Science.gov

Sample records for glass mat technology

  1. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  2. Micro-hybrid electric vehicle application of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries in absorbent glass mat technology: Testing a partial-state-of-charge operation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Hockgeiger, E.

    The BMW Group has launched two micro-hybrid functions in high volume models in order to contribute to reduction of fuel consumption in modern passenger cars. Both the brake energy regeneration (BER) and the auto-start-stop function (ASSF) are based on the conventional 14 V vehicle electrical system and current series components with only little modifications. An intelligent control algorithm of the alternator enables recuperative charging in braking and coasting phases, known as BER. By switching off the internal combustion engine at a vehicle standstill the idling fuel consumption is effectively reduced by ASSF. By reason of economy and package a lead-acid battery is used as electrochemical energy storage device. The BMW Group assembles valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology in the micro-hybrid electrical power system since special challenges arise for the batteries. By field data analysis a lower average state-of-charge (SOC) due to partial state-of-charge (PSOC) operation and a higher cycling rate due to BER and ASSF are confirmed in this article. Similar to a design of experiment (DOE) like method we present a long-term lab investigation. Two types of 90 Ah VRLA AGM batteries are operated with a test bench profile that simulates the micro-hybrid vehicle electrical system under varying conditions. The main attention of this lab testing is focused on capacity loss and charge acceptance over cycle life. These effects are put into context with periodically refresh charging the batteries in order to prevent accelerated battery aging due to hard sulfation. We demonstrate the positive effect of refresh chargings concerning preservation of battery charge acceptance. Furthermore, we observe moderate capacity loss over 90 full cycles both at 25 °C and at 3 °C battery temperature.

  3. Study on the Strength of GFRP/Stainless Steel Adhesive Joints Reinforced with Glass Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Masaaki

    The adhesive strengths of glass fiber reinforced plastics/metal adhesive joints reinforced with glass mat under tensile shear loads and tensile loads were investigated analytically and experimentally. First, the stress singularity parameters of the bonding edges were analyzed by FEM for various types of adhesive joints reinforced with glass mat. The shear stress and normal stress distributions near the bonding edge can be expressed by two stress singularity parameters. Second, tensile shear tests were performed on taper lap joint and taper lap joint reinforced with glass mat and tensile tests were performed on T-type adhesive joint and T-type adhesive joint reinforced with glass mat. The relationships between the loads and the crosshead displacements were measured. We concluded that reinforcing adhesive joints has a greater effect on strength under tensile load than under tensile shear load. The adhesive joints strength reinforced with glass mat can be evaluated by using stress singularity parameters.

  4. Foam-mat drying technology: A review.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Z; Jideani, V A

    2017-08-13

    This article reviews various aspects of foam-mat drying such as foam-mat drying processing technique, main additives used for foam-mat drying, foam-mat drying of liquid and solid foods, quality characteristics of foam-mat dried foods, and economic and technical benefits for employing foam-mat drying. Foam-mat drying process is an alternative method that allows the removal of water from liquid materials and pureed materials. In this drying process, a liquid material is converted into foam that is stable by being whipped after adding an edible foaming agent. The stable foam is then spread out in sheet or mat and dried by using hot air (40-90°C) at atmospheric pressure. Methyl cellulose (0.25-2%), egg white (3-20%), maltodextrin (0.5-05%), and gum Arabic (2-9%) are the commonly utilized additives for the foam-mat drying process at the given range, either combined together for their effectiveness or individual effect. The foam-mat drying process is suitable for heat sensitive, viscous, and sticky products that cannot be dried using other forms of drying methods such as spray drying because of the state of product. More interest has developed for foam-mat drying because of the simplicity, cost effectiveness, high speed drying, and improved product quality it provides.

  5. Mechanical characterization of glass fiber (woven roving/chopped strand mat E-glass fiber) reinforced polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijaya; Srinivas, Kolla

    2017-07-01

    Polymer reinforced composites have been replacing most of the engineering material and their applications become more and more day by day. Polymer composites have been analyzing from past thirty five years for their betterment for adapting more applications. This paper aims at the mechanical properties of polyester reinforced with glass fiber composites. The glass fiber is reinforced with polyester in two forms viz Woven Rovings (WRG) and Chopped Strand Mat (CSMG) E-glass fibers. The composites are fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the composites are cut as per ASTM Standard sizes for corresponding tests like flexural, compression and impact tests, so that flexural strength, compression strength, impact strength and inter laminar shear stress(ILSS) of polymer matrix composites are analyzed. From the tests and further calculations, the polyester composites reinforced with Chopped Strand Mat glass fiber have shown better performance against flexural load, compression load and impact load than that of Woven Roving glass fiber.

  6. Damage zone development and failure sequence in glass fibre mat-reinforced polypropylene under static loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger-Kocsis, J.; Fejes-Kozma, Zs.

    1994-01-01

    The size of the damage zone in glass mat-reinforced PP (GMT—PP) can well be estimated by locating the acoustic emission (AE) events monitored during loading. It was shown that the extension of this zone can be adequately approximated by a circle of about 30-mm diameter, the half of which penetrates into the free ligament of the specimen.

  7. Proof testing a bridge deck design with glass fiber reinforced polymer bars as top mat of reinforcement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to test a full-scale prototype of a bridge deck design containing glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars as the top mat of reinforcement. The test deck mimics the design of the deck of one span of the new...

  8. HiMAT highly maneuverable aircraft technology, flight report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Flight verification of a primary flight control system, designed to control the unstable HiMAT aircraft is presented. The initial flight demonstration of a maneuver autopilot in the level cruise mode and the gathering of a limited amount of airspeed calibration data.

  9. Constitutive modelling of creep in a long fiber random glass mat thermoplastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasappa, Prasad

    The primary objective of this proposed research is to characterize and model the creep behaviour of Glass Mat Thermoplastic (GMT) composites under thermo-mechanical loads. In addition, tensile testing has been performed to study the variability in mechanical properties. The thermo-physical properties of the polypropylene matrix including crystallinity level, transitions and the variation of the stiffness with temperature have also been determined. In this work, the creep of a long fibre GMT composite has been investigated for a relatively wide range of stresses from 5 to 80 MPa and temperatures from 25 to 90°C. The higher limit for stress is approximately 90% of the nominal tensile strength of the material. A Design of Experiments (ANOVA) statistical method was applied to determine the effects of stress and temperature in the random mat material which is known for wild experimental scatter. Two sets of creep tests were conducted. First, preliminary short-term creep tests consisting of 30 minutes creep followed by recovery were carried out over a wide range of stresses and temperatures. These tests were carried out to determine the linear viscoelastic region of the material. From these tests, the material was found to be linear viscoelastic up-to 20 MPa at room temperature and considerable non-linearities were observed with both stress and temperature. Using Time-Temperature superposition (TTS) a long term master curve for creep compliance for up-to 185 years at room temperature has been obtained. Further, viscoplastic strains were developed in these tests indicating the need for a non-linear viscoelastic viscoplastic constitutive model. The second set of creep tests was performed to develop a general non-linear viscoelastic viscoplastic constitutive model. Long term creep-recovery tests consisting of 1 day creep followed by recovery has been conducted over the stress range between 20 and 70 MPa at four temperatures: 25°C, 40°C, 60°C and 80°C. Findley's model

  10. Closing the design loop on HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Robinson, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    The design methodology used in the HiMAT program and the wind tunnel development activities are discussed. Selected results from the flight test program are presented and the strengths and weaknesses of testing advanced technology vehicles using the RPV concept is examined. The role of simulation on the development of digital flight control systems and in RPV's in particular is emphasized.

  11. Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) flight-flutter test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle was evaluated in a joint NASA and Air Force flight test program. The HiMAT vehicle is a remotely piloted research vehicle. Its design incorporates the use of advanced composite materials in the wings, and canards for aeroelastic tailoring. A flight-flutter test program was conducted to clear a sufficient flight envelope to allow for performance, stability and control, and loads testing. Testing was accomplished with and without flight control-surface dampers. Flutter clearance of the vehicle indicated satisfactory damping and damping trends for the structural modes of the HiMAT vehicle. The data presented include frequency and damping plotted as a function of Mach number.

  12. MINERGY CORPORATION GLASS FURNACE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents performance and economic data for a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program demonstration of the Minergy Corporation (Minergy) Glass Furnace Technology (GFT). The demonstration evaluated the techno...

  13. Glass fiber reinforced polymer bars as top mat reinforcement for bridge decks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to characterize the material and bond properties of three commercially available GFRP (glass fiber reinforced polymer) reinforcing bars, and evaluate the effects of the material properties and the current ACI desi...

  14. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

  15. SITE - DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - MINERGY GLASS FURNACE TECHNOLOGY - MINERGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Glass Furnace Technology (GFT) was developed by Minergy Corporation (Minergy), of Waukesha, Wisconsin. Minergy originally developed vitrification technologies to process wastewater sludge into glass aggregate that could be sold as a commercial product. Minergy modified a st...

  16. Incorporation of glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite microparticles into poly(lactic acid) electrospun fibre mats for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, Daniel; Correia, Cristina O; Silva, Dina M; Gomes, Pedro S; Fernandes, Maria H; Santos, José D; Sencadas, Vitor

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering is constantly evolving towards novel materials that mimic the properties of the replaced injured tissue or organ. A hybrid electrospun membrane of electroactive poly(l-acid lactic) (PLLA) polymer with glass reinforced hydroxyapatite (Bonelike®) microparticles placed among the polymer fibres in a morphology like "islands in the sea" was processed. The incorporation of 60 to 80wt% Bonelike® bone grafts granules with ≤150μm into the polymer solution lead to an amorphous polymeric fibre membranes, and a decrease of the average polymer fibre diameter from 550±150nm for neat PLA down to 440±170nm for the hybrid composite. The presence of Bonelike® in the polymer mats reduced the activation energy for thermal degradation from 134kJ·mol -1 , obtained for the neat PLLA membranes down to 71kJ·mol -1 , calculated for the hybrid composite membranes. In vitro cell culture results suggest that the developed processing method does not induce cytotoxic effects in MG 63 osteoblastic cells, and creates an environment that enhances cell proliferation, when compared to the neat PLLA membrane. The simplicity and scalability of the processing method suggests a large application potential of this novel hybrid polymer-microparticles fibre membranes for bone regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  18. Flight control systems development of highly maneuverable aircraft technology /HiMAT/ vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) program was conceived to demonstrate advanced technology concepts through scaled-aircraft flight tests using a remotely piloted technique. Closed-loop primary flight control is performed from a ground-based cockpit, utilizing a digital computer and up/down telemetry links. A backup flight control system for emergency operation resides in an onboard computer. The onboard systems are designed to provide fail-operational capabilities and utilize two microcomputers, dual uplink receiver/decoders, and redundant hydraulic actuation and power systems. This paper discusses the design and validation of the primary and backup digital flight control systems as well as the unique pilot and specialized systems interfaces.

  19. Performance of a bridge deck with glass fiber reinforced polymer bars as the top mat of reinforcement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the performance of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars as reinforcement for concrete decks. Today's rapid bridge deck deterioration is calling for a replacement for steel reinforcement. The advan...

  20. Wearable technology: using Google Glass as a teaching tool

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Hui Min; Gajendragadkar, Parag Ravindra; Bokhari, Awais

    2015-01-01

    Wearable technology holds great promise in revolutionising healthcare delivery. The benefits can also be seen in medical education and delivering healthcare in remote places. We report the use of Google Glass technology as a teaching tool in broadcasting a procedure onto a mobile phone as a viewer, replacing expensive and often cumbersome existing equipment. PMID:25969411

  1. Wearable technology: using Google Glass as a teaching tool.

    PubMed

    Knight, Hui Min; Gajendragadkar, Parag Ravindra; Bokhari, Awais

    2015-05-12

    Wearable technology holds great promise in revolutionising healthcare delivery. The benefits can also be seen in medical education and delivering healthcare in remote places. We report the use of Google Glass technology as a teaching tool in broadcasting a procedure onto a mobile phone as a viewer, replacing expensive and often cumbersome existing equipment. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Rediscovering ancient glass technologies through the examination of opacifier crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlil, S.; Biron, I.; Galoisy, L.; Morin, G.

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the study is to understand how antimonate opacifying crystals were obtained throughout history. Two archaeological glass productions opacified with calcium and lead antimonates are studied in this paper, in order to rediscover ancient opaque glass technologies: Roman mosaic tesserae (1st cent. B.C. 4th cent. A.D.) and Nevers lampworking glass (18th cent. A.D.). The fine examination of crystalline phases and of the vitreous matrix is undertaken using various and complementary techniques. Results are compared with a modern reference production, for which the technological process is well known. We demonstrate that Ca-antimonate opacifiers in Roman mosaic tesserae, as well as in Nevers lampworking glass, were obtained by in situ crystallization. Nevertheless, Roman and Nevers glass would have undergone different firing processes. We propose that the addition of previously synthesized crystals or the use of “anime” could be the process used to obtain Pb-antimonate opacified glass, for both productions studied. We demonstrate that CaO, PbO and Sb2O3 concentrations in the bulk compositions and in the matrices, and their evolution with the crystallinity ratio, offer robust criteria for the distinction of the opacification process used. Also, the different crystalline structures help to provide information on the experimental conditions.

  3. Deconstructing three-dimensional (3D) structure of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator to tailor pore dimensions and amplify electrolyte uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawal, Amit; Rao, P. V. Kameswara; Kumar, Vijay

    2018-04-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator is a vital technical component in valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries that can be tailored for a desired application. To selectively design and tailor the AGM separator, the intricate three-dimensional (3D) structure needs to be unraveled. Herein, a toolkit of 3D analytical models of pore size distribution and electrolyte uptake expressed via wicking characteristics of AGM separators under unconfined and confined states is presented. 3D data of fiber orientation distributions obtained previously through X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) analysis are used as key set of input parameters. The predictive ability of pore size distribution model is assessed through the commonly used experimental set-up that usually apply high level of compressive stresses. Further, the existing analytical model of wicking characteristics of AGM separators has been extended to account for 3D characteristics, and subsequently, compared with the experimental results. A good agreement between the theory and experiments pave the way to simulate the realistic charge-discharge modes of the battery by applying cyclic loading condition. A threshold criterion describing the invariant behavior of pore size and wicking characteristics in terms of maximum permissible limit of key structural parameters during charge-discharge mode of the battery has also been proposed.

  4. Arctic Glass: Innovative Consumer Technology in Support of Arctic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of cyberinfrastructure on the North Slope of Alaska is drastically limited by location-specific conditions, including: unique geophysical features, remoteness of location, and harsh climate. The associated cost of maintaining this unique cyberinfrastructure also becomes a limiting factor. As a result, field experiments conducted in this region have historically been at a technological disadvantage. The Arctic Glass project explored a variety of scenarios where innovative consumer-grade technology was leveraged as a lightweight, rapidly deployable, sustainable, alternatives to traditional large-scale Arctic cyberinfrastructure installations. Google Glass, cloud computing services, Internet of Things (IoT) microcontrollers, miniature LIDAR, co2 sensors designed for HVAC systems, and portable network kits are several of the components field-tested at the Toolik Field Station as part of this project. Region-specific software was also developed, including a multi featured, voice controlled Google Glass application named "Arctic Glass". Additionally, real-time sensor monitoring and remote control capability was evaluated through the deployment of a small cluster of microcontroller devices. Network robustness was analyzed as the devices delivered streams of abiotic data to a web-based dashboard monitoring service in near real time. The same data was also uploaded synchronously by the devices to Amazon Web Services. A detailed overview of solutions deployed during the 2015 field season, results from experiments utilizing consumer sensors, and potential roles consumer technology could play in support of Arctic science will be discussed.

  5. Wafer-level manufacturing technology of glass microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossner, U.; Hoeftmann, T.; Wieland, R.; Hansch, W.

    2014-08-01

    In high-tech products, there is an increasing demand to integrate glass lenses into complex micro systems. Especially in the lighting industry LEDs and laser diodes used for automotive applications require encapsulated micro lenses. To enable low-cost production, manufacturing of micro lenses on wafer level base using a replication technology is a key technology. This requires accurate forming of thousands of lenses with a diameter of 1-2 mm on a 200 mm wafer compliant with mass production. The article will discuss the technical aspects of a lens manufacturing replication process and the challenges, which need to be solved: choice of an appropriate master for replication, thermally robust interlayer coating, choice of replica glass, bonding and separation procedure. A promising approach for the master substrate material is based on a lens structured high-quality glass wafer with high melting point covered by a coating layer of amorphous silicon or germanium. This layer serves as an interlayer for the glass bonding process. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes allow a deposition of layer coatings with different hydrogen and doping content influencing their chemical and physical behavior. A time reduced molding process using a float glass enables the formation of high quality lenses while preserving the recyclability of the mother substrate. The challenge is the separation of the replica from the master mold. An overview of chemical methods based on optimized etching of coating layer through small channels will be given and the impact of glass etching on surface roughness is discussed.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, KMC CONTROLS, INC. SLE-1001 SIGHT GLASS MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the KMC SLE-1001 Sight Glass Monitor manufactured by KMC Controls, Inc. The sight glass monitor (SGM) fits over the sight glass that may be installed in a refrigeration system for the pur...

  7. A field operational test on valve-regulated lead-acid absorbent-glass-mat batteries in micro-hybrid electric vehicles. Part I. Results based on kernel density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Karspeck, T.; Ott, C.; Weckler, M.; Stoermer, A. O.

    2011-03-01

    In March 2007 the BMW Group has launched the micro-hybrid functions brake energy regeneration (BER) and automatic start and stop function (ASSF). Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology are applied in vehicles with micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In both part I and part II of this publication vehicles with MHPS and AGM batteries are subject to a field operational test (FOT). Test vehicles with conventional power system (CPS) and flooded batteries were used as a reference. In the FOT sample batteries were mounted several times and electrically tested in the laboratory intermediately. Vehicle- and battery-related diagnosis data were read out for each test run and were matched with laboratory data in a data base. The FOT data were analyzed by the use of two-dimensional, nonparametric kernel estimation for clear data presentation. The data show that capacity loss in the MHPS is comparable to the CPS. However, the influence of mileage performance, which cannot be separated, suggests that battery stress is enhanced in the MHPS although a battery refresh function is applied. Anyway, the FOT demonstrates the unsuitability of flooded batteries for the MHPS because of high early capacity loss due to acid stratification and because of vanishing cranking performance due to increasing internal resistance. Furthermore, the lack of dynamic charge acceptance for high energy regeneration efficiency is illustrated. Under the presented FOT conditions charge acceptance of lead-acid (LA) batteries decreases to less than one third for about half of the sample batteries compared to new battery condition. In part II of this publication FOT data are presented by multiple regression analysis (Schaeck et al., submitted for publication [1]).

  8. Technology development program for an advanced microsheet glass concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems are candidate electrical power generating systems for future NASA missions. One of the key components in a solar dynamic power system is the concentrator which collects the sun's energy and focuses it into a receiver. In 1985, the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated the Advanced Solar Dynamic Concentrator Program with funding from NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST). The objectives of the Advanced Concentrator Program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived (7 to 10 years) space solar dynamic concentrators. The Advanced Concentrator Program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. The Advanced Microsheet Glass Concentrator Program, a reflector concept, that is currently being investigated both in-house and under contract is discussed.

  9. Development of glass fibre reinforced composites using microwave heating technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, T.; Vonberg, K.; Gries, T.; Seide, G.

    2017-10-01

    Fibre reinforced composites are differentiated by the used matrix material (thermoplastic versus duroplastic matrix) and the level of impregnation. Thermoplastic matrix systems get more important due to their suitability for mass production, their good shapeability and their high impact resistance. A challenge in the processing of these materials is the reduction of the melt flow paths of the thermoplastic matrix. The viscosity of molten thermoplastic material is distinctly higher than the viscosity of duroplastic material. An approach to reduce the flow paths of the thermoplastic melt is given by a commingling process. Composites made from commingling hybrid yarns consist of thermoplastic and reinforcing fibres. Fabrics made from these hybrid yarns are heated and consolidated by the use of heat pressing to form so called organic sheets. An innovative heating system is given by microwaves. The advantage of microwave heating is the volumetric heating of the material, where the energy of the electromagnetic radiation is converted into thermal energy inside the material. In this research project microwave active hybrid yarns are produced and examined at the Institute for Textile Technology of RWTH Aachen University (ITA). The industrial research partner Fricke und Mallah Microwave Technology GmbH, Peine, Germany develops an innovative pressing systems based on a microwave heating system. By implementing the designed microwave heating technology into an existing heat pressing process, FRTCs are being manufactured from glass and nanomodified polypropylene fibre woven fabrics. In this paper the composites are investigated for their mechanical and optical properties.

  10. Archean Microbial Mat Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Michael M.; Thornton, Daniel C. O.; Pope, Michael C.; Olszewski, Thomas D.; Gong, Jian

    2011-05-01

    Much of the Archean record of microbial communities consists of fossil mats and stromatolites. Critical physical emergent properties governing the evolution of large-scale (centimeters to meters) topographic relief on the mat landscape are (a) mat surface roughness relative to the laminar sublayer and (b) cohesion. These properties can be estimated for fossil samples under many circumstances. A preliminary analysis of Archean mat cohesion suggests that mats growing in shallow marine environments from throughout this time had cohesions similar to those of modern shallow marine mats. There may have been a significant increase in mat strength at the end of the Archean.

  11. Damage Resistant Optical Glasses for High Power Lasers: A Continuing Glass Science and Technology Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H

    2002-08-28

    A major challenge in the development of optical glasses for high-power lasers is reducing or eliminating laser-induced damage to the interior (bulk) and the polished surface of the glass. Bulk laser damage in glass generally originates from inclusions. With the development of novel glass melting and forming processes it is now possible to make both fused silica and a suit of meta-phosphate laser glasses in large sizes ({approx}>0.5-lm diameter), free of inclusions and with high optical homogeneity ({approx} 10{sup -6}). Considerable attention also has been focused on improving the laser damage resistance to polished optical glass surfaces. Studies have shownmore » that laser-induced damage to surfaces grows exponentially with the number of shots when illuminated with nano-second pulses at 351-nm above a given fluence threshold. A new approach for reducing and eliminating laser-induced surface damage relies on a series of post-polishing treatment steps. This damage improvement method is briefly reviewed.« less

  12. Solder glass sealing technology for use in packaging of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzmann, Gerd

    1990-08-01

    The solder glass sealing technology is an alternative to the direct sealing method of the socalled hboptocansu. Using solder glass for the junction of glass and the metal can the temperature at about 500 °C does not destroy the optical quality of the precision glass components. The glass can also be coated with an antireflective layer and even the sealing of filterglass is possible. In cases where coupling losses can't be tolerated, the fiber has to be fed directly through the wall into the housing. Fiber feedthroughs, using solder glass for the sealing of the fiber into a metal tube, are commonly metal soldered or welded into the wall and the fiber surface is directly leading to the semiconductor.

  13. Samsung Licenses ORNL Transparent Superhydrophobic Glass Coating Technology for Electronic Devices

    ScienceCinema

    Aytug, Tolga

    2018-06-12

    Samsung Electronics has exclusively licensed optically clear superhydrophobic film technology from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory to improve the performance of glass displays on smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices.

  14. PREFACE: International Seminar on Science and Technology of Glass Materials (ISSTGM-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeraiah, N.

    2009-07-01

    The progress of the human race is linked with the development of new materials and also the values they acquired in the course of time. Though the art of glass forming has been known from Egyptian civilization, the understanding and use of these glasses for technological applications only became possible once the structural aspects were revealed by the inspiring theories proposed by William H Zachariasen. Glass and glass ceramics have become the essential materials for modern technology. The applications of these materials are wide and cover areas such as optical communication, laser host, innovative architecture, bio-medical, automobile and space technology. As we master the technology, we must also learn to use it judiciously and for the overall development of all in this global village. The International Seminar on Science and Technology of Glass Materials (ISSTGM-2009) is organized to bring together scientists, academia and industry in order to discuss various aspects of the technology and to inspire young scholars to take up fruitful research. Various topics such as glass formation and glass-ceramics, glass structure, applications of glass and glass ceramics in nuclear waste management, radiation dosimetry, electronics and information technology, biotechnological applications, bulk metallic glasses, glasses containing nano-particles, hybrid glasses, novel glasses and applications in photonics, Non-linear optics and energy generation were discussed. In this volume, 59 research articles covering 18 invited talks, 10 oral presentations and 31 poster presentations are included. We hope these will serve as a valuable resource to all the scientists and scholars working with glass materials. Acharya Nagarjuna University, established in 1976, is named after the great Buddhist preceptor and philosopher, Acharya Nagarjuna, who founded a university on the banks of river Krishna some centuries ago. The University is situated between Vijayawada and Guntur, the famous

  15. Assessment of Japanese Technology in Advanced Glass and Ceramic Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    powders and crystals by hydrothermal tech- niques, and they have had their process for the preparation of zirconia powder commercial- ized by the...Masahiro Yoshimura. Whisker-Glass Composites, Hydrothermal Zirconia Powders , Hydrothermal Machining, Super-Conducting Thin Films. Professor Eiichi

  16. Accuracy of remote chest X-ray interpretation using Google Glass technology.

    PubMed

    Spaedy, Emily; Christakopoulos, Georgios E; Tarar, Muhammad Nauman J; Christopoulos, Georgios; Rangan, Bavana V; Roesle, Michele; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Yarbrough, William; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2016-09-15

    We sought to explore the accuracy of remote chest X-ray reading using hands-free, wearable technology (Google Glass, Google, Mountain View, California). We compared interpretation of twelve chest X-rays with 23 major cardiopulmonary findings by faculty and fellows from cardiology, radiology, and pulmonary-critical care via: (1) viewing the chest X-ray image on the Google Glass screen; (2) viewing a photograph of the chest X-ray taken using Google Glass and interpreted on a mobile device; (3) viewing the original chest X-ray on a desktop computer screen. One point was given for identification of each correct finding and a subjective rating of user experience was recorded. Fifteen physicians (5 faculty and 10 fellows) participated. The average chest X-ray reading score (maximum 23 points) as viewed through the Google Glass, Google Glass photograph on a mobile device, and the original X-ray viewed on a desktop computer was 14.1±2.2, 18.5±1.5 and 21.3±1.7, respectively (p<0.0001 between Google Glass and mobile device, p<0.0001 between Google Glass and desktop computer and p=0.0004 between mobile device and desktop computer). Of 15 physicians, 11 (73.3%) felt confident in detecting findings using the photograph taken by Google Glass as viewed on a mobile device. Remote chest X-ray interpretation using hands-free, wearable technology (Google Glass) is less accurate than interpretation using a desktop computer or a mobile device, suggesting that further technical improvements are needed before widespread application of this novel technology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Production of coloured glass-ceramics from incinerator ash using thermal plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Huang, M Z; Tzeng, C C; Cheng, K B; Ueng, T H

    2007-08-01

    Incineration is a major treatment process for municipal solid waste in Taiwan. It is estimated that over 1.5 Mt of incinerator ash are produced annually. This study proposes using thermal plasma technology to treat incinerator ash. Sintered glass-ceramics were produced using quenched vitrified slag with colouring agents added. The experimental results showed that the major crystalline phases developed in the sintered glass-ceramics were gehlenite and wollastonite, but many other secondary phases also appeared depending on the colouring agents added. The physical/mechanical properties, chemical resistance and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure of the coloured glass-ceramics were satisfactory. The glass-ceramic products obtained from incinerator ash treated with thermal plasma technology have great potential for building applications.

  18. Through the Looking Glass: Examining Technology Integration in School Librarianship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lucy Santos

    2014-01-01

    The school library profession has begun to develop a reputation for tech-savviness. Several school librarians are nationally recognized technology leaders and present at conferences where instructional technology is at the forefront. Unfortunately, while school librarians have done a wonderful job of marketing their technological expertise in the…

  19. Glass sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  20. 78 FR 77194 - Golden Elephant Glass Technology, Inc., and Pacific Alliance Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] Golden Elephant Glass Technology, Inc., and Pacific Alliance Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading December 18, 2013. It appears to the Securities and... Golden Elephant Glass Technology, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period...

  1. Precision molding of advanced glass optics: innovative production technology for lens arrays and free form optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongs, Guido; Bresseler, Bernd; Bergs, Thomas; Menke, Gert

    2012-10-01

    Today isothermal precision molding of imaging glass optics has become a widely applied and integrated production technology in the optical industry. Especially in consumer electronics (e.g. digital cameras, mobile phones, Blu-ray) a lot of optical systems contain rotationally symmetrical aspherical lenses produced by precision glass molding. But due to higher demands on complexity and miniaturization of optical elements the established process chain for precision glass molding is not sufficient enough. Wafer based molding processes for glass optics manufacturing become more and more interesting for mobile phone applications. Also cylindrical lens arrays can be used in high power laser systems. The usage of unsymmetrical free-form optics allows an increase of efficiency in optical laser systems. Aixtooling is working on different aspects in the fields of mold manufacturing technologies and molding processes for extremely high complex optical components. In terms of array molding technologies, Aixtooling has developed a manufacturing technology for the ultra-precision machining of carbide molds together with European partners. The development covers the machining of multi lens arrays as well as cylindrical lens arrays. The biggest challenge is the molding of complex free-form optics having no symmetrical axis. A comprehensive CAD/CAM data management along the entire process chain is essential to reach high accuracies on the molded lenses. Within a national funded project Aixtooling is working on a consistent data handling procedure in the process chain for precision molding of free-form optics.

  2. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  3. Single-mode glass waveguide technology for optical interchip communication on board level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Neitz, Marcel; Schröder, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The large bandwidth demand in long-distance telecom networks lead to single-mode fiber interconnects as result of low dispersion, low loss and dense wavelength multiplexing possibilities. In contrast, multi-mode interconnects are suitable for much shorter lengths up to 300 meters and are promising for optical links between racks and on board level. Active optical cables based on multi-mode fiber links are at the market and research in multi-mode waveguide integration on board level is still going on. Compared to multi-mode, a single-mode waveguide has much more integration potential because of core diameters of around 20% of a multi-mode waveguide by a much larger bandwidth. But light coupling in single-mode waveguides is much more challenging because of lower coupling tolerances. Together with the silicon photonics technology, a single-mode waveguide technology on board-level will be the straight forward development goal for chip-to-chip optical interconnects integration. Such a hybrid packaging platform providing 3D optical single-mode links bridges the gap between novel photonic integrated circuits and the glass fiber based long-distance telecom networks. Following we introduce our 3D photonic packaging approach based on thin glass substrates with planar integrated optical single-mode waveguides for fiber-to-chip and chip-to-chip interconnects. This novel packaging approach merges micro-system packaging and glass integrated optics. It consists of a thin glass substrate with planar integrated singlemode waveguide circuits, optical mirrors and lenses providing an integration platform for photonic IC assembly and optical fiber interconnect. Thin glass is commercially available in panel and wafer formats and characterizes excellent optical and high-frequency properties. That makes it perfect for microsystem packaging. The paper presents recent results in single-mode waveguide technology on wafer level and waveguide characterization. Furthermore the integration in a

  4. An experimental approach to manufacturing technology of historical glass (XIII-XV centuries). Comparison with current glassmaking technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrago, Mariona; Gimeno, Domingo; Bazzocchi, Flavia; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2015-04-01

    One of the major and less explored issues in the characterization of historical glasses is the determination of their viscosity as a function of temperature in order to constrain technological aspects of glass production. Until now, assumptions on temperatures have been based on mathematical models based on chemical compositions. Hence, the topic of this work is to explore the technology of stained glass production related to the workability and melting process of the glass by experimental laboratory measurements. This work presents the analysis of viscosity of glasses from different historical sites and chemical compositions: four from Santes Creus (Tarragona, XIII century), two of classical medieval stained glass window from Santa Maria de Pedralbes (Barcelona, mid XIV century), and three of evolved late-medieval type from Santa Maria del Mar (Barcelona first half of XV century), and one sample of soda-lime industrial glass by means of Hot-Stage Microscopy and glass transformation temperature Tg by dilatometry. These data are then compared to the predictions on theoretical viscosity obtained from mathematical models based on chemical composition. These samples are classified according to their major modifier in: Na-rich (12-17% of Na2O, between 65-77% of SiO2 and less than 3 % of K2O); Ca-rich (29% of CaO, 54% of SiO2, 4% of K2O, and 4% of Na2O); K-Ca-rich (17 to 21% of K2O, more than 14% of CaO, 49-55% of SiO2and less than 2% of Na2O); Na-Ca-rich (12-14% of Na2O, 9-15% of CaO, 57-71% of SiO2 and < 6% of K2O). Glass transition temperature (Tg) is correlated to chemical composition: 464-492 °C for Na-rich, 645 °C for Ca-rich, 582-586 °C for K-Ca-rich and 497-542 °C for Na-Ca-rich glasses. Experimental viscosity-temperature curves are traced using Tg and fixed viscosity points measured by Hot-Stage microscopy (according to German standard 51730) in order to provide more accurate insight into the phases of glass production process (melting, working, conditioning

  5. Video-based self-review: comparing Google Glass and GoPro technologies.

    PubMed

    Paro, John A M; Nazareli, Rahim; Gurjala, Anadev; Berger, Aaron; Lee, Gordon K

    2015-05-01

    Professionals in a variety of specialties use video-based review as a method of constant self-evaluation. We believe critical self-reflection will allow a surgical trainee to identify methods for improvement throughout residency and beyond. We have used 2 new popular technologies to evaluate their role in accomplishing the previously mentioned objectives. Our group investigated Google Glass and GoPro cameras. Medical students, residents, and faculty were invited to wear each of the devices during a scheduled operation. After the case, each participant was asked to comment on a number of features of the device including comfort, level of distraction/interference with operating, ease of video acquisition, and battery life. Software and hardware specifications were compiled and compared by the authors. A "proof-of-concept" was also performed using the video-conferencing abilities of Google Glass to perform a simulated flap check. The technical specifications of the 2 cameras favor GoPro over Google Glass. Glass records in 720p with 5-MP still shots, and the GoPro records in 1080p with 12-MP still shots. Our tests of battery life showed more than 2 hours of continuous video with GoPro, and less than 1 hour for Glass. Favorable features of Google Glass included comfort and relative ease of use; they could not comfortably wear loupes while operating, and would have preferred longer hands-free video recording. The GoPro was slightly more cumbersome and required a nonsterile team member to activate all pictures or video; however, loupes could be worn. Google Glass was successfully used in the hospital for a simulated flap check, with overall audio and video being transmitted--fine detail was lost, however. There are benefits and limitations to each of the devices tested. Google Glass is in its infancy and may gain a larger intraoperative role in the future. We plan to use Glass as a way for trainees to easily acquire intraoperative footage as a means to "review tape" and

  6. Using the Technology: Introducing Point of View Video Glasses Into the Simulated Clinical Learning Environment.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Helene; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana; Saunders, Rosemary; Dugmore, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The introduction of learning technologies into educational settings continues to grow alongside the emergence of innovative technologies into the healthcare arena. The challenge for health professionals such as medical, nursing, and allied health practitioners is to develop an improved understanding of these technologies and how they may influence practice and contribute to healthcare. For nurse educators to remain contemporary, there is a need to not only embrace current technologies in teaching and learning but to also ensure that students are able to adapt to this changing pedagogy. One recent technological innovation is the use of wearable computing technology, consisting of video recording with the capability of playback analysis. The authors of this article discuss the introduction of the use of wearable Point of View video glasses by a cohort of nursing students in a simulated clinical learning laboratory. Of particular interest was the ease of use of the glasses, also termed the usability of this technology, which is central to its success. Students' reflections were analyzed together with suggestions for future use.

  7. Composition, Preservation and Production Technology of Augusta Emerita Roman Glasses from the First to the Sixth Century a.d.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomar, Teresa; Garcia-Heras, Manuel; Sabio, Rafael; Rincon, Jesus-Maria; Villegas, Maria-Angeles

    This paper presents the results derived from an archaeometric study undertaken on glass samples from the Roman town of Augusta Emerita (Mérida, Spain). The main goal of the research was to provide for the first time some compositional and technological insights into the glass finds unearthed in this town. Glass samples from different sites and chronology, either from inside or from outside the perimeter of the ancient town and from the first to the sixth century AD, were analyzed and characterized through optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and VIS spectrophotometry. Resulting data indicated that all the samples studied were natron-based soda lime silicate glasses, even though two chronological and compositionally distinct groups were distinguished. One composed of Early Empire glasses and a second one composed of glasses from the fourth century AD onward, which was characterized by the presence of the so-called HIMT (high iron, manganese, and titanium) glasses. Comparison with coeval glasses suggested that Augusta Emerita shared the same trade glass circles than other contemporary Roman towns, within the frame of a secondary production scale. Finally, some outstanding differences connected to composition and chronology were found, since Late Roman glasses presented a higher and distinct degree of alteration than Early Empire ones.

  8. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines the rates of processes that shape Earth's environment, define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred, and create biosignatures in sediments and atmospheres. In cyanobacterial mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides energy, organic substrates and oxygen to the ecosystem. Incident light changes with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition, and counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Microliters produce hydrogen, small organic acids, nitrogen and sulfur species. Such compounds fuel a flow of energy and electrons in these ecosystems and thus shape interactions between groups of microorganisms. Coordinated observations of population distribution, abundance, and activity for an entire community are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. These questions address those factors that sustain the remarkable diversity of microorganisms that are now being revealed by molecular techniques. These questions also target the processes that shape the various kinds of biosignatures that we will seek, both in ancient rocks from Earth and Mars, and in atmospheres of distant planets beyond our Solar System.

  9. Macro Analysis Tool - MAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is an easy-to-use Excel-based macro analysis tool (MAT) for performing comparisons of air sensor data with reference data and interpreting the results. This tool tackles one of the biggest hurdles in citizen-led community air monitoring projects – working with ...

  10. New surface smoothing technologies for manufacturing of complex shaped glass components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Sebastian; Schwager, Anne-Marie; Bliedtner, Jens; Götze, Kerstin; Rädlein, Edda; Schulze, Christian; Gerhardt, Martin; Fuhr, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The production of complex glass components with 2.5D or 3D-structures involves great effort and the need for advanced CNC-technology. Especially the final surface treatment, for generation of transparent surfaces, represents a timeconsuming and costly process. The ultrasonic-assisted grinding procedure is used to generate arbitrary shaped components and freeform-surfaces. The special kinematic principle, containing a high-frequency tool oscillation, enables efficient manufacturing processes. Surfaces produced in this way allow for application of novel smoothing methods, providing considerable advantages compared to classic polishing. It is shown, that manufacturing of transparent glass surfaces with low roughness down to Rq = 10 nm is possible, using an ultra-fine grinding process. By adding a CO2-laser polishing process, roughness can be reduced even further with a very short polishing time.

  11. Glass Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA technologies have played part in growth and cost containment of studio glass art, among them a foam type insulation developed to meet a need for lightweight material that would reduce flame spread in aircraft fire. Foam comes in several forms and is widely used by glass artists, chiefly as an insulator for the various types of ovens used in glass working. Another Spinoff is alumina crucibles to contain molten glass. Before alumina crucibles were used, glass tanks were made of firebrick which tended to erode under high temperatures and cause impurities; this not only improved quality but made the process more cost effective. One more NASA technology that found its way into glass art working is a material known as graphite board, a special form of graphite originally developed for rocket motor applications. This graphite is used to exact compound angles and creates molds for poured glass artworks of dramatic design.

  12. Choice of mathematical models for technological process of glass rod drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseeva, L. B.

    2017-10-01

    The technological process of drawing glass rods (light guides) is considered. Automated control of the drawing process is reduced to the process of making decisions to ensure a given quality. The drawing process is considered as a control object, including the drawing device (control device) and the optical fiber forming zone (control object). To study the processes occurring in the formation zone, mathematical models are proposed, based on the continuum mechanics basics. To assess the influence of disturbances, a transfer function is obtained from the basis of the wave equation. Obtaining the regression equation also adequately describes the drawing process.

  13. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ritzberger, Christian; Apel, Elke; Höland, Wolfram; Peschke, Arnd; Rheinberger, Volker M.

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  14. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan tomore » conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2

  15. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    PubMed

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Polypropylene/glass fiber hierarchical composites incorporating inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles for advanced technological applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-10-09

    Novel isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/glass fiber (GF) laminates reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS2) nanoparticles as environmentally friendly fillers have been successfully fabricated by simple melt-blending and fiber impregnation in a hot-press without the addition of any compatibilizer. The influence of IF-WS2 concentration on the morphology, viscosity. and thermal and mechanical behavior of the hierarchical composites has been investigated. Results revealed an unprecedented 62 °C increase in the degradation temperature of iPP/GF upon addition of only 4.0 wt % IF-WS2. The coexistence of both micro- and nanoscale fillers resulted in synergistic effects on enhancing the stiffness, strength, crystallinity, thermal stability, glass transition (Tg) and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of the matrix. The approach used in this work is an efficient, versatile, scalable and economic strategy to improve the mechanical and thermal behavior of GF-reinforced thermoplastics with a view to extend their use in advanced technological applications. This new type of composite materials shows great potential to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport.

  17. Transition to Glass: Pilot Training for High-Technology Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Chute, Rebecca D.; Moses, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This report examines the activities of a major commercial air carrier between 1993 and late 1996 as it acquired an advanced fleet of high-technology aircraft (Boeing 757). Previously, the airline's fleet consisted of traditional (non-glass) aircraft, and this report examines the transition from a traditional fleet to a glass one. A total of 150 pilots who were entering the B-757 transition training volunteered for the study, which consisted of three query phases: (1) first day of transition training, (2) 3 to 4 months after transition training, and (3) 12 to 14 months after initial operating experience. Of these initial 150 pilots, 99 completed all three phases of the study, with each phase consisting of probes on attitudes and experiences associated with their training and eventual transition to flying the line. In addition to the three questionnaires, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Although the primary focus of this study was on the flight training program, additional factors such as technical support, documentation, and training aids were investigated as well. The findings generally indicate that the pilot volunteers were highly motivated and very enthusiastic about their training program. In addition, the group had low levels of apprehension toward automation and expressed a high degree of satisfaction toward their training. However, there were some concerns expressed regarding the deficiencies in some of the training aids and lack of a free-play flight management system training device.

  18. Automatic identification and location technology of glass insulator self-shattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinbo; Zhang, Huiying; Zhang, Ye

    2017-11-01

    The insulator of transmission lines is one of the most important infrastructures, which is vital to ensure the safe operation of transmission lines under complex and harsh operating conditions. The glass insulator often self-shatters but the available identification methods are inefficient and unreliable. Then, an automatic identification and localization technology of self-shattered glass insulators is proposed, which consists of the cameras installed on the tower video monitoring devices or the unmanned aerial vehicles, the 4G/OPGW network, and the monitoring center, where the identification and localization algorithm is embedded into the expert software. First, the images of insulators are captured by cameras, which are processed to identify the region of insulator string by the presented identification algorithm of insulator string. Second, according to the characteristics of the insulator string image, a mathematical model of the insulator string is established to estimate the direction and the length of the sliding blocks. Third, local binary pattern histograms of the template and the sliding block are extracted, by which the self-shattered insulator can be recognized and located. Finally, a series of experiments is fulfilled to verify the effectiveness of the algorithm. For single insulator images, Ac, Pr, and Rc of the algorithm are 94.5%, 92.38%, and 96.78%, respectively. For double insulator images, Ac, Pr, and Rc are 90.00%, 86.36%, and 93.23%, respectively.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Development of spin-on-glass process for triple metal interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Wenbin, Zhao; Guozhang, Wang; Zongguang, Yu

    2010-12-01

    Spin-on-glass (SOG), an interlayer dielectric material applied in liquid form to fill narrow gaps in the sub-dielectric surface and thus conducive to planarization, is an alternative to silicon dioxide (SiO2) deposited using PECVD processes. However, its inability to adhere to metal and problems such as cracking prevent the easy application of SOG technology to provide an interlayer dielectric in multilevel metal interconnect circuits, particularly in university processing labs. This paper will show that a thin layer of CVD SiO2 and a curing temperature below the sintering temperature of the metal interconnect layer will promote adhesion, reduce gaps, and prevent cracking. Electron scanning microscope analysis has been used to demonstrate the success of the improved technique. This optimized process has been used in batches of double-poly, triple-metal CMOS wafer fabrication to date.

  20. HazMatID (trademark) Replacement Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-09

    replacement for the Smiths Detection HazMatIDTM on the 886H allowance standard, a search of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR ) instruments was...uses FTIR spectroscopy. It has the capability to identify chemical warfare agents, explosives , toxic industrial chemicals, narcotics, and...uses FTIR technology , providing a wider spectral coverage and higher spectral resolution. Findings: As I operated the Mobile-IR, I found it to

  1. M.A.T. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    A proposal is presented for developing a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program at California State University, Bakersfield. The criteria for a MAT program are examined by outlining existing programs at: (1) Harvard Graduate School; (2) University of California, Berkeley; (3) Portland State University; (4) Stanford University; (5) University of…

  2. Compositions of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  3. Exploring Technology-Enhanced Learning Using Google Glass to Offer Students a Unique Instructor's Point of View Live Laboratory Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Fung Fun

    2016-01-01

    Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) is fast gaining momentum among educational institutions all over the world. The usual way in which laboratory instructional videos are filmed takes the third-person view. However, such videos are not as realistic and sensorial. With the advent of Google Glass and GoPro cameras, a more personal and effective way…

  4. Preparation of a YAG:Ce phosphor glass by screen-printing technology and its application in LED packaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Chen, Mingxiang; Lv, Zhicheng; Wang, Simin; Liu, Xiaogang; Liu, Sheng

    2013-07-01

    A simple and practical method for preparing phosphor glass is proposed. Phosphor distribution and element analysis are investigated by optical microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The phosphor particles dispersed in the matrix are vividly observed, and their distributions are uniform. Spectrum distribution and color coordinates dependent on the thickness of the screen-printed phosphor layer coupled with a blue light emitting diode (LED) chip are studied. The luminous efficacy of the 75 μm printed phosphor-layer phosphor glass packaged white LED is 81.24 lm/W at 350 mA. This study opens up many possibilities for applications using the phosphor glass on a selected chip in which emission is well absorbed by all phosphors. The screen-printing technique also offers possibilities for the design and engineering of complex phosphor layers on glass substrates. Phosphor screen-printing technology allows the realization of high stability and thermal conductivity for the phosphor layer. This phosphor glass method provides many possibilities for LED packing, including thin-film flip chip and remote phosphor technology.

  5. Through the Looking Glass: Real-Time Video Using 'Smart' Technology Provides Enhanced Intraoperative Logistics.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Andrew C W; Mallidi, Hari R; Baldwin, John C; Sandoval, Elena; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H; Singh, Steve K

    2016-01-01

    In the setting of increasingly complex medical therapies and limited physician resources, the recent emergence of 'smart' technology offers tremendous potential for improved logistics, efficiency, and communication between medical team members. In an effort to harness these capabilities, we sought to evaluate the utility of this technology in surgical practice through the employment of a wearable camera device during cardiothoracic organ recovery. A single procurement surgeon was trained for use of an Explorer Edition Google Glass (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA) during the recovery process. Live video feed of each procedure was securely broadcast to allow for members of the home transplant team to remotely participate in organ assessment. Primary outcomes involved demonstration of technological feasibility and validation of quality assurance through group assessment. The device was employed for the recovery of four organs: a right single lung, a left single lung, and two bilateral lung harvests. Live video of the visualization process was remotely accessed by the home transplant team, and supplemented final verification of organ quality. In each case, the organs were accepted for transplant without disruption of standard procurement protocols. Media files generated during the procedures were stored in a secure drive for future documentation, evaluation, and education purposes without preservation of patient identifiers. Live video streaming can improve quality assurance measures by allowing off-site members of the transplant team to participate in the final assessment of donor organ quality. While further studies are needed, this project suggests that the application of mobile 'smart' technology offers not just immediate value, but the potential to transform our approach to the practice of medicine.

  6. Composite panels for optical mirrors for Cherenkov Telescopes: development of the cold glass slumping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canestrari, R.; Motta, G.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Doro, M.; Giro, E.; Lessio, L.

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade a new window for ground-based high energy astrophysics has been opened. It explores the energy band from about 100 GeV to 10 TeV making use of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Research in Very High Energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy is improving rapidly and thanks to the newest facilities as MAGIC, HESS and VERITAS astronomers and particle physicists are obtaining surprising implications in the theoretical models. New projects have been started as the European Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the U.S. Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS). The aim is to enhance both the sensitivity and the energy band coverage to perform imaging, photometry and spectroscopy of sources. In this framework, tens of thousands of optical mirror panels have to be manufactured, tested and mounted into the telescopes. Because of this high number of mirrors it is mandatory to develop a technique easily transferable to industrial mass production, but keeping the technical and cost-effectiveness requirements of the next generation of TeV telescopes. In this context the Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB) is investigating a technique for the manufacturing of stiff and lightweight glass mirror panels with modest angular resolution. These panels have a composite sandwich-like structure with two thin glass skins on both sides of a core material; the reflecting skin is optically shaped using an ad-hoc slumping procedure. The technology here presented is particularly attractive for the mass production of cost-effective mirror segments with long radius of curvature like those required in the primary mirrors of the next generation of Cherenkov telescopes. In this paper we present and discuss some relevant results we have obtained from the latest panels realized.

  7. The silicon-glass microreactor with embedded sensors—technology and results of preliminary qualitative tests, toward intelligent microreaction plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapkiewicz, P.

    2013-03-01

    The technology and preliminary qualitative tests of silicon-glass microreactors with embedded pressure and temperature sensors are presented. The concept of microreactors for leading highly exothermic reactions, e.g. nitration of hydrocarbons, and design process-included computer-aided simulations are described in detail. The silicon-glass microreactor chip consisting of two micromixers (multistream micromixer), reaction channels, cooling/heating chambers has been proposed. The microreactor chip was equipped with a set of pressure and temperature sensors and packaged. Tests of mixing quality, pressure drops in channels, heat exchange efficiency and dynamic behavior of pressure and temperature sensors were documented. Finally, two applications were described.

  8. Blue upconversion in Yb3+/Tm3+ co-doped silica fiber based on glass phase-separation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Chu, Yingbo; Chen, Zhangru; Xing, Yingbin; Hu, Xionwei; Li, Haiqing; Peng, Jinggang; Dai, Nengli; Li, Jinyan; Yang, Luyun

    2018-02-01

    Yb3+/Tm3+ co-doped silica fiber was prepared successfully by glass phase-separation technology. The measured refractive index profile indicated that the active fiber core had an excellent uniformity. The highest emission intensity was obtained in a sample with a Yb3+ concentration of 0.3 mol/L and a Tm3+ concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Under the excitation at 976 nm, intense blue upconversion emission of Tm3+ at 474 nm was observed due to energy transfer from Yb3+ to Tm3+. A three-photon process was responsible for the blue emission. Due to re-absorption resulted from the Tm3+:3H6→1G4 transition, the blue emission peak was red-shifted. It is suggested that the fiber preparation technology based on glass phase-separation technology can be a potential candidate for preparing active fibers with large core or complex fiber structure.

  9. Technology Insertion (TI)/Industrial Process Improvement (IPI) Task Order Number 15, Data Base Documentation Book SA-ALC/MAE & MAT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-14

    r . ,,,’ , ,.r ,-z /Ar A i-, ’- -. q <-->- as 7/ 4, ’C ’ 4’ / de /- --, AI c " (/’r)i -l 74 7 C/L CAe 71C, eX X-- r , ’Ie? 74-4 c- 7,’/,, , /’ 74 V1;he...GLASSES SAFETY GOGGLES CHEMICAL SPLASH GOGGLES &rFACE SHIELD RESPIRATOR ORGANIC VAPOR SPRAY PAINT METAL FUME I TOXIC ,._ ____r _ _ _ OTHER (Speci’y...SAFETY GOGGLES CHEMICAL SPLASH GOGGLES - , FACE SHIELD RESPIRATOR ORGANIC VAPOR SPRAY PAINT METAL FUME ’ TOXIC DUST OTHER (Specify) 23. EMERGENCY

  10. The usage of carbon fiber reinforcement polymer and glass fiber reinforcement polymer for retrofit technology building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, Johannes; Meka, Randi; Nursyamsi

    2018-03-01

    Fiber Reinforcement Polymer has been used as a material technology since the 1970s in Europe. Fiber Reinforcement Polymer can reinforce the structure externally, and used in many types of buildings like beams, columns, and slabs. It has high tensile strength. Fiber Reinforcement Polymer also has high rigidity and strength. The profile of Fiber Reinforcement Polymer is thin and light, installation is simple to conduct. One of Fiber Reinforcement Polymer material is Carbon Fiber Reinforcement Polymer and Glass Fiber Reinforcement Polymer. These materials is tested when it is installed on concrete cylinders, to obtain the comparison of compressive strength CFRP and GFRP. The dimension of concrete is diameter of 15 cm and height of 30 cm. It is amounted to 15 and divided into three groups. The test is performed until it collapsed to obtain maximum load. The results of research using CFRP and GFRP have shown the significant enhancement in compressive strength. CFRP can increase the compressive strength of 26.89%, and GFRP of 14.89%. For the comparison of two materials, CFRP is more strengthening than GFRP regarding increasing compressive strength. The usage of CFRP and GFRP can increase the loading capacity.

  11. Accuracy of remote electrocardiogram interpretation with the use of Google Glass technology.

    PubMed

    Jeroudi, Omar M; Christakopoulos, George; Christopoulos, George; Kotsia, Anna; Kypreos, Megan A; Rangan, Bavana V; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2015-02-01

    We sought to investigate the accuracy of remote electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation using Google Glass (Google, Mountain View, California). Google Glass is an optical head mounted display device with growing applications in medicine. We compared interpretation of 10 ECGs with 21 clinically important findings by faculty and fellow cardiologists by (1) viewing the electrocardiographic image at the Google Glass screen; (2) viewing a photograph of the ECG taken using Google Glass and interpreted on a mobile device; (3) viewing the original paper ECG; and (4) viewing a photograph of the ECG taken with a high-resolution camera and interpreted on a mobile device. One point was given for identification of each correct finding. Subjective rating of the user experience was also recorded. Twelve physicians (4 faculty and 8 fellow cardiologists) participated. The average electrocardiographic interpretation score (maximum 21 points) as viewed through the Google Glass, Google Glass photograph on a mobile device, on paper, and high-resolution photograph on a mobile device was 13.5 ± 1.8, 16.1 ± 2.6, 18.3 ± 1.7, and 18.6 ± 1.5, respectively (p = 0.0005 between Google Glass and mobile device, p = 0.0005 between Google Glass and paper, and p = 0.002 between mobile device and paper). Of the 12 physicians, 9 (75%) were dissatisfied with ECGs viewing on the prism display of Google Glass. In conclusion, further improvements are needed before Google Glass can be reliably used for remote electrocardiographic analysis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Luminescence of Eu(3+) doped SiO2 Thin Films and Glass Prepared by Sol-gel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Lymari; Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Yanyun; Santiago, Miguel; Liu, Huimin

    1998-01-01

    Trivalent europium ions are an important luminophore for lighting and display. The emission of (5)D0 to (7)F2 transition exhibits a red color at about 610 nm, which is very attractive and fulfills the requirement for most red-emitting phosphors including lamp and cathode ray phosphorescence materials. Various EU(3+) doped phosphors have been developed, and luminescence properties have been extensively studied. On the other hand, sol-gel technology has been well developed by chemists. In recent years, applications of this technology to optical materials have drawn a great attention. Sol-gel technology provides a unique way to obtain homogeneous composition distribution and uniform doping, and the processing temperature can be very low. In this work, EU(3+) doped SiO2 thin films and glasses were prepared by sol-gel technology and their spectroscopic properties were investigated.

  13. A laser-based technology for fabricating a soda-lime glass based microfluidic device for circulating tumour cell capture.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Couceiro, Ramiro; Aymerich, Maria; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We developed a laser-based technique for fabricating microfluidic microchips on soda-lime glass substrates. The proposed methodology combines a laser direct writing, as a manufacturing tool for the fabrication of the microfluidics structures, followed by a post-thermal treatment with a CO2 laser. This treatment will allow reshaping and improving the morphological (roughness) and optical qualities (transparency) of the generated microfluidics structures. The use of lasers commonly implemented for material processing makes this technique highly competitive when compared with other glass microstructuring approaches. The manufactured chips were tested with tumour cells (Hec 1A) after being functionalized with an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody coating. Cells were successfully arrested on the pillars after being flown through the device giving our technology a translational application in the field of cancer research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of simulation in the development and flight test of the HiMAT vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. B.; Schilling, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Real time simulations have been essential in the flight test program of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. The HiMAT project makes extensive use of simulations in design, development, and qualification for flight, pilot training, and flight planning. Four distinct simulations, each with varying amounts of hardware in the loop, were developed for the HiMAT project. The use of simulations in detecting anomalous behavior of the flight software and hardware at the various stages of development, verification, and validation has been the key to flight qualification of the HiMAT vehicle.

  15. Resonance Tests on Glass Reinforced Plastic Composite Panels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    glass -- fibre woven roving and glass - fibre chopped strand mat. BP Cellobond A2785-CV resin was used to bond the glass fibre layers to the foam. A rib was...foam slabs were filled with putty. The differences between the panels were the number of layers of glass fibre used on each side, the density of the...ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA Structures Technical Memorandum 329 RESONANCE TESTS O GLASS REINFORCED PLASTIC

  16. Modified rod-in-tube for high-NA tellurite glass fiber fabrication: materials and technologies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuling; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qingwei; Chen, Qiuping; Hao, Yinlei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we report the whole fabrication process for high-numerical aperture (NA) tellurite glass fibers from material preparation to preform fabrication, and eventually, fiber drawing. A tellurite-based high-NA (0.9) magneto-optical glass fiber was drawn successfully and characterized. First, matchable core and cladding glasses were fabricated and matched in terms of physical properties. Second, a uniform bubble-free preform was fabricated by means of a modified rod-in-tube technique. Finally, the fiber drawing process was studied and optimized. The high-NA fibers (∅(core), 40-50 μm and ∅(cladding), 120-130 μm) so obtained were characterized for their geometrical and optical properties.

  17. Using Talking Mats to Support Communication in Persons with Huntington's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferm, Ulrika; Sahlin, Anna; Sundin, Linda; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many individuals with Huntington's disease experience reduced functioning in cognition, language and communication. Talking Mats is a visually based low technological augmentative communication framework that supports communication in people with different cognitive and communicative disabilities. Aims: To evaluate Talking Mats as a…

  18. Ectomycorrhizal mats alter forest soil biogeochemistry

    Treesearch

    Laurel A. Kluber; Kathryn M. Tinnesand; Bruce A. Caldwell; Susie M. Dunham; Rockie R. Yarwood; Peter J. Bottomley; David D. Myrold

    2010-01-01

    Dense hyphal mats formed by ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi are prominent features in Douglas-fir forest ecosystems, and have been estimated to cover up to 40% of the soil surface in some forest stands. Two morphotypes of EcM mats have been previously described: rhizomorphic mats, which have thick hyphal rhizomorphs and are found primarily in the organic horizon, and...

  19. Aerobic sulfate reduction in microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of bacterial sulfate reduction and dissolved oxygen (O2) in hypersaline bacterial mats from Baja California, Mexico, revealed that sulfate reduction occurred consistently within the well-oxygenated photosynthetic zone of the mats. This evidence that dissimilatory sulfate reduction can occur in the presence of O2 challenges the conventional view that sulfate reduction is a strictly anaerobic process. At constant temperature, the rates of sulfate reduction in oxygenated mats during daytime were similar to rates in anoxic mats at night: thus, during a 24-hour cycle, variations in light and O2 have little effect on rates of sulfate reduction in these mats.

  20. Preface - BraMat 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of the BraMat 2017 Conference was, as for the previous editions, to stimulate an international exchange of information in the field of materials science and engineering and to establish future research directions. The main topics of this edition included: ​Metallic materials (Section I), Biomaterials (Section II), Ceramics, polymers and composite materials (Section III), Surface engineering (Section IV), Nanomaterials (Section V), Welding engineering (Section VI), Safety engineering (Section VII), and Magnesium science and engineering (Section VIII).

  1. Validation of FRP Matting Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    airfield pavements using crushed stone. A side-by-side comparison between FRP and folded fiberglass matting (FFM) was performed on simulated small...medium, and large craters in Portland cement concrete and asphalt concrete pavements . The demonstration took place at the Silver Flag Exercise Site...report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. DESTROY THIS

  2. Study on construction technology of metro tunnel under a glass curtain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Yu, Deqiang

    2018-03-01

    To ensure the safety of the glass curtain wall building above loess tunnel and get an optimal scheme, an elastic-plastic FEM model is established to simulate three reinforcement schemes based on a tunnel section in Xi’an Metro Line 3. The results show that the settlement value of the optimal scheme is reduced by 69.89% compared with the drainage measures, and the uneven settlement value is reduced by 57.5%. The construction points, technical processes and technical indexes of the optimal scheme are introduced. According to the actual project, the cumulative settlement of the building under construction is 16mm, which meets the control standards. According to the actual project, the cumulative settlement of the glass curtain wall building is 16mm, which meets the control standards. The reinforcement scheme can provide some reference for the design and construction of the metro in loess area.

  3. Design And Development The Ixo Mirrors By Innovative Slumping Glass Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Canestrari, R.; Dell'Orto, E.; Conconi, P.; Parodi, G.; Proserpio, L.

    2009-01-01

    At INAF Brera Astronomical Observatory development activities are ongoing aiming at the design and development of the IXO mirrors based on slumping glass technique. Our approach is based on the use of thermal slumping of thin glass optics and it presents a number of innovative solution for the implementation. In particular our approach foresees the use of a ceramic mould made of SiC for thermal shaping of the glass segments, which occurs exerting a proper pressure during the moulding process. A thin layer (a few hundred Angstroms) of Pt or Ir is previously deposited on the glass segment, to prevent the adhesion on the SiC mould surface. Therefore this coating not only acts as a release agent of the process but, at the same time, it has also the role of reflecting layer of the X-ray mirror (in a sense like it was the role of gold in the Ni electroforming replication method used for the XMM shells). SiC is chosen for its very good T/M characteristics and, in particular, a very high thermal conductivity and very low CTE. SiC mould will be produced via injection moulding process, followed by a the application of a cladding layer (a few tens microns) application of CVD SiC for allowing a superpolishing of the surface until a roughness of a few Angstrom rms is achieved. Once the mirror segments are produced, they are integrated in petals by means of air-bearings supports, that allows us to maintain the proper shape of the segments without deformations. The segments are stacked into the petals by the use of connecting ribs, glued to the front surface of each mirror and to the rear of the next one.

  4. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  5. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  6. Soft lithography using perfluorinated polyether molds and PRINT technology for fabrication of 3-D arrays on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, Kenton B.; Wiles, Natasha S.; Herlihy, Kevin P.; Maynor, Benjamin W.; Rolland, Jason P.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2006-03-01

    The fabrication of nanometer size structures and complex devices for microelectronics is of increasing importance so as to meet the challenges of large-scale commercial applications. Soft lithography typically employs elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds to replicate micro- and nanoscale features. However, the difficulties of PDMS for nanoscale fabrication include inherent incompatibility with organic liquids and the production of a residual scum or flash layer that link features where the nano-structures meet the substrate. An emerging technologically advanced technique known as Pattern Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) avoids both of these dilemmas by utilizing photocurable perfluorinated polyether (PFPE) rather than PDMS as the elastomeric molding material. PFPE is a liquid at room temperature that exhibits low modulus and high gas permeability when cured. The highly fluorinated PFPE material allows for resistance to swelling by organic liquids and very low surface energies, thereby preventing flash layer formation and ease of separation of PFPE molds from the substrates. These enhanced characteristics enable easy removal of the stamp from the molded material, thereby minimizing damage to the nanoscale features. Herein we describe that PRINT can be operated in two different modes depending on whether the objects to be molded are to be removed and harvested (i.e. to make shape specific organic particles) or whether scum free objects are desired which are adhered onto the substrate (i.e. for scum free pattern generation using imprint lithography). The former can be achieved using a non-reactive, low surface energy substrate (PRINT: Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) and the latter can be achieved using a reactive, low surface energy substrate (PRINT: Pattern Replication in Non-wetting Templates). We show that the PRINT technology can been used to fabricate nano-particle arrays covalently bound to a glass substrate with no scum layer

  7. Phylogenetic stratigraphy in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Kirk; Caporaso, J Gregory; Walker, Jeffrey J; Spear, John R; Gold, Nicholas J; Robertson, Charles E; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goodrich, Julia; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Marshall, Paul; Tufo, Henry; Knight, Rob; Pace, Norman R

    2013-01-01

    The microbial mats of Guerrero Negro (GN), Baja California Sur, Mexico historically were considered a simple environment, dominated by cyanobacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Culture-independent rRNA community profiling instead revealed these microbial mats as among the most phylogenetically diverse environments known. A preliminary molecular survey of the GN mat based on only ∼1500 small subunit rRNA gene sequences discovered several new phylum-level groups in the bacterial phylogenetic domain and many previously undetected lower-level taxa. We determined an additional ∼119,000 nearly full-length sequences and 28,000 >200 nucleotide 454 reads from a 10-layer depth profile of the GN mat. With this unprecedented coverage of long sequences from one environment, we confirm the mat is phylogenetically stratified, presumably corresponding to light and geochemical gradients throughout the depth of the mat. Previous shotgun metagenomic data from the same depth profile show the same stratified pattern and suggest that metagenome properties may be predictable from rRNA gene sequences. We verify previously identified novel lineages and identify new phylogenetic diversity at lower taxonomic levels, for example, thousands of operational taxonomic units at the family-genus levels differ considerably from known sequences. The new sequences populate parts of the bacterial phylogenetic tree that previously were poorly described, but indicate that any comprehensive survey of GN diversity has only begun. Finally, we show that taxonomic conclusions are generally congruent between Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies, with the taxonomic resolution achieved dependent on the abundance of reference sequences in the relevant region of the rRNA tree of life.

  8. Dry silver electromigration process for optical glass waveguide fabrication and fluxless bonding technology for photonics and MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ricky Wenkuei

    2001-07-01

    An effectively simple dry silver electromigration technology without the need of evaporating separate gold or aluminum film electrodes onto both sides of glass is reported to fabricate low-loss deep multimode planar and channel waveguides on BK7 and BF450 glass substrates. A relatively high electrical field ranging from 440 to 545 V/mm was applied to the glass to speed up the migration, while at the same time preventing silver ions that were driven into the glass from reducing into silver atom; a major contributor to waveguide loss. The deep planar and channel waveguides thus fabricated showed no discolors or cracks, of which the attenuation losses of less than 2dB/cm and 0.1dB/cm were later measured from channel waveguides constructed on the BK7 and BF450 glass substrates, respectively, using our 0.6328mum He-Ne laser edge-coupling setup. To complete the waveguide studies, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector was adopted to obtain the concentration profiles of silver and sodium ions distributed in a waveguiding region after the exchange. The EDX measurements acquired hereafter were then utilized along with the Gladstone-Dale relation altogether to deduce the refractive index profile; of which a nearly step-like profile was consistently deduced from every deep planar and channel waveguides fabricated. Finally, a numerical model utilizing the space charge approach was devised to explain the nonlinear current effect often observed during the actual waveguide fabrication. The simulation results have confirmed that the nonlinear current-versus-time profile obtained is mainly attributed to the inhomogeneous distribution of the electric field in the glass substrate due to a space charge region created by the separation between silver- and sodium-ion migration fronts as a result of their unequal mobilities; a phenomenon which is ultimately responsible for the eventual slow down in the ion exchange rate as monitored

  9. Hot slumping glass technology for the grazing incidence optics of future missions with particular reference to IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Bavdaz, M.; Conconi, P.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Friedrich, P.; Gallieni, D.; Guldimann, B.; Martelli, F.; Negri, R.; Pagano, G.; Pareschi, G.; Parodi, G.; Proserpio, L.; Salmaso, B.; Scaglione, F.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Terzi, L.; Tintori, M.; Vongehr, M.; Wille, E.; Winter, A.; Zambra, A.

    2010-07-01

    The mirrors of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) consist of a large number of high quality segments delivering a spatial resolution better than 5 arcsec. A study concerning the slumping of thin glass foils for the IXO mirrors is under development in Europe, funded by ESA and led by the Brera Observatory. We are investigating two approaches, the "Direct" and "Indirect" slumping technologies, being respectively based on the use of convex and concave moulds. In the first case during the thermal cycle the optical surface of the glass is in direct contact with the mould surface, while in the second case it is the rear side of the foil which touches the master. Both approaches present pros and cons and aim of this study is also to make an assessment of both processes and to perform a trade-off between the two. The thin plates are made of D263glass produced by Schott. Each plate is 0.4 mm thick, with a reflecting area of 200 mm x 200 mm; the mould are made of Fused Silica. After the thermal cycle the slumped MPs are characterized to define their optical quality and microroughness. The adopted integration process foresees the bonding of the slumped foils to a rigid backplane by means of reinforcing ribs. During the bonding process the plates are constrained to stay in close contact to the surface of the master (i.e. the same mould used for the hot slumping process) by the application of a vacuum pump suction. In this way spring-back deformations and low frequency errors still present on the foil profile after slumping can be corrected. In this paper we present the preliminary results concerning achieved during the first part of the project.

  10. Utilization of MatPIV program to different geotechnical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklik, P.; Idinger, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) technique is being used to measure soil displacements. PIV has been used for many years in fluid mechanics; but for physical modeling in geotechnical engineering, this technique is still relatively new. PIV is a worldwide growth in soil mechanics over the last decade owing to the developments in digital cameras and laser technologies. The use of PIV is feasible provided the surface contains sufficient texture. A Cambridge group has shown that natural sand contains enough texture for applying PIV. In a texture-based approach, the only requirement is for any patch, big or small to be sufficiently unique so that statistical tracking of this patch is possible. In this paper, some of the soil mechanic's models were investigated such as retaining walls, slope failures, and foundations. The photographs were taken with the help of the high resolution digital camera, the displacements of soils were evaluated with free software named as MatPIV and the displacement graphics between the two images were obtained. Nikon D60 digital camera is 10.2 MB and it has special properties which makes it possible to use in PIV applications. These special properties are Airflow Control System and Image Sensor cleaning for protection against dust, Active D-Lighting for highlighted or shadowy areas while shooting, advanced three-point AF system for fast, efficient and precise autofocus. Its fast and continuous shooting mode enables up to 100 JPEG images at three frames per second. Norm Sand (DIN 1164) was used for all the models in a glass rectangular box. For every experiment, MatPIV was used to calculate the velocities from the two images. MatPIV program was used in two ways such as easy way and difficult way: In the easy way, the two images with 64*64 pixels with 50% or 75% overlap of the interrogation windows were taken into consideration and the calculation was performed with a single iteration through the images and the result consisted of four

  11. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  12. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  13. An integrated micro-manipulation and biosensing platform built in glass-based LTPS TFT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei-Guang; Wu, Dong-Yi; S-C Lu, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The glass-based low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistor (TFT) process, widely known for making liquid crystal displays, is utilized in this work to realize a fully integrated, microbead-based micro-manipulation and biosensing platform. The operation utilizes arrays of microelectrodes made of transparent iridium tin oxide (ITO) to move the immobilized polystyrene microbeads to the sensor surface by dielectrophoresis (DEP). Detection of remaining microbeads after a specific antigen/antibody reaction is accomplished by photo-detectors under the transparent electrodes. It was found that microbeads can be driven successfully by the 30 × 30 µm2 microelectrodes separated by 10 µm with no more than 6 Vp-p, which is compatible with the operating range of thin-film transistors. Microbeads immobilized with antimouse immunoglobulin (IgG) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) antibody were successfully detected after specific binding, illustrating the potential of LTPS TFT microarrays for more versatile biosensing applications.

  14. Key Processes of Silicon-On-Glass MEMS Fabrication Technology for Gyroscope Application.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhibo; Wang, Yinan; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Han; Guo, Xuetao

    2018-04-17

    MEMS fabrication that is based on the silicon-on-glass (SOG) process requires many steps, including patterning, anodic bonding, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), and chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The effects of the process parameters of CMP and DRIE are investigated in this study. The process parameters of CMP, such as abrasive size, load pressure, and pH value of SF1 solution are examined to optimize the total thickness variation in the structure and the surface quality. The ratio of etching and passivation cycle time and the process pressure are also adjusted to achieve satisfactory performance during DRIE. The process is optimized to avoid neither the notching nor lag effects on the fabricated silicon structures. For demonstrating the capability of the modified CMP and DRIE processes, a z-axis micro gyroscope is fabricated that is based on the SOG process. Initial test results show that the average surface roughness of silicon is below 1.13 nm and the thickness of the silicon is measured to be 50 μm. All of the structures are well defined without the footing effect by the use of the modified DRIE process. The initial performance test results of the resonant frequency for the drive and sense modes are 4.048 and 4.076 kHz, respectively. The demands for this kind of SOG MEMS device can be fulfilled using the optimized process.

  15. PA15 Beer mat chat.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, Mark A; Patterson, Rebecca M

    2015-04-01

    Storytelling/remembrance can the reduce isolation of recently (and less recently) bereaved people, and are beneficial to participants. Traditional rituals and approaches which supported storytelling/remembrance are declining in Scotland. Pubs are hubs of social interaction and storytelling, especially for men. To explore the acceptability of beer mats in pubs as a prompt to storytelling and remembrance of people who have died, and to promote To Absent Friends, a peoples' festival of storytelling and remembrance. 5 mats were designed - each had a carefully selected quotation or piece of trivia relating to loss or remembrance, plus a web link to www.toabsentfriends.org.uk. 20,000 mats were made available to order. Feedback regarding acceptability was elicited through conversation with bar tenders, direct observation and a questionnaire dispatched with some orders. A press release was issued. The mats were generally viewed as being acceptable. A local brewer distributed Approximately 15,000 mats to pubs across Edinburgh. The main Edinburgh newspaper ran a prominent article about the mats, the To Absent Friends Festival and the value of greater openness about death and dying. Beer mats are an acceptable way of introducing reflection on loss, grief and mortality into pubs. More research is needed to establish the effectiveness of the mats in prompting storytelling and remembrance. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  17. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  18. Surface-structured diffuser by iterative down-size molding with glass sintering technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xuan-Hao; Tsai, Jung-Lin; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2012-03-12

    In this paper, a down-size sintering scheme for making high-performance diffusers with micro structure to perform beam shaping is presented and demonstrated. By using down-size sintering method, a surface-structure film is designed and fabricated to verify the feasibility of the sintering technology, in which up to 1/8 dimension reduction has been achieved. Besides, a special impressing technology has been applied to fabricate diffuser film with various materials and the transmission efficiency is as high as 85% and above. By introducing the diffuser into possible lighting applications, the diffusers have been shown high performance in glare reduction, beam shaping and energy saving.

  19. Integrating Personalized Technology in Toxicology: Sensors, Smart Glass, and Social Media Applications in Toxicology Research.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Chai, Peter R; Carey, Jennifer; Chapman, Brittany; Boyer, Edward W

    2017-06-01

    Rapid proliferation of mobile technologies in social and healthcare spaces create an opportunity for advancement in research and clinical practice. The application of mobile, personalized technology in healthcare, referred to as mHealth, has not yet become routine in toxicology. However, key features of our practice environment, such as frequent need for remote evaluation, unreliable historical data from patients, and sensitive subject matter, make mHealth tools appealing solutions in comparison to traditional methods that collect retrospective or indirect data. This manuscript describes the features, uses, and costs associated with several of common sectors of mHealth research including wearable biosensors, ingestible biosensors, head-mounted devices, and social media applications. The benefits and novel challenges associated with the study and use of these applications are then discussed. Finally, opportunities for further research and integration are explored with a particular focus on toxicology-based applications.

  20. The nature of science and technology for pre-service chemistry teacher: A case of techno-chemistry experiment "From Stannum Metalicum to conductive glass"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudzakir, A.; Widhiyanti, T.; Hernani, Arifin, M.; Lestari, A. N.; Jauhariansyah, S.

    2017-08-01

    The study was conducted to address the problems related to low Indonesian students' scientific literacy as revealed in the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) since 2000-2015. Science teachers (e.g. chemistry teacher) must recognize the nature of science (NOS) to assist their students in preparing an explanation of a phenomenon scientifically correctly. Teachers also need to understand critically about nature of technology (NOT) and it relationship with science as well as society. To integrate those two kinds of knowledge (NOS and NOT), we can conduct a techno-science activity, which integrate the technology to science course in pre-service teacher education program, so that they can improve their knowledge about nature of science and technology (NOST) and pedagogical content knowledge related to NOST. The purpose of this study was to construct an inquiry based laboratory activity worksheet for making conductive glass so that the pre-service teacher could explain how the structure of the semiconductor Fluor doped Tin Oxide (SnO2.F) affect their performance. This study we conducted, described how to design a pre-service chemistry teacher education course that can improve recognizing view of NOST by using a framework called model of educational reconstruction (MER). The scientific activities in the course were guided inquiry based techno-chemistry experiments involving "From Stannum Metallicum to Conductive Glass". Conductive glasses are interesting subject research for several reason. The application of this technology could be found on solar cell, OLED, and display panel. The doped Tin dioxide has been deposited on glass substrate using the spray pyrolysis technique at 400-550°C substrate temperature, 4-5 times, 20 cm gap between glass and sprayer and 450 angle to form a thin film which will act as electrical contact. The resistivity is about 0.5 - 15Ω. The product resulted on this study was rated by several expert to find if the worksheet could

  1. Thin glass based packaging and photonic single-mode waveguide integration by ion-exchange technology on board and module level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Lang, Günter; Schröder, Henning

    2011-01-01

    The proposed novel packaging approach merges micro-system packaging and glass integrated optics. It provides 3D optical single-mode intra system links to bridge the gap between novel photonic integrated circuits and the glass fibers for inter system interconnects. We introduce our hybrid 3D photonic packaging approach based on thin glass substrates with planar integrated optical single-mode waveguides for fiber-to-chip and chip-to-chip links. Optical mirrors and lenses provide optical mode matching for photonic IC assemblies and optical fiber interconnects. Thin glass is commercially available in panel and wafer formats and characterizes excellent optical and high-frequency properties as reviewed in the paper. That makes it perfect for micro-system packaging. The adopted planar waveguide process based on ion-exchange technology is capable for high-volume manufacturing. This ion-exchange process and the optical propagation are described in detail for thin glass substrates. An extensive characterization of all basic circuit elements like straight and curved waveguides, couplers and crosses proves the low attenuation of the optical circuit elements.

  2. Player-Tracking Technology: Half-Full or Half-Empty Glass?

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben Michael

    2017-04-01

    With the ongoing development of microtechnology, player tracking has become one of the most important components of load monitoring in team sports. The 3 main objectives of player tracking are better understanding of practice (provide an objective, a posteriori evaluation of external load and locomotor demands of any given session or match), optimization of training-load patterns at the team level, and decision making on individual players' training programs to improve performance and prevent injuries (eg, top-up training vs unloading sequences, return to play progression). This paper discusses the basics of a simple tracking approach and the need to integrate multiple systems. The limitations of some of the most used variables in the field (including metabolic-power measures) are debated, and innovative and potentially new powerful variables are presented. The foundations of a successful player-monitoring system are probably laid on the pitch first, in the way practitioners collect their own tracking data, given the limitations of each variable, and how they report and use all this information, rather than in the technology and the variables per se. Overall, the decision to use any tracking technology or new variable should always be considered with a cost/benefit approach (ie, cost, ease of use, portability, manpower/ability to affect the training program).

  3. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3–3.5; temperature = 68–75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4–40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14–30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1–2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day−1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems. PMID:26913020

  4. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs.

    PubMed

    Beam, Jacob P; Bernstein, Hans C; Jay, Zackary J; Kozubal, Mark A; Jennings, Ryan deM; Tringe, Susannah G; Inskeep, William P

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day(-1), and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems.

  5. The type of mat (Contact vs. Photocell) affects vertical jump height estimated from flight time.

    PubMed

    García-López, Juan; Morante, Juan C; Ogueta-Alday, Ana; Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose A

    2013-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to analyze the validity and reliability of 2 photocell mats and to probe the possible influence of the type of mat (contact vs. photocell) on vertical jump height estimated from flight time. In 2 separate studies, 89 and 92 physical students performed 3 countermovement jumps that were simultaneously registered by a Force Plate (gold standard method), 2 photocell mats (SportJump System Pro and ErgoJump Plus), and a contact mat (SportJump-v1.0). The first study showed that the 2 photocell mats underestimated the vertical jump height (1.3 ± 0.2 cm and 5.9 ± 5.2 cm, respectively), but only SportJump System Pro showed a high correlation with the Force Plate (r = 0.999 and 0.676, respectively) and good intraday reliability (coefficient of variation = 2.98 and 15.94%, intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.95-0.97 and 0.45-0.57, respectively). The second study demonstrated a strong correlation (r = 0.994) between the 2 technologies (contact vs. photocell mats) with differences in vertical jump height of 2.0 ± 0.8 cm (95% confidence interval = 1.9-2.1 cm), which depended on both flight time and subjects' body mass. In conclusion, SportJump System Pro was a valid and reliable device. The new devices to measure vertical jump height from flight time should be validated. The type of mat (contact vs. photocell) affected approximately 6% the vertical jump height (approximately 2 cm in this study), which should be considered in further studies. The use of validated photocell mats instead of the contact mats was recommended.

  6. Cyanobacterial mats: Microanalysis of community metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.; Bermudes, D.; Fischer, U.; Haddad, R.; Prufert, L.; Scheulderman-Suylen, T.; Shaw, T.

    1985-01-01

    The microbial communities in two sites were studied using several approaches: (1) light microscopy; (2) the measurement of microprofiles of oxygen and sulfide at the surface of the microbial mat; (3) the study of diurnal variation of oxygen and sulfides; (4) in situ measurement of photosynthesis and sulfate reduction and study of the coupling of these two processes; (5) measurement of glutathione in the upper layers of the microbial mat as a possible oxygen quencher; (6) measurement of reduced iron as a possible intermediate electron donor along the established redoxcline in the mats; (7) measurement of dissolved phosphate as an indicator of processes of break down of organic matter in these systems; and (8) measurement of carbon dioxide in the interstitial water and its delta C-13 in an attempt to understand the flow of CO2 through the systems. Microbial processes of primary production and initial degradation at the most active zone of the microbial mat were analyzed.

  7. Development of kenaf mat for slope stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. M.; Manaf, M. B. H. Ab; Zainol, N. Z.

    2017-09-01

    This study focusing on the ability of kenaf mat to act as reinforcement to laterite compared to the conventional geosynthetic in term of stabilizing the slope. Kenaf mat specimens studied in this paper are made up from natural kenaf fiber with 3mm thickness, 150mm length and 20mm width. With the same size of specimens, geosynthetic that obtain from the industry are being tested for both direct shear and tensile tests. Plasticity index of the soil sample used is equal to 13 which indicate that the soil is slightly plastic. Result shows that the friction angle of kenaf mat is higher compared to friction between soil particles itself. In term of resistance to tensile load, the tensile strength of kenaf mat is 0.033N/mm2 which is lower than the tensile strength of geosynthetic.

  8. Investigations on injection molded, glass-fiber reinforced polyamide 6 integral foams using breathing mold technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, A.; Kehret, L.; Huber, T.; Henning, F.; Elsner, P.

    2015-05-01

    Investigations on PA6-GF50 integral foams have been carried out using different material systems: longfiber- and shortfiber-reinforced PA6 as well as unreinforced PA6 as a reference material. Both chemical and physical blowing agents were applied. Breathing mold technology (decompression of the mold) was selected for the foaming process. The integral foam design, which can be conceived as a sandwich structure, helps to save material in the neutral axis area and maintains a distance between load-bearing, unfoamed skin layers. For all test series an initial mold gap of 2.5 mm was chosen and the same amount of material was injected. In order to realize different density reductions, the mold opening stroke was varied. The experiments showed that, at a constant mass per unit area, integral polyamide 6 foams have a significantly higher bending stiffness than compact components, due to their higher area moment of inertia after foaming. At a constant surface weight the bending stiffness in these experiments could be increased by up to 600 %. Both shortfiber- and longfiber-reinforced polyamide 6 showed an increase in energy absorption during foaming.

  9. Design and Construction of Mat Foundations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    column loads indicates the effectiveness of stiffening beams in spreading applied loads ... beams centered on rows of columns , (3) a shear and moment diagram may be constructed assuming that the column loads are point loads , (4) the mat depth...flexible consisting of precast concrete panels on a structural steel frame. Column loads , Figure 48, lead to an average pressure of 1.4 ksf. The mat

  10. Hydroponic root mats for wastewater treatment-a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Cuervo, Diego Paredes; Müller, Jochen A; Wiessner, Arndt; Köser, Heinz; Vymazal, Jan; Kästner, Matthias; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Hydroponic root mats (HRMs) are ecotechnological wastewater treatment systems where aquatic vegetation forms buoyant filters by their dense interwoven roots and rhizomes, sometimes supported by rafts or other floating materials. A preferential hydraulic flow is created in the water zone between the plant root mat and the bottom of the treatment system. When the mat touches the bottom of the water body, such systems can also function as HRM filter; i.e. the hydraulic flow passes directly through the root zone. HRMs have been used for the treatment of various types of polluted water, including domestic wastewater; agricultural effluents; and polluted river, lake, stormwater and groundwater and even acid mine drainage. This article provides an overview on the concept of applying floating HRM and non-floating HRM filters for wastewater treatment. Exemplary performance data are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of this technology are discussed in comparison to those of ponds, free-floating plant and soil-based constructed wetlands. Finally, suggestions are provided on the preferred scope of application of HRMs.

  11. Flow visualization study of the HiMAT RPRV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Water tunnel studies were performed to qualitatively define the flow field of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle (HiMAT RPRV). Particular emphasis was placed on defining the vortex flows generated at high angles of attack. The flow visualization tests were conducted in the Northrop water tunnel using a 1/15 scale model of the HiMAT RPRV. Flow visualization photographs were obtained for angles of attack up to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 5 deg. The HiMAT model was investigated in detail to determine the canard and wing vortex flow field development, vortex paths, and vortex breakdown characteristics as a function of angle of attack and sideslip. The presence of the canard caused the wing vortex to form further outboard and delayed the breakdown of the wing vortex to higher angles of attack. An increase in leading edge camber of the maneuver configuration delayed both the formation and the breakdown of the wing and canard vortices. Additional tests showed that the canard vortex was sensitive to variations in inlet mass flow ratio and canard flap deflection angle.

  12. Glass and ceramics. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of glasses and ceramics can be produced from bulk lunar materials or from separated components. Glassy products include sintered regolith, quenched molten basalt, and transparent glass formed from fused plagioclase. No research has been carried out on lunar material or close simulants, so properties are not known in detail; however, common glass technologies such as molding and spinning seem feasible. Possible methods for producing glass and ceramic materials are discussed along with some potential uses of the resulting products.

  13. Safety assessment of continuous glass filaments used in eclipse.

    PubMed

    Swauger, J E; Foy, J W

    2000-11-01

    Eclipse is a cigarette that produces smoke by primarily heating, rather than burning, tobacco. The Eclipse heat source assembly employs a continuous filament glass mat jacket to insulate the heat source. The glass mat insulator is composed of continuous glass filaments and a binder. The purpose of this article is to address the potential toxicological significance of the continuous glass filaments under the conditions of intended use. Transfer data and the unique physical characteristics of the filaments demonstrate that significant exposure of the smoker will not occur. The available environmental survey data clearly demonstrate that Eclipse smokers are extremely unlikely to be exposed to continuous glass filaments at a level that represents a biologically significant increase over background exposure to glass fibers. The chemical composition of the continuous glass filaments used in Eclipse is generally similar to C-glass fiber compositions such as MMVF 11 that have failed to produce either tumors or fibrosis in chronic inhalation studies conducted in rats. In vitro dissolution data demonstrate that the continuous glass filaments used in Eclipse are more soluble than biologically active fibers such as rock wool (MMVF 21) or asbestos. However, the continuous glass filaments used in Eclipse were not as soluble in simulated extracellular lung fluid as representative C-glass fibers (MMVF 10 and MMVF 11). In brief, exposure of Eclipse smokers to continuous glass filaments is extremely unlikely to occur at a level that may be construed to be of biological significance.

  14. Electrochromic Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  15. A blinded assessment of video quality in wearable technology for telementoring in open surgery: the Google Glass experience.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Daniel A; Phitayakorn, Roy; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Meireles, Ozanan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of telementoring is to recreate face-to-face encounters with a digital presence. Open-surgery telementoring is limited by lack of surgeon's point-of-view cameras. Google Glass is a wearable computer that looks like a pair of glasses but is equipped with wireless connectivity, a camera, and viewing screen for video conferencing. This study aimed to assess the safety of using Google Glass by assessing the video quality of a telementoring session. Thirty-four (n = 34) surgeons at a single institution were surveyed and blindly compared via video captured with Google Glass versus an Apple iPhone 5 during the open cholecystectomy portion of a Whipple. Surgeons were asked to evaluate the quality of the video and its adequacy for safe use in telementoring. Thirty-four of 107 invited surgical attendings (32%) responded to the anonymous survey. A total of 50% rated the Google Glass video as fair with the other 50% rating it as bad to poor. A total of 52.9% of respondents rated the Apple iPhone video as good. A significantly greater proportion of respondents felt Google Glass video quality was inadequate for telementoring versus the Apple iPhone's (82.4 vs 26.5%, p < 0.0001). Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.924 (95% CI 0.660-0.999, p < 0.001). While Google Glass provides a great breadth of functionality as a wearable device with two-way communication capabilities, current hardware limitations prevent its use as a telementoring device in surgery as the video quality is inadequate for safe telementoring. As the device is still in initial phases of development, future iterations or competitor devices may provide a better telementoring application for wearable devices.

  16. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  17. Investigation of needleless electrospun PAN nanofiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabantina, Lilia; Mirasol, José Rodríguez; Cordero, Tomás; Finsterbusch, Karin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) can be spun from a nontoxic solvent (DMSO, dimethyl sulfoxide) and is nevertheless waterproof, opposite to the biopolymers which are spinnable from aqueous solutions. This makes PAN an interesting material for electrospinning nanofiber mats which can be used for diverse biotechnological or medical applications, such as filters, cell growth, wound healing or tissue engineering. On the other hand, PAN is a typical base material for producing carbon nanofibers. Nevertheless, electrospinning PAN necessitates convenient spinning parameters to create nanofibers without too many membranes or agglomerations. Thus we have studied the influence of spinning parameters on the needleless electrospinning process of PAN dissolved in DMSO and the resulting nanofiber mats.

  18. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    DOEpatents

    Langton, Christine A.; Narasimhan, Rajendran; Karraker, David G.

    2001-01-01

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  19. Disclosure of the quackery: testing of the bactericidal action of products based on the "hydronic" technology ("informed glass") on ATCC strains of Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enteritidis and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Aleksandar, Racz; Josip, Cipriš; Olivera, Petrak

    2011-01-01

    To disclose a quackery called "revitalisation of tired water by hydronic technology", scientific experiments have been conducted with drinking water kept in "ordinary, everyday-use" drinking glasses and so-called 'informed' glasses, a patent-protected product supposed to have an effect on the "structure, vitality and memory of water". Drinking "informed" water is claimed to have a wide range of positive revitalising health effects (blue informed glass), to facilitate weight loss (red informed glass) and to have a stress-relieving action (green informed glass). Allegedly, by the use of the "orgon methodology", information is coded into the glass, which action is additionally enforced by the addition of the "magic life" symbol - a specially designed energy condenser which, together with the selected information, is permanently introduced into the liquid contained in the glass. Since the manufacturer claimed the products to have a broad bactericidal action, regardless of the external conditions and completely independent from additional factor that would lead to the activation of the system, the efficacy of the informed drinking glass was tested using standardised, microbiological tests. Respecting the principle of a single-blind test for each of 5 samples of each type of the informed glass, growth reduction factor (RF) (difference log cfu/ml - colony per unit/ml of control glass and log cfu/ml of each informed glass) was determined after 0,2,4,6 and 8 h in spring water experimentally contaminated with standardised ATCC strains of two types of bacteria and one yeast. The results showed a statistically significant bactericidal action of the blue informed glass with all strains-Enterococcus faecalis (RF 0.62/0.76), Salmonella enteritidis (RF 0.87/0.97), and Candida albicans (RF 0.5/0.60) - as opposed to the red and green glasses where this effect was negligible (RF < 0.1). However, when the tests were repeated in complete darkness, none of the three informed glasses

  20. When to Go to the Mat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carol A.

    2017-01-01

    School leaders rightly tend toward collaboration and consensus-building when it comes to important decisions affecting students. But there are moments when, perhaps to their own surprise, they may find themselves willing to "go to the mat" on an important decision, whether consensus has been reached or not. Smith, a professor and chair…

  1. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  2. Description of the HiMAT Tailored composite structure and laboratory measured vehicle shape under load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The aeroelastically tailored outer wing and canard of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle are closely examined and a general description of the overall structure of the vehicle is provided. Test data in the form of laboratory measured twist under load and predicted twist from the HiMAT NASTRAN structural design program are compared. The results of this comparison indicate that the measured twist is generally less than the NASTRAN predicted twist. These discrepancies in twist predictions are attributed, at least in part, to the inability of current analytical composite materials programs to provide sufficiently accurate properties of matrix dominated laminates for input into structural programs such as NASTRAN.

  3. Synthesis for Lunar Simulants: Glass, Agglutinate, Plagioclase, Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Michael; Wilson, Stephen A.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Stoeser, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The video describes a process for making glass for lunar regolith simulants that was developed from a patented glass-producing technology. Glass composition can be matched to simulant design and specification. Production of glass, pseudo agglutinates, plagioclase, and breccias is demonstrated. The system is capable of producing hundreds of kilograms of high quality glass and simulants per day.

  4. Characterization and Modification of Electrospun Fiber Mats for Use in Composite Proton Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarino, Matthew Marchand

    . Post-spin thermal annealing was used to modify the fiber morphology, inter-fiber welding, and crystallinity within the fibers. Morphological changes, in-plane tensile response, friction coefficient, and wear rate were characterized as functions of the annealing temperature. The Young's moduli, yield stresses and toughnesses of the PA 6(3)T nonwoven mats improved by two- to ten-fold when annealed slightly above the glass transition temperature, but at the expense of mat porosity. The mechanical and tribological properties of the thermally annealed P A 6,6 fiber mats exhibited significant improvements through the Brill transition temperature, comparable to the improvements observed for amorphous P A 6(3)T electrospun mats annealed near the glass transition temperature. The wear rates for both polymer systems correlate with the yield properties of the mat, in accordance with a modified Ratner-Lancaster model. The variation in mechanical and tribological properties of the mats with increasing annealing temperature is consistent with the formation of fiber-to-fiber junctions and a mechanism of abrasive wear that involves the breakage of these junctions between fibers. A mechanically robust proton exchange membrane with high ionic conductivity and selectivity is an important component in many electrochemical energy devices such as fuel cells, batteries, and photovoltaics. The ability to control and improve independently the mechanical response, ionic conductivity, and selectivity properties of a membrane is highly desirable in the development of next generation electrochemical devices. In this thesis, the use of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolytes is used to generate three different polymer film morphologies on highly porous electrospun fiber mats: webbed, conformal coating, and pore-bridging films. Specifically, depending on whether a vacuum is applied to the backside of the mat or not, the spray-LbL assembly either fills the voids of the mat with the proton

  5. Glass Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Research efforts span three general areas of glass science: glass refining, gel-derived glasses, and nucleation and crystallization of glasses. Gas bubbles which are present in a glass product are defects which may render the glass totally useless for the end application. For example, optical glasses, laser host glasses, and a variety of other specialty glasses must be prepared virtually defect free to be employable. Since a major mechanism of bubble removal, buoyant rise, is virtually inoperative in microgravity, glass fining will be especially difficult in space. On the other hand, the suppression of buoyant rise and the ability to perform containerless melting experiments in space allows the opportunity to carry out several unique bubble experiments in space. Gas bubble dissolution studies may be performed at elevated temperatures for large bubbles with negligible bubble motion. Also, bubble nucleation studies may be performed without the disturbing feature of heterogeneous bubble nucleation at the platinum walls. Ground based research efforts are being performed in support of these potential flight experiments.

  6. Ecophysiological Changes in Microbial Mats Incubated in a Greenhouse Collaboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; DesMarais, David J.; GarciaPichel, Ferran; Hogan, Mary; Jahnke, Linda; Keller, Richard M.; Miller, Scott R.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial mats are modern examples of the earliest microbial communities known. Among the best studied are microbial mats growing in hypersaline ponds managed for the production of salt by Exportadora de Sal, S.A. de C.V., Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. In May, 2001, we collected mats from Ponds 4 and 5 in this system and returned them to Ames Research Center, where they have been maintained for a period of over nine months. We report here on both the ecophysiological changes occurring in the mats over that period of time as well as the facility in which they were incubated. Mats (approximately 1 sq. meter total area) were incubated in a greenhouse facility modified to provide the mats with natural levels of visible and ultraviolet radiation as well as constantly flowing, temperature-controlled water. Two replicated treatments were maintained, a 'high salinity' treatment (about 120 ppt) and a 'low salinity' treatment (about 90 ppt). Rates of net biological activity (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, trace gas production) in the mats were relatively constant over the several months, and were similar to rates of activity measured in the field. However, over the course of the incubation, mats in both treatments changed in physical appearance. The most obvious change was that mats in the higher salinity treatments developed a higher proportion of carotenoid pigments (relative to chlorophyll), resulting in a noticeably orange color in the high salinity mats. This trend is also seen in the natural salinity gradient present at the field site. Changes in the community composition of the mats, as assayed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), as well as biomarker compounds produced in the mats were also monitored. The degree to which the mats kept in the greenhouse changed from the originally collected mats, as well as differences between high and low salinity mats will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended

  7. Lava Cave Microbial Communities Within Mats and Secondary Mineral Deposits: Implications for Life Detection on Other Planets

    PubMed Central

    Melim, L.A.; Spilde, M.N.; Hathaway, J.J.M.; Garcia, M.G.; Moya, M.; Stone, F.D.; Boston, P.J.; Dapkevicius, M.L.N.E.; Riquelme, C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai‘i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai‘i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai‘i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. Key Words: Biosignatures—Astrobiology—Bacteria—Caves—Life detection—Microbial mats. Astrobiology 11, 601–618. PMID:21879833

  8. Bioflumology: Microbial mat growth in flumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airo, A.; Weigert, S.; Beck, C.

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis resulted in a transformational change of Earth's geochemical cycles and the subsequent evolution of life. However, it remains vigorously debated when this metabolic ability had evolved in cyanobacteria. This is largely because studies of Archean microfossil morphology, molecular biomarkers, and isotopic characteristics are frequently ambiguous. However, the high degree of morphological similarities between modern photosynthetic and Archean fossil mats has been interpreted to indicate phototactic microbial behavior or oxygenic photosynthesis. In order to better evaluate the relationship between mat morphology and metabolism, we here present a laboratory set-up for conducting month-long experiments in several sterilizable circular flumes designed to allow single-species cyanobacterial growth under adjustable fluid-flow conditions and protected from contamination.

  9. Microbial mats: an ecological niche for fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sharon A.; Duval-Pérez, Lisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Fungi were documented in tropical hypersaline microbial mats and their role in the degradation of complex carbohydrates (exopolymeric substance – EPS) was explored. Fungal diversity is higher during the wet season with Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium among the more common genera. Diversity is also higher in the oxic layer and in young and transient mats. Enrichments with xanthan (a model EPS) show that without antibiotics (full community) degradation is faster than enrichments with antibacterial (fungal community) and antifungal (bacterial community) agents, suggesting that degradation is performed by a consortium of organisms (bacteria and fungi). The combined evidence from all experiments indicates that bacteria carried out approximately two-third of the xanthan degradation. The pattern of degradation is similar between seasons and layers but degradation is faster in enrichments from the wet season. The research suggests that fungi thrive in these hypersaline consortia and may participate in the carbon cycle through the degradation of complex carbohydrates. PMID:23577004

  10. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    DOE PAGES

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; ...

    2016-02-15

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) inmore » YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day -1 , and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems.« less

  11. Complexity of Curved Glass Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosić, T.; Svetel, I.; Cekić, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the increasing number of research on the architectural structures of curvilinear forms and technological and practical improvement of the glass production observed over recent years, there is still a lack of comprehensive codes and standards, recommendations and experience data linked to real-life curved glass structures applications regarding design, manufacture, use, performance and economy. However, more and more complex buildings and structures with the large areas of glass envelope geometrically complex shape are built every year. The aim of the presented research is to collect data on the existing design philosophy on curved glass structure cases. The investigation includes a survey about how architects and engineers deal with different design aspects of curved glass structures with a special focus on the design and construction process, glass types and structural and fixing systems. The current paper gives a brief overview of the survey findings.

  12. Transferability of glass lens molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  13. Flow-induced Development of Unicellular Cyanobacterial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Tice, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial mats/biofilms are abundant microbial growth structures throughout the history of life on Earth. Understanding the mechanisms for their morphogenesis and interactions with physical sedimentary forces are important topics that allow deeper understanding of related records. When subjected to hydrodynamic influences, mats are known to vary in morphology and structure in response to fluid shear, yet mechanistically, the underlying cellular architecture due to interactions with flow remain unexplained. Moreover, mats are found to emerge larger scale roughness elements and modified cohesive strength growing under flow. It is a mystery how and why these mat-community-level features are linked in association with modified boundary layers at the mats surface. We examined unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in a circular flow bioreactor designed to maintain a fixed set of hydrodynamic conditions. The use of monoculture strains and unidirectional currents, while not replicating natural mat systems (almost certainly multi-species and often multi-directional currents under complex wind or tidal wave actions), helps to simplify these systems and allows for specific testing of hypotheses regarding how mats evolve distinctive morphologies induced by flow. The unique design of the reactor also makes measurements such as critical erosional shear stress of the mats possible, in addition to microscopic, macroscopic imaging and weeks of continuous mats growth monitoring. We report the finding that linear chains, filament-like cell groups were present from unicellular cyanobacterial mats growing under flow (~1-5 cm/s) and these structures are organized within ~1-3mm size streamers and ~0.5-1mm size nodular macrostructures. Ultra-small, sub-micron thick EPS strings are observed under TEM and are likely the cohesive architectural elements in mats across different fluid regimes. Mat cohesion generally grows with and adapts to increasing flow shear stress within

  14. Commander Mattingly prepares meal on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-07-04

    STS004-28-312 (27 June-4 July 1982) --- Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, STS-4 crew commander, prepares a meal in the middeck area of space shuttle Columbia. He uses scissors to open a drink container. Various packages of food and meal accessories are attached to locker doors. At far left edge of the frame is the tall payload called continuous flow electrophoresis experiment (CFES) system-designed to separate biological materials according to their surface electrical charges as they pass through an electrical field. Astronaut Henry W. Hartsfield Jr. exposed this frame with a 35mm camera. Photo credit: NASA

  15. An Assessment of Binary Metallic Glasses: Correlations Between Structure, Glass Forming Ability and Stability (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Cu, germanium and tellurium ," J. Mat. Sci., vol. 9, pp. 707-717, 1974. [29] A. Inoue, T. Zhang, K. Kita, and T. Masumoto, "Mechanical strengths...Toribuchi, K. Aoki, and T. Masumoto, "Formation of La-M- Cu (M=Ca, Sr or Ba) amorphous alloys and their oxidization and superconductivity," Trans. JIM...structure of Pd- Ge alloys glasses by pulsed neutron total scattering," presented at Proc. 4 th International Conference on Rapidly Quenched Metals

  16. GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Fibrous glass fillers Binders used in the glass plastic industry Method of manufacturing glass plastics and glass plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of glass fibre reinforced plastics

  17. Contributions of ectomycorrhizal fungal mats to forest soil respiration

    Treesearch

    C. Phillips; L.A. Kluber; J.P. Martin; B.A. Caldwell; B.J. Bond

    2012-01-01

    Distinct aggregations of fungal hyphae and rhizomorphs, or “mats”, formed by some genera of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi are common features of soils in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. We measured in situ respiration rates of Piloderma mats and neighboring non-mat soils in an old-growth Douglas-fir forest in western Oregon to investigate whether there was...

  18. Framboidal iron oxide: Chondrite-like material from the black mat, Murray Springs, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayek, Mostafa; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Hull, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    At the end of the Pleistocene a Younger Dryas "black mat" was deposited on top of the Pleistocene sediments in many parts of North America. A study of the magnetic fraction (~ 10,900 ± 50 B.P.) from the basal section of the black mat at Murray Springs, AZ revealed the presence of amorphous iron oxide framboids in a glassy iron-silica matrix. These framboids are very similar in appearance and chemistry to those reported from several types of carbonaceous chondrites. The glass contains iron, silicon, oxygen, vanadium and minor titanium, while the framboidal particles contain calcium as well. The major element chemistry of both the spherules and the glass matrix are consistent with the chemistry of material associated with meteorite impact sites and meteorites. Electron microscopy confirms that the glassy material is indeed amorphous, and also shows that what appear to be individual oxide particles are amorphous as well. The latter appears consistent with their overall morphology that, while euhedral, typically shows significant fracture. Based on these data, we argue that these particles are the product of a hypervelocity impact.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal, IMRT, and V-MAT techniques for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jian-Jian; Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai

    2014-07-01

    The purpose is to dosimetrically compare the following 3 delivery techniques: 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (V-MAT) in the treatment of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Overall, 16 patients with T1/2N0 breast cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (multiple, noncoplanar photon fields) on the RTOG 0413 partial-breast trial. These cases were subsequently replanned using static gantry IMRT and V-MAT technology to understand dosimetric differences among these 3 techniques. Several dosimetric parameters were used in plan quality evaluation, including dose conformity index (CI) and dose-volume histogram analysis of normal tissue coverage. Quality assurance studies includingmore » gamma analysis were performed to compare the measured and calculated dose distributions. The IMRT and V-MAT plans gave more conformal target dose distributions than the 3D-CRT plans (p < 0.05 in CI). The volume of ipsilateral breast receiving 5 and 10 Gy was significantly less using the V-MAT technique than with either 3D-CRT or IMRT (p < 0.05). The maximum lung dose and the ipsilateral lung volume receiving 10 (V{sub 10}) or 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly less with both V-MAT and IMRT (p < 0.05). The IMRT technique was superior to 3D-CRT and V-MAT of low dose distributions in ipsilateral lung (p < 0.05 in V{sub 5} and D{sub 5}). The total mean monitor units (MUs) for V-MAT (621.0 ± 111.9) were 12.2% less than those for 3D-CRT (707.3 ± 130.9) and 46.5% less than those for IMRT (1161.4 ± 315.6) (p < 0.05). The average machine delivery time was 1.5 ± 0.2 minutes for the V-MAT plans, 7.0 ± 1.6 minutes for the 3D-CRT plans, and 11.5 ± 1.9 minutes for the IMRT plans, demonstrating much less delivery time for V-MAT. Based on this preliminary study, V-MAT and IMRT techniques offer improved dose conformity as compared with 3D-CRT techniques without increasing dose to the ipsilateral

  20. Reduced Gas Cycling in Microbial Mats: Implications for Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    For more than half the history of life on Earth, biological productivity was dominated by photosynthetic microbial mats. During this time, mats served as the preeminent biological influence on earth's surface and atmospheric chemistry and also as the primary crucible for microbial evolution. We find that modern analogs of these ancient mat communities generate substantial quantities of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane. Escape of these gases from the biosphere would contribute strongly to atmospheric evolution and potentially to the net oxidation of earth's surface; sequestration within the biosphere carries equally important implications for the structure, function, and evolution of anaerobic microbial communities within the context of mat biology.

  1. A Cyanine Dye Encapsulated Porous Fibrous Mat for Naked-Eye Ammonia Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chendong; Ma, Lijing; Yin, Meizhen; Yang, Wantai; Pan, Kai

    2016-08-19

    Electrospun ultrathin fiber-based sensors are desirable because of their practicality and sensitivity. Ammonia-detection systems are in high demand in different areas, including the industrial and agricultural fields. However, current technologies rely on large and complex instruments that restrict their actual utilization. Herein, we report a flexible naked-eye ammonia sensor, the polylactic acid-cyanine (PLA-Cy) fibrous mat, which was fabricated by blending a carboxyl-functionalized cyanine dye (D1) into electospun PLA porous fibers. The sensing mat was shown to undergo a naked-eye-detectable color change from white to blue upon exposure to ammonia vapor. The mat showed high selectivity to ammonia gas with a detection limit of 3.3 ppm. Aggregated D1 was first encapsulated by PLA and was then ionized by NH3 . These mechanisms were examined by photophysical studies and scanning electron microscopy. The aggregation-deaggregation process of D1 in the PLA-Cy fibrous mat led to the color change. This work provides a facile method for the naked-eye detection of ammonia and a novel strategy for the use of organic dyes in ammonia sensing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Flight control systems development and flight test experience with the HiMAT research vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Earls, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Two highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted vehicles were flown a total of 26 flights. These subscale vehicles were of advanced aerodynamic configuration with advanced technology concepts such as composite and metallic structures, digital integrated propulsion control, and ground (primary) and airborne (backup) relaxed static stability, digital fly-by-wire control systems. Extensive systems development, checkout, and flight qualification were required to conduct the flight test program. The design maneuver goal was to achieve a sustained 8-g turn at Mach 0.9 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. This goal was achieved, along with the acquisition of high-quality flight data at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers. Control systems were modified in a variety of ways using the flight-determined aerodynamic characteristics. The HiMAT program was successfully completed with approximately 11 hours of total flight time.

  3. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    PubMed

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies.

  4. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  5. Use of palm-mat geotextiles for rainsplash erosion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Fullen, M. A.; Davies, K.; Booth, C. A.

    2010-07-01

    Soil detachment by raindrop action (rainsplash erosion) is a very important subprocess of erosion by water. It is a particular problem in the UK as most soils are sandy or loamy sand in texture and lands have gentle to medium slope. However, few studies report potential rainsplash erosion control options under field conditions. Hence, the utilization of palm-mat geotextiles as a rainsplash erosion control technique was investigated at Hilton, east Shropshire, U.K. (52°33'5.7″ N, 2°19'18.3″ W). Geotextile-mats constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Borassus palm of West Africa) and Mauritia flexuosa (Buriti palm of South America) leaves are termed Borassus mats and Buriti mats, respectively. Two-year field experiments were conducted at Hilton to study the effects of emplacing Borassus and Buriti mats on rainsplash erosion of a loamy sand soil. Two sets (12 plots each) of experiments were established to study the effects of these mats on splash height and splash erosion. Splash height needs to be known to assess the transport mechanism of major soil fraction and its constituents on sloping land by rainsplash. In both sets, six randomly-selected plots were covered with mats, and the rest were bare. Results (during 22/01/2007‒23/01/2009; total precipitation = 1731.5 mm) show that Borassus mat-covered plots had ˜ 89% ( P < 0.001) less total splash erosion (2.97 kg m - 2 ) than bare plots (27.02 kg m - 2 ). Comparatively, mean splash height from Borassus mat-covered plots (0.12 m) was significantly ( P < 0.001) less than the bare plots, by ˜ 54%. However, Buriti mat-cover on bare plots had no significant ( P > 0.05) effect in rainsplash erosion control during that period, although plots with Buriti mats significantly ( P < 0.05) decreased splash height (by ˜ 18%) compared with bare plots (0.26 m). Buriti mats, probably due to their ˜ 43, 62 and 50% lower cover percentage (44%), mass per unit area (413 g - 2 ) and thickness (10 mm), respectively, compared with

  6. Electrospinning and stabilization of chitosan nanofiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmelsmann, N.; Grothe, T.; Homburg, S. V.; Ehrmann, A.

    2017-10-01

    Chitosan is of special interest for biotechnological and medical applications due to its antibacterial, antifungal and other intrinsic physical and chemical properties. The biopolymer can, e.g., be used for biotechnological purposes, as a filter medium, in medical products, etc. In all these applications, the inner surface should be maximized to increase the contact area with the filtered medium etc. and thus the chitosan’s efficacy. Chitosan dissolves in acidic solutions, opposite to neutral water. Electrospinning is possible, e.g., by co-spinning with PEO (poly(ethylene oxide)). Tests with different chitosan:PEO ratios revealed that higher PEO fractions resulted in better spinnability and more regular fibre mats, but make stabilization of the fibre structure more challenging.

  7. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; He, Bin

    2005-11-01

    We report our theoretical and experimental investigations on a new imaging modality, magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). In MAT-MI, the sample is located in a static magnetic field and a time-varying (µs) magnetic field. The time-varying magnetic field induces an eddy current in the sample. Consequently, the sample will emit ultrasonic waves by the Lorentz force. The ultrasonic signals are collected around the object to reconstruct images related to the electrical impedance distribution in the sample. MAT-MI combines the good contrast of electrical impedance tomography with the good spatial resolution of sonography. MAT-MI has two unique features due to the solenoid nature of the induced electrical field. Firstly, MAT-MI could provide an explicit or simple quantitative reconstruction algorithm for the electrical impedance distribution. Secondly, it promises to eliminate the shielding effects of other imaging modalities in which the current is applied directly with electrodes. In the theoretical part, we provide formulae for both the forward and inverse problems of MAT-MI and estimate the signal amplitude in biological tissues. In the experimental part, the experimental setup and methods are introduced and the signals and the image of a metal object by means of MAT-MI are presented. The promising pilot experimental results suggest the feasibility of the proposed MAT-MI approach.

  8. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden... switchboards and power-control switches where shock hazards exist. However, metal plates on which a person...

  9. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden... switchboards and power-control switches where shock hazards exist. However, metal plates on which a person...

  10. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden... switchboards and power-control switches where shock hazards exist. However, metal plates on which a person...

  11. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden... switchboards and power-control switches where shock hazards exist. However, metal plates on which a person...

  12. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden... switchboards and power-control switches where shock hazards exist. However, metal plates on which a person...

  13. The compression of wood/thermoplastic fiber mats during consolidation

    Treesearch

    Karl R. Englund; Michael P. Wolcott; John C. Hermanson

    2004-01-01

    Secondary processing of non-woven wood and wood/thermoplastic fiber mats is generally performed using compression molding, where heated platens or dies form the final product. Although the study and use of wood-fiber composites is widespread, few research efforts have explicitly described the fundamentals of mat consolidation. In contrast, the wood composite literature...

  14. Selected properties of MDF and flakeboard overlaid with fiberglass mats

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai

    2006-01-01

    Nonwoven fiberglass face laminates have long been applied to consolidated wood- based composites to improve their performance and serviceability. In this study, fiberglass mats with 50 percent resin binder were applied as face laminates to unconsolidated wood fiber or flake mats, then hot-pressed to make overlaid medium density fiberboard and flakeboard. Fiberglass...

  15. MAT@USC Candidates and Latino English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomeli, Cynthia Leticia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the perceptions of MAT@USC teacher candidates and how their perceptions and previous experiences affect the educational experiences of Latino English language learners. Three questions were developed to guide this study: (1) What are the perceptions of MAT@USC candidates in selected courses…

  16. Compositions and method of use of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    1997-01-01

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  17. Intelligent glasses, watches and vests…oh my! Rethinking the meaning of "harm" in the age of wearable technologies.

    PubMed

    Jadad, Alejandro R; Fandiño, Marcela; Lennox, Robin

    2015-02-05

    The widespread release and adoption of wearable devices will likely accelerate the "hybrid era", already initiated by mobile digital devices, with progressively deeper levels of human-technology co-evolution and increasing blurring of our boundaries with machines. Questions about the potentially harmful nature of information and communication technologies have been asked before, since the introduction of the telephone, the Web, and more recently, mobile phones. Our capacity to answer them now is limited by outdated conceptual approaches to harm, mostly derived from drug evaluation; and by the slow and static nature of traditional research tools. In this article, we propose a re-conceptualizing of the meaning of "harm", which builds on a global effort focused on health, adding flexibility and richness within a context that acknowledges the physical, mental, and social domains in which it can occur.

  18. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  19. Research on Bayes matting algorithm based on Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Jiang, Shan; Han, Cheng; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Zhengang

    2015-12-01

    The digital matting problem is a classical problem of imaging. It aims at separating non-rectangular foreground objects from a background image, and compositing with a new background image. Accurate matting determines the quality of the compositing image. A Bayesian matting Algorithm Based on Gaussian Mixture Model is proposed to solve this matting problem. Firstly, the traditional Bayesian framework is improved by introducing Gaussian mixture model. Then, a weighting factor is added in order to suppress the noises of the compositing images. Finally, the effect is further improved by regulating the user's input. This algorithm is applied to matting jobs of classical images. The results are compared to the traditional Bayesian method. It is shown that our algorithm has better performance in detail such as hair. Our algorithm eliminates the noise well. And it is very effectively in dealing with the kind of work, such as interested objects with intricate boundaries.

  20. Benthic Marine Cyanobacterial Mat Ecosystems: Biogeochemistry and Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are complete ecosystems that can include processes of primary production, diagenesis and lithification. Light sustains oxygenic photosynthesis, which in turn provides energy, organic matter and oxygen to the community. Due to both absorption and scattering phenomena, incident light is transformed with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition. Mobile photo synthesizers optimize their position with respect to this light gradient. When photosynthesis ceases at night, the upper layers of the mat become reduced and sulfidic. Counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide combine to provide daily-contrasting environments separated on a scale of a few mm. The functional complexity of mats, coupled with the highly proximal and ordered spatial arrangement of biota, offers the potential for a staggering number of interactions. At a minimum, the products of each functional group of microorganisms affect the other groups both positively and negatively. For example, cyanobacteria generate organic matter (potential substrates) but also oxygen (a toxin for many anaerobes). Anaerobic activity recycles nutrients to the photosynthesizers but also generates potentially toxic sulfide. The combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods, and to various depths in the mat. Observations of mats have produced numerous surprises. For example, obligately anaerobic processes can occur in the presence of abundant oxygen, highly reduced gases are produced in the presence of abundant sulfate, meiofauna thrive at high sulfide concentrations, and the mats' constituent populations respond to environmental changes in complex ways. While photosynthetic bacteria dominate the biomass and productivity of the mat, nonphotosynthetic, anaerobic processes constitute the ultimate biological filter on the ecosystem's emergent biosignatures, including those

  1. Spatial patterns of cyanobacterial mat growth on sand ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Klepac-Ceraj, V.; Perron, J. T.; Bosak, T.

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats produce organic matter, cycle nutrients, bind pollutants and stabilize sediment in sandy marine environments. Here, we investigate the influence of bedforms and wave motion on the growth rate, composition and spatial variability of microbial mats by growing cyanobacterial mats on a rippled bed of carbonate sand in a wave tank. The tank was forced with an oscillatory flow with velocities below the threshold for sediment motion yet able to induce a porewater flow within the sediment. Different spatial patterns developed in mats depending on the initial biochemistry of the water medium. When growing in a medium rich in nitrogen, phosphorous and micronutrients, mats grew faster on ripple troughs than on ripple crests. After two months, mats covered the bed surface uniformly, and the microbial communities on the crests and in the troughs had similar compositions. Differences in bed shear stress and nutrient availability between crests and troughs were not able to explain the faster growth in the troughs. We hypothesize that this growth pattern is due to a "strainer" effect, i.e. the suspended bacteria from the inoculum were preferentially delivered to troughs by the wave-induced porewater flow. In the experiments initiated in a medium previously used up by a microbial mat and thus depleted in nutrients, mats grew preferentially on the ripple crests. This spatial pattern persisted for nearly two years, and the microbial composition on troughs and crests was different. We attribute this pattern to the upwelling of porewater in the crests, which increased the delivery of nutrients from sediment to the cyanobacteria on the bed surface. Thus, the macroscopic patterns formed by photosynthetic microbial mats on sand ripples may be used to infer whether mats are nutrient-limited and whether they are recently colonized or older than a month.

  2. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments in solar saltern microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Joan; Grimalt, Joan O.; de Wit, Rutger; Keely, Brendan J.; Maxwell, James R.

    1994-11-01

    The distributions of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and their degradation products have been studied in two microbial mat systems developed in the calcite and calcite/gypsum evaporite domains of a solar saltern system. Phormidium valderianum and Microcoleus chthonoplastes are the dominant cyanobacterial species, respectively, and large amounts of Chloroflexus-like bacteria occur in the carbonate/gypsum mat. In both systems, the major pigments are chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and myxoxanthophyll, which originate from these mat-building cyanobacteria. This common feature contrasts with differences in other pigments that are specific for each mat community. Thus, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin, reflecting diatom inputs, are only found in the calcite mat, whereas the calcite/gypsum mat contains high concentrations of bacteriochlorophylls c produced by the multicellular green filamentous bacteria. In both cases, the depth concentration profiles (0-30 and 0-40 mm) show a relatively good preservation of the cyanobacterial carotenoids, zeaxanthin, β-carotene, myxoxanthophyll, and echinenone. This contrasts with the extensive biodegradation of cyanobacterial remains observed microscopically. Fucoxanthin in the calcite mat is also transformed at a faster rate than the cyanobacterial carotenoids. Chlorophyll a, the major pigment in both mats, exhibits different transformation pathways. In the calcite/gypsum mat, it is transformed via C-13 2 carbomethoxy defunctionalization prior to loss of the phytyl chain, leading to the formation of pyrophaeophytin a and, subsequently, pyrophaeophorbide a. On the other hand, the occurrence of the enzyme chlorophyllase, attributed to diatoms in the calcite mat, gives rise to extensive phytyl hydrolysis, with the formation of chlorophyllide a, pyrophaeophorbide a and, in minor proportion, phaeophorbide a. Studies of the sources of the photosynthetic pigments and of their transformation pathways in such simplified ecosystems provide a

  3. Diversity and stratification of archaea in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Charles E; Spear, John R; Harris, J Kirk; Pace, Norman R

    2009-04-01

    The Guerrero Negro (GN) hypersaline microbial mats have become one focus for biogeochemical studies of stratified ecosystems. The GN mats are found beneath several of a series of ponds of increasing salinity that make up a solar saltern fed from Pacific Ocean water pumped from the Laguna Ojo de Liebre near GN, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Molecular surveys of the laminated photosynthetic microbial mat below the fourth pond in the series identified an enormous diversity of bacteria in the mat, but archaea have received little attention. To determine the bulk contribution of archaeal phylotypes to the pond 4 study site, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of archaeal rRNA gene sequences in PCR libraries based on nominally universal primers. The ratios of bacterial/archaeal/eukaryotic rRNA genes, 90%/9%/1%, suggest that the archaeal contribution to the metabolic activities of the mat may be significant. To explore the distribution of archaea in the mat, sequences derived using archaeon-specific PCR primers were surveyed in 10 strata of the 6-cm-thick mat. The diversity of archaea overall was substantial albeit less than the diversity observed previously for bacteria. Archaeal diversity, mainly euryarchaeotes, was highest in the uppermost 2 to 3 mm of the mat and decreased rapidly with depth, where crenarchaeotes dominated. Only 3% of the sequences were specifically related to known organisms including methanogens. While some mat archaeal clades corresponded with known chemical gradients, others did not, which is likely explained by heretofore-unrecognized gradients. Some clades did not segregate by depth in the mat, indicating broad metabolic repertoires, undersampling, or both.

  4. Microbial and Functional Gene Diversity in the Thrombolitic Mats of Highborne Cay, Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. S.; Mobberley, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    In this study we examine the metagenome of modern thrombolitic mats. Our results indicate that thrombolitic mats are far more diverse than previously assumed; and gene analysis is now elucidating the molecular pathways needed for thrombolitic mat development.

  5. Pinhole Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole glasses really give better vision? Some ways to use this question for motivation in teaching optics have been discussed. For this column we include a series of experiments that students can complete using a model of the eye and demonstrate issues related to pinhole vision correction.

  6. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  7. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  8. PsyGlass: Capitalizing on Google Glass for naturalistic data collection.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Kevin; Dale, Rick

    2015-09-01

    As commercial technology moves further into wearable technologies, cognitive and psychological scientists can capitalize on these devices to facilitate naturalistic research designs while still maintaining strong experimental control. One such wearable technology is Google Glass (Google, Inc.: www.google.com/glass), which can present wearers with audio and visual stimuli while tracking a host of multimodal data. In this article, we introduce PsyGlass, a framework for incorporating Google Glass into experimental work that is freely available for download and community improvement over time (www.github.com/a-paxton/PsyGlass). As a proof of concept, we use this framework to investigate dual-task pressures on naturalistic interaction. The preliminary study demonstrates how designs from classic experimental psychology may be integrated in naturalistic interactive designs with emerging technologies. We close with a series of recommendations for using PsyGlass and a discussion of how wearable technology more broadly may contribute to new or adapted naturalistic research designs.

  9. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  10. Flexural strength using Steel Plate, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) on reinforced concrete beam in building technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, Johannes; Patra, Fadel Muhammad; Sitorus, Torang

    2018-03-01

    Reinforced concrete structures are very commonly used in buildings because they are cheaper than the steel structures. But in reality, many concrete structures are damaged, so there are several ways to overcome this problem, by providing reinforcement with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) and reinforcement with steel plates. Each type of reinforcements has its advantages and disadvantages. In this study, researchers discuss the comparison between flexural strength of reinforced concrete beam using steel plates and Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP). In this case, the researchers use Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) as external reinforcements. The dimension of the beams is 15 x 25 cm with the length of 320 cm. Based on the analytical results, the strength of the beam with CFRP is 1.991 times its initial, GFRP is 1.877 times while with the steel plate is 1.646 times. Based on test results, the strength of the beam with CFRP is 1.444 times its initial, GFRP is 1.333 times while the steel plate is 1.167 times. Based on these test results, the authors conclude that beam with CFRP is the best choice for external reinforcement in building technology than the others.

  11. Pinhole Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole…

  12. Solution blowing of chitosan/PVA hydrogel nanofiber mats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifang; Xu, Xianlin; Zhuang, Xupin; Cheng, Bowen

    2014-01-30

    Both nanofiber mats and hydrogel have their own advantages in wound healing. In this study, a novel hydrogel nanofiber mats were fabricated via solution blowing of chitosan and PVA solution, with various content of ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE) as cross-linker. SEM observation showed that the fibers were several hundred nanometers in diameter with smooth surface and distributed randomly forming three-dimensional mats. The structure of the chitosan/PVA nanofibers was examined by FTIR and XPS, and the results showed that the cross-linking reaction occurred between EGDE and the hydroxyl groups. The mats could quickly hydrate in an aqueous environment to form hydrogel. Their value of equilibrate water absorption varied from 680 to 459% various content of EGDE. The nanofiber mats showed good bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli. The chitosan/PVA hydrogel nanofiber mats showed the combination advantages of nanofibrous mats and hydrogel dressing, and were suggested as potential application in wound healing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geosynthetic Reinforcement of Sand-Mat Layer above Soft Ground

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Beom; Park, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Daehyeon

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the bearing capacity of soft ground for the purpose of getting trafficability of construction vehicles, the reinforcement of geosynthetics for sand-mat layers on soft ground has often been used. As the strength of the geosynthetics increases, and the sand-mat system becomes stronger, the bearing capacity of sand-mat systems will be increased. The depths of geosynthetics, reinforced in sand-mat layers, were varied with respect to the width of footing. The tensile strengths of geosynthetics were also varied to evaluate the effect of reinforcement on the bearing capacity of soft ground. The dispersion angles, with varying sand-mat thicknesses, were also determined in consideration of the tensile strength of geosynthetics and the depths of reinforcement installations. The bearing capacity ratios, with the variation of footing width and reinforced embedment depth, were determined for the geosynthetics-only, reinforced soft ground, 1-layer sand-mat system and 2-layer sand-mat system against the non-reinforced soft ground. From the test results of various models, a principle that better explains the concept of geosynthetic reinforcement has been found. On the basis of this principle, a new bearing capacity equation for practical use in the design of geosynthetically reinforced soft ground has been proposed by modifying Yamanouchi’s equation. PMID:28788392

  14. Sulfate reducing bacteria in microbial mats: Changing paradigms, new discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, L. K.; Reid, R. P.; Dupraz, C.; Decho, A. W.; Buckley, D. H.; Spear, J. R.; Przekop, K. M.; Visscher, P. T.

    2006-03-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have existed throughout much of Earth's history and remain major contributors to carbon cycling in modern systems. Despite their importance, misconceptions about SRB are prevalent. In particular, SRB are commonly thought to lack oxygen tolerance and to exist only in anoxic environments. Through the last two decades, researchers have discovered that SRB can, in fact, tolerate and even respire oxygen. Investigations of microbial mat systems have demonstrated that SRB are both abundant and active in the oxic zones of mats. Additionally, SRB have been found to be highly active in the lithified zones of microbial mats, suggesting a connection between sulfate reduction and mat lithification. In the present paper, we review recent research on SRB distribution and present new preliminary findings on both the diversity and distribution of δ-proteobacterial SRB in lithifying and non-lithifying microbial mat systems. These preliminary findings indicate the unexplored diversity of SRB in a microbial mat system and demonstrate the close microspatial association of SRB and cyanobacteria in the oxic zone of the mat. Possible mechanisms and further studies to elucidate mechanisms for carbonate precipitation via sulfate reduction are also discussed.

  15. Study of the mechanical stability and bioactivity of Bioglass(®) based glass-ceramic scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technology.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Elena; Melli, Virginia; Catignoli, Gabriele; Altomare, Lina; Jahromi, Maryam Tavafoghi; Cerruti, Marta; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; De Nardo, Luigi

    2016-02-02

    Large bone defects are challenging to heal, and often require an osteoconductive and stable support to help the repair of damaged tissue. Bioglass-based scaffolds are particularly promising for this purpose due to their ability to stimulate bone regeneration. However, processing technologies adopted so far do not allow for the synthesis of scaffolds with suitable mechanical properties. Also, conventional sintering processes result in glass de-vitrification, which generates concerns about bioactivity. In this work, we studied the bioactivity and the mechanical properties of Bioglass(®) based scaffolds, produced via a powder technology inspired process. The scaffolds showed compressive strengths in the range of 5-40 MPa, i.e. in the upper range of values reported so far for these materials, had tunable porosity, in the range between 55 and 77%, and pore sizes that are optimal for bone tissue regeneration (100-500 μm). We immersed the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 d and analyzed the evolution of the scaffold mechanical properties and microstructure. Even if, after sintering, partial de-vitrification occurred, immersion in SBF caused ion release and the formation of a Ca-P coating within 2 d, which reached a thickness of 10-15 μm after 28 d. This coating contained both hydroxyapatite and an amorphous background, indicating microstructural amorphization of the base material. Scaffolds retained a good compressive strength and structural integrity also after 28 d of immersion (6 MPa compressive strength). The decrease in mechanical properties was mainly related to the increase in porosity, caused by its dissolution, rather than to the amorphization process and the formation of a Ca-P coating. These results suggest that Bioglass(®) based scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technique are excellent candidates for bone regeneration applications.

  16. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell wasmore » issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order

  17. Molecular Ecology of Hypersaline Microbial Mats: Current Insights and New Directions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hon Lun; Ahmed-Cox, Aria; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2016-01-05

    Microbial mats are unique geobiological ecosystems that form as a result of complex communities of microorganisms interacting with each other and their physical environment. Both the microorganisms present and the network of metabolic interactions govern ecosystem function therein. These systems are often found in a range of extreme environments, and those found in elevated salinity have been particularly well studied. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the molecular ecology of select model hypersaline mat systems (Guerrero Negro, Shark Bay, S'Avall, and Kiritimati Atoll), and any potentially modulating effects caused by salinity to community structure. In addition, we discuss several emerging issues in the field (linking function to newly discovered phyla and microbial dark matter), which illustrate the changing paradigm that is seen as technology has rapidly advanced in the study of these extreme and evolutionally significant ecosystems.

  18. Using Intact Iron Microbial Mats to Gain Insights Into Mat Ecology and Geochemical Niche at the Microbial Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Chan, C. S. Y.; Mcallister, S.; Leavitt, A.; Emerson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are formed by microorganisms working in coordinated symbiosis, often benefitting the community by controlling the local geochemical or physical environment. Thus, the ecology of the mat depends on the individual roles of microbes organized into niches within a larger architecture. Chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) form distinctive Fe oxyhydroxide biominerals which constitute the building blocks of the mat. However, the majority of our progress has been in understanding the overall community structure. Understanding the physical mat structure on the microbial scale is important to unraveling FeOB evolution, the biogeochemistry and ecology of Fe-rich habitats, and ultimately interpreting FeOB biosignatures in the rock record. Mats in freshwater and marine environments contain strikingly similar biomineral morphologies, yet they are formed by phylogenetically distinct microorganisms. This suggests that the overall architecture and underlying genetics of freshwater and marine mats has evolved to serve particular roles specific to Fe oxidation. Thus, we conducted a comparative study of Fe seep freshwater mats and marine hydrothermal mats. We have developed a new approach to sampling Fe mats in order to preserve the delicate structure for analysis by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Our analyses of these intact mats show that freshwater and marine mats are similarly initiated by a single type of structure-former. These ecosystem engineers form either a hollow sheath or a twisted stalk biomineral during mat formation, with a highly directional structure. These microbes appear to be the vanguard organisms that anchor the community within oxygen/Fe(II) gradients, further allowing for community succession in the mat interior as evidenced by other mineralized morphologies. Patterns in biomineral thickness and directionality were indicative of redox gradients and temporal changes in the geochemical environment. These observations show that

  19. Protocyanobacteria: Oxygenic and Anoxygenic photosynthesis in mat-forming bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The oldest record of life is preserved in prePhanerozoic stromatolites dated 3500 million years old and is most likely of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria. The sedimentary records of cyanobacterial mats in stromatolites are the most abundant record of life throughout the prePhanerozoic. Stromatolites persisted into the Phanerozoic Eon, yet they become much less pronounced relative to earlier ones. The abundance and persistence of cyanobacterial mats throughout most of geological time point to the evolutionary success of these kinds of microbial communities and their possible role in the evolution of the earth and atmosphere.

  20. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  1. Permutation glass.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mobolaji

    2018-01-01

    The field of disordered systems in statistical physics provides many simple models in which the competing influences of thermal and nonthermal disorder lead to new phases and nontrivial thermal behavior of order parameters. In this paper, we add a model to the subject by considering a disordered system where the state space consists of various orderings of a list. As in spin glasses, the disorder of such "permutation glasses" arises from a parameter in the Hamiltonian being drawn from a distribution of possible values, thus allowing nominally "incorrect orderings" to have lower energies than "correct orderings" in the space of permutations. We analyze a Gaussian, uniform, and symmetric Bernoulli distribution of energy costs, and, by employing Jensen's inequality, derive a simple condition requiring the permutation glass to always transition to the correctly ordered state at a temperature lower than that of the nondisordered system, provided that this correctly ordered state is accessible. We in turn find that in order for the correctly ordered state to be accessible, the probability that an incorrectly ordered component is energetically favored must be less than the inverse of the number of components in the system. We show that all of these results are consistent with a replica symmetric ansatz of the system. We conclude by arguing that there is no distinct permutation glass phase for the simplest model considered here and by discussing how to extend the analysis to more complex Hamiltonians capable of novel phase behavior and replica symmetry breaking. Finally, we outline an apparent correspondence between the presented system and a discrete-energy-level fermion gas. In all, the investigation introduces a class of exactly soluble models into statistical mechanics and provides a fertile ground to investigate statistical models of disorder.

  2. Structure and constitution of glass and steel compound in glass-metal composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimova, Olga N.; Morkovin, Andrey V.; Dryuk, Sergey A.

    2014-11-14

    The research using methods of optical and scanning electronic microscopy was conducted and it discovered common factors on structures and diffusing zone forming after welding glass C49-1 and steel Ct3sp in technological process of creating new glass-metal composite. Different technological modes of steel surface preliminary oxidation welded with and without glass were investigated. The time of welding was varied from minimum encountering time to the time of stabilizing width of diffusion zone.

  3. Formation of Kinneyia via shear-induced instabilities in microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Katherine; Herminghaus, Stephan; Porada, Hubertus; Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Kinneyia are a class of microbially mediated sedimentary fossils. Characterized by clearly defined ripple structures, Kinneyia are generally found in areas that were formally littoral habitats and covered by microbial mats. To date, there has been no conclusive explanation of the processes involved in the formation of these fossils. Microbial mats behave like viscoelastic fluids. We propose that the key mechanism involved in the formation of Kinneyia is a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability induced in a viscoelastic film under flowing water. A ripple corrugation is spontaneously induced in the film and grows in amplitude over time. Theoretical predictions show that the ripple instability has a wavelength proportional to the thickness of the film. Experiments carried out using viscoelastic films confirm this prediction. The ripple pattern that forms has a wavelength roughly three times the thickness of the film. This behaviour is independent of the viscosity of the film and the flow conditions. Laboratory-analogue Kinneyia were formed via the sedimentation of glass beads, which preferentially deposit in the troughs of the ripples. Well-ordered patterns form, with both honeycomb-like and parallel ridges being observed, depending on the flow speed. These patterns correspond well with those found in Kinneyia, with similar morphologies, wavelengths and amplitudes being observed.

  4. Formation of Kinneyia via shear-induced instabilities in microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Katherine; Herminghaus, Stephan; Porada, Hubertus; Goehring, Lucas

    2013-12-13

    Kinneyia are a class of microbially mediated sedimentary fossils. Characterized by clearly defined ripple structures, Kinneyia are generally found in areas that were formally littoral habitats and covered by microbial mats. To date, there has been no conclusive explanation of the processes involved in the formation of these fossils. Microbial mats behave like viscoelastic fluids. We propose that the key mechanism involved in the formation of Kinneyia is a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability induced in a viscoelastic film under flowing water. A ripple corrugation is spontaneously induced in the film and grows in amplitude over time. Theoretical predictions show that the ripple instability has a wavelength proportional to the thickness of the film. Experiments carried out using viscoelastic films confirm this prediction. The ripple pattern that forms has a wavelength roughly three times the thickness of the film. This behaviour is independent of the viscosity of the film and the flow conditions. Laboratory-analogue Kinneyia were formed via the sedimentation of glass beads, which preferentially deposit in the troughs of the ripples. Well-ordered patterns form, with both honeycomb-like and parallel ridges being observed, depending on the flow speed. These patterns correspond well with those found in Kinneyia, with similar morphologies, wavelengths and amplitudes being observed.

  5. Children's Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerskog, Gunnar; Soderlund, Jan

    1980-07-01

    There is a common opinion among eye specialists and opticians that children's glasses often are not shaped for optimal fitting. A fundamental reason for this is the lack of data for the shaping of the bows, with the result that most children's glasses are reduced copies of adult's glasses. This report describes a photogrammetric method for collection of primary data for manufac-turing bows for children. An ordinary amateur camera was equipped with a stereo-adapter. With a few arrangements, such as projecting a pattern on the face and keeping the hair away from the ears, 600 children were photographed. A calibration photograph was exposed at the beginning and end of each film or when the equipment had been transported or otherwise disturbed. The photographs were measured in a stereocomparator and the coordinates analytically corrected for distortion. After determination of model coordinates the requested geometric information, such as pupillar distance, eye-ear distance, location of the bridge of the nose etc, was calculated. The shapes of average noses were presented as profile plots.

  6. BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL MATS AND THEIR BIOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David; Discipulo, M.; Turk, K.; Londry, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time. their biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self- sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a dial (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  7. Fabrication of nanofiber mats from electrospinning of functionalized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktay, Burcu; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Erdem-Kuruca, Serap

    2014-08-01

    Electrospinning technique enabled us to prepare nanofibers from synthetic and natural polymers. In this study, it was aimed to fabricate electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based nanofibers by reactive electrospinning process. To improve endurance of fiber toward to many solvents, PVA was functionalized with photo-crosslinkable groups before spinning. Afterward PVA was crosslinked by UV radiation during electrospinning process. The nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that homogenous, uniform and crosslinked PVA nanofibers in diameters of about 200 nm were obtained. Thermal stability of the nanofiber mat was investigated with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Also the potential use of this nanofiber mats for tissue engineering was examined. Osteosarcoma (Saos) cells were cultured on the nanofiber mats.

  8. Microbial mats and the early evolution of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Microbial mats have descended from perhaps the oldest and most widespread biological communities known. Mats harbor microbes that are crucial for studies of bacterial phylogeny and physiology. They illustrate how several oxygen-sensitive biochemical processes have adapted to oxygen, and they show how life adapted to dry land long before the rise of plants. The search for the earliest grazing protists and metazoa in stromatolites is aided by observations of mats: in them, organic compounds characteristic of ancient photosynthetic protists can be identified. Recent mat studies suggest that the 13C/12C increase observed over geological time in stromatolitic organic matter was driven at least in part by a long-term decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  9. Apollo 13 Astronaut Thomas Mattingly during water egress training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-17

    S70-24016 (17 Jan. 1970) --- Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission, participates in water egress training in a water tank in Building 260 at the Manned Spacecraft Center.

  10. Biodiversity of the microbial mat of the Garga hot spring.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Alexey Sergeevich; Bryanskaya, Alla Victorovna; Ivanisenko, Timofey Vladimirovich; Malup, Tatyana Konstantinovna; Peltek, Sergey Evgenievich

    2017-12-28

    Microbial mats are a good model system for ecological and evolutionary analysis of microbial communities. There are more than 20 alkaline hot springs on the banks of the Barguzin river inflows. Water temperature reaches 75 °C and pH is usually 8.0-9.0. The formation of microbial mats is observed in all hot springs. Microbial communities of hot springs of the Baikal rift zone are poorly studied. Garga is the biggest hot spring in this area. In this study, we investigated bacterial and archaeal diversity of the Garga hot spring (Baikal rift zone, Russia) using 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing. We studied two types of microbial communities: (i) small white biofilms on rocks in the points with the highest temperature (75 °C) and (ii) continuous thick phototrophic microbial mats observed at temperatures below 70 °C. Archaea (mainly Crenarchaeota; 19.8% of the total sequences) were detected only in the small biofilms. The high abundance of Archaea in the sample from hot springs of the Baikal rift zone supplemented our knowledge of the distribution of Archaea. Most archaeal sequences had low similarity to known Archaea. In the microbial mats, primary products were formed by cyanobacteria of the genus Leptolyngbya. Heterotrophic microorganisms were mostly represented by Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria in all studied samples of the microbial mats. Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, and Chlorobi were abundant in the middle layer of the microbial mats, while heterotrophic microorganisms represented mostly by Firmicutes (Clostridia, strict anaerobes) dominated in the bottom part. Besides prokaryotes, we detect some species of Algae with help of detection their chloroplasts 16 s rRNA. High abundance of Archaea in samples from hot springs of the Baikal rift zone supplemented our knowledge of the distribution of Archaea. Most archaeal sequences had low similarity to known Archaea. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities of the microbial mat of Garga hot spring showed that

  11. Fused Silica Surface Coating for a Flexible Silica Mat Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Fused silica insulation coatings have been developed for application to a flexible mat insulation system. Based on crystalline phase nucleation and growth kinetics, a 99+% SiO2 glass was selected as the base composition. A coating was developed that incorporated the high emissivity phase NiCr2O4 as a two phase coating with goals of high emittance and minimum change in thermal expansion. A second major coating classification has a plasma sprayed emittance coating over a sealed pure amorphous SiO2 layer. A third area of development centered on extremely thin amorphous SiO2 coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The coating characterization studies presented are mechanical testing of thin specimens extracted from the coatings, cyclic arc exposures, and emittance measurements before and after arc exposures.

  12. The biogeochemistry of microbial mats, stromatolites and the ancient biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Canfield, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    Stromatolites offer an unparalleled geologic record of early life, because they constitute the oldest and most abundant recognizable remains of microbial ecosystems. Microbial mats are living homologs of stromatolites; thus, the physiology of the microbiota as well as the processes which create those features of mats (e.g., biomarker organic compounds, elemental and stable isotopic compositions) which are preserved in the ancient record. Observations of the carbon isotopic composition (delta C-13) of stromatolites and microbial mats were made and are consistent with the hypothesis that atmospheric CO2 concentrations have declined by at least one to two orders of magnitude during the past 2.5 Ga. Whereas delta C-13 values of carbonate carbon average about 0 permil during both the early and mid-Proterozoic, the delta C-13 values of stromatolitic organic matter increase from an average of -35 between 2.0 and 2.6 Ga ago to an average of about -28 about 1.0 Ga ago. Modern microbial mats in hypersaline environments have delta C-13 values typically in the range of -5 to -9, relative to an inorganic bicarbonate source at 0 permil. Both microbial mats and pur cultures of cyanobacteria grown in waters in near equilibrium with current atmospheric CO2 levels exhibit minimal discrimination against C-13. In contrast, hot spring cyanobacterial mats or cyanobacterial cultures grown under higher CO2 levels exhibit substantially greater discrimination. If care is taken to compare modern mats with stromatolites from comparable environments, it might be possible to estimate ancient levels of atmospheric CO2. In modern microbial mats, a tight coupling exists between photosynthetic organic carbon production and subsequent carbon oxidation, mostly by sulfate reduction. The rate of one process fuels a high rate of the other, with much of the sulfate reduction occurring within the same depth interval as oxygenic photosynthesis. Other aspects of this study are presented.

  13. Methane Production by Microbial Mats Under Low Sulfate Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Thamdrup, Bo; Albert, Dan; Carpenter, Steven P.; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra; DesMarais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats collected in hypersaline salterns were incubated in a greenhouse under low sulfate concentrations ([SO4]) and examined for their primary productivity and emissions of methane and other major carbon species. Atmospheric greenhouse warming by gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been greater during the Archean than today in order to account for a record of moderate to warm paleoclemates, despite a less luminous early sun. It has been suggested that decreased levels of oxygen and sulfate in Archean oceans could have significantly stimulated microbial methanogenesis relative to present marine rates, with a resultant increase in the relative importance of methane in maintaining the early greenhouse. We maintained modern microbial mats, models of ancient coastal marine communities, in artificial brine mixtures containing both modern [SO4=] (ca. 70 mM) and "Archean" [SO4] (less than 0.2 mM). At low [SO4], primary production in the mats was essentially unaffected, while rates of sulfate reduction decreased by a factor of three, and methane fluxes increased by up to ten-fold. However, remineralization by methanogenesis still amounted to less than 0.4 % of the total carbon released by the mats. The relatively low efficiency of conversion of photosynthate to methane is suggested to reflect the particular geometry and chemical microenvironment of hypersaline cyanobacterial mats. Therefore, such mats w-ere probably relatively weak net sources of methane throughout their 3.5 Ga history, even during periods of low- environmental levels oxygen and sulfate.

  14. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  15. ERB master archival tape specification no. T 134081 ERB MAT, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Earth radiation budget (ERB)MAT tapes are generated by the ERB MATGEN software using the IBM 3081 computer system operated by the Science and Applications Computer Center at Goddard Space Flight Center. All MAT's are 9-track and MAT data are in ascending time order. The gross tape format for NIMBUS year-1 and year-2 MAT's is different from the format of MAT's starting with year-3. The MATs from the first two years are to contain one day's worth of data while all other MATs are to contain multiple day's worth of data stacked onto the tapes.

  16. Photosynthetic Microbial Mats are Exemplary Sources of Diverse Biosignatures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    Marine cyanobacterial microbial mats are widespread, compact, self-contained ecosystems that create diverse biosignatures and have an ancient fossil record. Within the mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides organic substrates and O2 to the community. Both the absorption and scattering of light change the intensity and spectral composition of incident radiation as it penetrates a mat. Some phototrophs utilize infrared light near the base of the photic zone. A mat's upper layers can become highly reduced and sulfidic at night. Counteracting gradients of O2 and sulfide shape the chemical environment and provide daily-contrasting microenvironments separated on a scale of a few mm. Radiation hazards (UV, etc.), O2 and sulfide toxicity elicit motility and other physiological responses. This combination of benefits and hazards of light, O2 and sulfide promotes the allocation of various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Associated nonphotosynthetic communities, including anaerobes, strongly influence many of the ecosystem's overall characteristics, and their processes affect any biosignatures that enter the fossil record. A biosignature is an object, substance and/or pattern whose origin specifically requires a biological agent. The value of a biosignature depends not only on the probability of life creating it, but also on the improbability of nonbiological processes producing it. Microbial mats create biosignatures that identify particular groups of organisms and also reveal attributes of the mat ecosystem. For example, branched hydrocarbons and pigments can be diagnostic of cyanobacteria and other phototrophic bacteria, and isoprenoids can indicate particular groups of archea. Assemblages of lipid biosignatures change with depth due to changes in microbial populations and diagenetic transformations of organic matter. The 13C/12C values of organic matter and carbonates reflect isotopic discrimination by particular

  17. Sulphur cycling in a Neoarchaean microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N R; Zerkle, A L; Fike, D A

    2017-05-01

    Multiple sulphur (S) isotope ratios are powerful proxies to understand the complexity of S biogeochemical cycling through Deep Time. The disappearance of a sulphur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) signal in rocks <~2.4 Ga has been used to date a dramatic rise in atmospheric oxygen levels. However, intricacies of the S-cycle before the Great Oxidation Event remain poorly understood. For example, the isotope composition of coeval atmospherically derived sulphur species is still debated. Furthermore, variation in Archaean pyrite δ 34 S values has been widely attributed to microbial sulphate reduction (MSR). While petrographic evidence for Archaean early-diagenetic pyrite formation is common, textural evidence for the presence and distribution of MSR remains enigmatic. We combined detailed petrographic and in situ, high-resolution multiple S-isotope studies (δ 34 S and Δ 33 S) using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to document the S-isotope signatures of exceptionally well-preserved, pyritised microbialites in shales from the ~2.65-Ga Lokammona Formation, Ghaap Group, South Africa. The presence of MSR in this Neoarchaean microbial mat is supported by typical biogenic textures including wavy crinkled laminae, and early-diagenetic pyrite containing <26‰ μm-scale variations in δ 34 S and Δ 33 S = -0.21 ± 0.65‰ (±1σ). These large variations in δ 34 S values suggest Rayleigh distillation of a limited sulphate pool during high rates of MSR. Furthermore, we identified a second, morphologically distinct pyrite phase that precipitated after lithification, with δ 34 S = 8.36 ± 1.16‰ and Δ 33 S = 5.54 ± 1.53‰ (±1σ). We propose that the S-MIF signature of this secondary pyrite does not reflect contemporaneous atmospheric processes at the time of deposition; instead, it formed by the influx of later-stage sulphur-bearing fluids containing an inherited atmospheric S-MIF signal and/or from magnetic isotope effects during thermochemical

  18. Angiogenic effects of borate glass microfibers in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yinan; Brown, Roger F; Jung, Steven B; Day, Delbert E

    2014-12-01

    The primary objective of this research was to evaluate the use of bioactive borate-based glass microfibers for angiogenesis in soft tissue repair applications. The effect of these fibers on growth of capillaries and small blood vessels was compared to that of 45S5 silica glass microfibers and sham implant controls. Compressed mats of three types of glass microfibers were implanted subcutaneously in rats and tissues surrounding the implant sites histologically evaluated 2-4 weeks post surgery. Bioactive borate glass 13-93B3 supplemented with 0.4 wt % copper promoted extensive angiogenesis as compared to silica glass microfibers and sham control tissues. The angiogenic responses suggest the copper-containing 13-93B3 microfibers may be effective for treating chronic soft tissue wounds. A second objective was to assess the possible systemic cytotoxicity of dissolved borate ions and other materials released from implanted borate glass microfibers. Cytotoxicity was assessed via histological evaluation of kidney tissue collected from animals 4 weeks after subcutaneously implanting high amounts of the borate glass microfibers. The evaluation of the kidney tissue from these animals showed no evidence of chronic histopathological changes in the kidney. The overall results indicate the borate glass microfibers are safe and effective for soft tissue applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. GlassForm

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-16

    GlassForm is a software tool for generating preliminary waste glass formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate glass properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste glass. The software includes property models for glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT).

  20. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  1. Metabolic potential of lithifying cyanobacteria-dominated thrombolitic mats.

    PubMed

    Mobberley, Jennifer M; Khodadad, Christina L M; Foster, Jamie S

    2013-11-01

    Thrombolites are unlaminated carbonate deposits formed by the metabolic activities of microbial mats and can serve as potential models for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of lithifying communities. To assess the metabolic complexity of these ecosystems, high throughput DNA sequencing of a thrombolitic mat metagenome was coupled with phenotypic microarray analysis. Functional protein analysis of the thrombolite community metagenome delineated several of the major metabolic pathways that influence carbonate mineralization including cyanobacterial photosynthesis, sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and aerobic heterotrophy. Spatial profiling of metabolite utilization within the thrombolite-forming microbial mats suggested that the top 5 mm contained a more metabolically diverse and active community than the deeper within the mat. This study provides evidence that despite the lack of mineral layering within the clotted thrombolite structure there is a vertical gradient of metabolic activity within the thrombolitic mat community. This metagenomic profiling also serves as a foundation for examining the active role individual functional groups of microbes play in coordinating metabolisms that lead to mineralization.

  2. Technical Status Report: Preliminary Glass Formulation Report for INEEL HAW

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Reamer, I.; Vienna, J.

    1998-03-01

    This study was performed by a team comprising experts in glass chemistry, glass technology, and statistics at both SRTC and PNNL. This joint effort combined the strengths of each discipline and site to quickly develop a glass formulation for specific INEEL HAW.

  3. Analysis of form deviation in non-isothermal glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilkamp, H.; Grunwald, T.; Dambon, O.; Klocke, F.

    2018-02-01

    Especially in the market of sensors, LED lighting and medical technologies, there is a growing demand for precise yet low-cost glass optics. This demand poses a major challenge for glass manufacturers who are confronted with the challenge arising from the trend towards ever-higher levels of precision combined with immense pressure on market prices. Since current manufacturing technologies especially grinding and polishing as well as Precision Glass Molding (PGM) are not able to achieve the desired production costs, glass manufacturers are looking for alternative technologies. Non-isothermal Glass Molding (NGM) has been shown to have a big potential for low-cost mass manufacturing of complex glass optics. However, the biggest drawback of this technology at the moment is the limited accuracy of the manufactured glass optics. This research is addressing the specific challenges of non-isothermal glass molding with respect to form deviation of molded glass optics. Based on empirical models, the influencing factors on form deviation in particular form accuracy, waviness and surface roughness will be discussed. A comparison with traditional isothermal glass molding processes (PGM) will point out the specific challenges of non-isothermal process conditions. Furthermore, the underlying physical principle leading to the formation of form deviations will be analyzed in detail with the help of numerical simulation. In this way, this research contributes to a better understanding of form deviations in non-isothermal glass molding and is an important step towards new applications demanding precise yet low-cost glass optics.

  4. GaN-on-glass success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    The successful growth of GaN-based LEDs on amorphous glass avoids the size and cost limitations of a sapphire substrate, says Jun Hee Choi from the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology in South Korea.

  5. A Thermal Physiological Comparison of Two HazMat Protective Ensembles With and Without Active Convective Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca; Carbo, Jorge; Luna, Bernadette; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1998-01-01

    Wearing impermeable garments for hazardous materials clean up can often present a health and safety problem for the wearer. Even short duration clean up activities can produce heat stress injuries in hazardous materials workers. It was hypothesized that an internal cooling system might increase worker productivity and decrease likelihood of heat stress injuries in typical HazMat operations. Two HazMat protective ensembles were compared during treadmill exercise. The different ensembles were created using two different suits: a Trelleborg VPS suit representative of current HazMat suits and a prototype suit developed by NASA engineers. The two life support systems used were a current technology Interspiro Spirolite breathing apparatus and a liquid air breathing system that also provided convective cooling. Twelve local members of a HazMat team served as test subjects. They were fully instrumented to allow a complete physiological comparison of their thermal responses to the different ensembles. Results showed that cooling from the liquid air system significantly decreased thermal stress. The results of the subjective evaluations of new design features in the prototype suit were also highly favorable. Incorporation of these new design features could lead to significant operational advantages in the future.

  6. The MATS Satellite Mission - Tomographic Perspectives on the Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, B.; Gumbel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Tomography in combination with space-borne limb imaging opens exciting new ways of probing atmospheric structures. MATS (Mesospheric Airglow/Aerosol Tomography and Spectroscopy) is a new Swedish satellite mission that applies these ideas to the mesosphere. MATS science questions focus on mesospheric wave activity and noctilucent clouds. Primary measurement targets are O2 Atmospheric band dayglow and nightglow in the near infrared (759-767 nm) and sunlight scattered from noctilucent clouds in the ultraviolet (270-300 nm). While tomography provides horizontally and vertically resolved data, spectroscopy allows analysis in terms of mesospheric composition, temperature and cloud properties. This poster introduces instrument and analysis ideas, and discusses scientific perspectives and connections to other missions. MATS is being prepared for a launch in 2018.

  7. Pressure Mapping Mat for Tele-Home Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Cogollo, Jose Francisco; Pau, Massimiliano; Fraboni, Beatrice; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of a mat-like pressure mapping system based on a single layer textile sensor and intended to be used in home environments for monitoring the physical condition of persons with limited mobility. The sensor is fabricated by embroidering silver-coated yarns on a light cotton fabric and creating pressure-sensitive resistive elements by stamping the conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) at the crossing points of conductive stitches. A battery-operated mat prototype was developed and includes the scanning circuitry and a wireless communication module. A functional description of the system is presented together with a preliminary experimental evaluation of the mat prototype in the extraction of plantar pressure parameters. PMID:26978369

  8. Electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) fibrous mat showing piezoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobeshima, Taiki; Ishii, Yuya; Sakai, Heisuke; Uemura, Sei; Yoshida, Manabu

    2018-05-01

    A piezoelectric effect, such as actuation behavior with voltage application, could be observed from a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) fibrous mat fabricated by electrospinning. This fibrous mat increased or decreased its thickness in accordance with the polarity of the applied voltage, which appears to be an inverse piezoelectric effect. The appearance d T constant was as large as 8.5 nm/V owing to the softness of the fibrous structure, and the coupling constant K T = 0.31 indicated its efficient piezoelectric property. This piezoelectric behavior was repeatedly observed to be stable at room temperature. In addition, the polarization components of the fibrous mat, which are considered to be the origin of its piezoelectric effect, and its relaxation behavior were confirmed from the results of thermally stimulated current measurements.

  9. HIDRA-MAT: A Material Analysis Tool for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruczyk, Daniel; Rizkallah, Rabel; Bedoya, Felipe; Kapat, Aveek; Schamis, Hanna; Allain, Jean Paul

    2017-10-01

    The former WEGA stellarator which is now operating as HIDRA at the University of Illinois will be almost exclusively used to study the intimate relationship between the plasma interacting with surfaces of different materials. A Material Analysis Tool (HIDRA-MAT) is being designed and will be built based on the successful Material Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) which is currently used on NSTX-U at PPPL. This will be an in-situ material diagnostic probe, meaning that all analysis can be done without breaking vacuum. This allows surface changes to be studied in real-time. HIDRA-MAT will consist of several in-situ diagnostics including Langmuir probes (LP), Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray Photo Spectroscopy (XPS) and Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS). This presentation will outline the HIDRA-MAT diagnostic and initial design, as well as its integration into the HIDRA system.

  10. An Hybrid Glass/hemp Fibers Solution Frp Pipes: Technical and Economic Advantages of Hand Lay up VS Light Rtm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicala, G.; Cristaldi, G.; Recca, G.; Ziegmann, G.; ElSabbagh, A.; Dickert, M.

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the replacement of glass fibers with hemp fibers for applications in the piping industry. The choice of hemp fibers was mainly related to the needs, expressed by some companies operating in this sector, for cost reduction without adversely reducing the performances of the pipes. Two processing techniques, namely hand lay up and light RTM, were evaluated. The pipe selected for the study was a curved fitting (90°) flanged at both ends. The fitting must withstand an internal pressure of 10 bar and the presence of acid aqueous solutions. The original lay-up used to build the pipe is a sequence of C-glass, glass mats and glass fabric. Commercial epoxy vinyl ester resin was used as thermoset matrix. Hemp fibers mats were selected as potential substitute of glass fibers mats because of their low cost and ready availability from different commercial sources. The data obtained from the mechanical characterization were used to define a favorable design of the pipe using hemp mats as internal layer. The proposed design for the fittings allowed for a cost reduction of about 24% and a weight saving of about 23% without any drawback in terms of the final performances. The light RTM techniques was developed on purpose for the manufacturing of the curved pipe. The comparison between hand lay up and light RTM evidenced a substantial cost reduction when light RTM was used.

  11. AN HYBRID GLASS/HEMP FIBERS SOLUTION FRP PIPES: TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ADVANTAGES OF HAND LAY UP VS LIGHT RTM

    SciTech Connect

    Cicala, G.; Cristaldi, G.; Recca, G.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the replacement of glass fibers with hemp fibers for applications in the piping industry. The choice of hemp fibers was mainly related to the needs, expressed by some companies operating in this sector, for cost reduction without adversely reducing the performances of the pipes. Two processing techniques, namely hand lay up and light RTM, were evaluated. The pipe selected for the study was a curved fitting (90 deg.) flanged at both ends. The fitting must withstand an internal pressure of 10 bar and the presence of acid aqueous solutions. The originalmore » lay-up used to build the pipe is a sequence of C-glass, glass mats and glass fabric. Commercial epoxy vinyl ester resin was used as thermoset matrix.Hemp fibers mats were selected as potential substitute of glass fibers mats because of their low cost and ready availability from different commercial sources. The data obtained from the mechanical characterization were used to define a favorable design of the pipe using hemp mats as internal layer. The proposed design for the fittings allowed for a cost reduction of about 24% and a weight saving of about 23% without any drawback in terms of the final performances.The light RTM techniques was developed on purpose for the manufacturing of the curved pipe. The comparison between hand lay up and light RTM evidenced a substantial cost reduction when light RTM was used.« less

  12. The MAT-sf: identifying risk for major mobility disability.

    PubMed

    Rejeski, W Jack; Rushing, Julia; Guralnik, Jack M; Ip, Edward H; King, Abby C; Manini, Todd M; Marsh, Anthony P; McDermott, Mary M; Fielding, Roger A; Newman, Anne B; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Gill, Thomas M

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of mobility is essential to both aging research and clinical geriatric practice. A newly developed self-report measure of mobility, the mobility assessment tool-short form (MAT-sf), uses video animations as an innovative method to improve measurement accuracy/precision. The primary aim of the current study was to evaluate whether MAT-sf scores can be used to identify risk for major mobility disability (MMD). This article is based on data collected from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study and involved 1,574 older adults between the ages of 70-89. The MAT-sf was administered at baseline; MMD, operationalized as failure to complete the 400-m walk ≤ 15 minutes, was evaluated at 6-month intervals across a period of 42 months. The outcome of interest was the first occurrence of MMD or incident MMD. After controlling for age, sex, clinic site, and treatment arm, baseline MAT-sf scores were found to be effective in identifying risk for MMD (p < .0001). Partitioning the MAT-sf into four groups revealed that persons with scores <40, 40-49, 50-59, and 60+ had failure rates across 42 months of follow-up of 66%, 52%, 35%, and 22%, respectively. The MAT-sf is a quick and efficient way of identifying older adults at risk for MMD. It could be used to clinically identify older adults that are in need of intervention for MMD and provides a simple means for monitoring the status of patients' mobility, an important dimension of functional health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Processes of carbonate precipitation in modern microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Christophe; Reid, R. Pamela; Braissant, Olivier; Decho, Alan W.; Norman, R. Sean; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2009-10-01

    Microbial mats are ecosystems that arguably greatly affected the conditions of the biosphere on Earth through geological time. These laminated organosedimentary systems, which date back to > 3.4 Ga bp, are characterized by high metabolic rates, and coupled to this, rapid cycling of major elements on very small (mm-µm) scales. The activity of the mat communities has changed Earth's redox conditions (i.e. oxidation state) through oxygen and hydrogen production. Interpretation of fossil microbial mats and their potential role in alteration of the Earth's geochemical environment is challenging because these mats are generally not well preserved. Preservation of microbial mats in the fossil record can be enhanced through carbonate precipitation, resulting in the formation of lithified mats, or microbialites. Several types of microbially-mediated mineralization can be distinguished, including biologically-induced and biologically influenced mineralization. Biologically-induced mineralization results from the interaction between biological activity and the environment. Biologically-influenced mineralization is defined as passive mineralization of organic matter (biogenic or abiogenic in origin), whose properties influence crystal morphology and composition. We propose to use the term organomineralization sensu lato as an umbrella term encompassing biologically influenced and biologically induced mineralization. Key components of organomineralization sensu lato are the "alkalinity" engine (microbial metabolism and environmental conditions impacting the calcium carbonate saturation index) and an organic matrix comprised of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which may provide a template for carbonate nucleation. Here we review the specific role of microbes and the EPS matrix in various mineralization processes and discuss examples of modern aquatic (freshwater, marine and hypersaline) and terrestrial microbialites.

  14. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  15. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  16. Late Byzantine Mineral Soda High Alumina Glasses from Asia Minor: A New Primary Glass Production Group

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  17. Kodak T-Mat G film in rotational panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Ponce, A Z; McDavid, W D; Lundeen, R C; Morris, C R

    1986-06-01

    Panoramic radiographs were taken of a tissue-equivalent phantom to evaluate T-Mat G and Ortho G films in combination with rare earth screens. The radiographs were compared to radiographs made with high-speed calcium tungstate screens and Kodak XRP film. The reduction in the amount of radiation necessary for the use of rare earth screens (50% to 70%) was accomplished by lowering the mA and adding filtration. All evaluated films were diagnostically acceptable. There was a marked preference of the T-Mat radiographs over the Ortho G radiographs and a slight preference over radiographs made with the standard calcium-tungstate screen-film system.

  18. Chemical Principles Revisited: The Chemistry of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a detailed discussion on the chemistry of glass. Topics discussed include: natural glass, early history, modern glass composition, raw materials for glass melting, chemically modified glasses, modern glass forming, glass ceramics, and new developments in glass research. (BT)

  19. MatMRI and MatHIFU: software toolboxes for real-time monitoring and control of MR-guided HIFU

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The availability of open and versatile software tools is a key feature to facilitate pre-clinical research for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) and expedite clinical translation of diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications. In the present study, two customizable software tools that were developed at the Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute are presented for use with both MRI and MR-HIFU. Both tools operate in a MATLAB®; environment. The first tool is named MatMRI and enables real-time, dynamic acquisition of MR images with a Philips MRI scanner. The second tool is named MatHIFU and enables the execution and dynamic modification of user-defined treatment protocols with the Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU therapy system to perform ultrasound exposures in MR-HIFU therapy applications. Methods MatMRI requires four basic steps: initiate communication, subscribe to MRI data, query for new images, and unsubscribe. MatMRI can also pause/resume the imaging and perform real-time updates of the location and orientation of images. MatHIFU requires four basic steps: initiate communication, prepare treatment protocol, and execute treatment protocol. MatHIFU can monitor the state of execution and, if required, modify the protocol in real time. Results Four applications were developed to showcase the capabilities of MatMRI and MatHIFU to perform pre-clinical research. Firstly, MatMRI was integrated with an existing small animal MR-HIFU system (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) to provide real-time temperature measurements. Secondly, MatMRI was used to perform T2-based MR thermometry in the bone marrow. Thirdly, MatHIFU was used to automate acoustic hydrophone measurements on a per-element basis of the 256-element transducer of the Sonalleve system. Finally, MatMRI and MatHIFU were combined to produce and image a heating pattern that recreates the word ‘HIFU’ in a tissue

  20. Inverted glass harp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Daniel B.; Rosenberg, Brian J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an analytical treatment of the acoustics of liquid-filled wine glasses, or "glass harps." The solution is generalized such that under certain assumptions it reduces to previous glass harp models, but also leads to a proposed musical instrument, the "inverted glass harp," in which an empty glass is submerged in a liquid-filled basin. The versatility of the solution demonstrates that all glass harps are governed by a family of solutions to Laplace's equation around a vibrating disk. Tonal analyses of recordings for a sample glass are offered as confirmation of the scaling predictions.

  1. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  2. Optimization of the contents of hollow glass microsphere and sodium hexametaphosphate for glass fiber vacuum insulation panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. D.; Chen, Z. F.; Zhou, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, various additive amounts of hollow glass microspheres (HGMs) and sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) powders were blended with flame attenuated glass wool (FAGW) to form hybrid core materials (HCMs) through the wet method. Among them, the SHMP was dissolved in the glass fiber suspension and coated on the surface of glass fibers while the HGMs were insoluble in the glass fiber suspension and filled in the fiber-fiber pores. The average pore diameter of the FAGW/HGM HCMs was 8-11 μm which was near the same as that of flame attenuated glass fiber mats (FAGMs, i.e., 10.5 µm). The tensile strength of the SHMP coated FAGMs was enhanced from 160 N/m to 370 N/m when SHMP content increased from 0 wt.% to 0.2 wt.%. By contrast, the tensile strength of the FAGW/HGM HCMs decreased from 160 N/m to 40 N/m when HGM content increased from 0 wt.% to 50 wt.%. Both the FAGW/HGM HCMs and SHMP coated FAGMs were vacuumed completely to form vacuum insulation panels (VIPs). The results showed that both the addition of SHMP and HGM led a slight increase in the thermal conductivity of the corresponding VIPs. To obtain a high-quality VIP, the optimal SHMP content and HGM content in glass fiber suspension was 0.12-0.2 wt.% and 0 wt.%.

  3. Targeting S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis with a novel allosteric inhibitor of Mat2A

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, Casey L.; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Bolaños, Ben

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is an enzyme cofactor used in methyl transfer reactions and polyamine biosynthesis. The biosynthesis of SAM from ATP and L-methionine is performed by the methionine adenosyltransferase enzyme family (Mat; EC 2.5.1.6). Human methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (Mat2A), the extrahepatic isoform, is often deregulated in cancer. We identified a Mat2A inhibitor, PF-9366, that binds an allosteric site on Mat2A that overlaps with the binding site for the Mat2A regulator, Mat2B. Studies exploiting PF-9366 suggested a general mode of Mat2A allosteric regulation. Allosteric binding of PF-9366 or Mat2B altered the Mat2A active site, resulting in increased substrate affinity and decreased enzymemore » turnover. These data support a model whereby Mat2B functions as an inhibitor of Mat2A activity when methionine or SAM levels are high, yet functions as an activator of Mat2A when methionine or SAM levels are low. The ramification of Mat2A activity modulation in cancer cells is also described.« less

  4. Micropatterned coculture of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells on layered electrospun fibrous mats toward blood vessel engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Huinan; Liu, Yaowen; Lu, Jinfu; Wei, Jiaojun; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in vascular engineering is the establishment of proper microenvironment to guide the spatial organization, growth, and extracellular matrix (ECM) productions of cells found in blood vessels. In the current study, micropatterned fibrous mats with distinct ridges and grooves of different width were created to load smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which were assembled by stacking on vascular endothelial cell (EC)-loaded flat fibrous mats to mimic the in vivo-like organized structure of blood vessels. SMCs were mainly distributed in the ridges, and aligned fibers in the patterned regions led to the formation of elongated cell bodies, intense actin filaments, and expressions of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin in a parallel direction with fibers. ECs spread over the flat fibrous mats and expressed collagen IV and laminin with a cobblestone-like feature. A z-stack scanning of fluorescently stained fibrous mats indicated that SMCs effectively infiltrated into fibrous scaffolds at the depth of around 200 μm. Compared with SMCs cultured alone, the coculture with ECs enhanced the proliferation, infiltration, and cytoskeleton elongation of SMCs on patterned fibrous mats. Although the coculture of SMCs made no significant difference in the EC growth, the coculture system on patterned fibrous scaffolds promoted ECM productions of both ECs and SMCs. Thus, this patterned fibrous configuration not only offers a promising technology in the design of tissue engineering scaffolds to construct blood vessels with durable mechanical properties, but also provides a platform for patterned coculture to investigate cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions in highly organized tissues. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Disaster medicine through Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Carenzo, Luca; Barra, Federico Lorenzo; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Colombo, Davide; Costa, Alessandro; Della Corte, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Nontechnical skills can make a difference in the management of disasters and mass casualty incidents and any tool helping providers in action might improve their ability to respond to such events. Google Glass, released by Google as a new personal communication device, could play a role in this field. We recently tested Google Glass during a full-scale exercise to perform visually guided augmented-reality Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment triage using a custom-made application and to identify casualties and collect georeferenced notes, photos, and videos to be incorporated into the debriefing. Despite some limitations (battery life and privacy concerns), Glass is a promising technology both for telemedicine applications and augmented-reality disaster response support to increase operators' performance, helping them to make better choices on the field; to optimize timings; and finally represents an excellent option to take professional education to a higher level.

  6. Promoting physical activity with a school-based dance mat exergaming intervention: qualitative findings from a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Burges Watson, Duika; Adams, Jean; Azevedo, Liane B; Haighton, Catherine

    2016-07-20

    Physical activity is critical to improving health and well-being in children. Quantitative studies have found a decline in activity in the transition from primary to secondary education. Exergames (active video games) might increase physical activity in adolescents. In January 2011 exergame dance mat systems were introduced in to all secondary schools across two local authority districts in the UK. We performed a quasi-experimental evaluation of a natural experiment using a mixed methods design. The quantitative findings from this work have been previously published. The aim of this linked qualitative study was to explore the implementation of the dance mat scheme and offer insights into its uptake as a physical activity intervention. Embedded qualitative interviews at baseline and 12 month follow-up with purposively selected physical education teachers (n = 20) and 25 focus groups with a convenience sample of pupils (n = 120) from five intervention schools were conducted. Analysis was informed by sociology of translation approach. At baseline, participants (both teachers and pupils) reported different expectations about the dance mats and how they could be employed. Variation in use was seen at follow-up. In some settings they were frequently used to engage hard to reach groups of pupils. Overall, the dance mats were not used routinely to increase physical activity. However there were other unanticipated benefits to pupils such as improved reaction time, co-ordination and mathematic skills. The use of dance mats was limited in routine physical education classes because of contextual issues (school/government policy) technological failures (batteries/updates) and because of expectations about how and where they could be used. Our linked quantitative study (previously published) suggested that the dance mats were not particularly effective in increasing physical activity, but the qualitative results (reported here) show that the dance mats were not used

  7. Method and system of culturing an algal mat

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C; Cannon, Benjamin R; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-05-13

    A system and method for culturing algae are presented. The system and method utilize a fog of growth medium that is delivered to an algal mat generator along with a stream of CO.sub.2 to promote growth of algal cells contained in the generator.

  8. Coconut matting bezoar identified by a combined analytical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Levison, D A; Crocker, P R; Boxall, T A; Randall, K J

    1986-01-01

    A rare type of bezoar composed of coconut matting was found in the stomach of a caucasian man. The exact identity of the fibres was established by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy spectroscopy, and microscopic infrared spectroscopy. This report illustrates the importance of these techniques for identifying the nature of foreign material. Images PMID:3950038

  9. Detail of the underground wire net mat and cable at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of the underground wire net mat and cable at the base of a 94' low-band reflector screen pole, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Enzyme functionalized electrospun chitosan mats for antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Bösiger, Peter; Tegl, Gregor; Richard, Isabelle M T; Le Gat, Luce; Huber, Lukas; Stagl, Viktoria; Mensah, Anna; Guebitz, Georg M; Rossi, René M; Fortunato, Giuseppino

    2018-02-01

    This work presents electrospun chitosan mats, functionalized with glucose oxidase (GOX) to implement an in-situ hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) generation system. The as spun CTS-PEO mats exhibited a smooth and homogenous morphology in combination with a high specific surface area (5.4m 2 /g) providing an excellent basis for further functionalization and subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking provided them with superior mechanical stability in aqueous environments. GOX was covalently immobilized, as proven by XPS, and resulted in activity recoveries between 20 and 40%. The functional mats generated a steady state concentration of ∼60μM H 2 O 2 per cm 2 which resulted in growth inhibition of E. coli and of S. aureus already after two hours of incubation. Additional cytotoxicity tests of the modified mats against mouse fibroblasts did not show an influence on the viability of the cells which proved it a functional biomaterial of great potential for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Direct piezoelectric responses of soft composite fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Morvan, J.; Diorio, N.; Buyuktanir, E.; Harden, J.; West, J. L.; Jákli, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recently soft fiber mats electrospun from solutions of Barium Titanate (BT) ferroelectric ceramics particles and polylactic acid (PLA) were found to have large (d33 ˜ 1 nm/V) converse piezoelectric signals offering a myriad of applications ranging from active implants to smart textiles. Here, we report direct piezoelectric measurements (electric signals due to mechanical stress) of the BT/PLA composite fiber mats at several BT concentrations. A homemade testing apparatus provided AC stresses in the 50 Hz-1.5 kHz-frequency range. The piezoelectric constant d33 ˜ 0.5 nC/N and the compression modulus Y ˜ 104-105 Pa found are in agreement with the prior converse piezoelectric and compressibility measurements. Importantly, the direct piezoelectric signal is large enough to power a small LCD by simple finger tapping of a 0.15 mm thick 2-cm2 area mat. We propose using these mats in active Braille cells and in liquid crystal writing tablets.

  12. The MAT-sf: identifying risk for major mobility disability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of mobility is essential to both aging research and clinical geriatric practice. A newly developed self-report measure of mobility, the mobility assessment tool-short form (MAT-sf), uses video animations as an innovative method to improve measurement accuracy/precision. Th...

  13. A Serious Look at the 4MAT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Harry V.

    4MAT is an 8-step, sequential instructional model based on two theoretical constructs: Kolb's model of learning styles and the concept of brain hemisphericity. The model, developed by B. McCarthy (1987), is derived by interacting each of Kolb's four quadrants with both left and right brain. Kolb outlined four learning styles based on the four…

  14. Electrospinning of caseinates to create protective fibrous mats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electrospinning is a nonthermal process that produces fibers on the micron- or nano-scale from a polymer solution. If produced by electrospinning of biopolymer solutions, fibrous mats may be created for protecting foods and allowing for the preservation and controlled release of bioactives for healt...

  15. Electrospinning of caseinates to create protective fibrous mats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    JUSTIFICATION Electrospinning is a nonthermal process that produces fibers with diameters on the micron- or nano-scales from a polymer solution. If produced by electrospinning of biopolymer solutions, fibrous mats may be created for protecting foods, improving food quality and allowing for the prese...

  16. Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    Compositions, methods and devices for bioremediation that comprise components of constructed microbial mats with organic and inorganic materials are described. The compositions, methods and devices can be used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  17. The first success of glass eel production in the world: basic biology on fish reproduction advances new applied technology in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hirohiko; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohta, Hiromi; Unuma, Tatsuya; Nomura, Kazuharu

    2005-04-01

    The eel has long been esteemed as an important food fish in the world, especially in Japan, and has been used as an experimental fish for many fields of fish physiology. However, the decreases in eel resources have been a serious concern in recent years. The catches of glass eels as seedlings for aquaculture have shown a long-term decrease in both Europe and East Asia. To increase eel resources, the development of techniques for artificial induction of maturation and spawning and rearing their larvae have been eagerly desired. Recent progress of reproductive physiology of fish, especially mechanisms of oocyte maturation and ovulation in female and of spermatozoa maturation in male, facilitate to establish techniques for hormonal induction of maturation and spawning in sexually immature eels. With persistent effort to development of rearing techniques of larvae, we have first succeeded to produce glass eel. These applied techniques are may contribute to understand the basic reproductive physiology of the eel.

  18. Surface Coatings on Lunar Volcanic Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas,-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are undertaking a detailed study of surface deposits on lunar volcanic glass beads. These tiny deposits formed by vapor condensation during cooling of the gases that drove the fire fountain eruptions responsible for the formation of the beads. Volcanic glass beads are present in most lunar soil samples in the returned lunar collection. The mare-composition beads formed as a result of fire-fountaining approx.3.4-3.7 Ga ago, within the age range of large-scale mare volcanism. Some samples from the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 landing sites are enriched in volcanic spherules. Three major types of volcanic glass bead have been identified: Apollo 15 green glass, Apollo 17 orange glass, and Apollo 17 "black" glass. The Apollo 15 green glass has a primitive composition with low Ti. The high-Ti compositions of the orange and black glasses are essentially identical to each other but the black glasses are opaque because of quench crystallization. A poorly understood feature common to the Apollo 15 and 17 volcanic glasses is the presence of small deposits of unusual materials on their exterior surfaces. For example, early studies indicated that the Apollo 17 orange glasses had surface enrichments of In, Cd, Zn, Ga, Ge, Au, and Na, and possible Pb- and Zn-sulfides, but it was not possible to characterize the surface features in detail. Technological advances now permit us to examine such features in detail. Preliminary FE-TEM/X-ray studies of ultramicrotome sections of Apollo 15 green glass indicate that the surface deposits are heterogeneous and layered, with an inner layer consisting of Fe with minor S and an outer layer of Fe and no S, and scattered Zn enrichments. Layering in surface deposits has not been identified previously; it will be key to defining the history of lunar fire fountaining.

  19. Carbon nanotube mat as mediator-less glucose sensor electrode.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jongeun; Kim, Hansang; Lee, Sangeui; Hahn, H Thomas; Lashmore, David

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, the direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on carbon nanotube (CNT) mat electrode is demonstrated. Because of the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength of CNT mat, it can be used as an electrode as well as a catalyst support. Therefore, the preparation process for the CNT mat based sensor electrode is simpler than that of the conventional CNT dispersed sensor electrodes. GOx was covalently immobilized on the oxidized CNT mat, which is connected to a wire by using silver paste and epoxy glue. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform-Infrared (ATR-FTIR) result shows transmittance peaks at 1637 cm(-1) and 1525 cm(-1) which are corresponding to the band I and II of amide. Cyclic voltammetric shows a pair of well-defined redox peaks with the average formal potential of -0.425 V (vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode) in the phosphate buffered saline solution (1 x PBS, pH 7.4). Calculated electron transfer rate constant and the surface density of GOx were 1.71 s(-1) and (3.27 +/- 0.20) x 10(-13) mol/cm2, respectively. Cyclic voltammograms of GOx-CNT mat in glucose solution show that the immobilized GOx retains its catalytic activity to glucose. The amperometric sensor response showed a linear dependence on the glucose concentration in the range of 0.2 mM to 2.18 mM with a detection sensitivity of 4.05 microA mM(-1) cm(-2). The Michaelis-Menten constant of the immobilized GOx was calculated to be 2.18 mM.

  20. Photosynthesis below the surface in a cryptic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-10-01

    The discovery of subsurface communities has encouraged speculation that such communities might be present on planetary bodies exposed to harsh surface conditions, including the early Earth. While the astrobiology community has focused on the deep subsurface, near-subsurface environments are unique in that they provide some protection while allowing partial access to photosynthetically active radiation. Previously we identified near-surface microbial communities based on photosynthesis. Here we assess the productivity of such an ecosystem by measuring in situ carbon fixation rates in an intertidal marine beach through a diurnal cycle, and find them surprisingly productive. Gross fixation along a transect (99×1 m) perpendicular to the shore was highly variable and depended on factors such as moisture and mat type, with a mean of ~41 mg C fixed m[minus sign]2 day[minus sign]1. In contrast, an adjacent well-established cyanobacterial mat dominated by Lyngbya aestuarii was ~12 times as productive (~500 mg C fixed m[minus sign]2 day[minus sign]1). Measurements made of the Lyngbya mat at several times per year revealed a correlation between total hours of daylight and gross daily production. From these data, annual gross fixation was estimated for the Lyngbya mat and yielded a value of ~1.3×105 g m[minus sign]2 yr[minus sign]1. An analysis of pulse-chase data obtained in the study in conjunction with published literature on similar ecosystems suggests that subsurface interstitial mats may be an overlooked endogenous source of organic carbon, mostly in the form of excreted fixed carbon.

  1. Vertical Geochemical Profiling Across a 3.33 Ga Microbial Mat from Barberton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, F.; Lemelle, L.; Simionovici, A.; Southam, G.; Maclean, L.; Salomé, M.; Wirick, S.; Toporski, J.; Jauss, A.

    2008-03-01

    The Josefdal Chert (3.33 Ga), Barberton, contains a superbly preserved microbial mat. High resolution geochemical profiling across the mat documents textures and compositions indicative of a mixed microbial community of anoxygenic photosynthesisers and probably SRBs.

  2. Investigations into the Structure and Dynamics of Chalcogenide Glasses using High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaseman, Derrick Charles

    Chalcogenide glasses constitute an important class of materials that are sulfides, selenides or tellurides of group IV and/or V elements, namely Ge, As, P and Si with minor concentrations of other elements such as Ga, Sb, In. Because of their infrared transparency that can be tuned by changing chemistry and can be actively altered by exposure to band gap irradiation, chalcogenide glasses find use in passive and active optical devices for applications in the areas of photonics, remote sensing and memory technology. Therefore, it is important to establish predictive models of structure-property relationships for these materials for optimization of their physical properties for various applications. Structural elucidation of chalcogenide glasses is experimentally challenging and in order to make predictive structural models, structural units at both short and intermediate -range length scales must be identified and quantified. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an element-specific structural probe that is uniquely suited for this task, but resolution and sensitivity issues have severely limited the applications of such techniques in the past. The recent development of multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques, such as Phase Adjusted Spinning Sidebands (PASS) and Magic Angle Turning (MAT) can potentially alleviate such issues. In this study novel two-dimensional, high-resolution 77Se and 125Te MATPASS NMR spectroscopic techniques are utilized to elucidate quantitatively the compositional evolution of the short- and intermediate- range atomic structure in three binary chalcogenide glass-forming systems, namely: GexSe100-x, AsxSe100-x , and AsxTe100-x. The spectroscopic results provide unambiguous site speciation and quantification for short- and intermediate-range structural motifs present in these glasses. In turn, for all systems, robust structural models and the corresponding structure-property relationships are successfully established as a function

  3. Research on the Properties of the Waste Glass Concrete Composite Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shilong; Chen, Kaihui; Chen, Zhongliang

    2018-02-01

    The composite foundation of glass concrete can not only reuse the large number of waste glass, but also improve the bearing capacity of weak foundation and soil with special properties. In this paper, the engineering properties of glass concrete composite foundation are studied based on the development situation of glass concrete and the technology of composite foundation.

  4. Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) Users' Workshop Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S. (Compiler)

    2018-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a Users' Workshop on the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) on August 21, 2017. The objective of this workshop was to update the user community on the latest features of T-MATS, and to provide a forum to present work performed using T-MATS. Presentations highlighted creative applications and the development of new features and libraries, and emphasized the flexibility and simulation power of T-MATS.

  5. Picture Wall (Glass Structures)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Photo shows a subway station in Toronto, Ontario, which is entirely glass-enclosed. The all-glass structure was made possible by a unique glazing concept developed by PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of flat glass. In the TVS glazing system, transparent glass "fins" replace conventional vertical support members used to provide support for wind load resistance. For stiffening, silicone sealant bonds the fins to adjacent glass panels. At its glass research center near Pittsburgh, PPG Industries uses the NASTRAN computer program to analyze the stability of enclosures made entirely of glass. The company also uses NASTRAN to simulate stresses on large containers of molten glass and to analyze stress effects of solar heating on flat glass.

  6. Reaction cured glass and glass coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to reaction cured glass and glass coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive glass frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate glass and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).

  7. Colonization of oak wilt fungal mats by Ophiostoma piceae during spring in Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Juzwik; Jason M. Meyer

    1997-01-01

    The colonization of Ceratocystis fagacearum fungal mats of different ages by Ophiostoma piceae on Quercus spp. was determined in three east-central Minnesota locations during the spring of 1995. The extent of the mat area colonized by O. piceae generally increased with mat age. Subsamples per...

  8. Flakeboard thickness swelling. Part I, Stress relaxation in a flakeboard mat

    Treesearch

    R. L. Geimer; J. H. Kwon; J. Bolton

    1998-01-01

    The steam injection schedule best suited for dimensionally stabilizing a flake mat is one in which steam treatment is initiated before the press is closed and is continued at least until the mat attains target thickness. Experiments showed that resinless mats treated with 20 sec of steam at 600 kPa had maximum thickness swelling of 205% compared to 350% for resinless...

  9. The Effects of Low Sulfate Concentrations on Modern Microbial Mat Communities: A Long Term Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; Carpenter, Steve; DesMarais, David J.; Discipulo, Mykell; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra

    2002-01-01

    Microbial mats were widespread during the first ca. 2 Ga. of our biosphere's history. To better understand microbial ecosystems and their biomarkers under the low sulfate levels present in early oceans, we attempted a long-term (ca. 1 year) manipulation of sulfate in modem mats. Mats collected from salt ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Calif. Sur were incubated in a Greenhouse "Collaboratory" at Ames. Mats were maintained in artificial seawater brine containing either: 1) sulfate levels normal for these mats (70 mM), or 2) brine in which sulfate was replaced by chloride. Sulfate concentrations in the "low sulfate" brine gradually approached their lowest (to date) value of 0. 1 mM as sulfate was consumed and/or diffused out of the mat over a period of ca. 4 months. During that period of time, a number of differences between the treatments emerged. Relative to the "low sulfate" mats, "normal sulfate" mats had: 1) lower consumption of oxygen in the lower levels of the mat, 2) higher efficiencies of oxygenic photosynthesis, and 3) higher rates of nitrogen fixation. Rates of methane production by the mats increased greatly as sulfate concentrations fell below ca. 0.2 mM. In contrast, "low" and "normal" sulfate mats had similar net rates of exchange of O2 and dissolved inorganic C between the mats and overlying water. Reduced sulfate levels have diverse impacts upon these ecosystems.

  10. Users guide for ERB 7 MAT (including the first year quality control)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groveman, B.

    1984-01-01

    In the first section of this report background information for the use of the ERB-7 Master Archival Tapes (MAT) is provided. The second section gives details regarding the scientific validity and quality of the MAT. The MAT data analyzed covers the period from November 16, 1978 to October 31, 1979.

  11. Damage assessment and progression in a polyisocyanurate-based continuous swirl mat composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Darwell Carlton, II

    This research conducted in conjunction with Oak Ridge National Laboratories and the Automotive Composite Consortium, ACC, was motivated by the desire to reduce vehicle weight for increased efficiency. At present, there are no databases of failure mechanisms, experimental procedures to study failure, mathematical expressions for empirical or theoretical prediction of properties of a continuous swirl mat composite, CSMC. Therefore, to contribute to the increased utilization of this class of materials the following research was performed. This research enabled the failure mechanism to be formulated, development of a method to quantify failure based on ultrasonic attenuation maps, and the prediction of the fracture toughness parameter KIC. The use of scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and real-time tensile loading showed that the CSMC failed in a brittle mode. These techniques also provided imaging information as to how a dominant crack propagates in the presence of a continuously swirled E-glass mat reinforcement and voids. This evaluation enabled a reconstruction of failure in order to demonstrate a possible failure mechanism. The aforementioned techniques revealed that the dominant crack follows the fiber/matrix interface, but may be influenced by the presence of voids. Voids have the tendency of luring the growing crack away from the interface. A growing crack would, however, return to a fiber/matrix interface until complete failure occurred. Another aspect of this work was the quantification of progressive damage using ultrasound. Comparisons were made between ultrasonic attenuation maps for unloaded and sequentially loaded specimens. The sequential loads were applied at different percentages of the ultimate tensile strength, UTS. This technique provided attenuation maps for a series of specimens with a controlled degree of damage, which showed an increase in attenuation with an increase in percent UTS. Fracture toughness experiments yielded an

  12. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE PAGES

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore » investments.« less

  13. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mV Ag/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mV Ag/AgCl [anodic (AN)more » mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. In conclusion, these data suggested that

  14. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    DOE PAGES

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; ...

    2015-09-03

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mV Ag/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mV Ag/AgCl [anodic (AN)more » mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. In conclusion, these data suggested that

  15. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  16. Research on up- and down-conversion emissions of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Chengguo; Song, Feng; An, Liqun; Ren, Xiaobin; Yuan, Yize; Cao, Yang; Wang, Gangzhi

    2012-12-01

    By high-temperature melting method and thermal treatment technology, Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic samples were prepared. The luminescence spectra of the glass and glass ceramic samples were studied under 975 nm excitation. In visible and near-infrared bands, the emission intensity of the glass ceramic is stronger than that of the glass. The glass ceramic can comprehensively improve the luminous characters of the precursor glass. The phosphate glass ceramic will be valuable luminescence materials.

  17. Fast releasing oral electrospun PVP/CD nanofiber mats of taste-masked meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-06-20

    Fast release and taste masking of meloxicam (MX)-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/cyclodextrin (CD) nanofiber mats were developed using an electrospinning process. CDs were blended to improve the stability of the mats. The morphology and diameter of the mats were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); physical and mechanical properties were also studied. The MX content, disintegration time, MX release and cytotoxicity of the mats were investigated. In vivo studies were also performed in healthy human volunteers. The results indicated that the mats were successfully prepared with fiber in the nanometer range. MX was well incorporated into the mats, with an amorphous form. The mats showed suitable tensile strength. CDs improved the physical stability by their cage-like supramolecular structure to protect from humidity and moisture, and create bead free nanofiber mats. The nanofiber mats with CDs were physically stable without any hygroscopicity and fusion. A fast disintegration and release of MX was achieved. Moreover, this mat released MX faster than the MX powder and commercial tablets. The cytotoxicity test revealed that mats were safe for a 5-min incubation. The disintegration studies indicated that in vivo disintegration agreed with the in vitro studies; the mat rapidly disintegrated in the mouth. The less bitter of MX was occurred in the mats that incorporated CD, menthol and aspartame. In addition, this mat was physical stable for 6 months. The results suggest that these mats may be a good candidate for fast dissolving drug delivery systems of bitter drugs to increase the palatability of dosage forms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 Gene Ratio in Black Koji Molds Isolated from Meju.

    PubMed

    Mageswari, Anbazhagan; Kim, Jeong-Seon; Cheon, Kyu-Ho; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Yamada, Osamu; Hong, Seung-Beom

    2016-12-01

    Aspergillus luchuensis is known as an industrially important fungal species used for making fermented foods such as awamori and shochu in Japan, makgeolli and Meju in Korea, and Pu-erh tea in China. Nonetheless, this species has not yet been widely studied regarding mating-type genes. In this study, we examined the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 gene ratio in black koji molds ( A. luchuensis , Aspergillus niger , and Aspergillus tubingensis ) and in Aspergillus welwitschiae isolated from Meju, a fermented soybean starting material for traditional soy sauce and soybean paste in Korea. The number of strains with the MAT1-1 locus was 2 of 23 ( A. luchuensis ), 6 of 13 ( A. tubingensis ), 21 of 28 ( A. niger ), and 5 of 10 ( A. welwitschiae ). Fungal species A. tubingensis and A. welwitschiae showed a 1 : 1 ratio of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating-type loci. In contrast, A. luchuensis revealed predominance of MAT1-2 (91.3%) and A. niger of MAT1-1 (75%). We isolated and identified 2 A. luchuensis MAT1-1 strains from Meju, although all strains for making shochu in Japan are of the MAT1-2 type. These strains may be a good resource for breeding of A. luchuensis to be used in the Asian fermented-food industry.

  19. Analysis of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 Gene Ratio in Black Koji Molds Isolated from Meju

    PubMed Central

    Mageswari, Anbazhagan; Kim, Jeong-seon; Cheon, Kyu-Ho; Kwon, Soon-Wo

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus luchuensis is known as an industrially important fungal species used for making fermented foods such as awamori and shochu in Japan, makgeolli and Meju in Korea, and Pu-erh tea in China. Nonetheless, this species has not yet been widely studied regarding mating-type genes. In this study, we examined the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 gene ratio in black koji molds (A. luchuensis, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus tubingensis) and in Aspergillus welwitschiae isolated from Meju, a fermented soybean starting material for traditional soy sauce and soybean paste in Korea. The number of strains with the MAT1-1 locus was 2 of 23 (A. luchuensis), 6 of 13 (A. tubingensis), 21 of 28 (A. niger), and 5 of 10 (A. welwitschiae). Fungal species A. tubingensis and A. welwitschiae showed a 1 : 1 ratio of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating-type loci. In contrast, A. luchuensis revealed predominance of MAT1-2 (91.3%) and A. niger of MAT1-1 (75%). We isolated and identified 2 A. luchuensis MAT1-1 strains from Meju, although all strains for making shochu in Japan are of the MAT1-2 type. These strains may be a good resource for breeding of A. luchuensis to be used in the Asian fermented-food industry. PMID:28154484

  20. The dielectric signature of glass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rams-Baron, M.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Knapik-Kowalczuk, J.; Jurkiewicz, K.; Burian, A.; Wojtyniak, M.; Pionteck, J.; Jaworska, M.; Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Paluch, M.

    2017-09-01

    At present, we are witnessing a renewed interest in the properties of densified glasses prepared by isobaric cooling of a liquid at elevated pressure. As high-pressure densification emerges as a promising approach in the development of glasses with customized features, understanding and controlling their unique properties represent a contemporary scientific and technological goal. The results presented herein indicate that the applied high-pressure preparation route leads to a glassy state with higher density (˜1%) and a reduced free volume of about 7%. We show that these subtle structural changes remarkably influence the dielectric response and spectral features of β-relaxation in etoricoxib glass. Our study, combining dynamical and structural techniques, reveal that β-relaxation in etoricoxib is extremely sensitive to the variations in molecular packing and can be used to probe the changes in glass density. Such connection is technologically relevant and may advance further progress in the field.

  1. Rapid process for producing transparent, monolithic porous glass

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R [Livermore, CA

    2006-02-14

    A process for making transparent porous glass monoliths from gels. The glass is produced much faster and in much larger sizes than present technology for making porous glass. The process reduces the cost of making large porous glass monoliths because: 1) the process does not require solvent exchange nor additives to the gel to increase the drying rates, 2) only moderate temperatures and pressures are used so relatively inexpensive equipment is needed, an 3) net-shape glass monoliths are possible using this process. The process depends on the use of temperature to control the partial pressure of the gel solvent in a closed vessel, resulting in controlled shrinking during drying.

  2. Clinical and surgical applications of smart glasses.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Stefan; Camacho, Elvis; Trivedi, Nirali; Logan, Julia; Campbell, Colson; Zilinyi, Robert; Lieber, Bryan; Bruce, Eliza; Taylor, Blake; Martineau, David; Dumont, Emmanuel L P; Appelboom, Geoff; Connolly, E Sander

    2015-01-01

    With the increased efforts to adopt health information technology in the healthcare field, many innovative devices have emerged to improve patient care, increase efficiency, and decrease healthcare costs. A recent addition is smart glasses: web-connected glasses that can present data onto the lenses and record images or videos through a front-facing camera. In this article, we review the most salient uses of smart glasses in healthcare, while also denoting their limitations including practical capabilities and patient confidentiality. Using keywords including, but not limited to, ``smart glasses'', ``healthcare'', ``evaluation'', ``privacy'', and ``development'', we conducted a search on Ovid-MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar. A total of 71 studies were included in this review. Smart glasses have been adopted into the healthcare setting with several useful applications including, hands-free photo and video documentation, telemedicine, Electronic Health Record retrieval and input, rapid diagnostic test analysis, education, and live broadcasting. In order for the device to gain acceptance by medical professionals, smart glasses will need to be tailored to fit the needs of medical and surgical sub-specialties. Future studies will need to qualitatively assess the benefits of smart glasses as an adjunct to the current health information technology infrastructure.

  3. Electrospun PVA/Bentonite Nanocomposites Mats for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ferrández-Rives, Mariola; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Electrospun mats and films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel are produced for drug delivery. To provide mechanical consistency to the gel a reinforcement by nanoclays is introduced in the polymer matrix. Four different suspensions of nanoparticles in the polymer solution are prepared in an adequate solvent. These suspensions are subjected to an electrospinning process to produce the nanofiber mat, while films are produced by casting. The influence of the process parameters over the nanofibers microstructure is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effectiveness of nanoclay encapsulation in the nanocomposites is tested by a thermogravimetric analysis. A crosslinking reaction in solution is carried out to prevent the dissolution of the nanocomposites in aqueous media. A model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) is absorbed in the nanocomposites to characterize the release kinetics in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). PMID:29261123

  4. Application of materials database (MAT.DB.) to materials education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    Finding the right material for the job is an important aspect of engineering. Sometimes the choice is as fundamental as selecting between steel and aluminum. Other times, the choice may be between different compositions in an alloy. Discovering and compiling materials data is a demanding task, but it leads to accurate models for analysis and successful materials application. Mat. DB. is a database management system designed for maintaining information on the properties and processing of engineered materials, including metals, plastics, composites, and ceramics. It was developed by the Center for Materials Data of American Society for Metals (ASM) International. The ASM Center for Materials Data collects and reviews material property data for publication in books, reports, and electronic database. Mat. DB was developed to aid the data management and material applications.

  5. Surgical Vision: Google Glass and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Johnny Yau Cheung; Tsui, Lok Yee; Yeung, Keith Siu Kay; Yip, Stefanie Wai Ying; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit

    2016-08-01

    Google Glass is, in essence, a smartphone in the form of a pair of spectacles. It has a display system, a bone conduction "speaker," video camera, and connectivity via WiFi or Bluetooth technologies. It can also be controlled by voice command. Seizing Google Glass' capabilities as windows of opportunity, surgeons have been the first group of doctors trying to incorporate the technology into their daily practices. Experiences from different groups have demonstrated Google Glass' potential in improving perioperative care, intraoperative communication and documentation, surgical outcome as well as surgical training. On the other hand, the device has technical limitations, notably suboptimal image qualities and a short battery life. Its operational functions also bring forth concerns on the protection of patient privacy. Nonetheless, the technological advances that this device embodies hold promises in surgical innovations. Further studies are required, and surgeons should explore, investigate, and embrace similar technologies with keen and informed anticipation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Effect of light wavelength on hot spring microbial mat biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Akifumi; Thiel, Vera; Nakagawa, Mayuko; Ayukawa, Shotaro; Yamamura, Masayuki

    2018-01-01

    Hot spring associated phototrophic microbial mats are purely microbial communities, in which phototrophic bacteria function as primary producers and thus shape the community. The microbial mats at Nakabusa hot springs in Japan harbor diverse photosynthetic bacteria, mainly Thermosynechococcus, Chloroflexus, and Roseiflexus, which use light of different wavelength for energy conversion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the phototrophs on biodiversity and community composition in hot spring microbial mats. For this, we specifically activated the different phototrophs by irradiating the mats with different wavelengths in situ. We used 625, 730, and 890 nm wavelength LEDs alone or in combination and confirmed the hypothesized increase in relative abundance of different phototrophs by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition to the increase of the targeted phototrophs, we studied the effect of the different treatments on chemotrophic members. The specific activation of Thermosynechococcus led to increased abundance of several other bacteria, whereas wavelengths specific to Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus induced a decrease in >50% of the community members as compared to the dark conditions. This suggests that the growth of Thermosynechococcus at the surface layer benefits many community members, whereas less benefit is obtained from an increase in filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus. The increases in relative abundance of chemotrophs under different light conditions suggest a relationship between the two groups. Aerobic chemoheterotrophs such as Thermus sp. and Meiothermus sp. are thought to benefit from aerobic conditions and organic carbon in the form of photosynthates by Thermosynechococcus, while the oxidation of sulfide and production of elemental sulfur by filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs benefit the sulfur-disproportionating Caldimicrobium thiodismutans. In this study, we used an experimental approach under controlled

  7. Mineralogy of Iron Microbial Mats from Loihi Seamount

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Brandy M.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Michel, F. Marc; Sorensen, Jeffry V.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5–4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard two-line ferrihydrite (Fh), except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (FhSRO) phases were stable at 4°C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400°C treatment. The observed stability of the FhSRO is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for FhSRO particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small CSD for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered Fe deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes. PMID:22485113

  8. Accuracy of Jump-Mat Systems for Measuring Jump Height.

    PubMed

    Pueo, Basilio; Lipinska, Patrycja; Jiménez-Olmedo, José M; Zmijewski, Piotr; Hopkins, Will G

    2017-08-01

    Vertical-jump tests are commonly used to evaluate lower-limb power of athletes and nonathletes. Several types of equipment are available for this purpose. To compare the error of measurement of 2 jump-mat systems (Chronojump-Boscosystem and Globus Ergo Tester) with that of a motion-capture system as a criterion and to determine the modifying effect of foot length on jump height. Thirty-one young adult men alternated 4 countermovement jumps with 4 squat jumps. Mean jump height and standard deviations representing technical error of measurement arising from each device and variability arising from the subjects themselves were estimated with a novel mixed model and evaluated via standardization and magnitude-based inference. The jump-mat systems produced nearly identical measures of jump height (differences in means and in technical errors of measurement ≤1 mm). Countermovement and squat-jump height were both 13.6 cm higher with motion capture (90% confidence limits ±0.3 cm), but this very large difference was reduced to small unclear differences when adjusted to a foot length of zero. Variability in countermovement and squat-jump height arising from the subjects was small (1.1 and 1.5 cm, respectively, 90% confidence limits ±0.3 cm); technical error of motion capture was similar in magnitude (1.7 and 1.6 cm, ±0.3 and ±0.4 cm), and that of the jump mats was similar or smaller (1.2 and 0.3 cm, ±0.5 and ±0.9 cm). The jump-mat systems provide trustworthy measurements for monitoring changes in jump height. Foot length can explain the substantially higher jump height observed with motion capture.

  9. Effect of light wavelength on hot spring microbial mat biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Akifumi; Thiel, Vera; Nakagawa, Mayuko; Ayukawa, Shotaro

    2018-01-01

    Hot spring associated phototrophic microbial mats are purely microbial communities, in which phototrophic bacteria function as primary producers and thus shape the community. The microbial mats at Nakabusa hot springs in Japan harbor diverse photosynthetic bacteria, mainly Thermosynechococcus, Chloroflexus, and Roseiflexus, which use light of different wavelength for energy conversion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the phototrophs on biodiversity and community composition in hot spring microbial mats. For this, we specifically activated the different phototrophs by irradiating the mats with different wavelengths in situ. We used 625, 730, and 890 nm wavelength LEDs alone or in combination and confirmed the hypothesized increase in relative abundance of different phototrophs by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition to the increase of the targeted phototrophs, we studied the effect of the different treatments on chemotrophic members. The specific activation of Thermosynechococcus led to increased abundance of several other bacteria, whereas wavelengths specific to Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus induced a decrease in >50% of the community members as compared to the dark conditions. This suggests that the growth of Thermosynechococcus at the surface layer benefits many community members, whereas less benefit is obtained from an increase in filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus. The increases in relative abundance of chemotrophs under different light conditions suggest a relationship between the two groups. Aerobic chemoheterotrophs such as Thermus sp. and Meiothermus sp. are thought to benefit from aerobic conditions and organic carbon in the form of photosynthates by Thermosynechococcus, while the oxidation of sulfide and production of elemental sulfur by filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs benefit the sulfur-disproportionating Caldimicrobium thiodismutans. In this study, we used an experimental approach under controlled

  10. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works. We infer from the data the various sinks for O2 as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. Although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount.

  11. Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Duckweed (Lemnaceae) Mats

    PubMed Central

    Zuberer, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Duckweed (Lemnaceae) mats in Texas and Florida were investigated, using the acetylene reduction assay, to determine whether nitrogen fixation occurred in these floating aquatic macrophyte communities. N2-fixing microorganisms were enumerated by plating or most-probable-number techniques, using appropriate N-free media. Results of the investigations indicated that substantial N2-fixation (C2H2) was associated with duckweed mats in Texas and Florida. Acetylene reduction values ranged from 1 to 18 μmol of C2H4 g (dry weight)−1 day−1 for samples incubated aerobically in light. Dark N2 fixation was always two- to fivefold lower. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (7 to 10 μM) reduced acetylene reduction to levels intermediate between light and dark incubation. Acetylene reduction was generally greatest for samples incubated anaerobically in the light. It was estimated that 15 to 20% of the N requirement of the duckweed could be supplied through biological nitrogen fixation. N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria (105 cells g [wet weight]−1 and cyanobacteria (105 propagules g [wet weight]−1 were associated with the duckweed mats. Azotobacter sp. was not detected in these investigations. One diazotrophic isolate was classified as Klebsiella. PMID:16345992

  12. Alpha Matting with KL-Divergence Based Sparse Sampling.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Levent; Erdem, Aykut; Erdem, Erkut

    2017-06-22

    In this paper, we present a new sampling-based alpha matting approach for the accurate estimation of foreground and background layers of an image. Previous sampling-based methods typically rely on certain heuristics in collecting representative samples from known regions, and thus their performance deteriorates if the underlying assumptions are not satisfied. To alleviate this, we take an entirely new approach and formulate sampling as a sparse subset selection problem where we propose to pick a small set of candidate samples that best explains the unknown pixels. Moreover, we describe a new dissimilarity measure for comparing two samples which is based on KLdivergence between the distributions of features extracted in the vicinity of the samples. The proposed framework is general and could be easily extended to video matting by additionally taking temporal information into account in the sampling process. Evaluation on standard benchmark datasets for image and video matting demonstrates that our approach provides more accurate results compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Iron microbial mats in modern and phanerozoic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baele, Jean-Marc; Bouvain, Frédéric; De Jong, Jeroen; Matielli, Nadine; Papier, Séverine; Préat, Alain

    2008-08-01

    The recognition of iron microbial mats in terrestrial environments is of great relevance for the search for extraterrestrial life, especially on mars where significant iron minerals were identified in the subsurface. Most researches focused on very ancient microbial mats (e.g. BIFs) since they formed on Earth at a time where similar conditions are supposed to have prevailed on Mars too. However, environmental proxies are often difficult to use for these deposits on Earth which, in addition, may be heavily transformed due to diagenesis or even metamorphism. Here we present modern and phanerozoic iron microbial mats occurrences illustrating the wide variety of environments in which they form, including many marine settings, ponds, creeks, caves, volcanoes, etc. Contrarily to their Precambrian counterparts, Modern and Phanerozoic deposits are usually less affected by diagenesis and the environmental conditions likely to be better constrained. Therefore, their investigation may help for the search for morphological and geochemical biosignatures (e.g. iron isotopes) in ancient iron microbial occurrences on Earth but also on other Planets. In particular, many of the case studies presented here show that microstromatolithe-like morphologies may be valuable targets for screening potential biosignatures in various rock types.

  14. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  15. Microbial Species Richness and Metabolic Activities in Hypersaline Microbial Mats: Insight into Biosignature Formation Through Lithification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Laura K.; Dupraz, Christophe; Buckley, Daniel H.; Spear, John R.; Pace, Norman R.; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2009-11-01

    Microbial mats in the hypersaline lake of Salt Pan, Eleuthera, Bahamas, display a gradient of lithification along a transect from the center to the shore of the lake. These mats exist under similar geochemical conditions, with light quantity and quality as the sole major environmental difference. Therefore, we hypothesized that the microbial community may be driving the differences in lithification and, by extension, mineral biosignature formation. The lithifying and non-lithifying mat communities were compared (via 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 485 and 464 sequences, respectively) over both temporal and spatial scales. Seven bacterial groups dominated in all the microbial mat libraries: bacteriodetes, alphaproteobacteria, deltaproetobacteria, chloroflexi, spirochaetes, cyanobacteria, and planctomycetes. The mat communities were all significantly different over space, time, and lithification state. Species richness is significantly higher in the non-lithifying mats, potentially due to differences in mat structure and activity. This increased richness may impact lithification and, hence, biosignature production.

  16. Glass in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Neville

    2005-01-01

    Glass is reviewed from fabrication to application, laying emphasis on the wide-ranging physics involved. This begins with liquids and solids and the way in which glasses are defined and can be demonstrated in the classroom. At the atomic level the regular structure of crystals and their irregular counterparts in glasses are explained through…

  17. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  18. Durability of a continuous strand mat polymeric composite for automotive structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; McCoy, H.E. Jr.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    A key unanswered question that must be addressed before polymeric composites will be widely used in automotive structural components is their durability. Major durability issues are the effects of cyclic loadings, creep, automotive environments, and low-energy impacts on dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness. The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address these issues and to develop, in cooperation with the Automotive Composites Consortium, experimentally based, durability driven, design guidelines. The initial reference material is an isocyanurate reinforced with a continuous strand, swirl glass mat. This paper describes the basic deformation and failuremore » behavior of the reference material, and it presents test results illustrating the property degradations caused by loading, time, and environmental effects. The importance of characterizing and understanding damage and how it leads to failure is also discussed. The results presented are from the initial phases of an ongoing project. The ongoing effort and plans are briefly described.« less

  19. The benefit of using chemical analysis in understanding archaeological glass. Case-study: Roman black glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosyns, P.; Cagno, S.; Janssens, K.; Nys, K.

    LA-ICP-MS is a well acquainted technique for the quantification of a wide range of minor and trace elements present in the glass matrix. The benefit to understand the changes in technological processes or the added value in assessing the provenance and chronology of the raw glass material is however rarely discussed. By selecting a set of 197 Roman black glass artifacts dating between the 1st and 5th century AD we aimed to contribute to this issue. The obtained data on the production of glass artifacts helps better understand the constantly evolving patterns in glass consumption throughout the Roman imperial period. The key trace elements linked with the sand generally show the use of Levantine and Egyptian raw glass to produce black glass artifacts and result in well defined clusters. These indications are evidence for the use of different raw glasses in the Roman Empire and therefore featuring the work of diverse workshops over time. Specific trace elements such as copper, cobalt and lead reflect the application of recycling glass in Roman times.

  20. Evaluation of 3D printed optofluidic smart glass prototypes.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Daniel; Goossen, K W

    2018-01-22

    Smart glass or smart windows are an innovative technology used for thermal management, energy efficiency, and privacy applications. Notable commercially available smart glass relies on an electric stimuli to modulate the glass from a transparent to a translucent mode of operation. However, the current market technologies, such as electrochromic, polymer dispersed liquid crystal, and suspended particle devices are expensive and suffer from solar absorption, poor transmittance modulation, and in some cases, continuous power consumption. The authors of this paper present a novel optofluidic smart glass prototype capable of modulating visible light transmittance from 8% to 85%.

  1. Oxynitride glass production procedure

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Schuetz, Stanley T.; O'Brien, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride glasses without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature glass. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide glass-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride glass. Glasses containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.

  2. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  3. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  4. 75 FR 55360 - In the Matter of Mattingly Testing Services, Inc. Molt, MT; Order Revoking License (Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... radiation safety officer, and due to expire on February 28, 2016. The license authorizes Mattingly to... effectiveness of Mattingly's radiation safety and compliance programs by commencing an assessment of Mattingly's radiation safety program within 30 days of NRC's approval of the consultant; by reviewing Mattingly's...

  5. Acoustics of glass harmonicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    2004-05-01

    Glass musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine glasses, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of glasses played in this manner is called a glass harp. Another type of glass harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs glass bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of glass harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.

  6. Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics [Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics and NanoSIMS.

    DOE PAGES

    Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Marshall, Ian PG; ...

    2012-11-29

    Photosynthetic microbial mats possess extraordinary phylogenetic and functional diversity that makes linking specific pathways with individual microbial populations a daunting task. Close metabolic and spatial relationships between Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi have previously been observed in diverse microbial mats. Here in this paper, we report that an expressed metabolic pathway for the anoxic catabolism of photosynthate involving Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in microbial mats can be reconstructed through metatranscriptomic sequencing of mats collected at Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, CA, USA. In this reconstruction, Microcoleus spp., the most abundant cyanobacterial group in the mats, ferment photosynthate to organic acids, CO 2 and Hmore » 2 through multiple pathways, and an uncultivated lineage of the Chloroflexi take up these organic acids to store carbon as polyhydroxyalkanoates. The metabolic reconstruction is consistent with metabolite measurements and single cell microbial imaging with fluorescence in situ hybridization and NanoSIMS.« less

  7. Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics [Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics and NanoSIMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Marshall, Ian PG

    Photosynthetic microbial mats possess extraordinary phylogenetic and functional diversity that makes linking specific pathways with individual microbial populations a daunting task. Close metabolic and spatial relationships between Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi have previously been observed in diverse microbial mats. Here in this paper, we report that an expressed metabolic pathway for the anoxic catabolism of photosynthate involving Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in microbial mats can be reconstructed through metatranscriptomic sequencing of mats collected at Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, CA, USA. In this reconstruction, Microcoleus spp., the most abundant cyanobacterial group in the mats, ferment photosynthate to organic acids, CO 2 and Hmore » 2 through multiple pathways, and an uncultivated lineage of the Chloroflexi take up these organic acids to store carbon as polyhydroxyalkanoates. The metabolic reconstruction is consistent with metabolite measurements and single cell microbial imaging with fluorescence in situ hybridization and NanoSIMS.« less

  8. HiMAT Subscale Research Vehicle Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) research vehicle is shown here mated to a wing pylon on NASA's B-52 mothership aircraft. The HiMAT was a technology demonstrator to test structures and configurations for advanced fighter concepts. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 proved a valuable workhorse for NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center (under various names), launching a wide variety of vehicles and conducting numerous other research flights. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for

  9. Dynamics of archaea at fine spatial scales in Shark Bay mat microbiomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Hon Lun; Visscher, Pieter T.; White, Richard Allen, III; Smith, Daniela-Lee; Patterson, Molly M.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2017-04-01

    The role of archaea in microbial mats is poorly understood. Delineating the spatial distribution of archaea with mat depth will enable resolution of putative niches in these systems. In the present study, high throughput amplicon sequencing was undertaken in conjunction with analysis of key biogeochemical properties of two mats (smooth and pustular) from Shark Bay, Australia. One-way analysis of similarity tests indicated the archaeal community structures of smooth and pustular mats were significantly different (global R = 1, p = 0.1%). Smooth mats possessed higher archaeal diversity, dominated by Parvarchaeota. The methanogenic community in smooth mats was dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, as well as methylotrophic Methanosarcinales, Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales and Methanomassiliicoccaceae. Pustular mats were enriched with Halobacteria and Parvarchaeota. Key metabolisms (bacterial and archaeal) were measured, and the rates of oxygen production/consumption and sulfate reduction were up to four times higher in smooth than in pustular mats. Methane production peaked in the oxic layers and was up to seven-fold higher in smooth than pustular mats. The finding of an abundance of anaerobic methanogens enriched at the surface where oxygen levels were highest, coupled with peak methane production in the oxic zone, suggests putative surface anoxic niches in these microbial mats.

  10. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-08-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works located in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Included in the budget are measured rates of O 2 production, sulfate reduction, and elemental exchange across the mat/brine interface, day and night, at various temperatures and times of the year. We infer from this data the various sinks for O 2, as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. To summarize, although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O 2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O 2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O 2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O 2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Also, oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation, although anoxygenic photosynthesis may have been important at low light levels during some times of the year. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount. These mats are thus closely coupled systems where rapid rates of photosynthesis both require and fuel rapid rates of heterotrophic carbon oxidation.

  11. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  12. New laser media based on microporous glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Altshuler, G.B.; Bakanov, V.A.; Dulneva, E.G.

    The results of the investigation of new class of the laser media based on dye solutions impregnated microporous glasses are presented. Based on such media highly effective active elements of tunable dye lasers and passive modulators for solid-state lasers are created. This article is devoted to laser media of the new type - the heterogenous solid-liquid media on the basis of the impregnated by the solutions of the dyes of the microporous glasses. The microporous glasses represent themselves the products of the leaching of heat - treated sodium borosilicate glasses of a certain composition range. As a result of heatmore » treatment is realized the phase separated glass. It consists of two interconnected phases: the silica rich phase and the chemical unstable sodium - borate - rich phase. If we place this glass in the acid then the ions of sodium and borate will be transfered to the solution. As a result we obtain the porous glass and this process produces the continuous claster. Therefore it could be easily impregnated by liquids and gases. We now have the technology that permits us to obtain the samples with the volume porosity from ten to fifty percent and the size of this poroses could be varied from twenty angstroms up to one thousand angstroms.« less

  13. Microbial mats in the Black Sea that anaerobically oxidise methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauhaus, K.; Knittel, K.; Krüger, M.; Boetius, A.; Michaelis, W.; Widdel, F.

    2003-04-01

    Reef-forming microbial mats were recovered from methane seeps in anoxic waters of the northwestern Black Sea (BS) shelf. The microbial mats consist mainly of archaea (ANME-1 cluster) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). Laboratory incubations with homogenized subsamples of the mats revealed their ability for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The phylogentic relationship of the sulfate reducing partner is the same as in the AOM consortia studied in sediment samples from a methane hydrate area (Hydrate Ridge (HR), Oregon, USA (1,2)). The archaeal partner however belongs to a different cluster than in the HR samples (ANME-2). Methane oxidation is coupled to sulfate reduction in a 1:1 stoichiometry. Elevated methane partial pressures (0.1 to 1.1 MPa) increased the sulfate reduction rates in the Black Sea samples only two-fold in contrast to 5-fold in HR samples. The optimal temperature for the BS samples is between 10 and 25^oC. In both samples AOM was not taking place if typical inhibitors for sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis were added, thus indicating a syntrophic relationship between the partner organisms. The intermediate that is exchanged between the methane oxidizing archaea and the sulfate-reducing bacterium is still unknown. Additions of the possible intermediates (Acetate, Formate, Hydrogen) did not result in higher sulfate reduction rates in the absence of methane. (1) Boetius, A. et al. (2000) A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature. 407: 623--626 (2) Nauhaus, K., Boetius, A., Krüger, M., Widdel, F. (2002) In vitro demonstration of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulphate reduction in sediment from a marine gas hydrate area. Environ. Microbiol. 4 (5): 296--305

  14. The MAT Experiment - Observing the CMB from the Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. D.; Dorwart, R.; Herbig, T.; Page, L.; Torbet, E.; Tran, H.; Devlin, M.; Puchalla, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Mobile Anisotropy Telescope (MAT) is a microwave telescope designed to measure the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on degree and sub-degree angular scales. MAT has successfully completed it's first season of observations during the months of October, November, and December of 1997. The site, at an altitude of 17,000 ft (5700 m), is located near San Pedro de Atacama, Chile. It is one of the highest and dryest places on the planet and is accessible nearly year-round by road. The observing strategy is similar to that used in the Saskatoon experiment. MAT observes at 30, 40, and 144 GHz with beam sizes of 0.95(deg) , 0.65(deg) , and 0.2(deg) respectively. We observe approximately 30,000 pixels at 144 GHz with an expected sensitivity of roughly 150 mu K per 0.2(deg) X 0.2(deg) pixel, 2800 pixels at 40 GHz with a sensitivity of roughly 30 mu K per 0.65 (deg) X 0.65(deg) pixel, and 1400 pixels at 30 GHz with a sensitivity of approximately 25 mu K per 0.95(deg) X 0.95(deg) pixel. The sky coverage results in a probe of the angular power spectrum from a multipole moment of l = 50 to l = 800. Jupiter is the primary calibration source. Other planets and eta Carinae are secondary calibrators. An additional benefit of the observing strategy is an unbiased survey of a 10 degree x 30 degree patch of the galaxy at 30, 40, and 144 GHz. We are compiling a list of observed point sources at these frequencies in the galactic plane. Observations will continue next year with improved SIS detectors and a longer observing time.

  15. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  16. Molecular Ecological and Stable Isotopic Studies of Nitrogen Fixation in Modern Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Crumbliss, L. L.; DesMarais, D. J.; Hogan, M. E.; Omoregie, E.; Turk, K. A.; Zehr, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen is usually the element limiting biological productivity in the marine environment. Microbial mats, laminated microbial communities analogous to some of the oldest forms of life on Earth, are often the sites of high rates of N fixation (the energetically expensive conversion of atmospheric dinitrogen into a biologically useful form). The N fixing enzyme nitrogenase is generally considered to be of ancient origin, and is widely distributed throughout the Bacterial and Archaeal domains of life, indicating an important role for this process over evolutionary time. The stable isotopic signature of N fixation is purportedly recognizable in organic matter (ancient kerogens as well as present-day microbial mats) as a delta (15)N(sub organic) near zero. We studied two microbial mats exhibiting different rates of N fixation in order to better understand the impact of N fixation on the delta (15)N (sub organic) of the mats, as well as what organisms are important in this process. Mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes grow in permanently submerged hypersaline salterns, and exhibit low rates of N fixation, whereas mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Lyngbya spp grow in an intertidal area, and exhibit rates of N fixation an order of magnitude higher. To examine successional stages in mat growth, both developing and established mats at each location were sampled. PCR and RT-PCR based approaches were used to identify, respectively, the organisms containing nifH (one of the genes that encode nitrogenase) as well as those expressing nifH in these mats. Both mats exhibited a distinct diel cycle of N fixation, with highest rates occurring at night. The delta (15)N(sub organic) of the subtidal Microcoleus mats is near zero whereas the delta (15)N(sub organic) is slightly more positive (+ 2-3%), in the intertidal Lyngbya mats, an interesting difference in view of the fact that overall rates of activity in the intertidal mats are much higher that those

  17. Are floating algal mats a refuge from hypoxia for estuarine invertebrates?

    PubMed Central

    Knysh, Kyle M.; Theriault, Emma F.; Pater, Christina C.; Courtenay, Simon C.; van den Heuvel, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophic aquatic habitats are characterized by the proliferation of vegetation leading to a large standing biomass that upon decomposition may create hypoxic (low-oxygen) conditions. This is indeed the case in nutrient impacted estuaries of Prince Edward Island, Canada, where macroalgae, from the genus Ulva, form submerged ephemeral mats. Hydrological forces and gases released from photosynthesis and decomposition lead to these mats occasionally floating to the water’s surface, henceforth termed floating mats. Here, we explore the hypothesis that floating mats are refugia during periods of sustained hypoxia/anoxia and examine how the invertebrate community responds to it. Floating mats were not always present, so in the first year (2013) sampling was attempted monthly and limited to when both floating and submerged mats occurred. In the subsequent year sampling was weekly, but at only one estuary due to logistical constraints from increased sampling frequency, and was not limited to when both mat types occurred. Water temperature, salinity, and pH were monitored bi-weekly with dissolved oxygen concentration measured hourly. The floating and submerged assemblages shared many of the same taxa but were statistically distinct communities; submerged mats tended to have a greater proportion of benthic animals and floating mats had more mobile invertebrates and insects. In 2014, sampling happened to occur in the weeks before the onset of anoxia, during 113 consecutive hours of sustained anoxia, and for four weeks after normoxic conditions returned. The invertebrate community on floating mats appeared to be unaffected by anoxia, indicating that these mats may be refugia during times of oxygen stress. Conversely, there was a dramatic decrease in animal abundances that remained depressed on submerged mats for two weeks. Cluster analysis revealed that the submerged mat communities from before the onset of anoxia and four weeks after anoxia were highly similar to each other

  18. Glass Development for Treatment of LANL Evaporator Bottoms Waste

    SciTech Connect

    DE Smith; GF Piepel; GW Veazey

    1998-11-20

    Vitrification is an attractive treatment option for meeting the stabilization and final disposal requirements of many plutonium (Pu) bearing materials and wastes at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-55 facility, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Hanford, and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that vitrification is the "best demonstrated available technology" for high- level radioactive wastes (HLW) (Federal Register 1990) and has produced a handbook of vitriilcation technologies for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste (US EPA, 1992). This technology has been demonstrated to convert Pu-containing materials (Kormanos, 1997) into durablemore » (Lutze, 1988) and accountable (Forsberg, 1995) waste. forms with reduced need for safeguarding (McCulhun, 1996). The composition of the Evaporator Bottoms Waste (EVB) at LANL, like that of many other I%-bearing materials, varies widely and is generally unpredictable. The goal of this study is to optimize the composition of glass for EVB waste at LANL, and present the basic techniques and tools for developing optimized glass compositions for other Pu-bearing materials in the complex. This report outlines an approach for glass formulation with fixed property restrictions, using glass property-composition databases. This approach is applicable to waste glass formulation for many variable waste streams and vitrification technologies.. Also reported are the preliminary property data for simulated evaporator bottom glasses, including glass viscosity and glass leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).« less

  19. Enhancement of the in-plane shear properties of carbon fiber composites containing carbon nanotube mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hansang

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane shear property of carbon fiber laminates is one of the most important structural features of aerospace and marine structures. Fiber-matrix debonding caused by in-plane shear loading is the major failure mode of carbon fiber composites because of the stress concentration at the interfaces. In this study, carbon nanotube mats (CNT mat) were incorporated in two different types of carbon fiber composites. For the case of woven fabric composites, mechanical interlocking between the CNTs and the carbon fibers increased resistance to shear failure. However, not much improvement was observed for the prepreg composites as a result of incorporation of the CNT mats. The reinforcement mechanism of the CNT mat layer was investigated by a fractographic study using scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the CNT mat was functionalized by three different methods and the effectiveness of the functionalization methods was determined and the most appropriate functionalization method for the CNT mat was air oxidation.

  20. Micropatterned stretchable circuit and strain sensor fabricated by lithography on an electrospun nanofiber mat.

    PubMed

    Park, Minwoo; Im, Jungkyun; Park, Jongjin; Jeong, Unyong

    2013-09-11

    This paper describes a novel approach for composite nanofiber mats and its application to fabricate a strain sensor. Electrospun poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) nanofiber mats are micropatterned by a lithographic approach that includes selective oxidation of the nanofibers and removal of unreacted fibers. The P4VP/HAuCl4 complex is converted to P4VP/Au composites by chemical reduction. We investigate the electrical resistivity of the composite mats according to the number of complexation-and-reduction cycles, the thickness of the fiber mats, and the annealing temperatures which control the percolation of the Au nanoparticles in the fiber mats. Nozzle printing of a polymeric solution on the patterned nanofiber mats simply produces an array of strain-sensitive and strain-invariant units. The patterns demonstrate high strain-sensing performance without any mechanical and electrical failure over 200 bending cycles in the strain range of ε<0.17.

  1. Three-dimensional printing of transparent fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, Frederik; Arnold, Karl; Bauer, Werner; Schild, Dieter; Keller, Nico; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Nargang, Tobias M.; Richter, Christiane; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2017-04-01

    Glass is one of the most important high-performance materials used for scientific research, in industry and in society, mainly owing to its unmatched optical transparency, outstanding mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance as well as its thermal and electrical insulating properties. However, glasses and especially high-purity glasses such as fused silica glass are notoriously difficult to shape, requiring high-temperature melting and casting processes for macroscopic objects or hazardous chemicals for microscopic features. These drawbacks have made glasses inaccessible to modern manufacturing technologies such as three-dimensional printing (3D printing). Using a casting nanocomposite, here we create transparent fused silica glass components using stereolithography 3D printers at resolutions of a few tens of micrometres. The process uses a photocurable silica nanocomposite that is 3D printed and converted to high-quality fused silica glass via heat treatment. The printed fused silica glass is non-porous, with the optical transparency of commercial fused silica glass, and has a smooth surface with a roughness of a few nanometres. By doping with metal salts, coloured glasses can be created. This work widens the choice of materials for 3D printing, enabling the creation of arbitrary macro- and microstructures in fused silica glass for many applications in both industry and academia.

  2. Reversing Glass Wettability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, J. E., Jr.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment reverses wettability of glassware: Liquids that normally wet glass no longer do, and those that do not wet glass are made to do so. Useful in research on container effects in nucleation and growth of secondary phase from solution. Treatment consists of spreading 3 percent (by weight) solution of silicone oil in hexane isomers over glass, drying in air, and curing at 300 degrees C in vacuum for one hour.

  3. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  4. Nonequilibrium viscosity of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Allan, Douglas C.; Potuzak, Marcel

    2009-09-01

    Since glass is a nonequilibrium material, its properties depend on both composition and thermal history. While most prior studies have focused on equilibrium liquid viscosity, an accurate description of nonequilibrium viscosity is essential for understanding the low temperature dynamics of glass. Departure from equilibrium occurs as a glass-forming system is cooled through the glass transition range. The glass transition involves a continuous breakdown of ergodicity as the system gradually becomes trapped in a subset of the available configurational phase space. At very low temperatures a glass is perfectly nonergodic (or “isostructural”), and the viscosity is described well by an Arrhenius form. However, the behavior of viscosity during the glass transition range itself is not yet understood. In this paper, we address the problem of glass viscosity using the enthalpy landscape model of Mauro and Loucks [Phys. Rev. B 76, 174202 (2007)] for selenium, an elemental glass former. To study a wide range of thermal histories, we compute nonequilibrium viscosity with cooling rates from 10-12 to 1012K/s . Based on these detailed landscape calculations, we propose a simplified phenomenological model capturing the essential physics of glass viscosity. The phenomenological model incorporates an ergodicity parameter that accounts for the continuous breakdown of ergodicity at the glass transition. We show a direct relationship between the nonequilibrium viscosity parameters and the fragility of the supercooled liquid. The nonequilibrium viscosity model is validated against experimental measurements of Corning EAGLE XG™ glass. The measurements are performed using a specially designed beam-bending apparatus capable of accurate nonequilibrium viscosity measurements up to 1016Pas . Using a common set of parameters, the phenomenological model provides an accurate description of EAGLE XG™ viscosity over the full range of measured temperatures and fictive temperatures.

  5. Full-Scale Instrumented Testing and Analysis of Matting Systems for Airfield Parking Ramps and Taxiways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    system can only be precisely determined by examining all the materials used in the mat, their structure , orientation, dimensions, etc. and determining...ER D C/ G SL T R- 07 -3 3 Full-Scale Instrumented Testing and Analysis of Matting Systems for Airfield Parking Ramps and Taxiways Chad...ERDC/GSL TR-07-33 December 2007 Full-Scale Instrumented Testing and Analysis of Matting Systems for Airfield Parking Ramps and Taxiways Chad A

  6. Accuracy of a vertical jump contact mat for determining jump height and flight time.

    PubMed

    Whitmer, Tyler D; Fry, Andrew C; Forsythe, Charles M; Andre, Matthew J; Lane, Michael T; Hudy, Andrea; Honnold, Darric E

    2015-04-01

    Several devices are available to measure vertical jump (VJ) height based on flight time, VJ reach height, or ground reaction forces. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of a VJ mat for measuring flight time and VJ height compared with a VJ tester or a force plate. Seventeen men and 18 women (X ± SD; age = 20.9 ± 0.7 years, height = 176.1 ± 0.9 cm, weight = 72.6 ± 13.5 kg) served as subjects. Subjects performed counter-movement vertical jumps while standing on both a force plate (1,000 Hz) and a VJ mat. A Vertec VJ tester was used to measure jump reach. Compared with the force plate, the VJ mat reported greater VJ height (VJ mat = 0.50 ± 0.12 m, force plate = 0.34 ± 0.10 m) and flight time (VJ mat = 0.629 ± 0.078 seconds, force plate = 0.524 ± 0.077 seconds). Comparison of VJ heights from the VJ mat and the Vertec revealed no significant differences (Vertec = 0.48 ± 0.11 m). Regression analyses indicated strong relationships between testing methods and suggested that high VJ performances may be underestimated with the VJ mat. This particular VJ mat compared favorably with the Vertec but not the force plate. It seems that the different flight times derived from the VJ mat may permit the VJ mat to be in closer agreement with VJ heights from the Vertec. Also, the VJ mat may not be an appropriate tool for assessing high VJ performances (i.e., ≥0.70 m; ≈28 inches). Practitioners and researchers using similar VJ mats may not obtain accurate flight times and may underestimate high performers.

  7. Glass--Sand + Imagination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris K.

    2000-07-01

    Glass is older than recorded history, and yet it is as new as tomorrow! How, when, or where man first learned to make glass is not known, but we do know that the ancient Egyptians were making glass articles as early as 2,600 B.C.E. (The making of glass beads may have begun as much as 3000 years earlier.) They used it to make jewelry and luxury items, such as decorative bowls and perfume bottles, available only to the wealthy.

  8. Apollo 15 green glasses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, W. I.; Reid, A. M.; Warner, J. L.; Brown, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The samples analyzed include 28 spheres, portions of spheres, and angular fragments from soil 15101. Emerald green glasses from other soils are identical to those from 15101. The composition of the green glass is unlike that of any other major lunar glass group. The Fe content is comparable to that in mare basalts, but Ti is much lower. The Mg content is much higher than in most lunar materials analyzed to date, and the Cr content is also high. The low Al content is comparable to that of mare basalt glasses.

  9. Multiple Doped Erbium Glasses,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GLASS, LASERS, ERBIUM, ERBIUM COMPOUNDS, DOPING, OXIDES, OPTIMIZATION, ATOMIC ENERGY LEVELS, PHOSPHATES , YTTERBIUM COMPOUNDS, NEODYMIUM COMPOUNDS, OPTICAL PUMPING, FLUORESCENCE, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), BAND SPECTRA.

  10. Improve Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery Through the Use of MatLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali; Martin, Dawn (Elliott); Beil, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Data mining is widely used to mine business, engineering, and scientific data. Data mining uses pattern based queries, searches, or other analyses of one or more electronic databases/datasets in order to discover or locate a predictive pattern or anomaly indicative of system failure, criminal or terrorist activity, etc. There are various algorithms, techniques and methods used to mine data; including neural networks, genetic algorithms, decision trees, nearest neighbor method, rule induction association analysis, slice and dice, segmentation, and clustering. These algorithms, techniques and methods used to detect patterns in a dataset, have been used in the development of numerous open source and commercially available products and technology for data mining. Data mining is best realized when latent information in a large quantity of data stored is discovered. No one technique solves all data mining problems; challenges are to select algorithms or methods appropriate to strengthen data/text mining and trending within given datasets. In recent years, throughout industry, academia and government agencies, thousands of data systems have been designed and tailored to serve specific engineering and business needs. Many of these systems use databases with relational algebra and structured query language to categorize and retrieve data. In these systems, data analyses are limited and require prior explicit knowledge of metadata and database relations; lacking exploratory data mining and discoveries of latent information. This presentation introduces MatLab(R) (MATrix LABoratory), an engineering and scientific data analyses tool to perform data mining. MatLab was originally intended to perform purely numerical calculations (a glorified calculator). Now, in addition to having hundreds of mathematical functions, it is a programming language with hundreds built in standard functions and numerous available toolboxes. MatLab's ease of data processing, visualization and its

  11. Improve Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery through the use of MatLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykahian, Gholan Ali; Martin, Dawn Elliott; Beil, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Data mining is widely used to mine business, engineering, and scientific data. Data mining uses pattern based queries, searches, or other analyses of one or more electronic databases/datasets in order to discover or locate a predictive pattern or anomaly indicative of system failure, criminal or terrorist activity, etc. There are various algorithms, techniques and methods used to mine data; including neural networks, genetic algorithms, decision trees, nearest neighbor method, rule induction association analysis, slice and dice, segmentation, and clustering. These algorithms, techniques and methods used to detect patterns in a dataset, have been used in the development of numerous open source and commercially available products and technology for data mining. Data mining is best realized when latent information in a large quantity of data stored is discovered. No one technique solves all data mining problems; challenges are to select algorithms or methods appropriate to strengthen data/text mining and trending within given datasets. In recent years, throughout industry, academia and government agencies, thousands of data systems have been designed and tailored to serve specific engineering and business needs. Many of these systems use databases with relational algebra and structured query language to categorize and retrieve data. In these systems, data analyses are limited and require prior explicit knowledge of metadata and database relations; lacking exploratory data mining and discoveries of latent information. This presentation introduces MatLab(TradeMark)(MATrix LABoratory), an engineering and scientific data analyses tool to perform data mining. MatLab was originally intended to perform purely numerical calculations (a glorified calculator). Now, in addition to having hundreds of mathematical functions, it is a programming language with hundreds built in standard functions and numerous available toolboxes. MatLab's ease of data processing, visualization and

  12. Comparative microbial diversity analyses of modern marine thrombolitic mats by barcoded pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Mobberley, Jennifer M; Ortega, Maya C; Foster, Jamie S

    2012-01-01

    Thrombolites are unlaminated carbonate structures that form as a result of the metabolic interactions of complex microbial mat communities. Thrombolites have a long geological history; however, little is known regarding the microbes associated with modern structures. In this study, we use a barcoded 16S rRNA gene-pyrosequencing approach coupled with morphological analysis to assess the bacterial, cyanobacterial and archaeal diversity associated with actively forming thrombolites found in Highborne Cay, Bahamas. Analyses revealed four distinct microbial mat communities referred to as black, beige, pink and button mats on the surfaces of the thrombolites. At a coarse phylogenetic resolution, the domain bacterial sequence libraries from the four mats were similar, with Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria being the most abundant. At the finer resolution of the rRNA gene sequences, significant differences in community structure were observed, with dramatically different cyanobacterial communities. Of the four mat types, the button mats contained the highest diversity of Cyanobacteria, and were dominated by two sequence clusters with high similarity to the genus Dichothrix, an organism associated with the deposition of carbonate. Archaeal diversity was low, but varied in all mat types, and the archaeal community was predominately composed of members of the Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. The morphological and genetic data support the hypothesis that the four mat types are distinctive thrombolitic mat communities. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Mechanisms of mindfulness training: Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT).

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Emily K; Creswell, J David

    2017-02-01

    Despite evidence linking trait mindfulness and mindfulness training with a broad range of effects, still little is known about its underlying active mechanisms. Mindfulness is commonly defined as (1) the ongoing monitoring of present-moment experience (2) with an orientation of acceptance. Building on conceptual, clinical, and empirical work, we describe a testable theoretical account to help explain mindfulness effects on cognition, affect, stress, and health outcomes. Specifically, Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT) posits that (1), by enhancing awareness of one's experiences, the skill of attention monitoring explains how mindfulness improves cognitive functioning outcomes, yet this same skill can increase affective reactivity. Second (2), by modifying one's relation to monitored experience, acceptance is necessary for reducing affective reactivity, such that attention monitoring and acceptance skills together explain how mindfulness improves negative affectivity, stress, and stress-related health outcomes. We discuss how MAT contributes to mindfulness science, suggest plausible alternatives to the account, and offer specific predictions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of Mindfulness Training: Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT)1

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Emily K.; Creswell, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence linking trait mindfulness and mindfulness training with a broad range of effects, still little is known about its underlying active mechanisms. Mindfulness is commonly defined as (1) the ongoing monitoring of present-moment experience (2) with an orientation of acceptance. Building on conceptual, clinical, and empirical work, we describe a testable theoretical account to help explain mindfulness effects on cognition, affect, stress, and health outcomes. Specifically, Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT) posits that (1), by enhancing awareness of one’s experiences, the skill of attention monitoring explains how mindfulness improves cognitive functioning outcomes, yet this same skill can increase affective reactivity. Second (2), by modifying one’s relation to monitored experience, acceptance is necessary for reducing affective reactivity, such that attention monitoring and acceptance skills together explain how mindfulness improves negative affectivity, stress, and stress-related health outcomes. We discuss how MAT contributes to mindfulness science, suggest plausible alternatives to the account, and offer specific predictions for future research. PMID:27835764

  15. Reconstruction of hyperspectral image using matting model for classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Li, Yunsong; Ge, Chiru

    2016-05-01

    Although hyperspectral images (HSIs) captured by satellites provide much information in spectral regions, some bands are redundant or have large amounts of noise, which are not suitable for image analysis. To address this problem, we introduce a method for reconstructing the HSI with noise reduction and contrast enhancement using a matting model for the first time. The matting model refers to each spectral band of an HSI that can be decomposed into three components, i.e., alpha channel, spectral foreground, and spectral background. First, one spectral band of an HSI with more refined information than most other bands is selected, and is referred to as an alpha channel of the HSI to estimate the hyperspectral foreground and hyperspectral background. Finally, a combination operation is applied to reconstruct the HSI. In addition, the support vector machine (SVM) classifier and three sparsity-based classifiers, i.e., orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), simultaneous OMP, and OMP based on first-order neighborhood system weighted classifiers, are utilized on the reconstructed HSI and the original HSI to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Specifically, using the reconstructed HSI, the average accuracy of the SVM classifier can be improved by as much as 19%.

  16. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  17. FunSimMat: a comprehensive functional similarity database

    PubMed Central

    Schlicker, Andreas; Albrecht, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Functional similarity based on Gene Ontology (GO) annotation is used in diverse applications like gene clustering, gene expression data analysis, protein interaction prediction and evaluation. However, there exists no comprehensive resource of functional similarity values although such a database would facilitate the use of functional similarity measures in different applications. Here, we describe FunSimMat (Functional Similarity Matrix, http://funsimmat.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/), a large new database that provides several different semantic similarity measures for GO terms. It offers various precomputed functional similarity values for proteins contained in UniProtKB and for protein families in Pfam and SMART. The web interface allows users to efficiently perform both semantic similarity searches with GO terms and functional similarity searches with proteins or protein families. All results can be downloaded in tab-delimited files for use with other tools. An additional XML–RPC interface gives automatic online access to FunSimMat for programs and remote services. PMID:17932054

  18. Zirconium Hydroxide-coated Nanofiber Mats for Nerve Agent Decontamination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohee; Ying, Wu Bin; Jung, Hyunsook; Ryu, Sam Gon; Lee, Bumjae; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-03-16

    Diverse innovative fabrics with specific functionalities have been developed for requirements such as self-decontamination of chemical/biological pollutants and toxic nerve agents. In this work, Zr(OH) 4 -coated nylon-6,6 nanofiber mats were fabricated for the decontamination of nerve agents. Nylon-6,6 fabric was prepared via the electrospinning process, followed by coating with Zr(OH) 4 , which was obtained by the hydrolysis of Zr(OBu) 4 by a sol-gel reaction on nanofiber surfaces. The reaction conditions were optimized by varying the amounts of Zr(OBu) 4 ,the reaction time, and the temperature of the sol-gel reaction. The composite nanofibers show high decontamination efficiency against diisopropylfluorophosphate, which is a nerve agent analogue, due to its high nucleophilicity that aids in the catalysis of the hydrolysis of the phosphonate ester bonds. Composite nanofiber mats have a large potential and can be applied in specific fields such as military and medical markets. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Skills and Knowledge Needed to Serve as Mobile Technology Consultants for Information Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potnis, Devendra; Regenstreif-Harms, Reynard; Deosthali, Kanchan; Cortez, Ed; Allard, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Libraries often lack the in-house information technology (IT) expertise required to (1) implement mobile applications and related technologies (MAT); (2) attain maximum return on investment including patron satisfaction for using MAT; and (3) reduce reliance on expensive IT consultants. Based on secondary analysis of the experiences and advice…

  20. Automated Image Analysis for the Detection of Benthic Crustaceans and Bacterial Mat Coverage Using the VENUS Undersea Cabled Network

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Costa, Corrado; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Antonucci, Francesca; Juniper, S. Kim; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The development and deployment of sensors for undersea cabled observatories is presently biased toward the measurement of habitat variables, while sensor technologies for biological community characterization through species identification and individual counting are less common. The VENUS cabled multisensory network (Vancouver Island, Canada) deploys seafloor camera systems at several sites. Our objective in this study was to implement new automated image analysis protocols for the recognition and counting of benthic decapods (i.e., the galatheid squat lobster, Munida quadrispina), as well as for the evaluation of changes in bacterial mat coverage (i.e., Beggiatoa spp.), using a camera deployed in Saanich Inlet (103 m depth). For the counting of Munida we remotely acquired 100 digital photos at hourly intervals from 2 to 6 December 2009. In the case of bacterial mat coverage estimation, images were taken from 2 to 8 December 2009 at the same time frequency. The automated image analysis protocols for both study cases were created in MatLab 7.1. Automation for Munida counting incorporated the combination of both filtering and background correction (Median- and Top-Hat Filters) with Euclidean Distances (ED) on Red-Green-Blue (RGB) channels. The Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features and Fourier Descriptors (FD) of tracked objects were then extracted. Animal classifications were carried out with the tools of morphometric multivariate statistic (i.e., Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis; PLSDA) on Mean RGB (RGBv) value for each object and Fourier Descriptors (RGBv+FD) matrices plus SIFT and ED. The SIFT approach returned the better results. Higher percentages of images were correctly classified and lower misclassification errors (an animal is present but not detected) occurred. In contrast, RGBv+FD and ED resulted in a high incidence of records being generated for non-present animals. Bacterial mat coverage was estimated in terms of Percent Coverage

  1. Water in Volcanic Glass: From Volcanic Degassing to Secondary Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Palandri, J. L.; Watkins, J. M.; Ross, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic glass contains both primary magmatic and secondary meteoric dissolved water, which can have distinguishable hydrogen isotopic ratios. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from recent to 640 ka for their δD (‰, VSMOW) and H2Ot (wt.%) on the TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. We find that rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), which is opposite the trend for magmatic degassing, while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). To better understand these results, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition using BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a resolution of ~1 mm. Mafic tephra have lower vesicle number densities (N/mm2 = 25-77) than silicic tephra (736) and thicker average bubble walls (0.07 mm) than silicic tephra (0.02 mm). Lengths of water diffusion were modeled by finite difference using H2Ot concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients for diffusion of water into basalt and rhyolite glass using Zhang et al. (2007) and Ni and Zhang (2008) diffusion parameterizations extrapolated to surface temperatures. Due to the 106 times slower diffusion, water only diffused ~10-5 mm into basaltic glass and ~10 mm into rhyolitic glass after 1000 years. These hydration rates match our H2Ot wt.% values for basaltic tephra, and would cause a rhyolite glass, with an average bubble wall thickness of 0.02 mm as described above, to already be fully hydrated with ~3.0-3.5 wt.% H2Ot after ~1000 years, which is similar to what we observe. Results here are our initial steps in understanding water diffusion rates at ambient temperature in basalt and rhyolite tephra, and the isotopic changes that occur during hydration, which have implications for research in physical volcanology (quantities of residual magmatic water) and paleoenvironments (low temperature hydration rates and isotopic changes

  2. Chondroitin Lyase from a Marine Arthrobacter sp. MAT3885 for the Production of Chondroitin Sulfate Disaccharides.

    PubMed

    Kale, Varsha; Friðjónsson, Ólafur; Jónsson, Jón Óskar; Kristinsson, Hörður G; Ómarsdóttir, Sesselja; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Ó

    2015-08-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) saccharides from cartilage tissues have potential application in medicine or as dietary supplements due to their therapeutic bioactivities. Studies have shown that depolymerized CS saccharides may display enhanced bioactivity. The objective of this study was to isolate a CS-degrading enzyme for an efficient production of CS oligo- or disaccharides. CS-degrading bacteria from marine environments were enriched using in situ artificial support colonization containing CS from shark cartilage as substrate. Subsequently, an Arthrobacter species (strain MAT3885) efficiently degrading CS was isolated from a CS enrichment culture. The genomic DNA from strain MAT3885 was pyro-sequenced by using the 454 FLX sequencing technology. Following assembly and annotation, an orf, annotated as family 8 polysaccharide lyase genes, was identified, encoding an amino acid sequence with a similarity to CS lyases according to NCBI blastX. The gene, designated choA1, was cloned in Escherichia coli and expressed downstream of and in frame with the E. coli malE gene for obtaining a high yield of soluble recombinant protein. Applying a dual-tag system (MalE-Smt3-ChoA1), the MalE domain was separated from ChoA1 with proteolytic cleavage using Ulp1 protease. ChoA1 was defined as an AC-type enzyme as it degraded chondroitin sulfate A, C, and hyaluronic acid. The optimum activity of the enzyme was at pH 5.5-7.5 and 40 °C, running a 10-min reaction. The native enzyme was estimated to be a monomer. As the recombinant chondroitin sulfate lyase (designated as ChoA1R) degraded chondroitin sulfate efficiently compared to a benchmark enzyme, it may be used for the production of chondroitin sulfate disaccharides for the food industry or health-promoting products.

  3. Phylogeny of Valerianaceae based on matK and ITS markers, with reference to matK individual polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    HIDALGO, ORIANE; GARNATJE, TERESA; SUSANNA, ALFONSO; MATHEZ, JOËL

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The monophyly of Valerianaceae and the precise delimitation of the family are not totally resolved. Our knowledge on the phylogeny of the group is only partial: on a morphological basis, some contradicting taxonomic proposals have been published, which demonstrates the difficulties in establishing a natural classification of the family and especially in proposing a relevant treatment of the large genus Valeriana. The aims of this study are to contribute to the phylogeny and generic delineation of the Valerianaceae on the basis of molecular data. • Methods A cladistic analysis of the sequences of one plastid (matK) and one nuclear (ITS) molecular marker was carried out, both individually and in combination. • Key Results The results of the analyses of both regions confirm that the family is monophyletic, with the exclusion of Triplostegia. The tribe Patrinieae is monophyletic, and the tribe Valerianeae is also a natural group. Two of the subtribes of Valerianeae, Fediinae and Centranthinae, are also monophyletic, with the exclusion of the genus Plectritis from Fediinae. The subtribe Valerianinae, on the other hand, is paraphyletic. • Conclusions Our results confirm, for the first time on a molecular basis, the suggested paraphyly of Valeriana in its present circumscription, with profound nomenclatural and taxonomic implications. The correlation between molecular phylogeny and biogeography is close. In the course of the plastid DNA sequencing, a polymorphism concerning the matK gene was found, a fact that should be carefully evaluated in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:14988097

  4. Getting Started with Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  5. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  6. Glass-Ampoule Breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, R. C.; Kaushik, Surender M.; Davis, Dennis D.

    1995-01-01

    Device breaks glass ampoule in repeatable manner and retains gaseous content so pressure of gas measured accurately. In addition, protects technician from gaseous contents, which can be hazardous. Broken glass and sample materials easily removed for disposal or analysis. Apparatus developed for use in experiments on compatibility of materials.

  7. Metagenomic and metabolic profiling of nonlithifying and lithifying stromatolitic mats of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Christina L M; Foster, Jamie S

    2012-01-01

    Stromatolites are laminated carbonate build-ups formed by the metabolic activity of microbial mats and represent one of the oldest known ecosystems on Earth. In this study, we examined a living stromatolite located within the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas and profiled the metagenome and metabolic potential underlying these complex microbial communities. The metagenomes of the two dominant stromatolitic mat types, a nonlithifying (Type 1) and lithifying (Type 3) microbial mat, were partially sequenced and compared. This deep-sequencing approach was complemented by profiling the substrate utilization patterns of the mats using metabolic microarrays. Taxonomic assessment of the protein-encoding genes confirmed previous SSU rRNA analyses that bacteria dominate the metagenome of both mat types. Eukaryotes comprised less than 13% of the metagenomes and were rich in sequences associated with nematodes and heterotrophic protists. Comparative genomic analyses of the functional genes revealed extensive similarities in most of the subsystems between the nonlithifying and lithifying mat types. The one exception was an increase in the relative abundance of certain genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in the lithifying Type 3 mats. Specifically, genes associated with the degradation of carbohydrates commonly found in exopolymeric substances, such as hexoses, deoxy- and acidic sugars were found. The genetic differences in carbohydrate metabolisms between the two mat types were confirmed using metabolic microarrays. Lithifying mats had a significant increase in diversity and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur substrates. The two stromatolitic mat types retained similar microbial communities, functional diversity and many genetic components within their metagenomes. However, there were major differences detected in the activity and genetic pathways of organic carbon utilization. These differences provide a strong link between the metagenome and the

  8. Dynamics of archaea at fine spatial scales in Shark Bay mat microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Hon Lun; Visscher, Pieter T.; White, III, Richard Allen

    Modern microbial mats provide remarkable insights into assembly, function and origin of complex microbial ecosystems. An excellent model of such systems is located in Shark Bay, Australia. Although bacteria have been extensively investigated in these communities, the role of archaea in microbial mats is poorly understood. Delineating the spatial distribution of archaea with mat depth will enable resolution of specific niches associated with this domain. In the present study, high throughput amplicon sequencing was undertaken in conjunction with key biogeochemical properties of two mat types (smooth and pustular). A total of 13,547,552 unfiltered sequences were obtained, and classified sequences weremore » affiliated to three archaeal and candidate phyla, Parvarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. One way analysis of similarity tests (ANOSIM) indicated the archaeal community structures of smooth and pustular mats were significantly different (global R = 1, p = 0.1 %). Smooth mats possessed higher archaeal diversity, dominated by Parvarchaeota, followed by Thermoplasmata, Class marine benthic group B and Halobacteria. The methanogenic community in smooth mats was dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, as well as methylotrophic Methanosarcinales, Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales and Methanomassiliicoccaceae. Conversely, pustular mats were enriched with Halobacteria and Parvarchaeota. The rates of oxygen production/consumption as well as sulphate reduction were up to four times higher in smooth than in pustular mats. Methane production peaked in the oxic part of mats and was up to seven-fold higher in smooth than in pustular mats. Metabolic cooperation in putative surface anoxic niches is proposed to be key in efficient cycling of key nutrients in these systems.« less

  9. Dynamics of archaea at fine spatial scales in Shark Bay mat microbiomes

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Hon Lun; Visscher, Pieter T.; White, III, Richard Allen; ...

    2017-04-11

    Modern microbial mats provide remarkable insights into assembly, function and origin of complex microbial ecosystems. An excellent model of such systems is located in Shark Bay, Australia. Although bacteria have been extensively investigated in these communities, the role of archaea in microbial mats is poorly understood. Delineating the spatial distribution of archaea with mat depth will enable resolution of specific niches associated with this domain. In the present study, high throughput amplicon sequencing was undertaken in conjunction with key biogeochemical properties of two mat types (smooth and pustular). A total of 13,547,552 unfiltered sequences were obtained, and classified sequences weremore » affiliated to three archaeal and candidate phyla, Parvarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. One way analysis of similarity tests (ANOSIM) indicated the archaeal community structures of smooth and pustular mats were significantly different (global R = 1, p = 0.1 %). Smooth mats possessed higher archaeal diversity, dominated by Parvarchaeota, followed by Thermoplasmata, Class marine benthic group B and Halobacteria. The methanogenic community in smooth mats was dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, as well as methylotrophic Methanosarcinales, Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales and Methanomassiliicoccaceae. Conversely, pustular mats were enriched with Halobacteria and Parvarchaeota. The rates of oxygen production/consumption as well as sulphate reduction were up to four times higher in smooth than in pustular mats. Methane production peaked in the oxic part of mats and was up to seven-fold higher in smooth than in pustular mats. Metabolic cooperation in putative surface anoxic niches is proposed to be key in efficient cycling of key nutrients in these systems.« less

  10. Evaluation of polyacrylonitrile electrospun nano-fibrous mats as leukocyte removal filter media.

    PubMed

    Pourbaghi, Raha; Zarrebini, Mohammad; Semnani, Dariush; Pourazar, Abbasali; Akbari, Nahid; Shamsfar, Reihaneh

    2018-07-01

    Removal of leukocytes from blood products is the most effective means for elimination of undesirable side effects and prevention of possible reactions in recipients. Micro-fibrous mats are currently used for removal of leukocytes from blood. In this study, samples of electrospun nano-fibrous mats were produced. The performance of the produced electrospun nano-fibrous mats as means of leukocytes removal from fresh whole blood was both evaluated and compared with that of commercially available micro-fibrous mats. In order to produce the samples, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nano-fibrous mats were made under different electrospinning conditions. Mean fiber diameter, pore characterization and surface roughness of the PAN nano-fibrous mats were determined using image processing technique. In order to evaluate the surface tension of the fabricated mats, water contact angle was measured. The leukocyte removal performance, erythrocytes recovery percent and hemolysis rate of the nano-fibrous mats were compared. The effectiveness of nano-fibrous mats in removing leukocyte was established using both scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. Results showed that for given weight, the fabricated nano-fibrous mats were not only more efficient but also more cost-effective than their commercial counterparts. Results confirmed that changes in mean fiber diameter, the number of layer and weight of each layer in the absence of any chemical reaction or physical surface modification, the fabricated nano-fibrous mats were able to remove 5-log of leukocytes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 1759-1769, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. B-Scan Based Acoustic Source Reconstruction for Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction (MAT-MI)

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; Li, Xu; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    We present in this study an acoustic source reconstruction method using focused transducer with B mode imaging for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). MAT-MI is an imaging modality proposed for non-invasive conductivity imaging with high spatial resolution. In MAT-MI acoustic sources are generated in a conductive object by placing it in a static and a time-varying magnetic field. The acoustic waves from these sources propagate in all directions and are collected with transducers placed around the object. The collected signal is then usedto reconstruct the acoustic source distribution and to further estimate the electrical conductivity distribution of the object. A flat piston transducer acting as a point receiver has been used in previous MAT-MI systems to collect acoustic signals. In the present study we propose to use B mode scan scheme with a focused transducer that gives a signal gain in its focus region and improves the MAT-MI signal quality. A simulation protocol that can take into account different transducer designs and scan schemes for MAT-MI imaging is developed and used in our evaluation of different MAT-MI system designs. It is shown in our computer simulations that, as compared to the previous approach, the MAT-MI system using B-scan with a focused transducer allows MAT-MI imaging at a closer distance and has improved system sensitivity. In addition, the B scan imaging technique allows reconstruction of the MAT-MI acoustic sources with a discrete number of scanning locations which greatly increases the applicability of the MAT-MI approach especially when a continuous acoustic window is not available in real clinical applications. We have also conducted phantom experiments to evaluate the proposed method and the reconstructed image shows a good agreement with the target phantom. PMID:21097372

  12. Review: Pressure-Induced Densification of Oxide Glasses at the Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Saurabh; Wondraczek, Lothar; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2017-02-01

    Densification of oxide glasses at the glass transition offers a novel route to develop bulk glasses with tailored properties for emerging applications. Such densification can be achieved in the technologically relevant pressure regime of up to 1GPa. However, the present understanding of the composition-structure-property relationships governing these glasses is limited, with key questions, e.g., related to densification mechanism, remaining largely unanswered. Recent advances in structural characterization tools and high-pressure apparatuses have prompted new research efforts. Here, we review this recent progress and the insights gained in the understanding of the influence of isostatic compression at elevated temperature (so-called hot compression) on the composition-structure-property relationships of oxide glasses. We focus on compression at temperatures at or around the glass transition temperature (Tg), with relevant comparisons made to glasses prepared by pressure quenching and cold compression. We show that permanent densification at 1 GPa sets-in at temperatures above 0.7Tg and the degree of densification increases with increasing compression temperature and time, until attaining an approximately constant value for temperatures above Tg. For glasses compressed at the same temperature/pressure conditions, we demonstrate direct relations between the degree of volume densification and the pressure-induced change in micro-mechanical properties such as hardness, elastic moduli, and extent of the indentation size effect across a variety of glass families. Furthermore, we summarize the results on relaxation behavior of hot compressed glasses. All the pressure-induced changes in the structure and properties exhibit strong composition dependence. The experimental results highlight new opportunities for future investigation and identify research challenges that need to be overcome to advance the field.

  13. Method for making glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter`s operating temperature until they meltmore » and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a ``non-bridging oxygen`` term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.« less

  14. Method for making glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they meltmore » and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.« less

  15. Origin of embrittlement in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Glenn R.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Johnson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their glassy nature, metallic glasses demonstrate a toughness that is extremely sensitive to the frozen-in configurational state. This sensitivity gives rise to “annealing embrittlement,” which is often severe and in many respects limits the technological advancement of these materials. Here, equilibrium configurations (i.e., “inherent states”) of a metallic glass are established around the glass transition, and the configurational properties along with the plane-strain fracture toughness are evaluated to associate the intrinsic glass toughness with the inherent state properties and identify the fundamental origin of embrittlement. The established correlations reveal a one-to-one correspondence between toughness and shear modulus continuous over a broad range of inherent states, suggesting that annealing embrittlement is controlled almost solely by an increasing resistance to shear flow. This annealing embrittlement sensitivity is shown to vary substantially between metallic glass compositions, and appears to correlate well with the fragility of the metallic glass. PMID:27573817

  16. Glass Fibers for Printed Circuit Boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardo, Anthony V.

    Fiberglass imparts numerous positive benefits to modern printed circuit boards. Reinforced laminate composites have an excellent cost-performance relationship that makes sense for most applications. At the leading edge of the technology, new glass fibers with improved properties, in combination with the best resin systems available, are able to meet very challenging performance, cost, and regulatory demands while remaining manufacturable.

  17. Distance Learning and Assistance Using Smart Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Michael; Nanic, Ibrahim; Ebner, Martin

    2018-01-01

    With the everyday growth of technology, new possibilities arise to support activities of everyday life. In education and training, more and more digital learning materials are emerging, but there is still room for improvement. This research study describes the implementation of a smart glasses app and infrastructure to support distance learning…

  18. Effects of Direct Systematic Instruction on Google Glass Orientation with Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Kelly R.; Rivera, Christopher J.; Kellems, Ryan O.

    2016-01-01

    Glass, designed by Google, is a fairly new wearable and mobile technology that projects an image into a glass prism above the eye and is currently in beta testing. A touch pad on the side of Glass allows users to engage with the device through swiping gestures and voice control to perform several functions similar to mobile devices. This initial…

  19. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, E.S.; King, S.; Tomberlin, J.K.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Barkay, T.; Geesey, G.G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Microbial mats are a visible and abundant life form inhabiting the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated with a phototrophic green/purple Zygogonium microbial mat community that inhabits low-temperature regions of acidic (pH ??? 3.0) thermal springs were found to serve as a food source for stratiomyid (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae. Mercury in spring source water was taken up and concentrated by the mat biomass. Monomethylmercury compounds (MeHg +), while undetectable or near the detection limit (0.025 ng l -1) in the source water of the springs, was present at concentrations of 4-7 ng g-1 dry weight of mat biomass. Detection of MeHg + in tracheal tissue of larvae grazing the mat suggests that MeHg+ enters this geothermal food web through the phototrophic microbial mat community. The concentration of MeHg+ was two to five times higher in larval tissue than mat biomass indicating MeHg+ biomagnification occurred between primary producer and primary consumer trophic levels. The Zygogonium mat community and stratiomyid larvae may also play a role in the transfer of MeHg+ to species in the food web whose range extends beyond a particular geothermal feature of YNP. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Distinctive fungal and bacterial communities are associated with mats formed by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Treesearch

    Laurel A. Kluber; Jane E. Smith; David D. Myrold

    2011-01-01

    The distinct rhizomorphic mats formed by ectomycorrhizal Piloderma fungi are common features of the organic soil horizons of coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. These mats have been found to cover 25-40% of the forest floor in some Douglas-fir stands, and are associated with physical and biochemical properties that distinguish them from...

  1. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; King, Susan; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Krabbenhoft, David P; Barkay, Tamar; Geesey, Gill G

    2009-04-01

    Microbial mats are a visible and abundant life form inhabiting the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated with a phototrophic green/purple Zygogonium microbial mat community that inhabits low-temperature regions of acidic (pH approximately 3.0) thermal springs were found to serve as a food source for stratiomyid (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae. Mercury in spring source water was taken up and concentrated by the mat biomass. Monomethylmercury compounds (MeHg(+)), while undetectable or near the detection limit (0.025 ng l(-1)) in the source water of the springs, was present at concentrations of 4-7 ng g(-1) dry weight of mat biomass. Detection of MeHg(+) in tracheal tissue of larvae grazing the mat suggests that MeHg(+) enters this geothermal food web through the phototrophic microbial mat community. The concentration of MeHg(+) was two to five times higher in larval tissue than mat biomass indicating MeHg(+) biomagnification occurred between primary producer and primary consumer trophic levels. The Zygogonium mat community and stratiomyid larvae may also play a role in the transfer of MeHg(+) to species in the food web whose range extends beyond a particular geothermal feature of YNP.

  2. Niche differentiation of bacterial communities at a millimeter scale in Shark Bay microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Hon Lun; Smith, Daniela-Lee; Visscher, Pieter T.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern microbial mats can provide key insights into early Earth ecosystems, and Shark Bay, Australia, holds one of the best examples of these systems. Identifying the spatial distribution of microorganisms with mat depth facilitates a greater understanding of specific niches and potentially novel microbial interactions. High throughput sequencing coupled with elemental analyses and biogeochemical measurements of two distinct mat types (smooth and pustular) at a millimeter scale were undertaken in the present study. A total of 8,263,982 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained, which were affiliated to 58 bacterial and candidate phyla. The surface of both mats were dominated by Cyanobacteria, accompanied with known or putative members of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The deeper anoxic layers of smooth mats were dominated by Chloroflexi, while Alphaproteobacteria dominated the lower layers of pustular mats. In situ microelectrode measurements revealed smooth mats have a steeper profile of O2 and H2S concentrations, as well as higher oxygen production, consumption, and sulfate reduction rates. Specific elements (Mo, Mg, Mn, Fe, V, P) could be correlated with specific mat types and putative phylogenetic groups. Models are proposed for these systems suggesting putative surface anoxic niches, differential nitrogen fixing niches, and those coupled with methane metabolism.

  3. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  4. Testing the utility of matK and ITS DNA regions for discrimination of Allium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Allium L. has been mainly based on the nucleotide sequences of ITS region. In 2009 matK and rbcL were accepted as a two-locus DNA barcode to classify plant species by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) Plant Working Group. MatK region has been ...

  5. IPM Analysis of the Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA used version 4.10_MATS of the Integrated Planning Model (IPM) to analyze the impact of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) rule on the U.S. electric power sector. Learn about the results and view links to documentation.

  6. Resistance and resilience of floating mat fens in interior Alaska following airboat disturbance

    Treesearch

    Amy Zacheis; Kate Doran

    2009-01-01

    The floating mat fens of the Tanana Flats in interior Alaska are productive wetlands near the urban center of Fairbanks. Airboat traffic has created a network of trails through the floating vegetation mats. We established protected areas along established trails, which allowed for measurement of plant community resistance to airboat traffic and resilience following...

  7. Enhanced antibacterial nanocomposite mats by coaxial electrospinning of polycaprolactone fibers loaded with Zn-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prone, Gina; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; García-Macedo, Jorge A; García, Victor I; Rodil, Sandra E; Ibarra, Clemente; Velasquillo, Cristina

    2018-04-16

    ZnO and Zn acetate nanoparticles were embedded in polycaprolactone coaxial-fibers and uniaxial-fibers matrices to develop potential antibacterial nanocomposite wound dressings (mats). Morphology, composition, wettability, crystallinity and fiber structure of mats were characterized. Antibacterial properties of mats were tested against E. coli and S. aureus by turbidity and MTT assays. The effect of UVA illumination (prior to bacteria inoculation) on mats' antibacterial activity was also studied. Results showed that a coaxial-fibers design maintained nanoparticles distributed in the outer-shell of fibers and, in general, enhanced the antibacterial effect of the mats, in comparison to conventional uniaxial-fibers mats. Results indicated that mats simultaneously inhibited planktonic and biofilm bacterial growth by, probably, two main antibacterial mechanisms; 1) release of Zn 2+ ions (mainly from Zn acetate nanoparticles) and 2) photocatalytic oxidative processes exerted by ZnO nanoparticles. Antibacterial properties of mats were significantly improved by coaxial-fibers design and exposure to UVA-light prior to bacteria inoculation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Polyelectrolyte-Functionalized Nanofiber Mats Control the Collection and Inactivation of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Katrina A.; Porter, Michael; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the effect that nanofiber mat chemistry and hydrophilicity have on microorganism collection and inactivation is critical in biomedical applications. In this study, the collection and inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 was examined using cellulose nanofiber mats that were surface-functionalized using three polyelectrolytes: poly (acrylic acid) (PAA), chitosan (CS), and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC). The polyelectrolyte functionalized nanofiber mats retained the cylindrical morphology and average fiber diameter (~0.84 µm) of the underlying cellulose nanofibers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements confirmed the presence of polycations or polyanions on the surface of the nanofiber mats. Both the control cellulose and pDADMAC-functionalized nanofiber mats exhibited a high collection of E. coli K12, which suggests that mat hydrophilicity may play a larger role than surface charge on cell collection. While the minimum concentration of polycations needed to inhibit E. coli K12 was 800 µg/mL for both CS and pDADMAC, once immobilized, pDADMAC-functionalized nanofiber mats exhibited a higher inactivation of E. coli K12, (~97%). Here, we demonstrate that the collection and inactivation of microorganisms by electrospun cellulose nanofiber mats can be tailored through a facile polyelectrolyte functionalization process. PMID:28773422

  9. Electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/green tea extract composite nanofiber mats and their antioxidant activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusporini, Pusporini; Edikresnha, Dhewa; Sriyanti, Ida; Suciati, Tri; Miftahul Munir, Muhammad; Khairurrijal, Khairurrijal

    2018-05-01

    Electrospinning was employed to make PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone)/GTE (green tea extract) composite nanofiber mats. The electrospun PVP nanofiber mat as well as the PVP/GTE nanofiber mats were uniform. The average fiber diameter of PVP/GTE composite nanofiber mat decreased with increasing the GTE weight fraction (or decreasing the PVP weight fraction) in the PVP/GTE solution because the PVP/GTE solution concentration decreased. Then, the broad FTIR peak representing the stretching vibrations of O–H in hydroxyl groups of phenols and the stretching of N–H in amine groups of the GTE paste shifted to higher wavenumbers in the PVP/GTE composite nanofiber mats. These peak shifts implied that PVP and catechins of GTE in the PVP/GTE composite nanofiber mats had intermolecular interactions via hydrogen bonds between carbonyl groups of PVP and hydroxyl groups of catechins in GTE. Lastly, the antioxidant activity of the PVP/GTE composite nanofiber mat increased with reducing the average fiber diameter because the amount of catechins in the composite nanofiber mat increased with the increase of surface area due to the reduction of the average fiber diameter.

  10. Reclamation of skid roads with fiber mats and native vegetation: effects on erosion

    Treesearch

    shawn T. Grushecky; David w. McGill; William Grafton; John Edwards; Lisa Tager

    2007-01-01

    A research study was established to test the effectiveness of fiber mats and native seed mixtures in reducing soil erosion from newly-constructed skid roads in the Elk River Watershed in central West Virginia. Twelve road sections of equal grade were paired with a randomly-selected section receiving a fiber mat and native grass seed while the other road section was not...

  11. Evaluating carbon stores at the earth-atmosphere interface: moss and lichen mats of subarctic Alaska

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Smith; Sarah Jovan; Bruce McCune

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental goal of the forest inventory in interior Alaska is to accurately estimate carbon pools in a way that sheds light on the feedbacks between forests and climate. In boreal forests, moss and lichen mats often serve as the interface between soils and the atmosphere, therefore characterizing the biomass and composition of mats is essential for understanding how...

  12. The Architecture of Iron Microbial Mats Reflects the Adaptation of Chemolithotrophic Iron Oxidation in Freshwater and Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clara S.; McAllister, Sean M.; Leavitt, Anna H.; Glazer, Brian T.; Krepski, Sean T.; Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Microbes form mats with architectures that promote efficient metabolism within a particular physicochemical environment, thus studying mat structure helps us understand ecophysiology. Despite much research on chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria, Fe mat architecture has not been visualized because these delicate structures are easily disrupted. There are striking similarities between the biominerals that comprise freshwater and marine Fe mats, made by Beta- and Zetaproteobacteria, respectively. If these biominerals are assembled into mat structures with similar functional morphology, this would suggest that mat architecture is adapted to serve roles specific to Fe oxidation. To evaluate this, we combined light, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy of intact Fe microbial mats with experiments on sheath formation in culture, in order to understand mat developmental history and subsequently evaluate the connection between Fe oxidation and mat morphology. We sampled a freshwater sheath mat from Maine and marine stalk and sheath mats from Loihi Seamount hydrothermal vents, Hawaii. Mat morphology correlated to niche: stalks formed in steeper O2 gradients while sheaths were associated with low to undetectable O2 gradients. Fe-biomineralized filaments, twisted stalks or hollow sheaths, formed the highly porous framework of each mat. The mat-formers are keystone species, with nascent marine stalk-rich mats comprised of novel and uncommon Zetaproteobacteria. For all mats, filaments were locally highly parallel with similar morphologies, indicating that cells were synchronously tracking a chemical or physical cue. In the freshwater mat, cells inhabited sheath ends at the growing edge of the mat. Correspondingly, time lapse culture imaging showed that sheaths are made like stalks, with cells rapidly leaving behind an Fe oxide filament. The distinctive architecture common to all observed Fe mats appears to serve specific functions related to chemolithotrophic Fe

  13. Community living long before man: fossil and living microbial mats and early life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Lopez Baluja, L.; Awramik, S. M.; Sagan, D.

    1986-01-01

    Microbial mats are layered communities of bacteria that form cohesive structures, some of which are preserved in sedimentary rocks as stromatolites. Certain rocks, approximately three and a half thousand million years old and representing the oldest known fossils, are interpreted to derive from microbial mats and to contain fossils of microorganisms. Modern microbial mats (such as the one described here from Matanzas, Cuba) and their fossil counterparts are of great interest in the interpretation of early life on Earth. Since examination of microbial mats and stromatolites increases our understanding of long-term stability and change, within the global environment, such structures should be protected wherever possible as natural science preserves. Furthermore, since they have existed virtually from the time of life's origin, microbial mats have developed exemplary mechanisms of local community persistence and may even play roles in the larger global environment that we do not understand.

  14. Enhancing the Mechanical Properties of Electrospun Nanofiber Mats through Controllable Welding at the Cross Points.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Chunlei; Xue, Jiajia; Ke, Qinfei; Xia, Younan

    2017-05-01

    This communication describes a simple and effective method for welding electrospun nanofibers at the cross points to enhance the mechanical properties of their nonwoven mats. The welding is achieved by placing a nonwoven mat of the nanofibers in a capped vial with the vapor of a proper solvent. For polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers, the solvent is dichloromethane (DCM). The welding can be managed in a controllable fashion by simply varying the partial pressure of DCM and/or the exposure time. Relative to the pristine nanofiber mat, the mechanical strength of the welded PCL nanofiber mat can be increased by as much as 200%. Meanwhile, such a treatment does not cause any major structural changes, including morphology, fiber diameter, and pore size. This study provides a generic method for improving the mechanical properties of nonwoven nanofiber mats, holding great potential in various applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Thermoelectric Properties of Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) Nanofiber Mat with a Large Void Fraction.

    PubMed

    Hiura, Shogo; Okada, Naoki; Wakui, Junma; Narita, Hikari; Kanehashi, Shinji; Shimomura, Takeshi

    2017-04-28

    The thermoelectric properties of a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanofiber mat which has higher crystallinity-and thus exhibits larger carrier mobility-than a non-fibrous P3HT film, were investigated. No significant difference was observed in the maximum values of the power factor between the P3HT nanofiber mat and the P3HT film. However, the thermal conductivity of the nanofiber mat was less than half that of the film despite having almost the same electrical conductivity. This higher thermoelectric property of the nanofiber mat than the film is attributed to the existence of highly effective conducting pathways and a large void fraction, and the result means that the nanofiber mat was a good candidate for use as a thermoelectric material.

  16. MatLab Programming for Engineers Having No Formal Programming Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Linda H.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for Scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. Also, stated are the current limitations of the MatLab, which possibly can be taken care of by Mathworks Inc. in a future version to make MatLab more versatile.

  17. Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Karl F.; Xu, Wen-Sheng; Dudowicz, Jacek B.

    Glass formation has been central to fabrication technologies since the dawn of civilization. Glasses not only encompass window panes, the insulation in our homes, the optical fibers supplying our cable TV, and vessels for eating and drinking, but they also include a vast array of ‘‘plastic’’ polymeric materials. Glasses find applications in high technology (e.g., producing microelectronic materials, etc., amorphous semiconductors), and recent advances have created ‘‘plastic metallic glasses’’ that are promising for fabricating everyday structural materials. Many commercially relevant systems, such as microemulsions and colloidal suspensions, have complex molecular structures and thus solidify by glass formation. Despite the importancemore » of understanding the fundamental nature of glass formation for the synthesis of new materials, a predictive molecular theory has been lacking. Much of our understanding of glass formation derives from the analysis of experimental data, a process that has uncovered a number of interesting universal behaviors, namely, relations between properties that are independent of molecular details. However, these empirically derived relations and their limitations remain to be understood on the basis of theories, and, more importantly, there is strong need for theories of the explicit variation with molecular system to enable the rational design and tailoring of new materials. We have recently developed the generalized entropy theory, the only analytic, theory that enables describing the dependence of the properties of glass-formation on monomer molecular structures. These properties include the two central quantities of glass formation, the glass transition temperature and the glass fragility parameter, material dependent properties that govern how a material may be processed (e.g., by extrusion, ink jet, molding, etc.) Our recent works, which are further described below, extend the studies of glass formation in polymer

  18. Chalcogenide Glass Lasers on Silicon Substrate Integrated Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-08

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0013 Chalcogenide glass lasers on silicon substrate integrated photonics Clara Dimas MASDAR INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY...PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER 5f.  WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) MASDAR INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY - MIST...communication by reducing coupling losses, chip size, energy requirements and manufacturing cost. Chalcogenide glass (ChG) light sources doped with rare earth

  19. Connectivity of glass structure. Oxygen number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, E. F.; Min'ko, N. I.

    2018-03-01

    With reference to mathematics, crystal chemistry and chemical technology of synthesis of glass structures in the solution (sol-gel technology), the paper is devoted to the study of the degree of connectivity of a silicon-oxygen backbone (fSi) and the oxygen number (R) [1]. It reveals logical contradictions and uncertainty of mathematical expressions of parameters, since fSi is not similar to the oxygen number. The connectivity of any structure is a result of various types of bonds: ion-covalent, donor-acceptor, hydrogen bonds, etc. Besides, alongside with SiO2, many glass compositions contain other glass-forming elements due to tetrahedral sites thus formed. The connectivity function of a glassy network with any set of glass-forming elements is roughly ensured by connectivity factor Y [2], which has monovalent elements loosening a glassy network. The paper considers the existence of various structural motives in hydrogen-impermeable glasses containing B2O3, Al2O3, PbO, Na2O, K2O and rare-earth elements. Hence, it also describes gradual nucleation, change of crystal forms, and structure consolidation in the process of substance intake from a matrix solution according to sol-gel technology. The crystal form varied from two-dimensional plates to three-dimensional and dendritical ones [3]. Alternative parameters, such as the oxygen number (O) and the structure connectivity factor (Y), were suggested. Functional dependence of Y=f(O) to forecast the generated structures was obtained for two- and multicomponent glass compositions.

  20. Validity Study of a Jump Mat Compared to the Reference Standard Force Plate.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Slavko; Radlinger, Lorenz; Imhasly, Caroline; Kneubuehler, Andrea; Hilfiker, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In the field of vertical jump diagnostics, force plates (FP) are the reference standard. Recently, despite a lack of evidence, jump mats have been used increasingly. Important factors in favor of jumping mats are their low cost and portability. This validity study compared the Haynl-Elektronik jump mat (HE jump mat) with the reference standard force plate. Ten healthy volunteers participated and each participant completed three series of five drop jumps (DJ). The parameters ground contact time (GCT) and vertical jump height (VJH) from the HE jump mat and the FP were used to evaluate the concurrent validity. The following statistical calculations were performed: Pearson's correlation (r), Bland-Altman plots (standard and for adjusted trend), and regression equations. The Bland-Altman plots suggest that the HE jump mat measures shorter contact times and higher jump heights than the FP. The trend-adjusted Bland-Altman plot shows higher mean differences and wider wing-spreads of confidence limits during longer GCT. During the VJH the mean differences and the wing-spreads of the confidence limits throughout the range present as relatively constant. The following regression equations were created, as close as possible to the true value: GCT = 5.920385 + 1.072293 × [value HE jump mat] and VJH = -1.73777 + 1.011156 × [value HE jump mat]. The HE jump mat can be recommended in relation to the validity of constraints. In this study, only a part of the quality criteria were examined. For the final recommendation it is advised to examine the HE jump mat on the other quality criteria (test-retest reliability, sensitivity change).

  1. Maté: a risk factor for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, David

    2002-10-01

    Maté is a tea-like beverage consumed mainly in Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, southern Brazil and to a lesser degree in other areas of the world such as Germany, Syria, Lebanon and Northern Israel. It is brewed from the dried leaves and stemlets of the perennial tree Ilex paraguarensis ("yerba mate") a species that belongs to the Aquifoliaceae family. Maté consumption has been associated with an increased rate of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and discuss the role of Maté consumption in the development of oral and oropharyngeal cancer and the potential carcinogenic mechanisms. A review of the relevant literature linking Maté consumption with oral and oropharyngeal cancer and the carcinogenicity of Maté was performed. The search was performed using Medline, library catalogues, OCLC first search and ISI web of science databases. Case control studies on Maté drinking populations and, in vivo and in vitro studies on the carcinogenicity of Maté were reviewed. The populations reviewed in many of these studies also used alcohol and tobacco products confounding the influence of Maté as an independent risk factor. There is evidence in the literature that Maté consumption is in itself carcinogenic and plays a role in the development of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Although the exact mechanism of carcinogenesis is still unknown, available information suggests that Maté drinking should be considered one of the risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  2. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Roche, Michael F.

    1985-01-01

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na.sub.2 O, ZrO.sub.2, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and SiO.sub.2 in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2.times.10.sup.-3 (ohm-cm).sup.-1 at 300.degree. C. and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500.degree. C.

  3. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

    1985-01-08

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

  4. Crafting glass vessels: current research on the ancient glass collections in the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Alexander; McCarthy, Blythe; Bowe, Stacy

    Our knowledge of glass production in ancient Egypt has been well augmented by the publication of recently excavated materials and glass workshops, but also by more recent materials analysis, and experiments of modern glass-makers attempting to reconstruct the production process of thin-walled coreformed glass vessels. From the mounting of a prefabricated core to the final glass product our understanding of this profession has much improved. The small but well preserved glass collection of the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. is a valid tool for examining and studying the technology and production of ancient Egyptian core formed glass vessels. Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919) acquired most of the material from Giovanni Dattari in Cairo in 1909. Previously the glass had received only limited discussion, suggesting that most of these vessels were produced in the 18th Dynasty in the 15th and 14th centuries BCE, while others date from the Hellenistic period and later. In an ongoing project we conducted computed radiography in conjunction with qualitative x-ray fluorescence analysis on a selected group of vessels to understand further aspects of the ancient production process. This paper will provide an overview of our recent research and present our data-gathering process and preliminary results. How can the examinations of core formed glass vessels in the Freer Gallery contribute to our understanding of ancient glass production and technology? By focusing on new ways of looking at old assumptions using the Freer Gallery glass collections, we hope to increase understanding of the challenges of the production process of core-vessel technology as represented by these vessels.

  5. Integral glass encapsulation for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding technology, an encapsulation technique for terrestrial solar array was developed. The process produces full integral, hermetic bonds with no adhesives or pottants. Panels of six solar cells on a simple glass superstrate were produced. Electrostatic bonding for making the cell front contact was also developed. A metal mesh is trapped into contact with the cell front during the bonding process. Six cell panels using the bonded mesh as the only cell front contact were produced. The possibility of using lower cost glass, with a higher thermal expansion mismatch to silicon, by making lower temperature bonds is developed. However, this requires a planar surface cell.

  6. The mineral phase evolution behaviour in the production of glass-ceramics from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by melting technology.

    PubMed

    Luan, Jingde; Chai, Meiyun; Li, Rundong; Yao, Pengfei; Khan, Agha Saood

    2016-01-01

    High energy consumption was the major obstacle to the widespread application of melting technology in the treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. Aiming to lower the ash-melting temperature (AMT) for energy-saving, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and the scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the relations between AMT and the mineral evolution. The results indicated that the change of AMT was determined by the types and the contents of mineral crystals. The transition from refractory minerals to fluxing minerals was the key. The transition of the main crystalline phase from pseudowollastonite (Ca3(Si3O9)) to wollastonite (CaSiO3) played a significant role in AMT reduction. A quantum chemistry calculation was carried out to investigate the effect of crystal reaction activity on AMT. In the chemical reaction, the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital played a more important role than any other orbits. Cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) were apt to enter into the crystal lattice of wollastonite and gehlenite mainly through Si (3), O (1), Si (6), O (10) and Al (2), O (10), and broke the covalent bonds of Si (3)-O (7), Al (1)-O (9) and Al (1)-O (15), respectively. This deconstruction behaviour provided convenient conditions for restructuring and promoted the formation of fluxing minerals. In melts, the excess SiO2 monomers which existed in the form of cristobalite and quartz caused AMT increase.

  7. Carrying Out and Developing the Glass Industry Vision and Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Greenman

    2007-06-14

    In support of its obligations under the above-mentioned project, the GMIC performed the following tasks: (1) Provided two-way communications liaison services between the U.S. glass industry and the D.O.E. to ensure the needs and concerns of each party are effectively communicated to the other. (2) Updated and modified on a continuing basis and in response to evolving conditions within the glass industry, the goals and priorities outlined in the Glass Industry Vision and the Glass Technology Roadmap. (3) Established relationships with a wide variety of government and non-governmental organizations with interests in further improving the levels of technology, productivity andmore » environmental responsibility of the glass industry. (4) Canvassed the glass industry on an ongoing basis to determine overall and specific sector needs for technological development. (5) Fostered direct contacts between member companies and national laboratories to facilitate the development of individual company technology development. (6) Advised the DOE on the key elements of the solicitation process in support of the Glass Industry Vision and Technology Roadmap. In the course of this contract, the membership of the GMIC has grown to include over 70% of the glass industry. This gives it the ability to communicate persuasively with the vast majority of this energy intensive industry. One of the principal benefits of the existence of the GMIC is that, for the first time in this country, representative companies of all major sectors of the glass industry are now in regular communication with each other. Prior to the existence and activity of the GMIC, companies and individuals in the flat glass, container glass, fiber glass and specialty glass sectors rarely had contact with each other, in spite of the fact that they all face similar challenges and can benefit from pre-competitive research conducted to the benefit of the broad industry. The development of innovations in the industry

  8. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  9. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  10. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  11. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  12. Chemical processing of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Richard M.

    1990-11-01

    The development of chemical processing methods for the fabrication of glass and ceramic shapes for photonic applications is frequently Edisonian in nature. In part, this is because the numerous variables that must be optimized to obtain a given material with a specific shape and particular properties cannot be readily defined based on fundamental principles. In part, the problems arise because the basic chemistry of common chemical processing systems has not been fully delineated. The prupose of this paper is to provide an overview of the basic chemical problems associated with chemical processing. The emphasis will be on sol-gel processing, a major subset pf chemical processing. Two alternate approaches to chemical processing of glasses are also briefly discussed. One approach concerns the use of bimetallic alkoxide oligomers and polymers as potential precursors to mulimetallic glasses. The second approach describes the utility of metal carboxylate precursors to multimetallic glasses.

  13. Seeing Glass Contractors Clearly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deliberato, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Offers seven tips for finding and working with an effective glass contractor. For example, schools should consider the company's reputation and longevity of service, and whether it has in-house engineering capabilities. (EV)

  14. Dissolving Bubbles in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.; Oronato, P. I.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical expression used to calculate time it takes for stationary bubbles of oxygen and carbon dioxide to dissolve from glass melt. Technique based on analytical expression for bubble radius as function time, with consequences of surface tension included.

  15. Glass Stronger than Steel

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  16. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  17. Method for making glass nonfogging

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    A method for rendering glass nonfogging (to condensation fog) by sandwiching the glass between two electrodes such that the glass functions as the dielectric of a capacitor, a large alternating current (AC) voltage is applied across the electrodes for a selected time period causing the glass to absorb a charge, and the electrodes are removed. The glass absorbs a charge from the electrodes rendering it nonfogging. The glass surface is undamaged by application of the AC voltage, and normal optical properties are unaffected. This method can be applied to optical surfaces such as lenses, auto windshields, mirrors, etc., wherever condensation fog on glass is a problem.

  18. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  19. Fluoride glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bayoumi, O.

    1983-08-09

    This invention relates to Fluoride-based glasses that exhibit a high degree of transparency throughout the near ultraviolet visible and mid infrared portions of the spectrum. The glasses are composed of MgF2 and ZnF2 as essential compositional ingredients together with at least two other metallic fluorides from the group of YbF3, ThF4, PbF2, A1F3 and MnF2.

  20. Deletion and Complementation of the Mating Type (MAT) Locus of the Wheat Head Blight Pathogen Gibberella zeae

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, A. E.; Brown, D. W.; Yun, S.-H.; Proctor, R. H.; Lee, T.; Plattner, R. D.; Lu, S.-W.; Turgeon, B. G.

    2004-01-01

    Gibberella zeae, a self-fertile, haploid filamentous ascomycete, causes serious epidemics of wheat (Triticum aestivum) head blight worldwide and contaminates grain with trichothecene mycotoxins. Anecdotal evidence dating back to the late 19th century indicates that G. zeae ascospores (sexual spores) are a more important inoculum source than are macroconidia (asexual spores), although the fungus can produce both during wheat head blight epidemics. To develop fungal strains to test this hypothesis, the entire mating type (MAT1) locus was deleted from a self-fertile (MAT1-1/MAT1-2), virulent, trichothecene-producing wild-type strain of G. zeae. The resulting MAT deletion (mat1-1/mat1-2) strains were unable to produce perithecia or ascospores and appeared to be unable to mate with the fertile strain from which they were derived. Complementation of a MAT deletion strain by transformation with a copy of the entire MAT locus resulted in recovery of production of perithecia and ascospores. MAT deletion strains and MAT-complemented strains retained the ability to produce macroconidia that could cause head blight, as assessed by direct injection into wheat heads in greenhouse tests. Availability of MAT-null and MAT-complemented strains provides a means to determine the importance of ascospores in the biology of G. zeae and perhaps to identify novel approaches to control wheat head blight. PMID:15066842

  1. Mulching effects of plant fiber and plant fiber-polyester mats combined with fertilizer on loblslly pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; John A. Youngquist

    1991-01-01

    In this preliminary study, several mattings, combined with and without fertilizer application, were tested around newly planted loblolly, pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings. After 9 months in the field, jute- polyester and jute mats had similar survival rates relitive to controls, but hemlock-po1yvester mats had depressed survival when used in...

  2. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as themore » need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming

  3. A cellular glass substrate solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, R.; Bell, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a second generation point focusing solar concentration is discussed. The design is based on reflective gores fabricated of thin glass mirror bonded continuously to a contoured substrate of cellular glass. The concentrator aperture and structural stiffness was optimized for minimum concentrator cost given the performance requirement of delivering 56 kWth to a 22 cm diameter receiver aperture with a direct normal insolation of 845 watts sq m and an operating wind of 50 kmph. The reflective panel, support structure, drives, foundation and instrumentation and control subsystem designs, optimized for minimum cost, are summarized. The use of cellular glass as a reflective panel substrate material is shown to offer significant weight and cost advantages compared to existing technology materials.

  4. Basic Research on Oxynitride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    The upsurge in interest in these glasses was originally motivated by their relevance to the processing of Si 3 1 4 -based ceramics (4, 5) when it was...are suggested by results obtained so far, among them refractory glass - ceramics , leach-resistant glasses , hardened optical windows, and Joining...compositions for ceramic - ceramic seals. Oxynitride Glass Synthesis The preparation of oxynitride glasses is more complex than preparation of conventional

  5. Containerless synthesis of interesting glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    One aspect of containerless glass experimentation was thoroughly examined: glass forming ability. It is argued that although containerless processing will abet glass formation, other ground-based methods can do the job better. However, these methods have limitations, such as sample dimensions and concomitant ability to make property measurements. Most importantly, perhaps, is the observation that glass properties are a function of preparation procedure. Thus, it seems as though there still is an argument for use of containerless processing for glass forming.

  6. Spatially-resolved carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Lindemann, S. R.; Cory, A. B.; Courtney, S.; Cole, J. K.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington. Low annual rainfall and high evaporation rates contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate, of which monimolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M concentrations. Induced by its high salinity and meromictic nature, Hot Lake displays an inverse thermal gradient with deep horizons seasonally exceeding 50 °C. Despite extreme conditions, dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, anoxygenic photoheterotrophs, and bacterial heterotroph populations develop in the lake. These mats can exceed 1 cm in thickness and display vertical stratification in color due to bacterial pigmentation. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer underlain by green and purple layers at increasing depth. Carbonates, including aragonite and magnesite, are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial metabolic activities and associated pH excursions. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the mat and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. Secondly, we seek to understand the overall net carbon balance of the mat through a growing season. We are using a stable isotope probing approach for assessing carbon uptake and migration through representative mat samples. We performed a series of ex situ incubations of freshly harvested mat samples in lake water amended with 13C-labeled bicarbonate or substrates commonly consumed by heterotrophs (including acetate and glucose) and using multiple stable isotope techniques to track label uptake, residence time, remineralization, and location within the mat. In addition to bulk isotope

  7. Complex polar lipids of a hot spring cyanobacterial mat and its cultivated inhabitants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, D. M.; Panke, S.; Kloppel, K. D.; Christ, R.; Fredrickson, H.

    1994-01-01

    The complex polar lipids of the hot spring cyanobacterial mat in the 50 to 55 degrees C region of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and of thermophilic bacteria cultivated from this or similar habitats, were compared in an attempt to understand the microbial sources of the major lipid biomarkers in this community. Intact complex lipids were analyzed directly by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and combined TLC-FAB-MS. FAB-MS and TLC gave qualitatively similar results, suggesting that the mat contains major lipids most like those of the cyanobacterial isolate we studied, Synechococcus sp. strain Y-7c-s. These include monoglycosyl, diglycosyl, and sulfoquinosovyl diglycerides (MG, DG, and SQ, respectively) and phosphatidyl glycerol (PG). Though Chloroflexus aurantiacus also contains MG, DG, and PG, the fatty acid chain lengths of mat MGs, DGs, and PGs resemble more those of cyanobacterial than green nonsulfur bacterial lipids. FAB-MS spectra of the lipids of nonphototrophic bacterial isolates were distinctively different from those of the mat and phototrophic isolates. The lipids of these nonphototrophic isolates were not detected in the mat, but most could be detected when added to mat samples. The mat also contains major glycolipids and aminophospholipids of unknown structure and origin. FAB-MS and TLC did not always give quantitatively similar results. In particular, PG and SQ may give disproportionately high FAB-MS responses.

  8. The micromorphology of Younger Dryas-aged black mats from Nevada, Arizona, Texas and New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris-Parks, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Black mats are organic-rich sediments and soils that form in wet environments associated with spring discharge. Micromorphological and geochemical analyses of 25 black mats dating to the Younger Dryas Chronozone (12.9-11.7 ka) and early Holocene were conducted to determine their composition and depositional environment. Samples were collected from Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and Nevada. Micromorphological analyses were conducted on thin sections using polarized and blue fluorescent light. These analyses determined that black mats contain humic acids, fine (5-20 μm) plant fragments, diatoms, phytoliths, and gastropods. The dominant type of organic matter in black mats is derived from herbaceous plants, contradicting previous studies that supported algal or charcoal sources. Differences in the micromorphological characteristics of the samples revealed that black mats formed as three different types, organic horizons, moist soils and, ponded sediments, depending on their topographic position in relation to the water table. The microscopic evidence found in black mats supports the presence of widespread wet environments in Nevada and Arizona during the Younger Dryas Chronozone, clearly indicating a sustained period of greater effective moisture, optimal for spring discharge and black mat formation.

  9. Cantera Integration with the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently developed a software package for modeling generic thermodynamic systems called the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a library of building blocks that can be assembled to represent any thermodynamic system in the Simulink(Registered TradeMark) (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment. These elements, along with a Newton Raphson solver (also provided as part of the T-MATS package), enable users to create models of a wide variety of systems. The current version of T-MATS (v1.0.1) uses tabular data for providing information about a specific mixture of air, water (humidity), and hydrocarbon fuel in calculations of thermodynamic properties. The capabilities of T-MATS can be expanded by integrating it with the Cantera thermodynamic package. Cantera is an object-oriented analysis package that calculates thermodynamic solutions for any mixture defined by the user. Integration of Cantera with T-MATS extends the range of systems that may be modeled using the toolbox. In addition, the library of elements released with Cantera were developed using MATLAB native M-files, allowing for quicker prototyping of elements. This paper discusses how the new Cantera-based elements are created and provides examples for using T-MATS integrated with Cantera.

  10. Cantera Integration with the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently developed a software package for modeling generic thermodynamic systems called the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a library of building blocks that can be assembled to represent any thermodynamic system in the Simulink (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment. These elements, along with a Newton Raphson solver (also provided as part of the T-MATS package), enable users to create models of a wide variety of systems. The current version of T-MATS (v1.0.1) uses tabular data for providing information about a specific mixture of air, water (humidity), and hydrocarbon fuel in calculations of thermodynamic properties. The capabilities of T-MATS can be expanded by integrating it with the Cantera thermodynamic package. Cantera is an object-oriented analysis package that calculates thermodynamic solutions for any mixture defined by the user. Integration of Cantera with T-MATS extends the range of systems that may be modeled using the toolbox. In addition, the library of elements released with Cantera were developed using MATLAB native M-files, allowing for quicker prototyping of elements. This paper discusses how the new Cantera-based elements are created and provides examples for using T-MATS integrated with Cantera.

  11. Increasing Mechanical Properties of 2-D-Structured Electrospun Nylon 6 Non-Woven Fiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chunhui; Frey, Margaret W

    2016-04-07

    Tensile strength, Young's modulus, and toughness of electrospun nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats were improved by increasing individual nanofiber strength and fiber-fiber load sharing. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used as reinforcement to increase the strength of the electrospun nylon 6 nanofibers. Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness of the nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats electrospun from 20 wt % solutions increased 51%, 87%, and 136%, respectively, after incorporating 1 wt % CNTs into the nylon 6 nanofibers. Three methods were investigated to enhance fiber-fiber load sharing: increasing friction between fibers, thermal bonding, and solvent bonding. The addition of beaded nylon 6 nanofibers into the non-woven fiber mats to increase fiber-fiber friction resulted in a statistically significantly increase in Young's modulus over comparable smooth non-woven fiber mats. After annealing, tensile strength, elongation, and toughness of the nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats electrospun from 20 wt % + 10 wt % solutions increased 26%, 28%, and 68% compared to those from 20 wt % solutions. Solvent bonding with formic acid vapor at room temperature for 30 min caused increases of 56%, 67%, and 39% in the Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness of non-woven fiber mats, respectively. The increases attributed to increased individual nanofiber strength and solvent bonding synergistically resulted in the improvement of Young's modulus of the electrospun nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats.

  12. Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction (MAT-MI) for Breast Tumor Imaging: Numerical Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lian; Li, Xu; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) was recently introduced as a noninvasive electrical conductivity imaging approach with high spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. In the present study, we test the feasibility of the MAT-MI method for breast tumor imaging using numerical modeling and computer simulation. Using the finite element method, we have built three dimensional numerical breast models with varieties of embedded tumors for this simulation study. In order to obtain an accurate and stable forward solution that does not have numerical errors caused by singular MAT-MI acoustic sources at conductivity boundaries, we first derive an integral forward method for calculating MAT-MI acoustic sources over the entire imaging volume. An inverse algorithm for reconstructing the MAT-MI acoustic source is also derived with spherical measurement aperture, which simulates a practical setup for breast imaging. With the numerical breast models, we have conducted computer simulations under different imaging parameter setups and all the results suggest that breast tumors that have large conductivity contrast to its surrounding tissues as reported in literature may be readily detected in the reconstructed MAT-MI images. In addition, our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of imaging breast tumors using the presented MAT-MI setup depends more on the tumor location and the conductivity contrast between the tumor and its surrounding tissues than on the tumor size. PMID:21364262

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Ions Released from Zeolites Immobilized on Cellulose Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Katrina A; Cho, Hong Je; Yeung, Hiu Fai; Fan, Wei; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-02-10

    In this study, we exploit the high silver ion exchange capability of Linde Type A (LTA) zeolites and present, for the first time, electrospun nanofiber mats decorated with in-house synthesized silver (Ag(+)) ion exchanged zeolites that function as molecular delivery vehicles. LTA-Large zeolites with a particle size of 6.0 μm were grown on the surface of the cellulose nanofiber mats, whereas LTA-Small zeolites (0.2 μm) and three-dimensionally ordered mesoporous-imprinted (LTA-Meso) zeolites (0.5 μm) were attached to the surface of the cellulose nanofiber mats postsynthesis. After the three zeolite/nanofiber mat assemblies were ion-exchanged with Ag(+) ions, their ion release profiles and ability to inactivate Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 were evaluated as a function of time. LTA-Large zeolites immobilized on the nanofiber mats displayed more than an 11 times greater E. coli K12 inactivation than the Ag-LTA-Large zeolites that were not immobilized on the nanofiber mats. This study demonstrates that by decorating nanometer to micrometer scale Ag(+) ion-exchanged zeolites on the surface of high porosity, hydrophilic cellulose nanofiber mats, we can achieve a tunable release of Ag(+) ions that inactivate bacteria faster and are more practical to use in applications over powder zeolites.

  14. Organismal and spatial partitioning of energy and macronutrient transformations within a hypersaline mat

    SciTech Connect

    Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Bernstein, Hans C.

    2017-03-21

    Phototrophic mat communities are model ecosystems for studying energy cycling and elemental transformations because complete biogeochemical cycles occur over millimeter-to-centimeter scales. Characterization of energy and nutrient capture within hypersaline phototrophic mats has focused on specific processes and organisms, however little is known about community-wide distribution of and linkages between these processes. To investigate energy and macronutrient capture and flow through a structured community, the spatial and organismal distribution of metabolic functions within a compact hypersaline mat community from Hot Lake have been broadly elucidated through species-resolved metagenomics and geochemical, microbial diversity, and metabolic gradient measurements. Draft reconstructed genomes of abundantmore » organisms revealed three dominant cyanobacterial populations differentially distributed across the top layers of the mat suggesting niche separation along light and oxygen gradients. Many organisms contained diverse functional profiles, allowing for metabolic response to changing conditions within the mat. Organisms with partial nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms were widespread indicating dependence upon metabolite exchange. In addition, changes in community spatial structure were observed over the diel. These results indicate that organisms within the mat community have adapted to the temporally dynamic environmental gradients in this hypersaline mat through metabolic flexibility and fluid syntrophic interactions, including shifts in spatial arrangements.« less

  15. Antibacterial electrospun chitosan-polyethylene oxide nanocomposite mats containing ZIF-8 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kohsari, Iraj; Shariatinia, Zahra; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial chitosan-polyethylene oxide (CS-PEO) nanofiber mats loaded with 3, 5 and 10% (w/w) of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 nanoparticles (ZIF-8 NPs, ∼60nm diameter) were developed by electrospinning technique. The CS-PEO-GA-3% ZIF-8 NPs crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor was also prepared. The electrospun mats were characterized by various analysis including FE-SEM, EDAX, elemental mapping, FT-IR, contact angle, TGA/DSC as well as tensile strength analysis. The nanofibers had average diameters within the range ∼70-120nm. Antimicrobial activities of the CS-PEO and CS-PEO-3% ZIF-8 mats were evaluated by the viable cell-counting method for determining their effectiveness in reducing or halting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria so that the CS-PEO mat containing 3% ZIF-8 revealed 100% bactericidal activity against both kinds of bacteria. The crosslinked CS-PEO-GA-3% ZIF-8 NPs sample was less thermally stable but more hydrophilic than its related non-crosslinked mat reflecting there was no need to crosslink the fibers using a chemical crosslinker having adverse effects. The highest hydrophobicity and appropriate thermal and tensile properties of CS-PEO-3% ZIF-8 NPs among those of the mats including 5 and 10% ZIF-8 NPs suggested that the mentioned mat is the most suitable sample for food coating applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing Mechanical Properties of 2-D-Structured Electrospun Nylon 6 Non-Woven Fiber Mats

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Chunhui; Frey, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    Tensile strength, Young’s modulus, and toughness of electrospun nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats were improved by increasing individual nanofiber strength and fiber–fiber load sharing. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used as reinforcement to increase the strength of the electrospun nylon 6 nanofibers. Young’s modulus, tensile strength, and toughness of the nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats electrospun from 20 wt % solutions increased 51%, 87%, and 136%, respectively, after incorporating 1 wt % CNTs into the nylon 6 nanofibers. Three methods were investigated to enhance fiber–fiber load sharing: increasing friction between fibers, thermal bonding, and solvent bonding. The addition of beaded nylon 6 nanofibers into the non-woven fiber mats to increase fiber-fiber friction resulted in a statistically significantly increase in Young’s modulus over comparable smooth non-woven fiber mats. After annealing, tensile strength, elongation, and toughness of the nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats electrospun from 20 wt % + 10 wt % solutions increased 26%, 28%, and 68% compared to those from 20 wt % solutions. Solvent bonding with formic acid vapor at room temperature for 30 min caused increases of 56%, 67%, and 39% in the Young’s modulus, tensile strength, and toughness of non-woven fiber mats, respectively. The increases attributed to increased individual nanofiber strength and solvent bonding synergistically resulted in the improvement of Young’s modulus of the electrospun nylon 6 non-woven fiber mats. PMID:28773397

  17. Production of Bulk and Fiber Glass in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The production of bulk glass and fiber glass in space and on the moon and Mars should lead to superior products. Specifically glass plates for windows and optical elements could be produced with theoretical strengths by production in vacuum. Water vapor is known to decrease glass strength by up to two orders of magnitude from theoretical. A low gravity glass plate apparatus prototype has been designed and built which uses centrifugal force to shape the glass and solar energy to melt the glass. Glass fiber could be produced on the moon or Mars from in-situ materials using standard technologies. This material could then be used as reinforcement in composite materials in construction of bases. Also, it has been shown that processing in reduced gravity suppresses crystallization in certain heavy metal fluoride glasses. It is proposed to reprocess optical fiber preforms on the space station and then pull these into optical fiber. It is estimated that the attenuation coefficient should be reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  18. The Feasibility and Acceptability of Google Glass for Teletoxicology Consults.

    PubMed

    Chai, Peter R; Babu, Kavita M; Boyer, Edward W

    2015-09-01

    Teletoxicology offers the potential for toxicologists to assist in providing medical care at remote locations, via remote, interactive augmented audiovisual technology. This study examined the feasibility of using Google Glass, a head-mounted device that incorporates a webcam, viewing prism, and wireless connectivity, to assess the poisoned patient by a medical toxicology consult staff. Emergency medicine residents (resident toxicology consultants) rotating on the toxicology service wore Glass during bedside evaluation of poisoned patients; Glass transmitted real-time video of patients' physical examination findings to toxicology fellows and attendings (supervisory consultants), who reviewed these findings. We evaluated the usability (e.g., quality of connectivity and video feeds) of Glass by supervisory consultants, as well as attitudes towards use of Glass. Resident toxicology consultants and supervisory consultants completed 18 consults through Glass. Toxicologists viewing the video stream found the quality of audio and visual transmission usable in 89 % of cases. Toxicologists reported their management of the patient changed after viewing the patient through Glass in 56 % of cases. Based on findings obtained through Glass, toxicologists recommended specific antidotes in six cases. Head-mounted devices like Google Glass may be effective tools for real-time teletoxicology consultation.

  19. Evolution of Mat Strength from the Paleoarchean to the Modern: A Record of Evolving Microbial Communities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, M.; Pope, M.; Thornton, D.

    2011-12-01

    Fossil microbial mats, i.e. surface-attached communities of benthic microorganisms, form the most extensive record of life on Earth. Qualitatively changing mat morphologies from 3.43-0.56-billion-years-ago may reflect the evolution of microorganism communities or changing environmental conditions. However, mat morphogenesis is not well understood or easily quantifiable, making interpretation of the mat record difficult. We show that microbial mat cohesion increased from ~1 Pa to ~13 Pa at 2.7-billion-years-ago (Ga), and has remained high for most of the rest of Earth history. This initial increase may represent an early increase in the productivity of mat communities, a change in the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by mat-formers, or a change in the composition of seawater affecting EPS strength. The appearance of early high-strength communities was coincident with the appearance of voids representing gas bubbles in the apices of conical stromatolites; together, these changes may record the emergence of productive mat communities dominated by oxygenic cyanobacteria. The earliest high-strength communities, like early bubble-forming conical stromatolites, grew in low-energy environments. The appearance of high-strength communities in shallow-water environments starting 2.63-2.52 Ga coincided with the appearance of the first barrier reef complexes. We hypothesize that the first oxygenic cyanobacteria were most competitive with anoxygenic phototrophs in diffusion-limited environments. As the cyanobacteria became more proficient at oxygenic photosynthesis, they eventually outcompeted anoxygenic phototrophs in higher-energy environments. Competition with higher strength seaweed and grazing by metazoans has displaced mat communities from essentially all modern high-energy niches.

  20. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  1. Tracing biosignatures from the Recent to the Jurassic in sabkha-associated microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Land, Cees; Dutton, Kirsten; Andrade, Luiza; Paul, Andreas; Sherry, Angela; Fender, Tom; Hewett, Guy; Jones, Martin; Lokier, Stephen W.; Head, Ian M.

    2017-04-01

    Microbial mat ecosystems have been operating at the sediment-fluid interface for over 3400 million years, influencing the flux, transformation and preservation of carbon from the biosphere to the physical environment. These ecosystems are excellent recorders of rapid and profound changes in earth surface environments and biota as they often survive crisis-induced extreme paleoenvironmental conditions. Their biosignatures, captured in the preserved organic matter and the biominerals that form the microbialite rock, constitute a significant tool in understanding geobiological processes and the interactions of the microbial communities with sediments and with the prevailing physical chemical parameters, as well as the environmental conditions at a local and global scale. Nevertheless, the exact pathways of diagenetic organic matter transformation and early-lithification, essential for the accretion and preservation in the geological record as microbialites, are not well understood. The Abu Dhabi coastal sabkha system contains a vast microbial mat belt that is dominated by continuous polygonal and internally-laminated microbial mats across the upper and middle intertidal zones. This modern system is believed to be the best analogue for the Upper Jurassic Arab Formation, which is both a prolific hydrocarbon reservoir and source rock facies in the United Arab Emirates and in neighbouring countries. In order to characterise the processes that lead to the formation of microbialites we investigated the modern and Jurassic system using a multidisciplinary approach, including growth of field-sampled microbial mats under controlled conditions in the laboratory and field-based analysis of microbial communities, mat mineralogy and organic biomarker analysis. In this study, we focus on hydrocarbon biomarker data obtained from the surface of microbial mats actively growing in the intertidal zone of the modern system. By comparing these findings to data obtained from recently

  2. Urinary Concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolites in Maté Drinkers in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Antonio Barros; Metzdorf, Marcela; Metzdorf, Luiza; Ramalho, Marcos Paulo; Kavalco, Caroline; Etemadi, Arash; Pritchett, Natalie R.; Murphy, Gwen; Calafat, Antonia M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato Borges

    2017-01-01

    Background Consumption of maté, an infusion of the herb Ilex paraguariensis (yerba maté), is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but the carcinogenic mechanism is unclear. Commercial brands of yerba maté contain high levels of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are acquired during the traditional drying process. The purpose of this study was to characterize exposure to PAHs in maté drinkers over a wide range of maté consumption. Methods We recruited 244 adults who answered a questionnaire and collected a fasting spot urine specimen. We quantified urinary concentrations of seven PAH metabolites, and assessed associations between self-reported recent maté consumption and urinary PAH metabolites by multivariate regression. Results Recent maté consumption showed a significant dose-response association with 6 of 7 PAH metabolites in unadjusted models (p-for-trend <0.05). After adjustment for creatinine and potential confounders, concentrations of 2-naphthol, 1-hydroxyphenanthrene, and the sum of 2- and 3-hydroxyphenanthrene remained significantly associated with recent maté intake. The sum of the urinary concentrations of the phenanthrene metabolites was similar or higher among maté drinkers who did not smoke than among smokers who did not drink maté. Conclusions Urinary concentrations of PAH metabolites were significantly associated with self-reported amount of recent maté intake, and drinking maté increased urinary concentrations of some PAH metabolites as much as smoking cigarettes. Impact Drinking maté is a source of exposure to potentially carcinogenic PAHs, consistent with the hypothesis that the PAH content of maté may contribute to the increased risk of ESCC in maté drinkers. PMID:29263183

  3. Urinary Concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolites in Maté Drinkers in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Barros; Metzdorf, Marcela; Metzdorf, Luiza; Sousa, Marcos Paulo Ramalho; Kavalco, Caroline; Etemadi, Arash; Pritchett, Natalie R; Murphy, Gwen; Calafat, Antonia M; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Fagundes, Renato Borges

    2018-03-01

    Background: Consumption of maté , an infusion of the herb Ilex paraguariensis (yerba maté) , is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but the carcinogenic mechanism is unclear. Commercial brands of yerba maté contain high levels of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are acquired during the traditional drying process. The purpose of this study was to characterize exposure to PAHs in maté drinkers over a wide range of maté consumption. Methods: We recruited 244 adults who answered a questionnaire and collected a fasting spot urine specimen. We quantified urinary concentrations of seven PAH metabolites and assessed associations between self-reported recent maté consumption and urinary PAH metabolites by multivariate regression. Results: Recent maté consumption showed a significant dose-response association with 6 of 7 PAH metabolites in unadjusted models ( P trend < 0.05). After adjustment for creatinine and potential confounders, concentrations of 2-naphthol, 1-hydroxyphenanthrene, and the sum of 2- and 3-hydroxyphenanthrene remained significantly associated with recent maté intake. The sum of the urinary concentrations of the phenanthrene metabolites was similar or higher among maté drinkers who did not smoke than among smokers who did not drink maté Conclusions: Urinary concentrations of PAH metabolites were significantly associated with self-reported amounts of recent maté intake, and drinking maté increased urinary concentrations of some PAH metabolites as much as smoking cigarettes. Impact: Drinking maté is a source of exposure to potentially carcinogenic PAHs, consistent with the hypothesis that the PAH content of maté may contribute to the increased risk of ESCC in maté drinkers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(3); 331-7. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Lessons Learned From Google Glass: Telemedical Spark or Unfulfilled Promise?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jonathan; Ferniany, William; Guthrie, Barton; Parekh, Selene G; Ponce, Brent

    2016-04-01

    Wearable devices such as Google Glass could potentially be used in the health care setting to expand access and improve quality of care. This study aims to assess the demographics of Google Glass users in health care and determine the obstacles to using Google Glass by surveying those who are known to use the device. A 48-question survey was designed to assess demographics of users, technological limitations of Google Glass, and obstacles to implementation of the device. The physicians surveyed worked in various fields of health care, with 50% of the respondents being surgeons. Potential participants were found using an Internet search for physicians using Google Glass in their practice. Outcome measures were divided into demographic information of users, technological limitations of the device, and administrative obstacles. A 43.6% response rate was observed. The majority of users were male, assistant professors, in academic hospitals, and in the United States. Numerous technological limitations were observed by the majority, including device ergonomics, display location, video quality, and audio quality. Patient confidentiality and data security were the major concerns among administrative obstacles. Despite the potential of Google Glass, numerous obstacles exist that limit its use in health care. While Google Glass has been discontinued, the results of this study may be used to guide future designs of wearable devices. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Diverse Thermus species inhabit a single hot spring microbial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nold, S. C.; Ward, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Through an effort to characterize aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the Octopus Spring cyano-bacterial mat community, we cultivated four Thermus isolates with unique 16S rRNA sequences. Isolates clustered within existing Thermus clades, including those containing Thermus ruber, Thermus aquaticus, and a subgroup closely related to T. aquaticus. One Octopus Spring isolate is nearly identical (99.9% similar) to isolates from Iceland, and two others are closely related to a T. ruber isolated from Russia. Octopus Spring isolates similar to T. aquaticus and T. ruber exhibited optimal growth rates at high (65-70 degrees C) and low (50 degrees C) temperatures, respectively, with the most abundant species best adapted to the temperature of the habitat (50-55 degrees C). Our results display a diversity of Thermus genotypes defined by 16S rRNA within one hot spring microbial community. We suggest that specialization to temperature and perhaps other local environmental features controls the abundance of Thermus populations.

  6. Soil stabilization mat for lunar launch/landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, Amy L.; Cohenour, Mark W.; Ephraim, Daniel; Gochoel, Dennis; Roberts, Jefferson G.

    1990-01-01

    Facilities which are capable of handling frequent arrivals and departures of spaceships between Earth and a lunar colony are necessary. The facility must be able to provide these services with minimal interruption of operational activity within the colony. The major concerns associated with the space traffic are the dust and rock particles that will be kicked up by the rocket exhaust. As a result of the reduced gravitation of the Moon, these particles scatter over large horizontal distances. This flying debris will not only seriously interrupt the routine operations of the colony, but could cause damage to the equipment and facilities surrounding the launch site. An approach to overcome this problem is presented. A proposed design for a lunar take-off/landing mat is presented. This proposal goes beyond dealing with the usual problems of heat and load resistances associated with take-off and landing, by solving the problem of soil stabilization at the site. Through adequate stabilization, the problem of flying debris is eliminated.

  7. Glass import and production in Hispania during the early medieval period: The glass from Ciudad de Vascos (Toledo)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    One hundred and forty-one glass fragments from medieval Ciudad de Vascos (Toledo, Spain) were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The glasses fall into three types according to the fluxing agents used: mineral natron, soda-rich plant ash, and a combination of soda ash and lead. The natron glasses can be assigned to various established primary production groups of eastern Mediterranean provenance. Different types of plant ash glasses indicate differences in the silica source as well as the plant ash component, reflecting changing supply mechanisms. While the earlier plant ash groups can be related to Islamic glasses from the Near East, both in terms of typology and composition, the chemical signature of the later samples appear to be specific to glass from the Iberian Peninsula. This has important implications for our understanding of the emerging glass industry in Spain and the distribution patterns of glass groups and raw materials. The plant ash that was used for the Vascos glasses is rich in soda with low levels of potash, similar to ash produced in the eastern Mediterranean. It could therefore be possible that Levantine plant ash was imported and used in Islamic period glass workshops in Spain. Unlike central and northern Europe where an independent glass industry based on potassium-rich wood ash developed during the Carolingian period, the prevalence of soda ash and soda ash lead glass on the Iberian Peninsula indicates its commercial and technological interconnection with the Islamic east. Our study thus traces several stages leading to the development of a specifically Spanish primary glassmaking industry. PMID:28746419

  8. Formulation and acceptability of foam mat dried seabuckthorn (Hippophae salicifolia) leather.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Manisha; Sharma, P C; Sharma, Rakesh

    2013-02-01

    Technology for utilization of seabuckthorn berries for preparation of fruit leather/bar was optimized by modifying the foam mat drying technique. The conversion of seabuckthorn juice/pulp into foam was standardized by whipping the pulp after addition of CMC @ 0-3% at 5 °C and drying the resultant foam in dehydrator (55 ± 2 °C) to a moisture content of about 12-14%. The fruit bar prepared from sulphited juice/pulp wrapped in a butter paper followed by packing in polyethylene pouches (20 g) and stored at ambient temperature (14.6-26.1 °C) experienced least changes in quality attributes like ascorbic acid (1045.7 mg/100 g vs 997.5 mg/100 g) and carotenoids (80.4 mg/100 g vs 72.3 mg/100 g) as compared to the leather made from the unsulphited pulp. Storage studies indicate that fruit bars are mildly hygroscopic (0.46-0.65) and can be stored within the RH of 46-65% at room temperature.

  9. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  10. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  11. Lipophilic pigments from cyanobacterial (blue-green algal) and diatom mats in Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmisano, A. C.; Summons, R. E.; Cronin, S. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Lipophilic pigments were examined in microbial mat communities dominated by cyanobacteria in the intertidal zone and by diatoms in the subtidal and sublittoral zones of Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia. These microbial mats have evolutionary significance because of their similarity to lithfied stromatolites from the Proterozoic and Early Paleozoic eras. Fucoxanthin, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, beta-carotene, and chlorophylls a and c characterized the diatom mats, whereas cyanobacterial mats contained myxoxanthophyll, zeaxanthin, echinenone, beta-carotene, chlorophyll a and, in some cases, sheath pigment. The presence of bacteriochlorophyll a within the mats suggest a close association of photosynthetic bacteria with diatoms and cyanobacteria. The high carotenoids : chlorophyll a ratios (0.84-2.44 wt/wt) in the diatom mats suggest that carotenoids served a photoprotective function in this high light environment. By contrast, cyanobacterial sheath pigment may have largely supplanted the photoprotective role of carotenoids in the intertidal mats.

  12. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    DOEpatents

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  13. New High Index Optical Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Gerald E.; Greco, Edgar J.; DeJager, Donald; Wylot, James M.

    1982-02-01

    The pioneering work of Charles W. Frederick and George W. Morey on the design by Frederick of an "ideal photographic lens" using hypothetical glasses, and the subsequent discovery and development of rare-element borate glasses by Morey, has been resumed at Eastman Kodak. New ultra-high index, low dispersion crown glasses and companion flint glasses have been developed, based on the needs dictated by lens design studies for novel fast cine' and still camera lenses. These new glasses reduce the number of elements required in a lens while maintaining or improving lens performance. Composition studies leading to these new glasses will be discussed.

  14. Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) software package is an open source, MATLABSimulink toolbox (plug in) that can be used by industry professionals and academics for the development of thermodynamic and controls simulations.

  15. Carbonate mineralisation in sabkha microbial mats; a comparative study of field and laboratory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Kirsten E.; Paul, Andreas; Lessa Andrade, Luiza; Sherry, Angela; Lokier, Stephen; Head, Ian M.; van der Land, Cees

    2017-04-01

    Microbial mats and their lithified counterparts are some of the earliest evidence of life on Earth. The coastal sabkha in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, is a modern setting where microbial mats flourish in a hypersaline and arid environment. These microbial communities are composed of microbes such as cyanobacteria, thermoplasmata and sulphate-reducing bacteria. The mats thrive as they are protected from predators, which are excluded by the extreme environmental conditions. Microbial mats are highly reactive to change, with their microbial communities and geochemistry varying on a millimetre scale, likely controlling mineralisation processes. Exact carbonate mineralisation rates within coastal sabkha microbial mats have not to date been quantified. Defining the mineralisation pathways and knowledge of precise mineralisation rates will help to explain how these organosedimentary structures are retained in the rock record. A fundamental understanding of the role of microbial mats in the formation of different carbonate phases is important, yet there are also other practical implications. For example, structures observed in core from the oil-bearing Arab Formation have been likened to modern microbial mats in terms of structure and mineralogy. The depositional configuration and primary mineralogy generated by microbial mats may control syndepositional lithification and later diagenesis thereby influencing reservoir porosity and permeability. In order to constrain factors effecting mineralisation and early lithification, experimentation in a controlled laboratory environment is required. Parameters for experimentation have been established during fieldwork and were applied to a tank-based laboratory simulation of sabkha microbial mats. These parameters include light, salinity and cation and anion water chemistry, gas production chemistry and vertical mat growth. Parameters were measured weekly with sampling for mineralogical and microbial community analysis on a

  16. A niche for cyanobacteria producing chlorophyll f within a microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Satoshi; Miyashita, Hideaki

    2017-10-01

    Acquisition of additional photosynthetic pigments enables photosynthetic organisms to survive in particular niches. To reveal the ecological significance of chlorophyll (Chl) f, we investigated the distribution of Chl and cyanobacteria within two microbial mats. In a 7-mm-thick microbial mat beneath the running water of the Nakabusa hot spring, Japan, Chl f was only distributed 4.0-6.5 mm below the surface, where the intensity of far-red light (FR) was higher than that of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). In the same mat, two ecotypes of Synechococcus and two ecotypes of Chl f-producing Leptolyngbya were detected in the upper and deeper layers, respectively. Only the Leptolyngbya strains could grow when FR was the sole light source. These results suggest that the deeper layer of the microbial mat was a habitat for Chl f-producing cyanobacteria, and Chl f enabled them to survive in a habitat with little PAR.

  17. Marine Microbial Mats and the Search for Evidence of Life in Deep Time and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats in extensive seawater evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico, have been excellent subjects for microbial ecology research. The studies reviewed here have documented the steep and rapidly changing environmental gradients experienced by mat microorganisms and the very high rates of biogeochemical processes that they maintained. Recent genetic studies have revealed an enormous diversity of bacteria as well as the spatial distribution of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. These findings, together with emerging insights into the intimate interactions between these diverse populations, have contributed substantially to our understanding of the origins, environmental impacts, and biosignatures of photosynthetic microbial mats. The biosignatures (preservable cells, sedimentary fabrics, organic compounds, minerals, stable isotope patterns, etc.) potentially can serve as indicators of past life on early Earth. They also can inform our search for evidence of any life on Mars. Mars exploration has revealed evidence of evaporite deposits and thermal spring deposits; similar deposits on Earth once hosted ancient microbial mat ecosystems.

  18. Life in Oligotropic Desert Environments: Contrasting Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Two Microbial Mats with Metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla-Rosso, G.; Peimbert, M.; Olmedo, G.; Alcaraz, L. D.; Eguiarte, L. E.; Souza, V.

    2010-04-01

    The metagenomic analysis of two microbial mats from the oligotrophic waters in the Cuatrociéngas basin reveals large differences both at taxonomic and functional level. These are explained in terms of environmental stability and nutrient availability.

  19. Halloysite nanotube-based electrospun ceramic nanofibre mat: a novel support for zeolite membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuwen; Zeng, Jiaying; Lv, Dong; Gao, Jinqiang; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Shan; Li, Ruili; Wu, Jingshen

    2016-01-01

    Some key parameters of supports such as porosity, pore shape and size are of great importance for fabrication and performance of zeolite membranes. In this study, we fabricated millimetre-thick, self-standing electrospun ceramic nanofibre mats and employed them as a novel support for zeolite membranes. The nanofibre mats were prepared by electrospinning a halloysite nanotubes/polyvinyl pyrrolidone composite followed by a programmed sintering process. The interwoven nanofibre mats possess up to 80% porosity, narrow pore size distribution, low pore tortuosity and highly interconnected pore structure. Compared with the commercial α-Al2O3 supports prepared by powder compaction and sintering, the halloysite nanotube-based mats (HNMs) show higher flux, better adsorption of zeolite seeds, adhesion of zeolite membranes and lower Al leaching. Four types of zeolite membranes supported on HNMs have been successfully synthesized with either in situ crystallization or a secondary growth method, demonstrating good universality of HNMs for supporting zeolite membranes. PMID:28083098

  20. Controls on O2 Production in Cyanobacterial Mats and Implications for Earth's Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Gregory J.; Grim, Sharon L.; Klatt, Judith M.

    2018-05-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are widely assumed to have been globally significant hot spots of biogeochemistry and evolution during the Archean and Proterozoic, but little is known about their quantitative contributions to global primary productivity or Earth's oxygenation. Modern systems show that mat biogeochemistry is the outcome of concerted activities and intimate interactions between various microbial metabolisms. Emerging knowledge of the regulation of oxygenic and sulfide-driven anoxygenic photosynthesis by versatile cyanobacteria, and their interactions with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria, highlights how ecological and geochemical processes can control O2 production in cyanobacterial mats in unexpected ways. This review explores such biological controls on O2 production. We argue that the intertwined effects of light availability, redox geochemistry, regulation and competition of microbial metabolisms, and biogeochemical feedbacks result in emergent properties of cyanobacterial mat communities that are all critical yet largely overlooked mechanisms to potentially explain the protracted nature of Earth's oxygenation.

  1. Development of an active isolation mat based on dielectric elastomer stack actuators for mechanical vibration cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, Roman; Flittner, Klaus; Haus, Henry; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the development of an active isolation mat for cancelation of vibrations on sensitive devices with a mass of up to 500 gram. Vertical disturbing vibrations are attenuated actively while horizontal vibrations are damped passively. The dimensions of the investigated mat are 140 × 140 × 20 mm. The mat contains 5 dielectric elastomer stack actuators (DESA). The design and the optimization of active isolation mat are realized by ANSYS FEM software. The best performance shows a DESA with air cushion mounted on its circumference. Within the mounting encased air increases static and reduces dynamic stiffness. Experimental results show that vibrations with amplitudes up to 200 μm can be actively eliminated.

  2. Halloysite nanotube-based electrospun ceramic nanofibre mat: a novel support for zeolite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuwen; Zeng, Jiaying; Lv, Dong; Gao, Jinqiang; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Shan; Li, Ruili; Hong, Mei; Wu, Jingshen

    2016-12-01

    Some key parameters of supports such as porosity, pore shape and size are of great importance for fabrication and performance of zeolite membranes. In this study, we fabricated millimetre-thick, self-standing electrospun ceramic nanofibre mats and employed them as a novel support for zeolite membranes. The nanofibre mats were prepared by electrospinning a halloysite nanotubes/polyvinyl pyrrolidone composite followed by a programmed sintering process. The interwoven nanofibre mats possess up to 80% porosity, narrow pore size distribution, low pore tortuosity and highly interconnected pore structure. Compared with the commercial α-Al2O3 supports prepared by powder compaction and sintering, the halloysite nanotube-based mats (HNMs) show higher flux, better adsorption of zeolite seeds, adhesion of zeolite membranes and lower Al leaching. Four types of zeolite membranes supported on HNMs have been successfully synthesized with either in situ crystallization or a secondary growth method, demonstrating good universality of HNMs for supporting zeolite membranes.

  3. Regulatory Actions - Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page describes Federal regulatory actions.

  4. Regulatory Actions - Proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page includes supporting documentation and

  5. Fabrication and In Vitro/In Vivo Performance of Mucoadhesive Electrospun Nanofiber Mats Containing α-Mangostin.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to fabricate mucoadhesive electrospun nanofiber mats containing α-mangostin for the maintenance of oral hygiene and reduction of the bacterial growth that causes dental caries. Synthesized thiolated chitosan (CS-SH) blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was selected as the mucoadhesive polymer. α-Mangostin was incorporated into the CS-SH/PVA solution and electrospun to obtain nanofiber mats. Scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and tensile strength testing were used to characterize the mats. The swelling degree and mucoadhesion were also determined. The nanofiber mats were further evaluated regarding their α-mangostin content, in vitro α-mangostin release, antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity, in vivo performance, and stability. The results indicated that the mats were in the nanometer range. The α-mangostin was well incorporated into the mats, with an amorphous form. The mats showed suitable tensile strength, swelling, and mucoadhesive properties. The loading capacity increased when the initial amount of α-mangostin was increased. Rapid release of α-mangostin from the mats was achieved. Additionally, a fast bacterial killing rate occurred at the lowest concentration of nanofiber mats when α-mangostin was added to the mats. The mats were less cytotoxic after use for 72 h. Moreover, in vivo testing indicated that the mats could reduce the number of oral bacteria, with a good mouth feel. The mats maintained the amount of α-mangostin for 6 months. The results suggest that α-mangostin-loaded mucoadhesive electrospun nanofiber mats may be a promising material for oral care and the prevention of dental caries.

  6. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2013-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico—permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)—were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  7. Model of carbon fixation in microbial mats from 3,500 Myr ago to the present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1990-01-01

    Using modern microbial mats as analogs for ancient stromatolites, it is shown that the rate of carbon fixation is higher at the greater levels of atmospheric CO2 that were probably present in the past. It is suggested that carbon fixation in microbial mats was not carbon-limited during the early Precambrian, but became carbon-limited as the supply of inorganic carbon decreased. Carbon limitation led to a lower rate of carbon fixation, especially towards the end of the Precambrian.

  8. Engineering and Scientific Applications: Using MatLab(Registered Trademark) for Data Processing and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Syamal K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2011-01-01

    MatLab(TradeMark)(MATrix LABoratory) is a numerical computation and simulation tool that is used by thousands Scientists and Engineers in many countries. MatLab does purely numerical calculations, which can be used as a glorified calculator or interpreter programming language; its real strength is in matrix manipulations. Computer algebra functionalities are achieved within the MatLab environment using "symbolic" toolbox. This feature is similar to computer algebra programs, provided by Maple or Mathematica to calculate with mathematical equations using symbolic operations. MatLab in its interpreter programming language form (command interface) is similar with well known programming languages such as C/C++, support data structures and cell arrays to define classes in object oriented programming. As such, MatLab is equipped with most of the essential constructs of a higher programming language. MatLab is packaged with an editor and debugging functionality useful to perform analysis of large MatLab programs and find errors. We believe there are many ways to approach real-world problems; prescribed methods to ensure foregoing solutions are incorporated in design and analysis of data processing and visualization can benefit engineers and scientist in gaining wider insight in actual implementation of their perspective experiments. This presentation will focus on data processing and visualizations aspects of engineering and scientific applications. Specifically, it will discuss methods and techniques to perform intermediate-level data processing covering engineering and scientific problems. MatLab programming techniques including reading various data files formats to produce customized publication-quality graphics, importing engineering and/or scientific data, organizing data in tabular format, exporting data to be used by other software programs such as Microsoft Excel, data presentation and visualization will be discussed.

  9. High Areal Capacity Si/LiCoO 2 Batteries from Electrospun Composite Fiber Mats

    SciTech Connect

    Self, Ethan C.; Naguib, Michael; Ruther, Rose E.

    Here, freestanding nanofiber mat Li-ion battery anodes containing Si nanoparticles, carbon black, and poly(acrylic acid) (Si/C/PAA) are prepared using electrospinning. The mats are compacted to a high fiber volume fraction (~0.85), and interfiber contacts are welded by exposing the mat to methanol vapor. A compacted+welded fiber mat anode containing 40 wt % Si exhibits high capacities of 1,484 mA h g -1 (3,500 mA h gmore » $$-1\\atop{Si}$$) at 0.1 C and 489 mAh g -1 at 1 C and good cycling stability (e.g., 73% capacity retention over 50 cycles). Post-mortem analysis of the fiber mats shows that the overall electrode structure is preserved during cycling. Whereas many nanostructured Si anodes are hindered by their low active material loadings and densities, thick, densely packed Si/C/PAA fiber mat anodes reported here have high areal and volumetric capacities (e.g., 4.5 mA h cm -2 and 750 mA h cm -3, respectively). A full cell containing an electrospun Si/C/PAA anode and electrospun LiCoO 2-based cathode has a high specific energy density of 270 Wh kg -1. The excellent performance of the electrospun Si/C/PAA fiber mat anodes is attributed to the: (i) PAA binder which interacts with the SiO x surface of Si nanoparticles and (ii) high material loading, high fiber volume fraction, and welded interfiber contacts of the electrospun mats« less

  10. Sedimentary Parameters Controlling Occurrence and Preservation of Microbial Mats in Siliciclastic Depositional Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffke, Nora; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2001-01-01

    Shallow-marine, siliciclastic depositional systems are governed by physical sedimentary processes. Mineral precipitation or penecontemporaneous cementation play minor roles. Today, coastal siliciclastic environments may be colonized by a variety of epibenthic, mat-forming cyanobacteria. Studies on microbial mats showed that they are not randomly distributed in modern tidal environments. Distribution and abundancy is mainly function of a particular sedimentary facies. Fine-grained sands composed of "clear" (translucent) quartz particles constitute preferred substrates for cyanobacteria. Mat-builders also favor sites characterized by moderate hydrodynamic flow regimes, which permit biomass enrichment and construction of mat fabrics without lethal burial of mat populations by fine sediments. A comparable facies relationship can be observed in ancient siliciclastic shelf successions from the terminal Neoproterozoic Nama Group, Namibia. Wrinkle structures that record microbial mats are present but sparsely distributed in mid- to inner shelf sandstones of the Nudaus Formation. The sporadic distribution of these structures reflects both the narrow ecological window that governs mat development and the distinctive taphonomic conditions needed to preserve the structures. These observations caution that statements about changing mat abundance across the Proterozoic-Cambrian boundary must be firmly rooted in paleoenvironmental and taphonomic analysis. Understanding the factors that influence the formation and preservation of microbial structures in siliciclastic regimes can facilitate exploration for biological signatures in Earth's oldest rocks. Moreover, insofar as these structures can be preserved on bedding surfaces and are not easily mimicked by physical processes, they constitute a set of biological markers that can be searched for on Mars by remotely controlled rovers.

  11. High Areal Capacity Si/LiCoO 2 Batteries from Electrospun Composite Fiber Mats

    DOE PAGES

    Self, Ethan C.; Naguib, Michael; Ruther, Rose E.; ...

    2017-03-24

    Here, freestanding nanofiber mat Li-ion battery anodes containing Si nanoparticles, carbon black, and poly(acrylic acid) (Si/C/PAA) are prepared using electrospinning. The mats are compacted to a high fiber volume fraction (~0.85), and interfiber contacts are welded by exposing the mat to methanol vapor. A compacted+welded fiber mat anode containing 40 wt % Si exhibits high capacities of 1,484 mA h g -1 (3,500 mA h gmore » $$-1\\atop{Si}$$) at 0.1 C and 489 mAh g -1 at 1 C and good cycling stability (e.g., 73% capacity retention over 50 cycles). Post-mortem analysis of the fiber mats shows that the overall electrode structure is preserved during cycling. Whereas many nanostructured Si anodes are hindered by their low active material loadings and densities, thick, densely packed Si/C/PAA fiber mat anodes reported here have high areal and volumetric capacities (e.g., 4.5 mA h cm -2 and 750 mA h cm -3, respectively). A full cell containing an electrospun Si/C/PAA anode and electrospun LiCoO 2-based cathode has a high specific energy density of 270 Wh kg -1. The excellent performance of the electrospun Si/C/PAA fiber mat anodes is attributed to the: (i) PAA binder which interacts with the SiO x surface of Si nanoparticles and (ii) high material loading, high fiber volume fraction, and welded interfiber contacts of the electrospun mats« less

  12. NASA Planetary Science Division's Instrument Development Programs, PICASSO and MatISSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The Planetary Science Division (PSD) has combined several legacy instrument development programs into just two. The Planetary Instrument Concepts Advancing Solar System Observations (PICASSO) program funds the development of low TRL instruments and components. The Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Observations (MatISSE) program funds the development of instruments in the mid-TRL range. The strategy of PSD instrument development is to develop instruments from PICASSO to MatISSE to proposing for mission development.

  13. Sway Area and Velocity Correlated With MobileMat Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) Scores.

    PubMed

    Caccese, Jaclyn B; Buckley, Thomas A; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2016-08-01

    The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) is often used for sport-related concussion balance assessment. However, moderate intratester and intertester reliability may cause low initial sensitivity, suggesting that a more objective balance assessment method is needed. The MobileMat BESS was designed for objective BESS scoring, but the outcome measures must be validated with reliable balance measures. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to compare MobileMat BESS scores to linear and nonlinear measures of balance. Eighty-eight healthy collegiate student-athletes (age: 20.0 ± 1.4 y, height: 177.7 ± 10.7 cm, mass: 74.8 ± 13.7 kg) completed the MobileMat BESS. MobileMat BESS scores were compared with 95% area, sway velocity, approximate entropy, and sample entropy. MobileMat BESS scores were significantly correlated with 95% area for single-leg (r = .332) and tandem firm (r = .474), and double-leg foam (r = .660); and with sway velocity for single-leg (r = .406) and tandem firm (r = .601), and double-leg (r = .575) and single-leg foam (r = .434). MobileMat BESS scores were not correlated with approximate or sample entropy. MobileMat BESS scores were low to moderately correlated with linear measures, suggesting the ability to identify changes in the center of mass-center of pressure relationship, but not higher-order processing associated with nonlinear measures. These results suggest that the MobileMat BESS may be a clinically-useful tool that provides objective linear balance measures.

  14. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; ...

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico$-$ permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)$-$were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H 2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suitemore » of organic acids. H 2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO 2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H 2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.« less

  15. MatProps: Material Properties Database and Associated Access Library

    SciTech Connect

    Durrenberger, J K; Becker, R C; Goto, D M

    2007-08-13

    Coefficients for analytic constitutive and equation of state models (EOS), which are used by many hydro codes at LLNL, are currently stored in a legacy material database (Steinberg, UCRL-MA-106349). Parameters for numerous materials are available through this database, and include Steinberg-Guinan and Steinberg-Lund constitutive models for metals, JWL equations of state for high explosives, and Mie-Gruniesen equations of state for metals. These constitutive models are used in most of the simulations done by ASC codes today at Livermore. Analytic EOSs are also still used, but have been superseded in many cases by tabular representations in LEOS (http://leos.llnl.gov). Numerous advanced constitutivemore » models have been developed and implemented into ASC codes over the past 20 years. These newer models have more physics and better representations of material strength properties than their predecessors, and therefore more model coefficients. However, a material database of these coefficients is not readily available. Therefore incorporating these coefficients with those of the legacy models into a portable database that could be shared amongst codes would be most welcome. The goal of this paper is to describe the MatProp effort at LLNL to create such a database and associated access library that could be used by codes throughout the DOE complex and beyond. We have written an initial version of the MatProp database and access library and our DOE/ASC code ALE3D (Nichols et. al., UCRL-MA-152204) is able to import information from the database. The database, a link to which exists on the Sourceforge server at LLNL, contains coefficients for many materials and models (see Appendix), and includes material parameters in the following categories--flow stress, shear modulus, strength, damage, and equation of state. Future versions of the Matprop database and access library will include the ability to read and write material descriptions that can be exchanged between codes

  16. Telangiectatic Matting is Associated with Hypersensitivity and a Bleeding Tendency.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Pooja; Lim, Jerrick; Paver, Ian; Connor, David E; Parsi, Kurosh

    2018-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the pathogenesis of telangiectatic matting (TM) and identify possible risk factors. This study had two parts. The clinical records of consecutive patients were retrospectively analysed to identify risk factors for TM. In the second part, the haemostatic and coagulation profile of the subset of patients with TM were analysed and compared with controls using standard coagulation tests, platelet function and a global assay of coagulation (rotational thromboelastometry, ROTEM). In 352 consecutive patients presenting to a phlebology practice, 25 patients had TM (7.1%). All 25 patients were female with the median age of 45 (27-57) years. A comprehensive medical history was taken. Among 27 possible risk factors assessed, statistically significant associations included recurrent epistaxis, easy bruising, hypersensitivity (eczema, hives, hay fever, and rhinitis), previous treatment with sclerotherapy or endovenous laser for lower limb veins, and a family history of telangiectasias. Variables not associated with TM included oral contraceptive intake, hormone replacement therapy, and age. The haemostatic and coagulation profile of 12 patients (6 male and 6 female) with TM did not differ significantly from those without TM. TM is associated with both hypersensitivity and a bleeding tendency. This study revealed no significant increase in the incidence of haemostatic abnormalities in patients with TM compared with the control group. Given the significant association with hypersensitivity disorders, the underlying mast cell hyper-reactivity may contribute to both hypersensitivity and a bleeding tendency and predispose patients to TM. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial Mat Compositional and Functional Sensitivity to Environmental Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Preisner, Eva C.; Fichot, Erin B.; Norman, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of ecosystems to adapt to environmental perturbations depends on the duration and intensity of change and the overall biological diversity of the system. While studies have indicated that rare microbial taxa may provide a biological reservoir that supports long-term ecosystem stability, how this dynamic population is influenced by environmental parameters remains unclear. In this study, a microbial mat ecosystem located on San Salvador Island, The Bahamas was used as a model to examine how environmental disturbance affects the protein synthesis potential (PSP) of rare and abundant archaeal and bacterial communities and how these changes impact potential biogeochemical processes. This ecosystem experienced a large shift in salinity (230 to 65 g kg-1) during 2011–2012 following the landfall of Hurricane Irene on San Salvador Island. High throughput sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA and rRNA genes from samples before and after the pulse disturbance showed significant changes in the diversity and PSP of abundant and rare taxa, suggesting overall compositional and functional sensitivity to environmental change. In both archaeal and bacterial communities, while the majority of taxa showed low PSP across conditions, the overall community PSP increased post-disturbance, with significant shifts occurring among abundant and rare taxa across and within phyla. Broadly, following the post-disturbance reduction in salinity, taxa within Halobacteria decreased while those within Crenarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, Thermoplasmata, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria, increased in abundance and PSP. Quantitative PCR of genes and transcripts involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling showed concomitant shifts in biogeochemical cycling potential. Post-disturbance conditions increased the expression of genes involved in N-fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and sulfate reduction. Together, our findings show complex community adaptation to environmental change and help

  18. Using polymerization, glass structure, and quasicrystalline theory to produce high level radioactive borosilicate glass remotely: a 20+ year legacy

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in borosilicate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt a highly variable waste with some glass forming additives such as SiO 2 and B 2O 3 in the form of a premelted frit and pour the molten mixture into a stainless steel canister. Seal the canister before moisture can enter themore » canister (10’ tall by 2’ in diameter) so the canister does not corrode from the inside out. Glass has also become widely used for HLW is that due to the fact that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in the structure of glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and hazardous species in the waste. The SRO and MRO have also been found to govern the melt properties such as viscosity and resistivity of the melt and the crystallization potential and solubility of certain species. Furthermore, the molecular structure of the glass also controls the glass durability, i.e. the contaminant/radionuclide release, by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to HLW waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150°C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as 99Tc, 137Cs, and 129I. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models were developed based on the molecular structure of glass, polymerization theory of glass, and quasicrystalline theory of glass crystallization. These models create a glass which is durable, pourable, and processable with 95% accuracy without knowing from batch to

  19. Using polymerization, glass structure, and quasicrystalline theory to produce high level radioactive borosilicate glass remotely: a 20+ year legacy

    DOE PAGES

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    2017-03-27

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in borosilicate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt a highly variable waste with some glass forming additives such as SiO 2 and B 2O 3 in the form of a premelted frit and pour the molten mixture into a stainless steel canister. Seal the canister before moisture can enter themore » canister (10’ tall by 2’ in diameter) so the canister does not corrode from the inside out. Glass has also become widely used for HLW is that due to the fact that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in the structure of glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and hazardous species in the waste. The SRO and MRO have also been found to govern the melt properties such as viscosity and resistivity of the melt and the crystallization potential and solubility of certain species. Furthermore, the molecular structure of the glass also controls the glass durability, i.e. the contaminant/radionuclide release, by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to HLW waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150°C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as 99Tc, 137Cs, and 129I. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models were developed based on the molecular structure of glass, polymerization theory of glass, and quasicrystalline theory of glass crystallization. These models create a glass which is durable, pourable, and processable with 95% accuracy without knowing from batch to

  20. Medical Surveillance Technology - Clinical Looking Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    0016 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ms Susan Mia McCroskey, Mr. Noah Geberer , Dr. Eran Bellin 5e. TASK NUMBER...Chowdhury, Soma 0-40% Edwards, Richie 25-30% Geberer , Noah 60-70% Golden, Joe 15-30% Lee, William 0-15% McCroskey, Mia 29-50% Muresan, Mircea 0

  1. Vitamin E-loaded silk fibroin nanofibrous mats fabricated by green process for skin care application.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaoyue; Fan, Linpeng; He, Chuanglong; Zhang, Kuihua; Mo, Xiumei; Wang, Hongsheng

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, we reported fabrication and skin benefit of a novel vitamin E (VE)-loaded silk fibroin (SF) nanofibrous mats. RRR-α-Tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (VE TPGS), a water-soluble derivative of VE, was incorporated into SF nanofiber successfully by aqua solution electrospinning for the first time. Morphology of the composite nanofibers changed with the different amount of VE TPGS: a ribbon-like shape for lower loading dose of VE TPGS, while a round shape for higher loading dose (more than 4% (wt/wt) based on the weight of SF). After treated with 75% (v/v) ethanol vapor, the composite nanofibrous mats showed an excellent water-resistant ability. In vitro study disclosed a sustained release behavior of VE TPGS disassociated from the nanofibrous mats. The mouse skin fibroblasts (L929 cells) cultured on the VE-loaded SF nanofibrous mats spread and proliferated much better than on cover slips. Moreover, the incorporation of VE TPGS was found strengthening the ability of SF nanofibrous mats on protecting the cells against oxidation stress induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. Our data presented impressive skin benefits of this VE-loaded SF nanofibrous mats, suggesting a promising applicative potential of this novel product on personal skin care, tissue regeneration and other related area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ecological succession leads to chemosynthesis in mats colonizing wood in sea water.

    PubMed

    Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Dupraz, Marlène; Le Bris, Nadine; Petetin, Carole; Rose, Christophe; West, Nyree J; Galand, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    Chemosynthetic mats involved in cycling sulfur compounds are often found in hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and whale falls. However, there are only few records of wood fall mats, even though the presence of hydrogen sulfide at the wood surface should create a perfect niche for sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report the growth of microbial mats on wood incubated under conditions that simulate the Mediterranean deep-sea temperature and darkness. We used amplicon and metagenomic sequencing combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to test whether a microbial succession occurs during mat formation and whether the wood fall mats present chemosynthetic features. We show that the wood surface was first colonized by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Arcobacter genus after only 30 days of immersion. Subsequently, the number of sulfate reducers increased and the dominant Arcobacter phylotype changed. The ecological succession was reflected by a change in the metabolic potential of the community from chemolithoheterotrophs to potential chemolithoautotrophs. Our work provides clear evidence for the chemosynthetic nature of wood fall ecosystems and demonstrates the utility to develop experimental incubation in the laboratory to study deep-sea chemosynthetic mats.

  3. Reliability, agreement, and validity of digital weighing scale with MatScan in limb load measurement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil N S; Omar, Baharudin; Htwe, Ohnmar; Joseph, Leonard H; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Jafarzedah Esfehani, Ali; Min, Lee L

    2014-01-01

    Limb loading measurements serve as an objective evaluation of asymmetrical weight bearing in the lower limb. Digital weighing scales (DWSs) could be used in clinical settings for measurement of static limb loading. However, ambiguity exists whether limb loading measurements of DWSs are comparable with a standard tool such as MatScan. A cross-sectional study composed of 33 nondisabled participants was conducted to investigate the reliability, agreement, and validity of DWSs with MatScan in static standing. Amounts of weight distribution and plantar pressure on the individual lower limb were measured using two DWSs (A, B) and MatScan during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. The results showed that intra- and interrater reliability (3, 1) were excellent (0.94-0.97) within and between DWS A and B. Bland-Altman plot revealed good agreement between DWS and MatScan in EO and EC conditions. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was significant and identified as 0.68 (p = 0.01). The measurements obtained with DWSs are valid and in agreement with MatScan measurements. Hence, DWSs could be used interchangeably with MatScan and could provide clinicians an objective measurement of limb loading suitable for clinical settings.

  4. Protein and Bacterial Antifouling Behavior of Melt-Coextruded Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Eun; Zhang, Cong; Advincula, Abigail A; Baer, Eric; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2016-04-13

    Antifouling surfaces are important for biomedical devices to prevent secondary infections and mitigate the effects of the foreign body response. Herein, we describe melt-coextruded poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber mats grafted with antifouling polymers. Nonwoven PCL fiber mats are produced using a multilayered melt coextrusion process followed by high-pressure hydroentanglement to yield porous patches. The resulting fiber mats show submicrometer cross-sectional fiber dimensions and yield pore sizes that were nearly uniform, with a mean pore size of 1.6 ± 0.9 μm. Several antifouling polymers, including hydrophilic, zwitterionic, and amphipathic molecules, are grafted to the surface of the mats using a two-step procedure that includes photochemistry followed by the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. Fiber mats are evaluated using separate adsorption tests for serum proteins and E. coli. The results indicate that poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-co-(trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (poly(OEGMEMA-co-TFEMA)) grafted mats exhibit approximately 85% less protein adhesion and 97% less E. coli adsorption when compared to unmodified PCL fibermats. In dynamic antifouling testing, the amphiphilic fluorous polymer surface shows the highest flux and highest rejection value of foulants. The work presented within has implications on the high-throughput production of antifouling microporous patches for medical applications.

  5. Molecular Diversity of Cyanobacteria Inhabiting Coniform Structures and Surrounding Mat in a Yellowstone Hot Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Evan; Nash, Cody Z.; Vogler, Detlev R.; Cullings, K. W.

    2005-02-01

    Lithified coniform structures are common within cyanobacterial mats in Yellowstone National Park hot springs. It is unknown whether these structures and the mats from which they develop are inhabited by the same cyanobacterial populations. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA was used to determine whether (1) three different morphological types of lithified coniform structures are inhabited by different cyanobacterial species, (2) these species are partitioned along a vertical gradient of these structures, and (3) lithified and non-lithified sections of mat are inhabited by different cyanobacterial species. Our results, based on multiple samplings, indicate that the cyanobacterial community compositions in the three lithified morphological types were identical and lacked any vertical differentiation. However, lithified and non-lithified portions of the same mat were inhabited by distinct and different populations of cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria inhabiting lithified structures included at least one undefined Oscillatorialean taxon, which may represent the dominant cyanobacteria genus in lithified coniform stromatolites, Phormidium, three Synechococcus-like species, and two unknown cyanobacterial taxa. In contrast, the surrounding mats contained four closely related Synechococcus-like species. Our results indicate that the distribution of lithified coniform stromatolites may be dependent on the presence of one or more microorganisms, which are phylogenetically different from those inhabiting surrounding non-lithified mats.

  6. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, A.; Ramsing, N.B.; Habicht, K.

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 7} cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1}. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR andmore » denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO{sub 2} from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO{sub 2} demand of the mat.« less

  7. Close association of active nitrifiers with Beggiatoa mats covering deep-sea hydrothermal sediments.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Matthias; de Beer, Dirk; Lavik, Gaute; Peplies, Jörg; Mußmann, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sediments in the Guaymas Basin are covered by microbial mats that are dominated by nitrate-respiring and sulphide-oxidizing Beggiatoa. The presence of these mats strongly correlates with sulphide- and ammonium-rich fluids venting from the subsurface. Because ammonium and oxygen form opposed gradients at the sediment surface, we hypothesized that nitrification is an active process in these Beggiatoa mats. Using biogeochemical and molecular methods, we measured nitrification and determined the diversity and abundance of nitrifiers. Nitrification rates ranged from 74 to 605 μmol N l(-1)  mat day(-1), which exceeded those previously measured in hydrothermal plumes and other deep-sea habitats. Diversity and abundance analyses of archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A genes, archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA pyrotags and fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing microorganisms were associated with Beggiatoa mats. Intriguingly, we observed cells of bacterial and potential thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidizers attached to narrow, Beggiatoa-like filaments. Such a close spatial coupling of nitrification and nitrate respiration in mats of large sulphur bacteria is novel and may facilitate mat-internal cycling of nitrogen, thereby reducing loss of bioavailable nitrogen in deep-sea sediments. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Electron microscopy study of microbial mat in the North Fiji basin hydrothermal vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Kim, J. W.; Lee, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems consisting of hydrothermal vent, hydrothermal sediment and microbial mat are widely spread around the ocean, particularly spreading axis, continental margin and back-arc basin. Scientists have perceived that the hydrothermal systems, which reflect the primeval earth environment, are one of the best places to reveal the origin of life and extensive biogeochemical process of microbe-mineral interaction. In the present study multiline of analytical methods (X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)) were utilized to investigate the mineralogy/chemistry of microbe-mineral interaction in hydrothermal microbial mat. Microbial mat samples were recovered by Canadian scientific submersible ROPOS on South Pacific North Fiji basin KIOST hydrothermal vent expedition 1602. XRD analysis showed that red-colored microbial mat contains Fe-oxides and Fe-oxyhydroxides. Various morphologies of minerals in the red-colored microbial mat observed by SEM are mainly showed sheath shaped, resembled with Leptothrix microbial structure, stalks shaped, similar with Marioprofundus microbial structure and globule shaped microbial structures. They are also detected with DNA analysis. The cross sectional observation of microbial structures encrusted with Fe-oxide and Fe-oxyhydroxide at a nano scale by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technique was developed to verify the structural/biogeochemical properties in the microbe-mineral interaction. Systematic nano-scale measurements on the biomineralization in the microbial mat leads the understandings of biogeochemical environments around the hydrothermal vent.

  9. Late Archean mineralised cyanobacterial mats and their modern analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmierczak, J.; Altermann, W.; Kremer, B.; Kempe, S.; Eriksson, P. G.

    2008-09-01

    ,c) reminiscent of common sheaths (glycocalix), typical for coccoidal colonial (pseudoparenchymatous) entophysalidacean or pleurocapsalean cyanobacteria (Fig. 2d-f). The remains of the coccoid sheaths and capsules are visible as a system of rimmed subglobular or irregularly polygonal pits separated from adjacent pits by 2-3 μm thick walls. Microprobe analyses show that the interiors of the pits are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate whereas the rims and walls of calcium carbonate with high admixture of silicates (mostly Al-Fe clay-like silicates) and dolomite. High magnification images of rims and walls confirm the microprobe data indicating authigenic character of the minerals forming both the carbonate infilling the pits interiors (CaCO3) and their rims and walls (CaCO3 + Al-Fe silicates + dolomite). EPSC Abstracts, Vol. 3, EPSC2008-A-00493, 2008 European Planetary Science Congress, Author(s) 2008 It seems that carbonates were the first mineral phase filling the spaces remained after the plasmolysis of the cyanobacterial cell contents, whereas the formation of silicates within the exopolysaccharides forming the bulk of the sheaths and capsules was a later diagenetic process. Microprobe analyses of mineralised modern coccoid cyanobacterial mats forming tower-like structures in the highly alkaline Lake Van, Turkey [3,4] display a set of elements indicative for the presence of authigenic carbonate and silicate minerals which are almost identical with that occurring in the studied Neoarchean samples. Also the optical and SEM images of polished and etched platelets of permineralised Lake Van microbialites are strikingly similar (Fig. 2d-f). Similarly as in modern cyanobacterial and other microbial mats, the process of early post mortem mineralisation, in the case of the Nauga Formation, was most probably associated with the action of heterotrophic bacteria upon the dead cyanobacterial biomass. Heterotrophic bacteria occupying EPS layers of living and dead cyanobacterial

  10. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  11. Noise and Ionic Conductivity in Glass Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Benjamin; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric; Stein, Derek

    2015-03-01

    Ion transport in nanochannels is relevant to processes in biology and has technological applications like batteries, fuel cells, and water desalination. We report experimental studies of the ionic conductance and noise characteristics of pulled glass capillaries with openings on the order of 200 nanometers. We employed an AC measurement technique to probe very low frequency fluctuations in the conductivity and to test a theory attributing these to chemical fluctuations in the surface charge density of the glass. We also investigate Hooge's empirical description of the noise power spectrum and its relationship to current rectification observed in nanochannels in the surface dominated ``Dukhin'' regime. Finally, we test the effects of anion and cation mobility on the direction and magnitude of the observed rectification. Research supported by NSF Grant DMR-1409577 and Oxford Nanopore Technologies.

  12. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Assessment, development, and testing of glass for blast environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Sarah Jill

    2003-06-01

    Glass can have lethal effects including fatalities and injuries when it breaks and then flies through the air under blast loading (''the glass problem''). One goal of this program was to assess the glass problem and solutions being pursued to mitigate it. One solution to the problem is the development of new glass technology that allows the strength and fragmentation to be controlled or selected depending on the blast performance specifications. For example the glass could be weak and fail, or it could be strong and survive, but it must perform reliably. Also, once it fails it should produce fragmentsmore » of a controlled size. Under certain circumstances it may be beneficial to have very small fragments, in others it may be beneficial to have large fragments that stay together. The second goal of this program was to evaluate the performance (strength, reliability, and fragmentation) of Engineered Stress Profile (ESP) glass under different loading conditions. These included pseudo-static strength and pressure tests and free-field blast tests. The ultimate goal was to provide engineers and architects with a glass whose behavior under blast loading is less lethal. A near-term benefit is a new approach for improving the reliability of glass and modifying its fracture behavior.« less

  14. NMR Spectroscopy in Glass Science: A Review of the Elements

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The study of inorganic glass structure is critically important for basic glass science and especially the commercial development of glasses for a variety of technological uses. One of the best means by which to achieve this understanding is through application of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which has a long and interesting history. This technique is element specific, but highly complex, and thus, one of the many inquiries made by non-NMR specialists working in glass science is what type of information and which elements can be studied by this method. This review presents a summary of the different elements that are amenable to the study of glasses by NMR spectroscopy and provides examples of the type of atomic level structural information that can be achieved. It serves to inform the non-specialist working in glass science and technology about some of the benefits and challenges involved in the study of inorganic glass structure using modern, readily-available NMR methods. PMID:29565328

  15. Slumped glass optics development with pressure assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Hołyszko, J.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-07-01

    Thin glass mirrors are a viable solution to build future X-ray telescopes with high angular resolution and large collecting area. This approach is very attractive for the optics implementation of future X-ray astronomy projects like the X-ray Surveyor Missions in USA, the XTP mission in China and the FORCE mission in Japan (all this projects could have an European participation). In the case of the X-ray Surveyor Mission, where a sub-arcsec angular resolution is requested, the use of actuators or post correction with sputtering deposition is envisaged. The hot slumping assisted by pressure is an innovative technology developed in our laboratories to replicate a mould figure. Our hot slumping process is based on thin substrates of Eagle XG glass to be thermally formed on Zerodur K20 moulds. This technology is coupled with an integration process able to damp low frequency errors. A continuous improvement in the reduction of the mid-frequency errors led to slumped glass foils with a potential angular resolution evaluated from the metrological data of a few arcsec. High frequency errors have been for a long time a critical point of our technology. In particular, the pressure assistance was leading to a partial replication of the mould micro-roughness, causing a non-negligible contribution to the Point Spread Function (PSF), in the incidence angle and X-ray energy range of operation. Therefore, we developed a new process to further reduce the micro-roughness of slumped glass foils, making now the technology attractive also for telescopes sensitive at higher X-ray energies. This paper provides the latest status of our research.

  16. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    1999-01-01

    improvements in glass processing technology on earth, with the potential for creating new high performance glasses and glass-ceramics.

  17. Recycled Glass and Dredged Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    stations, and is either source-separated or co-mingled with plastics, aluminum cans, ceramics , or colored glass containers. In the United States in...anything other than container glass ). The debris may contain contaminants including ceramics (from dishware, pottery, window glass , light bulbs...ERDC TN-DOER-T8 March 2007 Recycled Glass and Dredged Materials by Landris T. Lee, Jr. PURPOSE: This technical note explores the concepts

  18. Risk assessment of medically assisted reproduction and advanced maternal ages in the development of Prader-Willi syndrome due to UPD(15)mat.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, K; Murakami, N; Fukami, M; Kagami, M; Nagai, T; Ogata, T

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have suggested that disomic oocyte-mediated uniparental disomy 15 (UPD(15)mat) is increased in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). However, it remains unknown whether the increase is primarily due to MAR procedure itself or advanced maternal childbearing ages as a predisposing factor for the disomic oocyte production. To examine this matter, we studied 122 naturally conceived PWS patients (PWS-NC group) and 13 MAR-conceived patients (PWS-MAR group). The relative frequency of disomic oocyte-mediated UPD(15)mat was significantly higher in PWS-MAR group than in PWS-NC group (7/13 vs 20/122, p = 0.0045), and the maternal childbearing ages were significantly higher in PWS-MAR group than in PWS-NC group [median (range), 38 (26-45) vs 30 (19-42), p = 0.0015]. However, the logistic regression analysis revealed no significant association between the occurrence of disomic oocyte-mediated UPD(15)mat and MAR, after adjusting for childbearing age (p = 0.25). Consistent with this, while the frequency of assisted reproductive technology (ART)-conceived livebirths was higher in the PWS patients than in the Japanese general population (6.4% vs 1.1%, p = 0.00018), the distribution of childbearing ages was significantly skewed to the increased ages in the PWS patients (p < 2.2 × 10(-16) ). These results argue against a positive association of MAR procedure itself with the development of UPD(15)mat. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stained-Glass Pastels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The author has always liked the look of stained-glass windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…

  20. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  1. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision problems; this includes prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses, but also doing eye surgery for other eye-related problems. An optometrist ... them clean. The most important thing about contact lenses is good hygiene to prevent infections in your eye. But the really fun part of new glasses ...

  2. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    PubMed

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  3. What Glass Ceiling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  4. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  5. Glasses for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... may play an important role in ensuring normal development of vision. The main reasons a child may need glasses are: • To provide better vision, so that a child may function better in his/her environment • To help straighten the eyes when they are ...

  6. HiMAT Subscale Research Vehicle Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight, Close-up View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A close-up view of the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) research vehicle attached to a wing pylon on NASA's B-52 mothership during a 1980 test flight. The HiMAT used sharply swept-back wings and a canard configuration to test possible technology for advanced fighters. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported

  7. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  8. Glass for Solid State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Glass film has low intrinsic compressive stress for isolating active layers of magnetic-bubble and other solid-state devices. Solid-state device structure incorporates low-stress glasses as barrier and spacer layers. Glass layers mechanically isolate substrate, conductor, and nickel/iron layers.

  9. The calcium carbonate saturation state in cyanobacterial mats throughout Earth’s history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Giovanni

    2008-12-01

    Through early lithification, cyanobacterial mats produced vast amounts of CaCO 3 on Precambrian carbonate platforms (before 540 Myr ago). The superposition of lithified cyanobacterial mats forms internally laminated, macroscopic structures known as stromatolites. Similar structures can be important constituents of Phanerozoic carbonate platforms (540 Myr to present). Early lithification in modern marine cyanobacterial mats is thought to be driven by a metabolically-induced increase of the CaCO 3 saturation state ( Ω) in the mat. However, it is uncertain which microbial processes produce the Ω increase and to which extent similar Ω shifts were possible in Precambrian oceans whose chemistry differed from that of the modern ocean. I developed a numerical model that calculates Ω in cyanobacterial mats and used it to tackle these questions. The model is first applied to simulate Ω in modern calcifying cyanobacterial mats forming at Highborne Cay (Bahamas); it shows that while cyanobacterial photosynthesis increases Ω considerably, sulphate reduction has a small and opposite effect on mat Ω because it is coupled to H 2S oxidation with O 2 which produces acidity. Numerical experiments show that the magnitude of the Ω increase is proportional to DIC in DIC-limited waters (DIC < 3-10 mM), is proportional to pH when ambient water DIC is not limiting and always proportional to the concentration of Ca 2+ in ambient waters. With oceanic Ca 2+ concentrations greater than a few millimolar, an appreciable increase in Ω occurs in mats under a wide range of environmental conditions, including those supposed to exist in the oceans of the past 2.8 Gyr. The likely lithological expression is the formation of the microsparitic stromatolite microtexture—indicative of CaCO 3 precipitation within the mats under the control of microbial activity—which is found in carbonate rocks spanning from the Precambrian to recent. The model highlights the potential for an increase in the

  10. MAT - MULTI-ATTRIBUTE TASK BATTERY FOR HUMAN OPERATOR WORKLOAD AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR RESEARCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    MAT, a Multi-Attribute Task battery, gives the researcher the capability of performing multi-task workload and performance experiments. The battery provides a benchmark set of tasks for use in a wide range of laboratory studies of operator performance and workload. MAT incorporates tasks analogous to activities that aircraft crew members perform in flight, while providing a high degree of experiment control, performance data on each subtask, and freedom to use non-pilot test subjects. The MAT battery primary display is composed of four separate task windows which are as follows: a monitoring task window which includes gauges and warning lights, a tracking task window for the demands of manual control, a communication task window to simulate air traffic control communications, and a resource management task window which permits maintaining target levels on a fuel management task. In addition, a scheduling task window gives the researcher information about future task demands. The battery also provides the option of manual or automated control of tasks. The task generates performance data for each subtask. The task battery may be paused and onscreen workload rating scales presented to the subject. The MAT battery was designed to use a serially linked second computer to generate the voice messages for the Communications task. The MATREMX program and support files, which are included in the MAT package, were designed to work with the Heath Voice Card (Model HV-2000, available through the Heath Company, Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022); however, the MATREMX program and support files may easily be modified to work with other voice synthesizer or digitizer cards. The MAT battery task computer may also be used independent of the voice computer if no computer synthesized voice messages are desired or if some other method of presenting auditory messages is devised. MAT is written in QuickBasic and assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The

  11. Low-Light Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Fe-S-Biogeochemistry in a Microbial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Sebastian; de Beer, Dirk; Klatt, Judith M.; Fink, Artur; Rench, Rebecca McCauley; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Meyer, Volker; Kakuk, Brian; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    We report extremely low-light-adapted anoxygenic photosynthesis in a thick microbial mat in Magical Blue Hole, Abaco Island, The Bahamas. Sulfur cycling was reduced by iron oxides and organic carbon limitation. The mat grows below the halocline/oxycline at 30 m depth on the walls of the flooded sinkhole. In situ irradiance at the mat surface on a sunny December day was between 0.021 and 0.084 μmol photons m-2 s-1, and UV light (<400 nm) was the most abundant part of the spectrum followed by green wavelengths (475–530 nm). We measured a light-dependent carbon uptake rate of 14.5 nmol C cm-2 d-1. A 16S rRNA clone library of the green surface mat layer was dominated (74%) by a cluster (>97% sequence identity) of clones affiliated with Prosthecochloris, a genus within the green sulfur bacteria (GSB), which are obligate anoxygenic phototrophs. Typical photopigments of brown-colored GSB, bacteriochlorophyll e and (β-)isorenieratene, were abundant in mat samples and their absorption properties are well-adapted to harvest light in the available green and possibly even UV-A spectra. Sulfide from the water column (3–6 μmol L-1) was the main source of sulfide to the mat as sulfate reduction rates in the mats were very low (undetectable-99.2 nmol cm-3 d-1). The anoxic water column was oligotrophic and low in dissolved organic carbon (175–228 μmol L-1). High concentrations of pyrite (FeS2; 1–47 μmol cm-3) together with low microbial process rates (sulfate reduction, CO2 fixation) indicate that the mats function as net sulfide sinks mainly by abiotic processes. We suggest that abundant Fe(III) (4.3–22.2 μmol cm-3) is the major source of oxidizing power in the mat, and that abiotic Fe-S-reactions play the main role in pyrite formation. Limitation of sulfate reduction by low organic carbon availability along with the presence of abundant sulfide-scavenging iron oxides considerably slowed down sulfur cycling in these mats. PMID:29755448

  12. Low-Light Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Fe-S-Biogeochemistry in a Microbial Mat.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sebastian; de Beer, Dirk; Klatt, Judith M; Fink, Artur; Rench, Rebecca McCauley; Hamilton, Trinity L; Meyer, Volker; Kakuk, Brian; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    We report extremely low-light-adapted anoxygenic photosynthesis in a thick microbial mat in Magical Blue Hole, Abaco Island, The Bahamas. Sulfur cycling was reduced by iron oxides and organic carbon limitation. The mat grows below the halocline/oxycline at 30 m depth on the walls of the flooded sinkhole. In situ irradiance at the mat surface on a sunny December day was between 0.021 and 0.084 μmol photons m -2 s -1 , and UV light (<400 nm) was the most abundant part of the spectrum followed by green wavelengths (475-530 nm). We measured a light-dependent carbon uptake rate of 14.5 nmol C cm -2 d -1 . A 16S rRNA clone library of the green surface mat layer was dominated (74%) by a cluster (>97% sequence identity) of clones affiliated with Prosthecochloris , a genus within the green sulfur bacteria (GSB), which are obligate anoxygenic phototrophs. Typical photopigments of brown-colored GSB, bacteriochlorophyll e and (β-)isorenieratene, were abundant in mat samples and their absorption properties are well-adapted to harvest light in the available green and possibly even UV-A spectra. Sulfide from the water column (3-6 μmol L -1 ) was the main source of sulfide to the mat as sulfate reduction rates in the mats were very low (undetectable-99.2 nmol cm -3 d -1 ). The anoxic water column was oligotrophic and low in dissolved organic carbon (175-228 μmol L -1 ). High concentrations of pyrite (FeS 2 ; 1-47 μmol cm -3 ) together with low microbial process rates (sulfate reduction, CO 2 fixation) indicate that the mats function as net sulfide sinks mainly by abiotic processes. We suggest that abundant Fe(III) (4.3-22.2 μmol cm -3 ) is the major source of oxidizing power in the mat, and that abiotic Fe-S-reactions play the main role in pyrite formation. Limitation of sulfate reduction by low organic carbon availability along with the presence of abundant sulfide-scavenging iron oxides considerably slowed down sulfur cycling in these mats.

  13. Cross-craft interactions between metal and glass working: slag additions to early Anglo-Saxon red glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peake, James R. N.; Freestone, Ian C.

    Opaque red glass has been extensively studied over the years, but its compositional complexity and variability means that the way in which it was manufactured is still not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested the use of metallurgical by-products in its manufacture, but until now the evidence has been limited. SEM-EDS analysis of glass beads from the early Anglo-Saxon cemetery complex at Eriswell, southeast England, has provided further insights into the production and technology of opaque red glass, which could only have been possible through invasive sampling. The matrix of the red glasses contains angular particles of slag, the main phases of which typically correspond to either fayalite (Fe2SiO4) or kirschsteinite (CaFeSiO4), orthosilicate (olivine-type) minerals characteristic of some copper- and iron-smelting slags. This material appears to have been added in part as a reducing agent, to promote the precipitation of sub-micrometer particles of the colorant phase, copper metal. Its use represents a sophisticated, if empirical, understanding of materials and can only have resulted through deliberate experimentation with metallurgical by-products by early glass workers. Slag also seems to have been added as a source of iron to colour `black' glass. The compositions of the opaque red glasses appear to be strongly paralleled by Merovingian beads from northern Europe and Anglo-Saxon beads from elsewhere in England, suggesting that this technology is likely to have been quite widespread.

  14. Comparative protein modeling of methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT) enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a potential target for antituberculosis drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Santosh A; Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Coutinho, Evans C

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a successful pathogen that overcomes the numerous challenges presented by the immune system of the host. In the last 40 years few anti-TB drugs have been developed, while the drug-resistance problem is increasing; there is thus a pressing need to develop new anti-TB drugs active against both the acute and chronic growth phases of the mycobacterium. Methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a methyl donor essential for mycolipid biosynthesis. As an anti-TB drug target, Mtb-MAT has been well validated. A homology model of MAT has been constructed using the X-ray structures of E. coli MAT (PDB code: 1MXA) and rat MAT (PDB code: 1QM4) as templates, by comparative protein modeling principles. The resulting model has the correct stereochemistry as gauged from the Ramachandran plot and good three-dimensional (3D) structure compatibility as assessed by the Profiles-3D score. The structurally and functionally important residues (active site) of Mtb-MAT have been identified using the E. coli and rat MAT crystal structures and the reported point mutation data. The homology model conserves the topological and active site features of the MAT family of proteins. The differences in the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) of Mtb and human MAT provide evidences that selective and specific Mtb-MAT inhibitors can be designed using the homology model, by the structure-based drug design approaches.

  15. Diversity, distribution and hydrocarbon biodegradation capabilities of microbial communities in oil-contaminated cyanobacterial mats from a constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Al-Kharusi, Samiha; Prigent, Stephane; Headley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA) showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA) were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was <60% in most cases. Multivariate analyses of fingerprinting profiles indicated that the bacterial communities in the wetland mats were influenced by oil and ammonia levels, but to a lesser extent by plant density. In addition to oil and ammonia, redundancy analysis (RDA) showed also a significant contribution of temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentration to the variations of the mats' microbial communities. Pyrosequencing yielded 282,706 reads with >90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences), Cyanobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (11.5%), Planctomycetes (7%) and Chloroflexi (3%). Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia) and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira) nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53-100% of C12-C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats' microbial

  16. Looking at plastic surgery through Google Glass: part 1. Systematic review of Google Glass evidence and the first plastic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher R; Rosenfield, Lorne K

    2015-03-01

    Google Glass has the potential to become a ubiquitous and translational technological tool within clinical plastic surgery. Google Glass allows clinicians to remotely view patient notes, laboratory results, and imaging; training can be augmented via streamed expert master classes; and patient safety can be improved by remote advice from a senior colleague. This systematic review identified and appraised every Google Glass publication relevant to plastic surgery and describes the first plastic surgical procedures recorded using Google Glass. A systematic review was performed using PubMed National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ovid MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, following modified Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Key search terms "Google" and "Glass" identified mutually inclusive publications that were screened for inclusion. Eighty-two publications were identified, with 21 included for review. Google Glass publications were formal articles (n = 3), editorial/commentary articles (n = 7), conference proceedings (n = 1), news reports (n = 3), and online articles (n = 7). Data support Google Glass' positive impact on health care delivery, clinical training, medical documentation, and patient safety. Concerns exist regarding patient confidentiality, technical issues, and limited software. The first plastic surgical procedure performed using Google Glass was a blepharoplasty on October 29, 2013. Google Glass is an exciting translational technology with the potential to positively impact health care delivery, medical documentation, surgical training, and patient safety. Further high-quality scientific research is required to formally appraise Google Glass in the clinical setting.

  17. Bioactive calcium pyrophosphate glasses and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Calcium phosphate glass-based materials in the pyrophosphate region are briefly reviewed. Calcium pyrophosphate glasses can be prepared by including a small amount of TiO(2) (glasses in simulated body fluid. By heating powder-compacts of the glasses, they are crystallized and subsequently are sintered, resulting in fabrication of high-strength glass-ceramics with machinability; they are easier to be machined using conventional tools in comparison with conventional calcium phosphate ceramics. beta-Ca(2)P(2)O(7) crystal formed in the glass-ceramics plays an important role in the machinability. Their apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid is drastically enhanced after autoclaving in distilled water. The glass-ceramics can be easily coated on a new beta-type titanium alloy using a conventional glazing technique.

  18. U-based metallic glasses with superior glass forming ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongyang; Ke, Haibo; Huang, Huogen; Zhang, Pengguo; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Pei; Liu, Tianwei

    2018-02-01

    By using Al as the third and B as the fourth but minor alloying elements for the U66.7Co33.3 basic metallic glass, a series of U-Co-Al(-B) alloys were designed. The quaternary U-Co-Al-B alloys exhibit significantly improved glass-forming ability (GFA) than previously reported U-based metallic glasses. Low fragility (∼24) is found for these new U-based metallic glasses. The improvement in GFA would result from denser atomic packing in the undercooled liquids due to the presence of small B atoms. Some U-Co-Al(-B) glasses showed corrosion resistance comparable to that of U64Co34Al2 glass, known for premium anti-corrosive performance among the unveiled U-based glasses.

  19. Potential utilization of glass experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidl, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    Materials processing in space utilizing the microgravity environment is discussed; glass processing in particular is considered. Attention is given to the processing of glass shells, critical cooling rate and novel glasses, gel synthesis of glasses, immiscibility, surface tension, and glass composites. Soviet glass experiments in space are also enumerated.

  20. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  1. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-05-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  2. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposiummore » papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.« less

  3. Microbial Mat Communities along an Oxygen Gradient in a Perennially Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Ian; Mackey, Tyler J.; Krusor, Megan; Doran, Peter T.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hillman, Colin; Goroncy, Alexander K.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Fryxell is a perennially ice-covered lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, with a sharp oxycline in a water column that is density stabilized by a gradient in salt concentration. Dissolved oxygen falls from 20 mg liter−1 to undetectable over one vertical meter from 8.9- to 9.9-m depth. We provide the first description of the benthic mat community that falls within this oxygen gradient on the sloping floor of the lake, using a combination of micro- and macroscopic morphological descriptions, pigment analysis, and 16S rRNA gene bacterial community analysis. Our work focused on three macroscopic mat morphologies that were associated with different parts of the oxygen gradient: (i) “cuspate pinnacles” in the upper hyperoxic zone, which displayed complex topography and were dominated by phycoerythrin-rich cyanobacteria attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya and a diverse but sparse assemblage of pennate diatoms; (ii) a less topographically complex “ridge-pit” mat located immediately above the oxic-anoxic transition containing Leptolyngbya and an increasing abundance of diatoms; and (iii) flat prostrate mats in the upper anoxic zone, dominated by a green cyanobacterium phylogenetically identified as Phormidium pseudopriestleyi and a single diatom, Diadesmis contenta. Zonation of bacteria was by lake depth and by depth into individual mats. Deeper mats had higher abundances of bacteriochlorophylls and anoxygenic phototrophs, including Chlorobi and Chloroflexi. This suggests that microbial communities form assemblages specific to niche-like locations. Mat morphologies, underpinned by cyanobacterial and diatom composition, are the result of local habitat conditions likely defined by irradiance and oxygen and sulfide concentrations. PMID:26567300

  4. Compound-specific Isotope Analysis of Cyanobacterial Pure cultures and Microbial Mats: Effects of Photorespiration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are considered modern homologs of Precambrian stromatolites. The carbon isotopic compositions of organic matter and biomarker lipids provide clues to the depositional environments of ancient mat ecosystems. As the source of primary carbon fixation for over two billion years, an understanding of cyanobacterial lipid biosynthesis, associated isotopic discriminations, and the influence of physiological factors on growth and isotope expression is essential to help us compare modern microbial ecosystems to their ancient counterparts. Here, we report on the effects of photorespiration (PR) on the isotopic composition of cyanobacteria and biomarker lipids, and on potential PR effects associated with the composition of various microbial mats. The high light, high O2 and limiting CO2 conditions often present at the surface of microbial mats are known to support PR in cyanobacteria. The oxygenase function of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase can result in photoexcretion of glycolate and subsequent degration by heterotrophic bacteria. We have found evidence which supports an isotopic depletion (increased apparent E) scaled to O2 level associated with growth of Phormidium luridum at low CO2 concentrations (less than 0.04%). Similar to previous studies, isotopic differences between biomass and lipid biomarkers, and between lipid classes were positively correlated with overall fractionation, and should provide a means of estimating the influence of PR on overall isotopic composition of microbial mats. Several examples of microbial mats growing in the hydrothermal waters of Yellowstone National Park and the hypersaline marine evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Sur Mexico will be compared with a view to PR as a possible explanation of the relatively heavy C-isotope composition of hypersaline mats.

  5. The epsomitic phototrophic microbial mat of Hot Lake, Washington: community structural responses to seasonal cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Stephen R.; Moran, James J.; Stegen, James C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Cole, Jessica K.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Chen, Feng; Tringe, Susannah G.; Beyenal, Haluk; Fredrickson, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring, disassembles each fall, and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO2−4) and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya), and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus). Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium) and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis) that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function. PMID:24312082

  6. The Epsomitic Phototrophic Microbial Mat of Hot Lake, Washington. Community Structural Responses to Seasonal Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemann, Stephen R.; Moran, James J.; Stegen, James C.

    2013-11-13

    Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring, disassembles each fall, and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg 2+ and SO 2 -4) and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation inmore » the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya), and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus). Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium) and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis) that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function.« less

  7. Microbial Mat Communities along an Oxygen Gradient in a Perennially Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Anne D; Hawes, Ian; Mackey, Tyler J; Krusor, Megan; Doran, Peter T; Sumner, Dawn Y; Eisen, Jonathan A; Hillman, Colin; Goroncy, Alexander K

    2016-01-15

    Lake Fryxell is a perennially ice-covered lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, with a sharp oxycline in a water column that is density stabilized by a gradient in salt concentration. Dissolved oxygen falls from 20 mg liter(-1) to undetectable over one vertical meter from 8.9- to 9.9-m depth. We provide the first description of the benthic mat community that falls within this oxygen gradient on the sloping floor of the lake, using a combination of micro- and macroscopic morphological descriptions, pigment analysis, and 16S rRNA gene bacterial community analysis. Our work focused on three macroscopic mat morphologies that were associated with different parts of the oxygen gradient: (i) "cuspate pinnacles" in the upper hyperoxic zone, which displayed complex topography and were dominated by phycoerythrin-rich cyanobacteria attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya and a diverse but sparse assemblage of pennate diatoms; (ii) a less topographically complex "ridge-pit" mat located immediately above the oxic-anoxic transition containing Leptolyngbya and an increasing abundance of diatoms; and (iii) flat prostrate mats in the upper anoxic zone, dominated by a green cyanobacterium phylogenetically identified as Phormidium pseudopriestleyi and a single diatom, Diadesmis contenta. Zonation of bacteria was by lake depth and by depth into individual mats. Deeper mats had higher abundances of bacteriochlorophylls and anoxygenic phototrophs, including Chlorobi and Chloroflexi. This suggests that microbial communities form assemblages specific to niche-like locations. Mat morphologies, underpinned by cyanobacterial and diatom composition, are the result of local habitat conditions likely defined by irradiance and oxygen and sulfide concentrations. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Thermal expansion behavior of graphite/glass and graphite/magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Ard, K. E.; Sharp, G. Richard

    1986-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of n (+/- 8)s graphite fiber reinforced magnesium laminate and four graphite reinforced glass-matrix laminates (a unidirectional laminate, a quasi-isotropic laminate, a symmetric low angle-ply laminate, and a random chopped-fiber mat laminate) was determined, and was found, in all cases, to not be significantly affected by thermal cycling. Specimens were cycled up to 100 times between -200 F and 100 F, and the thermal expansion coefficients determined for each material as a function of temperature were found to be low. Some dimensional changes as a function of thermal cycling, and some thermal-strain hysteresis, were observed.

  9. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  10. Fun with singing wine glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency against water volume percent are made using a spreadsheet. Students can also play combinations of pitches with several glasses. A video (Ruiz 2018 Video: Singing glasses http://mjtruiz.com/ped/wineglasses/) is provided which includes an excerpt of a beautiful piece written for singing glasses and choir: Stars by Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds.

  11. Comparative functional ultrastructure of two hypersaline submerged cyanobacterial mats - Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico, and Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Elisa D'antoni; Des Marais, David J.; Cohen, Jehuda

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the submerged microbial mat from the Solar Lake (SL), Egypt, was compared to that of samples from the Guerrero Negro (GN), Mexico, salt pans. The locations and distributions of the main organisms were determined light microscopy, and the corresponding ultrathin sections were examined under TEM; chemical microprofile analyses were carried out on the day of sampling for microscopic studies. Both communities were found to be dominated by Microleus chthonoplastes, although several morphological species found in the GN mat were absent from the SL mat, including the Tropica nigra and the 'big' Microleus chthonoplastes component. The chemical microprofiles of oxygen, sulfide, pH, and the oxygenic photosynthesis in the two mats were virtually identical. In both mats, the photic zone was restricted to the upper 800 microns of the mat, and oxygenic photosynthesis was detected down to 600 microns.

  12. Effects of tacky mat contamination on bond degradation for Chemlok/liner and NBR/liner bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tacky mats are placed by the rubber lay-up areas for the solid rocket motor segments. These mats dust off the shoes prior to entering the platform where the lay-up work is performed. The possibility exists that a tacky mat could be touched with gloved hands prior to handling the uncured nitride butadiene rubber (NBR). Tests were run to determine if NBR were accidentally touched would there be any degradation of the liner/NBR bond. The tacky mats were judged solely on the basis of bond degradation caused by either direct or indirect contamination. Test results all indicate that there was no notable NBR/Chemlok or liner/NBR bond degradation on samples that came into contact with the tacky mat material. Testing procedures are described. The tacky mat adhesive composition does not contain fluorocarbons or release agents that would affect bonding.

  13. Separators used in microbial electrochemical technologies: Current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Daud, Siti Mariam; Kim, Byung Hong; Ghasemi, Mostafa; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan

    2015-11-01

    Microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) are emerging green processes producing useful products from renewable sources without causing environmental pollution and treating wastes. The separator, an important part of METs that greatly affects the latter's performance, is commonly made of Nafion proton exchange membrane (PEM). However, many problems have been identified associated with the Nafion PEM such as high cost of membrane, significant oxygen and substrate crossovers, and transport of cations other than protons protons and biofouling. A variety of materials have been offered as alternative separators such as ion-exchange membranes, salt bridges, glass fibers, composite membranes and porous materials. It has been claimed that low cost porous materials perform better than PEM. These include J-cloth, nylon filter, glass fiber mat, non-woven cloth, earthen pot and ceramics that enable non-ion selective charge transfer. This paper provides an up-to-date review on porous separators and plots directions for future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  15. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  16. matK-QR classifier: a patterns based approach for plant species identification.

    PubMed

    More, Ravi Prabhakar; Mane, Rupali Chandrashekhar; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding is widely used and most efficient approach that facilitates rapid and accurate identification of plant species based on the short standardized segment of the genome. The nucleotide sequences of maturaseK ( matK ) and ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase ( rbcL ) marker loci are commonly used in plant species identification. Here, we present a new and highly efficient approach for identifying a unique set of discriminating nucleotide patterns to generate a signature (i.e. regular expression) for plant species identification. In order to generate molecular signatures, we used matK and rbcL loci datasets, which encompass 125 plant species in 52 genera reported by the CBOL plant working group. Initially, we performed Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) of all species followed by Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) for both loci to achieve a percentage of discrimination among species. Further, we detected Discriminating Patterns (DP) at genus and species level using PSSM for the matK dataset. Combining DP and consecutive pattern distances, we generated molecular signatures for each species. Finally, we performed a comparative assessment of these signatures with the existing methods including BLASTn, Support Vector Machines (SVM), Jrip-RIPPER, J48 (C4.5 algorithm), and the Naïve Bayes (NB) methods against NCBI-GenBank matK dataset. Due to the higher discrimination success obtained with the matK as compared to the rbcL , we selected matK gene for signature generation. We generated signatures for 60 species based on identified discriminating patterns at genus and species level. Our comparative assessment results suggest that a total of 46 out of 60 species could be correctly identified using generated signatures, followed by BLASTn (34 species), SVM (18 species), C4.5 (7 species), NB (4 species) and RIPPER (3 species) methods As a final outcome of this study, we converted signatures into QR codes and developed a software matK -QR Classifier (http

  17. Quantifying Thin Mat Floating Marsh Strength and Interaction with Hydrodynamic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. H., III; Sasser, C.; Willson, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Louisiana possesses over 350,000 acres of unique floating vegetated systems known as floating marshes or flotants. Floating marshes make up 70% of the Terrebonne and Barataria basin wetlands and exist in several forms, mainly thick mat or thin mat. Salt-water intrusion, nutria grazing, and high-energy wave events are believed to be some contributing factors to the degradation of floating marshes; however, there has been little investigation into the hydrodynamic effects on their structural integrity. Due to their unique nature, floating marshes could be susceptible to changes in the hydrodynamic environment that may result from proposed river freshwater and sediment diversion projects introducing flow to areas that are typically somewhat isolated. This study aims to improve the understanding of how thin mat floating marshes respond to increased hydrodynamic stresses and, more specifically, how higher water velocities might increase the washout probability of this vegetation type. There are two major components of this research: 1) A thorough measurement of the material properties of the vegetative mats as a root-soil matrix composite material; and 2) An accurate numerical simulation of the hydrodynamics and forces imposed on the floating marsh mats by the flow. To achieve these goals, laboratory and field experiments were conducted using a customized device to measure the bulk properties of typical floating marshes. Additionally, Delft-3D FLOW and ANSYS FLUENT were used to simulate the flow around a series of simplified mat structures in order to estimate the hydrodynamic forcings on the mats. The hydrodynamic forcings are coupled with a material analysis, allowing for a thorough analysis of their interaction under various conditions. The 2-way Fluid Structure Interaction (F.S.I.) between the flow and the mat is achieved by coupling a Finite Element Analysis (F.E.A.) solver in ANSYS with FLUENT. The flow conditions necessary for the structural failure of the

  18. Spatiotemporal patterns in community structure of macroinvertebrates inhabiting calcareous periphyton mats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liston, S.E.; Trexler, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Calcareous floating periphyton mats in the southern Everglades provide habitat for a diverse macroinvertebrate community that has not been well characterized. Our study described this community in an oligotrophic marsh, compared it with the macroinvertebrate community associated with adjacent epiphytic algae attached to macrophytes in the water column, and detected spatial patterns in density and community structure. The floating periphyton mat (floating mat) and epiphytic algae in the water column (submerged epiphyton) were sampled at 4 sites (???1 km apart) in northern Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park (ENP), in the early (July) and late (November) wet season. Two perpendicular 90-m transects were established at each site and ???100 samples were taken in a nested design. Sites were located in wet-prairie spikerush-dominated sloughs with similar water depths and emergent macrophyte communities. Floating mats were sampled by taking cores (6-cm diameter) that were sorted under magnification to enumerate infauna retained on a 250-??m-mesh sieve and with a maximum dimension >1 mm. Our results showed that floating mats provide habitat for a macroinvertebrate community with higher densities (no. animals/g ash-free dry mass) of Hyalella azteca, Dasyhelea spp., and Cladocera, and lower densities of Chironomidae and Planorbella spp. than communities associated with submerged epiphyton. Densities of the most common taxa increased 3x to 15x from early to late wet season, and community differences between the 2 habitat types became more pronounced. Floating-mat coverage and estimated floating-mat biomass increased 20 to 30%, and 30 to 110%, respectively, at most sites in the late wet season. Some intersite variation was observed in individual taxa, but no consistent spatial pattern in any taxon was detected at any scale (from 0.2 m to 3 km). Floating mats and their resident macroinvertebrate communities are important components in the Everglades food web. This

  19. Water diffusion in silicate glasses: the effect of glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, M.; Tachibana, S.

    2016-12-01

    Water diffusion in silicate melts (glasses) is one of the main controlling factors of magmatism in a volcanic system. Water diffusivity in silicate glasses depends on its own concentration. However, the mechanism causing those dependences has not been fully understood yet. In order to construct a general model for water diffusion in various silicate glasses, we performed water diffusion experiments in silica glass and proposed a new water diffusion model [Kuroda et al., 2015]. In the model, water diffusivity is controlled by the concentration of both main diffusion species (i.e. molecular water) and diffusion pathways, which are determined by the concentrations of hydroxyl groups and network modifier cations. The model well explains the water diffusivity in various silicate glasses from silica glass to basalt glass. However, pre-exponential factors of water diffusivity in various glasses show five orders of magnitude variations although the pre-exponential factor should ideally represent the jump frequency and the jump distance of molecular water and show a much smaller variation. Here, we attribute the large variation of pre-exponential factors to a glass structure dependence of activation energy for molecular water diffusion. It has been known that the activation energy depends on the water concentration [Nowak and Behrens, 1997]. The concentration of hydroxyls, which cut Si-O-Si network in the glass structure, increases with water concentration, resulting in lowering the activation energy for water diffusion probably due to more fragmented structure. Network modifier cations are likely to play the same role as water. With taking the effect of glass structure into account, we found that the variation of pre-exponential factors of water diffusivity in silicate glasses can be much smaller than the five orders of magnitude, implying that the diffusion of molecular water in silicate glasses is controlled by the same atomic process.

  20. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.