandolfi, Davide; Oliveira, Isa

    2008-03-01

    We discuss the results from the combined IRAC and MIPS c2d Spitzer Legacy survey observations and complementary optical and NIR data of the Chamaeleon II (Cha II) dark cloud. We perform a census of the young population in an area of ~1.75 deg2 and study the spatial distribution and properties of the cloud members and candidate pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects and their circumstellar matter. Our census is complete down to the substellar regime (M ≈ 0.03 M⊙). From the analysis of the volume density of the PMS objects and candidates we find two groups of objects with volume densities higher than 25 M⊙ pc -3 and 5-10 members each. A multiplicity fraction of about 13% +/- 3% is observed for objects with separations 0.8'' < θ < 6.0'' (142-1065 AU). No evidence for variability between the two epochs of the c2d IRAC data set, Δ t ~ 6 hr, is detected. We estimate a star formation efficiency of 1%-4%, consistent with the estimates for Taurus and Lupus, but lower than for Cha I. This might mean that different star formation activities in the Chamaeleon clouds reflect a different history of star formation. We also find that Cha II is turning some 6-7 M⊙ into stars every Myr, which is low in comparison with the star formation rate in other c2d clouds. The disk fraction of 70%-80% that we estimate in Cha II is much higher than in other star-forming regions and indicates that the population in this cloud is dominated by objects with active accretion. Finally, the Cha II outflows are discussed; a new Herbig-Haro outflow, HH 939, driven by the classical T Tauri star Sz 50, has been discovered.

  7. On the Nature of the FBS Blue Stellar Objects and the Completeness of the Bright Quasar Survey. Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A.; Goncalves, A.; Veron-Cetty, M.; Veron, P.

    In Paper I (Mickaelian et al. 1999), we compared the surface density of QSOs in the Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) and in the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) and concluded that the completeness of the BQS is of the order of 70% rather than 30-50% as suggested by several authors. A number of new observations recently became available, allowing a re-evaluation of this completeness. We now obtain a surface density of QSOs brighter than B = 16.16 in a subarea of the FBS covering ~2250 deg^2, equal to 0.012 deg^-2 (26 QSOs), implying a completeness of 53+/-10%.

  8. On the Nature of the FBS Blue Stellar Objects and the Completeness of the Bright Quasar Survey. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M. P.; Véron, P.

    2001-01-01

    In Paper I we compared the surface density of QSOs in the Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) and in the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) and concluded that the completeness of the BQS is of the order of 70% rather than 30-50% as suggested by several authors. A number of new observations recently became available, allowing a reevaluation of this completeness. We now obtain a surface density of QSOs brighter than B = 16.16 in a subarea of the FBS covering 2250 deg2, equal to 0.012 deg-2 (26 QSOs), implying a completeness of 53 ± 10%.

  9. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and the atlas of synthetic dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Battaglia, G.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Cignoni, M.; Correnti, M.

    2016-06-01

    The searching for StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey is devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within ultra compact high velocity clouds that are candidate low-mass, low-luminosity galaxies. We present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size, and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all of our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogues, taking all the observational effects into account. In the fields where the available observational material is of top quality (≃36% of the SECCO fields), we detect synthetic galaxies as ≥5σ over-densities of resolved stars down to μV,h ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 1.5 Mpc, and down to μV,h ≃ 29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey, we detect synthetic galaxies with μV,h ≤ 28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 1.0 Mpc, and those with μV,h ≤ 27.5 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. Dwarf galaxies with MV = -10.0, with sizes in the range spanned by known dwarfs, are detected by visual inspection of the images up to D = 5 Mpc independent of the image quality. In the best quality images, dwarfs are partially resolved into stars up to D = 3.0 Mpc and completely unresolved at D = 5 Mpc. As an independent test of the sensitivity of our images to low surface brightness galaxies, we report on the detection of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies probably located in the Virgo cluster with MV ≲ -8.0 and μV,h ≲ 26.8 mag/arcsec2. The nature of the previously discovered SECCO 1 stellar system, also likely located in the Virgo cluster, is rediscussed in comparison with these dwarfs. While specific for the SECCO survey, our study may also provide general

  10. The GALEX Time Domain Survey. II. Wavelength-Dependent Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, T.; Gezari, S.; Jones, D. O.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Rest, A.; Huber, M.; Narayan, G.; Scolnic, D.; Waters, C.; Wainscoat, R.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the wavelength-dependent variability of a sample of spectroscopically confirmed active galactic nuclei selected from near-UV (NUV) variable sources in the GALEX Time Domain Survey that have a large amplitude of optical variability (difference-flux S/N > 3) in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). By matching GALEX and PS1 epochs in five bands (NUV, g P1, r P1, i P1, z P1) in time, and taking their flux difference, we create co-temporal difference-flux spectral energy distributions ({{Δ }}f{SEDs}) using two chosen epochs for each of the 23 objects in our sample, on timescales of about a year. We confirm the “bluer-when-brighter” trend reported in previous studies, and measure a median spectral index of the {{Δ }}f{SEDs} of {α }λ = 2.1 that is consistent with an accretion disk spectrum. We further fit the {{Δ }}f{SEDs} of each source with a standard accretion disk model in which the accretion rate changes from one epoch to the other. In our sample, 17 out of 23 (∼74%) sources are described well by this variable accretion-rate disk model, with a median average characteristic disk temperature \\bar{T}* of 1.2× {10}5 K that is consistent with the temperatures expected, given the distribution of accretion rates and black hole masses inferred for the sample. Our analysis also shows that the variable accretion rate model is a better fit to the {{Δ }}f{SEDs} than a simple power law.

  11. Human Trafficking in the United States. Part II. Survey of U.S. Government Web Resources for Publications and Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panigabutra-Roberts, Anchalee

    2012-01-01

    This second part of a two-part series is a survey of U.S. government web resources on human trafficking in the United States, particularly of the online publications and data included on agencies' websites. Overall, the goal is to provide an introduction, an overview, and a guide on this topic for library staff to use in their research and…

  12. Biennial Survey of Education in the United States, 1928-1930. Bulletin, 1931, No. 20. Volume II. [Chapter IV - Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1932

    1932-01-01

    This document contains the four concluding chapters and index of the Biennial Survey of Education, covering the years 1928-1930. Chapter 4, Statistics of universities, colleges, and professional schools, 1929-30, is made up of three parts: (1) Personnel, receipts, and property (Emery M. Foster and Frederick J. Kelley); (2) Expenditures (Henry G.…

  13. Survey of Public Participation in the Arts: Volume II. Changes in American's Participation, 1982-1985. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, John P.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this report was to compare data obtained from the 1982 and 1985 "Survey of Public Participation in the Arts." Comparisons of core questions and responses indicate that: (1) 1985 results are very close to those obtained in 1982; (2) there was a statistically significant decline in musical theater performance…

  14. A Survey of Self-Advocacy Groups for People with Learning Disabilities in an English Region: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The second article on a survey of self-advocacy groups for people with learning disabilities in England reports key findings that included the consistency of the issues identified as important and the willingness to engage in research. Key themes were self-advocacy, rights, day service center issues, staffing, personal relationships, complaints,…

  15. Industry Wage Surveys: Banking and Life Insurance, December 1976. Part I--Banking. Part II--Life Insurance. Bulletin 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsky, Carl

    This report presents the results of a survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine wages and related benefits in (1) the banking industry and (2) for employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance carriers. Part 1 discusses banking industry characteristics and presents data for tellers and selected…

  16. Telecommunications Research in the United States and Selected Foreign Countries: A Preliminary Survey. Volume II, Individual Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC. Committee on Telecommunications.

    At the request of the National Science Foundation, the Panel on Telecommunications Research of the Committee on Telecommunications of the National Academy of Engineering has made a preliminary survey of the status and trends of telecommunications research in the United States and selected foreign countries. The status and trends were identified by…

  17. DETECTING VARIABILITY IN MASSIVE ASTRONOMICAL TIME-SERIES DATA. II. VARIABLE CANDIDATES IN THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min-Su; Yi, Hahn; Kim, Dae-Won; Chang, Seo-Won; Byun, Yong-Ik E-mail: yihahn@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr E-mail: seowony@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr

    2012-03-15

    We present variability analysis of data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Using the clustering method, which defines variable candidates as outliers from large clusters, we cluster 16,189,040 light curves having data points at more than 15 epochs as variable and non-variable candidates in 638 NSVS fields. Variable candidates are selected depending on how strongly they are separated from the largest cluster and how rarely they are grouped together in eight-dimensional space spanned by variability indices. All NSVS light curves are also cross-correlated with IRAS, AKARI, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and GALEX objects, as well as known objects in the SIMBAD database. The variability analysis and cross-correlation results are provided in a public online database, which can be used to select interesting objects for further investigation. Adopting conservative selection criteria for variable candidates, we find about 1.8 million light curves as possible variable candidates in the NSVS data, corresponding to about 10% of our entire NSVS sample. Multi-wavelength colors help us find specific types of variability among the variable candidates. Moreover, we also use morphological classification from other surveys such as SDSS to suppress spurious cases caused by blending objects or extended sources due to the low angular resolution of the NSVS.

  18. Survey of Lake Ontario bottom sediment off Rochester, New York, to define the extent of jettisoned World War II material and its potential for sediment contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Gregory; Kappel, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Military-type mat??riel was recovered from the bottom of Lake Ontario near Rochester, N.Y., during bottom-trawl, fish-stock surveys at depths of 75 to 180 feet each year from 1978 through 1996. The recovered mat??riel included many shell-detonator nose cones (2 inches in diameter by about 3.5 inches long); several electronic components; one corroded box of detonators; a corrugated container of mercury-filled capsules; and corroded batteries. Most of the recovered mat??riel has been identified as defective components of shell detonators (proximity-fuze assemblies) that were jettisoned in the lake to protect them from discovery during World War II. Side-scan SONAR, metal-detector, and ROV (remotely-operated-vehicle) surveys found no evidence of any large piles of mat??riel containing potentially hazardous, toxic, or polluting materials within the 17-square-mile study site. Many scattered magnetic anomalies were detected in this area, but chemical analysis of bottom sediment and of zebra- and quagga-mussel (Dreissena spp.) tissue indicate that the concentrations of mercury and other heavy metals are within the previously documented ranges for Lake Ontario sediment. The failure of ROV videos and of SCUBA-diver surveys and probes of the lake bottom to locate any debris indicates that most, if not all, of the debris is scattered and buried under a layer of fine-grained sediment and, possibly, mussels.

  19. Part I. Synthesis and characterization of C2 substituted imidazolium room temperature ionic liquids. Part II. Survey and analysis of organic chemistry textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, Elliot G.

    Part I. Among room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), those derived from the imidazolium cation are the most common. RTILs have generally been viewed solely as solvents, but they are able to participate in certain types of reactions, particularly due to the relatively high acidity at the imidazolium C2. Deprotonation affords N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), which can cause unwanted side reactions. Consequently, the major limitation of imidazolium RTILs is that they cannot be used as solvents in highly basic reactions such as the Baylis-Hillman and Grignard reactions. This work reveals a convenient route for the preparation of C2-substituted imidazolium ionic liquids. This method involves the alkylation of N-heterocyclic carbenes, which are readily generated from the C2-unsubstituted imidazolium ionic liquids. It works well for nonfunctionalized alkyl chlorides and less well for alkyl bromides and iodides, likely due to competing elimination reactions. The resulting C2-substituted salts can be transformed into ionic liquids via standard anion metathesis reactions. Part II. Recent advances in media and the increasingly encyclopedic nature of traditional textbooks have made their role in college classes uncertain. In an effort to discover what is really being taught in organic chemistry courses across the US, a survey of organic chemistry professors in all 50 states was conducted to determine what material is covered in their organic chemistry courses for science majors. Survey Monkey, an online survey program, was used to construct a short 10-item survey which was sent to organic chemistry professors at various types of institutions across the nation. We sent out 2417 surveys and received 489 responses. The results of this survey revealed what topics the professors believe is core material and what they feel is extraneous. Additionally, this research identifies the things these professors would like to see changed in the organic chemistry texts. From the open

  20. Domestic violence and immigration status among Latina mothers in the child welfare system: findings from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being II (NSCAW II).

    PubMed

    Ogbonnaya, Ijeoma Nwabuzor; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Kohl, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    Many children involved with the child welfare system witness parental domestic violence. The association between children's domestic violence exposure and child welfare involvement may be influenced by certain socio-cultural factors; however, minimal research has examined this relationship. The current study compares domestic violence experiences and case outcomes among Latinas who are legal immigrants (n=39), unauthorized immigrants (n=77), naturalized citizens (n=30), and US-born citizen mothers (n=383) reported for child maltreatment. This analysis used data from the second round of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Mothers were asked about whether they experienced domestic violence during the past year. In addition, data were collected to assess if (a) domestic violence was the primary abuse type reported and, if so, (b) the maltreatment allegation was substantiated. Results show that naturalized citizens, legal residents, and unauthorized immigrants did not differ from US-born citizens in self-reports of domestic violence; approximately 33% of mothers reported experiences of domestic violence within the past year. Yet, unauthorized immigrants were 3.76 times more likely than US-born citizens to have cases with allegations of domestic violence as the primary abuse type. Despite higher rates of alleged domestic violence, unauthorized citizens were not more likely than US-born citizens to have these cases substantiated for domestic violence (F(2.26, 153.99)=0.709, p=.510). Findings highlight that domestic violence is not accurately accounted for in families with unauthorized immigrant mothers. We recommend child welfare workers are trained to properly assess and fulfill the needs of immigrant families, particularly as it relates to domestic violence.

  1. The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS). II. X-Ray Emission from Compact Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Montez, R., Jr.; Kastner, J. H.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Chu, Y.-H.; De Marco, O.; Frank, A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Lopez, J. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sandin, C.; Schönberner, D.; Soker, N.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Steffen, M.; Toalá, J. A.; Ueta, T.; Villaver, E.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ~1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. ChanPlaNS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R neb <~ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ~1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall ChanPlaNS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ~27% and the point source detection rate to ~36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (lsim 5 × 103 yr), and likewise compact (R neb <~ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (ne >~ 1000 cm-3), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H2 emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  2. The OmegaWhite Survey for short period variable stars - II. An overview of results from the first four years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, R.; Ramsay, G.; Macfarlane, S.; Groot, P. J.; Woudt, P. A.; Dhillon, V.; Jeffery, C. S.; Marsh, T.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.

    2016-11-01

    OmegaWhite is a wide-field, high cadence, synoptic survey targeting fields in the southern Galactic plane, with the aim of discovering short period variable stars. Our strategy is to take a series of 39 s exposures in the g band of a 1 deg2 of sky lasting 2 h using the OmegaCAM wide field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). We give an overview of the initial 4 yr of data which covers 134 deg2 and includes 12.3 million light curves. As the fields overlap with the VLT Survey Telescope Hα Photometric Survey of the Galactic plane and Bulge (VPHAS+), we currently have ugriHα photometry for ˜1/3 of our fields. We find that a significant fraction of the light curves have been affected by the diffraction spikes of bright stars sweeping across stars within a few dozen of pixels over the two hour observing time interval due to the alt-az nature of the VST. We select candidate variable stars using a variety of variability statistics, followed by a manual verification stage. We present samples of several classes of short period variables, including: an ultra compact binary, a DQ white dwarf, a compact object with evidence of a 100 min rotation period, three CVs, one eclipsing binary with an 85 min period, a symbiotic binary which shows evidence of a 31 min photometric period, and a large sample of candidate δ Sct type stars including one with a 9.3 min period. Our overall goal is to cover 400 deg2, and this study indicates we will find many more interesting short period variable stars as a result.

  3. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  4. Massachusetts--Stony Brook Galactic Plane CO Survey. II. (l,V) Maps of the First Galactic Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, D. P.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N. Z.; Solomon, P. M.

    1986-06-01

    The Massachusetts-Stony Brook Galactic Plane CO Survey data set, consisting of 40,551 12CO J =1-0 spectra covering longitudes 8° -90° and latitudes -1.°05 to + 1°, is presented in longitude-velocity (l, V) format. Spectra from the 42 latitudes sampled were averaged to yield seven (l, V) gray scale maps with 18' latitude resolution. One contour (l, V) map along the Galactic equator is included to show the spatially clumpy nature of the CO emission. The integrated CO intensity is presented as a function of longitude for the 18' averaged data, and as a function of longitude and latitude in contour and gray scale maps at the full survey spatial resolution. The presentations of the data set contained here are most useful for comparison with other Galactic surveys of the first quadrant, for tracing out large-scale features, and for identifying emission-line velocities associated with continuum (e.g., radio and IRAS) sources.

  5. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. II. The frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (∼0.1 M {sub Jup}) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M {sub Jup}) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub Jup} ≲ 13) with periods 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} is f{sub J}=0.029{sub −0.015}{sup +0.013}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub G}=0.15{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4}), we find f{sub G{sup ′}}=0.11±0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 ≤ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≤ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub p} = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  6. Report for borehole explosion data acquired in the 1999 Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II), Southern California: Part I, description of the survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, Gary S.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Davis, Paul M.; Thygesen, Kristina; Baher, Shirley A.; Ryberg, Trond; Benthien, Mark L.; Simila, Gerry; Perron, J. Taylor; Yong, Alan K.; Reusser, Luke; Lutter, William J.; Kaip, Galen; Fort, Michael D.; Asudeh, Isa; Sell, Russell; Van Schaack, John R.; Criley, Edward E.; Kaderabek, Ronald; Kohler, Will M.; Magnuski, Nickolas H.

    2001-01-01

    explosions and vibrating-truck sources onshore. The two chief LARSE transects pass near recent moderate earthquakes, including the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando, 1987 M 5.9 Whittier Narrows, 1991 M 5.8 Sierra Madre, and 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquakes. The first transect extended from San Clemente Island northeastward to the Mojave Desert (Line 1, Fig. 1), passing near the epicenter of the Whittier Narrows and Sierra Madre earthquakes. The second transect extended from west of San Clemente Island northward to the western Mojave Desert (Line 2, Figs. 1, 2), passing through the epicenter of the Northridge earthquake and near the epicenter of the San Fernando earthquake. Data along Line 1 were acquired during the years 1993-1994, and data along Line 2, during the years 1994–2000. In this open-file report and that of Murphy and others (in preparation), we present the details of the October 1999 explosion survey along Line 2, which extended from Santa Monica Bay northward to the western Mojave Desert (Figs. 1, 2). This survey is referred to as LARSE II. In this survey, 93 borehole explosions were detonated along the main north-south line and along 5 auxiliary lines in the San Fernando Valley and Santa Monica areas. These explosions were recorded by ~1400 seismographs. A variety of seismic instrumentation was used in these imaging surveys and was obtained from collaborators from around the world, including the Geological Survey of Canada (Ottawa, Canada), IRIS/PASSCAL (Socorro, NM), Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (Palisades, NY), Stanford University (Stanford, CA), SCEC (Los Angeles, CA), USGS (Menlo Park, CA, and Woods Hole, MA), University of Texas at El Paso (El Paso, TX), GeoForschungsZentrum (Potsdam, Germany), University of Karlsruhe (Karlsruhe, Germany), and University of Copenhagen (Copenhagen, Denmark). The reader is referred to Table 1 for instrumentation used in LARSE II.

  7. Polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids. II. Results for 58 B- and C-type objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Cañada-Assandri, M.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We present results of a polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), San Juan, Argentina. The aims of this survey are to increase the database of asteroid polarimetry, to estimate diversity in polarimetric properties of asteroids that belong to different taxonomic classes, and to search for objects that exhibit anomalous polarimetric properties. Methods: The data were obtained with the Torino and CASPROF polarimeters at the 2.15m telescope. The Torino polarimeter is an instrument that allows simultaneous measurement of polarization in five different bands, and the CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. Results: The survey began in 2003, and up to 2009 data on a sample of more than 170 asteroids were obtained. In this paper the results for 58 B- and C-type objects are presented, most of them polarimetrically observed for the first time. Using these data we find phase-polarization curves and polarimetric parameters for these taxonomic classes. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A115

  8. OT2_eegami_6: SPIRE Snapshot Survey II: Using SPT/CODEX Massive Clusters as Powerful Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, E.

    2011-09-01

    On the extragalactic side, one of the most remarkable results coming out of Herschel is the discovery of extremely bright (>100 mJy in the SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed galaxies. The great sensitivity and mapping speed of SPIRE have enabled us to find these rare extraordinary objects. What is truly exciting about these bright lensed galaxies is that they enable a variety of detailed multi-wavelength follow-up observations, shedding new light on the physical properties of these high-redshift sources. In this regard, our OT1 program, "SPIRE Snapshot Survey of Massive Galaxy Clusters" turned out to be a great success. After imaging ~50 galaxies out of 279 in the program, we have already found two spectacularly bright lensed galaxies, one of which is at a redshift of 4.69. This type of cluster-lensed sources are not only bright but also spatially stretched over a large scale, so ALMA (or NOEMA in the north) is likely to be able to study them at the level of individual GMCs. Such studies will open up a new frontier in the study of high-redshift galaxies. Here, we propose to extend this highly efficient and effective survey of gravitationally lensed galaxies to another 353 clusters carefully chosen from the SPT and CODEX cluster samples. These samples contain newly discovered high-redshift (z>0.3) massive (>3-4e14 Msun) clusters, which can be used as powerful gravitational lenses to magnify sources at high redshift. With the OT1 and OT2 surveys together, we expect to find ~20 highly magnified SPIRE sources with exceptional brightnesses (assuming a discovery rate of ~1/30). Such a unique sample of extraordinary objects will enable a variety of follow-up sciences, and will therefore remain as a great legacy of the Herschel mission for years to come.

  9. OT2_eegami_5: Herschel Lensing Survey II: Completing the Herschel Legacy with the HST/MCT CLASH Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, E.

    2011-09-01

    For deep imaging longward of 100 um, confusion noise sets the fundamental sensitivity limits achievable with Herschel, and these limits cannot be improved by integrating longer. To penetrate through this confusion limit and detect faint high-redshift galaxies, gravitational lensing by massive galaxy clusters offers a very powerful and yet cheap solution. For this reason, our team has been conducting a PACS/SPIRE imaging survey of 44 massive lensing clusters as one of the Herschel Key Programs, "The Herschel Lensing Survey" (PI: Egami, 292.3 hrs). Deep PACS/SPIRE imaging data of massive clusters are quite rich with a variety of information, which allows us to study not only the properties of gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies but also those of cluster member galaxies and the intracluster medium through the analysis of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. In January 2010, a massive HST program targeting powerful lensing clusters was accepted as one of the three multi-cycle treasury (MCT) programs. This program, ``the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble'' (CLASH), has an allocation of 524 orbits, and will obtain deep ACS and WFC3 images of 25 massive galaxy clusters using 16 broad-band filters from near-UV (2250 A) to near-IR (1.6 um). These extensive multi-filter imaging observations will produce high-precision photometric redshifts (sigma/(1+z)<0.02). On average, the program spends 20 orbits per cluster. Considering this enormous investment of HST time, the CLASH program will define the ultimate sample of massive galaxy clusters on which future studies will focus. Here, we propose to obtain deep PACS and SPIRE images for 10 CLASH clusters that still lack such data (the other 15 clusters already have a good Herschel coverage). To fully exploit the combination of the Herschel and HST data, the HLS and CLASH teams are submitting this proposal jointly with the participation of key scientists from both teams.

  10. FIRST-based survey of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. II. MERLIN and VLA observations of medium-sized symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Marecki, A.; Thomasson, P.; Spencer, R. E.

    2005-09-01

    A new sample of candidate Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources that are much weaker than the CSS source prototypes has been selected from the VLA FIRST catalogue. MERLIN "snapshot" observations of the sources at 5 GHz indicate that six of them have an FR II-like morphology, but are not edge-brightened as is normal for Medium-sized Symmetric Objects (MSOs) and FR IIs. Further observations of these six sources with the VLA at 4.9 GHz and MERLIN at 1.7 GHz, as well as subsequent full-track observations with MERLIN at 5 GHz of what appeared to be the two sources of greatest interest are presented. The results are discussed with reference to the established evolutionary model of CSS sources being young but in which not all of them evolve to become old objects with extended radio structures. A lack of stable fuelling in some of them may result in an early transition to a so-called coasting phase so that they fade away instead of growing to become large-scale objects. It is possible that one of the six sources (1542+323) could be labelled as a prematurely "dying" MSO or a "fader".

  11. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  12. A survey of the 158 micron forbidden C II fine-structure line in the central 50 parsecs of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poglitsch, A.; Geis, N.; Haggerty, M.; Jackson, J.; Stacey, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory has been used to conduct an extensive, velocity-resolved survey at 1-arcsec resolution of the 158-micron forbidden C II fine-structure line emission in the central 50 pc of the Galaxy. The emission is found to be strongest toward the rotating circumnuclear disk surrounding Sgr A West; a continuous bridge of the emission connects the Sgr A complex to the thermal radio filaments in the radio arc 10 arcmin north of the center. This suggests a direct physical connection. The brightest emission occurs preferentially near the edges of the massive Galactic center molecular clouds. It is concluded that these clouds are predominantly ionized by external UV photons.

  13. Phase II Characterization Survey of the USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10), Military Sealift Fleet Support Command, Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2012-08-30

    In March 2011, the USNS Bridge was deployed off northeastern Honshu, Japan with the carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with relief efforts after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. During that time, the Bridge was exposed to air-borne radioactive materials leaking from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. The proximity of the Bridge to the air-borne impacted area resulted in the contamination of the ship’s air-handling systems and the associated components, as well as potential contamination of other ship surfaces due to either direct intake/deposition or inadvertent spread from crew/operational activities. Preliminary surveys in the weeks after the event confirmed low-level contamination within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ductwork and systems, and engine and other auxiliary air intake systems. Some partial decontamination was performed at that time. In response to the airborne contamination event, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSFSC) contracted Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under provisions of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to assess the radiological condition of the Bridge. Phase I identified contamination within the CPS filters, ventilation systems, miscellaneous equipment, and other suspect locations that could not accessed at that time (ORAU 2011b). Because the Bridge was underway during the characterization, all the potentially impacted systems/spaces could not be investigated. As a result, MSFSC contracted with ORAU to perform Phase II of the characterization, specifically to survey systems/spaces previously inaccessible. During Phase II of the characterization, the ship was in port to perform routine maintenance operations, allowing access to the previously inaccessible systems/spaces.

  14. Large Magellanic Cloud Near-infrared Synoptic Survey. II. The Wesenheit Relations and Their Application to the Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Macri, Lucas M.; Singh, Harinder P.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2016-04-01

    We present new near-infrared (NIR) Cepheid period-Wesenheit (P-W) relations in the LMC using time-series observations from the Large Magellanic Cloud NIR Synoptic Survey. We also derive optical+NIR P-W relations using V and I magnitudes from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. We employ our new JHKs data to determine an independent distance to the LMC of {μ }{{LMC}}\\=\\18.47+/- 0.07(statistical) mag, using an absolute calibration of the Galactic relations based on several distance determination methods and accounting for the intrinsic scatter of each technique. We also derive new NIR period-luminosity and Wesenheit relations for Cepheids in M31 using observations from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey. We use the absolute calibrations of the Galactic and LMC {W}J,H relations to determine the distance modulus of M31, {μ }{{M31}}\\=\\24.46+/- 0.20 mag. We apply a simultaneous fit to Cepheids in several Local Group galaxies covering a range of metallicities (7.7\\lt 12+{log}[{{O}}/{{H}}]\\lt 8.6 dex) to determine a global slope of -3.244 ± 0.016 mag dex-1 for the {W}J,{Ks} relation and obtain robust distance estimates. Our distances are in good agreement with recent TRGB based distance estimates and we do not find any evidence for a metallicity dependence in the NIR P-W relations.

  15. An optical spectroscopic survey of the 3CR sample of radio galaxies with z < 0.3. V. Implications for the unified model for FR IIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Buttiglione, Sara; Chiaberge, Marco; Celotti, Annalisa

    2013-12-01

    We explore the implications of our optical spectroscopic survey of 3CR radio sources with z < 0.3 for the unified model (UM) for radio-loud AGN, focusing on objects with a "edge-brightened" (FR II) radio morphology. The sample contains 33 high ionization galaxies (HIGs) and 18 broad line objects (BLOs). According to the UM, HIGs, the narrow line sources, are the nuclearly obscured counterparts of BLOs. The fraction of HIGs indicates a covering factor of the circumnuclear matter of 65% that corresponds, adopting a torus geometry, to an opening angle of 50° ± 5. No dependence on redshift and luminosity on the torus opening angle emerges. We also consider the implications for a "clumpy" torus. The distributions of total radio luminosity of HIGs and BLOs are not statistically distinguishable, as expected from the UM. Conversely, BLOs have a radio core dominance, R, more than ten times larger with respect to HIGs, as expected in case of Doppler boosting when the jets in BLOs are preferentially oriented closer to the line of sight than in HIGs. Modeling the R distributions leads to an estimate of the jet bulk Lorentz factor of Γ ~ 3-5. The test of the UM based on the radio source size is not conclusive due to the limited number of objects and because the size distribution is dominated by the intrinsic scatter rather than by projection effects. The [O II] line luminosities in HIGs and BLOs are similar but the [O III] and [O I] lines are higher in BLOs by a factor of ~2. We ascribe this effect to the presence of a line emitting region located within the walls of the obscuring torus, visible in BLOs but obscured in HIGs, with a density higher than the [O II] critical density. We find evidence that BLOs have broader [O I] and [O III] lines than HIGs of similar [O II] width, as expected in the presence of high density gas in the proximity of the central black hole. In conclusion, the radio and narrow line region (NLR) properties of HIGs and BLOs are consistent with the UM

  16. Survey of the seroprovalence of HTLV I/II in hemodialysis patients and blood donors in Urmia.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Zakieh Rostamzadeh; Baradaran, Mohammad; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2008-09-01

    Human T lymphocytotropic virus HTLV is a virus from retroviridae family, and more than 20 million people are infected with this virus worldwide. It can cause leukemia/lymphoma in adults, tropical spastic paralysis, HTLV associated myelopathy, spastic paraparesis, tropical myelopathy (HAM/TSP), and some other nervous system diseases. It is transmitted by means of blood products via blood transfusion. In Iran, except the Great Khorasan region, none of blood products undergo screening for HTLV. Immunodeficiency in HD patients, results in increased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HTLV-I/II antibody among hemo-dialysis patients and healthy blood donors in Urmia, Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2005 to January 2006 among healthy blood donors and in 2006 among hemodialysis patients. The serum of 2046 blood donors and 95 Hemodialysis patients was checked with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti HTLV-I/II, and positive cases were confirmed by western blot. Three seropositive cases among 95 hemodialysis patients were detected, and only one of them was confirmed by western blot. Of the healthy blood donors 1910 (93.4%) were males and 136 (6.6%) were females. Serum of 1997 (97.6%) subjects was negative, and 49 (2.6%) cases were positive for HTLV by ELISA. Among the positive cases western blot confirmed only 7 (14.3%) persons as HTLV positive, 37 (75.5%) as negative, and 5 (10.2%) as indeterminate. Among the 7 positive cases 6 (85.6%) were infected with HTLV-I, and only one (14.3%) with HTLV-I /II infection. Total Serologic prevalence of HTLV in healthy blood donors was 0.34%. We conclude that such high serologic prevalence in the population of blood donors in Urmia city, suggests the high probability of transmission through blood transfusion, and therefore screening of blood donors for human T-lymphocyte virus is essential in this region. HD patients should be screened for HTLV and positive

  17. An empirical mass-loss law for Population II giants from the Spitzer-IRAC survey of Galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Fabbri, S.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Dalessandro, E.; Rich, R. M.; Valenti, E.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The main aim of the present work is to derive an empirical mass-loss (ML) law for Population II stars in first and second ascent red giant branches. Methods: We used the Spitzer InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) photometry obtained in the 3.6-8 μm range of a carefully chosen sample of 15 Galactic globular clusters spanning the entire metallicity range and sampling the vast zoology of horizontal branch (HB) morphologies. We complemented the IRAC photometry with near-infrared data to build suitable color-magnitude and color-color diagrams and identify mass-losing giant stars. Results: We find that while the majority of stars show colors typical of cool giants, some stars show an excess of mid-infrared light that is larger than expected from their photospheric emission and that is plausibly due to dust formation in mass flowing from them. For these stars, we estimate dust and total (gas + dust) ML rates and timescales. We finally calibrate an empirical ML law for Population II red and asymptotic giant branch stars with varying metallicity. We find that at a given red giant branch luminosity only a fraction of the stars are losing mass. From this, we conclude that ML is episodic and is active only a fraction of the time, which we define as the duty cycle. The fraction of mass-losing stars increases by increasing the stellar luminosity and metallicity. The ML rate, as estimated from reasonable assumptions for the gas-to-dust ratio and expansion velocity, depends on metallicity and slowly increases with decreasing metallicity. In contrast, the duty cycle increases with increasing metallicity, with the net result that total ML increases moderately with increasing metallicity, about 0.1 M⊙ every dex in [Fe/H]. For Population II asymptotic giant branch stars, we estimate a total ML of ≤0.1 M⊙, nearly constant with varying metallicity. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  18. Evidence for elevated cortical hyperexcitability and its association with out-of-body experiences in the non-clinical population: new findings from a pattern-glare task.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Jason J; Broglia, Emma; Bagshaw, Andrew P; Wilkins, Arnold J

    2013-03-01

    Individuals with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness can report hallucinatory Out-of-Body Experiences (OBEs) and display elevated scores on measures of temporal-lobe dysfunction (Braithwaite et al., 2011). However, all previous investigations of such biases in non-clinical populations are based on indirect questionnaire measures. Here we present the first empirical investigation that a non-clinical OBE group is subject to pattern-glare, possibly as a result of cortical hyperexcitability (Wilkins et al., 1984). Fifty-nine students at the University of Birmingham viewed a series of square-wave gratings with spatial frequencies of approximately .7, 3 and 11 cycles-per-degree, both black/white and of contrasting colours. The illusions and discomfort reported when viewing gratings with mid-range spatial frequency have been hypothesized to reflect cortical hyperexcitability (Wilkins, 1995; Huang et al., 2003). Participants also completed the Cardiff Anomalous Perception Scale (CAPS: Bell et al., 2006) which included experiential measures of disruptions in 'Temporal-lobe Experience'. Participants who reported OBEs also reported significantly more visual illusions/distortions and significantly greater discomfort as a result of viewing the mid-frequency gratings. There were no such differences with respect to gratings with relatively lower or higher spatial frequency. The OBE group also produced significantly elevated scores on the CAPS measures of Temporal-lobe Experience, relative to controls. Collectively, the results are consistent with there being a neural 'vulnerability' in the cortices of individuals pre-disposed to some hallucinations, even in the non-clinical population.

  19. PROBING THE PHYSICS OF NARROW LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES. II. THE SIDING SPRING SOUTHERN SEYFERT SPECTROSCOPIC SNAPSHOT SURVEY (S7)

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, Michael A.; Davies, Rebecca; Kewley, Lisa; Hampton, Elise; Sutherland, Ralph; Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S.; Scharwächter, Julia; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2015-03-15

    Here we describe the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7) and present results on 64 galaxies drawn from the first data release. The S7 uses the Wide Field Spectrograph mounted on the ANU 2.3 m telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory to deliver an integral field of 38 × 25 arcsec at a spectral resolution of R = 7000 in the red (530–710 nm), and R = 3000 in the blue (340–560 nm). From these data cubes we have extracted the narrow-line region spectra from a 4 arcsec aperture centered on the nucleus. We also determine the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 fluxes in the narrow lines, the nuclear reddening, the reddening-corrected relative intensities of the observed emission lines, and the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 luminosities determined from spectra for which the stellar continuum has been removed. We present a set of images of the galaxies in [O iii] λ5007, [N ii] λ6584, and Hα, which serve to delineate the spatial extent of the extended narrow-line region and also to reveal the structure and morphology of the surrounding H ii regions. Finally, we provide a preliminary discussion of those Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies that display coronal emission lines in order to explore the origin of these lines.

  20. The ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II). I. Newly identified X-ray luminous clusters at z ≥ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, G.; Böhringer, H.

    2012-02-01

    We report 19 intermediate redshift clusters newly detected in the ROSAT All-Sky survey that are spectroscopically confirmed. They form a part of 911 objects in the REFLEX II cluster catalogue with a limiting flux of 1.8 × 10-12 erg/s/cm2 in the 0.1-2.4 keV ROSAT band at redshift z ≥ 0.2. In addition we report three clusters from the REFLEX III supplementary catalogue, which contains objects below the REFLEX II flux limit but satisfies the redshift constraint above. These clusters are spectroscopically followed-up by our ESO NTT-EFOSC2 campaigns for the redshift measurement. We describe our observing and data reduction methods. We show how X-ray properties such as spectral hardness ratio and source extent can be used as important diagnostics in selecting galaxy cluster candidates. Physical properties of the clusters are subsequently calculated from the X-ray observations. This sample contains the high mass and intermediate-redshift galaxy clusters for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on the data obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  1. Probing the Physics of Narrow Line Regions in Active Galaxies. II. The Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Shastri, Prajval; Davies, Rebecca; Kewley, Lisa; Hampton, Elise; Scharwächter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S.; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; Juneau, Stéphanie; James, Bethan; Srivastava, Shweta

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7) and present results on 64 galaxies drawn from the first data release. The S7 uses the Wide Field Spectrograph mounted on the ANU 2.3 m telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory to deliver an integral field of 38 × 25 arcsec at a spectral resolution of R = 7000 in the red (530-710 nm), and R = 3000 in the blue (340-560 nm). From these data cubes we have extracted the narrow-line region spectra from a 4 arcsec aperture centered on the nucleus. We also determine the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 fluxes in the narrow lines, the nuclear reddening, the reddening-corrected relative intensities of the observed emission lines, and the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 luminosities determined from spectra for which the stellar continuum has been removed. We present a set of images of the galaxies in [O iii] λ5007, [N ii] λ6584, and Hα, which serve to delineate the spatial extent of the extended narrow-line region and also to reveal the structure and morphology of the surrounding H ii regions. Finally, we provide a preliminary discussion of those Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies that display coronal emission lines in order to explore the origin of these lines.

  2. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. II. Young Stars and their Relation to Hα and UV Emission Timescales in the M81 Outer Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan; Holtzman, Jon; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; de Jong, Roelof S.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Rosema, Keith

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained resolved stellar photometry from Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of a field in the outer disk of M81 as part of ANGST. Motivated by the recent discovery of extended UV disks around many nearby spiral galaxies, we use the observed stellar population to derive the recent star formation histories of five ~ 0.5 kpc-sized regions within this field. These regions were selected on the basis of their UV luminosity from GALEX and include two H II regions, two regions that are UV-bright but Hα-faint, and one "control" region faint in both UV and Hα. We estimate our effective star formation rate detection limit at ~2 × 10-4 M sun yr-1, which is lower than that of GALEX for regions of this size. As expected, the H II regions contain massive main-sequence stars (in the mass range 18-27 M sun, based on our best extinction estimates), while similar massive main-sequence stars are lacking in the UV-bright/Hα-faint regions. The observations are consistent with stellar ages lsim 10 Myr in the H II regions, and gsim 16 Myr in the UV-bright/Hα-faint regions. All regions but the control have formed ~ 104 M sun of stars over the past ~ 65 Myr. Thus, our results, for at least one small area in the outer disk of M81, are consistent with an age difference being sufficient to explain the observed discrepancy between star forming regions detected in Hα and those detected exclusively in UV. However, our data cannot conclusively rule out other explanations, such as a strongly truncated initial mass function.

  3. CONTINUUM HALOS IN NEARBY GALAXIES: AN EVLA SURVEY (CHANG-ES). II. FIRST RESULTS ON NGC 4631

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, Judith; Henriksen, Richard N.; Beck, Rainer; Krause, Marita; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Schmidt, Philip; Benjamin, R. A.; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Miskolczi, Arpad; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Oosterloo, Tom; Johnson, Megan; Li, Jiang-Tao; Murphy, E. J.; Porter, Troy A.; Rand, Richard J.; Saikia, D. J.; Strong, A. W.; Walterbos, Rene E-mail: henriksn@astro.queensu.ca E-mail: rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: cmora@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de; and others

    2012-08-15

    We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies-an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (i.e., the Expanded Very Large Array or EVLA) with observations in two bands centered at 1.5 and 6 GHz in a variety of array configurations with full polarization. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). These first results are based on C-array test observations in both observing bands of the well-known radio halo galaxy, NGC 4631. In this paper, we outline the observations and the data reduction steps that are required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data), we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, rather than fits across widely separated frequencies as has been done in the past and is also the highest spatial resolution spectral index map yet presented for this galaxy. The average spectral index in the disk is {alpha}-bar{sub 1.5GHz} = -0.84 {+-} 0.05 indicating that the emission is largely non-thermal, but a small global thermal contribution is sufficient to explain a positive curvature term in the spectral index over the band. Two specific star-forming regions have spectral indices that are consistent with thermal emission. Polarization results (uncorrected for

  4. Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies: An EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES). II. First Results on NGC 4631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Judith; Beck, Rainer; Benjamin, R. A.; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N.; Johnson, Megan; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Miskolczi, Arpad; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Murphy, E. J.; Oosterloo, Tom; Porter, Troy A.; Rand, Richard J.; Saikia, D. J.; Schmidt, Philip; Strong, A. W.; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q. Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2012-08-01

    We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies—an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (i.e., the Expanded Very Large Array or EVLA) with observations in two bands centered at 1.5 and 6 GHz in a variety of array configurations with full polarization. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). These first results are based on C-array test observations in both observing bands of the well-known radio halo galaxy, NGC 4631. In this paper, we outline the observations and the data reduction steps that are required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data), we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 μJy beam-1 at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, rather than fits across widely separated frequencies as has been done in the past and is also the highest spatial resolution spectral index map yet presented for this galaxy. The average spectral index in the disk is \\bar{\\alpha }_{1.5 \\,GHz} =-0.84+/- 0.05 indicating that the emission is largely non-thermal, but a small global thermal contribution is sufficient to explain a positive curvature term in the spectral index over the band. Two specific star-forming regions have spectral indices that are consistent with thermal emission. Polarization results (uncorrected for internal

  5. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. II. HIPPARCOS STARS OBSERVED IN 2010 JANUARY AND JUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Gomez, Shamilia C.; Anderson, Lisa M.; Sherry, William H.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Van Altena, William F. E-mail: shamilia.gomez@gmail.com E-mail: wsherry@noao.edu E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2011-02-15

    The results of 497 speckle observations of Hipparcos stars and selected other targets are presented. Of these, 367 were resolved into components and 130 were unresolved. The data were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument at the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope. (The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories.) Since the first paper in this series, the instrument has been upgraded so that it now uses two electron-multiplying CCD cameras. The measurement precision obtained when comparing to ephemeris positions of binaries with very well known orbits is approximately 1-2 mas in separation and better than 0.{sup 0}6 in position angle. Differential photometry is found to be in very good agreement with Hipparcos measures in cases where the comparison is most relevant. We derive preliminary orbits for two systems.

  6. Spectral analysis of the Stromlo-APM Survey - II. Galaxy luminosity function and clustering by spectral type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, J.; Tresse, L.; Maddox, S.

    1999-11-01

    We study the luminosity function and clustering properties of subsamples of local galaxies selected from the Stromlo-APM Survey by the rest-frame equivalent widths of their Hα and [Oii] emission lines. The bJ luminosity function of star-forming galaxies has a significantly steeper faint-end slope than that for quiescent galaxies: the majority of sub-L* galaxies are currently undergoing significant star formation. Emission-line galaxies are less strongly clustered, both amongst themselves and with the general galaxy population, than are quiescent galaxies. Thus as well as being less luminous, star-forming galaxies also inhabit lower density regions of the Universe than quiescent galaxies.

  7. [A survey on condition of outpatients at prosthodontics II, University Hospital, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, N; Shiozawa, I; Masuda, T; Takei, H; Tsuruta, J; Ogura, N; Hasegawa, S

    1998-06-01

    The number of dental patients who have medical illnesses is increasing at the hospital of the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University. Although prosthodontic treatments are considered less invasive in all dental treatments, invasive procedures such as tooth extraction may be required occasionally. Therefore, it is necessary to treat patients in consideration of their condition. Under this situation, a clinical survey was conducted by health questionnaires answered by the patients who visited our clinic between October 1992 and March 1997. The number of patients whose illness was heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, nephritic disease, hepatitis, tuberculosis, hemodyscrasia, asthma, epilepsy, and so on during dental treatment was higher than the national average according to the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Dental psychosomatic diseases such as TMD and dental phobia were increased every year. These data reflect the contemporary disease structure in Japan characterized by the spreading of life-style related diseases and increase of neuropsychological and infectious diseases.

  8. The Gould’s Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) II. Distances and Structure toward the Orion Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounkel, Marina; Hartmann, Lee; Loinard, Laurent; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Torres, Rosa M.; Pech, Gerardo; Galli, Phillip A. B.; Rivera, Juana L.; Boden, Andrew F.; Evans, Neal J., II; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the Gould’s Belt Distances Survey of young star-forming regions toward the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. We detected 36 young stellar objects (YSOs) with the Very Large Baseline Array, 27 of which have been observed in at least three epochs over the course of two years. At least half of these YSOs belong to multiple systems. We obtained parallax and proper motions toward these stars to study the structure and kinematics of the Complex. We measured a distance of 388 ± 5 pc toward the Orion Nebula Cluster, 428 ± 10 pc toward the southern portion L1641, 388 ± 10 pc toward NGC 2068, and roughly ∼420 pc toward NGC 2024. Finally, we observed a strong degree of plasma radio scattering toward λ Ori.

  9. The Exoplanet Mass-ratio Function from the MOA-II Survey: Discovery of a Break and Likely Peak at a Neptune Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, D.; Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Onishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Shibai, H.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of the statistical analysis of planetary signals discovered in MOA-II microlensing survey alert system events from 2007 to 2012. We determine the survey sensitivity as a function of planet-star mass ratio, q, and projected planet-star separation, s, in Einstein radius units. We find that the mass-ratio function is not a single power law, but has a change in slope at q ˜ 10-4, corresponding to ˜20 M ⊕ for the median host-star mass of ˜0.6 {M}⊙ . We find significant planetary signals in 23 of the 1474 alert events that are well-characterized by the MOA-II survey data alone. Data from other groups are used only to characterize planetary signals that have been identified in the MOA data alone. The distribution of mass ratios and separations of the planets found in our sample are well fit by a broken power-law model of the form {{dN}}{pl}/{(d{log}qd{log}s)=A(q/{q}{br})}n{s}m {{dex}}-2 for q > q br and {{dN}}{pl}/{(d{log}qd{log}s)=A(q/{q}{br})}p{s}m {{dex}}-2 for q < q br, where q br is the mass ratio of the break. We also combine this analysis with the previous analyses of Gould et al. and Cassan et al., bringing the total sample to 30 planets. This combined analysis yields A={0.61}-0.16+0.21, n = -0.93 ± 0.13, m={0.49}-0.49+0.47, and p={0.6}-0.4+0.5 for q br ≡ 1.7 × 10-4. The unbroken power-law model is disfavored with a p-value of 0.0022, which corresponds to a Bayes factor of 27 favoring the broken power-law model. These results imply that cold Neptunes are likely to be the most common type of planets beyond the snow line.

  10. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey. II. Diving with massive galaxies in 22 square degrees since z = 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutard, T.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; Guzzo, L.; Hudelot, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Van Werbaeke, L.; Morrison, G. E.; Le Fèvre, O.; Comte, V.; Bolzonella, M.; Fritz, A.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function and stellar mass density from redshift z = 0.2 to z = 1.5 of a Ks < 22-selected sample with highly reliable photometric redshifts and over an unprecedentedly large area. Our study is based on near-infrared observations carried out with the WIRCam instrument at CFHT over the footprint of the VIPERS spectroscopic survey and benefits from the high-quality optical photometry from the CFHTLS and ultraviolet observations with the GALEX satellite. The accuracy of our photometric redshifts is σΔz/ (1 + z) < 0.03 and 0.05 for the bright (iAB< 22.5) and faint (iAB > 22.5) samples, respectively. The galaxy stellar mass function is measured with ~760 000 galaxies down to Ks ~ 22 and over an effective area of ~22.4 deg2, the latter of which drastically reduces the statistical uncertainties (i.e. Poissonian error and cosmic variance). We point out the importance of carefully controlling the photometric calibration, whose effect becomes quickly dominant when statistical uncertainties are reduced, which will be a major issue for future cosmological surveys with EUCLID or LSST, for instance. By exploring the rest-frame (NUV-r) vs. (r-Ks) colour-colour diagram with which we separated star-forming and quiescent galaxies, (1) we find that the density of very massive log (M∗/M⊙) > 11.5 galaxies is largely dominated by quiescent galaxies and increases by a factor 2 from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0.2, which allows for additional mass assembly through dry mergers. (2) We also confirm the scenario in which star formation activity is impeded above a stellar mass log(ℳ*SF/M⊙) = 10.64±0.01. This value is found to be very stable at 0.2

  11. The VISTA Carina Nebula Survey. II. Spatial distribution of the infrared-excess-selected young stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, P.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Roccatagliata, V.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a deep wide-field (6.76 sq. deg) near-infrared survey with the VISTA telescope that covers the entire extent of the Carina nebula complex (CNC). The point-source catalog created from these data contains around four million individual objects down to masses of 0.1 M⊙. We present a statistical study of the large-scale spatial distribution and an investigation of the clustering properties of infrared-excesses objects, which are used to trace disk-bearing young stellar objects (YSOs). A selection based on a near-infrared (J-H) versus (H-Ks) color-color diagram shows an almost uniform distribution over the entire observed area. We interpret this as a result of the very high degree of background contamination that arises from the Carina Nebula's location close to the Galactic plane. Complementing the VISTA near-infrared catalog with Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared photometry improves the situation of the background contamination considerably. We find that a (J-H) versus (Ks- [4.5]) color-color diagram is well suited to tracing the population of YSO-candidates (cYSOs) by their infrared excess. We identify 8781 sources with strong infrared excess, which we consider as cYSOs. This sample is used to investigate the spatial distribution of the cYSOs with a nearest-neighbor analysis. The surface density distribution of cYSOs agrees well with the shape of the clouds as seen in our Herschel far-infrared survey. The strong decline in the surface density of excess sources outside the area of the clouds supports the hypothesis that our excess-selected sample consists predominantly of cYSOs with a low level of background contamination. This analysis allows us to identify 14 groups of cYSOs outside the central area.Our results suggest that the total population of cYSOs in the CNC comprises about 164 000 objects, with a substantial fraction (~35%) located in the northern, still not well studied parts. Our cluster analysis suggests that roughly half of the cYSOs constitute a

  12. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. II. THE CEPHEUS FLARE OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Jason M.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Di Francesco, James E-mail: derek.ward-thompson@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2009-11-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; {approx}2 deg{sup 2}) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; {approx}8 deg{sup 2}) observations of the Cepheus Flare, which is associated with the Gould Belt, at an approximate distance of {approx}300 pc. Around 6500 sources are detected in all four IRAC bands, of which {approx}900 have MIPS 24 {mu}m detections. We identify 133 young stellar object (YSO) candidates using color-magnitude diagram techniques, and a large number of the YSO candidates are associated with the NGC 7023 reflection nebula. Cross-identifications were made with the Guide Star Catalog II and the IRAS Faint Source Catalog, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were constructed. SED modeling was conducted to estimate the degree of infrared excess. It was found that a large majority of disks were optically thick accreting disks, suggesting that there has been little disk evolution in these sources. Nearest-neighbor clustering analysis identified four small protostellar groups (L1228, L1228N, L1251A, and L1251B) with 5-15 members each and the larger NGC 7023 association with 32 YSO members. The star-formation efficiency for cores with clusters of protostars and for those without clusters was found to be {approx}8% and {approx}1%, respectively. The cores L1155, L1241, and L1247 are confirmed to be starless down to our luminosity limit of L {sub bol} = 0.06 L {sub sun}.

  13. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) - III. Construction of the first flux-limited supercluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Nowak, Nina

    2013-03-01

    We present the first supercluster catalogue constructed with the extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX II) Galaxy Cluster survey data, which comprises 919 X-ray selected galaxy clusters with a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2. Based on this cluster catalogue we construct a supercluster catalogue using a friends-of-friends algorithm with a linking length depending on the (local) cluster density, which thus varies with redshift. The resulting catalogue comprises 164 superclusters at redshift z ≤ 0.4. The choice of the linking length in the friends-of-friends method modifies the properties of the superclusters. We study the properties of different catalogues such as the distributions of the redshift, extent and multiplicity by varying the choice of parameters. In addition to the supercluster catalogue for the entire REFLEX II sample, we compile a large volume-limited cluster sample from REFLEX II with the redshift and luminosity constraints of z ≤ 0.1 and LX ≥ 5 × 1043 erg s-1. With this catalogue we construct a volume-limited sample of superclusters. This sample is built with a homogeneous linking length, and hence selects effectively the same type of superclusters. By increasing the luminosity cut we can build a hierarchical tree structure of the volume-limited samples, where systems at the top of the tree are only formed via the most luminous clusters. This allows us to test if the same superclusters are found when only the most luminous clusters are visible, comparable to the situation at higher redshift in the REFLEX II sample. We find that the selection of superclusters is very robust, independent of the luminosity cut, and the contamination of spurious superclusters among cluster pairs is expected to be small. Numerical simulations and observations of the substructure of clusters suggest that regions of high cluster number density provide an astrophysically different environment for galaxy clusters, where the mass function and X

  14. A Deep Proper Motion Catalog Within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Footprint. II. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; von Hippel, Ted; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGennaro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Dame, Kyra; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2017-01-01

    A catalog of 8472 white dwarf (WD) candidates is presented, selected using reduced proper motions from the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al. Candidates are selected in the magnitude range 16< r< 21.5 over 980 square degrees, and 16< r< 21.3 over an additional 1276 square degrees, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging footprint. Distances, bolometric luminosities, and atmospheric compositions are derived by fitting SDSS ugriz photometry to pure hydrogen and helium model atmospheres (assuming surface gravities {log} {\\text{}}g=8). The disk white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) is constructed using a sample of 2839 stars with 5.5< {M}{bol}< 17, with statistically significant numbers of stars cooler than the turnover in the luminosity function. The WDLF for the halo is also constructed, using a sample of 135 halo WDs with 5< {M}{bol}< 16. We find space densities of disk and halo WDs in the solar neighborhood of 5.5+/- 0.1× {10}-3 {{pc}}-3 and 3.5+/- 0.7× {10}-5 {{pc}}-3, respectively. We resolve the bump in the disk WDLF due to the onset of fully convective envelopes in WDs, and see indications of it in the halo WDLF as well.

  15. The OPD photometric survey of open clusters II. robust determination of the fundamental parameters of 24 open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, H.; Dias, W. S.; Hickel, G. R.; Caetano, T. C.

    2017-02-01

    In the second paper of the series we continue the investigation of open cluster fundamental parameters using a robust global optimization method to fit model isochrones to photometric data. We present optical UBVRI CCD photometry (Johnsons-Cousins system) observations for 24 neglected open clusters, of which 14 have high quality data in the visible obtained for the first time, as a part of our ongoing survey being carried out in the 0.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory in Brazil. All objects were then analyzed with a global optimization tool developed by our group which estimates the membership likelihood of the observed stars and fits an isochrone from which a distance, age, reddening, total to selective extinction ratio RV (included in this work as a new free parameter) and metallicity are estimated. Based on those estimates and their associated errors we analyzed the status of each object as real clusters or not, finding that two are likely to be asterisms. We also identify important discrepancies between our results and previous ones obtained in the literature which were determined using 2MASS photometry.

  16. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  17. The German Environmental Survey 1990/92 (GerES II): sources of personal exposure to volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Krause, C; Seifert, B; Ullrich, D

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of the second German Environmental Survey carried out in the Western part of Germany in 1990/91 (GerES IIa) 113 adults aged 25-69 years were selected at random from the total study population of about 2500 to investigate personal exposure to about 70 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each subject wore a diffusive badge-type sampler for 1 week. The VOCs determined included alkanes, aromatics, aliphatic halocarbons, terpenes, and oxygen-containing compounds. Multivariate regression analysis was carried out to determine and quantify the major sources of personal exposure to various VOCs. In this paper, results are given for benzene, and C8- and C9-aromatics. Being subject to environmental tobacco smoke was found to be the most important determinant of benzene exposure, but automobile-related activities such as driving a car or refuelling, were also associated with significantly increased levels of benzene. The major determinant of C8- and C9-aromatics concentrations was occupational exposure. Emissions from paints, lacquers, newspapers, magazines and print-works were also important contributors to C8-aromatics exposure. Renovation, painting and smoking were associated with a significant increase of the exposure to C9-aromatics.

  18. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data. II. The Spring Equatorial Stripe

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Anderson, Scott F.; Voges, Wolfgang; Margon, Bruce; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u{sup '} g{sup '} r{sup '} i{sup '} z{sup '}) imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we present 22 high-redshift quasars (z>3.6) discovered from {approx}250 deg2 of data in the spring Equatorial Stripe, plus photometry for two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of the sky. Our success rate in identifying high-redshift quasars is 68%. Five of the newly discovered quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.62, 4.69, 4.70, 4.92, and 5.03). All the quasars have i{sup *} <20.2 with absolute magnitude - 28.8

  19. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. Queen Mary College, London )

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

  20. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Danish leafy crops. Part I: PAH in kale and beets relate to point sources of PAH. Part II: a survey of PAH in commercial grown fresh and deep-frozen kale

    SciTech Connect

    Vahl, M.; Beck, J.; Stoebet, M.

    1982-01-01

    Part I discusses the investigation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) has been to demonstrate the possible pollution of leafy vegetables from expected PAH-emmissions, and to compare with similar investigations in Scandinavia. Part II is a survey has been to establish levels of PAH to which consumers are normally exposed from intake of fruits and above ground parts of vegetables.

  2. A Far-Ultraviolet Survey of 47 Tucanae. II. The Long-Period Cataclysmic Variable AKO 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Christian; Zurek, David R.; Shara, Michael M.; Long, Knox S.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2003-12-01

    We present time-resolved far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy and photometry of the 1.1 day eclipsing binary system AKO 9 in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. The FUV spectrum of AKO 9 is blue and exhibits prominent C IV and H II emission lines. The spectrum broadly resembles that of long-period cataclysmic variables (CVs) in the Galactic field. Combining our time-resolved FUV data with archival optical photometry of 47 Tuc, we refine the orbital period of AKO 9 and define an accurate ephemeris for the system. We also place constraints on several other system parameters using a variety of observational constraints. We find that all of the empirical evidence is consistent with AKO 9 being a long-period dwarf nova in which mass transfer is driven by the nuclear expansion of a subgiant donor star. We therefore conclude that AKO 9 is the first spectroscopically confirmed cataclysmic variable in 47 Tuc. We also briefly consider AKO 9's likely formation and ultimate evolution. Regarding the former, we find that the system was almost certainly formed dynamically, either via tidal capture or in a three-body encounter. Regarding the latter, we show that AKO 9 will probably end its CV phase by becoming a detached double white dwarf system or by exploding in a Type Ia supernova. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with proposals 8219 and 8267.

  3. The snapshot Hubble U-band cluster survey (SHUCS). II. The star cluster population of NGC 2997

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, J. E.; Gallagher, J. S. III; Adamo, A.; Bastian, N.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Larsen, S.; Zackrisson, E.

    2014-08-01

    We study the star cluster population of NGC 2997, a giant spiral galaxy located at 9.5 Mpc and targeted by the Snapshot Hubble U-band Cluster Survey (SHUCS). Combining our U-band imaging from SHUCS with archival BVI imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, we select a high confidence sample of clusters in the circumnuclear ring and disk through a combination of automatic detection procedures and visual inspection. The cluster luminosity functions in all four filters can be approximated by power laws with indices of –1.7 to –2.3. Some deviations from pure power-law shape are observed, hinting at the presence of a high-mass truncation in the cluster mass function. However, upon inspection of the cluster mass function, we find it is consistent with a pure power law of index –2.2 ± 0.2 despite a slight bend at ∼2.5 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}. No statistically significant truncation is observed. From the cluster age distributions, we find a low rate of disruption (ζ ∼ –0.1) in both the disk and circumnuclear ring. Finally, we estimate the cluster formation efficiency (Γ) over the last 100 Myr in each region, finding 7% ± 2% for the disk, 12% ± 4% for the circumnuclear ring, and 10% ± 3% for the entire UBVI footprint. This study highlights the need for wide-field UBVI coverage of galaxies to study cluster populations in detail, though a small sample of clusters can provide significant insight into the characteristics of the population.

  4. The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity Survey of Perseus Protostars (VANDAM). II. Multiplicity of Protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Dunham, Michael M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Harris, Robert J.; Kratter, Kaitlin; Perez, Laura

    2016-02-01

    We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L⊙ and ˜33 L⊙, with a median of 0.7 L⊙. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of ˜0.″065 (15 au) and separations out to ˜43″ (10,000 au) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be 0.40 ± 0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71 ± 0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23 ± 0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at ˜75 au and another peak at ˜3000 au. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on >1000 au scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on <200 au scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by <30 au. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50-400 au) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.

  5. THE VLA NASCENT DISK AND MULTIPLICITY SURVEY OF PERSEUS PROTOSTARS (VANDAM). II. MULTIPLICITY OF PROTOSTARS IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Harris, Robert J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Perez, Laura; Dunham, Michael M.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Kratter, Kaitlin

    2016-02-10

    We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L{sub ⊙} and ∼33 L{sub ⊙}, with a median of 0.7 L{sub ⊙}. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of ∼0.″065 (15 au) and separations out to ∼43″ (10,000 au) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be 0.40 ± 0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71 ± 0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23 ± 0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at ∼75 au and another peak at ∼3000 au. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on >1000 au scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on <200 au scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by <30 au. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50–400 au) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.

  6. The Segue K giant survey. II. A catalog of distance determinations for the Segue K giants in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ma, Zhibo; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Ivans, Inese I.; Jacobson, Heather R.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Lucatello, Sara; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian; Zhao, Gang; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    We present an online catalog of distance determinations for 6036 K giants, most of which are members of the Milky Way's stellar halo. Their medium-resolution spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration are used to derive metallicities and rough gravity estimates, along with radial velocities. Distance moduli are derived from a comparison of each star's apparent magnitude with the absolute magnitude of empirically calibrated color-luminosity fiducials, at the observed (g – r){sub 0} color and spectroscopic [Fe/H]. We employ a probabilistic approach that makes it straightforward to properly propagate the errors in metallicities, magnitudes, and colors into distance uncertainties. We also fold in prior information about the giant-branch luminosity function and the different metallicity distributions of the SEGUE K-giant targeting sub-categories. We show that the metallicity prior plays a small role in the distance estimates, but that neglecting the luminosity prior could lead to a systematic distance modulus bias of up to 0.25 mag, compared to the case of using the luminosity prior. We find a median distance precision of 16%, with distance estimates most precise for the least metal-poor stars near the tip of the red giant branch. The precision and accuracy of our distance estimates are validated with observations of globular and open clusters. The stars in our catalog are up to 125 kpc from the Galactic center, with 283 stars beyond 50 kpc, forming the largest available spectroscopic sample of distant tracers in the Galactic halo.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The SEGUE K giant survey. II. Distances of 6036 stars (Xue+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.-X.; Ma, Z.; Rix, H.-W.; Morrison, H. L.; Harding, P.; Beers, T. C.; Ivans, I. I.; Jacobson, H. R.; Johnson, J.; Lee, Y. S.; Lucatello, S.; Rockosi, C. M.; Sobeck, J. S.; Yanny, B.; Zhao, G.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-08-01

    SDSS and its extensions use a dedicated 2.5m telescope to obtain ugriz imaging and resolution (defined as R=λ/Δλ)~2000 spectra for 640 (SDSS spectrograph) or 1000 (BOSS spectrograph) objects over a 7deg2 field. Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE), one of the key projects executed during SDSS-II and SDSS-III, obtained some 360000 spectra of stars in the Galaxy, selected to explore the nature of stellar populations from 0.5kpc to 100kpc (Yanny et al. 2009, cat. J/AJ/137/4377; and C. M. Rockosi et al., in preparation). Data from SEGUE is a significant part of the ninth SDSS public data release (DR9; Ahn et al. 2012, cat. V/139). The SEGUE project obtained spectra for a large number of different stellar types: 18 for SEGUE-1 (see Yanny et al. 2009, cat. J/AJ/137/4377, for details) and 11 for SEGUE-2 (C. M. Rockosi et al. in preparation). Three of these target types were specifically designed to detect K giants: these are designated "l-color K giants", "red K giants", and "proper-motion K giants." The K-giant targets from these three categories all have 0.5<(g-r)0<1.3, 0.5<(u-g)0<3.5, and proper motions smaller than 11mas/yr. We present a catalog containing the distance moduli, observed information, and SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP) atmospheric parameters for 6036 SEGUE K giants (see Table4). For each object in the catalog, we also list some of the basic observables such as (R.A., decl.), extinction-corrected apparent magnitudes and dereddened colors, as well as the information obtained from the spectra--heliocentric radial velocities plus SSPP atmospheric parameters. In addition, we provide the Bayesian estimates of the distance moduli, distances to the Sun, Galactocentric distances, the absolute magnitudes and their uncertainties, along with the distance moduli at (5%, 16%, 50%, 84%, 95%) confidence of L(DM). (2 data files).

  8. Physical and chemical variations within the W3 star-forming region. II. The 345 GHz spectral line survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich, F. P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    1997-08-01

    Results are presented of the 345 GHz spectral survey toward three sources in the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud: W3 IRS4, W3 IRS5 and W3(H_2O). Nearly 90% of the atmospheric window between 334 and 365 GHz has been scanned using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope down to a noise level of ~80 mK per resolution element. These observations are complemented by a large amount of data in the 230 GHz atmospheric window. From this data set physical conditions and beam-averaged column densities are derived for more than 14 chemically different species (over 24 different isotopes). The physical parameters derived in Paper I (\\cite[Helmich et al. 1994]{ref36}) are confirmed by the analysis of the excitation of other species, although there is evidence that the silicon- and sulfur-bearing molecules exist in a somewhat denser and warmer environment. The densities are high, >= 10^6 cm^{-3}, in the three sources and the kinetic temperatures for the bulk of the gas range from 55 K for IRS4 to 220 K for W3(H_2O). The chemical differences between the three sources are very striking: silicon- and sulfur-bearing molecules such as SiO and SO_2 are prominent toward IRS5, whereas organic molecules like CH_3OH, CH_3OCH_3 and CH_3OCHO are at least an order of magnitude more abundant toward W3(H_2O). Vibrationally excited molecules are also detected toward this source. Only simple molecules are found toward IRS4. The data provide constraints on the amount of deuterium fractionation and the ionization fraction in the observed regions as well. These chemical characteristics are discussed in the context of an evolutionary sequence, in which IRS5 is the youngest, W3(H_2O) somewhat older and IRS4, although still enigmatic, the oldest. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the The Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, and the National Research Council of Canada

  9. Wide-Field Survey of Globular Clusters in M31. II. Kinematics of the Globular Cluster System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Hong Soo; Geisler, Doug; Sarajedini, Ata; Harris, William E.

    2008-02-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system in M31, using the velocity data for 504 GCs including those for 150 GCs in our wide-field survey. The all GC system shows strong rotation, with rotation amplitude of vrot ~ 190 km s-1, and weak rotation persists even for the outermost samples at | Y| >= 5 kpc, where Y represents the projected distance from the major axis. The rotation-corrected velocity dispersion for the GC system is estimated to be σp,r ~ 130 km s-1, and it increases from σp,r ~ 120 km s-1 at | Y| < 1 kpc to σp,r ~ 150 km s-1 at | Y| >= 5 kpc. These results are very similar to those for the metal-poor GCs. This shows that there is a dynamically hot halo in M31 that is rotating but primarily pressure-supported. We have identified 50 "friendless" GCs, and they appear to rotate around the major axis of M31. Both metal-rich GCs and metal-poor GCs show strong rotation in the inner region. The rotation for the faint GCs is stronger than that for the bright GCs. We have identified 56 GCs and GC candidates with X-ray detection including 39 GCs with measured velocities. The majority of X-ray-emitting GCs follow the disk rotation. We have derived a rotation curve of M31 using the GCs at | Y| <= 0.6 kpc. We have estimated the dynamical mass of M31 using "Projected Mass Estimator (PME)" and "Tracer Mass Estimator (TME)" as MPME = 5.5+ 0.4-0.3 × 1011 M⊙ out to a radius of ~55 kpc and MTME = 19.2+ 1.4-1.3 × 1011 M⊙ for a radius of ~100 kpc, respectively. We finally discuss the implication of these results and compare the kinematics of GCs with that of planetary nebulae in M31. Based on observations with the Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  10. Peculiar velocity decomposition, redshift space distortion, and velocity reconstruction in redshift surveys. II. Dark matter velocity statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng; Lin, Weipeng; Pan, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Massive spectroscopic redshift surveys open a promising window to accurately measure peculiar velocity at cosmological distances through redshift space distortion (RSD). In Paper I Zhang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 87, 063526 (2013)] of this series of work, we proposed decomposing peculiar velocity into three eigenmodes (vδ, vS, and vB) in order to facilitate the RSD modeling and peculiar velocity reconstruction. In the current paper we measure the dark matter RSD-related statistics of the velocity eigenmodes through a set of N-body simulations. These statistics include the velocity power spectra, correlation functions, one-point probability distribution functions, cumulants, and the damping functions describing the Finger of God effect. We have carried out a number of tests to quantify possible numerical artifacts in these measurements and have confirmed that these numerical artifacts are under control. Our major findings are as follows: (1) The power spectrum measurement shows that these velocity components have distinctly different spatial distribution and redshift evolution, consistent with predictions in Paper I. In particular, we measure the window function W˜(k,z). W˜ describes the impact of nonlinear evolution on the vδ-density relation. We confirm that the approximation W˜=1 can induce a significant systematic error of O(10%) in RSD cosmology. We demonstrate that W˜ can be accurately described by a simple fitting formula with one or two free parameters. (2) The correlation function measurement shows that the correlation length is O(100), O(10), and O(1)Mpc for vδ, vS, and vB, respectively. These correlation lengths determine where we can treat the velocity fields as spatially uncorrelated. Hence, they are important properties in RSD modeling. (3) The velocity probability distribution functions and cumulants quantify non-Gaussianities of the velocity fields. We confirm speculation in Paper I that vδ is largely Gaussian, but with non-negligible non

  11. How to Avoid Headlight Glare

    MedlinePlus

    ... technology, automotive design, and demographics. Extra Lights Many vehicles now sport fog lamps or other auxiliary lights ... broad beam to reduce “back-scatter” from the vehicle’s headlights when water droplets hang in the air. ...

  12. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; Miquel, Ramon; Oestman, Linda; Brown, Peter J.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Cinabro, David; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Nichol, Robert C.; Frieman, Joshua; Jha, Saurabh W.; Marriner, John; Nordin, Jakob; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; and others

    2012-08-20

    We use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host-galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light curves using both MLCS2K2 and SALT2, and determine color (A{sub V} , c) and light-curve shape ({Delta}, x{sub 1}) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4{sigma} level) finding is that the average fitted A{sub V} from MLCS2K2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that supernovae (SNe) in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  13. The GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey (GIBS). II. Metallicity distributions and alpha element abundances at fixed Galactic latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, O. A.; Zoccali, M.; Vasquez, S.; Hill, V.; Rejkuba, M.; Valenti, E.; Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Renzini, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Minniti, D.; Brown, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We investigate metallicity and α-element abundance gradients along a Galactic longitude strip, at latitude b ~ -4°, with the aim of providing observational constraints for the structure and origin of the Milky Way bulge. Methods: High-resolution (R ~ 22 500) spectra for 400 K giants, in four fields within -4.8° ≲ b ≲ -3.4° and -10° ≲ l ≲ +10°, were obtained within the GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey (GIBS) project. To this sample we added another ~400 stars in Baade's Window at (l,b) = (1°,-4°), observed with the identical instrumental configuration: FLAMES GIRAFFE in Medusa mode with HR13 setup. All target stars lie within the red clump of the bulge colour-magnitude diagram, thus minimising contamination from the disc or halo stars. The spectroscopic stellar surface parameters were derived with an automatic method based on the GALA code, while the [Ca/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] abundances as a function of [Fe/H] were derived through a comparison with the synthetic spectra using MOOG. We constructed the metallicity distributions for the entire sample, and for each field individually, in order to investigate the presence of gradients or field-to-field variations in the shape of the distributions. Results: The metallicity distributions in the five fields are consistent with being drawn from a single parent population, indicating the absence of a gradient along the major axis of the Galactic bar. The global metallicity distribution is nicely fitted by two Gaussians. The metal-poor component is rather broad, with a mean at ⟨ [Fe/H] ⟩ = -0.31 dex and σ = 0.31 dex. The metal-rich component is narrower, with mean ⟨ [Fe/H] ⟩ = + 0.26 and σ = 0.2 dex. The [Mg/Fe] ratio follows a tight trend with [Fe/H], with enhancement with respect to solar in the metal-poor regime similar to the value observed for giant stars in the local thick disc. [Ca/Fe] abundances follow a similar trend, but with a considerably larger scatter than [Mg/Fe]. A decrease in [Mg/Fe] is

  14. An analysis of star formation with Herschel in the Hi-GAL Survey. II. The tips of the Galactic bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, M.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S.; Di Giorgio, A.; Fukui, Y.; Maiolo, B. M. T.; Maruccia, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Mizuno, N.; Molinari, S.; Mottram, J. C.; Moore, T. J. T.; Onishi, T.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Piacentini, F.; Plume, R.; Russeil, D.; Strafella, F.

    2017-02-01

    Context. We present the physical and evolutionary properties of prestellar and protostellar clumps in the Herschel Infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) in two large areas centered in the Galactic plane and covering the tips of the long Galactic bar at the intersection with the spiral arms. The areas fall in the longitude ranges 19° <ℓ < 33° and 340° < ℓ < 350°, while latitude is -1° < b < 1°. Newly formed high mass stars and prestellar objects are identified and their properties derived and compared. A study is also presented on five giant molecular complexes at the further edge of the bar, identified through ancillary 12CO(1-0) data from the NANTEN observatory. Aims: One of the goals of this analysis is assessing the role of spiral arms in the star-formation processes in the Milky Way. It is, in fact, still a matter of debate if the particular configuration of the Galactic rotation and potential at the tips of the bar can trigger star formation. Methods: The star-formation rate was estimated from the quantity of proto-stars expected to form during the collapse of massive turbulent clumps into star clusters. The expected quantity of proto-stars was estimated by the possible final cluster configurations of a given initial turbulent clump. This new method was developed by applying a Monte Carlo procedure to an evolutionary model of turbulent cores and takes into account the wide multiplicity of sources produced during the collapse. Results: The star-formation rate density values at the tips are 1.2±0.3×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2} and 1.5±0.3×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2} in the first and fourth quadrant, respectively. The same values estimated on the entire field of view, that is including the tips of the bar and background and foreground regions, are 0.9±0.2×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2} and 0.8±0.2×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2}. The conversion efficiency indicates the percentage amount of material converted into stars and is approximately 0.8% in the first quadrant and 0

  15. WINGS: A WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. II. Deep optical photometry of 77 nearby clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Marmo, C.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.

    2009-04-01

    Context: This is the second paper of a series devoted to the WIde Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). WINGS is a long term project which is gathering wide-field, multi-band imaging and spectroscopy of galaxies in a complete sample of 77 X-ray selected, nearby clusters (0.04 < z < 0.07) located far from the galactic plane (|b|≥ 20°). The main goal of this project is to establish a local reference for evolutionary studies of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Aims: This paper presents the optical (B,V) photometric catalogs of the WINGS sample and describes the procedures followed to construct them. We have paid special care to correctly treat the large extended galaxies (which includes the brightest cluster galaxies) and the reduction of the influence of the bright halos of very bright stars. Methods: We have constructed photometric catalogs based on wide-field images in B and V bands using SExtractor. Photometry has been performed on images in which large galaxies and halos of bright stars were removed after modeling them with elliptical isophotes. Results: We publish deep optical photometric catalogs (90% complete at V ~ 21.7, which translates to ˜ M^*_V+6 at mean redshift), giving positions, geometrical parameters, and several total and aperture magnitudes for all the objects detected. For each field we have produced three catalogs containing galaxies, stars and objects of “unknown” classification (~6%). From simulations we found that the uncertainty of our photometry is quite dependent of the light profile of the objects with stars having the most robust photometry and de Vaucouleurs profiles showing higher uncertainties and also an additional bias of ~-0.2^m. The star/galaxy classification of the bright objects (V < 20) was checked visually making negligible the fraction of misclassified objects. For fainter objects, we found that simulations do not provide reliable estimates of the possible misclassification and therefore we have compared our data

  16. Getting the truth into workplace surveys.

    PubMed

    Morrel-Samuels, Palmer

    2002-02-01

    There's no doubt that companies can benefit from workplace surveys and questionnaires. Good surveys accurately home in on the problems the company wants information about. They are designed so that as many people as possible actually respond. And good survey design ensures that the spectrum of responses is unbiased. In this article, the author, a former research scientist at the University of Michigan and currently the president of a survey design firm, explores some glaring failures of survey design and provides 16 guidelines to improve workplace assessment tools. Applied judiciously, these rules will not only make a tangible difference in the quality and usefulness of the data obtained but will also produce an increased response rate. The guidelines--and the problems they address--fall into five areas: content, format, language, measurement, and administration. Here are a few examples: Survey questions should require people to assess observable behavior rather than make inferences; each section should contain a similar number of items and each item should have a similar number of words; words with strong associations to gender, race, or ethnicity should be avoided; the wording in one-third of the questions should be changed so that the desirable answer is a negative one; and response scales should provide a "don't know" or "not applicable" option. Following the guidelines in this article will help you get unbiased, representative, and useful information from your workplace survey.

  17. Ten-Year Changes in the Prevalence and Socio-Demographic Determinants of Physical Activity among Polish Adults Aged 20 to 74 Years. Results of the National Multicenter Health Surveys WOBASZ (2003-2005) and WOBASZ II (2013-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Kwaśniewska, Magdalena; Pikala, Małgorzata; Bielecki, Wojciech; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elżbieta; Rębowska, Ewa; Kozakiewicz, Krystyna; Pająk, Andrzej; Piwoński, Jerzy; Tykarski, Andrzej; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to estimate ten-year changes in physical activity (PA) patterns and sociodemographic determinants among adult residents of Poland. Methods The study comprised two independent samples of randomly selected adults aged 20–74 years participating in the National Multicentre Health Survey WOBASZ (2003–2005; n = 14572) and WOBASZ II (2013–2014; n = 5694). In both surveys the measurements were performed by six academic centers in all 16 voivodships of Poland (108 measurement points in each survey). Sociodemographic data were collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire in both surveys. Physical activity was assessed in three domains: leisure-time, occupational and commuting physical activity. Results Leisure-time PA changed substantially between the surveys (p<0.001). The prevalence of subjects being active on most days of week fell in both genders in the years 2003–2014 (37.4% vs 27.3% in men); 32.7% vs 28.3% in women. None or occasional activity increased from 49.6% to 56.8% in men, while remained stable in women (55.2% vs 54.9%). In both WOBASZ surveys the likelihood of physical inactivity was higher in less educated individuals, smokers and those living in large agglomerations (p<0.01). No significant changes were observed in occupational activity in men between the surveys, while in women percentage of sedentary work increased from 43.4% to % 49.4% (p<0.01). Commuting PA decreased significantly in both genders (p<0.001). About 79.3% of men and 71.3% of women reported no active commuting in the WOBASZ II survey. Conclusions The observed unfavourable changes in PA emphasize the need for novel intervention concepts in order to reverse this direction. Further detailed monitoring of PA patterns in Poland is of particular importance. PMID:27272130

  18. Wide disparities in attitudes and practices regarding Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: a survey of expert U.S. endoscopists

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rabindra R.; Klapman, Jason; Komanduri, Srinadh; Shah, Janak N.; Wani, Sachin; Muthusamy, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) is recommended in the evaluation of suspected Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD2), though its utility is uncertain. Little is known about the practice of expert endoscopists in the United States regarding SOD2. Methods: An anonymous electronic survey was distributed to 128 expert biliary endoscopists identified from U.S. advanced endoscopy training programs. Results: The response rate was 46.1 % (59/128). Only 55.6 % received training in SOM, and 49.2 % currently perform SOM. For biliary SOD2, 33.3 % routinely obtain SOM, 33.3 % perform empiric sphincterotomy, and 26.3 % perform single session endoscopic ultrasound/endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (EUS/ERCP). In contrast, an equal number (35.1 %) favor SOM or single session EUS/ERCP for suspected acute idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis, while 19.3 % would perform empiric sphincterotomy. Those who perform SOM believe it to be important in predicting response to treatment compared with those who do not (71.8 % vs 23.1 %, P = 0.01). Yet only 51.7 % of this group performs SOM for suspected SOD2. Most (78.6 %) believe that < 50 % of patients report improvement in symptoms after sphincterotomy. Common reasons for not obtaining SOM included unreliable results (50 %), and procedure-related risks (39.3 %). Most (59.3 %) believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder; only 3.7 % felt SOD is a legitimate disorder of the sphincter of Oddi. Conclusions: Our survey of U.S. expert endoscopists suggests that SOM is not routinely performed for SOD2 and concerns regarding its associated risks and validity persist. Most endoscopists believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder that will not respond to sphincterotomy in the majority of cases. PMID:27652298

  19. Type Ia Supernova Properties as a Function of the Distance to the Host Galaxy in the SDSS-II SN Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; et al.

    2012-08-20

    We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  20. CF-HiZELS, an ˜10 deg2 emission-line survey with spectroscopic follow-up: Hα, [O III] + Hβ and [O II] luminosity functions at z = 0.8, 1.4 and 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, D.; Matthee, J.; Best, P. N.; Smail, I.; Khostovan, A. A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Kim, J.-W.; Stott, J.; Calhau, J.; Nayyeri, H.; Mobasher, B.

    2015-08-01

    We present results from the largest contiguous narrow-band survey in the near-infrared. We have used the wide-field infrared camera/Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the lowOH2 filter (1.187 ± 0.005 μm) to survey ≈10 deg2 of contiguous extragalactic sky in the SA22 field. A total of ˜6000 candidate emission-line galaxies are found. We use deep ugrizJK data to obtain robust photometric redshifts. We combine our data with the High-redshift(Z) Emission Line Survey (HiZELS), explore spectroscopic surveys (VVDS, VIPERS) and obtain our own spectroscopic follow-up with KMOS, FMOS and MOSFIRE to derive large samples of high-redshift emission-line selected galaxies: 3471 Hα emitters at z = 0.8, 1343 [O III] + Hβ emitters at z = 1.4 and 572 [O II] emitters at z = 2.2. We probe comoving volumes of >106 Mpc3 and find significant overdensities, including an 8.5σ (spectroscopically confirmed) overdensity of Hα emitters at z = 0.81. We derive Hα, [O III] + Hβ and [O II] luminosity functions at z = 0.8, 1.4, 2.2, respectively, and present implications for future surveys such as Euclid. Our uniquely large volumes/areas allow us to subdivide the samples in thousands of randomized combinations of areas and provide a robust empirical measurement of sample/cosmic variance. We show that surveys for star-forming/emission-line galaxies at a depth similar to ours can only overcome cosmic-variance (errors <10 per cent) if they are based on volumes >5 × 105 Mpc3; errors on L* and φ* due to sample (cosmic) variance on surveys probing ˜104 and ˜105 Mpc3 are typically very high: ˜300 and ˜40-60 per cent, respectively.

  1. THE SPLASH SURVEY: INTERNAL KINEMATICS, CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES, AND MASSES OF THE ANDROMEDA I, II, III, VII, X, AND XIV DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Geha, Marla C.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan N.

    2010-03-10

    We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of hundreds of individual stars along the sightline to the first three of the Andromeda (M31) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies to be discovered, And I, II, and III, and combine them with recent spectroscopic studies by our team of three additional M31 dSphs, And VII, X, and XIV, as a part of the SPLASH Survey (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo). Member stars of each dSph are isolated from foreground Milky Way dwarf stars and M31 field contamination using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic diagnostics. Our final spectroscopic sample of member stars in each dSph, for which we measure accurate radial velocities with a median uncertainty (random plus systematic errors) of 4-5 km s{sup -1}, includes 80 red giants in And I, 95 in And II, 43 in And III, 18 in And VII, 22 in And X, and 38 in And XIV. The sample of confirmed members in the six dSphs is used to derive each system's mean radial velocity, intrinsic central velocity dispersion, mean abundance, abundance spread, and dynamical mass. This combined data set presents us with a unique opportunity to perform the first systematic comparison of the global properties (e.g., metallicities, sizes, and dark matter masses) of one-third of Andromeda's total known dSph population with Milky Way counterparts of the same luminosity. Our overall comparisons indicate that the family of dSphs in these two hosts have both similarities and differences. For example, we find that the luminosity-metallicity relation is very similar between L {approx} 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, suggesting that the chemical evolution histories of each group of dSphs are similar. The lowest luminosity M31 dSphs appear to deviate from the relation, possibly suggesting tidal stripping. Previous observations have noted that the sizes of M31's brightest dSphs are systematically larger than Milky Way satellites of similar luminosity. At lower luminosities

  2. Exposure of UK industrial plumbers to asbestos, Part II: Awareness and responses of plumbers to working with asbestos during a survey in parallel with personal sampling.

    PubMed

    Bard, Delphine; Burdett, Garry

    2007-03-01

    Throughout the European Union, millions tonnes of asbestos were used in the manufacture of products for building and for industrial installations. Today, in the UK, it is estimated that over half a million non-domestic premises alone have asbestos-containing materials in them and it is recognized that those working in building maintenance trades continue to be at significant risk. In part II, the awareness of UK plumbers to when they are working with asbestos was investigated and compared with the monitored levels reported in part I. The plumbers were issued by post with passive samplers, activity logs to monitor a working week and a questionnaire. The activity logs were used to assess whether maintenance workers were knowingly or unknowingly exposed to airborne asbestos fibres during a course of a working week. The questionnaire was designed to gather information on their: age, employment status, current and past perception of the frequency which they work with asbestos and knowledge of the precautions that should be taken to limit exposure and risk. Approximately 20% of workers reported on the sample log that they had worked with asbestos. There was a high correlation (93%) between the sampling log replies that they were knowingly working with asbestos and measured asbestos on the passive sampler. However, some 60% of the samples had >5 microm long asbestos structures found by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis suggesting that the plumbers were aware of about only one-third of their contacts with asbestos materials throughout the week. This increased to just over one half of the plumbers being aware of their contact based on the results for phase contrast microscopy (PCM) countable asbestos fibres. The results from the questionnaire found that over half of the plumbers replying thought that they disturb asbestos only once a year and 90% of them thought they would work with asbestos for<10 h year-1. Their expectations and awareness of work with

  3. De-Creolization and Re-Creolization: A Preliminary Report on the Sociolinguistic Survey of Multilingual Communities Stage II: St. Lucia. York Papers in Linguistics, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Page, R. B.

    This study continues a series of reports on the work of the team which has carried out a sociolinguistic survey of multilingual communities. This study deals with an early sample of the results of the St. Lucian survey, and in particular with the extent to which they provide support for the theoretical model of linguistic choice and change, and…

  4. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  5. N-Acetylcarnosine sustained drug delivery eye drops to control the signs of ageless vision: Glare sensitivity, cataract amelioration and quality of vision currently available treatment for the challenging 50,000-patient population

    PubMed Central

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Burke, Leslie; Micans, Philip; Richer, Stuart P

    2009-01-01

    Background: Innovative Vision Products, Inc. (IVP)’s scientists developed the lubricant eye drops (Can-C™) designed as 1% N-acetylcarnosine (NAC) prodrug of l-carnosine containing a mucoadhesive cellulose-based compound combined with corneal absorption promoters in a sustained drug delivery system. Only the natural l-isomeric form of NAC raw material was specifically synthesized at the cGMP facility and employed for the manufacturing of Can-C™ eye drops. Objective and study design: In the present clinical study the authors assessed vision before and after 9 month term of topical ocular administration of NAC lubricant eye drops or placebo in 75 symptomatic patients with age-related uncomplicated cataracts in one or both eyes, with acuity in one eye of 20/40 or worse (best-corrected distance), and no previous cataract surgery in either eye and no other ocular abnormality and 72 noncataract subjects ranged in age from 54 to 78 years. Setting: Subjects in these subsample groups have reported complaints of glare and wanted to administer eye drops to get quick eye relief and quality of vision for their daily activities including driving and computer works. Following 9 months of treatment with NAC lubricant eye drops, most patients’ glare scores were improved or returned to normal in disability glare tests with Halometer DG. Improvement in disability glare was accompanied with independent improvement in acuity. Furthermore, patients with the poorest pretreatment vision were as likely to regain certain better visual function after 9 months of treatment with N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops as those with the worth pretreatment vision. Patients or other participants: The authors made a reference to electronic records of the product sales to patients who have been made the repurchase of the Can-C™ eye drops since December 2001. Intervention: Based on this analysis of recorded adjustments to inventory, various parameters were analyzed during the continued

  6. A search for pre-main sequence stars in the high-latitude molecular clouds. II - A survey of the Einstein database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Magnani, Loris

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary results are reported of a survey of every EINSTEIN image which overlaps any high-latitude molecular cloud in a search for X-ray emitting pre-main sequence stars. This survey, together with complementary KPNO and IRAS data, will allow the determination of how prevalent low mass star formation is in these clouds in general and, particularly, in the translucent molecular clouds.

  7. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  8. THE MASSIVE AND DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY. II. INITIAL SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF z ∼ 1 GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED FROM 10,000 deg{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Gettings, Daniel P.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2014-08-01

    We present optical and infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy of galaxy clusters which were identified as part of an all-sky search for high-redshift galaxy clusters, the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS). The initial phase of MaDCoWS combined infrared data from the all-sky data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select probable z ∼ 1 clusters of galaxies over an area of 10,000 deg{sup 2}. Our spectroscopy confirms 19 new clusters at 0.7 < z < 1.3, half of which are at z > 1, demonstrating the viability of using WISE to identify high-redshift galaxy clusters. The next phase of MaDCoWS will use the greater depth of the AllWISE data release to identify even higher redshift cluster candidates.

  9. Shallow subsurface temperature surveys in the basin and range province-II. Ground temperatures in the upsal hogback geothermal area, West-Central Nevada, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olmsted, F.H.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Numerous temperature surveys at a depth of 1 m were made in 1973-1985 in the Upsal Hogback and Soda Lakes geothermal areas in west-central Nevada. Whereas the surveys effectively delineated temperature at depth and heat flow within the relatively intense Soda Lakes thermal anomaly, they were not effective at the diffuse Upsal Hogback anomaly, where several perturbing factors that affect shallow subsurface temperatures are exceedingly variable. Albedo is the most important factor in the Upsal Hogback area, even at a depth of 30 m. All possible perturbing factors should be considered when designing a shallow temperature-based prospecting scheme. ?? 1986.

  10. Asia and the Pacific: A Survey of Distance Education 1992. Vol. II: Republic of Korea-Vietnam. New Papers on Higher Education: Studies and Research, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Suk-Ying; And Others

    This report is intended to serve as a general reference for people either new to the field or involved in planning and decision-making in the field of distance education, specifically in Asia and the Pacific region. Volume II contains data from 15 countries: the Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan,…

  11. Satellite Infrared (SIRE) Sensor Data Processing Perspective and Definition. Volume II. Appendix A. Survey of Available IR Data Processing Options for SIRE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-31

    International Imaging System’s (12S) System 101, CDC’s Cyber- Ikon System, the Bendix Multispectral Data Analysis System, General Electric’s DIPS...Vision I Cyber- Ikon ESL IDIMS II Number installed 4 installed 40 installed New product 9 installed Processor DCC PDP-11/35 DEC LSI-l Cyber 18/20 HP

  12. Child Care. The Philip Morris Companies Inc. Family Survey II. [Full Report and Booklet.] A Survey of Public Concerns about the State of Children, Existing Child-Care Systems, and the Need for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    A survey of public concerns about the state of children, child care systems, and the need for political action was conducted with a sample of 2,009 parents with young children and 2,041 without young children. Findings indicated that most Americans believe children in the U.S. are neglected and that the situation has grown worse. Americans are…

  13. A survey of surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    A new era for the field of Galactic structure is about to be opened with the advent of wide-area digital sky surveys. In this article, the author reviews the status and prospects for research for 3 new ground-based surveys: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS) and the Two Micron AU Sky Survey (2MASS). These surveys will permit detailed studies of Galactic structure and stellar populations in the Galaxy with unprecedented detail. Extracting the information, however, will be challenging.

  14. Energy savings opportunity survey Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Phase II. Volume 1, section 1-3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 112 buildings, two generators, four chillers, and roadway lighting. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were lighting efficiency improvements, peak-shaving generators, chiller replacement, variable speed circulation pumps, EMCS expansion, and Commissary lighting. Cost estimates were prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The projects that were developed represent $187,203 in annual savings with favorable simple paybacks and savings to investment ratios (SIRs). Systems Engineering and Management Corporation (Systems Corp) was contracted by the Louisville District of the United States Army Corps of Engineers in June 1993 to perform an energy savings opportunity survey (ESOS) for 112 buildings at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. In addition, the project includes an exterior lighting survey of five locations around the facility, a comprehensive survey of two generators at the Water Treatment Plant and Boiling Springs Pump House, and four chillers serving four buildings.

  15. Monitoring the Future. National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2009. Volume II, College Students & Adults Ages 19-50. NIH Publication Number 10-7585

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Now in its 35th year, Monitoring the Future (MTF) is a long-term program of research conducted at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research under a series of investigator-initiated research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The study is comprised of several ongoing series of annual surveys of nationally…

  16. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part II. Evaluating Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys: A Classical Test Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the second of five papers detailing our national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. This article begins our quantitative investigation of the data. We describe how we scored students' responses to four conceptual cosmology surveys, and we present evidence for the inter-rater…

  17. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE 350 MHz DRIFT-SCAN SURVEY II: DATA ANALYSIS AND THE TIMING OF 10 NEW PULSARS, INCLUDING A RELATIVISTIC BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Anne M.; Karako-Argaman, Chen; Boyles, Jason; Lorimer, Duncan R.; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Cardoso, Rogerio F.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Berndsen, Aaron; Cherry, Angus; McPhee, Christie A.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Kondratiev, Vladislav I.; Van Leeuwen, Joeri; Epstein, Courtney R.; Pennucci, Tim; Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Stovall, Kevin

    2013-02-15

    We have completed a 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered {approx}10,300 deg{sup 2} and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, 7 of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental setup, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources-two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  18. Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2010. Volume II, College Students & Adults Ages 19-50

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the Future (MTF), which is now in its 36th year, is a research program conducted at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research under a series of investigator-initiated research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The study is comprised of several ongoing series of annual surveys of nationally representative…

  19. Monitoring the Future: National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2006. Volume II: College Students & Adults Ages 19-25. NIH Publication No. 07-6206

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring the Future is a long-term program of research being conducted at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research under a series of investigator-initiated research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Now in its 32nd year, the study is comprised of several ongoing series of annual surveys of nationally…

  20. Surveying Future Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.

    2016-06-01

    The now standard model of cosmology has been tested and refined by the analysis of increasingly sensitive, large astronomical surveys, especially with statistically significant millimeter-wave surveys of the cosmic microwave background and optical surveys of the distribution of galaxies. This talk will offer a glimpse of the future, which promises an acceleration of this trend with cosmological information coming from new surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum as well as particles and even gravitational waves.

  1. Survey of group I and group II introns in 29 sequenced genomes of the Bacillus cereus group: insights into their spread and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2008-01-01

    Group I and group II introns are different catalytic self-splicing and mobile RNA elements that contribute to genome dynamics. In this study, we have analyzed their distribution and evolution in 29 sequenced genomes from the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria. Introns were of different structural classes and evolutionary origins, and a large number of nearly identical elements are shared between multiple strains of different sources, suggesting recent lateral transfers and/or that introns are under a strong selection pressure. Altogether, 73 group I introns were identified, inserted in essential genes from the chromosome or newly described prophages, including the first elements found within phages in bacterial plasmids. Notably, bacteriophages are an important source for spreading group I introns between strains. Furthermore, 77 group II introns were found within a diverse set of chromosomal and plasmidic genes. Unusual findings include elements located within conserved DNA metabolism and repair genes and one intron inserted within a novel retroelement. Group II introns are mainly disseminated via plasmids and can subsequently invade the host genome, in particular by coupling mobility with host cell replication. This study reveals a very high diversity and variability of mobile introns in B. cereus group strains. PMID:18587153

  2. THE JAMES CLERK MAXWELL TELESCOPE NEARBY GALAXIES LEGACY SURVEY. II. WARM MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN THREE FIELD SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B. E.; Wilson, C. D.; Sinukoff, E.; Israel, F. P.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Serjeant, S.; Bendo, G. J.; Clements, D. L.; Brinks, E.; Irwin, J. A.; Knapen, J. H.; Leech, J.; Tan, B. K.; Matthews, H. E.; Muehle, S.; Mortimer, A. M. J.; Petitpas, G.; Spekkens, K.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Usero, A. E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.c E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.n

    2010-05-01

    We present the results of large-area {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 emission mapping of three nearby field galaxies, NGC 628, NGC 3521, and NGC 3627, completed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey. These galaxies all have moderate to strong {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 detections over large areas of the fields observed by the survey, showing resolved structure and dynamics in their warm/dense molecular gas disks. All three galaxies were part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample, and as such have excellent published multiwavelength ancillary data. These data sets allow us to examine the star formation properties, gas content, and dynamics of these galaxies on sub-kiloparsec scales. We find that the global gas depletion time for dense/warm molecular gas in these galaxies is consistent with other results for nearby spiral galaxies, indicating this may be independent of galaxy properties such as structures, gas compositions, and environments. Similar to the results from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey, we do not see a correlation of the star formation efficiency with the gas surface density consistent with the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. Finally, we find that the star formation efficiency of the dense molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 is potentially flat or slightly declining as a function of molecular gas density, the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2/J = 1-0 ratio (in contrast to the correlation found in a previous study into the starburst galaxy M83), and the fraction of total gas in molecular form.

  3. Results of a Survey Software Development Project Management in the U.S. Aerospace Industry. Volume II. Project Management Techniques, Procedures and Tools.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-18

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN THE U.S. AEROSPACE INDUSTRY Volume I1 PROJECT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES, PROCEDURES AND TOOLS RICHARD Hf. THAYER SACRAMENTO AIR...MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES USED IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS BY THE US AEROSPACE INDUSTRY BY Richard H. Thayer and John H. Lehman This report...contains the results of a survey conducted in 1977 and 1978 on how the US Aerospace Industry manages its software development projects. The sample of

  4. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. II. CONFIRMATION OF 144 NEW ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE SOUTHERN EDGE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, Szymon; Jacyszyn, A. M.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Poleski, R.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kochanek, C. S. E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-02-10

    We quadruple the number of quasars known behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from 56 (42 in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-III LMC fields) to 200 by spectroscopically confirming 169 (144 new) quasars from a sample of 845 observed candidates in four {approx}3 deg{sup 2} Anglo-Australian Telescope/AAOmega fields south of the LMC center. The candidates were selected based on their Spitzer mid-infrared colors, X-ray emission, and/or optical variability properties in the database of the OGLE microlensing survey. The contaminating sources can be divided into 115 young stellar objects (YSOs), 17 planetary nebulae (PNe), 39 Be and 24 blue stars, 68 red stars, and 12 objects classed as either YSO/PN or blue star/YSO. There are also 402 targets with either featureless spectra or too low signal-to-noise ratios for source classification. Our quasar sample is 50% (30%) complete at I = 18.6 mag (19.3 mag). The newly discovered active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide many additional reference points for proper motion studies of the LMC, and the sample includes 10 bright AGNs (I < 18 mag) that are potentially suitable for absorption line studies. Their primary use, however, is for detailed studies of quasar variability, as they all have long-term, high cadence, continuously growing light curves from the microlensing surveys of the LMC. Completing the existing Magellanic Quasars Survey fields in the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud should yield a sample of {approx}700 well-monitored AGNs, and expanding it to the larger regions covered by the OGLE-IV survey should yield a sample of {approx}3600 AGNs.

  5. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Gerke, Jill; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: gerke@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.ca

    2012-06-15

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150 Degree-Sign in Galactic longitude and reaches 1 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  6. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. II. Survey description, results, and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.; Vigan, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Desidera, S.; Bonavita, M.; Mesa, D.; Boccaletti, A.; Buenzli, E.; Carson, J.; Delorme, P.; Hagelberg, J.; Montagnier, G.; Mordasini, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Segransan, D.; Thalmann, C.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Biller, B.; Covino, E.; Feldt, M.; Girard, J.; Gratton, R.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Messina, S.; Meyer, M.; Mouillet, D.; Moutou, C.; Reggiani, M.; Schlieder, J. E.; Zurlo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Young, nearby stars are ideal targets for direct imaging searches for giant planets and brown dwarf companions. After the first-imaged planet discoveries, vast efforts have been devoted to the statistical analysis of the occurence and orbital distributions of giant planets and brown dwarf companions at wide (≥5-6 AU) orbits. Aims: In anticipation of the VLT/SPHERE planet-imager, guaranteed-time programs, we have conducted a preparatory survey of 86 stars between 2009 and 2013 to identify new faint comoving companions to ultimately analyze the occurence of giant planets and brown dwarf companions at wide (10-2000 AU) orbits around young, solar-type stars. Methods: We used NaCo at VLT to explore the occurrence rate of giant planets and brown dwarfs between typically 0.1 and 8''. Diffraction-limited observations in H-band combined with angular differential imaging enabled us to reach primary star-companion brightness ratios as small as 10-6 at 1.5''. Repeated observations at several epochs enabled us to discriminate comoving companions from background objects. Results: During our survey, twelve systems were resolved as new binaries, including the discovery of a new white dwarf companion to the star HD 8049. Around 34 stars, at least one companion candidate was detected in the observed field of view. More than 400 faint sources were detected; 90% of them were in four crowded fields. With the exception of HD 8049 B, we did not identify any new comoving companions. The survey also led to spatially resolved images of the thin debris disk around HD 61005 that have been published earlier. Finally, considering the survey detection limits, we derive a preliminary upper limit on the frequency of giant planets for the semi-major axes of [10, 2000] AU: typically less than 15% between 100 and 500 AU and less than 10% between 50 and 500 AU for exoplanets that are more massive than 5 MJup and 10 MJup respectively, if we consider a uniform input distribution and a

  7. HERSCHEL/PACS SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN TAURUS/AURIGA—OBSERVATIONS OF [O I] AND [C II], AND FAR-INFRARED CONTINUUM

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Vacca, William D.; Duchêne, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Ménard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Thi, Wing-Fai; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Grady, Carol; Roberge, Aki; Kamp, Inga; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-10

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe ∼120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 μm, [O I] 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, OH, H{sub 2}O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 μm. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 μm line and the 63 μm continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 μm is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 μm emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 μm to [O I] 145 μm are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 μm and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  8. Herschel - PACS Survey Of Protoplanetary Disks In Taurus - Auriga Observations Of [O I] And [C Ii], And Far-Infrared Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Christian; Sandell, Goeran; Vacca, William D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Matthews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barbado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; Kamp, Inga; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Roberge, Aki; Thi,, Wing-Fai; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe approx. 120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 micron, [O I] 145 micron, [C II] 158, micron OH, H2O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 micron. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 micron line and the 63 micron continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 micron is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 micron emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 micron to [O I] 145 micron are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 micron and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  9. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-Ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the recently completed Chandra/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library of 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular (α ˜ 1.50 ± 0.07) to elliptical (˜1.21 ± 0.02), to spirals (˜0.80 ± 0.02), to peculiars (˜0.55 ± 0.30), and to irregulars (˜0.26 ± 0.10). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosities for different types of galaxies. A radial dependency is found for ellipticals, with a flatter XLF slope for sources located between D 25 and 2D 25, suggesting the XLF slopes in the outer region of early-type galaxies are dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters. This study shows that the ULX rate in early-type galaxies is 0.24 ± 0.05 ULXs per surveyed galaxy, on a 5σ confidence level. The XLF for ULXs in late-type galaxies extends smoothly until it drops abruptly around 4 × 1040 erg s-1, and this break may suggest a mild boundary between the stellar black hole population possibly including 30 M ⊙ black holes with super-Eddington radiation and intermediate mass black holes.

  10. Maternal nutritional status is inversely associated with lactational amenorrhea in Sub-Saharan Africa: results from demographic and health surveys II and III.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y K; Hight-Laukaran, V; Peterson, A E; Pérez-Escamilla, R

    1998-10-01

    Breast-feeding is positively associated with the duration of postpartum amenorrhea; thus it is a major determinant of fertility in countries where effective contraceptive methods are not widely available. The objective of these analyses was to examine the association between maternal nutritional status and lactational amenorrhea (LA) among breast-feeding women. Women who were not pregnant, who were breast-feeding, who were not using hormonal contraceptives and who had a child survey were included in the analyses. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine this association with the use of Demographic and Health Surveys data collected in seven Sub-Saharan African countries between 1990 and 1994. Analyses were adjusted for nine confounders, including breast-feeding behavior, child nutritional status and child age. Within-country analyses consistently showed the trend of low maternal body mass index (BMI) associated with a higher likelihood of being amenorrheic. Pooled analyses (n = 9839) were performed using two child age groups (<9 mo and 9-24 mo). The <9 mo pooled analysis showed that women with BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval: 1.6; 1.2-2.3) were more likely to remain amenorrheic at the time of the survey than their "better-nourished" counterparts. The 9-24 mo pooled analysis showed that the differential probability of being amenorrheic between undernourished and "better-nourished" women increased with time postpartum, where the adjusted difference in the median duration of amenorrhea associated with maternal nutritional status among breast-feeding women was 1.4 mo. These results suggest that maternal nutritional status plays an independent role in the return of ovulation after delivery.

  11. SURVEYING THE AGENTS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE TIDALLY STRIPPED, LOW METALLICITY SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD (SAGE-SMC). II. COOL EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Shiao, Bernie; Srinivasan, Sundar; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Kemper, F.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Whitney, Barbara; Hora, Joe; Robitaille, Thomas; Indebetouw, Remy; Sewilo, Marta

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the infrared (IR) properties of cool, evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), including the red giant branch (RGB) stars and the dust-producing red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program entitled 'Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity SMC', or SAGE-SMC. The survey includes, for the first time, full spatial coverage of the SMC bar, wing, and tail regions at IR wavelengths (3.6-160 {mu}m). We identify evolved stars using a combination of near-IR and mid-IR photometry and point out a new feature in the mid-IR color-magnitude diagram that may be due to particularly dusty O-rich AGB stars. We find that the RSG and AGB stars each contribute {approx}20% of the global SMC flux (extended + point-source) at 3.6 {mu}m, which emphasizes the importance of both stellar types to the integrated flux of distant metal-poor galaxies. The equivalent SAGE survey of the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC) allows us to explore the influence of metallicity on dust production. We find that the SMC RSG stars are less likely to produce a large amount of dust (as indicated by the [3.6] - [8] color). There is a higher fraction of carbon-rich stars in the SMC, and these stars appear to reach colors as red as their LMC counterparts, indicating that C-rich dust forms efficiently in both galaxies. A preliminary estimate of the dust production in AGB and RSG stars reveals that the extreme C-rich AGB stars dominate the dust input in both galaxies, and that the O-rich stars may play a larger role in the LMC than in the SMC.

  12. THE HIGH A{sub V} Quasar Survey: Reddened Quasi-Stellar Objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry. II

    SciTech Connect

    Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vestergaard, M.; Geier, S.; Venemans, B. P.; Ledoux, C.; Møller, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Kangas, T.; Pursimo, T.; Smirnova, O.; Saturni, F. G.

    2015-03-15

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the ones used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared (near-IR) color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 μm flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 μm relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-IR selection of red QSOs.

  13. Complications of foldable intraocular lenses requiring explantation or secondary intervention--2007 survey update.

    PubMed

    Mamalis, Nick; Brubaker, Jacob; Davis, Don; Espandar, Ladan; Werner, Liliana

    2008-09-01

    The tenth annual survey of complications associated with foldable intraocular lenses (IOLs) requiring explantation or secondary intervention was sent to members of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons. Preoperative data about visual acuity, patient signs and symptoms, and complications requiring IOL removal were evaluated. Complications were then tabulated for each of the following major foldable IOL groups: 1-piece (plate) silicone, 1-piece hydrophobic acrylic with haptics, 3-piece silicone, 3-piece hydrophobic acrylic, 3-piece hydrophilic acrylic (hydrogel), 3-piece unknown, multifocal acrylic, and multifocal silicone. One hundred forty-two surveys were returned for evaluation. Dislocation/decentration, incorrect IOL power, glare/optical aberrations, and IOL calcification were the most common reasons for removing foldable IOLs. Good surgical technique, accurate IOL power measurements, and high manufacturing standards for foldable IOL materials and designs are the most important factors in preventing complications.

  14. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: results from the first European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nikolaos; Hocini, Melece; Fauchier, Laurent; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Defaye, Pascal; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Estner, Heidi; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-11-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey collecting patient-based data on current clinical practices during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. The participating centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (from September to October 2014). A web-based case report form was employed to collect information of patients and data of procedures. A total of 455 eligible consecutive patients from 13 countries were enrolled (mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 28.8% women). Distinct strategies and endpoints were collected for AF ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was performed in 96.7% and served as the endpoint in 91.3% of procedures. A total of 52 (11.5%) patients underwent ablation as first-line therapy. The cryoballoon technique was employed in 31.4% of procedures. Procedure, ablation, and fluoroscopy times differed among various types of AF ablation. Divergences in patient selection and complications were observed among low-, medium-, and high-volume centres. Adverse events were observed in 4.6% of AF ablation procedures. In conclusion, PVI was still the main strategy for AF ablation. Procedure-related complications seemed not to have declined. The centre volume played an important role in patient selection, strategy choice, and had impact on the rate of periprocedural complication.

  15. A Wide Area Survey for High-Redshift Massive Galaxies. II. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of BzK-Selected Massive Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Masato; Arimoto, Nobuo; Daddi, Emanuele; Renzini, Alvio; Kong, Xu; Cimatti, Andrea; Broadhurst, Tom; Alexander, Dave M.

    2010-05-01

    Results are presented from near-infrared spectroscopic observations of a sample of BzK-selected, massive star-forming galaxies (sBzKs) at 1.5 < z < 2.3 that were obtained with OHS/CISCO at the Subaru telescope and with SINFONI at the Very Large Telescope. Among the 28 sBzKs observed, Hα emission was detected in 14 objects, and for 11 of them the [N II] λ6583 flux was also measured. Multiwavelength photometry was also used to derive stellar masses and extinction parameters, whereas Hα and [N II] emissions have allowed us to estimate star formation rates (SFRs), metallicities, ionization mechanisms, and dynamical masses. In order to enforce agreement between SFRs from Hα with those derived from rest-frame UV and mid-infrared, additional obscuration for the emission lines (that originate in H II regions) was required compared to the extinction derived from the slope of the UV continuum. We have also derived the stellar mass-metallicity relation, as well as the relation between stellar mass and specific SFR (SSFR), and compared them to the results in other studies. At a given stellar mass, the sBzKs appear to have been already enriched to metallicities close to those of local star-forming galaxies of similar mass. The sBzKs presented here tend to have higher metallicities compared to those of UV-selected galaxies, indicating that near-infrared selected galaxies tend to be a chemically more evolved population. The sBzKs show SSFRs that are systematically higher, by up to ~2 orders of magnitude, compared to those of local galaxies of the same mass. The empirical correlations between stellar mass and metallicity, and stellar mass and SSFR are then compared with those of evolutionary population synthesis models constructed either with the simple closed-box assumption, or within an infall scenario. Within the assumptions that are built-in such models, it appears that a short timescale for the star formation (sime100 Myr) and large initial gas mass appear to be required

  16. Photometric and Spectroscopic Survey of the Cluster [DBS2003] 156 Associated with the H II Region G331.1-0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, M. C.; Ortiz, R.; Abraham, Z.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2016-05-01

    The Norma section of the Milky Way is especially interesting because it crosses three spiral arms: Sagittarius-Carina, Scutum-Crux and the Norma arm itself. Distance determinations of embedded young stellar clusters can contribute to define the spiral structure in this part of the Galaxy. However, spectrophotometric distances were obtained for only a few of these clusters in Norma. We present a photometric and spectroscopic study in the NIR of the [DBS2003] 156 stellar cluster, associated with the H II region G331.1-0.5. We aim to find the ionizing sources of the H II region and determine its distance. The cluster was observed in the J, H, and {K}{{s}} bands and eight potential massive stars were chosen among the detected sources according to color criteria; subsequent spectroscopy of these candidates was performed with the Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrometer spectrograph attached to the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research 4.1 m telescope. We identified and classified spectroscopically four early-type stars: IRS 176 (O8 V), IRS 308 (O-type), IRS 310 (O6 V), and IRS 71 (B1 Iab). Based on the proximity of IRS 176 and 308 with the radio continuum emission peaks and their relative positions with respect to the warm dust mid-infrared emission, we concluded that these two stars are the main ionizing sources of the H ii region G331.1-0.5. The mean spectrophotometric distance of IRS 176 and 310 of 3.38 ± 0.58 kpc is similar to that obtained in a previous work for two early-type stars of the neighbor cluster [DBS2003] 157 of 3.29 ± 0.58 kpc. The narrow range of radial velocities of radio sources in the area of the clusters [DBS2003] 156 and 157 and their similar visual extinction indicate that these clusters are physically associated. A common distance of 3.34 ± 0.34 kpc is derived for the system [DBS2003] 156 and 157. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR), a joint project of the Ministério de Ci

  17. A history of the Water Resources Branch of the United States Geological Survey: volume 4, years of World War II, July 1, 1939 to June 30, 1947

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Follansbee, Robert

    1939-01-01

    This period extends from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1947, and is called the years of World War II, although it was not until December 1941 that the United States entered the war which began in Europe in September 1939. By the beginning of the period, it was evident that this country might be drawn into the conflict and a rearmament program including the draft act , effective in September 1940, was started and prosecuted vigorously prior to December 1941, when the attack on Pearl Harbor forced us into the war. Although the war was not officially ended by June 1947, President Truman proclaimed the end of hostilities on December 31, 1946, thus terminating some of his war-time powers, and by further action terminated other war-time powers as of June 30, 1947.

  18. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO distant cluster survey (EDisCS). II.. Redshifts, velocity dispersions, and substructure for clusters in the last 15 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milvang-Jensen, B.; Noll, S.; Halliday, C.; Poggianti, B. M.; Jablonka, P.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Nowak, N.; von der Linden, A.; De Lucia, G.; Pelló, R.; Moustakas, J.; Poirier, S.; Bamford, S. P.; Clowe, D. I.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Rudnick, G. H.; Simard, L.; White, S. D. M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2008-05-01

    Aims: We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 15 survey fields as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We determine the redshifts and velocity dispersions of the galaxy clusters located in these fields, and we test for possible substructure in the clusters. Methods: We obtained multi-object mask spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the VLT. We reduced the data with particular attention to the sky subtraction. We implemented the method of Kelson for performing sky subtraction prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data. From the measured galaxy redshifts, we determine cluster velocity dispersions using the biweight estimator and test for possible substructure in the clusters using the Dressler-Shectman test. Results: The method of subtracting the sky prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data delivers photon-noise-limited results, whereas the traditional method of subtracting the sky after the data have been rebinned/interpolated results in substantially larger noise for spectra from tilted slits. Redshifts for individual galaxies are presented and redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for 21 galaxy clusters. For the 9 clusters with at least 20 spectroscopically confirmed members, we present the statistical significance of the presence of substructure obtained from the Dressler-Shectman test, and substructure is detected in two of the clusters. Conclusions: Together with data from our previous paper, spectroscopy and spectroscopic velocity dispersions are now available for 26 EDisCS clusters with redshifts in the range 0.40-0.96 and velocity dispersions in the range 166 km s-1-1080 km s-1. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, as part of large programme 166.A-0162 (the ESO Distant Cluster Survey). Full Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/482/419

  19. Distant Cluster Hunting. II; A Comparison of X-Ray and Optical Cluster Detection Techniques and Catalogs from the ROSAT Optical X-Ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan; Scharf, Caleb A.; Mack, Jennifer; Lee, Y. Paul; Postman, Marc; Rosait, Piero; Dickinson, Mark; Voit, G. Mark; Stocke, John T.

    2002-01-01

    We present and analyze the optical and X-ray catalogs of moderate-redshift cluster candidates from the ROSA TOptical X-Ray Survey, or ROXS. The survey covers the sky area contained in the fields of view of 23 deep archival ROSA T PSPC pointings, 4.8 square degrees. The cross-correlated cluster catalogs were con- structed by comparing two independent catalogs extracted from the optical and X-ray bandpasses, using a matched-filter technique for the optical data and a wavelet technique for the X-ray data. We cross-identified cluster candidates in each catalog. As reported in Paper 1, the matched-filter technique found optical counter- parts for at least 60% (26 out of 43) of the X-ray cluster candidates; the estimated redshifts from the matched filter algorithm agree with at least 7 of 1 1 spectroscopic confirmations (Az 5 0.10). The matched filter technique. with an imaging sensitivity of ml N 23, identified approximately 3 times the number of candidates (155 candidates, 142 with a detection confidence >3 u) found in the X-ray survey of nearly the same area. There are 57 X-ray candidates, 43 of which are unobscured by scattered light or bright stars in the optical images. Twenty-six of these have fairly secure optical counterparts. We find that the matched filter algorithm, when applied to images with galaxy flux sensitivities of mI N 23, is fairly well-matched to discovering z 5 1 clusters detected by wavelets in ROSAT PSPC exposures of 8000-60,000 s. The difference in the spurious fractions between the optical and X-ray (30%) and IO%, respectively) cannot account for the difference in source number. In Paper I, we compared the optical and X-ray cluster luminosity functions and we found that the luminosity functions are consistent if the relationship between X-ray and optical luminosities is steep (Lx o( L&f). Here, in Paper 11, we present the cluster catalogs and a numerical simulation of the ROXS. We also present color-magnitude plots for several of the cluster

  20. The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. II. Rest-frame Near-IR Luminosity Distribution and Evidence for a Near-solar Metallicity Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, D. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Hjorth, J.; Laskar, T.; Berger, E.; Chary, R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Schulze, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present rest-frame near-IR (NIR) luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly selected population of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and we determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find a rapid increase in the characteristic NIR host luminosity between z ˜ 0.5 and z ˜ 1.5, but little variation between z ˜ 1.5 and z ˜ 5. Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their interstellar medium. Comparing our luminosity distributions with field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass-metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously reported “excess” in the GRB rate beyond z ≳ 2 metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z < 1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be small at z < 4.

  1. THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEY OF THE ORION A AND B MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF DUSTY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Megeath, S. T.; Kryukova, E.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Hora, J. L.; Myers, P. C.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.; Flaherty, K.; Hartmann, L.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.

    2016-01-15

    We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc{sup −2} to over 10,000 pc{sup −2}, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc{sup −2}, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ∼2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.

  2. Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP). II. IRAC-detected Lyman-Break Galaxies at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 behind Strong-lensing Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Bradač, Maruša; Lemaux, Brian C.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Hoag, Austin; Castellano, Marco; Amorín, Ricardo; Fontana, Adriano; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cain, Benjamin; Lubin, L. M.; Merlin, Emiliano; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Schrabback, Tim; Treu, Tommaso; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; von der Linden, Anja; Knight, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program. Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 17 galaxy candidates at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 from Hubble Space Telescope images (including the full-depth images from the Hubble Frontier Fields program for MACS 1149 and MACS 0717) that have detections at signal-to-noise ratios ≥ 3 in at least one of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of ˜1.2-5.5. Due to the magnification of the foreground galaxy clusters, the rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M1600 are between -21.2 and -18.9 mag, while their intrinsic stellar masses are between 2 × 108M⊙ and 2.9 × 109M⊙. We identify two Lyα emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at zLyα = 6.76 (in RXJ 1347) and one at zLyα = 6.32 (in MACS 0454). We find that 4 out of 17 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates are favored by z ≲ 1 solutions when IRAC fluxes are included in photometric redshift fitting. We also show that IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies which likely have strong nebular emission lines or obscured active galactic nucleus contributions within certain redshift windows.

  3. SPITZER ULTRA FAINT SURVEY PROGRAM (SURFS UP). II. IRAC-DETECTED LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AT 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 BEHIND STRONG-LENSING CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Bradač, Maruša; Hoag, Austin; Cain, Benjamin; Lubin, L. M.; Knight, Robert I.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Castellano, Marco; Amorin, Ricardo; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Schrabback, Tim; Treu, Tommaso; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Linden, Anja von der E-mail: astrokuang@gmail.com

    2016-01-20

    We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program. Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 17 galaxy candidates at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 from Hubble Space Telescope images (including the full-depth images from the Hubble Frontier Fields program for MACS 1149 and MACS 0717) that have detections at signal-to-noise ratios  ≥ 3 in at least one of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of ∼1.2–5.5. Due to the magnification of the foreground galaxy clusters, the rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M{sub 1600} are between −21.2 and −18.9 mag, while their intrinsic stellar masses are between 2 × 10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙} and 2.9 × 10{sup 9}M{sub ⊙}. We identify two Lyα emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at z{sub Lyα} = 6.76 (in RXJ 1347) and one at z{sub Lyα} = 6.32 (in MACS 0454). We find that 4 out of 17 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates are favored by z ≲ 1 solutions when IRAC fluxes are included in photometric redshift fitting. We also show that IRAC [3.6]–[4.5] color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies which likely have strong nebular emission lines or obscured active galactic nucleus contributions within certain redshift windows.

  4. Herschel Observations of Extraordinary Sources: Analysi sof the HIFI 1.2 THz Wide Spectral Survey toward Orion KL II. Chemical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Favre, C.; Blake, G. A.; Herbst, E.; Anderson, D. E.; Hassel, G. E.

    2015-06-01

    We present chemical implications arising from spectral models fit to the Herschel/HIFI spectral survey toward the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL). We focus our discussion on the eight complex organics detected within the HIFI survey utilizing a novel technique to identify those molecules emitting in the hottest gas. In particular, we find the complex nitrogen bearing species CH3CN, C2H3CN, C2H5CN, and NH2CHO systematically trace hotter gas than the oxygen bearing organics CH3OH, C2H5OH, CH3OCH3, and CH3OCHO, which do not contain nitrogen. If these complex species form predominantly on grain surfaces, this may indicate N-bearing organics are more difficult to remove from grain surfaces than O-bearing species. Another possibility is that hot (Tkin ∼ 300 K) gas phase chemistry naturally produces higher complex cyanide abundances while suppressing the formation of O-bearing complex organics. We compare our derived rotation temperatures and molecular abundances to chemical models, which include gas-phase and grain surface pathways. Abundances for a majority of the detected complex organics can be reproduced over timescales ≳105 years, with several species being underpredicted by less than 3σ. Derived rotation temperatures for most organics, furthermore, agree reasonably well with the predicted temperatures at peak abundance. We also find that sulfur bearing molecules that also contain oxygen (i.e., SO, SO2, and OCS) tend to probe the hottest gas toward Orion KL, indicating the formation pathways for these species are most efficient at high temperatures. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  5. THE SWIFT GRB HOST GALAXY LEGACY SURVEY. II. REST-FRAME NEAR-IR LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTION AND EVIDENCE FOR A NEAR-SOLAR METALLICITY THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krühler, T.; Laskar, T.; Berger, E.; Chary, R.; Postigo, A. de Ugarte; Michałowski, M. J.; Schulze, S.

    2016-01-20

    We present rest-frame near-IR (NIR) luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly selected population of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and we determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find a rapid increase in the characteristic NIR host luminosity between z ∼ 0.5 and z ∼ 1.5, but little variation between z ∼ 1.5 and z ∼ 5. Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their interstellar medium. Comparing our luminosity distributions with field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass–metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously reported “excess” in the GRB rate beyond z ≳ 2; metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z < 1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be small at z < 4.

  6. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. II. the Bright End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ≈ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ˜ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ˜ 5. Combining our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ˜ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range of 4.7 ≤ z < 5.4 and -29 < M 1450 ≤ -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/V a method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as α = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope β = -3.58 ± 0.24 and a fainter break magnitude {M}1450* = -26.98 ± 0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution model. Using the best-fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ˜ 5 is found to be 18%-45% with a clumping factor C of 2-5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.

  7. The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Orion A and B Molecular Clouds. II. The Spatial Distribution and Demographics of Dusty Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Kryukova, E.; Hora, J. L.; Allen, L. E.; Flaherty, K.; Hartmann, L.; Myers, P. C.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc-2 to over 10,000 pc-2, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc-2, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ˜2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.

  8. Survey design and observations relating to cancer education funding. Cancer Education Survey II: cancer education in United States medical schools (conducted by The American Association for Cancer Education with the support of the American Cancer Society).

    PubMed

    Bakemeier, R F; Kupchella, C E; Chamberlain, R M; Gallagher, R E; O'Donnell, J F; Parker, J A; Hill, G J; Brooks, C M

    1992-01-01

    A survey has been conducted of cancer education programs for medical students in United States medical schools by the American Association for Cancer Education with grant support from the Department of Detection and Treatment of the American Cancer Society (formerly the Professional Education Department). Two questionnaires were used, an Educational Resources Questionnaire (ERQ), which 126 of the 128 medical schools completed and returned, and a Faculty and Curriculum Questionnaire (FCQ), which was completed and returned by 1,035 faculty members who had been named as active in undergraduate medical student cancer education by respondents in each school who had been designated by the Dean's Office to complete the ERQ. Overall conclusions included: (1) increased coordination of cancer education activities is a major need in many schools; (2) there is widespread interest in the further development of cancer education objectives; (3) development of a national cancer education curriculum is needed; (4) there is interest in the development of improved instructional materials and methods; (5) development of evaluation methods is needed for cancer education programs; and (6) an ongoing funding process is needed to provide support for interdepartmental coordination of cancer education activities. Cancer prevention and detection topics were ranked above cancer treatment in plans for future curriculum emphasis. More detailed conclusions and recommendations are provided in this publication and three subsequent articles in this issue of the Journal of Cancer Education.

  9. THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AGNs. II. HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector; Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L.

    2011-01-10

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS broad-line AGNs with SDSS luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16 < z < 0.36 that was calculated in Paper I. In our HOD modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a 'typical' AGN host halo mass, M{sub h}, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M{sub h} more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper limit to the slope ({alpha}) of the AGN HOD that is far below unity. The other two models have a central component, which has a step function form, where the HOD is constant above a minimum mass, without (Model B) or with (Model C) an upper mass cutoff, in addition to the truncated power-law satellite component, similar to the HOD that is found for galaxies. In these two models we find that the upper limits on {alpha} are still below unity, with {alpha} {approx}< 0.95 and {alpha} {approx}< 0.84 for Models B and C, respectively. Our analysis suggests that the satellite AGN occupation increases slower than, or may even decrease with, M{sub h}, in contrast to the satellite HODs of luminosity-threshold samples of galaxies, which, in contrast, grow approximately as (N{sub s}) {proportional_to} M{sup {alpha}}{sub h} with {alpha} {approx} 1. These results are consistent with observations that the AGN fraction in groups and clusters

  10. THE COOL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. GAS CONTENT IN THE VOLUME-LIMITED SAMPLE AND RESULTS FROM THE COMBINED ELLIPTICAL AND LENTICULAR SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Gary A.; Sage, Leslie J.; Young, Lisa M. E-mail: lsage@astro.umd.ed

    2010-12-10

    We report new observations of atomic and molecular gas in a volume-limited sample of elliptical galaxies. Combining the elliptical sample with an earlier and similar lenticular one, we show that cool gas detection rates are very similar among low-luminosity E and S0 galaxies but are much higher among luminous S0s. Using the combined sample we revisit the correlation between cool gas mass and blue luminosity which emerged from our lenticular survey, finding strong support for previous claims that the molecular gas in ellipticals and lenticulars has different origins. Unexpectedly, however, and contrary to earlier claims, the same is not true for atomic gas. We speculate that both the active galactic nucleus feedback and merger paradigms might offer explanations for differences in detection rates, and might also point toward an understanding of why the two gas phases could follow different evolutionary paths in Es and S0s. Finally, we present a new and puzzling discovery concerning the global mix of atomic and molecular gas in early-type galaxies. Atomic gas comprises a greater fraction of the cool interstellar medium in more gas-rich galaxies, a trend which can be plausibly explained. The puzzle is that galaxies tend to cluster around molecular-to-atomic gas mass ratios near either 0.05 or 0.5.

  11. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of galactic globular clusters - II. The seven stellar populations of NGC 7089 (M2)⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Anderson, J.; Renzini, A.; King, I. R.; Bellini, A.; Brown, T. M.; Cassisi, S.; D'Antona, F.; Jerjen, H.; Nardiello, D.; Salaris, M.; Marel, R. P. van der; Vesperini, E.; Yong, D.; Aparicio, A.; Sarajedini, A.; Zoccali, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present high-precision multiband photometry for the globular cluster (GC) M2. We combine the analysis of the photometric data obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic GCs GO-13297, with chemical abundances by Yong et al., and compare the photometry with models in order to analyse the multiple stellar sequences we identified in the colour-magnitude diagram. We find three main stellar components, composed of metal-poor, metal-intermediate, and metal-rich stars (hereafter referred to as population A, B, and C, respectively). The components A and B include stars with different s-process element abundances. They host six sub-populations with different light-element abundances, and exhibit an internal variation in helium up to ΔY ˜ 0.07 dex. In contrast with M22, another cluster characterized by the presence of populations with different metallicities, M2 contains a third stellar component, C, which shows neither evidence for sub-populations nor an internal spread in light-elements. Population C does not exhibit the typical photometric signatures that are associated with abundance variations of light elements produced by hydrogen burning at hot temperatures. We compare M2 with other GCs with intrinsic heavy-element variations and conclude that M2 resembles M22, but it includes an additional stellar component that makes it more similar to the central region of the Sagittarius galaxy, which hosts a GC (M54) and the nucleus of the Sagittarius galaxy itself.

  12. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIRS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. II. EVIDENCE FOR TIDALLY ENHANCED STAR FORMATION AND BLACK HOLE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Shen Yue; Strauss, Michael A.

    2012-01-20

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are occasionally seen in pairs, suggesting that tidal encounters are responsible for the accretion of material by both central supermassive black holes (BHs). In Paper I of this series, we selected a sample of AGN pairs with projected separations r{sub p} < 100 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc and velocity offsets <600 km s{sup -1} from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and quantified their frequency. In this paper, we address the BH accretion and recent star formation properties in their host galaxies. AGN pairs experience stronger BH accretion, as measured by their [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosities (corrected for contribution from star formation) and Eddington ratios, than do control samples of single AGNs matched in redshift and host-galaxy stellar mass. Their host galaxies have stronger post-starburst activity and younger mean stellar ages, as indicated by stronger H{delta} absorption and smaller 4000 A break in their spectra. The BH accretion and recent star formation in the host galaxies both increase with decreasing projected separation in AGN pairs, for r{sub p} {approx}< 10-30 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc. The intensity of BH accretion, the post-starburst strength, and the mean stellar ages are correlated between the two AGNs in a pair. The luminosities and Eddington ratios of AGN pairs are correlated with recent star formation in their host galaxies, with a scaling relation consistent with that observed in single AGNs. Our results suggest that galaxy tidal interactions enhance both BH accretion and host-galaxy star formation in close AGN pairs, even though the majority of low-redshift AGNs are not coincident with on-going interactions.

  13. Seismic, side-scan survey, diving, and coring data analyzed by a Macintosh II sup TM computer and inexpensive software provide answers to a possible offshore extension of landslides at Palos Verdes Peninsula, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, R.F. ); Slosson, J.E. ); McEachen, D.B. )

    1990-05-01

    A Macintosh II{sup TM} computer and commercially available software were used to analyze and depict the topography, construct an isopach sediment thickness map, plot core positions, and locate the geology of an offshore area facing an active landslide on the southern side of Palos Verdes Peninsula California. Profile data from side scan sonar, 3.5 kHz, and Boomer subbottom, high-resolution seismic, diving, echo sounder traverses, and cores - all controlled with a mini Ranger II navigation system - were placed in MacGridzo{sup TM} and WingZ{sup TM} software programs. The computer-plotted data from seven sources were used to construct maps with overlays for evaluating the possibility of a shoreside landslide extending offshore. The poster session describes the offshore survey system and demonstrates the development of the computer data base, its placement into the MacGridzo{sup TM} gridding program, and transfer of gridded navigational locations to the WingZ{sup TM} data base and graphics program. Data will be manipulated to show how sea-floor features are enhanced and how isopach data were used to interpret the possibility of landslide displacement and Holocene sea level rise. The software permits rapid assessment of data using computerized overlays and a simple, inexpensive means of constructing and evaluating information in map form and the preparation of final written reports. This system could be useful in many other areas where seismic profiles, precision navigational locations, soundings, diver observations, and core provide a great volume of information that must be compared on regional plots to develop of field maps for geological evaluation and reports.

  14. Submarine canyon development in the Izu-Bonin forearc: A SeaMARC II and seismic survey of Aoga Shima Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Adam; Taylor, Brian

    1991-05-01

    SeaMARC II sidescan (imagery and bathymetry) and seismic data reveal the morphology, sedimentary processes, and structural controls on submarine canyon development in the central Izu-Bonin forearc, south of Japan. Canyons extend up to 150 km across the forearc from the trench-slope break to the active volcanic arc. The canyons are most deeply incised (1200 1700 m) into the gentle gradients (1 2°) upslope on the outer arc high (OAH) and lose bathymetric expression on the steep (6 18°) inner trench-slope. The drainage patterns indicate that canyons are formed by both headward erosion and downcutting. Headward erosion proceeds on two scales. Initially, pervasive small-scale mass wasting creates curvilinear channels and pinnate drainage patterns. Large-scale slumping, evidenced by abundant crescent-shaped scarps along the walls and tributaries of Aoga Shima Canyon, occurs only after a channel is present, and provides a mechanism for canyon branching. The largest slump has removed >16 km3 of sediment from an ˜85 km2 area of seafloor bounded by scarps more than 200 m high and may be in the initial stages of forming a new canyon branch. The northern branch of Aoga Shima Canyon has eroded upslope to the flanks of the arc volcanoes allowing direct tapping of this volcaniclastic sediment source. Headward erosion of the southern branch is not as advanced but the canyon may capture sediments supplied by unconfined (non-channelized) mass flows. Oligocene forearc sedimentary processes were dominated by unconfined mass flows that created sub-parallel and continuous sedimentary sequences. Pervasive channel cut-and-fill is limited to the Neogene forearc sedimentary sequences which are characterized by migrating and unconformable seismic sequences. Extensive canyon formation permitting sediment bypassing of the forearc by canyon-confined mass flows began in the early Miocene after the basin was filled to the spill points of the OAH. Structural lows in the OAH determined the

  15. The SWELLS survey - II. Breaking the disc-halo degeneracy in the spiral galaxy gravitational lens SDSS J2141-0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.; Brewer, Brendon J.; Marshall, Philip J.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Koo, David C.; Bolton, Adam S.; Holden, Bradford P.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.

    2011-11-01

    The degeneracy among the disc, bulge and halo contributions to galaxy rotation curves prevents an understanding of the distribution of baryons and dark matter in disc galaxies. In an attempt to break this degeneracy, we present an analysis of the strong gravitational lens SDSS J2141-0001, discovered as part of the Sloan Lens ACS survey. The lens galaxy is a high-inclination, disc-dominated system. We present new Hubble Space Telescope multicolour imaging, gas and stellar kinematics data derived from long-slit spectroscopy and K-band laser guide star adaptive optics imaging, both from the Keck telescopes. We model the galaxy as a sum of concentric axisymmetric bulge, disc and halo components and infer the contribution of each component, using information from gravitational lensing and gas kinematics. This analysis yields a best-fitting total (disc plus bulge) stellar mass of log10(M*/M⊙) = 10.99+0.11- 0.25. The photometric data combined with stellar population synthesis models yield log10(M*/M⊙) = 10.97 ± 0.07 and 11.21 ± 0.07 for the Chabrier and Salpeter initial mass functions (IMFs), respectively. Assuming no cold gas, a Salpeter IMF is marginally disfavoured, with a Bayes factor of 2.7. Accounting for the expected gas fraction of ≃ 20 per cent reduces the lensing plus kinematics stellar mass by 0.10 ± 0.05 dex, resulting in a Bayes factor of 11.9 in favour of a Chabrier IMF. The dark matter halo is roughly spherical, with minor to major axis ratio q3, h= 0.91+0.15- 0.13. The dark matter halo has a maximum circular velocity of Vmax= 276+17- 18 km s-1, and a central density parameter of log10ΔV/2= 5.9+0.9- 0.5. This is higher than predicted for uncontracted dark matter haloes in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies, log10ΔV/2= 5.2, suggesting that either the halo has contracted in response to galaxy formation, or that the halo has a higher than average concentration. Larger samples of spiral galaxy strong gravitational lenses are needed in order to

  16. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  17. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  18. A Multi-Target Survey. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    The functional variations of the eigenvalues were (d) The filter processed measurements from the senor found to be relatively smooth and...doppler differ- I3I I . S. Meditch . Stcatiac Vpinwt Loiwer Lsrr.,aeraoa d Cos- enc mediurensents. had disappeared. trut. McGraw-Hill, 1%19 Tha ue was

  19. Acoustic tensometry. II - Methods and apparatus /survey/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrenko, V. M.; Kutsenko, A. N.; Sheremetikov, A. S.

    1981-08-01

    Acoustic methods for determining the stress-strain state of a solid are analyzed; the methods are based on the results obtained in a previous article on acoustic tensometry (Bobrenko et al., 1980), as well as other literature and patent information on the subject. The analysis, relevant to factory conditions, is broken down into a study of three methods: (1) the measurement of absolute propagation times of ultrasonic space waves; (2) the measurement of absolute velocities of Rayleigh waves; and (3) the measurement of acoustic anisotrophy. Features of the acoustic and electronic units, and the demands imposed on the transducers are also considered. Practical recommendations are given for using the acoustic methods, depending on the relative dimensions of the testpieces.

  20. Acoustic tensometry. II - Methods and apparatus /survey/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrenko, V. M.; Kutsenko, A. N.; Sheremetikov, A. S.

    1980-12-01

    Acoustic methods for determining the stress-strain state of a solid are analyzed; the methods are based on the results obtained in a previous article on acoustic tensometry (Bobrenko et al., 1980), as well as other literature and patent information on the subject. The analysis, relevant to factory conditions, is broken down into a study of three methods: (1) the measurement of absolute propagation times of ultrasonic space waves; (2) the measurement of absolute velocities of Rayleigh waves; and (3) the measurement of acoustic anisotrophy. Features of the acoustic and electronic units, and the demands imposed on the transducers are also considered. Practical recommendations are given for using the acoustic methods, depending on the relative dimensions of the testpieces.

  1. A Survey of Secondary School Students' Perceptions of and Attitudes Toward Use of Drugs by Teenagers. Part I, Part II, Part III.; A Survey of Secondary School Teachers' Perceptions of the Role of the Schools in Dealing with Teenage Drug Use. A General Overview of Survey Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Three volumes report the findings of a student survey among a random sample of 2,777 junior high and senior high school students. Volume one presents the overall findings: the typical student believes that drug use and experimentation are not common, except for marihuana, alcohol, cigarettes, and glue; believes that drug use is increasing; is not…

  2. A Method of Identifying AGNs Based on Emission-Line Excess and the Nature of Low-Luminosity AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. II. The Nature of Low-Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a new method of identifying active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and studied the nature of low-luminosity AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This is the latter part of a series of papers in which we consider correlations between the AGN activities and the host-galaxy properties. Based on a sample of AGNs identified by a new method developed in the former part (2012, PASJ, 64, 36), we found that AGNs typically show extinction of τV = 1.2, and exhibit a wide range of ionization levels. The finding of ionization levels motivated us to use [O II] + [O III] as an indicator of AGN power. We found that AGNs are preferentially located in massive, red, early-type galaxies. Taking into account a selection bias of the Oxygen-excess method, we showed that strong AGNs are located in active star-forming galaxies, and that rapidly growing super-massive black holes are located in rapidly growing galaxies, which clearly shows the coevolution of super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. This is a surprising phenomenon, given that the growths of black holes and host galaxies occur on their respective physical scales which are very different. Interestingly, the AGN power does not strongly correlate with the host-galaxy mass. It seems that the mass works as a ``switch'' for activating AGNs. The absence of AGNs in low-mass galaxies might be due to the absence of super-massive black holes there, but a dedicated observation of the nuclear region of nearby low-mass galaxies would be necessary to obtain a deeper insight into it.

  3. Helium II level measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  4. A Southern Hemisphere ammonia survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. L.; Forster, J. R.; Gardner, F. F.; Whiteoak, J. B.; Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1986-01-01

    A spectral line survey for interstellar NH3 is being carried out using the 64-m telescopes at Parkes and Tidbinbilla. Both telescopes are equipped with K-band maser receivers yielding system temperatures below 100 K. The preliminary survey is being made with the Parkes antenna (beam = 1.35 arcmin), with follow-up mapping of the more interesting sources at Tidbinbilla (beam = 0.9 arcmin). The selected sources have in general been H II regions from the H2CO surveys made at Parkes. Statistical results from initial observations of the (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines in the preliminary survey are presented.

  5. Sanitary Surveys

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sanitary survey is on-site review of a public water system’s water source, facilities, equipment, operation, and maintenance. Surveys point out sanitary deficiencies and assess a system’s capability to supply safe drinking water.

  6. "Suntelligence" Survey

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  7. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Theory Survey or Survey Theory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Matthew Moore's survey of political theorists in U.S. American colleges and universities is an impressive contribution to political science (Moore 2010). It is the first such survey of political theory as a subfield, the response rate is very high, and the answers to the survey questions provide new information about how political theorists look…

  9. Survey of the Schools of Wilmington, Delaware. Part 1: I. The Educational Background; II. School Organization, Supervision, and Finance; III. A School Building Program for Wilmington. Bulletin, 1921, No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1921

    1921-01-01

    During March of 1920, by resolution of the Board of Education of Wilmington, Delaware, a committee of 30 citizens of the city was appointed to make a survey of the public schools and of the system of education of the city. The executive committee was directed to prepare a plan or program to be followed in making the investigation and survey and to…

  10. SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C J

    1954-01-19

    This pulse-type survey instrument is suitable for readily detecting {alpha} particles in the presence of high {beta} and {gamma} backgrounds. The instruments may also be used to survey for neutrons, {beta} particles and {gamma} rays by employing suitably designed interchangeable probes and selecting an operating potential to correspond to the particular probe.

  11. Survey report of NOAA Ship McArthur II cruises AR-04-04, AR-05-05 and AR-06-03: habitat classification of side scan sonar imagery in support of deep-sea coral/sponge explorations at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Intelmann, Steven S.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Bowlby, C. Edward; Brancato, Mary Sue; Hyland, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Habitat mapping and characterization has been defined as a high-priority management issue for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS), especially for poorly known deep-sea habitats that may be sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance. As a result, a team of scientists from OCNMS, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), and other partnering institutions initiated a series of surveys to assess the distribution of deep-sea coral/sponge assemblages within the sanctuary and to look for evidence of potential anthropogenic impacts in these critical habitats. Initial results indicated that remotely delineating areas of hard bottom substrate through acoustic sensing could be a useful tool to increase the efficiency and success of subsequent ROV-based surveys of the associated deep-sea fauna. Accordingly, side scan sonar surveys were conducted in May 2004, June 2005, and April 2006 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur II to: (1) obtain additional imagery of the seafloor for broader habitat-mapping coverage of sanctuary waters, and (2) help delineate suitable deep-sea coral-sponge habitat, in areas of both high and low commercial-fishing activities, to serve as sites for surveying-in more detail using an ROV on subsequent cruises, Several regions of the sea floor throughout the OCNMS were surveyed and mosaicked at 1-meter pixel resolution. Imagery from the side scan sonar mapping efforts was integrated with other complementary data from a towed camera sled, ROVs, sedentary samples, and bathymetry records to describe geological and biological (where possible) aspects of habitat. Using a hierarchical deep-water marine benthic classification scheme (Greene et al. 1999), we created a preliminary map of various habitat polygon features for use in a geographical information system (GIS). This report provides a description of the mapping and groundtruthing efforts as well as results of the image classification procedure for each of the areas surveyed.

  12. A survey of ultraviolet interstellar absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Jenkins, E. B.; Spitzer, L., Jr.; York, D. G.; Hill, J. K.; Savage, B. D.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A telescope-spectrometer on the Copernicus spacecraft made possible the measurement of many ultraviolet absorption lines produced by the interstellar gas. The present survey provides data on ultraviolet absorption lines in the spectra of 88 early-type stars. The stars observed are divided into four classes, including reddened stars, unreddened bright stars, moderately reddened bright stars, and unreddened and moderately reddened faint stars. Data are presented for equivalent width, W, radial velocity V, and rms line width, D, taking into account some 10 to 20 lines of N I, O I, Si II, P II, S II, Cl I, Cl II, Mn II, Fe II, Ni II, Cu II, and H2. The data are based on multiple scans for each line. Attention is given to details of observations, the data reduction procedure, and the computation of equivalent width, mean velocity, and velocity dispersion.

  13. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  14. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  15. Children's Reading Interests: A Wellington Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elley, Warwick B.; Tolley, Cyril W.

    This survey of children's reading interests in New Zealand, conducted in 1969, sought to discover which books, writers, magazines, and comics children read; what determines their choices; what they look for in a book; and where they obtain their reading material. A cross section of children was surveyed at four class levels from Standard II to…

  16. Luminosity function of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, KwangHo; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-11-01

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [O II] emission line luminosity L([O II]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [O II] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([O II]) = 1043.0 erg s-1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [O II] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([O II]) = 1041.6 erg s-1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [O II] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [O II] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from -3 to -2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)-1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ˜3(z + 1)-1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [O III] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Finally, we show that the auto-correlation function of [O II] and [O III] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  17. Surveying System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Sunrise Geodetic Surveys are setting up their equipment for a town survey. Their equipment differs from conventional surveying systems that employ transit rod and chain to measure angles and distances. They are using ISTAC Inc.'s Model 2002 positioning system, which offers fast accurate surveying with exceptional signals from orbiting satellites. The special utility of the ISTAC Model 2002 is that it can provide positioning of the highest accuracy from Navstar PPS signals because it requires no knowledge of secret codes. It operates by comparing the frequency and time phase of a Navstar signal arriving at one ISTAC receiver with the reception of the same set of signals by another receiver. Data is computer processed and translated into three dimensional position data - latitude, longitude and elevation.

  18. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  19. Measuring disability across cultures — the psychometric properties of the WHODAS II in older people from seven low- and middle-income countries. The 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Renata M; Dewey, Michael E; Acosta, Daisy; Jotheeswaran, AT; Castro-Costa, Erico; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, KS; Pichardo, Juana Guillermina Rodriguez; Ramírez, Nayeli Garcia; Rodriguez, Juan Llibre; Rodriguez, Marina Calvo; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph; Prince, Martin J

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the 12-item interviewer-administered screener version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule – version II (WHODAS II) among older people living in seven low- and middle-income countries. Principal component analysis (PCA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Mokken analyses were carried out to test for unidimensionality, hierarchical structure, and measurement invariance across 10/66 Dementia Research Group sites. PCA generated a one-factor solution in most sites. In CFA, the two-factor solution generated in Dominican Republic fitted better for all sites other than rural China. The two factors were not easily interpretable, and may have been an artefact of differing item difficulties. Strong internal consistency and high factor loadings for the one-factor solution supported unidimensionality. Furthermore, the WHODAS II was found to be a ‘strong’ Mokken scale. Measurement invariance was supported by the similarity of factor loadings across sites, and by the high between-site correlations in item difficulties. The Mokken results strongly support that the WHODAS II 12-item screener is a unidimensional and hierarchical scale confirming to item response theory (IRT) principles, at least at the monotone homogeneity model level. More work is needed to assess the generalizability of our findings to different populations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20104493

  20. The WEAVE disk dynamics survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famaey, B.; Antoja, T.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Siebert, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Di Matteo, P.; Figueras, F.; Fragkoudi, F.; Garzon-Lopez, F.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.; Monari, G.; Mor-Crespo, R.; Hill, V.

    2016-12-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope. It consists of a multi-object fibre spectrograph with a 2°-diameter field of view that can obtain ˜ 1000 spectra simultaneously. The "WEAVE Galactic Archaeology survey" is the survey focused on the Milky Way, as a complement to the Gaia space mission, and will start operating in early 2018. This survey is subdivided in four sub-surveys, among which the "WEAVE disk dynamics survey". This survey plans to measure the radial velocities (and abundances as far as possible) of ˜ 10^6 stars with magnitude 15ii) about their detailed structure and dynamics - e.g., is the bar short or long, what is its pattern speed? -, as well as (iii) about their influence on secular processes such as stellar radial migration are essential elements for a better understanding of the chemo-dynamical evolution of our Galaxy, and of galaxies in general. This survey is designed to answer these questions.

  1. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  2. Astronomical surveys and big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum, from γ -rays to radio waves, are reviewed, including such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ -ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and POSS II-based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in the optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio range, and many others, as well as the most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS), and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era, with Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics playing an important role in using and analyzing big data for new discoveries.

  3. THE WYOMING SURVEY FOR H{alpha}. II. H{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z{approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, AND 0.40

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Daniel A.; Cook, David O.; Moore, Carolynn A.; Staudaher, Shawn M.; Barlow, Rebecca J.; Cohen, Seth A.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Kattner, ShiAnne M.; Schuster, Micah D.

    2010-04-01

    The Wyoming Survey for H{alpha}, or WySH, is a large-area, ground-based imaging survey for H{alpha}-emitting galaxies at redshifts of z {approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.40. The survey spans up to 4 deg{sup 2} in a set of fields of low Galactic cirrus emission, using twin narrowband filters at each epoch for improved stellar continuum subtraction. H{alpha} luminosity functions are presented for each {delta}z {approx} 0.02 epoch based on a total of nearly 1200 galaxies. These data clearly show an evolution with look-back time in the volume-averaged cosmic star formation rate. Integrals of Schechter fits to the incompleteness- and extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosity functions indicate star formation rates per comoving volume of 0.010, 0.013, 0.020, 0.022 h {sub 70} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at z {approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.40, respectively. Combined statistical and systematic measurement uncertainties are on the order of 25%, while the effects of cosmic variance are at the 20% level. The bulk of this evolution is driven by changes in the characteristic luminosity L {sub *} of the H{alpha} luminosity functions, with L {sub *} for the earlier two epochs being a factor of 2 larger than L {sub *} at the latter two epochs; it is more difficult with this data set to decipher systematic evolutionary differences in the luminosity function amplitude and faint-end slope. Coupling these results with a comprehensive compilation of results from the literature on emission line surveys, the evolution in the cosmic star formation rate density over 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5 is measured.

  4. What Are Probability Surveys?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) use probability-survey designs to assess the condition of the nation’s waters. In probability surveys (also known as sample-surveys or statistical surveys), sampling sites are selected randomly.

  5. Survey Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollick, Anne M.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides advice on how to plan and conduct an alumni census through the mail, drawing on the experiences of Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts, which undertook such a survey in 1992. It focuses on costs, information needs, questionnaire design, mailing considerations, reporting the results, and expected response rates.…

  6. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  7. The Student Instructional Report for Distance Education: e-SIR II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Recently the Educational Testing Service (ETS) has modified its Student Instructional Report II (SIR II) for use in online distance education courses. The SIR II is a second-generation survey based on more than thirty years of experience with student evaluations (Centra, 1998; Centra and Gaubatz, n.d.). The e-SIR II is based on the highly…

  8. Probing outflows in z = 1 ∼ 2 galaxies through Fe II/Fe II* multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuping; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-10-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600 Å Fe II/Fe II* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z ∼ 1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spectroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the Very Large Telescope and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the Fe II absorption lines down to a limit of W{sub r} > 1.5 Å and of the Fe II* emission lines to W{sub r} > 0.5 Å. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [O II] emission line, we find that both the Fe II and Mg II absorption lines are blueshifted, indicating that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the Fe II gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of Mg II. We investigate the variation of Fe II line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that Fe II lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the Fe II lines relative to the Mg II doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended Fe II* emission in two-dimensional stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for Fe II absorption lie close (3 ∼ 4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the Fe II/Fe II* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.

  9. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. Volume II. New Mexico-Las Cruces NI 13-10 Quadrangle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The results of a high-sensitivity, aerial gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey of the Las Cruces two degree quadrangle, New Mexico, are presented. Instrumentation and methods are described in Volume 1 of this final report. The work was done by Carson Helicopters, Inc., and International Exploration, Inc. The work was performed for the US Department of Energy - National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Analysis of this radiometric data yielded 192 statistically significant eU anomalies. Of this number, thirty-nine were considered to be of sufficient strength to warrant further investigation.

  10. Individualized Instruction in Great Britain: A Survey and a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, D. Keith; Hammond, Roger A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents results of a selective survey of schools using individualized instruction (II) in Great Britain and a detailed description of a particular II self-study zoology course at University College, Cardiff. (CS)

  11. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  12. 77 FR 6785 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Feedback Survey for Annual Tsunami Warning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... exceed seven days. This will be a Web-based survey and will allow for efficient collection of information regarding the effectiveness of the Tsunami Warning System. II. Method of Collection A Web-based survey...

  13. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. Volume II. Texas-New Mexico-El Paso NH 13-1 Quadrangle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The results of a high-sensitivity, aerial gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey of the El Paso, two degree quadrangle, New Mexico, are presented. Instrumentation and methods are described in Volume I of this final report. The work was done by Carson Helicopters Inc., and Carson Helicopters was assisted in the interpretation by International Exploration, Inc. The work was performed for the US Department of Energy - National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. A total of 72 statistically significant eU anomalies were identified in this quadrangle. Of this number 20 were considered to be of sufficient intensity to warrant field investigations, however, many of these anomalies appear to be wholly, or in part, associated with various unconsolidated Quaternary deposits. Only three of the 20 can, with certainty be identified with bedrock; one with a Quaternary flow, one with Cambrian sandstone and one with a Precambrian granite.

  14. Laser Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has produced a laser-aided system for surveying land boundaries in difficult terrain. It does the job more accurately than conventional methods, takes only one-third the time normally required, and is considerably less expensive. In surveying to mark property boundaries, the objective is to establish an accurate heading between two "corner" points. This is conventionally accomplished by erecting a "range pole" at one point and sighting it from the other point through an instrument called a theodolite. But how do you take a heading between two points which are not visible to each other, for instance, when tall trees, hills or other obstacles obstruct the line of sight? That was the problem confronting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The Forest Service manages 187 million acres of land in 44 states and Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, National Forest System lands are not contiguous but intermingled in complex patterns with privately-owned land. In recent years much of the private land has been undergoing development for purposes ranging from timber harvesting to vacation resorts. There is a need for precise boundary definition so that both private owners and the Forest Service can manage their properties with confidence that they are not trespassing on the other's land.

  15. Farmland Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A 1981 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study estimated that the nation is converting farmland to non-agricultural uses at the rate of 3 million acres a year. Seeking information on farmland loss in Florida, the state legislature, in 1984, directed establishment of a program for development of accurate data to enable intelligent legislation of state growth management. Thus was born Florida's massive Mapping and Monitoring of Agricultural Lands Project (MMALP). It employs data from the NASA-developed Landsat Earth resources survey satellite system as a quicker, less expensive alternative to ground surveying. The 3 year project involved inventory of Florida's 36 million acres classifying such as cropland, pastureland, citrus, woodlands, wetland, water and populated areas. Direction was assigned to Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) with assistance from the DOT. With the cooperation of the USDA, Soil Conservation Service, DCA decided that combining soil data with the Landsat land cover data would make available to land use planners a more comprehensive view of a county's land potential.

  16. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  17. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform the following two complementary types of analysis. (i) We quantify the statistical confidence and the accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a `model-independent' fashion. We show for example that a 10000-deg2 imaging survey with depth r= 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy δz/(1 +z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9 per cent confidence, measuring the associated preferred cosmological scale with 2 per cent precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95 per cent confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20 per cent accuracy. (ii) By assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model power spectrum we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future galaxy surveys. We quantify `wiggle detection' by calculating the number of standard deviations by which the baryon fraction is measured, after marginalizing over the shape parameter. This is typically a factor of 4 more significant (in terms of number of standard deviations) than the above `model-independent' result. For both analyses, we quantify the variation of the results with magnitude depth and photometric redshift precision, and discuss the prospects for obtaining the required performance with realistic future surveys. We conclude that the precision with which the clustering pattern may be inferred from future photometric redshift surveys will be competitive with contemporaneous spectroscopic redshift surveys, assuming that systematic effects can be controlled. We find that for equivalent wiggle detection power, a photometric redshift survey requires an area approximately 12[δz/(1 +z

  18. The VVDS-VLA deep field. II. Optical and near infrared identifications of VLA S1.4 GHz > 80 μ Jy sources in the VIMOS VLT deep survey VVDS-02h field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliegi, P.; Zamorani, G.; Bondi, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Gregorini, L.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Radovich, M.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Merluzzi, P.; Paltani, S.; Pollo, A.; Zucca, E.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Gavignaud, I.; Pellò, R.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we present the optical and near-infrared identifications of the 1054 radio sources detected in the 20 cm deep radio survey down to a 5σ flux limit of ~80 μJy obtained with the VLA in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey VVDS-02h deep field. Using U,B,V,R,I and K data, with limiting magnitudes of UAB˜25.4, BAB˜26.5, VAB˜26.2, RAB˜25.9 IAB˜25.0, JAB˜24.2, KAB˜23.9 (50% completeness) we identified 718 radio sources (~74% of the whole sample). The photometric redshift analysis shows that, in each magnitude bin, the radio sample has a higher median photometric redshift than the whole optical sample, while the median (V-I)AB color of the radio sources is redder than the median color of the whole optical sample. These results suggest that radio detection is preferentially selecting galaxies with higher intrinsic optical luminosity. From the analysis of the optical properties of the radio sources as function of the radio flux, we found that while about 35% of the radio sources are optically unidentified in the higher radio flux bin (S> 1.0 mJy), the percentage of unidentified sources decreases to about 25% in the faintest bins (S< 0.5 mJy). The median IAB magnitude for the total sample of radio sources, i.e. including also the unidentified ones, is brighter in the faintest radio bins than in the bin with higher radio flux. This suggests that most of the faintest radio sources are likely to be associated to relatively lower radio luminosity objects at relatively modest redshift, rather than radio-powerful, AGN type objects at high redshift. Using a classification in early-type and late-type galaxies based on the (B-I)AB color and the photometric redshift, we found that the majority of the radio sources below ~0.15 mJy are indeed late-type star forming galaxies. Finally, the radio sources without optical counterpart in our deep imaging have a median radio flux of 0.15 mJy, equal to that of identified sources. Given the very faint optical limits, these

  19. MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER. II. PROPERTIES OF WISE-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE NDWFS BOOeTES FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Assef, R. J.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Tsai, C.-W.; Kochanek, C. S.; Blain, A. W.; Brodwin, M.; Brown, M. J. I.; Donoso, E.; Jarrett, T. H.; Yan, L.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Stanford, S. A.; Wu, J.

    2013-07-20

    Stern et al. presented a study of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selection of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field, finding that a simple criterion W1-W2 {>=} 0.8 provides a highly reliable and complete AGN sample for W2 < 15.05, where the W1 and W2 passbands are centered at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, respectively. Here we extend this study using the larger 9 deg{sup 2} NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field which also has considerably deeper WISE observations than the COSMOS field, and find that this simple color cut significantly loses reliability at fainter fluxes. We define a modified selection criterion combining the W1-W2 color and the W2 magnitude to provide highly reliable or highly complete AGN samples for fainter WISE sources. In particular, we define a color-magnitude cut that finds 130 {+-} 4 deg{sup -2} AGN candidates for W2 < 17.11 with 90% reliability. Using the extensive UV through mid-IR broadband photometry available in this field, we study the spectral energy distributions of WISE AGN candidates. We find that, as expected, the WISE AGN selection can identify highly obscured AGNs, but that it is biased toward objects where the AGN dominates the bolometric luminosity output. We study the distribution of reddening in the AGN sample and discuss a formalism to account for sample incompleteness based on the step-wise maximum-likelihood method of Efstathiou et al. The resulting dust obscuration distributions depend strongly on AGN luminosity, consistent with the trend expected for a receding torus. At L{sub AGN} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}, 29% {+-} 7% of AGNs are observed as Type 1, while at {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} the fraction is 64% {+-} 13%. The distribution of obscuration values suggests that dust in the torus is present as both a diffuse medium and in optically thick clouds.

  20. ORION II bus demonstration. Demonstration report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, J.

    1989-02-01

    The Central New York Regional Transportation Authority conducted an 18-month demonstration to determine how the ORION II bus operates in actual service. The ORION II vehicle is a small low floor, accessible heavy duty, diesel-powered transit bus designed to meet the needs of the elderly and handicapped. It has the capacity to seat 26 passengers with 4 wheelchair lockdowns. Side and rear doors are equipped with electrically powered ramps. Eight Thomas vehicles (22-foot, 11,500 lbs, wheelchair equipped, gasoline fueled) were also tested during the demonstration period. Operations (fuel and oil usage) and maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) data were collected and charted-out in the report as well as driver, passenger, and maintenance surveys. This report provides descriptions, photographs, and comparison charts of both the diesel-fueled ORION II transit bus and the gasoline-fueled Thomas vehicles along with the demonstration test plan, evaluations, conclusions, and survey results.

  1. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  2. SHIELD II: VLA HI Spectral Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eojin; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from low-resolution D-configuration VLA HI spectral line observations of 6 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from SDSS and WIYN. These data allow us to localize the HI gas and to study the bulk neutral gas kinematics.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  3. [Diagnosis and therapy of retained fetal membranes, puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis in cattle: Results of the Online-survey among Swiss practitioners. II. Puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis].

    PubMed

    Hehenberger, E M; Doherr, M G; Bodmer, M; Steiner, A; Hirsbrunner, G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain the diagnostic and therapeutic approach among Swiss practitioners in cows with puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis (part 2). All members of the Association for ruminant health were contacted per email via the newsletter. The survey was completed by 128 veterinarians, partially responded by 140 veterinarians. The following main symptoms of puerperal metritis were stated by the practitioners: purulent vaginal discharge, fever and reduced appetite. A vaginal and rectal examination was performed to diagnose the disease. Usually, an intrauterine treatment with tetracycline or cefapirin was done. Parenteral administration of tetracycline or penicillin was often combined with PGF(2α), NSAIDS or cortisone. Clinical endometritis was also diagnosed by vaginal and rectal examination and the main symptom indicated was purulent vaginal discharge. The therapy consisted of the administration of PGF(2α), uterine infusions predominantly with cefapirin, and rarely with parenteral administration of antibiotics. Further diagnostic tools were not used and normally cows were not rechecked. The success of the therapy of puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis was judged to be satisfactory to excellent.

  4. Population-Based Questionnaire Survey on Health Effects of Aircraft Noise on Residents Living around U.S. Airfields in the RYUKYUS—PART II: AN Analysis of the Discriminant Score and the Factor Score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HIRAMATSU, K.; MATSUI, T.; MIYAKITA, T.; ITO, A.; TOKUYAMA, T.; OSADA, Y.; YAMAMOTO, T.

    2002-02-01

    Discriminant function values of psychosomatics and neurosis are calculated using the 12 scale scores of the Todai Health Index, a general health questionnaire, obtained in the survey done around the Kadena and Futenma U.S. airfields in Okinawa, Japan. The total number of answers available for the analysis is 6301. Factor analysis is applied to the 12 scale scores by means of the principal factor method, and Oblimin rotation is done because the factors extracted are considered likely to correlate with each other to a greater or lesser extent. The logistic regression analysis is made with the independent variables of discriminant function (DF) values and factor scores and with the dependent variables of Ldn, age (six levels), sex, occupation (four categories) and the interaction of age and sex. Results indicate that the odds ratio of the DF values regarding psychosomatic disorder and of the score of somatic factor have clear dose-response relationship. The odds ratios of the DF value of neurosis and of the score of the mental factor increase in the area where noise exposure is very intense.

  5. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  6. Analysis of concentrating PV-T systems for the commercial/industrial sector. Volume II. PV-T state-of-the-art survey and site/application pair selection and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1984-09-01

    As part of a project to develop feasibility assessments, design procedures, and reference designs for total energy systems that could use actively cooled concentrating photovoltaic collectors, a survey was conducted to provide an overview of available photovoltaic-thermal (PV-T) technology. General issues associated with the design and installation of a PV-T system are identified. Electrical and thermal efficiencies for the line-focus Fresnel, the linear parabolic trough, and the point-focus Fresnel collectors are specified as a function of operating temperature, ambient temperature, and insolation. For current PV-T technologies, the line-focus Fresnel collector proved to have the highest thermal and electrical efficiencies, lowest array cost, and lowest land area requirement. But a separate feasibility analysis involving 11 site/application pairs showed that for most applications, the cost of the photovoltaic portion of a PV-T system is not recovered through the displacement of an electrical load, and use of a thermal-only system to displace the thermal load would be a more economical alternative. PV-T systems are not feasible for applications that have a small thermal load, a large steam requirement, or a high load return temperature. SAND82-7157/3 identifies the technical issues involved in designing a photovoltaic-thermal system and provides guidance for resolving such issues. Detailed PV-T system designs for three selected applications and the results of a trade-off study for these applications are presented in SAND82-7157/4. A summary of the major results of this entire study and conclusions concerning PV-T systems and applications is presented in SAND82-7157/1.

  7. Physical properties of galaxies and their evolution in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. II. Extending the mass-metallicity relation to the range z ≈ 0.89-1.24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, E.; Contini, T.; Lamareille, F.; Brinchmann, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Charlot, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2009-02-01

    Aims: We present a continuation of our study about the relation between stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). In this work we extend the determination of metallicities up to redshift ≈1.24 for a sample of 42 star-forming galaxies with a mean redshift value of 0.99. Methods: For a selected sample of emission-line galaxies, we use both diagnostic diagrams and empirical calibrations based on [Oii] emission lines along with the empirical relation between the intensities of the [Oiii] and [Neiii] emission lines and the theoretical ratios between Balmer recombination emission lines to identify star-forming galaxies and to derive their metallicities. We derive stellar masses by fitting the whole spectral energy distribution with a set of stellar population synthesis models. Results: These new methods allow us to extend the mass-metallicity relation to higher redshift. We show that the metallicity determinations are consistent with more established strong-line methods. Taken together this allows us to study the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation up to z ≈ 1.24 with good control of systematic uncertainties. We find an evolution with redshift of the average metallicity of galaxies very similar to those reported in the literature: for a given stellar mass, galaxies at z ~ 1 have, on average, a metallicity ~ 0.3 dex lower than galaxies in the local universe. However we do not see any significant metallicity evolution between redshifts z ~ 0.7 (Paper I) and z ~ 1.0 (this paper). We find also the same flattening of the mass-metallicity relation for the most massive galaxies as reported in Paper I at lower redshifts, but again no apparent evolution of the slope is seen between z ~ 0.7 and z ~ 1.0. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007, and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the CNRS in France, CNRC in Canada and the

  8. A SURVEY OF METAL LINES AT HIGH REDSHIFT. II. SDSS ABSORPTION LINE STUDIES-O VI LINE DENSITY, SPACE DENSITY, AND GAS METALLICITY AT z{sub abs} {approx} 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S.; Mathur, S.; Pieri, M.; York, D. G.

    2010-09-15

    We have analyzed a large data set of O VI absorber candidates found in the spectra of 3702 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars, focusing on a subsample of 387 active galactic nuclei sight lines with an average S/N {>=}5.0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W{sub r} {>=} 0.19 A for the O VI 1032 A component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density {Delta}N/{Delta}z for redshifts z{sub abs} {>=} 2.8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending with the ubiquitous Ly{alpha} forest lines and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber, and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectrum by modeling typical Lyman forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N-corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers: {Delta}N{sub O{sub VI,c}}/{Delta}z{sub c} (2.8 < z < 3.2) = 4.6 {+-} 0.3, {Delta}N{sub O{sub VI,c}}/{Delta}z{sub c} (3.2 < z < 3.6) = 6.7 {+-} 0.8, and {Delta}N{sub O{sub VI,c}}/{Delta}z{sub c} (3.6 < z < 4.0) = 8.4 {+-} 2.9. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: {Omega}{sub O{sub VI}}(2.8 < z < 3.2) {>=} 1.9 x 10{sup -8} h {sup -1}. We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionization fraction, O{sub VI}/O, and adopting the Anders and Grevesse solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicity of the gas probed in our search: {zeta}(2.8 < z < 3.2) {>=} 3.6 x 10{sup -4} h, in good agreement with other

  9. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. II. THE SURVEY AND A SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS OF KINEMATIC ANOMALIES AND ASYMMETRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Boselli, A.; Lisker, T.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Van de Ven, G.; Paudel, S.; Emsellem, E.; Janz, J.; Den Brok, M.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Niemi, S.-M.

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially resolved kinematics and global stellar populations and mass-to-light ratios for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. This sample is representative of the early-type population in the Virgo cluster in the absolute magnitude range –19.0 < M{sub r} < –16.0 and of all morphological subclasses found in this galaxy population. For each dE, we measure the rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile and fit an analytic function to the rotation curve. We study the significance of the departure of the rotation curve from the best-fit analytic function (poorly fit) and of the difference between the approaching and receding sides of the rotation curve (asymmetry). Our sample includes two dEs with kinematically decoupled cores that have been previously reported. We find that 62 ± 8% (23 out of the 39) of the dEs have a significant anomaly in their rotation curve. Analysis of the images reveals photometric anomalies for most galaxies. However, there is no clear correlation between the significance of the photometric and kinematic anomalies. We measure age-sensitive (H{sub β} and H{sub γA}) and metallicity sensitive (Fe4668 and Mgb) Lick spectral indices in the LIS-5 Å system. This population of galaxies exhibits a wide range of ages and metallicities; we also find that 4 dEs show clear evidence of emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. Finally, we estimate the total masses and dark matter fractions of the dEs and plot them in the mass-size, the mass-velocity dispersion, and the fundamental plane scaling relations. The dEs seem to be the bridge between massive early-type galaxies and dSphs, and have a median total mass within the R{sub e} of log M{sub e} = 9.1 ± 0.2 and a median dark matter fraction within the R{sub e} of f {sub DM} = 46 ± 18%. Any formation model for the dE galaxy class must account for this

  10. 42 CFR 488.308 - Survey frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished by a SNF or a NF, within 60 days of a change in the following: (i) Ownership; (ii) Entity responsible for management of a facility (management firm); (iii) Nursing home administrator; or (iv) Director of nursing. (2) The survey agency must review all complaint allegations...

  11. 42 CFR 488.308 - Survey frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished by a SNF or a NF, within 60 days of a change in the following: (i) Ownership; (ii) Entity responsible for management of a facility (management firm); (iii) Nursing home administrator; or (iv) Director of nursing. (2) The survey agency must review all complaint allegations...

  12. 42 CFR 488.308 - Survey frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished by a SNF or a NF, within 60 days of a change in the following: (i) Ownership; (ii) Entity responsible for management of a facility (management firm); (iii) Nursing home administrator; or (iv) Director of nursing. (2) The survey agency must review all complaint allegations...

  13. 42 CFR 488.308 - Survey frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished by a SNF or a NF, within 60 days of a change in the following: (i) Ownership; (ii) Entity responsible for management of a facility (management firm); (iii) Nursing home administrator; or (iv) Director of nursing. (2) The survey agency must review all complaint allegations...

  14. 42 CFR 488.308 - Survey frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished by a SNF or a NF, within 60 days of a change in the following: (i) Ownership; (ii) Entity responsible for management of a facility (management firm); (iii) Nursing home administrator; or (iv) Director of nursing. (2) The survey agency must review all complaint allegations...

  15. THE HETDEX PILOT SURVEY. II. THE EVOLUTION OF THE Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FRACTION FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET SLOPE AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF 1.9 < z < 3.8 LAEs

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Adams, Joshua J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hao Lei; Fry, Alexander B.; Jeong, Donghui; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Kelzenberg, Ralf; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gawiser, Eric; MacQueen, Phillip; Roth, Martin M.

    2011-07-20

    We study the escape of Ly{alpha} photons from Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) and the overall galaxy population using a sample of 99 LAEs at 1.9 < z < 3.8 detected through integral-field spectroscopy of blank fields by The Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Pilot Survey. For 89 LAEs with broadband counterparts we measure ultraviolet (UV) luminosities and UV slopes, and estimate E(B - V) under the assumption of a constant intrinsic UV slope for LAEs. These quantities are used to estimate dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Comparison between the observed Ly{alpha} luminosity and that predicted by the dust-corrected SFR yields the Ly{alpha} escape fraction. We also measure the Ly{alpha} luminosity function and luminosity density ({rho}{sub Ly{alpha}}) at 2 < z < 4. Using this and other measurements from the literature at 0.3 < z < 7.7 we trace the redshift evolution of {rho}{sub Ly{alpha}.} We compare it to the expectations from the star formation history of the universe and characterize the evolution of the Ly{alpha} escape fraction of galaxies. LAEs at 2 < z < 4 selected down to a luminosity limit of L(Ly{alpha}) > (3-6) x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} (0.25-0.5 L*), have a mean (E(B - V)) = 0.13 {+-} 0.01, implying an attenuation of {approx}70% in the UV. They show a median UV uncorrected SFR = 11 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, dust-corrected SFR = 34 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, and Ly{alpha} equivalent widths (EWs) which are consistent with normal stellar populations. We measure a median Ly{alpha} escape fraction of 29%, with a large scatter and values ranging from a few percent to 100%. The Ly{alpha} escape fraction in LAEs correlates with E(B - V) in a way that is expected if Ly{alpha} photons suffer from similar amounts of dust extinction as UV continuum photons. This result implies that a strong enhancement of the Ly{alpha} EW with dust, due to a clumpy multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM), is not a common process in LAEs at these redshifts. It also

  16. Probing low-redshift galaxies using quasar absorption lines with an emphasis on Ca II absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardane, Gendith M.

    2016-05-01

    We searched for intervening CaII absorption in nearly 95,000 quasar spectra with i≤20 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS) data releases DR7+DR9. Our identification of >400 CaII systems is the largest compilation of CaII absorbers in a blind search. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  17. Veiling Glare from Spectacles and Visors in Aviation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    more restricted. There is sometimes an ambiguity between its use for windshields and the long- established usage of the term in meteorology (Ref. 6...one aircraft seen from another is a matter of considerable importance in aviation. If, for reasons of poor meteorological visibility, aircraft have to...operate under instrument flight rules, collision avoidance is provided by the air traffic control system. In visual meteorological conditions (VMC) by

  18. Automatic Laser Glare Suppression in Electro-Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. PMID:25569754

  19. Development of the DHQ II and C-DHQ II Nutrient & Food Group Database

    Cancer.gov

    The nutrient and food group database, created for analyzing the DHQ II, is based on a compilation of national 24-hour dietary recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) conducted in 2001-02, 2003-04, and 2005-06.

  20. Robotic Surveying

    SciTech Connect

    Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

    2007-03-01

    -actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

  1. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2010. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2010-01-01

    During the months of April and September of 2009, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) conducted the Alumni Perspectives Survey, a longitudinal study of prior respondents to the Global Management Education Graduate Survey of management students nearing graduation. A total of 3,708 alumni responded to the April 2009 survey,…

  2. 2012 Alumni Perspectives Survey. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Conducted in September 2011, this Alumni Perspectives Survey by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) is a longitudinal study of respondents to the Global Management Education Graduate Survey, the annual GMAC[R] exit survey of graduate management students in their final year of business school. This 12th annual report includes responses…

  3. The MWA Transients Survey (MWATS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.; Croft, S. D.; Hancock, P.; Rowlinson, A.; Wayth, R.; Gaensler, B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A.; Loi, C.; Bannister, K.; Trott, C.; Marquart, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the continuation of the MWA transients survey to search for and monitor low frequency transient and variable radio sources in the southern sky. This proposal is aimed at commensally utilising data from the GLEAM-X (G0008) project in semester 2017-A. The aim of this commensal data acquisition is to commission long baseline observations for transient science. In particular this will involve studying the impact of the ionosphere on calibration and imaging, and developing the techniques needed to produce science quality data products. The proposed drift scans with LST locking (see G0008 proposal) are particularly exciting as we can test image subtraction for transient and variable identification. This survey is targeted at studying objects such as AGN (intrinsic and extrinsic variability), long duration synchrotron emitters, pulsars and transients of unknown origin. The maps generated from this survey will be analysed with the Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) detection pipeline. The motivation for this survey is as follows: (i) To obtain temporal data on an extremely large and robust sample of low frequency sources to explore and quantify both intrinsic and extrinsic variability; (ii) To search and find new classes of low frequency radio transients that previously remained undetected and obscured from multi-wavelength discovery; (iii) To place rigorous statistics on the occurrence of both transients and variables prior to the Australian SKA era.

  4. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits <10% of the stellar mass and (ii) 3D optical spectroscopy including both high-resolution ionized gas or stellar kinematic data for each galaxy and broad 320-725nm spectroscopy spanning [OII] 3727, Halpha, and Hbeta. RESOLVE is designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  5. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IIA, IIB, and stage II primary peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that ...

  6. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  7. The second MIT-Green Bank 5 GHz survey

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, G.I.; Heflin, M.B.; Conner, S.R.; Lehar, J.; Carrilli, C.L. E. O. Hulburt Center for Space Research, Washington, DC )

    1990-03-01

    The MHT-Green Bank II (MG II) 5-GHz survey covers 1.51 sr of sky in the right ascension range 4-21 h between +17 and +39.15 deg declination (J2000.0). The final MG II catalog contains 6182 sources detected with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5. The MG II flux density limit is 41 mJy. The catalog was produced from two separate north and south surveys with the NRAO 91-m transit telescope. Spectral indices are computed for sources identified in the NRAO 1400-MHz Survey (Condon and Broderick, 1985). A comparison of the spectral-index distributions for sources above and below 10 deg Galactic latitude is presented. 18 refs.

  8. Surveys of Luminous Quasars in the Post-reionization Universe at z=5-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Feige; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Green, Richard F.; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Ran; Yi, Weimin; UHS Team

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at z ~ 5 to 6, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium (IGM), quasar evolution and the early super-massive black hole growth. The quasar luminosity function (QLF) and its evolution at z >~ 5 is also needed to estimate the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background during and after the reionization epoch. McGreer et al. (2013) provided the first complete measurement of the z ~ 5 QLF. However, their work focused on faint quasars over a small sky area; there were only 8 quasars with M1450 < -27.3. We have carried out a new quasar survey of luminous quasars at 4.7 < z < 5.4 over 14555 deg^2 with high completeness, selected using a combination of SDSS and WISE optical/NIR colors . Using this luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample, we present a new determination of the z ~ 5 QLF and discuss the evolution model of QLF at high redshift. Based on surveys of luminous quasars at z > 4, previous studies have concluded that the number density evolution steepens at high redshift, such that luminous quasars decline as a population more steeply at higher redshift (z ~ 5.5) than from z=4 to 5. However, quasars at redshifts 5.3 < z < 5.7 have been very challenging to select using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distribution. We have developed a new selection technique for z ~ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near- and mid-infrared photometric data. Up to date, we have constructed an uniform luminous z ~ 5.5 quasar sample with 26 new quasars. Our final completed sample of quasars at z=5-6 will be used to study QLF, evolution model and IGM evolution in the post-deionization universe.

  9. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for surveying marine fauna: assessing detection probability.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Amanda; Peel, David; Kelly, Natalie

    2017-02-08

    Aerial surveys are conducted for various fauna to assess abundance, distribution, and habitat use over large spatial scales. They are traditionally conducted using light-aircraft with observers recording sightings in real time. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) offer an alternative with many potential advantages, including eliminating human-risk. To be effective, this emerging platform needs to provide detection rates of animals comparable to traditional methods. UAVs can also acquire new types of information, and this new data requires a re-evaluation of traditional analyses used in aerial surveys; including estimating the probability of detecting animals. We conducted 17 replicate UAV surveys of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) while simultaneously obtaining a 'census' of the population from land-based observations, to assess UAV detection probability. The ScanEagle UAV, carrying a digital SLR camera, continuously captured images (with 75% overlap) along transects covering the visual range of land-based observers. We also used ScanEagle to conduct focal follows of whale pods (n = 12, mean duration = 40 min), to assess a new method of estimating availability. A comparison of the whale detections from the UAV to the land-based census provided an estimated UAV detection probability of 0.33 (CV = 0.25) (incorporating both availability and perception biases), which was not affected by environmental covariates (Beaufort sea state, glare and cloud cover). According to our focal follows, the mean availability was 0.63 (CV = 0.37), with pods including mother/calf pairs having a higher availability (0.86, CV = 0.20) than those without (0.59, CV = 0.38). The follows also revealed (and provided a potential correction for) a downward bias in group size estimates from the UAV surveys, which resulted from asynchronous diving within whale pods, and a relatively short observation window of 9 s. We have shown that UAVs are an effective alternative to traditional methods

  10. Community Perception Survey, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Patricia; Silverman, Barbara

    This document is a report on the 2001 Community Perception Survey administered by Mt. San Antonio College (SAC) (California). The survey gathered public perception data of SAC services and programs. The survey was mailed to 773 service area community leaders; 160 (21%) responded. Survey results showed that: (1) 70% had knowledge of SAC programs…

  11. WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-21

    Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2004 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2004 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey's (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during August through November of 2004 by personnel from the WashingtonTRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2004, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports

  12. Applying Beliefs and Resources Frameworks to the Psychometric Analyses of an Epistemology Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Elby, Andrew; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how researchers' views about the form of students' epistemologies influence how the researchers develop and refine surveys and how they interpret survey results. After running standard statistical analyses on 505 physics students' responses to the Turkish version of the Maryland Physics Expectations-II survey, probing students'…

  13. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  14. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  15. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1989-90. Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    Information about pensions offered to employees of 17 Ontario universities is presented. For each of the 17 universities' pension plans, the following types of information are provided: type of plan; eligibility; member contribution; university contribution; benefits on normal retirement, on early retirement, on termination, and on death; model…

  16. Survey and Analysis of Alternative Education Programs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosley, Nathaniel S.; Hosley, Jessica; Thein, Myint

    2009-01-01

    This research is a follow up to a similar study published by the Center for Rural Pennsylvania in 2003 in which researchers examined alternative education policies and practices among Pennsylvania school districts. The current study extended the previous research to include information on the perceptions of administrators and teachers on the…

  17. A survey for red varibles INT he LMC - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Neill; Glass, I. S.; Catchpole, R. M.

    1988-05-01

    Infrared photometry of a sample of 126 variables drawn from a 16 sq deg area of the northern LMC is presented. Most of these stars were previously unknown and the majority prove the be long period red-giant variables. Most of the latter stars fall within two groups in the /K(0), log(P)/ diagram, the lower luminosity ones being Miras which obey a definite period-luminosity relation. Using the latter stars as distance estimators is discussed. The /M(bol), P/ diagram is compared with the theoretical tracks calculated by Wood, Bessell & Fox (1983), and it is found that the distribution of stars is probably consistent with a lull in star formation in the LMC from about 10 to the 9th - 2 x 10 to the 8th yr ago, although this conclusion depends strongly on the luminosity at which stars of different initial mass enter the thermally pulsing AGB.

  18. General Historical Survey of Federal Indian Policies. Chapter II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockman, W. H.

    This paper summarizes the history of North America, especially of the United States, from the earliest explorations and settlements through the present. Emphasis is placed on the Europeans' effect on American Indian life and the inadequate development of Indian education. Comparisons are made between the various colonizers' Indian policies before…

  19. Far Outer Galaxy H II Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, A. L.; deGues, E. J.; Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have made a multifrequency (6, 3.6, and 2 cm), high-resolution (3"-6"), radio continuum survey of IRAS selected sources from the catalogue of Wouterloot & Brand (1989) to search for and study H II regions in the far outer Galaxy. We identified 31 sources in this catalog with well determined galactocentric distances, and with R approx.. greater than 15 kpc and L(sub FIR) approx.greater than 10(exp 4) solar luminosity, indicating the presence of high-mass star-formation. We have observed 11 of these sources with the Very Large Array (VLA). We observed the sources at 6 and 2 cm using "scaled arrays", making possible a direct and reliable comparison of the data at these two wavelengths for the determination of spectral indices. We detected a total of 12 radio sources, of which 10 have spectral indices consistent with optically-thin free-free emission from H II regions. Combined with previous VLA observations by other investigators, we have data on a total of 15 H II regions at galactocentric distances of 15 to 18.2kpc, among the most remote H II regions found in our Galaxy. The sizes of the H II regions range from approx. less than 0.10 to 2.3 pc. Using the measured fluxes and sizes, we determine the electron densities, emission measures, and excitation parameters of the H II regions, as well as the fluxes of Lyman continuum photons needed to keep the nebulae ionized. The sizes and electron densities are consistent with most of the sources detected in this survey being compact or ultracompact H II regions. Seven of the fifteen H II regions have sizes approx. less than 0.20 pc. Assuming simple pressure-driven expansion of the H II regions, these sizes indicate ages approx. less than 5 x 10(exp 4) yr, or only 1% of the lifetime of an O star, which implies an unlikely overabundance of O stars in the outer Galaxy. Thus, the large number of compact H II regions suggests that the time these regions spend in a compact phase must be much longer than their dynamical

  20. 1981 CRC Octane Number Requirement Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    were found to have premium unleaded gasoline in their tanks at the time they were rated than in last year’s Survey. This may account for the lower...select models totaling 123 cars, and are plotted in Figures J-1 through J-9 for the 50 percent satisfaction level. The select model calculated results...i • .. . .. . " - lJ ii t i -- - n i I ... .. . " ’ ... B-1 1981 CRC OCTANE NUMBER REQUIREMENT SURVEY (CRC Project No. CM- 123 -81) 1981 Analysts

  1. WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-01

    Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2005 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2005 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey’s (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during September through November of 2005 by personnel from the Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering Department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2005, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary

  2. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume II, Part II. Biological Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    members of the family Cactaceae : Coryphantha vivipara, Sclerocactus pubispinus, Opuntia spp., and Echinocereus engelmannii. The individuals were widely...Sclerocactus pubispinus (family Cactaceae ) was found on Sites 2/16, 3/6, 3/12, and 3/14. Coryphantha vivipara (family cactaceae ), a taxon Currently Under...family Cactaceae : Echinocereus engelmanii, Echinocereus sp., Opuntia erinacea, Opuntia sp., Sclerocactus pubispinus, Sclerocactus sp., and Coryphantha

  3. High resolution survey for topographic surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luh, L. C.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A. K.; Tan, Z.

    2014-02-01

    In this decade, terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is getting popular in many fields such as reconstruction, monitoring, surveying, as-built of facilities, archaeology, and topographic surveying. This is due the high speed in data collection which is about 50,000 to 1,000,000 three-dimensional (3D) points per second at high accuracy. The main advantage of 3D representation for the data is that it is more approximate to the real world. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to show the use of High-Definition Surveying (HDS), also known as 3D laser scanning for topographic survey. This research investigates the effectiveness of using terrestrial laser scanning system for topographic survey by carrying out field test in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, Johor. The 3D laser scanner used in this study is a Leica ScanStation C10. Data acquisition was carried out by applying the traversing method. In this study, the result for the topographic survey is under 1st class survey. At the completion of this study, a standard of procedure was proposed for topographic data acquisition using laser scanning systems. This proposed procedure serves as a guideline for users who wish to utilize laser scanning system in topographic survey fully.

  4. 2012 Corporate Recruiters Survey. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results from the 2012 Corporate Recruiters Survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]). Conducted annually since 2001, this survey examines the job outlook for recent graduate business students as well as employer needs and expectations. The objectives of this study are to obtain a picture of…

  5. UBVRIz Light Curves of 51 Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, Lluís; Hamuy, Mario; Phillips, Mark M.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; de Jaeger, Thomas; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Krisciunas, Kevin; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Krzeminski, Wojtek; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; Anguita, Claudio; Galaz, Gaspar; Green, Elisabeth M.; Impey, Chris; Kim, Yong-Cheol; Kirhakos, Sofia; Malkan, Mathew A.; Mulchaey, John S.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Prosser, Charles F.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Sherry, William; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wells, Lisa A.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986-2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  6. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; Krisciunas, Kevin; Krzeminski, Wojtek; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  7. Aerial radiation surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Jobst, J.

    1980-01-01

    A recent aerial radiation survey of the surroundings of the Vitro mill in Salt Lake City shows that uranium mill tailings have been removed to many locations outside their original boundary. To date, 52 remote sites have been discovered within a 100 square kilometer aerial survey perimeter surrounding the mill; 9 of these were discovered with the recent aerial survey map. Five additional sites, also discovered by aerial survey, contained uranium ore, milling equipment, or radioactive slag. Because of the success of this survey, plans are being made to extend the aerial survey program to other parts of the Salt Lake valley where diversions of Vitro tailings are also known to exist.

  8. Survey of Radioactivities Induced by Lithium Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-15

    function is not sinusoidal, but exponentially decaying . The WKB approximation is good if the lithium energy is close to the barrier potential, Eb, and...titanium alloy targets are identified. For each radioactivity, the half-life and decay products are tabulated. Reaction yields are dominated by the Coulomb...survey. In Sec. II, the nuclear reactions on these targets which produce radioactivity are listed, and the decay properties of the radioactive nuclei

  9. Surveys: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2004-10-01

    Surveys are a valuable research tool for studying the knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of a study population. This article explores quantitative analyses of written questionnaires as instruments for survey research. Obtaining accurate and precise information from a survey requires minimizing the possibility of bias from inappropriate sampling or a flawed survey instrument, and this article describes strategies to minimize sampling bias by increasing response rates, comparing responders to nonresponders, and identifying the appropriate sampling population. It is crucial that the survey instrument be valid, meaning that it actually measures what the investigator intends it to measure. In developing a valid survey instrument, it can be useful to adapt survey instruments that were developed by other researchers and to conduct extensive pilot-testing of your survey instrument.

  10. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  11. Water Use: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Rose Glee; Warden, Jessie

    1976-01-01

    A survey of Florida State University students showed that their current laundry practices generate energy and water over-consumption. The survey also resulted in some concrete suggestions to the students that would improve their conservation practices. (Author/BP)

  12. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mazzali, Paolo; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M.; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S.; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-12-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2° × 2.2° field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a 3-min exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g ˜ 20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since 2012 April. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of the order of 1 during our three-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  13. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  14. USAF Family Survey: A Revision of the USAF Spouse Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    82174 f ii1 f wt~c~n~ ct he ouet ir:ris. (-u.i I L,-,r oe rt w je rEa t ucd’ .~r~zerarci rec.-mTded. P c omment s r a de by the L’a rt I c J parts W e11...RD-I60 68 USF FMILY SURVEY: A REVISION OF THE USF SPOUSE 1/2 SURYEY(U) LEADERSHIP ND NAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER MAXNELL RFB AL P A FLANNERY ET AL...ADDRESS ICit%. Stale and ZIP Code) lb. AODRESS Wit,,. State and ’ / P Code Ma xie7 Air Force Base A 1a b-.. 36112-5712 8& NAME OF FUNDING/SPONISORING 8b

  15. AACC CEO Survey: Compensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippe, Kent A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) conducted a survey of community college chief executive officers (CEOs) to collect their opinions on current issues, and gather information on their compensation. This report provides the results from this survey. The AACC CEO Survey was sent to 960 public community college presidents.…

  16. ACSI Survey 2014

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-08-26

    ... EOSDIS Survey   Dear Colleagues,   In the next few days, you will receive an email from CFI Group on behalf of NASA. ... a few minutes to complete the survey.   If you did not receive a survey and wish to complete one, or know of someone who uses ...

  17. Sensitive Questions in Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourangeau, Roger; Yan, Ting

    2007-01-01

    Psychologists have worried about the distortions introduced into standardized personality measures by social desirability bias. Survey researchers have had similar concerns about the accuracy of survey reports about such topics as illicit drug use, abortion, and sexual behavior. The article reviews the research done by survey methodologists on…

  18. Urban School Board Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Council of the Great City Schools surveyed its member districts in the fall of 2004 to determine the characteristics of school boards and board members in U.S. urban schools. This was the first survey of its school boards and this report contains the results of that survey. Respondents were asked to provide information on a range of topics…

  19. Generic Survey Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matross, Ron; Roesler, Jon

    Hints on conducting surveys appropriate for university use are outlined, and sample checklists and forms are provided. The following research elements concerning generic surveys are covered: sequences of events for surveys conducted by mail (15 weeks) and telephone (11 weeks); algorithms for estimating materials costs and quantities; a catalog of…

  20. AECT Needs Survey, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.; Richter, Kurt; Kim, Minhee; Yang, Jessica Chao-I; Duvenci, Abdullah

    The purpose of this study was to determine the needs of AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) members. A total of 590 individuals completed a Web-based 16-question survey after receiving an e-mail invitation from AECT. This survey was active between October 30 and November 10, 2000. The survey was categorized into three…

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. Developing the online survey.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffry S; McNew, Ryan

    2008-12-01

    Institutions of higher education are now using Internet-based technology tools to conduct surveys for data collection. Research shows that the type and quality of responses one receives with online surveys are comparable with what one receives in paper-based surveys. Data collection can take place on Web-based surveys, e-mail-based surveys, and personal digital assistants/Smartphone devices. Web surveys can be subscription templates, software packages installed on one's own server, or created from scratch using Web programming development tools. All of these approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. The survey owner must make informed decisions as to the right technology to implement. The correct choice can save hours of work in sorting, organizing, and analyzing data.

  3. FY 2001 Customer Satisfiction & Top 200 Users Composite Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Satisfaction Survey FY 2001 Top 200 Survey Marketing Communications The majority of users agreed that DTIC did a good job of informing users about...personnel in the 1540 signature process were mentioned as user difficulties. 4 4 Top users are satisfied that DTIC does a good job communicating...improvement, but it really doesn’t meet Top Users’ needs because it is not interactive. 4 Fig 5 LEFT BLANK ON PURPOSE 8 PART II: Graphical Data Review Job

  4. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Biological Resources Survey, Dry Lake Valley, Nevada. Volume II, Part I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    members of the cactaceae family: Coryphantha vivipara, Echinocereus engelmannii, Sclerocactus pubispinus, Opuntia erinacea, Opuntia polycantha, and...Streptantnus cordatus ArFtemisia tr-identata Arem s p. Cactaceae Aster sp. Corypnantha vivipara* Baiy pleniradiata Ectinocereus engelmannii* c W -acis sp

  5. FIRE II Cirrus Info

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-03-18

    ... Page:  FIRE II Main Grouping:  Cirrus Description:  First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Data Products:  Cirrus ...

  6. START II and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, J.

    1996-10-01

    The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START II), signed by President George Bush and Russian President Boris yeltsin in January 1993, was ratified by the US Senate in January 1996 by and overwhelming vote of 87-4. The treaty, which will slash the strategic arsenals of the United States and Russia to 3,000-3,500 warheads each, is now before the two houses of the Russian Parliament (the Duma and the Federation Council) awaiting ratification amidst confusion and criticism. The Yeltsin administration supports START II and spoke in favor of Russian ratification after the Senate acted on the treaty. The Russian foreign minister and the Russian military believed that START II should be ratified as soon as possible. During the recent presidential campaign and his subsequent illness, President Yeltsin has been virtually silent on the subject of START II and nuclear force reductions. Without a push from the Yeltsin administration, the tone among Duma members, has been sharply critical of START II. Voices across the Russian political spectrum have questioned the treaty and linked it to constraints on highly capable theater missile defense (TMD) systems and the continued viability of the ABM Treaty. And urged that START II ratification be held hostage until NATO abandons its plans to expand eastward. Although the START I and START II accords have generated the momentum, opportunity and expectation-both domestic and international-for additional nuclear arms reductions, the current impasse over ratification in the Duma has cast a shadow over the future of START II and raised questions about the chances for any follow-on (START III) agreement.

  7. Mod II engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karl, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Mod II engine, a four-cylinder, automotive Stirling engine utilizing the Siemens-Rinia double-acting concept, was assembled and became operational in January 1986. This paper describes the Mod II engine, its first assembly, and the subsequent development work done on engine components up to the point that engine performance characterization testing took place. Performance data for the engine are included.

  8. Extreme Bal quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick B. Hall et al.

    2002-10-11

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has discovered a population of broad absorption line quasars with various extreme properties. Many show absorption from metastable states of Fe II with varying excitations; several objects are almost completely absorbed bluewards of Mg II; at least one shows stronger absorption from Fe III than Fe II, indicating temperatures T > 35000 K in the absorbing region; and one object even seems to have broad H{beta} absorption. Many of these extreme BALs are also heavily reddened, though ''normal'' BALs (particularly LoBALs) from SDSS also show evidence for internal reddening.

  9. 76 FR 53402 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... the new universe of the 100 largest pension systems, based on the 2012 Census of Governments. A bridge study will be published if there is any change to the universe. II. Method of Collection Survey...

  10. O I and Ca II Observations in Intermediate Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Dultzin, Deborah; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-03-01

    We present an unprecedented spectroscopic survey of the Ca II triplet + O i for a sample of 14 luminous (-26≳ {{M}V}≳ -29), intermediate redshift (0.85 ≲ z ≲ 1.65) quasars. The Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera spectrometer on the ESO Very Large Telescope allowed us to cover the Ca II near-infrared spectral region redshifted into the H and K windows. We describe in detail our data analysis which enabled us to detect Ca II triplet emission in all 14 sources (with the possible exception of HE0048-2804) and to retrieve accurate line widths and fluxes of the triplet and O i λ8446. The new measurements show trends consistent with previous lower-z observations, indicating that Ca II and optical Fe II emission are probably closely related. The ratio between the Ca II triplet and the optical Fe II blend at λ4570 Å is apparently systematically larger in our intermediate redshift sample relative to a low-z control sample. Even if this result needs a larger sample for adequate interpretation, higher Ca II/optical Fe II should be associated with recent episodes of star formation in intermediate redshift quasars and, at least in part, explain the apparent correlation of Ca II triplet equivalent width with z and L. The Ca II triplet measures yield significant constraints on the emitting region density and ionization parameter, implying Ca II triplet emission from log {{n}H} ≳ 11 [cm-3] and ionization parameter log U≲ -1.5. The line width and intensity ratios suggest properties consistent with emission from the outer part of a high-density broad line region (a line emitting accretion disk?). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the southern hemisphere, Chile, under programme ID 085.B-0158(A).

  11. A review of national health surveys in India.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Rakhi; Pandey, Anamika; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-04-01

    Several rounds of national health surveys have generated a vast amount of data in India since 1992. We describe and compare the key health information gathered, assess the availability of health data in the public domain, and review publications resulting from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), the District Level Household Survey (DLHS) and the Annual Health Survey (AHS). We highlight issues that need attention to improve the usefulness of the surveys in monitoring changing trends in India's disease burden: (i) inadequate coverage of noncommunicable diseases, injuries and some major communicable diseases; (ii) modest comparability between surveys on the key themes of child and maternal mortality and immunization to understand trends over time; (iii) short time intervals between the most recent survey rounds; and (iv) delays in making individual-level data available for analysis in the public domain. We identified 337 publications using NFHS data, in contrast only 48 and three publications were using data from the DLHS and AHS respectively. As national surveys are resource-intensive, it would be prudent to maximize their benefits. We suggest that India plan for a single major national health survey at five-year intervals in consultation with key stakeholders. This could cover additional major causes of the disease burden and their risk factors, as well as causes of death and adult mortality rate estimation. If done in a standardized manner, such a survey would provide useable and timely data to inform health interventions and facilitate assessment of their impact on population health.

  12. Atmospheric prediction model survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellck, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the SEASAT Satellite program of NASA, a survey of representative primitive equation atmospheric prediction models that exist in the world today was written for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Seventeen models developed by eleven different operational and research centers throughout the world are included in the survey. The surveys are tutorial in nature describing the features of the various models in a systematic manner.

  13. Surveying your internal customers.

    PubMed

    Weir, V L

    1998-06-01

    Internal customers often are overlooked when business techniques are applied. By applying common external customer satisfaction survey techniques to internal business functions, one hospital identified areas for improvement.

  14. Infrared airborne spectroradiometer survey results in the western Nevada area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.; Kuo, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark II airborne spectroradiometer system was flown over several geologic test sites in western Nevada. The infrared mineral absorption bands were observed and recorded for the first time using an airborne system with high spectral resolution in the 2.0 to 2.5 micron region. The data show that the hydrothermal alteration zone minerals, carbonates, and other minerals are clearly visible in the airborne survey mode. The finer spectral features that distinguish the various minerals with infrared bands are also clearly visible in the airborne survey data. Using specialized computer pattern recognition methods, it is possible to identify mineralogy and map alteration zones and lithologies by airborne spectroradiometer survey techniques.

  15. Aerial remote sensing surveys progress report: Helicopter geophysical survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; King, A.D.; Bell, D.T.; Holladay, J.S.; Labson, V.F.; Pellerin, L.

    1993-03-01

    The 35,252 acre Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in the western portion of the Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province in Tennessee, has been a nuclear production and development facility for50 years. Contaminants in the many waste sites on the ORR include a wide variety of radioactive isotopes as well as many organic and inorganic compounds. The locations, geometry, and contents of many of these waste sites are reasonably well known, while others are poorly known or unknown. To better characterize the reasonably well known sites and search for additional potentially environmentally hazardous sites, a two-phase aerial survey of the ORR was developed. Phase I began in March 1992 and consisted of aerial radiation, multispectral scanner, and photographic (natural color and color infrared) surveys. Phase II began in November 1992 and is described in this report. Phase II consisted of helicopter electromagnetic (HEM), magnetic, and gamma radiation surveys. Targets of the survey included both man-made (drums, trench boundaries, burn pits, well heads) and geologic (fractures, faults, karst features, geologic contacts) features. The Phase II survey has three components: testing, reconnaissance, and high-resolution data acquisition. To date, the testing and reconnaissance data acquisition have been completed, and some of the data have been processed. They indicate that: (1) magnetic and HEM data are complementary and do not always highlight the same anomaly; (2) under favorable circumstances, helicopter magnetometer systems are capable of detecting groups of four or more 55-gal drums at detector altitudes of 15 m or less; (3) HEM data provide data that compare favorably with surface data collected over burial trenches, (4) well casings may be related to magnetic monopole anomalies, as would be expected; and (5) changes in HEM and magnetic anomaly character are related to lithologic changes and may be used to track contacts between known outcrops.

  16. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2011-01-01

    Since the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) first began conducting its Alumni Perspectives Surveys 11 years ago, several "truths" about graduate business school alumni have consistently stood the test of time: They are and remain eminently employable. They constantly rate the value of the degree highly. This year's results are…

  17. Alumni Perspectives Survey. 2014 Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    Alumni are a powerful force in building a business school's brand. They recommend programs to prospective students, they connect current students to job opportunities, and they contribute significantly to building a school's legacy. The findings in the 2014 Alumni Perspectives Survey Report provide a current snapshot of nearly 21,000 business…

  18. Application Trends Survey. 2014 Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Rebecca; Bruggeman, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Now in its 15th year, the Graduate Management Admission Council's assessment of application volume trends for graduate management programs offers timely insights into demographic shifts and other factors defining the candidate pools for the 2014 application cycle. Responses collected in the 2014 survey represent a record-breaking total of 748 MBA,…

  19. Corporate Recruiters Survey: 2014 Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada Worthington, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Corporate Recruiters Survey Report examines the current hiring outlook for graduate business students and analyzes demand by industry and world region, salaries, job functions, and mobility in regional job placement. It also explores recruiter behavior, including recruitment practices and school and candidate selection criteria, and…

  20. Application Trends Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Application Trends Survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) is the industry source for comprehensive statistics and timely and reliable insights into the demand for graduate management education around the world. A total of 649 programs from 331 business schools and faculties worldwide representing 45 countries…