Science.gov

Sample records for glast lat studies

  1. Studying Gamma-Ray Blazars With the GLAST-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, B.; Carson, J.; Madejski, G.; Ciprini, S.; Dermer, C.D.; Giommi, P.; Lonjou, V.; Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Thanks to its sensitivity (4 10{sup -9} ph (E> 100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for one year of observation), the GLAST LAT should detect many more (over a thousand) gamma-ray blazars than currently known. This large blazar sample will enable detailed population studies to be carried out. Moreover, the LAT large field-of-view combined with the scanning mode will provide a very uniform exposure over the sky, allowing a constant monitoring of several tens of blazars and flare alerts to be issued. This poster presents the LAT performance relevant to blazar studies, more particularly related to timing and spectral properties. Major specific issues regarding the blazar phenomenon that the LAT data should shed light on thanks to these capabilities will be discussed, as well as the different approaches foreseen to address them. The associated data required in other bands, to be collected in contemporaneous/simultaneous multiwavelength campaigns are mentioned as well.

  2. The Capabilities of the GLAST LAT for Blazar Variability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    One of the more notable features of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST is its extremely large field of view, which covers more than 20% of the sky at any instant. In survey mode the LAT will be rocked about the orbital plane to provide coverage of the entire gamma-ray sky above 20 MeV every three hours. This will be the default observing mode for the first year of operations and is likely to be the dominant observing mode throughout the rest of the mission. Thus the LAT will provide long, evenly sampled, gamma-ray lightcurves for a large number of sources. In this talk we describe the nature and quality of the data that will be provided by the LAT and use simulated lightcurves to illustrate some of the scientific questions that can be addressed with LAT observations.

  3. GLAST LAT And Pulsars: What Do We Learn from Simulations?

    SciTech Connect

    Razzano, Massimiliano; Harding, Alice K.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-24

    Gamma-ray pulsars are among the best targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the GLAST mission. The higher sensitivity, time and energy resolution of the LAT will provide data of fundamental importance to understand the physics of these fascinating objects. Powerful tools for studying the LAT capabilities for pulsar science are the simulation programs developed within the GLAST Collaboration. Thanks to these simulations it is possible to produce a detailed distribution of gamma-ray photons in energy and phase that can be folded through the LAT Instrument Response Functions (IRFs). Here we present some of the main interesting results from the simulations developed to study the discovery potential of the LAT. In particular we will focus on the capability of the LAT to discover new radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars, on the discrimination between Polar Cap and Outer Gap models, and on the LAT pulsar sensitivity.

  4. The Synergy between the LAT and GBM in GLAST's Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Using semi-analytic calculations I characterize the gamma-ray bursts to which GLAST's LAT and GBM detectors will be sensitive. The thresholds of both instruments are at approximately the same vfv proportional to E(sup 2)N(E) values, i.e., the thresholds can be connected by an E(sup -2) spectrum. Therefore simultaneous detections by both instruments will be biased towards spectral components flatter than E(sup -2).

  5. GeV flares observations with GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Omodei, N.; Piro, L.

    2007-07-12

    Early X-ray afterglow observations show that X-ray flares are very common features in GRB light curves. X-ray flares may reflect long duration central engine activity. The delayed flare photons are expected to interact with relativistic electrons by Inverse Compton giving delayed high energy counterparts that potentially will be detected by GLAST LAT, which could observe GRB from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The nature oh high energy spectral components from GRB detected by EGRET is still debated. Observations with GLAST LAT will give useful information to constrain the origin of X-ray flares. In this work we simulate a set of possible GeV emitting flares in the context of External Shock model to study the capability of GLAST LAT to detect GeV flares at different intensities and durations.

  6. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James

    2007-07-12

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  7. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James; Carson, Jennifer; Focke, Warren; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  8. GLAST Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2001-01-01

    Cominsky served as the chair of the GLAST Public Affairs Working Group during the mission concept study. The major accomplishments of this group, which were carried out under her direction include: (1) GLAST Outreach website; (2) Brochure for scientists; (3) Brochure for public; (4) Developed the five key science goal 'bullets' to explain GLAST to the public, as well as the motto used on the GLAST brochures 'Quest for the Ultimate Sources of Energy in the Universe'; (5) Defined the EPO program for GLAST for the proposal phase. Developed initial program outline and budget; and (6) Assisted in the development of the GLAST exhibit, which was used at several scientific conferences.

  9. Environmental Tests of the Flight GLAST LAT Tracker Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Belli, F.; Borden, T.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Angelis, A.De; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Goodman, J.; Himel, T.

    2008-03-12

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space telescope (GLAST) is a gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in 2008. Before the assembly of the Tracker subsystem of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) science instrument of GLAST, every component (tray) and module (tower) has been subjected to extensive ground testing required to ensure successful launch and on-orbit operation. This paper describes the sequence and results of the environmental tests performed on an engineering model and all the flight hardware of the GLAST LAT Tracker. Environmental tests include vibration testing, thermal cycles and thermal-vacuum cycles of every tray and tower as well as the verification of their electrical performance.

  10. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  11. Analysis of Burst Observations by GLAST's LAT Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Digel, Seth W.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing data from GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) will require sophisticated techniques. The PSF and effective area are functions of both photon energy and the position in the field-of-view. During most of the mission the observatory will survey the sky continuously and thus the LAT will detect each count from a source at a different detector orientation; each count requires its own response function! The likelihood as a function of celestial position and photon energy will be the foundation of the standard analysis techniques. However the 20 MeV-300 GeV emission at the time of the approx.100 keV burst emission (timescale of approx.10 s) can be isolated and analyzed because essentially no non-burst counts are expected within a PSF radius of the burst location during the burst. Both binned and unbinned (in energy) spectral fitting will be possible. Longer timescale afterglow emission will require the likelihood analysis that will be used for persistent sources.

  12. Novel Technique for Monitoring the Performance of the LAT Instrument on Board the GLAST Satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Paneque, D.; Borgland, A.; Bovier, A.; Bloom, E.; Edmonds, Y.; Funk, S.; Godfrey, G.; Rando, R.; Wai, L.; Wang, P.

    2007-06-13

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an observatory designed to perform gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. GLAST will be launched at the end of 2007, opening a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy astrophysical phenomena . The main instrument of GLAST is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which provides break-through high-energy measurements using techniques typically used in particle detectors for collider experiments. The LAT consists of 16 identical towers in a four-by-four grid, each one containing a pair conversion tracker and a hodoscopic crystal calorimeter, all covered by a segmented plastic scintillator anti-coincidence shield. The scientific return of the instrument depends very much on how accurately we know its performance, and how well we can monitor it and correct potential problems promptly. We report on a novel technique that we are developing to help in the characterization and monitoring of LAT by using the power of classification trees to pinpoint in a short time potential problems in the recorded data. The same technique could also be used to evaluate the effect on the overall LAT performance produced by potential instrumental problems.

  13. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  14. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  15. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered p ulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsar s will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar s, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for e lucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric partic le acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theo retical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all un identified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geming a-like pulsars.

  16. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts And Data Challenge One: Searching GRB in One Week of Simulated GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.; Omodei, N.; Band, D.; Bonnell, J.T.; Brigida, M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Giannitrapani, R.; Kamae, T.; Norris, J.P.; Winai, M.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa /NASA, Goddard /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /SLAC /Udine U.

    2006-02-22

    GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) is a gamma-ray astronomy mission that will be launched in mid 2007. The main instrument is the LAT (Large Area Telescope), a pair conversion telescope with sensitivity in the range 20 MeV-300 GeV. Data Challenge One (DC1) was the simulation of one week of observation of the entire gamma-ray sky by the LAT detector. the simulated data was similar to the real data, which allowed for the development of scientific software. In this paper they present the GRB simulations and the detection algorithms developed by the GLAST GRB and Solar Flare Science Team.

  18. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration And Interaction in the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Kamae, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2008-05-23

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multiagency mission scheduled for launch in the fall 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to {approx} 300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of 'Data Challenges' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: (1) GLAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; (2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; (3) multiple sources will be 'confused' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

  19. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma-Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The new Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) which covers the energy range from 20 MeV to >300 GeV and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor), covering 8 keV - 30 MeV energy range. The GLAST science objectives include understanding the mechanism of charged particle acceleration in active galactic nuclei, pulsars and supernova remnants, determining the nature of the still-unidentified EGRET sources, detailed study of gamma-ray diffuse emission, high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts and transient sources, and probing dark matter. A brief overview of the mission is given.

  20. Prospects for GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in late 007, is a satellite based observatory to study the high energy gamma-ray sky. There are two instruments on GLAST: the Large Area Telescope (LAT) which provides coverage from 20 MeV to over 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) which provides supportive observations of transients from 8 keV to 30 MeV. GLAST will provide well beyond those achieved by the highly successful EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, with dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe approx. 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on timescale of a few hours. This talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  1. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration and Interaction in the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, T.

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency mission scheduled for launch in the fall of 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to ˜ 300 GeV. The insrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of ``Data Challenges'' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: 1) G LAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; 2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; 3) multiple sources will be ``confused'' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

  2. The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, T.A.; Digel, S.W.; Grenier, I.A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2007-06-13

    Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

  3. The Use of Weighting in Periodicity Searches in All-Sky Monitor Data: Applications to the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Corbet, Robin; Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2009-06-25

    The light curves produced by all-sky monitors, such as the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), generally have non-uniform error bars. In searching for periodic modulation in this type of data using power spectra it can be important to use appropriate weighting of data points to achieve the best sensitivity. It was recently demonstrated that for Swift BAT data a simple weighting scheme can actually sometimes reduce the sensitivity of the power spectrum depending on source brightness. Instead, a modified weighting scheme, based on the Cochran semi-weighted mean, gives improved results independent of source brightness. We investigate the benefits of weighting power spectra in period searches using simulated GLAST LAT observations of {gamma}-ray binaries.

  4. Searching for Dark Matter Signatures in the GLAST LAT Electron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    We explored several viable scenarios of how LAT might observe DM, when the spectral feature is predicted to be observed in the HE electron flux It has been demonstrated elsewhere that LAT will be capable to detect HE electrons flux in energy range from 20 GeV to - 1 TeV with 520% energy resolution and good statistics If there is a DM-caused feature in the HE electron flux (in the range 20 GeV - 1 TeV), LAT will be the best current instrument to observe it!

  5. The GLAST mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope for studying high energy gamma-ray emission from astrophysical sources. The main instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT) which operated in the energy band from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. A second instrument, the Glast Burst Monitor to provide supportive observations of gamma-ray bursts at lower energies. The LAT is a solid state pair-conversion telescope which will have capabilities well beyond those achieved by the highly successful EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. The sensitivity achieved on the entire sky after a single day's observation is similar to the point source sensitivity of EGRET for its entire mission. The large effective area will allow flares from AGN to be detected at much lower flux levels and on far shorter time intervals that has previously been possible from space. The very large field of view will make it possible to monitor approx. 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on timescale of a few hours. In this talk I will describe the design of the GLAST instruments and discuss their science capabilities.

  6. A Comprehensive Approach to Gamma-Ray Source Identification in the GLAST-LAT Era

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Unveiling the nature of a vast number of unidentified sources is the most compelling problem facing today's high-energy (MeV-to-GeV) gamma-ray astronomy. However, unidentified sources are not peculiar to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, they have been an ever-present phenomenon in astronomy. Indeed, every time a new astronomical window was opened, astronomers found sources they were not able to identify, i.e. to associate with previously known objects. This can happen either because such sources belong to a genuinely new (thus unknown) class or because their positions are not known accurately enough to allow for an unambiguous association between the newly found emitter and a known object. Thus, the lack of identification is frequently ascribed to poor angular resolution. Being unidentified, however, is a 'temporary' status: sooner or later better tools will allow the source identification, i.e. either its classification within a given class of astronomical objects or its recognition as belonging to a new class. Owing to the intrinsic limitations of gamma-ray detection technique, however, the instruments' angular resolution has not yet reached the minimum level required to permit the transition from the unidentified limbo to the paradise of known objects, thus creating a continuing unidentified high-energy gamma-ray source problem. Different approaches towards source identification have been pursued in the past. Here we will review the state of the art as well as the strategies devised for the GLAST era.

  7. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  8. Galactic Variable Sky with EGRET and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; /SLAC

    2006-11-28

    The characteristics of the largely-unidentified Galactic sources of gamma rays that were detected by EGRET are reviewed. Proposed source populations that may have the correct spatial, spectral, luminosity, and variability properties to be the origins of the EGRET sources are also presented. Finally, the prospects for studying Galactic gamma-ray sources with the GLAST LAT are reviewed.

  9. GRB Analysis Results from GLAST Data Challenge 2

    SciTech Connect

    Komin, Nukri

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will observe the gamma-ray sky in the MeV and GeV energy range. It will detect a number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) every year, depending on their emission at high energies, which is still unknown. GLAST will be the first instrument observing GRBs at energies above 20 GeV. A systematic study prior to launch, which is foreseen for 15 November 2007, was the GLAST Data Challenge 2 (DC 2). For GLAST DC 2 two month of data taking were simulated. Based on these simulations the GRB Working Group performed systematic studies of the performance of GLAST in observing GRBs. These studies included the spectral analysis of the prompt emission, a position fit of the GRB, and the search for prompt and afterglow emissions in the LAT data.

  10. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  11. The Capabilities of the GLAST Large Area Telescope for Blazar Variability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2006-01-01

    One of the more notable features of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST is its extremely large field of view, which covers more than 20% of the sky at any instant. In survey mode the LAT will be rocked about the orbital plane to provide coverage of the entire gamma-ray sky above 20 MeV every three hours. This will be the default observing mode for the first year of operations and is likely to be the dominant observing mode throughout the rest of the mission. Thus the LAT will provide long, evenly sampled, gamma-ray lightcurves for a large number of sources. In this talk we describe the nature and quality of the data that will be provided by the LAT and use simulated lightcurves to illustrate some of the scientific questions that can be addressed with LAT observations.

  12. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma Radiation: Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a overview of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now named Fermi Space Telescope. The new telescope is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor). The science objectives of GLAST cover almost every area of high energy astrophysics, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), including Extragalactic background light (EBL), Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), Pulsars, Diffuse gamma-radiation, EGRET unidentified sources, Solar physics, Origin of Cosmic Rays and, Dark Matter and New Physics. Also included in this overview is a discussion of the preparation to the analysis of the science data.

  13. MAXI and GLAST Studies of Jets in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; Kataoka, Jun; Sikora, Marek

    2008-10-13

    The recent launch of GLAST--coinciding with the MAXI workshop--opens a new era for studies of jet-dominated active galaxies, known as blazars. While the emission processes operating in various spectral bands in blazars are reasonably well understood, the knowledge of the details of the structure of the jet, location of the dissipation region with respect to the accreting black hole, and coupling of the jet to the accretion process are known only at a rudimentary level. Blazars are variable, and this provides an opportunity to use the variability in various bands--and in particular, the relationship of respective time series to each other--to explore the relative location of regions responsible for emission in the respective bands. Observationally, this requires well-sampled time series in as many spectral bands as possible. To this end, with its all-sky, sensitive monitoring capability, the recently launched GLAST, and MAXI, to be deployed in 2009, are the most promising instruments bound to provide good sampling in respectively the energetic gamma-ray, and the soft X-ray band. This paper highlights the inferences regarding blazar jets that can be gleaned from such joint observations.

  14. GLAST Status and Application to Microquasars

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2006-11-15

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a next generation high energy gamma-ray observatory due for launch in Fall 2007. The primary instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will measure gamma-ray flux and spectra from 20 MeV to > 300 GeV and is a successor to the highly successful EGRET experiment on CGRO. The LAT will have better angular resolution, greater effective area, wider field of view and broader energy coverage than any previous experiment in this energy range. An overview of the LAT instrument design and construction is presented which includes performance estimates with particular emphasis on how these apply to studies of microquasars. The nature and quality of the data that will be provided by the LAT is described with results from recent detailed simulations that illustrate the potential of the LAT to observe gamma ray variability and spectra.

  15. LAT Observation of GRBs: Simulations and Sensitivity Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Norris, Jay; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It employs a pair conversion technique to record photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT will follow the steps from its predecessor EGRET (1991-2000), and will explore the high-energy gamma-ray sky with unprecedented capabilities. The observation of Gamma-Ray Bursts is one of the main science goal of the LAT: in this contribution we compute an estimation of the LAT sensitivity to GRB, adopting a phenomenological description of GRBs, where the high-energy emission in GRB is obtained extrapolating the observed BATSE spectrum up to LAT energies. The effect of the cosmological attenuation is included. We use the BATSE current catalog to build up our statistics.

  16. LAT observation of GRBs: Simulations and Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Norris, Jay

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It employs a pair conversion technique to record photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT will follow the steps from its predecessor EGRET (1991-2000), and will explore the high-energy gamma-ray sky with unprecedented capabilities. The observation of Gamma-Ray Bursts is one of the main science goal of the LAT: in this contribution we compute an estimation of the LAT sensitivity to GRB, adopting a phenomenological description of GRBs, where the high-energy emission in GRB is obtained extrapolating the observed BATSE spectrum up to LAT energies. The effect of the cosmological attenuation is included. We use the BATSE current catalog to build up our statistics.

  17. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J. F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Ritz, S.; Mizuno, T.

    2007-07-12

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  18. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  19. Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

    2011-11-29

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

  20. Prospects for Observations of Microquasars with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2007-10-09

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a next generation high energy gamma-ray observatory due for launch in Fall 2007. The primary instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will measure gamma-ray flux and spectra from 20 MeV to > 300 GeV and is a successor to the highly successful EGRET experiment on CGRO. The LAT will have better angular resolution, greater effective area, wider field of view and broader energy coverage than any previous experiment in this energy range. This poster will present performance estimates with particular emphasis on how these apply to studies of microquasars. The LAT's scanning mode will provide unprecedented uniformity of sky coverage and permit measurements of light curves for any source. We will show results from recent detailed simulations that illustrate the potential of the LAT to observe microquasar variability and spectra, including source sensitivity and ability to detect orbital modulation.

  1. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  2. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Norris, Jay; Ryde, Felix

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  3. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  4. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  5. Dark Matter Searches With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Lawrence; Nuss, E.

    2007-02-05

    Indirect detection of particle dark matter relies upon pair annihilation of Weakly Interaction Massive Particles (WIMPs), which is complementary to the well known techniques of direct detection (WIMP-nucleus scattering) and collider production (WIMP pair production). Pair annihilation of WIMPs results in the production of gamma-rays, neutrinos, and anti-matter. Of the various experiments sensitive to indirect detection of dark matter, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) may play the most crucial role in the next few years. After launch in late 2007, The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will survey the gamma-ray sky in the energy range of 20MeV-300GeV. By eliminating charged particle background above 100 MeV, GLAST may be sensitive to as yet to be observed Milky Way dark matter subhalos, as well as WIMP pair annihilation spectral lines from the Milky Way halo. Discovery of gamma-ray signals from dark matter in the Milky Way would not only demonstrate the particle nature of dark matter; it would also open a new observational window on galactic dark matter substructure. Location of new dark matter sources by GLAST would dramatically alter the experimental landscape; ground based gamma ray telescopes could follow up on the new GLAST sources with precision measurements of the WIMP pair annihilation spectrum.

  6. GLAST: Exploring Nature's Highest Energy Processes with the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, Seth; Myers, J. D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV. Several successful exploratory missions in gamma-ray astronomy led to the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Launched in 1991, EGRET made the first complete survey of the sky in the 30 MeV-10 GeV range. EGRET showed the high-energy gamma-ray sky to be surprisingly dynamic and diverse, with sources ranging from the sun and moon to massive black holes at large redshifts. Most of the gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET remain unidentified. In light of the discoveries with EGRET, the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope vastly more capable than instruments flown previously, as well as a secondary instrument to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. The main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will have superior area, angular resolution, field of view, and deadtime that together will provide a factor of 30 or more advance in sensitivity, as well as provide capability for study of transient phenomena. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will have a field of view several times larger than the LAT and will provide spectral coverage of gamma-ray bursts that extends from the lower limit of the LAT down to 10 keV. The basic parameters of the GBM are compared to those of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on CGRO in Table 1-2. With the LAT and GBM, GLAST will be a flexible observatory for investigating the great range of astrophysical phenomena best studied in high-energy gamma rays. NASA plans to launch GLAST in late 2005.

  7. The Glast Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  8. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors in the GLAST Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors that will operate in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. I review the burst detection sensitivities, spectral bands, and localization capabilities of the GLAST (GBM and LAT), Swift (BAT), INTEGRAL (ISGRI), Suzaku (wAM), AGILE (Super-AGILE) and wind (Konus) detectors; the detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. In addition, I estimate the rate of simultaneous burst observations. In particular, coordination of the Swift observing plan consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts

  9. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  10. GLAST beam test at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Engovatov, D.; Anthony, P.; Atwood, W.

    1996-10-01

    In May and June, a beam test for GLAST calorimeter technologies was conducted. A parasitic low intensity electron/tagged photon beam line into the End Station A at SLAC was commissioned and used. The preliminary stage of the test was devoted to measuring the performance of the parasitic beam. In the main test we studied the response of GLAST prototype CsI and scintillating fiber calorimeters to the electrons and photons. Results of this work are discussed.

  11. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  12. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  13. Modern Statistical Methods for GLAST Event Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robin D.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-10

    We describe a statistical reconstruction methodology for the GLAST LAT. The methodology incorporates in detail the statistics of the interactions of photons and charged particles with the tungsten layers in the LAT, and uses the scattering distributions to compute the full probability distribution over the energy and direction of the incident photons. It uses model selection methods to estimate the probabilities of the possible geometrical configurations of the particles produced in the detector, and numerical marginalization over the energy loss and scattering angles at each layer. Preliminary results show that it can improve on the tracker-only energy estimates for muons and electrons incident on the LAT.

  14. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  15. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  16. Swift and GLAST Cooperative Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Because gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) instrument teams are eagerly anticipating coordinated observations with the Swift observatory. Swift and GLAST combined cover most of twelve orders of magnitude in the electromagnetic spectrum, offering numerous opportunities for cooperation. Three of the high-priority interests are: (1) gamma-ray burst studies; (2) broad-spectrum studies of blazars in both quiescent and flaring states; and (3) identification and detailed study of unidentified gamma-ray sources.

  17. The GLAST Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the GLAST Guest Investigator (GI) program, which will support basic research relevant to the GLAST mission in yearly cycles beginning approximately two months after launch. Current details about the GLAST GI program will always be posted on the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) website: http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/.

  18. Pre-launch Estimates for GLAST Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.A.; Berenji, B.; Bertone, G.; Bergstrom, L.; Bloom, E.; Bringmann, T.; Chiang, J.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Edmonds, Y.; Edsjo, J.; Godfrey, G.; Hughes, R.E.; Johnson, R.P.; Lionetto, A.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Nuss, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Rando, R.; /INFN, Padua /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /Ohio State U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ohio State U.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to indirectly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through the {gamma}-ray signal that their pair annihilation produces. WIMPs are among the favorite candidates to explain the compelling evidence that about 80% of the mass in the Universe is non-baryonic dark matter (DM). They are serendipitously motivated by various extensions of the standard model of particle physics such as Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). With its unprecedented sensitivity and its very large energy range (20 MeV to more than 300 GeV) the main instrument on board the GLAST satellite, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will open a new window of discovery. As our estimates show, the LAT will be able to detect an indirect DM signature for a large class of WIMP models given a cuspy profile for the DM distribution. Using the current state of the art Monte Carlo and event reconstruction software developed within the LAT collaboration, we present preliminary sensitivity studies for several possible sources inside and outside the Galaxy. We also discuss the potential of the LAT to detect UED via the electron/positron channel. Diffuse background modeling and other background issues that will be important in setting limits or seeing a signal are presented.

  19. GLAST large area telescope - daily survey of high energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi

    2003-07-01

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as a follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore a wide range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20MeV to 300GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e+e- pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit (~ 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity. The instrument has been prototyped twice between 1995 and 2001, designed almost to the Flight Model by the international collaboration of the US (NASA and DoE), France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden. The first prototype consisted of one tower of e+e- pair trackers, one block of segmented calorimeters and a smaller set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles (Beam Test Engineering Model, BTEM), which was put into e+, p, and γ beams at SLAC in the winter of 1999-2000. It was subsequently modified for a balloon experiment (Balloon Flight Engineering Model, BFEM) and flown at Palestine, Texas in August 2001. Data collected in the test experiments have been analyzed and compared with predictions of computer simulation codes such as Geant4. These studies have confirmed validity of the basic design, brought up a few issues for further improvement, and gathered data on

  20. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; vonKienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Steinle, Helmut; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to approx. 8 kev, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 kev to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be approx. 0.7 photon/cm2/s and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 degrees.

  1. LAT Perspectives in Detection of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Ormes, J. F.; Funk, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) science objectives and capabilities in the detection of high energy electrons in the energy range from 20 GeV to approx. 1 TeV are presented. LAT simulations are used to establish the event selections. It is found that maintaining the efficiency of electron detection at the level of 30% the residual hadron contamination does not exceed 2-3% of the electron flux. LAT should collect approx. ten million of electrons with the energy above 20 GeV for each year of observation. Precise spectral reconstruction with high statistics presents us with a unique opportunity to investigate several important problems such as studying galactic models of IC radiation, revealing the signatures of nearby sources such as high energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, testing the propagation model, and searching for KKDM particles decay through their contribution to the electron spectrum.

  2. Gev Gamma-ray Astronomy in the Era of GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a high energy astronomy mission planned for launch in 2005. GLAST features two instruments; the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating from 20 MeV - 300 GeV and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating from 10 keV - 25 MeV. GLAST observations will contribute to our understanding of active galactic nuclei and their jets, gamma-ray bursts, extragalactic and galactic diffuse emissions, dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, and the unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources. The LAT sensitivity is 4 x 10(exp -9) photons per square centimeter per second (greater than 100 MeV) for a one year all-sky survey, which is a factor of greater than 20 better than CGRO/EGRET. GLAST spectral observations of gamma-ray bursts cover over 6 orders of magnitude in energy thanks to the context observations of the GBM. The upper end of the LAT energy range merges with the low energy end of ground-based observatories to provide a remarkable new perspective on particle acceleration in the Universe.

  3. The Utilization of the RCT Telescope for Studies of Blazar Continuum Emission during the GLAST Gamma-Ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Cominsky, L.; Spear, G.; Carinni, M.; Gelderman, R.; McGruder, C. H.; Guinan, E.; Howell, S.; Davis, D. R.; Everett, M.; Walter, D. K.

    2003-05-01

    The RCT Consortium successfully proposed to refurbish and automate the Kitt Peak 1.3-m telescope, and to operate it as the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT). Refurbishment is nearing completion, and observations have begun. The capabilities of the RCT for broad-band optical photometry will be described. A program for systematic optical monitoring of blazars with the RCT is planned. We anticipate that an important utilization of the RCT will be in conjunction with multi-wavelength studies of blazar continuum emission during the operation of NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) satellite, now scheduled for launch in 2006. Refurbishment of the RCT has been made possible by NASA grant NAG58762.

  4. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  5. Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Godfrey, G.; Williams, S. M.; Grove, J. E.; Mizuno, T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Kamae, T.; Ampe, J.; Briber, Stuart; Dann, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (greater than 20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under conditions similar to those expected in orbit. Results from a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on August 4, 2001, show that the BFEM successfully obtained gamma-ray data in this high-background environment.

  6. Gamma-ray Emission from the Sun: A Study with EGRET Data and Perspectives for GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena; Strong, A. W.

    2008-03-01

    The Sun has recently been predicted to be an extended source of gamma-ray emission, produced by inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic-ray electrons on the solar radiation field. The emission was predicted to be extended and a confusing foreground for the diffuse extragalactic background even at large angular distances from the Sun. The solar disk is also expected to be a steady gamma-ray source. Analyzing the EGRET database, we find evidence of emission from the solar disk and its halo (Orlando and Strong 2008,arXiv:0801.2178). The observations are compared with our model for the extended emission. The spectrum of the solar disk emission and the spectrum of the extended emission have been obtained. The spectrum of the moon is also given. The observed intensity distribution and the flux are consistent with the predicted model of IC gamma-rays from the halo around the Sun. This emission is expected to be readily detectable in the future by GLAST, and we describe the perspectives for what can be learned from this upcoming mission.

  7. GLAST Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a satellite-based observatory under construction to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its launch in 2007, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations, Lorentz invariance violation, and exotic relics from the Big Bang. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk will include a brief description of the instruments, the collaboration of particle physicists and high energy astrophysicist, the mission status, and the opportunities and support for guest observers.

  8. Supporting the GLAST User Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Science Support Center (GSSC) is the scientific community's interface with GLAST. The GSSC will provide data, analysis software and documentation. In addition, the GSSC will administer the guest investigator program for NASA HQ. Consequently, the GSSC will provide proposal preparation tools to assist proposers in assessing the feasibility of observing sources of interest.

  9. Explore Physics Beyond the Standard Model with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Lionetto, A. M.

    2007-07-12

    We give an overview of the possibility of GLAST to explore theories beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Among the wide taxonomy we will focus in particular on low scale supersymmetry and theories with extra space-time dimensions. These theories give a suitable dark matter candidate whose interactions and composition can be studied using a gamma ray probe. We show the possibility of GLAST to disentangle such exotic signals from a standard production background.

  10. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  11. New Results on High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons Observed with Fermi LAT and Their Implications on the Models of Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes, in detail, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). Observations made from the June 11, 2008 launch and a discussion of observations made of high energy cosmic ray electrons is also presented.

  12. The GLAST Science Support Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Staff, GSSC

    2006-09-01

    The GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) will serve as the primary interface between the GLAST mission and the scientific community. The GSSC will support the planning and scheduling of science observations, as well as establishing and maintaining a publicly accessible archive of all GLAST data products. Data analysis software and documentation will also be maintained and disseminated by the GSSC. In addition, the GSSC will administer the guest investigator program for NASA HQ and provide proposal preparation tools, documentation as well as technical and scientific support. We will describe our plans for each of these activities, as well as offering a preview of the forthcoming NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for the Cycle-1 GLAST Guest Investigator Program.

  13. Status of GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large-area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rochester, L.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    GLAST is a satellite-based observatory consisting of the Large-Area Telescope (LAT), a modular 4 x 4-tower pair-conversion telescope with a field-of-view greater than 2 steradians, capable of measuring gamma-ray energies in the range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), a set of NaI and BGO detectors covering 8 steradians and sensitive to photons with energies between 10 keV and 25 MeV, allowing for correlative observations of transient events. The observatory is currently being constructed and is scheduled to be launched in August 2007.

  14. Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

  15. The Nature of the Most Extreme Cosmic Explosions: Broadband Studies of Fermi LAT GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Lauren; Troja, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the five years since its launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has revealed a population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that are among the most energetic explosions ever observed. While typical GRB afterglows are observed from radio to X-rays, afterglows of Fermi LAT GRBs are detected up to GeV energies, challenging our understanding of GRB emission mechanisms and central engines. There are now a significant number of LAT-detected GRBs with multi-wavelength afterglow data and measured redshifts that allow us to investigate potential correlations between this high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission and the afterglow parameters and determine if any particular conditions (e.g., weak magnetic field or low density medium) must be met by the progenitor system in order to generate the bright GeV emission. We developed an afterglow fitting code to model and fit the broadband afterglow data in counts space, allowing us to directly test the model predictions on the observed data. The uncertainties in our results were derived using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which allows us to uncover degeneracies between the physical parameters of the explosion. Here we present the preliminary results of our study of the population of Fermi LAT-detected GRBs.

  16. Future GLAST Observations of SNRs and PWNe

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /SLAC

    2007-10-10

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbor a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of Diffusive shock acceleration. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are also known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy. {gamma}-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes through the following channels: ultra-relativistic electrons emit {gamma}-radiation through Inverse Compton scattering in ubiquitous photon fields (such as CMBR), protons emit {gamma}-radiation through the decay of {pi}{sup 0}s, generated in hadronic interactions with Interstellar material such as gas clouds. The upcoming GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a so-far rather poorly investigated energy band to address important questions in our understanding of both shell-type SNRs and PWNe.

  17. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in t he 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensi tivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand part icle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified ga mma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Uni verse. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  18. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in the 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensitivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand particle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified gamma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Universe. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  19. Design and Characteristics of the Anticoincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Johnson, T. E.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) is the outermost detector layer in the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), surrounding the top and sides of the tracker. The purpose of the ACD is to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly charged relativistic particles, but must also have low sensitivity to backsplash particles. These are products of high- energy interactions in the LAT calorimeter. They can cause a veto signal in the ACD, resulting in loss of good gamma-ray events.

  20. The anti-coincidence detector for the GLAST large area telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.; Amato, M. J.; Johnson, T. E.; Segal, K. N.; Sheppard, D. A.

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LATs first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3 5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and four sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of ˜8.3 m2. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  1. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  2. LAT Software Induced Savings on Medical Costs of Alcohol Addicts' Care - Results from a Matched-Pairs Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo; Jovanovic, Mirjana; Rancic, Nemanja; Vyssoki, Benjamin; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Lesch Alcoholism Typology (LAT) is one of the most widely used clinical typologies of alcohol addiction. Study tested whether introduction of LAT software in clinical practice leaded to improved outcomes and reduced costs. Retrospective matched-pairs case-control cost comparison study was conducted at the Regional Addiction Center of the University Clinic in Serbia involving 250 patients during the four-year period. Mean relapse frequency followed by outpatient detoxification was 0.42±0.90 vs. 0.70±1.66 (LAT/non-LAT; p = 0.267). Adding relapses after inpatient treatment total mean-number of relapses per patient was 0.70±1.74 vs. 0.97±1.89 (LAT/non-LAT; p = 0.201). However, these relapse frequency differentials were not statistically significant. Total hospital costs of Psychiatry clinic based non-LAT addicts' care (€54,660) were significantly reduced to €36,569 after initiation of LAT. Mean total cost per patient was reduced almost by half after initiation of LAT based treatment: €331±381 vs. €626±795 (LAT/non-LAT; p = 0.001). Mean cost of single psychiatry clinic admission among non-LAT treatment group was €320±330 (CI 95% 262–378) and among LAT €197±165 (CI 95% 168–226) (p = 0.019). Mean LAT software induced net savings on psychiatric care costs were €144 per patient. Total net savings on hospital care including F10 associated somatic co-morbidities amounted to €295 per patient. More sensitive diagnostic assessment and sub-type specific pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy following implementation of LAT software lead to significant savings on costs of hospital care. PMID:25379730

  3. LAT software induced savings on medical costs of alcohol addicts' care--results from a matched-pairs case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo; Jovanovic, Mirjana; Rancic, Nemanja; Vyssoki, Benjamin; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Lesch Alcoholism Typology (LAT) is one of the most widely used clinical typologies of alcohol addiction. Study tested whether introduction of LAT software in clinical practice leaded to improved outcomes and reduced costs. Retrospective matched-pairs case-control cost comparison study was conducted at the Regional Addiction Center of the University Clinic in Serbia involving 250 patients during the four-year period. Mean relapse frequency followed by outpatient detoxification was 0.42 ± 0.90 vs. 0.70 ± 1.66 (LAT/non-LAT; p = 0.267). Adding relapses after inpatient treatment total mean-number of relapses per patient was 0.70 ± 1.74 vs. 0.97 ± 1.89 (LAT/non-LAT; p = 0.201). However, these relapse frequency differentials were not statistically significant. Total hospital costs of Psychiatry clinic based non-LAT addicts' care (€ 54,660) were significantly reduced to € 36,569 after initiation of LAT. Mean total cost per patient was reduced almost by half after initiation of LAT based treatment: € 331 ± 381 vs. € 626 ± 795 (LAT/non-LAT; p = 0.001). Mean cost of single psychiatry clinic admission among non-LAT treatment group was € 320 ± 330 (CI 95% 262-378) and among LAT € 197 ± 165 (CI 95% 168-226) (p = 0.019). Mean LAT software induced net savings on psychiatric care costs were € 144 per patient. Total net savings on hospital care including F10 associated somatic co-morbidities amounted to € 295 per patient. More sensitive diagnostic assessment and sub-type specific pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy following implementation of LAT software lead to significant savings on costs of hospital care.

  4. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  5. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A. W.; Charles, E.

    2007-07-12

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration and Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  6. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; /SLAC

    2007-10-16

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  7. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgland, A. W.; Charles, E.

    2007-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  8. Definition of a Twelve-Point Polygonal SAA Boundaryfor the GLAST Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; /UC, Santa Cruz /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), set to launch in early 2008, detects gamma rays within a huge energy range of 100 MeV - 300 GeV. Background cosmic radiation interferes with such detection resulting in confusion over distinguishing cosmic from gamma rays encountered. This quandary is resolved by encasing GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) with an Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), a device which identifies and vetoes charged particles. The ACD accomplishes this through plastic scintillator tiles; when cosmic rays strike, photons produced induce currents in Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) attached to these tiles. However, as GLAST orbits Earth at altitudes {approx}550km and latitudes between -26 degree and 26 degree, it will confront the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), a region of high particle flux caused by trapped radiation in the geomagnetic field. Since the SAA flux would degrade the sensitivity of the ACD's PMTs over time, a determined boundary enclosing this region need be attained, signaling when to lower the voltage on the PMTs as a protective measure. The operational constraints on such a boundary require a convex SAA polygon with twelve edges, whose area is minimal ensuring GLAST has maximum observation time. The AP8 and PSB97 models describing the behavior of trapped radiation were used in analyzing the SAA and defining a convex SAA boundary of twelve sides. The smallest possible boundary was found to cover 14.58% of GLAST's observation time. Further analysis of defining a boundary safety margin to account for inaccuracies in the models reveals if the total SAA hull area is increased by {approx}20%, the loss of total observational area is < 5%. These twelve coordinates defining the SAA flux region are ready for implementation by the GLAST satellite.

  9. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors In The Glast Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors operating in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. The detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. Coordination of the Swift and GLAST observing plans consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts.

  10. A Catalog of Candidate High-redshift Blazars for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Tersi M.; /SLAC /San Francisco State U.

    2006-09-27

    High-redshift blazars are promising candidates for detection by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST, expected to be launched in the Fall of 2007, is a high-energy gamma-ray observatory designed for making observations of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy band extending from 10 MeV to more than 200 GeV. It is estimated that GLAST will find several thousand blazars. The motivations for measuring the gamma-ray emission from distant blazars include the study of the high-energy emission processes occurring in these sources and an indirect measurement of the extragalactic background light. In anticipation of the launch of GLAST we have compiled a catalog of candidate high-redshift blazars. The criteria for sources chosen for the catalog were: high radio emission, high redshift, and a flat radio spectrum. A preliminary list of 307 radio sources brighter than 70mJy with a redshift z {ge} 2.5 was acquired using data from the NASA Extragalactic Database. Flux measurements of each source were obtained at two or more radio frequencies from surveys and catalogs to calculate their radio spectral indices {alpha}. The sources with a flat-radio spectrum ({alpha} {le} 0.5) were selected for the catalog, and the final catalog includes about 200 sources.

  11. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  12. The GLAST Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, P.; Graves, T.; Silva, S.; Simonnet, A.; Spear, G.; Cominsky, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in 2007, is a NASA mission designed to observe gamma rays from the most energetic objects in the Universe. The NASA Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Group at Sonoma State University is the lead institution for GLAST E/PO. Given the size of the mission itself, we have planned and are executing an ambitious outreach program, including 1) an educators guide with activities (and a beautiful poster) designed to bring the science of active galaxies into the classroom; 2) a series of classroom modules by TOPS Learning Systems, Inc. that uses the GLAST mission to teach logarithms, powers of ten, and the scale of the Universe; 3) a robotic telescope in Sonoma County, California to observe GLAST targets, aiding not only GLAST science but also teaching students how astronomers process astronomical data; 4) ten Educator Ambassadors: award-winning teachers who help the E/PO group develop, test, and disseminate educational products; 5) an interactive Virtual Visitor Center web site for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, featuring an interactive simulation of GLAST's main gamma ray detector, which is being built by the US Department of Energy, and institutions in Italy, Japan, France and Sweden; 6) a one-hour PBS NOVA television show about black holes; 7) an interactive web-based Space Mystery which teaches students about active galaxies; 8) a series of educator workshops across the country to train teachers how to use the GLAST products; 9) an educators guide based on the high-energy physics of supernovae; and 10) extensive assessment by external evaluators at WestEd. More educational materials and information about the GLAST E/PO program can be found at http://glast.sonoma.edu.

  13. Searching for the first blazars with LMT and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Linan, Gustavo M.; Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-07-12

    Massive star formation and black hole growth are prone to be linked in massive protogalaxies. This relation has been studied at low redshifts, pointing to active galactic nuclei growing within dust enshrouded high redshift galaxies, a prime target of the Large Millimeter Telescope. The coincidence of GLAST sources with highly-obscured high-redshift LMT/GTM galaxies can be a powerful tool for studying the formation of the first blazars.

  14. The Trigger And Onboard Filter of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Grove, J.E.; Kocian, M.; Ritz, S.; Russell, J.J.; Siskind, E.; Smith, P.; Winer, B.; Usher, T.; /SLAC

    2007-11-13

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena. Achieving this capability requires a hardware trigger and onboard software event filters that are robust and highly efficient for gamma rays while keeping the event rates due to the much larger fluxes of charged particle backgrounds at an acceptable level. Because of the important discovery windows for science and the uncertainties in the background fluxes, configuration flexibility is a particularly important system feature. This poster describes the purposes and architecture of the system, the components and capabilities of the hardware trigger and onboard software filters, testing and operation experience on the ground, and the on-orbit operations plan and expected performance.

  15. Study of LAT1 Expression in Brain Metastases: Towards a Better Understanding of the Results of Positron Emission Tomography Using Amino Acid Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Papin-Michault, Caroline; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Dufour, Maxime; Almairac, Fabien; Coutts, Mickael; Patouraux, Stéphanie; Virolle, Thierry; Darcourt, Jacques; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using radiolabeled amino acid (PET-AA) appears to be promising in distinguishing between recurrent tumour and radionecrosis in the follow-up of brain metastasis (BM). The amino acid transporter LAT1 and its cofactor CD98, which are involved in AA uptake, have never been investigated in BM. The aim of our study was to determine and compare the expression of LAT1 and CD98 in BM and in non-tumoral brain tissue (NT). The expression of LAT1 and CD98 were studied by immunohistochemistry in 67 BM, including 18 BM recurrences after radiotherapy, in 53 NT, and in 13 cases of patients with previously irradiated brain tumor and investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET. LAT1 and CD98 expression were detected in 98.5% and 59.7% of BM respectively and were significantly associated with BM tissue as compared to NT (p<0.001). LAT1 expression in recurrent BM was significantly increased as compared to newly occurring BM. Ten cases investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET corresponding to recurrent BM displayed significant [18F] FDOPA uptake and LAT1 overexpression whereas three cases corresponding to radionecrosis showed no or low uptake and LAT1 expression. LAT1 expression level and [18F] FDOPA uptake were significantly correlated. In conclusion, we hypothesized that BM may overexpress the AA transporter LAT1. We have shown that LAT1 overexpression was common in BM and was specific for BM as compared to healthy brain. These results could explain the specific BM uptake on PET-AA. PMID:27276226

  16. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET have prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space-based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that will increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays, and the triggering capability of the instrument. The GLAST proposal is based on the assertion that silicon particle detectors are the technology of choice for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST Tracker has planes of thin radiatior interspersed with planes of crossed-strip (x,y) 300-{mu}m-pitch silicon detectors to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers ({approximately}5 cm) provides a lever arm in track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of 0.1{degree} at high energy (the low energy angular resolution at 100 MeV would be about 2{degree}, limited by multiple scattering). A possible GLAST calorimeter is made of a mosaic of Csl crystals of order 10 r.l. in depth, with silicon photodiodes readout. The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET`s extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  17. GLAST (FERMI) Data-Processing Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Flath, Daniel L.; Johnson, Tony S.; Turri, Massimiliano; Heidenreich, Karen A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    The Data Processing Pipeline ('Pipeline') has been developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) which launched June 11, 2008. It generically processes graphs of dependent tasks, maintaining a full record of its state, history and data products. The Pipeline is used to automatically process the data down-linked from the satellite and to deliver science products to the GLAST collaboration and the Science Support Center and has been in continuous use since launch with great success. The pipeline handles up to 2000 concurrent jobs and in reconstructing science data produces approximately 750GB of data products using 1/2 CPU-year of processing time per day.

  18. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than in normal tissues. Additionally, MM with distant metastasis showed a higher expression than those without distant metastasis. Functional analysis of LAT1 was performed on one of the five cell lines, CMeC-1. [{sup 3}H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM

  19. Searches for WIMP Annihilation with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, L.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    We describe signatures for WIMP annihilation in the gamma ray sky which can be observed by the GLAST mission, scheduled for launch in 2007. We review the search regions, which range from galactic substructure in the Milky Way all the way out to cosmological sources.

  20. GLAST observation of high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca; Omodei, Nicola

    2007-07-12

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) rates with the observed long-duration Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift, by assuming different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological types. Due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict a large number of GRBs beyond z > 7. Moreover, based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this burst population is presented.

  1. The Expression of Glutamate Aspartate Transporter (GLAST) within the Human Cochlea and its Distribution in Various Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sameer; Vorasubin, Nopawan; Lopez, Ivan A; Hosokawa, Seiji; Ishiyama, Gail; Ishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate plays an important role in the central nervous system as an excitatory neurotransmitter. However, its abundance can lead to excitotoxicity which necessitates the proper function of active glutamate transporters. The glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST) has been shown to exist and function within non-human cochlear specimens regulating the inner ear glutamate concentration. In this study, we examined micro-dissected human cochleas from formalin-fixed celloidin-embedded temporal bone specimens of three different types of patients (Meniere's disease, normal controls, and other otopathologic conditions) and examined the differential expression of GLAST in the spiral ligament of the basal, middle, and apical turns of the cochlea. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with polyclonal antibodies against GLAST and image analysis was carried out with the Image J analysis software. In contrast to other studies with non-human specimens, GLAST was expressed in the spiral ligament fibrocytes but was not detected in the satellite cells of the spiral ganglia or supporting cells of the organ of Corti in the human cochlea. Our data also showed that GLAST expression significantly differs in the basal and apical turns of the cochlea. Lastly, post-hoc analysis showed a difference in the GLAST immunoreactive area of patients with Meniere's disease when compared to that of patients with other otopathologic conditions—such as presbycusis or ototoxicity. These results may potentially lead to further understanding of different disease states that affect hearing. PMID:23850643

  2. The Origin of Cosmic Rays: What can GLAST Say?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F.; Digel, Seith; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Moiseev, Alexander; Williamson, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Gamma rays in the band from 30 MeV to 300 GeV, used in combination with direct measurements and with data from radio and X-ray bands, provide a powerful tool for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) with its fine 10-20 arcmin angular resolution will be able to map the sites of acceleration of cosmic rays and their interactions with interstellar matter, It will provide information that is necessary to study the acceleration of energetic particles in supernova shocks, their transport in the interstellar medium and penetration into molecular clouds.

  3. High efficiency plastic scintillator detector with wavelength-shifting fiber readout for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Deering, P. L.; Hartman, R. C.; Johnson, T. E.; Nebel, T. R.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the design and performance studies of the scintillator tile detectors for the anti-coincidence detector (ACD) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in early 2008. The scintillator tile detectors utilize wavelength-shifting fibers and have dual-photomultiplier-tube readout. The design requires highly efficient and uniform detection of singly charged relativistic particles over the tile area and must meet all requirements for a launch, as well as operation in a space environment. We present here the design of three basic types of tiles used in the ACD, ranging in size from ˜450 to ˜2500 cm2, all ˜1 cm thick, with different shapes, and with photoelectron yield of ˜20 photoelectrons per minimum ionizing particle at normal tile incidence, uniform over the tile area. Some tiles require flexible clear fiber cables up to 1.5 m long to deliver scintillator light to remotely located photomultiplier tubes.

  4. Force Measurement on the GLAST Delta II Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the interface force measurement at spacecraft separation of GLAST Delta II. The contents include: 1) Flight Force Measurement (FFM) Background; 2) Team Members; 3) GLAST Mission Overview; 4) Methodology Development; 5) Ground Test Validation; 6) Flight Data; 7) Coupled Loads Simulation (VCLA & Reconstruction); 8) Basedrive Simulation; 9) Findings; and 10) Summary and Conclusions.

  5. GLAST Prospects for Swift-Era Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, L.J.; Meszaros, P.; /Penn State U.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate the GeV spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows produced by inverse Compton scattering of these objects sub-MeV emission. We improve on earlier treatments by using refined afterglow parameters and new model developments motivated by recent Swift observations. We present time-dependent GeV spectra for standard, constant-parameter models, as well as for models with energy injection and with time-varying parameters, for a range of burst parameters. We evaluate the limiting redshift to which such afterglows can be detected by the GLAST Large Area Telescope, as well as by AGILE.

  6. Fate mapping by piggyBac transposase reveals that neocortical GLAST+ progenitors generate more astrocytes than Nestin+ progenitors in rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Faez; Chen, Fuyi; Aron, Abraham W; Fiondella, Christopher G; Patel, Komal; LoTurco, Joseph J

    2014-02-01

    Progenitors within the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ) first generate pyramidal neurons and then astrocytes. We applied novel piggyBac transposase lineage tracking methods to fate-map progenitor populations positive for Nestin or glutamate and aspartate transpoter (GLAST) promoter activities in the rat neocortex. GLAST+ and Nestin+ progenitors at embryonic day 13 (E13) produce lineages containing similar rations of neurons and astrocytes. By E15, the GLAST+ progenitor population diverges significantly to produce lineages with 5-10-fold more astrocytes relative to neurons than generated by the Nestin+ population. To determine when birth-dated progeny within GLAST+ and Nestin+ populations diverge, we used a Cre/loxP fate-mapping system in which plasmids are lost after a cell division. By E18, birth-dated progeny of GLAST+ progenitors give rise to 2-3-fold more neocortical astrocytes than do Nestin+ progenitors. Finally, we used a multicolor clonal labeling method to show that the GLAST+ population labeled at E15 generates astrocyte progenitors that produce larger, spatially restricted, clonal clusters than the Nestin+ population. This study provides in vivo evidence that by mid-corticogenesis (E15), VZ progenitor populations have significantly diversified in terms of their potential to generate astrocytes and neurons.

  7. Swift Late GRB Emission and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nathaniel

    2007-07-12

    Recent observations of early X-ray afterglows of GRBs by the Swift satellite - prior to t {approx} 103s but well after the end of the burst - show most GRBs to be followed by highly time and energy variable emission. This was unexpected prior to Swift and physical mechanisms remain largely mysterious. The spectra exhibit a strong hard-to-soft evolution which tracks the flux, consistent with a well-established hardness intensity correlation for the prompt Gamma-ray emission. The light curves show dramatic flares or rapid logarithmic time decays. In the simplest interpretation, this emission is GRB-like and indicates a long lived energy source with the possibility of interacting shells of widely varying bulk Lorentz factor. We review the phenomenology in order to ascertain how GLAST observations of this early emission, either detected directly or through the detection of inverse-Compton emission, can help to rule on possible models.

  8. The LAT story: a tale of cooperativity, coordination, and choreography.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Coussens, Nathan P; Sherman, Eilon; Samelson, Lawrence E; Sommers, Connie L

    2010-08-01

    The adapter molecule LAT is a nucleating site for multiprotein signaling complexes that are vital for the function and differentiation of T cells. Extensive investigation of LAT in multiple experimental systems has led to an integrated understanding of the formation, composition, regulation, dynamic movement, and function of LAT-nucleated signaling complexes. This review discusses interactions of signaling molecules that bind directly or indirectly to LAT and the role of cooperativity in stabilizing LAT-nucleated signaling complexes. In addition, it focuses on how imaging studies visualize signaling assemblies as signaling clusters and demonstrate their dynamic nature and cellular fate. Finally, this review explores the function of LAT based on the interpretation of mouse models using various LAT mutants.

  9. Cap and trade schemes on waste management: A case study of the Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) in England

    SciTech Connect

    Calaf-Forn, Maria; Roca, Jordi; Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • LATS has been effective to achieve a reduction of the amount of landfilled waste. • LATS has been one of the few environmental instruments for waste management with a cap and trade methodology. • LATS has achieved to increase recycling of the biodegradable and other waste fractions. - Abstract: The Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) is one of the main instruments used in England to enforce the landfill diversion targets established in the Directive 1999/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste (Landfill Directive). Through the LATS, biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) allowances for landfilling are allocated to each local authority, otherwise known as waste disposal authorities (WDAs). The quantity of landfill allowances received is expected to decrease continuously from 2005/06 to 2019/20 so as to meet the objectives of the Landfill Directive. To achieve their commitments, WDAs can exchange, buy, sell or transfer allowances among each other, or may re-profile their own allocation through banking and/or borrowing. Despite the goals for the first seven years – which included two target years (2005/06 and 2009/10) – being widely achieved (the average allocation of allowances per WDA was 22.9% higher than those finally used), market activity among WDAs was high and prices were not very stable. Results in terms of waste reduction and recycling levels have been satisfactory. The reduction of BMW landfilled (in percentage) was higher during the first seven years of the LATS period (2005/06–2011/12) (around 7% annually) than during the previous period (2001/02–2004/05) (4.2% annually). Since 2008, the significance of the LATS diminished because of an increase in the rate of the UK Landfill Tax. The LATS was suppressed after the 2012/13 target year, before what it was initially scheduled. The purpose of this paper is to describe the particularities of the LATS, analyse its performance as

  10. Cap and trade schemes on waste management: a case study of the landfill allowance trading scheme (LATS) in England.

    PubMed

    Calaf-Forn, Maria; Roca, Jordi; Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi

    2014-05-01

    The Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) is one of the main instruments used in England to enforce the landfill diversion targets established in the Directive 1999/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste (Landfill Directive). Through the LATS, biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) allowances for landfilling are allocated to each local authority, otherwise known as waste disposal authorities (WDAs). The quantity of landfill allowances received is expected to decrease continuously from 2005/06 to 2019/20 so as to meet the objectives of the Landfill Directive. To achieve their commitments, WDAs can exchange, buy, sell or transfer allowances among each other, or may re-profile their own allocation through banking and/or borrowing. Despite the goals for the first seven years - which included two target years (2005/06 and 2009/10) - being widely achieved (the average allocation of allowances per WDA was 22.9% higher than those finally used), market activity among WDAs was high and prices were not very stable. Results in terms of waste reduction and recycling levels have been satisfactory. The reduction of BMW landfilled (in percentage) was higher during the first seven years of the LATS period (2005/06-2011/12) (around 7% annually) than during the previous period (2001/02-2004/05) (4.2% annually). Since 2008, the significance of the LATS diminished because of an increase in the rate of the UK Landfill Tax. The LATS was suppressed after the 2012/13 target year, before what it was initially scheduled. The purpose of this paper is to describe the particularities of the LATS, analyse its performance as a waste management policy, make a comparison with the Landfill Tax, discuss its main features as regards efficiency, effectiveness and the application of the "polluter pays" principle and finally discuss if the effect of the increase in the Landfill Tax is what made the LATS ultimately unnecessary.

  11. Changing Horses in Midstream: Fermi LAT Computing and SCons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogart, J. R.; Golpayegani, N.

    2011-07-01

    (For the Fermi LAT Collaboration) Several years into GLAST (now Fermi) offline software development it became evident we would need a replacement for our original build system, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) developed at CERN, in order to support Mac users and to keep pace with newer compilers and operating system versions on our traditional platforms, Linux and Windows. The open source product SCons emerged as the only viable alternative and development began in earnest several months before Fermi's successful launch in June of 2008. Over two years later the conversion is nearing completion. This paper describes the conversion to and our use of SCons, concentrating on the resulting environment for users and developers and how it was achieved. Topics discussed include SCons and its interaction with Fermi code, GoGui, a cross-platform gui for Fermi developers, and issues specific to Windows developer support.

  12. Fermi (nee GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  13. Fermi (Formerly GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  14. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  15. The Large Millimeter Telescope in the GLAST era

    SciTech Connect

    Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-07-12

    The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) was inaugurated on November 22, 2006. LMT will soon start commissioning and is expected to enter full science operations by 2008. With a 50m aperture, LMT will be the largest millimeter telescope and can become a powerful multiwavelength partner for GLAST. LMT will probe star formation at very high redshifts and can be used jointly with GLAST to uncover relativistic jet engines of flaring AGNs and GRBs. It will map with high resolution the distribution of molecular gas in nearby galaxies and in extended molecular clouds, providing an important input for gamma-ray emission models. These possibilities are a sample of how the Large Millimeter Telescope, working in a coordinated manner with GLAST, can become a powerful tool for high energy astrophysics.

  16. Testing Gravity with GLAST: GRBs Lensed by Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Matthew; Keeton, C. R.

    2007-05-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum model of branework gravity, very low mass (<10-18 Msun) primordial black holes could persist to the present day. Keeton & Petters have calculated the gravitational lensing effects of such primordial braneworld black holes. Although the direct lensing effects are too small to be observed, the time delay between images produces interference fringes in the energy spectrum at wavelengths which will be accessible to GLAST in gamma ray bursts. This phenomenon is dubbed "attolensing." Assuming such primordial black holes comprise some fraction of the dark matter, we calculate the probability of observing attolensing of a GRB. The most significant contributions to the probability come from black holes outside of the solar system but within the Galaxy; the attolensing probability is on the same order as that of microlensing. We also simulate GLAST observations of attolensed GRBs to demonstrate with what confidence GLAST would be able to detect such an event.

  17. Finding (Or Not) New Gamma-Ray Pulsars with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, Scott M.; /NRAO, Charlottesville

    2011-11-29

    Young energetic pulsars will likely be the largest class of Galactic sources observed by GLAST, with many hundreds detected. Many will be unknown as radio pulsars, making pulsation detection dependent on radio and/or x-ray observations or on blind periodicity searches of the gamma-rays. Estimates for the number of pulsars GLAST will detect in blind searches have ranged from tens to many hundreds. I argue that the number will be near the low end of this range, partly due to observations being made in a scanning as opposed to a pointing mode. This paper briefly reviews how blind pulsar searches will be conducted using GLAST, what limits these searches, and how the computations and statistics scale with various parameters.

  18. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  19. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  20. Construction, Test And Calibration of the GLAST Silicon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Sgro, C.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Bonamente, E.; Borden, T.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; De Angelis, A.; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Trieste /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /SLAC /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Udine U. /Hiroshima U. /Maryland U., JCA /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /JAXA, Sagamihara /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /NASA, Goddard

    2009-06-05

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope represents a great advance in space application of silicon detectors. With a surface of 80 m{sup 2} and about 1 M readout channels it is the largest silicon tracker ever built for a space experiment. GLAST is an astro-particle mission that will study the mostly unexplored, high energy (20 MeV-300 GeV) spectrum coming from active sources or diffused in the Universe. The detector integration and test phase is complete. The full instrument underwent environmental testing and the spacecraft integration phase has just started: the launch is foreseen in late 2007. In the meanwhile the spare modules are being used for instrument calibration and performance verification employing the CERN accelerator complex. A Calibration Unit has been exposed to photon, electron and hadron beams from a few GeV up to 300 GeV. We report on the status of the instrument and on the calibration campaign.

  1. Multiwavelength Study of Fermi-LAT blazars Variability and Radiation Production Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britto, R. J.; Bottacini, E.; Böttcher, M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Buson, S.; Lott, B.; Marais, J. P.; Meintjes, P. J.; Razzaque, S.; van Soelen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Quasars constitute a subclass of radio-loud active galactic nuclei that release a tremendous amount of non-thermal radiation through a pair of twin jets. When one of these jets is aligned close to the direction of the Earth, the object is then called a blazar. A consistent monitoring of these sources can help to unveil physical mechanisms at the origin of the radiation production that spreads throughout the whole electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ rays. The goal of this paper is to report some current works being undertaken in term of both spectral studies and time domain analyses of bright blazars which are observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and by South Africa-based optical telescopes. In particular, we present our recent and current studies on blazars 3C 454.3 and NVSS J141922-083830 respectively.

  2. Posterior cerebellar Purkinje cells in an SCA5/SPARCA1 mouse model are especially vulnerable to the synergistic effect of loss of β-III spectrin and GLAST.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Emma M; Suminaite, Daumante; Clarkson, Yvonne L; Lee, Sin Kwan; Lyndon, Alastair R; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wyllie, David J A; Tanaka, Kohichi; Jackson, Mandy

    2016-08-15

    Clinical phenotypes of spinocerebellar ataxia type-5 (SCA5) and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type-1 (SPARCA1) are mirrored in mice lacking β-III spectrin (β-III(-/-)). One function of β-III spectrin is the stabilization of the Purkinje cell-specific glutamate transporter EAAT4 at the plasma membrane. In β-III(-/-) mice EAAT4 levels are reduced from an early age. In contrast levels of the predominant cerebellar glutamate transporter GLAST, expressed in Bergmann glia, only fall progressively from 3 months onwards. Here we elucidated the roles of these two glutamate transporters in cerebellar pathogenesis mediated through loss of β-III spectrin function by studying EAAT4 and GLAST knockout mice as well as crosses of both with β-III(-/-) mice. Our data demonstrate that EAAT4 loss, but not abnormal AMPA receptor composition, in young β-III(-/-) mice underlies early Purkinje cell hyper-excitability and that subsequent loss of GLAST, superimposed on the earlier deficiency of EAAT4, is responsible for Purkinje cell loss and progression of motor deficits. Yet the loss of GLAST appears to be independent of EAAT4 loss, highlighting that other aspects of Purkinje cell dysfunction underpin the pathogenic loss of GLAST. Finally, our results demonstrate that Purkinje cells in the posterior cerebellum of β-III(-/-) mice are most susceptible to the combined loss of EAAT4 and GLAST, with degeneration of proximal dendrites, the site of climbing fibre innervation, most pronounced. This highlights the necessity for efficient glutamate clearance from these regions and identifies dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission particularly within the posterior cerebellum as a key mechanism in SCA5 and SPARCA1 pathogenesis.

  3. Science of Compact X- and Gamma-ray Sources: MAXI and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    MAXI and GLAST will be surveying the sky simultaneously. Compact objects that may show variability will be excellent targets for coordinated multiwavelength studies. Gamma-ray bursts (and afterglows), pulsars, high-mass X-ray binaries, microquasars, and active galactic nuclei are all objects whose X- and gamma-ray relationship can be explored by such observations. Of particular interest will be variable unidentified gamma-ray sources, whose contemporaneous observations by MAXI may prove decisive in identifying the source of the high-energy emission.

  4. GlastCam: A Telemetry-Driven Spacecraft Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Tsai, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Developed for the GLAST project, which is now the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, GlastCam software ingests telemetry from the Integrated Test and Operations System (ITOS) and generates four graphical displays of geometric properties in real time, allowing visual assessment of the attitude, configuration, position, and various cross-checks. Four windows are displayed: a "cam" window shows a 3D view of the satellite; a second window shows the standard position plot of the satellite on a Mercator map of the Earth; a third window displays star tracker fields of view, showing which stars are visible from the spacecraft in order to verify star tracking; and the fourth window depicts

  5. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  6. Processing GPS Receiver Data for Improved Fermi GLAST Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi GLAST s 5-year mission objectives: a) Explore the most extreme environments in the Universe. b) Search for signs of new laws of physics and what composes the mysterious Dark Matter. c) Explain how black holes accelerate immense jets of material to nearly light speed. d) Help crack the mysteries of gamma-ray bursts. e) Answer long-standing questions across a broad range of topics, including solar flares, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

  7. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  8. The Spectral Index Distribution of EGRET Blazars: Prospects for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; /SLAC

    2011-11-29

    The intrinsic distribution of spectral indices in GeV energies of gamma-ray-loud blazars is a critical input in determining the spectral shape of the unresolved blazar contribution to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, as well as an important test of blazar emission theories. We present a maximum-likelihood method of determining the intrinsic spectral index distribution (ISID) of a population of {gamma}-ray emitters which accounts for error in measurement of individual spectral indices, and we apply it to EGRET blazars. We find that the most likely Gaussian ISID for EGRET blazars has a mean of 2.27 and a standard deviation of 0.20. We additionally find some indication that FSRQs and BL Lacs may have different ISIDs (with BL Lacs being harder). We also test for spectral index hardening associated with blazar variability for which we find no evidence. Finally, we produce simulated GLAST spectral index datasets and perform the same analyses. With improved statistics due to the much larger number of resolvable blazars, GLAST data will help us determine the ISIDs with much improved accuracy. Should any difference exist between the ISIDs of BL Lacs and FSRQs or between the ISIDs of blazars in the quiescent and flaring states, GLAST data will be adequate to separate these ISIDs at a significance better than 3{sigma}.

  9. Activated PLC-γ1 is catalytically induced at LAT but activated PLC-γ1 is localized at both LAT- and TCR-containing complexes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Orcutt, Noemi; Vacaflores, Aldo; Connolly, Sean F; Bunnell, Stephen C; Houtman, Jon C D

    2014-04-01

    Phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) is a key regulator of T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. Activation of the TCR enhances PLC-γ1 enzymatic function, resulting in calcium influx and the activation of PKC family members and RasGRP. The current model is that phosphorylation of LAT tyrosine 132 facilitates the recruitment of PLC-γ1, leading to its activation and function at the LAT complex. In this study, we examined the phosphorylation kinetics of LAT and PLC-γ1 and the cellular localization of activated PLC-γ1. We observed that commencement of the phosphorylation of LAT tyrosine 132 and PLC-γ1 tyrosine 783 occurred simultaneously, supporting the current model. However, once begun, PLC-γ1 activation occurred more rapidly than LAT tyrosine 132. The association of LAT and PLC-γ1 was more transient than the interaction of LAT and Grb2 and a pool of activated PLC-γ1 translocated away from LAT to cellular structures containing the TCR. These studies demonstrate that LAT and PLC-γ1 form transient interactions that catalyze the activation of PLC-γ1, but that activated PLC-γ1 resides in both LAT and TCR clusters. Together, this work highlights that our current model is incomplete and the activation and function of PLC-γ1 in T cells is highly complex.

  10. Pushing the Limits: High Redshift Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Gasparrini, Dario; Lott, Benoit; Cutini, Sara; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift blazars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) are of great astrophysical import as they are extreme objects whose energetics remain a mystery. Such blazars are intrinsically interesting since they inform us about the evolution of gamma-ray blazars and are, by definition, some of the more luminous blazars in the LAT sample. They are also an excellent tool to study the EBL and thus the gamma-ray horizon. We present the latest high redshift blazar detections in the LAT and discuss some of their implications.

  11. Extreme blazars studied with Fermi-lat and Suzaku: 1ES 0347–121 and blazar candidate HESS J1943+213

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Stawarz, Ł.; Finke, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Dermer, C. D.; Kataoka, J.; Bamba, A.; Dubus, G.; Fukazawa, Y.; Thompson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    We report on our study of high-energy properties of two peculiar TeV emitters: the 'extreme blazar' 1ES 0347–121 and the 'extreme blazar candidate' HESS J1943+213 located near the Galactic plane. Both objects are characterized by quiescent synchrotron emission with flat spectra extending up to the hard X-ray range, and both were reported to be missing GeV counterparts in the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) two-year Source Catalog. We analyze a 4.5 yr accumulation of the Fermi-LAT data, resulting in the detection of 1ES 0347–121 in the GeV band, as well as in improved upper limits for HESS J1943+213. We also present the analysis results of newly acquired Suzaku data for HESS J1943+213. The X-ray spectrum is well represented by a single power law extending up to 25 keV with photon index 2.00 ± 0.02 and a moderate absorption in excess of the Galactic value, which is in agreement with previous X-ray observations. No short-term X-ray variability was found over the 80 ks duration of the Suzaku exposure. Under the blazar hypothesis, we modeled the spectral energy distributions of 1ES 0347–121 and HESS J1943+213, and we derived constraints on the intergalactic magnetic field strength and source energetics. We conclude that although the classification of HESS J1943+213 has not yet been determined, the blazar hypothesis remains the most plausible option since, in particular, the broadband spectra of the two analyzed sources along with the source model parameters closely resemble each other, and the newly available Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey data for HESS J1943+213 are consistent with the presence of an elliptical host at the distance of approximately ∼600 Mpc.

  12. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  13. Cosmic rays and their modulation in the heliosphere by studying gamma rays from the Sun with Fermi-LAT: updated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena; Giglietto, Nicola; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Raino', Silvia; Strong, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The Sun is a known quiescent gamma-ray source. Its gamma-ray steady-state, characterized by two distinct emissions, is unique for its spatially and spectrally distinct components: 1) disc emission due by pion decay of CR hadrons interacting with the solar atmosphere; 2) spatially extended emission from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of CR electrons on the solar photons of the heliosphere. Being produced by CRs, which are affected by solar modulation, the intensity of both emissions is expected to be inversely proportional to the solar activity. After the discovery of the quiet solar emission with EGRET, thanks to the high sensitivity of Fermi-LAT we can now monitor the solar steady-state in the various periods of solar activity. The release of Pass 8 data, with its improved event reconstruction and larger effective area, provides a unique opportunity to refine the study and extend it to different solar activities and also to lower and higher energies. In fact a first study was conducted using 18 month of data during low solar activity, where the best model for IC emission was investigated. Now the recent CR electron and positron measurements by Pamela, AMS-02, Fermi, and the changed solar activity call for a more extended analysis. We present here updates on solar IC models based on available CR measurements for different solar activity.

  14. GLAST Burst Monitor Signal Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Meegan, Charles; Paciesas, William; Persyn, Steven; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-07-01

    The onboard Data Processing Unit (DPU), designed and built by Southwest Research Institute, performs the high-speed data acquisition for GBM. The analog signals from each of the 14 detectors are digitized by high-speed multichannel analog data acquisition architecture. The streaming digital values resulting from a periodic (period of 104.2 ns) sampling of the analog signal by the individual ADCs are fed to a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Real-time Digital Signal Processing (DSP) algorithms within the FPGA implement functions like filtering, thresholding, time delay and pulse height measurement. The spectral data with a 12-bit resolution are formatted according to the commandable look-up-table (LUT) and then sent to the High-Speed Science-Date Bus (HSSDB, speed=1.5 MB/s) to be telemetered to ground. The DSP offers a novel feature of a commandable & constant event deadtime. The ADC non-linearities have been calibrated so that the spectral data can be corrected during analysis. The best temporal resolution is 2 μs for the pre-burst & post-trigger time-tagged events (TTE) data. The time resolution of the binned data types is commandable from 64 msec to 1.024 s for the CTIME data (8 channel spectral resolution) and 1.024 to 32.768 s for the CSPEC data (128 channel spectral resolution). The pulse pile-up effects have been studied by Monte Carlo simulations. For a typical GRB, the possible shift in the Epeak value at high-count rates (~100 kHz) is ~1% while the change in the single power-law index could be up to 5%.

  15. GLAST Burst Monitor Signal Processing System

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Meegan, Charles; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Kippen, R. Marc; Persyn, Steven

    2007-07-12

    The onboard Data Processing Unit (DPU), designed and built by Southwest Research Institute, performs the high-speed data acquisition for GBM. The analog signals from each of the 14 detectors are digitized by high-speed multichannel analog data acquisition architecture. The streaming digital values resulting from a periodic (period of 104.2 ns) sampling of the analog signal by the individual ADCs are fed to a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Real-time Digital Signal Processing (DSP) algorithms within the FPGA implement functions like filtering, thresholding, time delay and pulse height measurement. The spectral data with a 12-bit resolution are formatted according to the commandable look-up-table (LUT) and then sent to the High-Speed Science-Date Bus (HSSDB, speed=1.5 MB/s) to be telemetered to ground. The DSP offers a novel feature of a commandable and constant event deadtime. The ADC non-linearities have been calibrated so that the spectral data can be corrected during analysis. The best temporal resolution is 2 {mu}s for the pre-burst and post-trigger time-tagged events (TTE) data. The time resolution of the binned data types is commandable from 64 msec to 1.024 s for the CTIME data (8 channel spectral resolution) and 1.024 to 32.768 s for the CSPEC data (128 channel spectral resolution). The pulse pile-up effects have been studied by Monte Carlo simulations. For a typical GRB, the possible shift in the Epeak value at high-count rates ({approx}100 kHz) is {approx}1% while the change in the single power-law index could be up to 5%.

  16. VERY RAPID HIGH-AMPLITUDE GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY IN LUMINOUS BLAZAR PKS 1510-089 STUDIED WITH FERMI-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y. T.; Madejski, G.; D'Ammando, F.

    2013-03-20

    Here we report on the detailed analysis of the {gamma}-ray light curve of a luminous blazar PKS 1510-089 observed in the GeV range with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi satellite during the period 2011 September-December. By investigating the properties of the detected three major flares with the shortest possible time binning allowed by the photon statistics, we find a variety of temporal characteristics and variability patterns. This includes a clearly asymmetric profile (with a faster flux rise and a slower decay) of the flare resolved on sub-daily timescales, a superposition of many short uncorrelated flaring events forming the apparently coherent longer-duration outburst, and a huge single isolated outburst unresolved down to the timescale of 3 hr. In the latter case we estimate the corresponding {gamma}-ray flux doubling timescale to be below 1 hr, which is extreme and never previously reported for any active galaxy in the GeV range. The other unique finding is that the total power released during the studied rapid and high-amplitude flares constitutes the bulk of the power radiatively dissipated in the source and a significant fraction of the total kinetic luminosity of the underlying relativistic outflow. Our analysis allows us to access directly the characteristic timescales involved in shaping the energy dissipation processes in the source, and to provide constraints on the location and the structure of the blazar emission zone in PKS 1510-089.

  17. Synergy Between Observations of AGN with GLAST and MAXI

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Grzegorz

    2002-03-25

    In five years' time we will witness the launch of two important missions developed to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST, sensitive in the high energy {gamma}-ray band, and MAXI, the all-sky X-ray monitor. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments will be particularly valuable for variable sources, allowing cross-correlations of time series between the two bands. We present the anticipated results from such observations of active galaxies, and in particular, of the jet-dominated sub-class of AGN known as blazars. We discuss the constraints on the structure and emission processes--and in particular, on the internal shock models currently invoked to explain the particle acceleration processes in blazars--that can be derived with simultaneous {gamma}-ray and X-ray data.

  18. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose.

  19. Alterations in the NF2/LATS1/LATS2/YAP Pathway in Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji-Eun; Ohta, Takashi; Satomi, Kaishi; Foll, Matthieu; Durand, Geoffroy; McKay, James; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Mittelbronn, Michel; Brokinkel, Benjamin; Paulus, Werner; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2015-10-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors composed of well-differentiated Schwann cells. Other than frequent NF2 (neurofibromatosis type 2) mutations (50%-60%), their molecular pathogenesis is not fully understood. LATS1 and LATS2 are downstream molecules of NF2 and are negative regulators of the yes-associated protein (YAP) oncogene in the Hippo signaling pathway. We assessed mutations of the NF2, LATS1, and LATS2 genes, promoter methylation of LATS1 and LATS2, and expression of YAP and phosphorylated YAP in 82 cases of sporadic schwannomas. Targeted sequencing using the Ion Torrent Proton instrument revealed NF2 mutations in 45 cases (55%), LATS1 mutations in 2 cases (2%), and LATS2 mutations in 1 case (1%) of schwannoma. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction showed promoter methylation of LATS1 and LATS2 in 14 cases (17%) and 25 cases (30%), respectively. Overall, 62 cases (76%) had at least 1 alteration in the NF2, LATS1, and/or LATS2 genes. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear YAP expression in 18 of 42 cases of schwannoma (43%) and reduced cytoplasmic phosphorylated YAP expression in 15 of 49 cases of schwannoma (31%), all of which had at least 1 alteration in the NF2, LATS1, and/or LATS2 genes. These results suggest that an abnormal Hippo signaling pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of most sporadic schwannomas.

  20. Pulsars above 10 GeV: Fermi LAT Observations and Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The success of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in studying gamma-ray pulsars offers hints about future work above 10 GeV. The infrastructure for discovering pulsars will be similar between LAT and any future telescope. Some of the Fermi LAT results suggest intriguing questions about the future of high-energy pulsar studies.

  1. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  2. Structural Definition and Mass Estimation of Lunar Surface Habitats for the Lunar Architecture Team Phase 2 (LAT-2) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Wu, K, Chauncey; Smith, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    The Lunar Architecture Team Phase 2 study defined and assessed architecture options for a Lunar Outpost at the Moon's South Pole. The Habitation Focus Element Team was responsible for developing concepts for all of the Habitats and pressurized logistics modules particular to each of the architectures, and defined the shapes, volumes and internal layouts considering human factors, surface operations and safety requirements, as well as Lander mass and volume constraints. The Structures Subsystem Team developed structural concepts, sizing estimates and mass estimates for the primary Habitat structure. In these studies, the primary structure was decomposed into a more detailed list of components to be sized to gain greater insight into concept mass contributors. Structural mass estimates were developed that captured the effect of major design parameters such as internal pressure load. Analytical and empirical equations were developed for each structural component identified. Over 20 different hard-shell, hybrid expandable and inflatable soft-shell Habitat and pressurized logistics module concepts were sized and compared to assess structural performance and efficiency during the study. Habitats were developed in three categories; Mini Habs that are removed from the Lander and placed on the Lunar surface, Monolithic habitats that remain on the Lander, and Habitats that are part of the Mobile Lander system. Each category of Habitat resulted in structural concepts with advantages and disadvantages. The same modular shell components could be used for the Mini Hab concept, maximizing commonality and minimizing development costs. Larger Habitats had higher volumetric mass efficiency and floor area than smaller Habitats (whose mass was dominated by fixed items such as domes and frames). Hybrid and pure expandable Habitat structures were very mass-efficient, but the structures technology is less mature, and the ability to efficiently package and deploy internal subsystems

  3. Monoterpene Glycoside ESK246 from Pittosporum Targets LAT3 Amino Acid Transport and Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The l-type amino acid transporter (LAT) family consists of four members (LAT1–4) that mediate uptake of neutral amino acids including leucine. Leucine is not only important as a building block for proteins, but plays a critical role in mTORC1 signaling leading to protein translation. As such, LAT family members are commonly upregulated in cancer in order to fuel increased protein translation and cell growth. To identify potential LAT-specific inhibitors, we established a function-based high-throughput screen using a prefractionated natural product library. We identified and purified two novel monoterpene glycosides, ESK242 and ESK246, sourced from a Queensland collection of the plant Pittosporum venulosum. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing individual LAT family members, we demonstrated that ESK246 preferentially inhibits leucine transport via LAT3, while ESK242 inhibits both LAT1 and LAT3. We further show in LNCaP prostate cancer cells that ESK246 is a potent (IC50 = 8.12 μM) inhibitor of leucine uptake, leading to reduced mTORC1 signaling, cell cycle protein expression and cell proliferation. Our study suggests that ESK246 is a LAT3 inhibitor that can be used to study LAT3 function and upon which new antiprostate cancer therapies may be based. PMID:24762008

  4. Amino acid transporter LAT3 is required for podocyte development and function.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Nishibori, Yukino; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kudo, Akihiko; Ito, Noriko; Fukuhara, Daisuke; Kurayama, Ryota; Higashihara, Eiji; Babu, Ellappan; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Nagata, Michio; Majumdar, Arindam; Tryggvason, Karl; Yan, Kunimasa

    2009-07-01

    LAT3 is a Na+-independent neutral l-amino acid transporter recently isolated from a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Although liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas are known to express LAT3, the tissue distribution and physiologic function of this transporter are not completely understood. Here, we observed that glomeruli express LAT3. Immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that LAT3 localizes to the apical plasma membrane of podocyte foot processes. In mice, starvation upregulated glomerular LAT3, phosphorylated AKT1, reconstituted the actin network, and elongated foot processes. In the fetal kidney, we observed intense LAT3 expression at the capillary loops stage of renal development. Finally, zebrafish morphants lacking lat3 function showed collapsed glomeruli with thickened glomerular basement membranes. Permeability studies of the glomerular filtration barrier in these zebrafish morphants demonstrated a disruption of selective glomerular permeability. Our data suggest that LAT3 may play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of podocyte structure and function by regulating protein synthesis and the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Correlating mass physical properties with ALOS reflectance spectra for intertidal sediments from the Ba Lat Estuary (northern Vietnam): an exploratory laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoc, Nguyen Thi; Koike, Katsuaki; Tue, Nguyen Tai

    2013-08-01

    Characterization of the sediment composition of tidal flats and monitoring of their spatiotemporal changes has become an important part of the sustainable management of coastal environments. To accurately classify sediments through remote sensing, a comprehensive understanding of sediment reflectance spectra is indispensable. The present laboratory-based study explores the performance of the high spatial resolution (10 × 10 m) Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) launched in 2006. Relationships between reflectance spectra (bands 1 to 4) and four typical mass physical properties were investigated under wet and dry experimental conditions for intertidal sediments sampled near the Ba Lat Estuary in northern Vietnam. Reflectance in the near-infrared region corresponding to ALOS band 4 (0.76-0.89 μm) was found (1) to have a strong negative correlation with sand content (dry wt%) under both wet and dry conditions (linear correlation coefficient r = -0.7859 and -0.8094, respectively), (2) to increase with decreasing relative water content (%) in a given sediment type (r = -0.7748 to -0.9367 for mud, sandy mud, muddy sand, and sand), (3) to have a positive correlation with organic matter content (r = 0.7610 and 0.6460 under wet and dry conditions for contents >0.20 dry wt%), and (4) to be insignificantly correlated with mineral composition assessed in terms of contents (wt%) of quartz, clay minerals, and mica group minerals. Positive relationships between reflectance and water content for the pooled data of all sediment types (r = 0.6395) or organic matter content contrast with previous findings, and can be attributed to close interrelationships between these properties and the predominance of sand content as controlling factor of reflectance. This study clarifies that ALOS band 4 provides the most useful imagery for intertidal monitoring because its reflectance, as simulated using the laboratory data, shows the strongest correlation with sand content. In a next step

  6. LAT1 is the transport competent unit of the LAT1/CD98 heterodimeric amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lara; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena; Albanese, Leticia Maria; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    LAT1 (SLC7A5) and CD98 (SLC3A2) constitute a heterodimeric transmembrane protein complex that catalyzes amino acid transport. Whether one or both subunits are competent for transport is still unclear. The present work aims to solve this question using different experimental strategies. Firstly, LAT1 and CD98 were immuno-detected in protein extracts from SiHa cells. Under oxidizing conditions, i.e., without addition of SH (thiol) reducing agent DTE, both proteins were revealed as a 120kDa major band. Upon DTE treatment separated bands, corresponding to LAT1(35kDa) or CD98(80kDa), were detected. LAT1 function was evaluated in intact cells as BCH sensitive [(3)H]His transport inhibited by hydrophobic amino acids. Antiport of [(3)H]His was measured in proteoliposomes reconstituted with SiHa cell extract in presence of internal His. Transport was increased by DTE. Hydrophobic amino acids were best inhibitors in addition to hydrophilic Tyr, Gln, Asn and Lys. Cys, Tyr and Gln, included in the intraliposomal space, were transported in antiport with external [(3)H]His. Similar experiments were performed in proteoliposomes reconstituted with the recombinant purified hLAT1. Results overlapping those obtained with native protein were achieved. Lower transport of [(3)H]Leu and [(3)H]Gln with respect to [(3)H]His was detected. Kinetic asymmetry was found with external Km for His lower than internal one. No transport was detected in proteoliposomes reconstituted with recombinant hCD98. The experimental data demonstrate that LAT1 is the sole transport competent subunit of the heterodimer. This conclusion has important outcome for following studies on functional characterization and identification of specific inhibitors with potential application in human therapy.

  7. Conceptual Design Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Tower Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Chad

    2002-07-18

    The main objective of this work was to develop a conceptual design and engineering prototype for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) tower structure. This thesis describes the conceptual design of a GLAST tower and the fabrication and testing of a prototype tower tray. The requirements were that the structure had to support GLAST's delicate silicon strip detector array through ground handling, launch and in orbit operations as well as provide for thermal and electrical pathways. From the desired function and the given launch vehicle for the spacecraft that carries the GLAST detector, an efficient structure was designed which met the requirements. This thesis developed in three stages: design, fabrication, and testing. During the first stage, a general set of specifications was used to develop the initial design, which was then analyzed and shown to meet or exceed the requirements. The second stage called for the fabrication of prototypes to prove manufacturability and gauge cost and time estimates for the total project. The last step called for testing the prototypes to show that they performed as the analysis had shown and prove that the design met the requirements. As a spacecraft engineering exercise, this project required formulating a solution based on engineering judgment, analyzing the solution using advanced engineering techniques, then proving the validity of the design and analysis by the manufacturing and testing of prototypes. The design described here met all the requirements set out by the needs of the experiment and operating concerns. This strawman design is not intended to be the complete or final design for the GLAST instrument structure, but instead examines some of the main challenges involved and demonstrates that there are solutions to them. The purpose of these tests was to prove that there are solutions to the basic mechanical, electrical and thermal problems presented with the GLAST project.

  8. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saadeldin, Mona K.; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M.; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5′UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer. PMID:25628642

  9. Real-Time Visualization of Spacecraft Telemetry for the GLAST and LRO Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Shah, Neerav; Chai, Dean J.

    2010-01-01

    GlastCam and LROCam are closely-related tools developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for real-time visualization of spacecraft telemetry, developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) missions, respectively. Derived from a common simulation tool, they use related but different architectures to ingest real-time spacecraft telemetry and ground predicted ephemerides, and to compute and display features of special interest to each mission in its operational environment. We describe the architectures of GlastCam and LROCam, the customizations required to fit into the mission operations environment, and the features that were found to be especially useful in early operations for their respective missions. Both tools have a primary window depicting a three-dimensional Cam view of the spacecraft that may be freely manipulated by the user. The scene is augmented with fields of view, pointing constraints, and other features which enhance situational awareness. Each tool also has another "Map" window showing the spacecraft's groundtrack projected onto a map of the Earth or Moon, along with useful features such as the Sun, eclipse regions, and TDRS satellite locations. Additional windows support specialized checkout tasks. One such window shows the star tracker fields of view, with tracking window locations and the mission star catalog. This view was instrumental for GLAST in quickly resolving a star tracker mounting polarity issue; visualization made the 180-deg mismatch immediately obvious. Full access to GlastCam's source code also made possible a rapid coarse star tracker mounting calibration with some on the fly code adjustments; adding a fine grid to measure alignment offsets, and introducing a calibration quaternion which could be adjusted within GlastCam without perturbing the flight parameters. This calibration, from concept to completion, took less than half an hour. Both GlastCam and LROCam were

  10. L-Type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in lymph node metastasis of gastric carcinoma: Its correlation with size of metastatic lesion and Ki-67 labeling.

    PubMed

    Ichinoe, Masaaki; Yanagisawa, Nobuyuki; Mikami, Tetuo; Hana, Kiyomi; Nakada, Norihiro; Endou, Hitoshi; Okayasu, Isao; Murakumo, Yoshiki

    2015-07-01

    L-Type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is one of the major amino acid transporters. High levels of LAT1 expression have been reported in various tumors, which can act as a novel prognostic marker. Previously, we demonstrated that LAT1 is highly expressed in advanced gastric carcinoma with lymph node metastasis, and proposed that LAT1 is an independent prognostic factor in non-scirrhous gastric carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between LAT1 expression and the size of lymph node metastatic lesions in gastric carcinoma. LAT1 and Ki-67 expression was immunohistochemically analyzed in 64 cases of advanced gastric carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. LAT1 expression in the metastatic lymph nodes was correlated with that in the primary lesions. The high LAT1 expression group showed a larger size of metastatic lesion and a higher Ki-67 labeling index than the low LAT1 expression group. LAT1 expression had a weak association with Ki-67 labeling index and tumor diameter of lymph nodes. These results suggest that LAT1 expression is associated with disease progression in gastric carcinoma. We proposed that LAT1 could be a potential therapeutic target for gastric carcinoma cases with large lymph node metastasis.

  11. Dark matter and gamma rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Hooper, Dan

    2006-03-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to nonthermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco’s dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  12. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  13. Dark matter and gamma rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstroem, Lars; Hooper, Dan

    2006-03-15

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to nonthermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  14. Dark matter and gamma-rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, Lars; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma-rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma-rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to non-thermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  15. Prospects for High Energy Detection of Microquasars with the AGILE and GLAST Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Santolamazza, Patrizia; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco

    2007-08-21

    We estimate the sensitivities of the AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments taking into account two cases for the galactic {gamma}-ray diffuse background (at high galactic latitude and toward the galactic center). Then we use sensitivities to estimate microquasar observability with the two experiments, assuming the {gamma}-ray emission above 100 MeV of a recent microquasar model.

  16. A Search for Cosmic-ray Proton Anisotropies with Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Matthew; Vandenbroucke, Justin; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In eight years of operation, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a large sample of cosmic-ray protons. The LAT's wide field of view and full-sky coverage make it an excellent instrument for studying anisotropies in the arrival directions of protons at all angular scales. These capabilities enable the LAT to make a full-sky 2D measurement of cosmic-ray proton anisotropy complementary to many recent TeV measurements, which are performed by projecting onto right ascension. Any detected anisotropies probe the structure of the local interstellar magnetic field and could indicate the presence of a nearby source

  17. Production of free glutamate in milk requires the leucine transporter LAT1.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Nakamura, Eiji; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Hirota, Mariko; San Gabriel, Ana; Nakamura, Ken-Ichiro; Chotechuang, Nattida; Wu, Guoyao; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Torii, Kunio

    2013-09-15

    The concentration of free glutamate (Glu) in rat's milk is ∼10 times higher than that in plasma. Previous work has shown that mammary tissue actively transports circulatory leucine (Leu), which is transaminated to synthesize other amino acids such as Glu and aspartate (Asp). To investigate the molecular basis of Leu transport and its conversion into Glu in the mammary gland, we characterized the expression of Leu transporters and [(3)H]Leu uptake in rat mammary cells. Gene expression analysis indicated that mammary cells express two Leu transporters, LAT1 and LAT2, with LAT1 being more abundant than LAT2. This transport system is sodium independent and transports large neutral amino acids. The Leu transport system in isolated rat mammary cells could be specifically blocked by the LAT1 inhibitors 2-aminobicyclo-[2.2.1]-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) and triiodothyronine (T3). In organ cultures, Glu secretion was markedly inhibited by these LAT1 inhibitors. Furthermore, the profiles of Leu uptake inhibition by amino acids in mammary cells were similar to those reported for LAT1. In vivo, concentrations of free Glu and Asp increased in milk by oral gavage with Leu at 6, 12, and 18 days of lactation. These results indicate that the main Leu transporter in mammary tissue is LAT1 and the transport of Leu is a limiting factor for the synthesis and release of Glu and Asp into milk. Our studies provide the bases for the molecular mechanism of Leu transport in mammary tissue by LAT1 and its active role on free Glu secretion in milk, which confer umami taste in suckling pups.

  18. Growth and properties of novel organic nonlinear optical crystal: L-alaninium tartrate (LAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimalan, M.; Kumar, T. Rajesh; Tamilselvan, S.; Sagayaraj, P.; Mahadevan, C. K.

    2010-09-01

    A new organic nonlinear optical crystal L-alaninium tartrate (LAT) has been grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the crystal has monoclinic structure with space group P2 1. From FT-IR spectrum, the CH vibrations of tartaric acid generate peaks at 2977 and 2960 cm -1. The thermal studies indicate that the grown LAT is stable up to 118 °C, SHG measurements and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. Photoconductivity studies of LAT reveal its negative photoconducting nature. The second harmonic generation efficiency of LAT crystal is found to be 174 mV. The laser damage threshold is found to be 8.16 GW/cm 2. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the crystal were studied as a function of frequency and the results are discussed. The AC/DC conductivity studies are carried out and reported for the first time.

  19. Very Rapid High-amplitude Gamma-Ray Variability in Luminous Blazar PKS 1510-089 Studied with Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Stawarz, L.; Tanaka, Y.T.; Takahashi, T.; Madejski, G.; D'Ammando, F.

    2013-03-20

    Here we report on the detailed analysis of the γ-ray light curve of a luminous blazar PKS 1510-089 observed in the GeV range with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite during the period 2011 September - December. By investigating the properties of the detected three major flares with the shortest possible time binning allowed by the photon statistics, we find a variety of temporal characteristics and variability patterns. This includes a clearly asymmetric profile (with a faster flux rise and a slower decay) of the flare resolved on sub-daily timescales, a superposition of many short uncorrelated flaring events forming the apparently coherent longer-duration outburst, and a huge single isolated outburst unresolved down to the timescale of three-hours. In the latter case we estimate the corresponding γ-ray flux doubling timescale to be below one hour, which is extreme and never previously reported for any active galaxy

  20. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST): Status and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view makes it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June, GLAST now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts: the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  1. Primary cultures of rat cortical microglia treated with nicotine increases in the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (GLAST) via the activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Morioka, N; Tokuhara, M; Nakamura, Y; Idenoshita, Y; Harano, S; Zhang, F F; Hisaoka-Nakashima, K; Nakata, Y

    2014-01-31

    Although the clearance of glutamate from the synapse under physiological conditions is performed by astrocytic glutamate transporters, their expression might be diminished under pathological conditions. Microglia glutamate transporters, however, might serve as a back-up system when astrocytic glutamate uptake is impaired, and could have a prominent neuroprotective function under pathological conditions. In the current study, the effect of nicotine, well known as a neuroprotective molecule, on the function of glutamate transporters in cultured rat cortical microglia was examined. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and pharmacological approaches demonstrated that, glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), not glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), is the major functional glutamate transporter in cultured cortical microglia. Furthermore, the α7 subunit was demonstrated to be the key subunit comprising nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors in these cells. Treatment of cortical microglia with nicotine led to a significant increase of GLAST mRNA expression and (14)C-glutamate uptake in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which were markedly inhibited by pretreatment with methyllycaconitine, a selective α7 nACh receptor antagonist. The nicotine-induced expression of GLAST mRNA and protein is mediated through an inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) depend intracellular pathway, since pretreatment with either xestospongin C, an IP3 receptor antagonist, or KN-93, a CaMKII inhibitor, blocked GLAST expression. Together, these findings indicate that activation of nACh receptors, specifically those expressing the α7 subunit, on cortical microglia could be a key mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of nACh receptor ligands such as nicotine.

  2. Detecting the Attenuation of Blazar Gamma-ray Emission by Extragalactic Background Light with GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Andrew; Ritz, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Gamma rays with energy above 10 GeV interact with optical-UV photons resulting in pair production. Therefore, a large sample of high redshift sources of these gamma rays can be used to probe the extragalactic background starlight (EBL) by examining the redshift dependence of the attenuation of the flux above 10 GeV. GLAST, the next generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope, will for the first time have the unique capability to detect thousands of gamma-ray blazars up to redshifts of at least z = 4, with enough angular resolution to allow identification of a large fraction of their optical counterparts. By combining recent determinations of the gamma-ray blazar luminosity function, recent calculations of the high energy gamma-ray opacity due to EBL absorption, and the expected GLAST instrument performance to produce simulated samples of blazars that GLAST would detect, including their redshifts and fluxes, we demonstrate that these blazars have the potential to be a highly effective probe of the EBL.

  3. Kinematic and electromyographic comparisons between chin-ups and lat-pull down exercises.

    PubMed

    Doma, Kenji; Deakin, Glen B; Ness, Kevin F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinematics and muscle activity between chin-ups and lat-pull down exercises and between muscle groups during the two exercises. Normalized electromyography (EMG) of biceps brachii (BB), triceps brachii (TB), pectoralis major (PM), latissimus dorsi (LD), rectus abdominus (RA), and erector spinae (ES) and kinematics of back, shoulder, and seventh cervical vertebrae (C7) was analysed during chin-ups and lat-pull down exercises. Normalized EMG of BB and ES and kinematics of shoulder and C7 for chin-ups were greater than lat-pull down exercises during the concentric phase (p < 0.05). For the eccentric phase, RA during lat-pull down exercises was greater than chin-ups and the kinematics of C7 during chin-ups was greater than lat-pull down exercises (p < 0.05). For chin-ups, BB, LD, and ES were greater than PM during the concentric phase, whereas BB and LD were greater than TB, and LD was greater than RA during the eccentric phase (p < 0.05). For lat-pull down exercise, BB and LD were greater than PM, TB, and ES during the concentric phase, whereas LD was greater than PM, TB, and BB during the eccentric phase (p < 0.05). Subsequently, chin-ups appears to be a more functional exercise.

  4. MicroRNA-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting LATS2

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ying; Gao, Yan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • miR-181b is upregulated in human ovarian cancer tissues. • miR-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • LATS2 is a direct target of miR-181b. • LATS2 is involved in miR-181b-induced ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we showed significant upregulation of miR-181b in ovarian cancer tissues, compared with the normal ovarian counterparts. Forced expression of miR-181b led to remarkably enhanced proliferation and invasion of ovarian cancer cells while its knockdown induced significant suppression of these cellular events. The tumor suppressor gene, LATS2 (large tumor suppressor 2), was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b. Specifically, miR-181b bound directly to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of LATS2 and suppressed its expression. Restoration of LATS2 expression partially reversed the oncogenic effects of miR-181b. Our results indicate that miR-181b promotes proliferation and invasion by targeting LATS2 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings support the utility of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  5. Constraining decaying dark matter with Fermi LAT gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Günter; Weniger, Christoph; Maccione, Luca; Redondo, Javier E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de E-mail: redondo@mppmm.mpg.de

    2010-06-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton off low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. The aim of this paper is providing a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the Fermi LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV. We provide a set of universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model produce the desired constraints. Our response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs such as the electron propagation in the galaxy, the dark matter profile, the gamma-ray fluxes of known origin, and the Fermi LAT data. We study the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. To this end we also take into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. We find that with the available data decaying dark matter cannot be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess.

  6. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  7. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  8. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  9. Mapping the Zap-70 phosphorylation sites on LAT (linker for activation of T cells) required for recruitment and activation of signalling proteins in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Paz, P E; Wang, S; Clarke, H; Lu, X; Stokoe, D; Abo, A

    2001-01-01

    T-cell-receptor (TCR)-mediated LAT (linker for activation of T cells) phosphorylation is critical for the membrane recruitment of signalling complexes required for T-cell activation. Although tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT is required for recruitment and activation of signalling proteins, the molecular mechanism associated with this event is unclear. In the present study we reconstituted the LAT signalling pathway by demonstrating that a direct tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT with activated protein-tyrosine kinase Zap70 is necessary and sufficient for the association and activation of signalling proteins. Zap-70 efficiently phosphorylates LAT on tyrosine residues at positions 226, 191, 171, 132 and 127. By substituting these tyrosine residues in LAT with phenylalanine and by utilizing phosphorylated peptides derived from these sites, we mapped the tyrosine residues in LAT required for the direct interaction and activation of Vav, p85/p110alpha and phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1). Our results indicate that Tyr(226) and Tyr(191) are required for Vav binding, whereas Tyr(171) and Tyr(132) are necessary for association and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity and PLCgamma1 respectively. Furthermore, by expression of LAT mutants in LAT-deficient T cells, we demonstrate that Tyr(191) and Tyr(171) are required for T-cell activation and Tyr(132) is required for the activation of PLCgamma1 and Ras signalling pathways. PMID:11368773

  10. Three Advantages of the KANATA 1.5-m Telescope as a Powerful Partner for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, M.; Yamashita, T.; Kawabata, K.; Ohsugi, T.; Arai, A.; Nagae, O.; Chiyonobu, S.; Ueda, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Mizuno, T.; Katagiri, H.; Takahashi, H.; Hayashi, T.; Okita, K.; Yoshida, M.; Yanagisawa, K.; Sato, S.; Kino, M.; Kitagawa, M.; Sadakane, K.

    2007-07-12

    KANATA is a 1.5-m optical--near infrared telescope of Hiroshima University, which has been developed for observations of astronomical transients and variables, such as {gamma}-ray bursts, blazars. X-ray transients, and cataclysmic variables. Here, we introduce three characteristics of KANATA with examples of observations, that is, i) high ability for prompt observations, ii) simultaneous optical and infrared observations, and iii) polarimetric observations. Collaborating with GLAST, we are planning to perform follow-up optical--infrared observations of {gamma}-ray sources with KANATA.

  11. Pulsars at the Highest Energies: Questions for the GLAST and ACT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    The recent announcement by the MAGIC team of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar above 25 GeV and the launch of AGILE and the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) offer the promise of major progress in understanding the most extreme emission from pulsar magnetospheres. While waiting for detailed results, we can formulate questions to be addressed, based on past measurements and theoretical modeling. This brief review will highlight promising approaches for research into high-energy pulsed radiation.

  12. Introducing point mutations into the ATGs of the putative open reading frames of the HSV-1 gene encoding the latency associated transcript (LAT) reduces its anti-apoptosis activity.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dale; Henderson, Gail; Hsiang, Chinhui; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2008-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) gene has anti-apoptosis activity that directly or indirectly enhances the virus's reactivation phenotype in small animal models. The first 1.5 kb of the primary 8.3 kb LAT is sufficient and some or all of it is necessary for LAT's anti-apoptosis in transient transfection assays and for LAT's ability to enhance the reactivation phenotype. Based on LAT's genomic sequence, the first 1.5 kb contains eight potential open reading frames (ORFs) defined as an ATG followed by an in frame termination codon. In this study, point mutations were introduced into the ATGs of ORFs present in the 1.5 kb fragment of LAT. Mutagenesis of all eight ATGs in LAT ORFs consistently reduced the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT in transiently transfected mouse neuroblastoma cells regardless of whether apoptosis was induced by caspase 8 or caspase 9. Mutation of the six ATGs located in the stable intron sequences within the 1.5 kb LAT had a dramatic effect on caspase 9, but not caspase 8, induced apoptosis. For both caspase 8 and caspase 9 induced apoptosis, mutating the two ATGs in the exon of the LAT 1.5 kb fragment reduced, but did not eliminate the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT. These studies suggest that altering the fine structure of regulatory RNA or expression of a putative LAT ORF regulates the anti-apoptosis activity of LAT. These studies also indicate that more than one function is present in the 1.5 kb LAT fragment.

  13. Association study of genetic variants in PLA2G4A, PLCG1, LAT, SYK, and TNFRS11A genes in NSAIDs-induced urticaria and/or angioedema patients.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Pedro; Plaza-Serón, María del Carmen; Doña, Inmaculada; Blanca-López, Natalia; Campo, Paloma; Cornejo-García, José A; Perkins, James R; Torres, Maria J; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    NSAIDs-induced urticaria and/or angioedema (NIUA) is the most frequent entity of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. The underlying cause is considered to be because of a nonspecific immunological mechanism in which mast cells are key players. We studied the association of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms in five genes involved in mast cell activation (SYK, LAT1, PLCG1, PLA2G4A, and TNFRSF11A) in 450 NIUA patients and 500 controls. We identified several statistically significant associations when stratifying patients by symptoms: PLA2G4A rs12746200 (urticaria vs. controls, Pc=0.005). PLCG1 rs2228246 (angioedema vs. controls; Pc=0.044), and TNFRS11A rs1805034 (urticaria+angioedema vs. controls; Pc=0.041). The frequency of haplotype PLCG1 rs753381-rs2228246 (C-G) in angioedema-NIUA patients was lower than that in controls (Pc=0.040). In addition, the haplotype frequency of TNFRS11A rs1805034-rs35211496 (C-T) was higher among urticaria-NIUA and urticaria+angioedema-NIUA patients than the controls (Pc=0.045 and 0.046). Our results shed light on the involvement of variants in genes related to non-immunological mast cell activation in NIUA.

  14. Hippocampal glutamate level and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) are up-regulated in senior rat associated with isoflurane-induced spatial learning/memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiangdong; Xu, Chengshi; Wang, Hui; Xu, Jie; Liu, Weiran; Wang, Yun; Jia, Xingyuan; Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Zhipeng; Ji, Chao; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline is a clinical concern especially for senior patients. It is generally recognized that glutamatergic system plays a crucial role in the physiopathologic process of neurocognitive deterioration. However, alterations of glutamatergic system in prolonged isoflurane-induced learning/memory decline are still unclear. This study investigates the question whether glutamate concentration and corresponding transporters or receptors display any alternations in aged rat suffering from isoflurane-induced learning/memory impairment. 111 male Sprague-Dawley rats (>18 months) were randomly divided into two main groups: hippocampal microdialysis group (n = 38) and western blotting group (n = 73). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups including (1) control subgroup (n = 6 and 10, receiving no behavioral trial, anesthesia or air exposure); (2) air-exposed subgroup (n = 7 and 15, receiving behavioral trial and air exposure but not anesthesia); (3) isoflurane anesthesia subgroup (n = 25 and 48, receiving both behavioral trial and anesthesia). The isoflurane-exposed rats were further divided into a learning/memory-impaired subgroup and a non-learning/memory-impaired subgroup according to their behavioral performance, which was measured using Morris water maze. Hippocampal glutamate concentrations in microdialysates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Expression levels of GLAST, GLT-1, NMDAR1, NMDAR2A/B, AMPAR and tau in hippocampus were assessed via quantitative Western blotting. The incidences of learning/memory impairment of isoflurane-exposed rats in hippocampal microdialysis group and western blotting group were 12.0 (3/25) and 10.4 % (5/48) respectively. The intra-anesthesia hippocampal glutamate levels were significantly lower than those of non-anesthesized rats. The learning/memory-impaired rats showed a long-lasting increased glutamate level from 24 h after isoflurane exposure to the end of the study, but the other

  15. Activation of T lymphocytes and the role of the adapter LAT.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Enrique; Martínez-Florensa, Mario; Aparicio, Pedro

    2006-12-01

    The adapter molecule LAT (Linker for the Activation of T cells) is a membrane protein that becomes phosphorylated on conserved tyrosine residues upon TCR/CD3 complex engagement in T lymphocytes. Tyrosine phosphorylation of this adapter recruits to the membrane many signaling proteins through the interaction with the phosphotyrosine binding domains of these proteins, allowing the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways. Initial studies performed in T cell lines suggested that the adapter LAT acts primarily as a platform for the distribution of activation signals coming from the TCR/CD3 complex, and the phenotype of LAT deficient mice, in which T cell development is arrested at an early stage, supported this "activatory" function. However, the analysis of several knock-in mice strains in which some tyrosine residues have been mutated, has revealed the development of lymphoproliferative disorders caused by polyclonal T lymphocytes producing high titers of T helper-type 2 (T(H)2) cytokines. Very recently, it has been demonstrated that raft localization of LAT is altered in anergic T lymphocytes. Therefore, LAT show unexpected regulatory functions in T cell development and homeostasis.

  16. GLAST LARGE AREA TELESCOPE: DAILY SURVEY OF HIGH-ENERGY SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Kamae, T

    2003-12-12

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore w die range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20 MeV to 300 GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e{sup +}e{sup -} pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a st of anti-coincidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit ({approx} 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity.

  17. Catching blazars in the act exlamation GLAST triggers for TeV observation of blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Bagmeet; Wagner, Stefan J.

    2008-12-24

    The double humped SED (Spectral Energy Distribution) of blazars, and their flaring phenomena can be explained by various leptonic and hadronic models. However, accurate modeling of the high frequency component and clear identification of the correct emission mechanism would require simultaneous measurements in both the MeV-GeV band and the TeV band. Due to the differences in the sensitivity and the field of view of the instruments required to do these measurements, it is essential to identify active states of blazars likely to be detected with TeV instruments.Using a reasonable intergalactic attenuation model, various extrapolations of the EGRET spectra, as a proxy for GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) measurements, are made into TeV energies for selecting EGRET blazars expected to be VHE-bright. Furthermore, estimates of the threshold fluxes at GLAST energies are provided, at which sources are expected to be detectable at TeV energies, with Cherenkov telescopes like HESS, MAGIC or VERITAS.

  18. FERMI-LAT Observations of Galatic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Observatory observations of Galactic Transients. LAT all-sky monitoring is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) Probing the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) Discovery of gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

  19. Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT Paul S. Ray∗, Matthew Kerr†, Damien Parent∗∗ and the Fermi PSC‡ ∗Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW...Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA ‡Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium Abstract. We present an overview of precise pulsar timing using data from the Large...unbinned photon data. In addition to determining the spindown behavior of the pulsars and detecting glitches and timing noise, such timing analyses al

  20. Involvement of the L-Type Amino Acid Transporter Lat2 in the Transport of 3,3′-Diiodothyronine across the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kinne, Anita; Wittner, Melanie; Wirth, Eva K.; Hinz, Katrin M.; Schülein, Ralf; Köhrle, Josef; Krause, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are transported across cell membranes by transmembrane transporter proteins, for example by members of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) and the L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) families. LATs consist of a light chain (e.g. LAT2) and a heavy chain (CD98), which is essential for their cell surface expression and functionality. The specificity of Lat2 for thyroid hormones and their metabolites and its role in their transport was not fully clear. This fact motivated us to establish a cell system to elucidate the uptake of thyroid hormones and their metabolites by mouse Lat2. The coinjection of cRNA coding for Lat2 and CD98 into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in a markedly increased level of 3,3′-diiodo-L-thyronine (3,3′-T2) and to some extent also enhanced T3 transport. To gain insight into properties of thyroid hormones and their metabolites transported by Lat2, we inhibited 3,3′-T2 uptake by various iodothyronine derivatives. T1 and T2 derivatives as well as 2-aminobicyclo-[2, 2,1]-heptane-2-carboxylic acid strongly competed with 3,3′-T2 uptake. In addition, we performed T2 uptake measurements with the thyroid hormone-specific transporter MCT8. For both Lat2 and MCT8, Km values in a low micromolar range were calculated. We demonstrated that oocytes are a suitable system for thyroid hormone transport studies mediated by Lat2. Our data indicates that Lat2 compared to other thyroid hormone transporters prefers 3,3′-T2 as the substrate. Thus, Lat2 might contribute to the availability of thyroid hormone by importing and/or exporting 3,3′-T2, which is generated either by T3 inactivation or by rapid deiodinase 1-mediated rT3 degradation. PMID:26601072

  1. Amino acid ester prodrugs conjugated to the α-carboxylic acid group do not display affinity for the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1).

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jarkko; Kärkkäinen, Jussi; Huttunen, Kristiina M; Gynther, Mikko

    2015-01-23

    L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1) is an intriguing target for carrier-mediated transport of drugs as it is highly expressed in the blood-brain barrier and also in various types of cancer. Several studies have proposed that in order for compounds to act as LAT1 substrates they should possess both negatively charged α-carboxyl and positively charged α-amino groups. However, in some reports, such as in two recent publications describing an isoleucine-quinidine ester prodrug (1), compounds having no free α-carboxyl group have been reported to exhibit high affinity for LAT1 in vitro. In the present study, 1 was synthesized and its affinity for LAT1 was evaluated both with an in situ rat brain perfusion technique and in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 in vitro. 1 showed no affinity for LAT1 in either model nor did it show any affinity for LAT2 in an in vitro study. Our results confirm the earlier reported requirements for LAT1 substrates. Thus drugs or prodrugs with substituted α-carboxyl group cannot bind to LAT with high affinity.

  2. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation

    PubMed Central

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the explant TG induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT(+) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT(−) virus) were irradiated with UV-B and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT(−) virus, LAT(+) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B induced reactivation model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs are discussed. PMID:26002839

  3. LatMix 2011 and 2012 Dispersion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. LatMix 2011 and 2012 Dispersion Analysis Miles A...continue analysis and publication of results obtained during the “Scalable Lateral Mixing and Coherent Turbulence” (a.k.a., LatMix) DRI. The initial...work included the airborne lidar operations as well as a substantial part of the field operations and analysis . A primary objective of our LatMix

  4. Acoustical facies analysis at the Ba Lat delta front (Red River Delta, North Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bergh, G. D.; van Weering, Tj. C. E.; Boels, J. F.; Duc, D. M.; Nhuan, M. T.

    2007-02-01

    A shallow penetrating, high-resolution acoustic study was performed in the Ba Lat delta, the major distributary of the Red River System in Northern Vietnam. An acoustic facies map was constructed and the various facies types were validated through analysis of bottom sediments, by a study of gravity cores collected at 22 stations. Analysis of the acoustic profiles and gravity cores revealed the presence of an asymmetrical, S to SW prograding prodelta lobe, in accordance with the prevailing longshore currents to the S. The southern part of this prodelta is detached from the protruding Ba Lat delta front. The prodelta is dominated by muddy sediments with minor thin (<5 cm) sandy and silty layers. The coarser-grained layers decrease in abundance away from the Ba Lat river mouth. Offshore, the modern delta deposits are characterized by an off-lapping contact over a semi-prolonged bottom reflector lacking any sub-bottom reflectors. This semi-prolonged bottom reflector is correlated with sandy deposits of presumably Early Holocene age. Bottom and coastal erosion is restricted to two areas N and SW of the Ba Lat. Erosion in the North is inferred to be due to reduced sediment supply as a result of shifting in 1971 of the main outlet to its present, more southern location. The erosional area along the Hai Hau coast SW of the Ba Lat also has experienced a reduction in sediment supply in the course of the 20th century, when the local Song Vop distributary channel became less active and was completely dammed in the 1970s. Most sediment supplied by the Ba Lat at present bypasses the Hai Hau erosional coastal zone, as the active part of the Ba Lat prodelta is detached from the coast SW of the Ba Lat. An active, NNE-SSW trending fault system with surface expression is located along the offshore edge of the prodelta, and is linked to deeper fault structures in this active neotectonic region. Subsurface reflectors are folded in the vicinity of the fault.

  5. [LAT (linker for activation of T cells): a useful marker for megakaryocyte evaluation on bone marrow biopsies].

    PubMed

    Ungari, M; Pellegrini, W; Borlenghi, E; Marocolo, D; Ubiali, A; Agazzi, C; Pich, A; Franco, V; Facchetti, F

    2002-12-01

    megakaryocytic leukemias. The use of LAT staining should be recommended in association with other megakaryocyte markers in the study of bone marrow biopsies in cases of hematopoietic disorders.

  6. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST): Instrument Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; GLAST Collaboration

    1999-04-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a satellite-based experiment under development to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The primary telescope for the mission is a pair-conversion telescope. The telescope design includes a precision tracker/converter section based on silicon-strip detectors, a CsI scintillating crystal calorimeter arranged in a hodoscopic configuration, an anticoincidence shield that is an array of plastic scintillator tiles read out with waveshifting optical fibers, and a powerful distributed data acquisition and triggering system. The design and expected performance of the telescope are presented along with results obtained from a high-energy beam test of a prototype.

  7. Monitoring the Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Using Earth Occultation with GLAST GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Cherry, M.; Kippen, M.; Ling, J.; Radocinski, R.; Wheaton, W.

    2007-01-01

    Long term all-sky monitoring of the 20 keV - 2 MeV gamma-ray sky using the Earth occultation technique was demonstrated by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The principles and techniques used for the development of an end-to-end earth occultation data analysis system for BATSE can be extended to the GLAST Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), resulting in multiband light curves and time-resolved spectra in the energy range 8 keV to above 1 MeV for known gamma-ray sources and transient outbursts, as well as the discovery of new sources of gamma-ray emission. In this paper we describe the application of the technique to the GBM. We also present the expected sensitivity for the GBM.

  8. MicroRNA-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting LATS2.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Gao, Yan

    2014-05-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we showed significant upregulation of miR-181b in ovarian cancer tissues, compared with the normal ovarian counterparts. Forced expression of miR-181b led to remarkably enhanced proliferation and invasion of ovarian cancer cells while its knockdown induced significant suppression of these cellular events. The tumor suppressor gene, LATS2 (large tumor suppressor 2), was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b. Specifically, miR-181b bound directly to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of LATS2 and suppressed its expression. Restoration of LATS2 expression partially reversed the oncogenic effects of miR-181b. Our results indicate that miR-181b promotes proliferation and invasion by targeting LATS2 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings support the utility of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  9. MicroRNA-373 (miR-373) post-transcriptionally regulates large tumor suppressor, homolog 2 (LATS2) and stimulates proliferation in human esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Goan, Yih-Gang; Hsiao, Michael; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Jian, Shu-Huei; Lin, Jen-Tai; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2009-09-10

    LATS2 is a member of the LATS tumor suppressor family. It has been implicated in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of LATS2 has been reported in human esophageal cancer. But, the LATS2 gene expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal cancer remain unclear. The present study has shown that LATS2 protein expression was mediated by miR-373 at the post-transcriptional level and inversely correlated with miR-373 amounts in esophageal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the direct inhibition of LATS2 protein was mediated by miR-373 and manipulated the expression of miR-373 to affect esophageal cancer cells growth. Moreover, this correlation was supported by data collected ex vivo, in which esophageal cancer tissues from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients were analyzed. Finally, by miRNA microarray analysis, four miRNAs including miR-373 were over-expressed in ESCC samples. Our findings reveal that miR-373 would be a potential oncogene and it participates in the carcinogenesis of human esophageal cancer by suppressing LATS2 expression.

  10. FERMI-LAT SEARCH FOR PULSAR WIND NEBULAE AROUND GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2011-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) offers the first opportunity to study faint and extended GeV sources such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). After one year of observation the LAT detected and identified three PWNe: the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and the PWN inside MSH 15-52. In the meantime, the list of LAT detected pulsars increased steadily. These pulsars are characterized by high energy loss rates ( E-dot ) from {approx}3 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} to 5 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} and are therefore likely to power a PWN. This paper summarizes the search for PWNe in the off-pulse windows of 54 LAT-detected pulsars using 16 months of survey observations. Ten sources show significant emission, seven of these likely being of magnetospheric origin. The detection of significant emission in the off-pulse interval offers new constraints on the {gamma}-ray emitting regions in pulsar magnetospheres. The three other sources with significant emission are the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and a new PWN candidate associated with the LAT pulsar PSR J1023-5746, coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575. We further explore the association between the HESS and the Fermi source by modeling its spectral energy distribution. Flux upper limits derived for the 44 remaining sources are used to provide new constraints on famous PWNe that have been detected at keV and/or TeV energies.

  11. Fermi LAT Observations of Cosmic-Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Designed as a gamma-ray instrument, the LAT is a capable detector of high energy cosmic ray electrons. The LAT is composed of a 4x4 array of identical towers. Each tower has a Tracker and a Calorimeter module. Entire LAT is covered by segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD). The electron data analysis is based on that developed for photons. The main challenge is to identify and separate electrons from all other charged species, mainly CR protons (for gamma-ray analysis this is provided by the Anti-Coincidence Detector)

  12. TP53, MSH4, and LATS1 germline mutations in a family with clustering of nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ho; Ohta, Takashi; Oh, Ji Eun; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; McKay, James; Voegele, Catherine; Durand, Geoffroy; Mittelbronn, Michel; Kleihues, Paul; Paulus, Werner; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2014-09-01

    Exome DNA sequencing of blood samples from a Li-Fraumeni family with a TP53 germline mutation (codon 236 deletion) and multiple nervous system tumors revealed additional germline mutations. Missense mutations in the MSH4 DNA repair gene (c.2480T>A; p.I827N) were detected in three patients with gliomas (two anaplastic astrocytomas, two glioblastomas). Two family members without a TP53 germline mutation who developed peripheral schwannomas also carried the MSH4 germline mutation, and in addition, a germline mutation of the LATS1 gene (c.286C>T; p.R96W). LATS1 is a downstream mediator of the NF2, but has not previously been found to be related to schwannomas. We therefore screened the entire coding sequence of the LATS1 gene in 65 sporadic schwannomas, 12 neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors, and 4 cases of schwannomatosis. We only found a single base deletion at codon 827 (exon 5) in a spinal schwannoma, leading to a stop at codon 835 (c.2480delG; p.*R827Kfs*8). Mutational loss of LATS1 function may thus play a role in some inherited schwannomas, but only exceptionally in sporadic schwannomas. This is the first study reporting a germline MSH4 mutation. Since it was present in all patients, it may have contributed to the subsequent acquisition of TP53 and LATS1 germline mutations.

  13. Laser-assisted tympanostomy (LAT) in adult individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopakis, E. P.; Lachanas, V. A.; Helidonis, Emmanuel S.; Velegrakis, G.

    2004-06-01

    Objectives: To assess outcome, in adult individuals undergone Laser Assisted Tympanostomy (LAT) without ventilation tube placement. Method: LAT was performed on a total of 95 ears (72 individuals). Indications included serous otitis media with effusion (44 ears/31 patients), eustachian tube dysfunction (32 ears/24 patients), acute otitis media (13 ears/11 patients), and endoscopic visualization of the middle ear (6 ears/6 patients). Results: Middle ear disease was resolved after the closure of tympanostomy in 48% of patients with serous otitis media with effusion. In 78% of patients with Eustachian tube dysfunction symptoms were diminished. All patients with acute otitis media had a satisfactory outcome. LAT was found quite effective in patients undergoing middle ear endoscopy. Conclusion: LAT without ventilation tubes provides a safe alternative surgical option in adult patients in certain cases. The selection criteria for this procedure are addressed in detail.

  14. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  15. Effect of C-Terminal Protein Tags on Pentitol and l-Arabinose Transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-3H]arabinose, l-[14C]arabitol, and [14C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter. PMID:24561586

  16. Effect of C-terminal protein tags on pentitol and L-arabinose transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Londesborough, John; Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-05-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-(3)H]arabinose, l-[(14)C]arabitol, and [(14)C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter.

  17. Low level of LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction is associated with Th2 polarized differentiation: a contributing factor to the etiology of asthma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaohua; Cui, Zhilei; Gu, Wen; Xu, Weiguo; Guo, Xuejun

    2014-07-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a key adaptor in the T cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathway. The expression of LAT is lower in asthmatic patients than that in healthy people, but there is little knowledge about the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. This study was aimed to determine whether LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction was involved in the development of asthma. It was shown that the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 decreased in the asthmatic mouse model and Th2 cell differentiated CD4(+) T cells. In addition, depleted endogenous PLC-γ1 promoted CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into IL-4-Productor. It was therefore concluded that the low level of LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction was associated with Th2 polarized differentiation, and this may contribute to the etiology of asthma.

  18. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation.

    PubMed

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Simpson, Jennifer L; Wechsler, Steven L

    2015-10-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular immune mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) explant-induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT((+)) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT((-)) virus) were irradiated with UV-B, and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT((-)) virus, LAT((+)) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B-induced reactivation mouse model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs is discussed.

  19. PSR J2030+364I: Radio Discovery and Gamma-ray Study of a Middle-aged Pulsar in the Now Identified Fermi-LAT Source 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Romani, R. W.; Parent, D.; Decesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Donato, D.; SazParkinson, P. M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with IFGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.28, spin-down luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 34) erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1 % that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc/cu cm. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive - PSR J2030+364 I would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only > or approx. 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  20. PSR J2030+3641: RADIO DISCOVERY AND GAMMA-RAY STUDY OF A MIDDLE-AGED PULSAR IN THE NOW IDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT SOURCE 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    SciTech Connect

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Romani, R. W.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Parent, D.; DeCesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Ferrara, E. C.; Donato, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu

    2012-02-10

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641 associated with 1FGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times which spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.2 s, a spin-down luminosity of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}, and a characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1% that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc cm{sup -3}. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive-PSR J2030+3641 would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only {approx}> 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  1. The Search for High Energy Extended Emission by Fermi-LAT from Swift-Localized Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.; Racusin, J.L.; /NASA, Goddard

    2012-05-01

    The brighter Fermi-LAT bursts have exhibited emission at energies >0.1 GeV that persists as late as {approx}2 ks after the prompt phase has nominally ended. This so-called 'extended emission' could arise from continued activity of the prompt burst mechanism or it could be the start of a high energy afterglow component. The high energy extended emission seen by the LAT has typically followed a t{sup -}{gamma} power-law temporal decay where {gamma} {approx} 1.2-1.7 and has shown no strong indication of spectral evolution. In contrast, the prompt burst emission generally displays strong spectral variability and more complex temporal changes in the LAT band. This differing behavior suggests that the extended emission likely corresponds to an early afterglow phase produced by an external shock. In this study, we look for evidence of high energy extended emission from 145 Swift-localized GRBs that have occurred since the launch of Fermi. A majority of these bursts were either outside of the LAT field-of-view or were otherwise not detected by the LAT during the prompt phase. However, because of the scanning operation of the Fermi satellite, the long-lived extended emission of these bursts may be detectable in the LAT data on the {approx}few ks time scale. We will look for emission from individual bursts and will perform a stacking analysis in order to set bounds on this emission for the sample as a whole. The detection of such emission would have implications for afterglow models and for the overall energy budget of GRBs.

  2. Identifying Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects (UFOs) at High-Latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Teddy

    2009-09-01

    We propose a Chandra study of 8 high Galactic latitude gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT bright source list. These sources are currently unidentified, i.e., they are not clearly associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like blazars and pulsars. The proposed observations will determine the basic properties (fluxes, positions, hardness ratio/spectra) of all X-ray sources down to a 0.3-10 keV flux limit of 1.5e-14 erg/cm2/s within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. This will enable further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources.

  3. Precursors in gamma-ray bursts detected by the Fermi-LAT and GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sylvia; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain mysterious more than 40 years after their initial discovery. However, observations of GRBs by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) have uncovered new information about the observed properties and the underlying physics. In a small minority (roughly 5-20%), a dim, temporally distinct precursor peak occurs before the brightest part of the prompt emission in the keV-MeV range. The origin of precursors is still unknown, and studies of precursors can probe the formation of the GRB central engine and/or the nature of the jets that produce the emission. We present a systematic search for precursor emission in LAT and GBM data, and the temporal and spectral properties and energetics of the population of GRBs with precursors.

  4. Detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars through blind frequency searches using the Fermi LAT.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gwon, C; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Primack, J R; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emitting radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although there are more than 1800 known radio pulsars, until recently only seven were observed to pulse in gamma rays, and these were all discovered at other wavelengths. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) makes it possible to pinpoint neutron stars through their gamma-ray pulsations. We report the detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT. Most of these pulsars are coincident with previously unidentified gamma-ray sources, and many are associated with supernova remnants. Direct detection of gamma-ray pulsars enables studies of emission mechanisms, population statistics, and the energetics of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants.

  5. FERMI/GLAST Integrated Trending and Plotting System Release 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, Sheila; Brumer, Haim; Reitan, Denise

    2012-01-01

    An Integrated Trending and Plotting System (ITPS) is a trending, analysis, and plotting system used by space missions to determine performance and status of spacecraft and its instruments. ITPS supports several NASA mission operational control centers providing engineers, ground controllers, and scientists with access to the entire spacecraft telemetry data archive for the life of the mission, and includes a secure Web component for remote access. FERMI/GLAST ITPS Release 5.0 features include the option to display dates (yyyy/ddd) instead of orbit numbers along orbital Long-Term Trend (LTT) plot axis, the ability to save statistics from daily production plots as image files, and removal of redundant edit/create Input Definition File (IDF) screens. Other features are a fix to address invalid packet lengths, a change in naming convention of image files in order to use in script, the ability to save all ITPS plot images (from Windows or the Web) as GIF or PNG format, the ability to specify ymin and ymax on plots where previously only the desired range could be specified, Web interface capability to plot IDFs that contain out-oforder page and plot numbers, and a fix to change all default file names to show yyyydddhhmmss time stamps instead of hhmmssdddyyyy. A Web interface capability sorts files based on modification date (with newest one at top), and the statistics block can be displayed via a Web interface. Via the Web, users can graphically view the volume of telemetry data from each day contained in the ITPS archive in the Web digest. The ITPS could be also used in nonspace fields that need to plot data or trend data, including financial and banking systems, aviation and transportation systems, healthcare and educational systems, sales and marketing, and housing and construction.

  6. Topical lidocaine adrenaline tetracaine (LAT gel) versus injectable buffered lidocaine for local anesthesia in laceration repair.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, A A; Marvez-Valls, E; Nick, T G; Mills, T; Minvielle, L; Houry, D

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare topical lidocaine adrenaline tetracaine (LAT gel) with injectable buffered lidocaine with epinephrine regarding pain of application or injection and anesthesia effectiveness. The study was a randomized prospective comparison trial in an urban emergency department. Physicians and patients ranked the pain of application, injection, and suturing according to a 10-cm visual analog scale. Sixty-six patients were entered, 33 in the LAT gel group and 33 in the injectable buffered lidocaine group. Injection was found to be significantly more painful than application of gel (P < 0.001). For anesthesia effectiveness, there was no difference according to patients (P = 0.48) or physicians (P = 0.83) for topical vs injectable forms. The number of sutures causing pain was not statistically different in the two groups (P = 0.28). In conclusion, LAT gel compared favorably with injectable buffered lidocaine for local anesthesia effectiveness and was significantly less painful to apply. It may be the preferred local anesthetic for this reason. PMID:9291744

  7. LATS1 and LATS2 Phosphorylate CDC26 to Modulate Assembly of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Subcomplex of APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Kenta; Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Kabe, Yasuaki; Ueki, Arisa; Banno, Koji; Suematsu, Makoto; Aoki, Daisuke; Ishihama, Yasushi; Saya, Hideyuki; Kuninaka, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    In budding yeast, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) regulates anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) via the Dbf2-Cdc14 signaling cascade. Dbf2 kinase phosphorylates and activates Cdc14 phosphatase, which removes the inhibitory phosphorylation of the APC/C cofactor Cdh1. Although each component of the MEN was highly conserved during evolution, there is presently no evidence supporting direct phosphorylation of CDC14 by large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1), the human counterpart of Dbf2; hence, it is unclear how LATS1 regulates APC/C. Here, we demonstrate that LATS1 phosphorylates the Thr7 (T7) residue of the APC/C component CDC26 directly. Nocodazole-induced phosphorylation of T7 was reduced by knockdown of LATS1 and LATS2 in HeLa cells, indicating that both of these kinases contribute to the phosphorylation of CDC26 in vivo. The T7 residue of CDC26 is critical for its interaction with APC6, a tetratricopeptide repeat-containing subunit of APC/C, and mutation of this residue to Asp (T7D) reduced the interaction of CDC26 with APC6. Replacement of endogenous CDC26 in HeLa cells with exogenous phosphor-mimic T7D-mutated CDC26 increased the elution size of APC/C subunits in a gel filtration assay, implying a change in the APC/C assembly upon phosphorylation of CDC26. Furthermore, T7D-mutated CDC26 promoted the ubiquitination of polo-like kinase 1, a well-known substrate of APC/C. Overall, these results suggest that LATS1/2 are novel kinases involved in APC/C phosphorylation and indicate a direct regulatory link between LATS1/2 and APC/C. PMID:25723520

  8. The First Fermi-LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T. J.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) has shed new light on many types of Galactic objects, including many individual Supernova Remnants (SNRs). The spectral detection of hadronic gamma-ray emission from two SNRs, suggesting acceleration of cosmic ray (CR) protons, is an example of individual studies providing clues to characteristics that may be common to all SNRs. To uniformly determine SNR properties, we have developed the first systematic survey of SNRs from 1 to 100 GeV. From the 279 known radio SNRs, we found more than 100 GeV candidates, 31 of which are likely and 14 of which are marginally counterparts. These candidates span a wide range of multiwavelength properties, providing a critical context for complementary, in depth individual studies. Modeling this multiwavelength data demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from hadronic and leptonic particle populations in these objects. Together with the > 240 upper limits on GeV emission at the radio position and extension, our results also enable us to indirectly constrain SNRs' aggregate ability to accelerate CRs, and with direct measurements, will additionally enable a better understanding of CR origins.

  9. Energetic Fermi/LAT GRB 100414A: Energetic and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tsai, Patrick P.; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-03-01

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E src peak of 1458.7+132.6 - 106.6 keV and E iso of 34.5+2.0 - 1.8 × 1052 erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of α = -2.6 ± 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 ± 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5fdg8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E src peak-E iso and E src peak-E γ correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  10. A Southern Sky Survey with Fermi LAT and ASKAP

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-04-29

    We present the prospects for a future joint gamma-ray and radio survey of southern hemisphere sources using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. ASKAP is a next generation radio telescope designed to perform surveys at GHz frequencies at a much higher survey speed than previous radio telescopes, and is scheduled to start engineering observations in 2011. The survey capabilities of both Fermi LAT and ASKAP are described, and the planned science surveys for ASKAP are summarized. We give some expected details of the Variable and Slow Transient (VAST) survey using ASKAP, which will search for transients on timescales from 5 seconds to years. Some observational properties of faint and transient sources seen at gamma-ray and radio wavelengths are summarized, and prospects and strategies for using ASKAP survey data for LAT source counterpart identification are summarized.

  11. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity.

  12. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  13. Large amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) prodrugs of valproic acid: new prodrug design ideas for central nervous system delivery.

    PubMed

    Peura, Lauri; Malmioja, Kalle; Laine, Krista; Leppänen, Jukka; Gynther, Mikko; Isotalo, Antti; Rautio, Jarkko

    2011-10-03

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery is a major challenge in drug development because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently restricts the entry of drug molecules into the CNS at sufficient amounts. The brain uptake of poorly penetrating drugs could be improved by utilizing the transporters at the BBB with a prodrug approach. In this study, we designed four phenylalanine derivatives of valproic acid and studied their ability to utilize a large amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) in CNS delivery with an aim to show that the meta-substituted phenylalanine prodrugs bind to LAT1 with a higher affinity compared with the affinity of the para-substituted derivatives. All of the prodrugs crossed the BBB carrier mediatedly via LAT1 in in situ rat brain perfusion. For the first time, we introduced a novel meta-substituted phenylalanine analogue promoiety which improved the LAT1 affinity 10-fold and more importantly the rat brain uptake of the prodrug 2-fold compared with those of the para-substituted derivatives. Therefore, we have characterized a new prodrug design idea for CNS drug delivery utilizing a transporter-mediated prodrug approach.

  14. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  15. A Potential of an Anti-HTLV-I gp46 Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody (LAT-27) for Passive Immunization against Both Horizontal and Mother-to-Child Vertical Infection with Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hideki; Shimizu, Mamoru; Miyagi, Takuya; Kunihiro, Marie; Tanaka, Reiko; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-02-03

    Although the number of human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals in the world has been estimated at over 10 million, no prophylaxis vaccines against HTLV-I infection are available. In this study, we took a new approach for establishing the basis of protective vaccines against HTLV-I. We show here the potential of a passively administered HTLV-I neutralizing monoclonal antibody of rat origin (LAT-27) that recognizes epitopes consisting of the HTLV-I gp46 amino acids 191-196. LAT-27 completely blocked HTLV-I infection in vitro at a minimum concentration of 5 μg/mL. Neonatal rats born to mother rats pre-infused with LAT-27 were shown to have acquired a large quantity of LAT-27, and these newborns showed complete resistance against intraperitoneal infection with HTLV-I. On the other hand, when humanized immunodeficient mice were pre-infused intravenously with humanized LAT-27 (hu-LAT-27), all the mice completely resisted HTLV-I infection. These results indicate that hu-LAT-27 may have a potential for passive immunization against both horizontal and mother-to-child vertical infection with HTLV-I.

  16. LATS1/WARTS phosphorylates MYPT1 to counteract PLK1 and regulate mammalian mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Shimizu, Takatsune; Naoe, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Ishizawa, Jo; Arima, Yoshimi; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masaaki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Aoki, Daisuke; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    In the mitotic exit network of budding yeast, Dbf2 kinase phosphorylates and regulates Cdc14 phosphatase. In contrast, no phosphatase substrates of LATS1/WARTS kinase, the mammalian equivalent of Dbf2, has been reported. To address this discrepancy, we performed phosphoproteomic screening using LATS1 kinase. Screening identified MYPT1 (myosin phosphatase–targeting subunit 1) as a new substrate for LATS1. LATS1 directly and preferentially phosphorylated serine 445 (S445) of MYPT1. An MYPT1 mutant (S445A) failed to dephosphorylate Thr 210 of PLK1 (pololike kinase 1), thereby activating PLK1. This suggests that LATS1 promotes MYPT1 to antagonize PLK1 activity. Consistent with this, LATS1-depleted HeLa cells or fibroblasts from LATS1 knockout mice showed increased PLK1 activity. We also found deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage–induced LATS1 activation caused PLK1 suppression via the phosphorylation of MYPT1 S445. Furthermore, LATS1 knockdown cells showed reduced G2 checkpoint arrest after DNA damage. These results indicate that LATS1 phosphorylates a phosphatase as does the yeast Dbf2 and demonstrate a novel role of LATS1 in controlling PLK1 at the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. PMID:22641346

  17. ENERGETIC FERMI/LAT GRB 100414A: ENERGETIC AND CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Yuji; Tsai, Patrick P.; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-03-20

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E{sup src}{sub peak} of 1458.7{sup +132.6}{sub -106.6} keV and E{sub iso} of 34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of {alpha} = -2.6 {+-} 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 {+-} 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5.{sup 0}8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub iso} and E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub {gamma}} correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  18. Search for Dark Matter Satellites Using the Fermi-Lat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations based on the ACDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic dark matter satellites. We report the results of a Large Area Telescope (LAT) search for these satellites via the gamma-ray emission expected from the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. Some dark matter satellites are expected to have hard gamma-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We sought to identify LAT sources with these characteristics, focusing on gamma-ray spectra consistent with WIMP annihilation through the bb(sup raised bar) channel. We found no viable dark matter satellite candidates using one year of data, and we present a framework for interpreting this result in the context of numerical simulations to constrain the velocity-averaged annihilation cross section for a conventional 100 Ge V WIMP annihilating through the bb(sup raised bar) channel.

  19. Search for Dark Matter Satellites Using the FERMI-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T.J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T.H.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; /more authors..

    2012-08-16

    Numerical simulations based on the {Lambda}CDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic dark matter satellites. We report the results of a Large Area Telescope (LAT) search for these satellites via the {gamma}-ray emission expected from the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. Some dark matter satellites are expected to have hard {gamma}-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We sought to identify LAT sources with these characteristics, focusing on {gamma}-ray spectra consistent with WIMP annihilation through the b{bar b} channel. We found no viable dark matter satellite candidates using one year of data, and we present a framework for interpreting this result in the context of numerical simulations to constrain the velocity-averaged annihilation cross section for a conventional 100 GeV WIMP annihilating through the b{bar b} channel.

  20. Relativistic Particle-in-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows Observed by GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "'jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  1. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  2. Recent and Future Observations in the X-ray and Gamma-ray Bands: Chandra, Suzaku, GLAST, and NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-02

    This paper presents a brief overview of the accomplishments of the Chandra satellite that are shedding light on the origin of high energy particles in astrophysical sources, with the emphasis on clusters of galaxies. It also discusses the prospects for the new data to be collected with instruments recently launched--such as Suzaku--or those to be deployed in the near future, and this includes GLAST and NuSTAR.

  3. Increased neurovirulence and reactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency associated transcript (LAT) negative mutant dLAT2903 with a disrupted LAT miR-H2

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianzhi; Brown, Don; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    At least six microRNAs (miRNAs) appear to be encoded by the latency associated transcript (LAT) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The gene for ICP0, an important immediate early (IE) viral protein, is antisense to, and overlaps with, the region of LAT from which miRNA H2 (miR-H2) is derived. We recently reported that a mutant (McK-ΔH2) disrupted for miR-H2 on the wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae genomic background has increased ICP0 expression, increased neurovirulence, and slightly more rapid reactivation. We report here that HSV-1 mutants deleted for the LAT promoter nonetheless make significant amounts of miR-H2 during lytic tissue culture infection, presumably via readthrough transcription from an upstream promoter. To determine if miR-H2 might also play a role in the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle of a LAT negative mutant, we constructed dLAT-ΔH2, in which miR-H2 is disrupted in dLAT2903 without altering the predicted amino acid sequence of the overlapping ICP0 open reading frame. Similar to McK-ΔH2, dLAT-ΔH2 expressed more ICP0, was more neurovirulent, and had increased reactivation in the mouse TG explant induced reactivation model of HSV-1 compared to its parental virus. Interestingly, although the increased reactivation of McK-ΔH2 compared to its parental wt virus was subtle and only detected at very early times after explant TG induced reactivation, the increased reactivation of dLAT-ΔH2 compared to its dLAT2903 parental virus appeared more robust and was significantly increased even at late times after induction. These results confirm that miR-H2 plays a role in modulating the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. PMID:26069184

  4. The LATS2 tumor suppressor inhibits SREBP and suppresses hepatic cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Aylon, Yael; Gershoni, Anat; Rotkopf, Ron; Biton, Inbal E; Porat, Ziv; Koh, Anna P; Sun, Xiaochen; Lee, Youngmin; Fiel, Maria-Isabel; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L; Johnson, Randy L; Oren, Moshe

    2016-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a major regulator of organ size. In the liver, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes hyperplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma primarily through hyperactivation of its downstream effector, YAP. The LATS2 tumor suppressor is a core member of the Hippo pathway. A screen for LATS2-interacting proteins in liver-derived cells identified the transcription factor SREBP2, master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. LATS2 down-regulation caused SREBP activation and accumulation of excessive cholesterol. Likewise, mice harboring liver-specific Lats2 conditional knockout (Lats2-CKO) displayed constitutive SREBP activation and overexpressed SREBP target genes and developed spontaneous fatty liver disease. Interestingly, the impact of LATS2 depletion on SREBP-mediated transcription was clearly distinct from that of YAP overexpression. When challenged with excess dietary cholesterol, Lats2-CKO mice manifested more severe liver damage than wild-type mice. Surprisingly, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis were actually attenuated relative to wild-type mice, in association with impaired p53 activation. Subsequently, Lats2-CKO mice failed to recover effectively from cholesterol-induced damage upon return to a normal diet. Additionally, decreased LATS2 mRNA in association with increased SREBP target gene expression was observed in a subset of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cases. Together, these findings further highlight the tight links between tumor suppressors and metabolic homeostasis.

  5. The LATS2 tumor suppressor inhibits SREBP and suppresses hepatic cholesterol accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Aylon, Yael; Gershoni, Anat; Rotkopf, Ron; Biton, Inbal E.; Porat, Ziv; Koh, Anna P.; Sun, Xiaochen; Lee, Youngmin; Fiel, Maria-Isabel; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L.; Johnson, Randy L.; Oren, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a major regulator of organ size. In the liver, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes hyperplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma primarily through hyperactivation of its downstream effector, YAP. The LATS2 tumor suppressor is a core member of the Hippo pathway. A screen for LATS2-interacting proteins in liver-derived cells identified the transcription factor SREBP2, master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. LATS2 down-regulation caused SREBP activation and accumulation of excessive cholesterol. Likewise, mice harboring liver-specific Lats2 conditional knockout (Lats2-CKO) displayed constitutive SREBP activation and overexpressed SREBP target genes and developed spontaneous fatty liver disease. Interestingly, the impact of LATS2 depletion on SREBP-mediated transcription was clearly distinct from that of YAP overexpression. When challenged with excess dietary cholesterol, Lats2-CKO mice manifested more severe liver damage than wild-type mice. Surprisingly, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis were actually attenuated relative to wild-type mice, in association with impaired p53 activation. Subsequently, Lats2-CKO mice failed to recover effectively from cholesterol-induced damage upon return to a normal diet. Additionally, decreased LATS2 mRNA in association with increased SREBP target gene expression was observed in a subset of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cases. Together, these findings further highlight the tight links between tumor suppressors and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27013235

  6. Search for gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies with Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Bravo, César; Araya, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have found a positive correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and their gamma-ray luminosity. Galaxies with a high SFR are expected to produce a large amount of high-energy cosmic rays, which emit gamma-rays when interacting with the interstellar medium and radiation fields. We search for gamma-ray emission from a sample of galaxies within and beyond the Local Group with data from the LAT instrument onboard the Fermi satellite. We exclude recently detected galaxies (NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, NGC 1068, NGC 2146, Arp 220) and use seven years of cumulative `Pass 8' data from the LAT in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. No new detections are seen in the data and upper limits for the gamma-ray fluxes are calculated. The correlation between gamma-ray luminosity and infrared luminosity for galaxies obtained using our new upper limits is in agreement with a previously published correlation, but the new upper limits imply that some galaxies are not as efficient gamma-ray emitters as previously thought.

  7. Fermi LAT Observations of the Crab Nebula During the Exceptional April 2011 Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula, formerly thought to be steady in gamma rays, shows unexpected and occasionally dramatic variability in high-energy gamma rays. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi recorded several strong outbursts, including dedicated pointed observations of the brightest yet seen, a spectacular flare in April 2011. These observations provide a particularly detailed look at the temporal and spectral characteristics of the nebula during the flare. The LAT data show an additional component in the spectral energy distribution that peaks at a maximum of $375\\pm26\\mathrm{MeV}$. In the probable scenario that this component is synchrotron emission, the electrons are accelerated to extreme energies that are difficult to reconcile with the very rapid change in flux and the expectation for acceleration processes and conditions occurring within the pulsar wind nebula. The physical location and mechanism driving the flares remains undetermined despite observations across the spectrum made by a variety of instruments including the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Very Large Array. I will present timing and spectral studies of the high-energy gamma-ray data, discuss implications for the origin of the flares, and highlight preparations for the next major flare.

  8. The First Fermi-LAT SNR Catalog: GeV Characteristics and Cosmic Ray Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T. J.; Acero, F.; de Palma, F.; Hewitt, J.; Renaud, M.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (CR) sources, classically proposed to be Supernova Remnants (SNRs), must meet the energetic particle content required by direct measurements of high energy CRs. Indirect gamma-ray measurements of SNRs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) have now shown directly that at least three SNRs accelerate protons. With the first Fermi LAT SNR Catalog, we have systematically characterized the GeV gamma-rays emitted by 279 SNRs known primarily from radio surveys. We present these sources in a multiwavelength context, including studies of correlations between GeV and radio size, flux, and index, TeV index, and age and environment tracers, in order to better understand effects of evolution and environment on the GeV emission. We show that previously sufficient models of SNRs' GeV emission no longer adequately describe the data. To address the question of CR origins, we also examine the SNRs' maximal CR contribution assuming the GeV emission arises solely from proton interactions. Improved breadth and quality of multiwavelength data, including distances and local densities, and more, higher resolution gamma-ray data with correspondingly improved Galactic diffuse models will strengthen this constraint.

  9. Fermi-LAT kills dark matter interpretations of AMS-02 data. Or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, Konstantin; Budaev, Ruslan; Kirillov, Alexander; Laletin, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    A number of papers attempt to explain the positron anomaly in cosmic rays, observed by PAMELA and AMS-02, in terms of dark matter (DM) decays or annihilations. However, the recent progress in cosmic gamma-ray studies challenges these attempts. Indeed, as we show, any rational DM model explaining the positron anomaly abundantly produces final state radiation and Inverse Compton gamma rays, which inevitably leads to a contradiction with Fermi-LAT isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background measurements. Furthermore, the Fermi-LAT observation of Milky Way dwarf satellites, supposed to be rich in DM, revealed no significant signal in gamma rays. We propose a generic approach in which the major contribution to cosmic rays comes from the dark matter disc and prove that the tension between the DM origin of the positron anomaly and the cosmic gamma-ray observations can be relieved. We consider both a simple model, in which DM decay/annihilate into charged leptons, and a model-independent minimal case of particle production, and we estimate the optimal thickness of DM disk. Possible mechanisms of formation and its properties are briefly discussed.

  10. The Half-Life of the HSV-1 1.5 kb LAT Intron is similar to the half-Life of the 2.0 kb LAT Intron

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Kerry K.; Mishra, Prakhar; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system of humans. Although about 80 genes are expressed during the lytic cycle of the virus infection, essentially only one gene is expressed during the latent cycle. This gene is known as the latency associated transcript (LAT) and it appears to play a role in the latency cycle through an anti-apoptotic function in the 5’ end of the gene and miRNA encoded along the length of the transcript which down regulate some of the viral immediate early (IE) gene products. The LAT gene is about 8.3 kb long and consists of two exons separated by an unusual intron. The intron between the exons consists of two nested introns. This arrangement of introns has been called a twintron. Furthermore, the larger (2 kb) intron has been shown to be very stable. In this study we measure the stability of the shorter 1.5 kb nested intron and find its half-life is similar to the longer intron. This was achieved by deleting the 0.5 kb overlapping intron from a plasmid construct designed to express the LAT transcript from a tet-inducible promoter, and measuring the half-life of the 1.5 kb intron in tissue culture cells. This finding supports the hypothesis that it is the common branch-point region of these nested introns that is responsible for their stability. PMID:23335177

  11. The half-life of the HSV-1 1.5-kb LAT intron is similar to the half-life of the 2.0-kb LAT intron.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Kerry K; Mishra, Prakhar; Fraser, Nigel W

    2013-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 establishes a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system of humans. Although about 80 genes are expressed during the lytic cycle of the virus infection, essentially only one gene is expressed during the latent cycle. This gene is known as the latency-associated transcript (LAT), and it appears to play a role in the latency cycle through an anti-apoptotic function in the 5' end of the gene and miRNA encoded along the length of the transcript which downregulate some of the viral immediate-early gene products. The LAT gene is about 8.3 kb long and consists of two exons separated by an unusual intron. The intron between the exons consists of two nested introns. This arrangement of introns has been called a twintron. Furthermore, the larger (2 kb) intron has been shown to be very stable. In this study, we measure the stability of the shorter 1.5-kb nested intron and find its half-life is similar to the longer intron. This was achieved by deleting the 0.5-kb overlapping intron from a plasmid construct designed to express the LAT transcript from a tet-inducible promoter and measuring the half-life of the 1.5-kb intron in tissue culture cells. This finding supports the hypothesis that it is the common branch-point region of these nested introns that is responsible for their stability.

  12. Tectonic significance of magnetic and gravity data across northern California (lat. 39[degree]N. to lat. 41[degree]N. )

    SciTech Connect

    Griscom, A.; Roberts, C.W.; Halvorson, P.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Aeromagnetic and isostatic residual gravity maps of an east-west transect across northern California show important tectonic features. A linear magnetic anomaly and west-sloping gradient extends over 300 km along the Franciscan-Great Valley contact (FGC) and across the Klamath Mountains province (KM) north to lat. 40[degree]45'N. The anomaly source lies at depths of 5--10 km beneath the KM and the FGC, and implies that the Franciscan complex of the Coast Ranges is thrust (and wedged) at least 80 km eastward beneath the KM to approximately long. 122[degree]40 minutes W. Calculations on a circular gravity low of [minus]50 mGal centered at the circular Bald Rock pluton (diameter about 15 km) in the Sierran foothills indicate a pluton thickness of about 15 km. The nearby Cascade and Merrimac plutons are located on the gradients of this gravity anomaly, have a relatively minor effect on it, and thus are interpreted to be thick (up to 5 km) laccolithic sills that emanate from the Bald Rock pluton, thinning away from it to a feather edge. Model studies indicate that the northeast contact of the Feather River periodotite body (FRPB) north of lat. 39[degree]40 minutes N. generally dips steeply northeast or vertical. The same contact south of this latitude dips east at angles of about 45[degree] to depths of at least 10 km. Magnetic patterns extending from the northern Sierra across the Cascades to the Klamath Mountains suggest that the FRPB may correlate with the Trinity ophiolite.

  13. Limits on dark matter annihilation signals from the Fermi LAT 4-year measurement of the isotropic gamma-ray background

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.

    2015-09-02

    We search for evidence of dark matter (DM) annihilation in the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) measured with 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. An improved theoretical description of the cosmological DM annihilation signal, based on two complementary techniques and assuming generic weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) properties, renders more precise predictions compared to previous work. More specifically, we estimate the cosmologically-induced gamma-ray intensity to have an uncertainty of a factor ~ 20 in canonical setups. We consistently include both the Galactic and extragalactic signals under the same theoretical framework, and study the impact of the former onmore » the IGRB spectrum derivation. We find no evidence for a DM signal and we set limits on the DM-induced isotropic gamma-ray signal. Our limits are competitive for DM particle masses up to tens of TeV and, indeed, are the strongest limits derived from Fermi LAT data at TeV energies. This is possible thanks to the new Fermi LAT IGRB measurement, which now extends up to an energy of 820 GeV. As a result, we quantify uncertainties in detail and show the potential this type of search offers for testing the WIMP paradigm with a complementary and truly cosmological probe of DM particle signals.« less

  14. Limits on dark matter annihilation signals from the Fermi LAT 4-year measurement of the isotropic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.

    2015-09-02

    We search for evidence of dark matter (DM) annihilation in the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) measured with 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. An improved theoretical description of the cosmological DM annihilation signal, based on two complementary techniques and assuming generic weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) properties, renders more precise predictions compared to previous work. More specifically, we estimate the cosmologically-induced gamma-ray intensity to have an uncertainty of a factor ~ 20 in canonical setups. We consistently include both the Galactic and extragalactic signals under the same theoretical framework, and study the impact of the former on the IGRB spectrum derivation. We find no evidence for a DM signal and we set limits on the DM-induced isotropic gamma-ray signal. Our limits are competitive for DM particle masses up to tens of TeV and, indeed, are the strongest limits derived from Fermi LAT data at TeV energies. This is possible thanks to the new Fermi LAT IGRB measurement, which now extends up to an energy of 820 GeV. As a result, we quantify uncertainties in detail and show the potential this type of search offers for testing the WIMP paradigm with a complementary and truly cosmological probe of DM particle signals.

  15. Limits on dark matter annihilation signals from the Fermi LAT 4-year measurement of the isotropic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We search for evidence of dark matter (DM) annihilation in the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) measured with 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. An improved theoretical description of the cosmological DM annihilation signal, based on two complementary techniques and assuming generic weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) properties, renders more precise predictions compared to previous work. More specifically, we estimate the cosmologically-induced gamma-ray intensity to have an uncertainty of a factor ∼ 20 in canonical setups. We consistently include both the Galactic and extragalactic signals under the same theoretical framework, and study the impact of the former on the IGRB spectrum derivation. We find no evidence for a DM signal and we set limits on the DM-induced isotropic gamma-ray signal. Our limits are competitive for DM particle masses up to tens of TeV and, indeed, are the strongest limits derived from Fermi LAT data at TeV energies. This is possible thanks to the new Fermi LAT IGRB measurement, which now extends up to an energy of 820 GeV. We quantify uncertainties in detail and show the potential this type of search offers for testing the WIMP paradigm with a complementary and truly cosmological probe of DM particle signals.

  16. Serine residues in the LAT adaptor are essential for TCR-dependent signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Florensa, Mario; García-Blesa, Antonio; Yélamos, José; Muñoz-Suano, Alba; Domínguez-Villar, Margarita; Valdor, Rut; Alonso, Antonio; García-Cózar, Francisco; Aparicio, Pedro; Malissen, Bernard; Aguado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The adaptor protein LAT has a prominent role in the transduction of intracellular signals elicited by the TCR/CD3 complex. Upon TCR engagement, LAT becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated and thereby, recruits to the membrane several proteins implicated in the activation of downstream signaling pathways. However, little is known about the role of other conserved motifs present in the LAT sequence. Here, we report that the adaptor LAT contains several conserved serine-based motifs, which are essential for proper signal transduction through the TCR. Mutation of these serine motifs in the human T cell line Jurkat prevents proper calcium influx, MAPK activation, and IL-2 production in response to TCR/CD3 stimulation. Moreover, this mutant form of LAT has a reduced ability to bind to PLC-γ1 and SLP-76, although phosphorylation of tyrosine residues 132, 171, and 191 is not decreased, raising a possible role for the serine-based motifs of LAT for the binding of important partners. The functional role of LAT serine-based motifs in signal transduction could be mediated by an effect on tyrosine phosphorylation, as their mutation significantly diminishes the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 226. In addition, these serine motifs seem to have a regulatory role, given that upon their mutation, ZAP-70 shows enhanced phosphorylation. Therefore, the LAT serine-based motifs likely regulate signaling pathways that are essential for T cell physiology.

  17. LAB/NTAL/Lat2: a force to be reckoned with in all leukocytes?

    PubMed

    Orr, Selinda J; McVicar, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    LAB/NTAL/Lat2 is a transmembrane adaptor protein closely related to LAT. It is expressed in various myeloid and lymphoid cells, many of which also express LAT. Phosphorylation of LAB occurs following engagement of various ITAM- and non-ITAM-linked receptors and can play positive and negative roles following receptor engagement. LAT binds PLCγ directly, resulting in efficient Ca²+ flux and degranulation. However, LAB does not contain a PLCγ-binding motif and only binds PLCγ indirectly, possibly via Grb2, thereby resulting in suboptimal signaling. As LAT can signal more efficiently than LAB, competition between the 2 for space/substrates in the lipid rafts can attenuate signaling. This competition model requires coexpression of LAT; however, LAB is repressive, even in cells lacking substantial LAT expression such as macrophages and mature B cells. The reported interaction between LAB and the ubiquitin E3-ligase c-Cbl suggests 1 possible mechanism for LAT-independent inhibition by LAB, but such a model requires further investigation. Given the wide-reaching expression pattern of LAB, LAB has the ability to modulate signaling in virtually every type of leukocyte. Regardless of its ultimate mode of action, the potent regulatory capability of LAB proves this protein to be a complex adaptor that warrants continued, substantial scrutiny by biochemists and immunologists alike.

  18. Fermi LAT Limits on Primordial Black Hole Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chistian; Malyshev, Dmitry; Funk, Stefan; Ritz, Steven; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) of sufficiently small mass emit gamma rays in the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) energy range. PBHs with lifetimes shorter than the Fermi observation time will appear as moving point sources with gamma-ray emission that becomes harder and brighter with time until the PBH completely evaporates. Previous searches for gamma rays from PBHs have focused on either short time scale bursts or the contribution of PBH bursts to the isotropic diffuse emission. Here we use Fermi LAT point source catalogs to search for PBH candidates that evaporate on a time scale of several years. In addition to looking for the spectral signatures of a PBH, we also develop an algorithm to detect proper motion. There are a few unassociated point sources with spectra consistent with PBH evaporation; however, none of these sources show significant proper motion. We derive a conservative limit on PBH evaporation rate in the vicinity of the Earth by using a threshold on the gamma-ray flux above 10 GeV such that there are no sources above this threshold with spectra consistent with Hawking radiation from PBHs. The derived limit is more stringent than the limits obtained with ground-based gamma-ray observatories.

  19. Regulation of a LATS-homolog by Ras GTPases is important for the control of cell division

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear Dbf-related/large tumor suppressor (NDR/LATS) kinases have been shown recently to control pathways that regulate mitotic exit, cytokinesis, cell growth, morphological changes and apoptosis. LATS kinases are core components of the Hippo signaling cascade and important tumor suppressors controlling cell proliferation and organ size in flies and mammals, and homologs are also present in yeast and Dictyostelium discoideum. Ras proto-oncogens regulate many biological functions, including differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Dysfunctions of LATS kinases or Ras GTPases have been implicated in the development of a variety of cancers in humans. Results In this study we used the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum to analyze the functions of NdrC, a homolog of the mammalian LATS2 protein, and present a novel regulatory mechanism for this kinase. Deletion of the ndrC gene caused impaired cell division and loss of centrosome integrity. A yeast two-hybrid analysis, using activated Ras proteins as bait, revealed NdrC as an interactor and identified its Ras-binding domain. Further in vitro pull-down assays showed that NdrC binds RasG and RasB, and to a lesser extent RasC and Rap1. In cells lacking NdrC, the levels of activated RasB and RasG are up-regulated, suggesting a functional connection between RasB, RasG, and NdrC. Conclusions Dictyostelium discoideum NdrC is a LATS2-homologous kinase that is important for the regulation of cell division. NdrC contains a Ras-binding domain and interacts preferentially with RasB and RasG. Changed levels of both, RasB or RasG, have been shown previously to interfere with cell division. Since a defect in cell division is exhibited by NdrC-null cells, RasG-null cells, and cells overexpressing activated RasB, we propose a model for the regulation of cytokinesis by NdrC that involves the antagonistic control by RasB and RasG. PMID:24986648

  20. Increased neurovirulence and reactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript (LAT)-negative mutant dLAT2903 with a disrupted LAT miR-H2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xianzhi; Brown, Don; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L

    2016-02-01

    At least six microRNAs (miRNAs) appear to be encoded by the latency-associated transcript (LAT) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The gene for ICP0, an important immediate early (IE) viral protein, is anti-sense to, and overlaps with, the region of LAT from which miRNA H2 (miR-H2) is derived. We recently reported that a mutant (McK-ΔH2) disrupted for miR-H2 on the wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae genomic background has increased ICP0 expression, increased neurovirulence, and slightly more rapid reactivation. We report here that HSV-1 mutants deleted for the LAT promoter nonetheless make significant amounts of miR-H2 during lytic tissue culture infection, presumably via readthrough transcription from an upstream promoter. To determine if miR-H2 might also play a role in the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle of a LAT-negative mutant, we constructed dLAT-ΔH2, in which miR-H2 is disrupted in dLAT2903 without altering the predicted amino acid sequence of the overlapping ICP0 open reading frame. Similar to McK-ΔH2, dLAT-ΔH2 expressed more ICP0, was more neurovirulent, and had increased reactivation in the mouse TG explant-induced reactivation model of HSV-1 compared with its parental virus. Interestingly, although the increased reactivation of McK-ΔH2 compared with its parental wild-type (wt) virus was subtle and only detected at very early times after explant TG induced reactivation, the increased reactivation of dLAT-ΔH2 compared with its dLAT2903 parental virus appeared more robust and was significantly increased even at late times after induction. These results confirm that miR-H2 plays a role in modulating the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype.

  1. Oncogenicity of L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) revealed by targeted gene disruption in chicken DT40 cells: LAT1 is a promising molecular target for human cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, Mayumi; Ohno, Yoshiya; Masuko, Kazue; Takeuchi, Akiko; Suda, Kentaro; Kubo, Akihiro; Kawahara, Rieko; Okazaki, Shogo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi; Yagi, Hideki; Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki; Masuko, Takashi

    2011-03-25

    Highlights: {yields} We established LAT1 amino-acid transporter-disrupted DT40 cells. {yields} LAT1-disrupted cells showed slow growth and lost the oncogenicity. {yields} siRNA and mAb inhibited human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LAT1 is a promising target molecule for cancer therapy. -- Abstract: L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is the first identified light chain of CD98 molecule, disulfide-linked to a heavy chain of CD98. Following cDNA cloning of chicken full-length LAT1, we have constructed targeting vectors for the disruption of chicken LAT1 gene from genomic DNA of chicken LAT1 consisting of 5.4 kb. We established five homozygous LAT1-disrupted (LAT1{sup -/-}) cell clones, derived from a heterozygous LAT1{sup +/-} clone of DT40 chicken B cell line. Reactivity of anti-chicken CD98hc monoclonal antibody (mAb) with LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 cells was markedly decreased compared with that of wild-type DT40 cells. All LAT1{sup -/-} cells were deficient in L-type amino-acid transporting activity, although alternative-splice variant but not full-length mRNA of LAT1 was detected in these cells. LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones showed outstandingly slow growth in liquid culture and decreased colony-formation capacity in soft agar compared with wild-type DT40 cells. Cell-cycle analyses indicated that LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones have prolonged cell-cycle phases compared with wild-type or LAT1{sup +/-} DT40 cells. Knockdown of human LAT1 by small interfering RNAs resulted in marked in vitro cell-growth inhibition of human cancer cells, and in vivo tumor growth of HeLa cells in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by anti-human LAT1 mAb. All these results indicate essential roles of LAT1 in the cell proliferation and occurrence of malignant phenotypes and that LAT1 is a promising candidate as a molecular target of human cancer therapy.

  2. miR-107 and miR-25 simultaneously target LATS2 and regulate proliferation and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Wanhu; Cui, Yongchun

    2015-05-08

    Although a series of oncogenes and tumor suppressors were identified in the pathological development of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC), the underlying molecule mechanism were still not fully understood. The current study explored the expression profile of miR-107 and miR-25 in GAC patients and their downstream regulative network. qRT-PCR analysis was performed to quantify the expression of these two miRNAs in serum samples from both patients and healthy controls. Dual luciferase assay was conducted to verify their putative bindings with LATS2. MTT assay, cell cycle assay and transwell assay were performed to explore how miR-107 and miR-25 regulate proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Findings of this study demonstrated that total miR-107 or miR-25 expression might be overexpressed in gastric cancer patients and they can simultaneously and synchronically regulate LATS2 expression, thereby affecting gastric cancer cell growth and invasion. Therefore, the miR-25/miR-107-LATS2 axis might play an important role in proliferation and invasion of the gastric cancer cells. - Highlights: • Total miR-107 and miR-25 expression is significantly increased in GAC patients. • Both miR-107 and miR-25 can promote proliferation and invasion of GAC cells. • Both miR-107 and miR-25 can target LATS2 and regulate its expression. • miR-107 and miR-25 regulate proliferation and invasion of GAC cells though LATS2.

  3. Constraining Inert Triplet dark matter by the LHC and FermiLAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ayazi, Seyed Yaser; Firouzabadi, S. Mahdi E-mail: smmfirouz@yahoo.com

    2014-11-01

    We study collider phenomenology of inert triplet scalar dark matter at the LHC. We discuss possible decay of Higgs boson to dark matter candidate and apply current experimental data for invisible Higgs decay and R{sub γγ} to constrain parameter space of our model. We also investigate constraints on dark matter coming from forthcoming measurement, R{sub Zγ} and mono-Higgs production. We analytically calculate the annihilation cross section of dark matter candidate into 2γ and Zγ and then use FermiLAT data to put constraints on parameter space of Inert Triplet Model. We found that this limit can be stronger than the constraints provided by LUX experiment for low mass DM.

  4. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis l-serine/l-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian l–amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT’s lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. PMID:26976827

  5. Cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism of newborn mct8-deficient mice transiently suppressed by lat2 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Bárbara; Martínez de Mena, Raquel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Nunes, Virginia; Palacín, Manuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone entry into cells is facilitated by transmembrane transporters. Mutations of the specific thyroid hormone transporter, MCT8 (Monocarboxylate Transporter 8, SLC16A2) cause an X-linked syndrome of profound neurological impairment and altered thyroid function known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. MCT8 deficiency presumably results in failure of thyroid hormone to reach the neural target cells in adequate amounts to sustain normal brain development. However during the perinatal period the absence of Mct8 in mice induces a state of cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism, indicating increased brain access and/or retention of thyroid hormone. The contribution of other transporters to thyroid hormone metabolism and action, especially in the context of MCT8 deficiency is not clear. We have analyzed the role of the heterodimeric aminoacid transporter Lat2 (Slc7a8), in the presence or absence of Mct8, on thyroid hormone concentrations and on expression of thyroid hormone-dependent cerebral cortex genes. To this end we generated Lat2-/-, and Mct8-/yLat2-/- mice, to compare with wild type and Mct8-/y mice during postnatal development. As described previously the single Mct8 KO neonates had a transient increase of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and expression of thyroid hormone target genes in the cerebral cortex. Strikingly the absence of Lat2 in the double Mct8Lat2 KO prevented the effect of Mct8 inactivation in newborns. The Lat2 effect was not observed from postnatal day 5 onwards. On postnatal day 21 the Mct8 KO displayed the typical pattern of thyroid hormone concentrations in plasma, decreased cortex 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and Hr expression, and concomitant Lat2 inactivation produced little to no modifications. As Lat2 is expressed in neurons and in the choroid plexus, the results support a role for Lat2 in the supply of thyroid hormone to the cerebral cortex during early postnatal development.

  6. Difficulties in the study of cosmic radio noise absorption at 30 MHz using riometer at low latitude station, Kolhapur (Lat-16.8°N, Long-74.25°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikte, S. S.; Sharma, A. K.; Nade, D. P.; Rokade, M. V.; Ghodpage, R. N.; Patil, P. T.; Bhonsle, R. V.

    2014-01-01

    A dual dipole antenna has been installed at low latitude station Kolhapur (Geographic 16.8°N, 74.25°E), Maharashtra, India for the study of cosmic radio noise absorption using Solid State Riometer (which operates at 30 MHz) during pre phase of 24th solar maxima. The aim for this type of study over Kolhapur was to know the response of lower (D region) ionosphere over low latitude by cosmic radio noise absorption using riometer technique during quite period as well as sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID). The observations are being taken for 3 years. Two different sites (˜40 km away from each other) were used for the installation of riometer equipment assuming minimum local noise. It is found that solar noise to cosmic radio noise hence resulting in signal saturation. The night time signal is relatively free of interference but sometimes local noise is responsible for spike-like signatures. Hence it is concluded that Kolhapur (a low latitude station) is not suitable for the study of cosmic radio noise absorption on 30 MHz with riometer and dual dipole antenna. Proper choice for operating frequency of riometer and antenna gain is suggested for low latitude use of this technique for ionospheric deviative and nondeviative absorption studies.

  7. Expanding the Gamma-ray Universe: High Redshift Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Paliya, Vaidehi; Gasparrini, Dario; Ajello, Marco; Cutini, Sara; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High-redshift blazars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) are of great astrophysical import as they are extreme objects whose energetics remain a mystery. Such blazars are intrinsically interesting since they inform us about the evolution of gamma-ray blazars and are, by definition, some of the more luminous blazars in the Fermi-LAT sample. These blazars appear to host very massive black holes and could shed light on the origin and growth of black holes in the early Universe. We present the latest high redshift blazar detections in the LAT and discuss some of their implications.

  8. Search for Spatially Extended Fermi-LAT Sources Using Two Years of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lande, Joshua; Ackermann, Markus; Allafort, Alice; Ballet, Jean; Bechtol, Keith; Burnett, Toby; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Funk, Stefan; Giordano, Francesco; Grondin, Marie-Helene; Kerr, Matthew; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne

    2012-07-13

    Spatial extension is an important characteristic for correctly associating {gamma}-ray-emitting sources with their counterparts at other wavelengths and for obtaining an unbiased model of their spectra. We present a new method for quantifying the spatial extension of sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations to validate this tool and calculate the LAT threshold for detecting the spatial extension of sources. We then test all sources in the second Fermi -LAT catalog (2FGL) for extension. We report the detection of seven new spatially extended sources.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Refined associations of Fermi/LAT sources (Massaro+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Landoni, M.; Paggi, A.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.; Oti-Floranes, H.; Chavushyan, V.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Patino-Alvarez, V.; Digel, S. W.; Smith, H. A.; Tosti, G.

    2015-04-01

    The Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) First Source Catalog (1FGL) was released in 2010 February and the Fermi-LAT 2-Year Source Catalog (2FGL) appeared in 2012 April, based on data from 24 months of operation. Since they were released, many follow up observations of unidentified γ-ray sources have been performed and new procedures for associating γ-ray sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths have been developed. Here we review and characterize all of the associations as published in the 1FGL and 2FGL catalogs on the basis of multifrequency archival observations. In particular, we located 177 spectra for the low-energy counterparts that were not listed in the previous Fermi catalogs, and in addition we present new spectroscopic observations of eight γ-ray blazar candidates. Based on our investigations, we introduce a new counterpart category of "candidate associations" and propose a refined classification for the candidate low-energy counterparts of the Fermi sources. We compare the 1FGL-assigned counterparts with those listed in 2FGL to determine which unassociated sources became associated in later releases of the Fermi catalogs. We also search for potential counterparts to all of the remaining unassociated Fermi sources. Finally, we prepare a refined and merged list of all of the associations of 1FGL plus 2FGL that includes 2219 unique Fermi objects. This is the most comprehensive and systematic study of all the associations collected for the γ-ray sources available to date. We conclude that 80% of the Fermi sources have at least one known plausible γ-ray emitter within their positional uncertainty regions. (2 data files).

  10. Structure-based ligand discovery for the Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1, LAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Ethan G.; Schlessinger, Avner; Fan, Hao; Gable, Jonathan E.; Irwin, John J.; Sali, Andrej; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    The Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT-1)—a sodium-independent exchanger of amino acids, thyroid hormones, and prescription drugs—is highly expressed in the blood–brain barrier and various types of cancer. LAT-1 plays an important role in cancer development as well as in mediating drug and nutrient delivery across the blood–brain barrier, making it a key drug target. Here, we identify four LAT-1 ligands, including one chemically novel substrate, by comparative modeling, virtual screening, and experimental validation. These results may rationalize the enhanced brain permeability of two drugs, including the anticancer agent acivicin. Finally, two of our hits inhibited proliferation of a cancer cell line by distinct mechanisms, providing useful chemical tools to characterize the role of LAT-1 in cancer metabolism. PMID:23509259

  11. The Monster Next Door: Fermi-LAT Observations of Supernova Remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Daniel; Hays, Elizabeth; Acero, Fabio; Slane, Patrick; Hughes, John; Plucinsky, Paul; Fermi-LAT Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Supernova remnant (SNR) N132D, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, represents a unique opportunity for the study of γ-ray emission from shock accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) in another galaxy since it stands as the first and only extra-Galactic SNR detected in γ-rays. N132D is bright in the X-ray, infrared and radio bands, as well as being detected in TeV energy γ-rays, and hence, characterizing its emission in the Fermi-LAT band allows us to build a very complete picture of the properties of the system and its progenitor, and help us understand CR acceleration in SNRs.

  12. Fermi-LAT detection of the Galactic nova TCP J18102829-2729590

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kwan-Lok; Chomiuk, Laura

    2016-11-01

    Fermi-LAT detection of the Galactic nova TCP J18102829-2729590 Following the discovery of the nova in Sagittarius TCP J18102829-2729590 (CBAT 2016 10 20.383; ATel #9658), we triggered an one-week Fermi ToO (observation number: 090603-1-1; PI: Laura Chomiuk) from 2016-10-25 as part of our Fermi-LAT monitoring campaign for Galactic novae (ATel #9311).

  13. [Co-integration of BLG-LAtPA and WAP improved the expression of LAtPA in transgenic mouse milk].

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Deng, J X; Cheng, X; Lu, Y F; Yang, X; Huang, P T

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the expression of longer acting tissue plasminogen activator in the mammary epithelium of transgenic mice, the fragment of BLG-LAtPA hydrid gene was microinjected into mouse embryos with mice whey acid protein gene. Three mouse were tested as being Co-integration of BLG-LAtPA and WAP transgene by PCR and Southern blot. Milk obtained from lactating females contains biologically active tPA, and the concentration of tPA was calculated to be about 10 micrograms/mL.

  14. LAT1 activity of carboxylic acid bioisosteres: Evaluation of hydroxamic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zur, Arik A; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Augustyn, Evan; Flint, Andrew; Heeren, Nathan; Finke, Karissa; Hernandez, Christopher; Hansen, Logan; Miller, Sydney; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-10-15

    Large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a solute carrier protein located primarily in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that offers the potential to deliver drugs to the brain. It is also up-regulated in cancer cells, as part of a tumor's increased metabolic demands. Previously, amino acid prodrugs have been shown to be transported by LAT1. Carboxylic acid bioisosteres may afford prodrugs with an altered physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile than those derived from natural amino acids, allowing for higher brain or tumor levels of drug and/or lower toxicity. The effect of replacing phenylalanine's carboxylic acid with a tetrazole, acylsulfonamide and hydroxamic acid (HA) bioisostere was examined. Compounds were tested for their ability to be LAT1 substrates using both cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays. As HA-Phe demonstrated weak substrate activity, its structure-activity relationship (SAR) was further explored by synthesis and testing of HA derivatives of other LAT1 amino acid substrates (i.e., Tyr, Leu, Ile, and Met). The potential for a false positive in the trans-stimulation assay caused by parent amino acid was evaluated by conducting compound stability experiments for both HA-Leu and the corresponding methyl ester derivative. We concluded that HA's are transported by LAT1. In addition, our results lend support to a recent account that amino acid esters are LAT1 substrates, and that hydrogen bonding may be as important as charge for interaction with the transporter binding site.

  15. THREE MILLISECOND PULSARS IN FERMI LAT UNASSOCIATED BRIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, Oe.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; Cognard, I.; Freire, P. C. C.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil

    2011-01-20

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and {gamma}-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind {gamma}-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby ({<=}2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of {gamma}-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient {gamma}-ray producers. The {gamma}-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 30}-10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1} are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  16. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Johnston, S.; Harding, A. K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  17. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  18. The Fermi-LAT view of the colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) have been considered as a possible high-energy γ-ray sources for some time, however no system other than η Car has been detected. In the Letter, a sample of seven CWBs (WR 11, WR 70, WR 137, WR 140, WR 146, WR 147) which, by means of theoretic modelling, were deemed most promising candidates, was analysed using almost 7 yr of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. WR 11 (γ2 Vel) was detected at 6.1σ confidence level with a photon flux in 0.1-100 GeV range (1.8 ± 0.6) × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 and an energy flux (2.7 ± 0.5) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. At the adopted distance d = 340 pc this corresponds to a luminosity L = (3.7 ± 0.7) × 1031 erg s-1. This luminosity amounts to ˜6 × 10-6 fraction of the total wind kinetic power and ˜1.6 × 10-4 fraction of the power injected into the wind-wind interaction region of this system. Upper limits were set on the high energy flux from the WR 70 and WR 140 systems.

  19. A Search for Transitions between States in Redbacks and Black Widows Using Seven Years of Fermi-LAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Diego F.; Ji, Long; Li, Jian; Papitto, Alessandro; Rea, Nanda; de Oña Wilhelmi, Emma; Zhang, Shu

    2017-02-01

    Considering about seven years of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data, we present a systematic search for variability that is possibly related to transitions between states in redbacks and black widow systems. The transitions are characterized by sudden and significant changes in the gamma-ray flux that persist on a timescale that is much larger than the orbital period. This phenomenology was already detected in the case of two redback systems, PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1227‑4853, which we present here. We show the existence of only one transition for each of these systems over the past seven years. We determine their spectra, establishing high-energy cutoffs at a few GeV for the high gamma-ray state of PSR J1023+0038, and for both states of PSR J1227‑4853. The surveying capability of the Fermi-LAT allows further study of whether similar phenomenology has occurred in other sources. Although we have not found any evidence of a state transition for most of the studied pulsars, we note two black-widow systems, PSR J2234+0944 and PSR J1446‑4701, whose apparent variabilities are reminiscent of the transitions in PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1227‑4853. For the other systems, we set limits on potential transitions in their measured gamma-ray light curves.

  20. Implications of an astrophysical interpretation of PAMELA and Fermi-LAT data for future searches of a positron signal from dark matter annihilations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Young; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2010-01-01

    The recent data from PAMELA and Fermi-LAT can be interpreted as evidence of new astrophysical sources of high energy positrons. In that case, such astrophysical positrons constitute an additional background against the positrons from dark matter annihilation. In this paper, we study the effect of that background on the prospects for the detection of a positron dark matter signal in future experiments. In particular, we determine the new regions in the (mass, ⟨σv⟩) plane that are detectable by the AMS-02 experiment for several dark matter scenarios and different propagation models. We find that, due to the increased background, these regions feature annihilation rates that are up to a factor of 3 larger than those obtained for the conventional background. That is, an astrophysical interpretation of the present data by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT implies that the detection of positrons from dark matter annihilation is slightly more challenging than previously believed.

  1. GRB 110709A, 111117A, AND 120107A: FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION FROM FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS AND DEMOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; McKay, Timothy A.; Pandey, Shashi B.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 {+-} 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  2. Cloning of two genes (LAT1,2) encoding specific L: -arabinose transporters of the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora.

    PubMed

    Verho, Ritva; Penttilä, Merja; Richard, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We identified and characterized two genes, LAT1 and LAT2, which encode specific L: -arabinose transporters. The genes were identified in the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae had only very low L: -arabinose transport activity; however, when LAT1 or LAT2 was expressed, L: -arabinose transport was facilitated. When the LAT1 or LAT2 were expressed in an S. cerevisiae mutant where the main hexose transporters were deleted, the L: -arabinose transporters could not restore growth on D: -glucose, D: -fructose, D: -mannose or D: -galactose. This indicates that these sugars are not transported and suggests that the transporters are specific for L: -arabinose.

  3. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Two Brightest Unidentified High Galactic Latitude Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Giroletti, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-I X-ray observations of 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, the two brightest high Galactic latitude (absolute value (beta) >10 deg) gamma-ray sources from the three-month Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) bright source list that are still unidentified. Both were also detected previously by EGRET, and despite dedicated multi-wavelength follow-up, they are still not associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like pulsars or radio-loud active galactic nuclei. X-ray sources found in the ACIS-I fields of view are cataloged, and their basic properties are determined. These are discussed as candidate counterparts to 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, with particular emphasis on the brightest of the 9 and 13 Chandra sources detected within the respective Fermi-LAT 95% confidence regions. Further follow-up studies, including optical photometric and spectroscopic observations, are necessary to identify these X-ray candidate counterparts in order to ultimately reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray objects.

  4. Cerebral Cortex Hyperthyroidism of Newborn Mct8-Deficient Mice Transiently Suppressed by Lat2 Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Bárbara; Martínez de Mena, Raquel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Nunes, Virginia; Palacín, Manuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M.; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone entry into cells is facilitated by transmembrane transporters. Mutations of the specific thyroid hormone transporter, MCT8 (Monocarboxylate Transporter 8, SLC16A2) cause an X-linked syndrome of profound neurological impairment and altered thyroid function known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. MCT8 deficiency presumably results in failure of thyroid hormone to reach the neural target cells in adequate amounts to sustain normal brain development. However during the perinatal period the absence of Mct8 in mice induces a state of cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism, indicating increased brain access and/or retention of thyroid hormone. The contribution of other transporters to thyroid hormone metabolism and action, especially in the context of MCT8 deficiency is not clear. We have analyzed the role of the heterodimeric aminoacid transporter Lat2 (Slc7a8), in the presence or absence of Mct8, on thyroid hormone concentrations and on expression of thyroid hormone-dependent cerebral cortex genes. To this end we generated Lat2-/-, and Mct8-/yLat2-/- mice, to compare with wild type and Mct8-/y mice during postnatal development. As described previously the single Mct8 KO neonates had a transient increase of 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine concentration and expression of thyroid hormone target genes in the cerebral cortex. Strikingly the absence of Lat2 in the double Mct8Lat2 KO prevented the effect of Mct8 inactivation in newborns. The Lat2 effect was not observed from postnatal day 5 onwards. On postnatal day 21 the Mct8 KO displayed the typical pattern of thyroid hormone concentrations in plasma, decreased cortex 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine concentration and Hr expression, and concomitant Lat2 inactivation produced little to no modifications. As Lat2 is expressed in neurons and in the choroid plexus, the results support a role for Lat2 in the supply of thyroid hormone to the cerebral cortex during early postnatal development. PMID:24819605

  5. Deep view of the Large Magellanic Cloud with six years of Fermi-LAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romani, R. W.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The nearby Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides a rare opportunity of a spatially resolved view of an external star-forming galaxy in γ-rays. The LMC was detected at 0.1-100 GeV as an extended source with CGRO/EGRET and using early observations with the Fermi-LAT. The emission was found to correlate with massive star-forming regions and to be particularly bright towards 30 Doradus. Aims: Studies of the origin and transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Milky Way are frequently hampered by line-of-sight confusion and poor distance determination. The LMC offers a complementary way to address these questions by revealing whether and how the γ-ray emission is connected to specific objects, populations of objects, and structures in the galaxy. Methods: We revisited the γ-ray emission from the LMC using about 73 months of Fermi-LAT P7REP data in the 0.2-100 GeV range. We developed a complete spatial and spectral model of the LMC emission, for which we tested several approaches: a simple geometrical description, template-fitting, and a physically driven model for CR-induced interstellar emission. Results: In addition to identifying PSR J0540-6919 through its pulsations, we find two hard sources positionally coincident with plerion N 157B and supernova remnant N 132D, which were also detected at TeV energies with H.E.S.S. We detect an additional soft source that is currently unidentified. Extended emission dominates the total flux from the LMC. It consists of an extended component of about the size of the galaxy and additional emission from three to four regions with degree-scale sizes. If it is interpreted as CRs interacting with interstellar gas, the large-scale emission implies a large-scale population of ~1-100 GeV CRs with a density of ~30% of the local Galactic value. On top of that, the three to four small-scale emission regions would correspond to enhancements of the CR density by factors 2 to 6 or higher, possibly more energetic and younger populations

  6. Modulation of LAT1 (SLC7A5) transporter activity and stability by membrane cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, David; Chiduza, George N.; Wright, Gareth S. A.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2017-01-01

    LAT1 (SLC7A5) is a transporter for both the uptake of large neutral amino acids and a number of pharmaceutical drugs. It is expressed in numerous cell types including T-cells, cancer cells and brain endothelial cells. However, mechanistic knowledge of how it functions and its interactions with lipids are unknown or limited due to inability of obtaining stable purified protein in sufficient quantities. Our data show that depleting cellular cholesterol reduced the Vmax but not the Km of the LAT1 mediated uptake of a model substrate into cells (L-DOPA). A soluble cholesterol analogue was required for the stable purification of the LAT1 with its chaperon CD98 (4F2hc,SLC3A2) and that this stabilised complex retained the ability to interact with a substrate. We propose cholesterol interacts with the conserved regions in the LAT1 transporter that have been shown to bind to cholesterol/CHS in Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter. In conclusion, LAT1 is modulated by cholesterol impacting on its stability and transporter activity. This novel finding has implications for other SLC7 family members and additional eukaryotic transporters that contain the LeuT fold. PMID:28272458

  7. Constraints on the pMSSM from LAT Observations of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Murgia, S.; Bloom, E.D.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    We examine the ability for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) to constrain Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) dark matter through a combined analysis of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We examine the Lightest Supersymmetric Particles (LSPs) for a set of {approx}71k experimentally valid supersymmetric models derived from the phenomenological-MSSM (pMSSM). We find that none of these models can be excluded at 95% confidence by the current analysis; nevertheless, many lie within the predicted reach of future LAT analyses. With two years of data, we find that the LAT is currently most sensitive to light LSPs (mLSP < 50 GeV) annihilating into {tau}-pairs and heavier LSPs annihilating into b{bar b}. Additionally, we find that future LAT analyses will be able to probe some LSPs that form a sub-dominant component of dark matter. We directly compare the LAT results to direct detection experiments and show the complementarity of these search methods.

  8. Constraints on the pMSSM from LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Murgia, S.; Bloom, E.D. E-mail: kadrlica@stanford.edu E-mail: elliott@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: rizzo@slac.stanford.edu

    2012-04-01

    We examine the ability for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) to constrain Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) dark matter through a combined analysis of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We examine the Lightest Supersymmetric Particles (LSPs) for a set of ∼ 71k experimentally valid supersymmetric models derived from the phenomenological-MSSM (pMSSM). We find that none of these models can be excluded at 95% confidence by the current analysis; nevertheless, many lie within the predicted reach of future LAT analyses. With two years of data, we find that the LAT is currently most sensitive to light LSPs (m{sub LSP} < 50GeV) annihilating into τ-pairs and heavier LSPs annihilating into b b-bar . Additionally, we find that future LAT analyses will be able to probe some LSPs that form a sub-dominant component of dark matter. We directly compare the LAT results to direct detection experiments and show the complementarity of these search methods.

  9. Searches for Angular Extension in High Latitude Fermi-LAT Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Regina; di Mauro, Mattia; Meyer, Manuel; Wells, Brendan; Wood, Matthew; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a comprehensive search for angular extension in high-latitude gamma-ray sources detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) using the 4-year LAT Point Source Catalog (3FGL). The majority of high-latitude LAT sources are extragalactic blazars that appear point-like within the LAT angular resolution. However, there are physics scenarios that predict populations of spatially extended sources. In one scenario, electron-positron pair cascades from gamma rays produced in blazars are deflected in the Intergalactic Magnetic Field (IGMF) producing extended emission, or ``pair halos''. The detection of a pair halo component around a LAT-detected blazar would provide a measurement of the strength and coherence length scale of the IGMF. In another scenario, the annihilation or decay of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, a candidate for dark matter (DM), in Milky Way subhalos would appear as a population of unassociated gamma-ray sources with an angular extension. The detection of spatial extension in nearby sub halos could provide compelling evidence for a DM interpretation and would serve as an independent cross-check against other DM searches. We report on the angular extension catalog based on 7.5 years of Pass 8 data and discuss the implications of these results.

  10. Inhibition of glucose metabolism prevents glycosylation of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and promotes compensatory LAT1 upregulation in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Martherus, Ruben; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are highly dependent on glucose and glutamine as bioenergetic and biosynthetic fuels. Inhibition of the metabolism of glucose but also of glutamine is thus proposed as a therapeutic modality to block leukemia cell growth. Since glucose also supports protein glycosylation, we wondered whether part of the growth inhibitory effects resulting from glycolysis inhibition could indirectly result from a defect in glycosylation of glutamine transporters. We found that ASCT2/SLC1A5, a major glutamine transporter, was indeed deglycosylated upon glucose deprivation and 2-deoxyglucose exposure in HL-60 and K-562 leukemia cells. Inhibition of glycosylation by these modalities as well as by the bona fide glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin however marginally influenced glutamine transport and did not impact on ASCT2 subcellular location. This work eventually unraveled the dispensability of ASCT2 to support HL-60 and K-562 leukemia cell growth and identified the upregulation of the neutral amino acid antiporter LAT1/SLC7A5 as a mechanism counteracting the inhibition of glycosylation. Pharmacological inhibition of LAT1 increased the growth inhibitory effects and the inactivation of the mTOR pathway resulting from glycosylation defects, an effect further emphasized during the regrowth period post-treatment with tunicamycin. In conclusion, this study points towards the underestimated impact of glycosylation inhibition in the interpretation of metabolic alterations resulting from glycolysis inhibition, and identifies LAT1 as a therapeutic target to prevent compensatory mechanisms induced by alterations in the glycosylating process. PMID:27344174

  11. HESS J1640–465 AND HESS J1641–463: TWO INTRIGUING TeV SOURCES IN LIGHT OF NEW FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Grondin, M.-H.; Laffon, H.; Reposeur, T.

    2014-10-10

    We report on γ-ray analysis of the region containing the bright TeV source HESS J1640–465 and the close-by TeV source HESS J1641–463 using 64 months of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Previously only one GeV source was reported in this region and was associated with HESS J1640–465. With an increased data set and the improved sensitivity afforded by the reprocessed data (P7REP) of the LAT, we now report the detection, morphological study, and spectral analysis of two distinct sources above 100 MeV. The softest emission in this region comes from the TeV source HESS J1641–463 which is well fitted with a power law of index Γ = 2.47 ± 0.05 ± 0.06 and presents no significant γ-ray signal above 10 GeV, which contrasts with its hard spectrum at TeV energies. The Fermi-LAT spectrum of the second TeV source, HESS J1640–465 is well described by a power-law shape of index Γ = 1.99 ± 0.04 ± 0.07 that links up naturally with the spectral data points obtained by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). These new results provide new constraints concerning the identification of these two puzzling γ-ray sources.

  12. The X-Ray Counterpart to LAT PSR J2021+4026 and Its Interesting Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Becker, W.; Carraminana, A.; De Luca, A.; Dormandy, M.; Harding, A.; Kanbach, G.; O'Dell, S. L.; Parkinson, P. Saz; Ray, P.; Razzano, M.; Romani, R.; Tennant, A. F.; Swarz, D. A.; Thompson, D.; Ziegler, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the likely identification of the X-ray counterpart to LAT PSR J2021+4026, using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S3 and timing analysis of Large Area telescope (LAT) data from the Fermi satellite. The X-ray source that lies closest (10 arcsec) to the position determined from the Fermi-LAT timing solution has no cataloged infrared-to-visible counterpart and we have set an upper limit to its optical I and R band emission. The source exhibits a X-ray spectrum which is different when compared to Geminga and CTA 1, and this may have implications for the evolutionary track of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

  13. Sharper Fermi LAT images: instrument response functions for an improved event selection

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-11-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point-spread function (PSF) with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker inefficiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi LAT data (available at http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/), estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the PSF can be suppressed at the cost of losing effective area. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where angular resolution is more important than Poisson noise.

  14. Sharper Fermi LAT Images: Instrument Response Functions for an Improved Event Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-11-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point-spread function (PSF) with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker inefficiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi LAT data (available at http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/), estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the PSF can be suppressed at the cost of losing effective area. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where angular resolution is more important than Poisson noise.

  15. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Observations of Nova Lupus 2016 (ASASSN-16kt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope performed a ~6-day Target of Opportunity (ToO) observation of Nova Lupus 2016 (ATel #9538, #9539, CBET #4322) that commenced on September 28. Considering earlier all-sky survey Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations as well, preliminary analysis indicates gamma-ray emission at ~2 sigma was detected around 1 to 2 days after the optical peak on September 25th (pre-validated AAVSO visual lightcurve; ATel #9550, CBET #4322) when the optical spectra show opaque ejecta, similar to previous gamma-ray detected novae (Fermi-LAT collaboration, 2014 Science 345, 554; Cheung et al. 2016 ApJ 826, 142).

  16. SUZAKU X-RAY FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF SEVEN UNASSOCIATED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K.; Makiya, R.; Totani, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.

    2012-03-01

    We report on our second-year campaign of X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 Degree-Sign ) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on board the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. In this second year of the project, seven new targets were selected from the First Fermi-LAT Catalog, and studied with 20-40 ks effective Suzaku exposures. We detected an X-ray point source coincident with the position of the recently discovered millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2302+4442 within the 95% confidence error circle of 1FGL J2302.8+4443. The X-ray spectrum of the detected counterpart was well fit by a blackbody model with temperature of kT {approx_equal} 0.3 keV, consistent with an origin of the observed X-ray photons from the surface of a rotating magnetized neutron star. For four other targets that were also recently identified with a normal pulsar (1FGL J0106.7+4853) and MSPs (1FGL J1312.6+0048, J1902.0-5110, and J2043.2+1709), only upper limits in the 0.5-10 keV band were obtained at the flux levels of {approx_equal} 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A weak X-ray source was found in the field of 1FGL J1739.4+8717, but its association with the variable {gamma}-ray emitter could not be confirmed with the available Suzaku data alone. For the remaining Fermi-LAT object 1FGL J1743.8-7620 no X-ray source was detected within the LAT 95% error ellipse. We briefly discuss the general properties of the observed high Galactic-latitude Fermi-LAT objects by comparing their multiwavelength properties with those of known blazars and MSPs.

  17. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE {gamma}-RAY EMISSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAYS AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: gudlaugu@glast2.stanford.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS and others

    2012-05-01

    The {gamma}-ray sky >100 MeV is dominated by the diffuse emissions from interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar gas and radiation fields of the Milky Way. Observations of these diffuse emissions provide a tool to study cosmic-ray origin and propagation, and the interstellar medium. We present measurements from the first 21 months of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) mission and compare with models of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission generated using the GALPROP code. The models are fitted to cosmic-ray data and incorporate astrophysical input for the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, interstellar gas, and radiation fields. To assess uncertainties associated with the astrophysical input, a grid of models is created by varying within observational limits the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, the size of the cosmic-ray confinement volume (halo), and the distribution of interstellar gas. An all-sky maximum-likelihood fit is used to determine the X{sub CO} factor, the ratio between integrated CO-line intensity and H{sub 2} column density, the fluxes and spectra of the {gamma}-ray point sources from the first Fermi-LAT catalog, and the intensity and spectrum of the isotropic background including residual cosmic rays that were misclassified as {gamma}-rays, all of which have some dependency on the assumed diffuse emission model. The models are compared on the basis of their maximum-likelihood ratios as well as spectra, longitude, and latitude profiles. We also provide residual maps for the data following subtraction of the diffuse emission models. The models are consistent with the data at high and intermediate latitudes but underpredict the data in the inner Galaxy for energies above a few GeV. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed, including the contribution by undetected point-source populations and spectral variations of cosmic rays throughout the Galaxy. In the outer Galaxy, we find that the data prefer models with a flatter

  18. Fermi LAT detection of renewed gamma-ray activity from PKS 2142-75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed high-level gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2142-75 (R.A.: 326.80304 deg, Dec.: -75.60367 deg, J2000, Johnston et al. ...

  19. Fermi LAT detection of renewed GeV activity from blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Gonzalez, Josefa Becerra

    2014-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed high-level gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the blazar 3C 279 (RA: 194.046527 deg, Dec: -5.789312 deg, J2000; Johnston et al.1995, AJ, 110, 880). ...

  20. Fermi LAT detection of a new Gamma-ray Source PKS B1251-713

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the radio source PKS B1251-713 with coordinates RA=193.7496721 deg, Dec=-71.6384544 deg (J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  1. Fermi LAT Gamma-ray Observations of IceCube-160731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Toomey, M. W.; Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-08-01

    We report follow-up of the extremely high-energy (EHE) IceCube-160731 neutrino event (AMON GCN notice; http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/notices_amon/6888376_128290.amon) with all-sky survey data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi LAT third source catalog (3FGL) (Acero+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; Deklotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer J. G, .; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-08-01

    The data for the 3FGL catalog were taken during the period from 2008 August 4 (15:43 UTC) to 2012 July 31 (22:46 UTC), to covering close to 4yr. The LAT detects γ-rays in the energy range from 20MeV to more than 300GeV. (3 data files).

  3. Search for Gamma-ray-emitting Active Galactic Nuclei in the Fermi-LAT Unassociated Sample Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doert, M.; Errando, M.

    2014-02-01

    The second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) is the deepest all-sky survey available in the gamma-ray band. It contains 1873 sources, of which 576 remain unassociated. Machine-learning algorithms can be trained on the gamma-ray properties of known active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to find objects with AGN-like properties in the unassociated sample. This analysis finds 231 high-confidence AGN candidates, with increased robustness provided by intersecting two complementary algorithms. A method to estimate the performance of the classification algorithm is also presented, that takes into account the differences between associated and unassociated gamma-ray sources. Follow-up observations targeting AGN candidates, or studies of multiwavelength archival data, will reduce the number of unassociated gamma-ray sources and contribute to a more complete characterization of the population of gamma-ray emitting AGNs.

  4. Search for gamma-ray-emitting active galactic nuclei in the Fermi-LAT unassociated sample using machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Doert, M.; Errando, M. E-mail: errando@astro.columbia.edu

    2014-02-10

    The second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) is the deepest all-sky survey available in the gamma-ray band. It contains 1873 sources, of which 576 remain unassociated. Machine-learning algorithms can be trained on the gamma-ray properties of known active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to find objects with AGN-like properties in the unassociated sample. This analysis finds 231 high-confidence AGN candidates, with increased robustness provided by intersecting two complementary algorithms. A method to estimate the performance of the classification algorithm is also presented, that takes into account the differences between associated and unassociated gamma-ray sources. Follow-up observations targeting AGN candidates, or studies of multiwavelength archival data, will reduce the number of unassociated gamma-ray sources and contribute to a more complete characterization of the population of gamma-ray emitting AGNs.

  5. MiR-93 enhances angiogenesis and metastasis by targeting LATS2

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ling; Du, William W.; Yang, Weining; Rutnam, Zina Jeyapalan; Peng, Chun; Li, Haoran; O'Malley, Yunxia Q.; Askeland, Ryan W.; Sugg, Sonia; Liu, Mingyao; Mehta, Tanvi; Deng, Zhaoqun; Yang, Burton B.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report that miR-93, a miRNA in the miR-106B~25 cluster, a paralog of the miR-17–92 cluster, was significantly upregulated in human breast carcinoma tissues. We stably expressed miR-93 in the MT-1 human breast carcinoma cell line and found that tumors formed by the miR-93 cells contained more blood vessels than those formed by the control cells. Co-culture experiments indicated that the MT-1 cells displayed a high activity of adhesion with endothelial cells and could form larger and more tube-like structures with endothelial cells. Lung metastasis assays were performed in a mouse metastatic model, and it was found that expression of miR-93 promoted tumor cell metastasis to lung tissue. In cell culture, expression of miR-93 enhanced cell survival and invasion. We examined the potential target that mediated miR-93’s effects and found that the large tumor suppressor, homology 2 (LATS2) was a target of miR-93. Higher levels of LATS2 were associated with cell death in the tumor mass. Silencing LATS2 expression promoted cell survival, tube formation and invasion, while ectopic expression of LATS2 decreased cell survival and invasion. These findings demonstrated that miR-93 promoted tumor angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing LATS2 expression. Our results suggest that the inhibition of miR-93 function may be a feasible approach to repress tumor metastasis. PMID:23111389

  6. MiR-93 enhances angiogenesis and metastasis by targeting LATS2.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ling; Du, William W; Yang, Weining; Rutnam, Zina Jeyapalan; Peng, Chun; Li, Haoran; O'Malley, Yunxia Q; Askeland, Ryan W; Sugg, Sonia; Liu, Mingyao; Mehta, Tanvi; Deng, Zhaoqun; Yang, Burton B

    2012-12-01

    Here we report that miR-93, a miRNA in the miR-106B~25 cluster, a paralog of the miR-17-92 cluster, was significantly upregulated in human breast carcinoma tissues. We stably expressed miR-93 in the MT-1 human breast carcinoma cell line and found that tumors formed by the miR-93 cells contained more blood vessels than those formed by the control cells. Co-culture experiments indicated that the MT-1 cells displayed a high activity of adhesion with endothelial cells and could form larger and more tube-like structures with endothelial cells. Lung metastasis assays were performed in a mouse metastatic model, and it was found that expression of miR-93 promoted tumor cell metastasis to lung tissue. In cell culture, expression of miR-93 enhanced cell survival and invasion. We examined the potential target that mediated miR-93's effects and found that the large tumor suppressor, homology 2 (LATS2) was a target of miR-93. Higher levels of LATS2 were associated with cell death in the tumor mass. Silencing LATS2 expression promoted cell survival, tube formation and invasion, while ectopic expression of LATS2 decreased cell survival and invasion. These findings demonstrated that miR-93 promoted tumor angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing LATS2 expression. Our results suggest that the inhibition of miR-93 function may be a feasible approach to repress tumor metastasis.

  7. NEDD4 E3 ligase inhibits the activity of the Hippo pathway by targeting LATS1 for degradation.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Cohen, Sherri; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-12-15

    Proper regulation of cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and cell death are vital for the development and survival of living organisms. Failure or dysfunction of any of these processes can have devastating effects, including cancer. The Hippo pathway, first discovered in Drosophila, has been found to be a major growth-regulatory signaling pathway that controls these crucial processes and has been implicated in cell-progress regulation and organ size determination. Abnormal regulation of this pathway has been found in several cancer types. However, the mechanisms that regulate the pathway and its core members yet have to be elucidated. One of the main core components of this pathway is LATS1, a serine/threonine kinase. Therefore, understanding how LATS1 activity is regulated is expected to shed light on new mechanisms that regulate the Hippo pathway. In the current work, we identified several potential LATS1 regulators and proved that NEDD4 E3 ubiquitin ligase controls LATS1 stability. We demonstrate that NEDD4 directly interacts with LATS1, leading to ubiquitination and decreased levels of LATS1 and, thus, increased YAP localization in the nucleus, which subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of YAP. As such, we show that NEDD4 acts as an additional regulator of the Hippo pathway on the protein level via interactions between WW domain-containing and PPxY motif-containing proteins. These findings might be applied in the development of new therapeutic approaches through the activation of LATS1.

  8. NEDD4 E3 ligase inhibits the activity of the Hippo pathway by targeting LATS1 for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zaidoun; Cohen, Sherri; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-01-01

    Proper regulation of cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and cell death are vital for the development and survival of living organisms. Failure or dysfunction of any of these processes can have devastating effects, including cancer. The Hippo pathway, first discovered in Drosophila, has been found to be a major growth-regulatory signaling pathway that controls these crucial processes and has been implicated in cell-progress regulation and organ size determination. Abnormal regulation of this pathway has been found in several cancer types. However, the mechanisms that regulate the pathway and its core members yet have to be elucidated. One of the main core components of this pathway is LATS1, a serine/threonine kinase. Therefore, understanding how LATS1 activity is regulated is expected to shed light on new mechanisms that regulate the Hippo pathway. In the current work, we identified several potential LATS1 regulators and proved that NEDD4 E3 ubiquitin ligase controls LATS1 stability. We demonstrate that NEDD4 directly interacts with LATS1, leading to ubiquitination and decreased levels of LATS1 and, thus, increased YAP localization in the nucleus, which subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of YAP. As such, we show that NEDD4 acts as an additional regulator of the Hippo pathway on the protein level via interactions between WW domain-containing and PPxY motif-containing proteins. These findings might be applied in the development of new therapeutic approaches through the activation of LATS1. PMID:24107629

  9. Dephosphorylation of the adaptor LAT and phospholipase C-γ by SHP-1 inhibits natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Omri; Fried, Sophia; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Joseph, Noah; Keizer, Danielle; Piterburg, Marina; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2016-05-24

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy cells and virally infected or transformed self-cells by tuning activating and inhibitory signals received through cell surface receptors. Inhibitory receptors inhibit NK cell function by recruiting and activating the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the plasma membrane. However, to date, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV1 is the only direct SHP-1 substrate identified in NK cells. We reveal that the adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) as well as phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and PLC-γ2 are SHP-1 substrates. Dephosphorylation of Tyr(132) in LAT by SHP-1 in NK cells abrogated the recruitment of PLC-γ1 and PLC-γ2 to the immunological synapse between the NK cell and a cancer cell target, which reduced NK cell degranulation and target cell killing. Furthermore, the ubiquitylation of LAT by the E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, which was induced by LAT phosphorylation, led to the degradation of LAT in response to the engagement of inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which abrogated NK cell cytotoxicity. Knockdown of the Cbl proteins blocked LAT ubiquitylation, which promoted NK cell function. Expression of a ubiquitylation-resistant mutant LAT blocked inhibitory receptor signaling, enabling cells to become activated. Together, these data identify previously uncharacterized SHP-1 substrates and inhibitory mechanisms that determine the response of NK cells.

  10. Brightest Fermi-LAT flares of PKS 1222+216: implications on emission and acceleration processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Pankaj; Singh, K. P.; Sahayanathan, Sunder

    2014-11-20

    We present a high time resolution study of the two brightest γ-ray outbursts from a blazar PKS 1222+216 observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in 2010. The γ-ray light curves obtained in four different energy bands, 0.1-3, 0.1-0.3, 0.3-1, and 1-3 GeV, with time bins of six hours, show asymmetric profiles with similar rise times in all the bands but a rapid decline during the April flare and a gradual one during the June flare. The light curves during the April flare show an ∼2 day long plateau in 0.1-0.3 GeV emission, erratic variations in 0.3-1 GeV emission, and a daily recurring feature in 1-3 GeV emission until the rapid rise and decline within a day. The June flare shows a monotonic rise until the peak, followed by a gradual decline powered mainly by the multi-peak 0.1-0.3 GeV emission. The peak fluxes during both the flares are similar except in the 1-3 GeV band in April, which is twice the corresponding flux during the June flare. Hardness ratios during the April flare indicate spectral hardening in the rising phase followed by softening during the decay. We attribute this behavior to the development of a shock associated with an increase in acceleration efficiency followed by its decay leading to spectral softening. The June flare suggests hardening during the rise followed by a complicated energy dependent behavior during the decay. Observed features during the June flare favor multiple emission regions while the overall flaring episode can be related to jet dynamics.

  11. Quantifying the Interstellar Medium and Cosmic Rays in the MBM 53, 54, and 55 Molecular Clouds and the Pegasus Loop Using Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Abdollahi, S.; Fukui, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Okumura, A.; Tajima, H.; Yamamoto, H.

    2016-12-01

    A study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and cosmic rays (CRs) using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data, in a region encompassing the nearby molecular clouds MBM 53, 54, and 55 and a far-infrared loop-like structure in Pegasus, is reported. By comparing the Planck dust thermal emission model with Fermi-LAT γ-ray data, it was found that neither the dust radiance (R) nor the dust opacity at 353 GHz (τ 353) was proportional to the total gas column density N(Htot) primarily because N(Htot)/R and N(Htot)/τ 353 depend on the dust temperature (T d). The N(Htot) distribution was evaluated using γ-ray data by assuming the regions of high T d to be dominated by optically thin atomic hydrogen ({{H}} {{I}}) and by employing an empirical linear relation of N(Htot)/R to T d. It was determined that the mass of the gas not traced by the 21 cm or 2.6 mm surveys is ˜25% of the mass of {{H}} {{I}} in the optically thin case and is larger than the mass of the molecular gas traced by carbon monoxide by a factor of up to 5. The measured γ-ray emissivity spectrum is consistent with a model based on CR spectra measured at the Earth and a nuclear enhancement factor of ≤1.5. It is, however, lower than local {{H}} {{I}} emissivities reported by previous Fermi-LAT studies employing different analysis methods and assumptions on ISM properties by 15%-20% in energies below a few GeV, even if we take account of the statistical and systematic uncertainties. The origin of the discrepancy is also discussed.

  12. Fermi LAT Results and Perspectives in Measurements of High Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Real breakthrough during last 1-1.5 years in cosmic ray electrons: ATIC, HESS, Pamela, and finally Fermi-LAT. New quality data have made it possible to start quantitative modeling. With the new data more puzzles than before on CR electrons origin. Need "multi-messenger" campaign: electrons, positrons, gammas, X-ray, radio, neutrino... It is viable that we are dealing with at least two distinct mechanisms of "primary" electron (both signs) production: a softer spectrum of negative electrons, and a harder spectrum of both e(+)+e(-). Exotic (e.g. DM) origin is not ruled out. Upper limits on CR electrons anisotropy are set. Good perspectives to have the Fermi LAT results on proton spectrum and positron fraction.

  13. GBM First-year Catalogs (with Some LAT GRB Catalogs as a Bonus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciesas, William Simon; GBM, Fermi; LAT Collaborations

    2010-03-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) monitors the entire unocculted sky for transient activity in the energy range from 8 keV to 40 MeV. In its first year of operation GBM's on-board trigger detected 253 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), of which 9 were confidently detected by the LAT (a catalog of LAT upper limits for non-detected GRBs is also available). In addition, GBM triggered on 12 terrestrial gamma flashes and 168 soft gamma repeater events from four different magnetar candidates. GBM's continuous data collection over the entire sky allows continual hard X-ray monitoring of both steady and variable sources using Earth occultation and pulsed source analysis techniques. Catalogs of the GBM-detected source categories will be summarized and, if time permits, compared with relevant catalogs from other instruments such as CGRO/BATSE.

  14. Optical spectroscopic classification of a selection of Southern Hemisphere Fermi-LAT unclassified blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, L.; van Soelen, B.; Meintjes, P. J.; Väisänen, P.

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi-LAT has detected more than 3000 sources in the GeV γ-ray regime. The majority are extra-galactic and these sources are dominated by blazars. However, ˜28 per cent of the sources in Fermi 3LAC are listed as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCU). Increasing the number of classified Fermi-LAT sources is important for improving our understanding of extra-galactic γ-ray sources and can be used to search for new very high energy sources. We report on the optical spectroscopy of seven selected unclassified BCU sources during 2014 and 2015 undertaken using the SAAO 1.9-m and Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). Based on the identified spectral lines we have classified three of the sources as FSRQs and the remaining four as BL Lac objects, determining the redshift for four sources.

  15. Fermi-LAT confirmation of enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis confirms the recent enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula detected by AGILE (ATel #9586). The daily-averaged gamma-ray fluxes (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula were (4.8 +/- 0.5) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Sep 30), (3.3 +/- 0.4) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Oct 1), and (4.5 +/- 0.5) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Oct 2). These are up to a factor of ~1.8 greater than the average gamma-ray flux of (2.71 +/- 0.02) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). All fluxes given are the sums of the pulsar and nebular emission, and with statistical uncertainties only.

  16. Lats1/2 Regulate Yap/Taz to Control Nephron Progenitor Epithelialization and Inhibit Myofibroblast Formation.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Helen; Reginensi, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    In the kidney, formation of the functional filtration units, the nephrons, is essential for postnatal life. During development, mesenchymal progenitors tightly regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation to give rise to all nephron epithelia. Here, we investigated the functions of the Hippo pathway serine/threonine-protein kinases Lats1 and Lats2, which phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, in nephron progenitor cells. Genetic deletion of Lats1 and Lats2 in nephron progenitors of mice led to disruption of nephrogenesis, with an accumulation of spindle-shaped cells in both cortical and medullary regions of the kidney. Lineage-tracing experiments revealed that the cells that accumulated in the interstitium derived from nephron progenitor cells and expressed E-cadherin as well as vimentin, a myofibroblastic marker not usually detected after mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The accumulation of these interstitial cells associated with collagen deposition and ectopic expression of the myofibroblastic markers vimentin and α-smooth-muscle actin in developing kidneys. Although these myofibroblastic cells had high Yap and Taz accumulation in the nucleus concomitant with a loss of phosphorylated Yap, reduction of Yap and/or Taz expression levels completely rescued the Lats1/2 phenotype. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Lats1/2 kinases restrict Yap/Taz activities to promote nephron progenitor cell differentiation in the mammalian kidney. Notably, our data also show that myofibroblastic cells can differentiate from nephron progenitors.

  17. Fermi LAT detection of renewed and strong GeV activity from blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutini, Sara

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an intense gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, also known as 3FGL J1256.1-0547 (Acero et al. 2015, APJS, 218, 23), with radio coordinates R.A.: 194.0465271 deg, Dec: -5.7893119 deg (J2000.0; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  18. Time delays between Fermi-LAT and GBM light curves of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castignani, G.; Guetta, D.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Puccetti, S.; Dichiara, S.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope exhibit a delay of up to about 10 seconds between the trigger time of the hard X-ray signal as measured by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the onset of the MeV-GeV counterpart detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This delay may hint at important physics, whether it is due to the intrinsic variability of the inner engine or related to quantum dispersion effects in the velocity of light propagation from the sources to the observer. Therefore, it is critical to have a proper assessment of how these time delays affect the overall properties of the light curves. Methods: We cross-correlated the 5 brightest GRBs of the 1st Fermi-LAT Catalog by means of the continuous correlation function (CCF) and of the discrete correlation function (DCF). The former is suppressed because of the low number counts in the LAT light curves. A maximum in the DCF suggests there is a time lag between the curves, whose value and uncertainty are estimated through a Gaussian fitting of the DCF profile and light curve simulation via a Monte Carlo approach. Results: The cross-correlation of the observed LAT and GBM light curves yields time lags that are mostly similar to those reported in the literature, but they are formally consistent with zero. The cross-correlation of the simulated light curves yields smaller errors on the time lags and more than one time lag for GRBs 090902B and 090926A. For all 5 GRBs, the time lags are significantly different from zero and consistent with those reported in the literature, when only the secondary maxima are considered for those two GRBs. Conclusions: The DCF method proves the presence of (possibly multiple) time lags between the LAT and GBM light curves in a given GRB and underlines the complexity of their time behavior. While this suggests that the delays should be ascribed to intrinsic physical mechanisms, more sensitivity and more statistics are

  19. Detection of the Small Magellanic Cloud in gamma-rays with Fermi/LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. Do Couto E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jean, P.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Martin, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The flux of gamma rays with energies greater than 100 MeV is dominated by diffuse emission coming from cosmic-rays (CRs) illuminating the interstellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy through the processes of Bremsstrahlung, pion production and decay, and inverse-Compton scattering. The study of this diffuse emission provides insight into the origin and transport of cosmic rays. Aims: We searched for gamma-ray emission from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to derive constraints on the cosmic-ray population and transport in an external system with properties different from the Milky Way. Methods: We analysed the first 17 months of continuous all-sky observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi mission to determine the spatial distribution, flux and spectrum of the gamma-ray emission from the SMC. We also used past radio synchrotron observations of the SMC to study the population of CR electrons specifically. Results: We obtained the first detection of the SMC in high-energy gamma rays, with an integrated >100 MeV flux of (3.7±0.7) × 10-8 ph cm-2 s-1, with additional systematic uncertainty of ≤16%. The emission is steady and from an extended source ~3° in size. It is not clearly correlated with the distribution of massive stars or neutral gas, nor with known pulsars or supernova remnants, but a certain correlation with supergiant shells is observed. Conclusions: The observed flux implies an upper limit on the average CR nuclei density in the SMC of ~15% of the value measured locally in the Milky Way. The population of high-energy pulsars of the SMC may account for a substantial fraction of the gamma-ray flux, which would make the inferred CR nuclei density even lower. The average density of CR electrons derived from radio synchrotron observations is consistent with the same reduction factor but the uncertainties are large. From our current knowledge of the SMC, such a low CR density does not seem to be due to a lower rate of CR

  20. Gamma-telescopes Fermi/LAT and GAMMA-400 Trigger Systems Event Recognizing Methods Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Murchenko, A. E.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.

    Usually instruments for high-energy γ-quanta registration consists of converter (where γ-quanta produced pairs) and calorimeter for particles energy measurements surrounded by anticoincidence shield used to events identification (whether incident particle was charged or neutral). The influence of pair formation by γ-quanta in shield and the backsplash (moved in the opposite direction particles created due high energy γ-rays interact with calorimeter) should be taken into account. It leads to decrease both effective area and registration efficiency at E>10 GeV. In the presented article the event recognizing methods used in Fermi/LAT trigger system is considered in comparison with the ones applied in counting and triggers signals formation system of gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new high-apogee space γ-observatory. The GAMMA-400 consist of converter-tracker based on silicon-strip coordinate detectors interleaved with tungsten foils, imaging calorimeter make of 2 layers of double (x, y) silicon strip coordinate detectors interleaved with planes of CsI(Tl) crystals and the electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 consists only of CsI(Tl) crystals. Several plastics detections systems used as anticoincidence shield, for particles energy and moving direction estimations. The main differences of GAMMA-400 constructions from Fermi/LAT one are using the time-of-flight system with base of 50 cm and double layer structure of plastic detectors provides more effective particles direction definition and backsplash rejection. Also two calorimeters in GAMMA-400 composed the total absorbtion spectrometer with total thickness ∼ 25 X0 or ∼1.2 λ0 for vertical incident particles registration and 54 X0 or 2.5 λ0 for laterally incident ones (where λ0 is nuclear interaction length). It provides energy resolution 1-2% for 10 GeV-3.0×103 GeV events while the Fermi/LAT energy resolution does not reach such a

  1. Time Stretching of the GeV Emission of GRBs: Fermi-LAT Data versus Geometrical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskunov, Maxim S.; Rubtsov, Grigory I.

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the high-energy (\\gt 100 {MeV}) emission of gamma-ray bursts is delayed with respect to the low-energy emission. However, the dependence of light curves on energy has not been studied for the high-energy bands. In this paper, we consider the bursts observed by Fermi LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2011 August 1, for which at least 10 photons were observed with energy greater than 1 {GeV}. These include four bursts: GRB 080916C, GRB 090510, GRB 090902B, and GRB 090926A. We use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to compare the light curves in the two bands 100 {MeV}\\lt E\\lt 1 {GeV} and E\\gt 1 {GeV}. For GRB 080916C and GRB 090510 the light curves in the two bands are statistically compatible. However, for GRB 090926A, the higher-energy light curve is stretched compared to the lower-energy one with a statistical significance of 3.3σ and, for GRB 090902B, on the contrary, the lower-energy curve is stretched with 2.3σ significance. We argue that the observed diversity of stretching factors may be explained using a simple geometrical model. The model assumes that the jet opening angle depends on the emission energy in a way that the most energetic photons are radiated near the axis of the jet. All of the bursts are considered equivalent in their rest frames, and the observed light curves differ only due to different redshifts and view directions. The model conforms to the total burst energy constraint and matches the Fermi-LAT observations of the fraction of GRBs visible in the 100 {MeV}\\lt E\\lt 1 {GeV} band, which may be observed at higher energies. The model predicts the distribution of observable stretching factors, which may be tested in future data. Finally, we propose a method to estimate the observer's off-axis angle based on the stretching factor and the fraction of the high-energy photons. The code for modeling is open source and is publicly available on GitHub (https://github.com/maxitg/GammaRays).

  2. A STACKED ANALYSIS OF 115 PULSARS OBSERVED BY THE FERMI LAT

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, A.

    2015-05-10

    Due to the low gamma-ray fluxes from pulsars above 50 GeV and the small collecting area of space-based telescopes, the gamma-ray emission discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in ∼150 pulsars is largely unexplored at these energies. In this regime, the uncertainties on the spectral data points and/or the constraints from upper limits are not sufficient to provide robust tests of competing emission models in individual pulsars. The discovery of power-law-type emission from the Crab pulsar at energies exceeding 100 GeV provides a compelling justification for exploration of other pulsars at these energies. We applied the method of aperture photometry to measure pulsar emission spectra from Fermi-LAT data and present a stacked analysis of 115 pulsars selected from the Second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars. This analysis, which uses an average of ∼4.2 yr of data per pulsar, aggregates low-level emission which cannot be resolved in individual objects but can be detected in an ensemble. We find no significant stacked excess at energies above 50 GeV. An upper limit of 30% of the Crab pulsar level is found for the average flux from 115 pulsars in the 100–177 GeV energy range at the 95% confidence level. Stacked searches exclusive to the young pulsar sample, the millisecond pulsar sample, and several other promising sub-samples also return no significant excesses above 50 GeV.

  3. The role of LAT in increased CD8+ T cell exhaustion in trigeminal ganglia of mice latently infected with herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Hamrah, Pedram; Gate, David; Mott, Kevin R; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Zheng, Lixin; Town, Terrence; Jones, Clinton; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Ahmed, Rafi; Wechsler, Steven L; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a classic example of latent viral infection in humans and experimental animal models. The HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) plays a major role in the HSV-1 latency reactivation cycle and thus in recurrent disease. Whether the presence of LAT leads to generation of dysfunctional T cell responses in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice is not known. To address this issue, we used LAT-positive [LAT(+)] and LAT-deficient [LAT(-)] viruses to evaluate the effect of LAT on CD8 T cell exhaustion in TG of latently infected mice. The amount of latency as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral DNA in total TG extracts was 3-fold higher with LAT(+) than with LAT(-) virus. LAT expression and increased latency correlated with increased mRNA levels of CD8, PD-1, and Tim-3. PD-1 is both a marker for exhaustion and a primary factor leading to exhaustion, and Tim-3 can also contribute to exhaustion. These results suggested that LAT(+) TG contain both more CD8(+) T cells and more CD8(+) T cells expressing the exhaustion markers PD-1 and Tim-3. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses of expression of CD3/CD8/PD-1/Tim-3, HSV-1, CD8(+) T cell pentamer (specific for a peptide derived from residues 498 to 505 of glycoprotein B [gB(498-505)]), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The functional significance of PD-1 and its ligands in HSV-1 latency was demonstrated by the significantly reduced amount of HSV-1 latency in PD-1- and PD-L1-deficient mice. Together, these results may suggest that both PD-1 and Tim-3 are mediators of CD8(+) T cell exhaustion and latency in HSV-1 infection.

  4. Fermi LAT Detection of a Rapid, Powerful Gamma-ray Flare of the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh

    2015-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 3FGL J2232.5+1143, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  5. Fermi LAT detection of renewed activity from the blazar PKS 1502+106

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1502+106 (also known as OR 103, S3 1502+10 and 3FGL J1504.4+1029, Acero et al., arXiv:1501.02003), with radio coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 226.10408 deg, Dec: 10.49422 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880). This blazar has a redshift of z=1.8383 (Hewett & Wild 2010, MNRAS, 405, 2302).

  6. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from the FSRQ 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the blazar 3C279 (RA: 194.0465271, Dec: -5.7893119 , Johnston et al.1995, AJ, 110, 880, J2000). This source is classified as a flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) at redshift of 0.536 (Marziani et al. ApJS, 1996, 104, 37) and is one of the three FSRQs known to be VHE gamma-ray emitters.

  7. Fermi-LAT detection of strong flaring activity from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, J.; Carpenter, Bryce; Cutini, Sara

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 3FGL J2232.5+1143, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The first Fermi LAT SNR catalog (1SC) (Acero+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Ka, Mae T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; Den Hartog P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have systematically characterized the Fermi/LAT 1-100GeV emission from 36 months (from 2008 August 4 to 2011 August 4) in 279 regions containing known radio SNRs, identifying sources emitting in the regions and then determining the likelihood that the source nearest the SNR is associated with it. We found 102 candidates, 30 of which have sufficient spatial overlap and significance with the alternative IEMs to suggest they are the GeV counterparts to their corresponding radio SNRs and an additional 14 candidates which may also be related to the SNRs. (3 data files).

  9. The radio and optical counterpart of the new Fermi LAT flaring source J0109+6134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.; Peracaula, M.

    2010-02-01

    Following the recent ATELs #2414, #2416 and #2420 concerning the Fermi-LAT, AGILE and Swift/XRT consistent detections of the new gamma-ray flaring source J0109+6134, we wish to remind that the proposed radio counterpart (VCS2 J0109+6133/GT 0106+613) was extensively observed nearly two decades ago by different authors in the context of the GT catalogue of Galactic Plane radio sources (Taylor and Gregory 1983, AJ, 88, 1784; Gregory and Taylor 1986, AJ 92, 371).

  10. Fermi LAT detection of renewed gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 2326-502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Torresi, E.

    2012-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar PKS 2326-502 (also known as 2FGL J2329.2-4956, Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 31; R.A.=23:29:20.880 Dec.=-49:55:40.68, J2000.0, Costa and Loyola 1996, A&AS, 115, 75) at redshift z=0.518 (Jauncey et al. 1984, ApJ, 286, 498).

  11. Fermi/LAT search for counterpart to the IceCube event 67093193 (run 127853)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, G.; Magill, J. D.; Omodei, N.; Kocevski, D.; Ajello, M.; Buson, S.; Krauss, F.; Chiang, J.

    2016-04-01

    on behalf of the Fermi-LAT team: We have searched the Fermi Large Area Telescope data for a high-energy gamma-ray counterpart for the IceCube High Energy Starting Event (HESE) 67093193, detected in run 127853 on 2016-04-27 05:52:32.00 UT (AMON GCN notice rev. 2, http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/notices_amon/67093193_127853.amon . See http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/doc/Public_Doc_AMON_IceCube_GCN_Alerts_v2.pdf for a description of HESE events and related GCN notices).

  12. Fermi LAT Detection of a Gamma-ray Flare from the BL Lac Object ON 246

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Josefa

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object ON 246 (RA=187.55871 deg, Dec=25.30198 deg, J2000, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13; with redshift z=0.135, Nass et al. 1996, A&A, 309, 419), also known as S3 1227+25 and 3FGL J1230.3+2519 (3FGL; Acero et al. 2015, arXiv:1501.02003).

  13. Fermi LAT and Swift flare of the FSRQ 4C +40.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh; Pivato, Giovanna; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed a gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) 4C +40.25 (also known as B2 1020+40 and 3FGL J1023.1+3952, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with coordinates RA: 10h 23m 11.5661s, Dec: 39d 48m 15.378s, J2000, (Helmboldt et al. 2007, ApJ, 658, 203) and a redshift of 1.254 (Xu et al. 1994, AJ, 108, 395).

  14. From FERMI-LAT observations to the blind pulsar survey SPAN512 with the Nançay Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Octau, F.; Desvignes, G.; Cognard, I.; Champion, D.; Lazarus, P.; Smith, D.; Theureau, G.

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of the first pulsar in 1967, we know over 2500 pulsars today. Pulsars offer a broad range of studies: from the study of the properties of interstellar medium and of pulsar magnetospheres up to test of gravity in the strong-field regime and the characterisation of the cosmological Gravitation Wave Background. This explains why we keep searching for pulsars nowadays. Such focus was initiated at the Nançay Radio Telescope (NRT) with the observation of unidentified Fermi-LAT sources, which led to the quick discovery of three new millisecond pulsars. In 2012, a blind pulsar survey called SPAN512 (in reference to the large bandwidth of 512 MHz) was initiated and the NRT began to observe the low galactic latitude sky at 1.4 GHz. This survey is still in progress (≈90% of the observations have been made) and, up to now, it has led to the discovery of three pulsars, two of them with millisecond spin periods.

  15. Latex agglutination test (LAT) for the diagnosis of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Gopal Shankar

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of latex agglutination test in the rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever was studied and the result compared with that of blood culture. This study included 80 children suffering from typhoid fever, among which 40 were confirmed by blood culture isolation and 40 had possible typhoid fever based on high Widal's titre (a four-fold rise in the titre of antibody to typhi "O" and "H" antigen was considered as a positive Widal's test result). Eighty children, 40 with febrile illness confirmed to be other than typhoid and 40 normal healthy children were used as negative controls. The various groups were: (i) Study group ie, group I had 40 children confirmed by culture isolation of Salmonella typhi(confirmed typhoid cases). (ii) Control groups ie, (a) group II with 40 febrile controls selected from paediatrics ward where cause other than S typhi has been established, (b) group III with 40 afebrile healthy controls that were siblings of the children admitted in paediatric ward for any reason with no history of fever and TAB vaccination in the last one year, and (c) group IV with 40 children with high Widal's titre in paired sera sample. Widal's test with paired sera with a one week interval between collections were done in all 40 patients. Latex aggtutination test which could detect 900 ng/ml of antigen as observed in checker board titration, was positive in all 40 children from group I who had positive blood culture and in 30 children from group IV who had culture negative and had high Widal's titre positive. Latex agglutination test was positive in 4 children in group II and none in group III. Using blood culture positive cases as true positive and children in groups II and III as true negative, the test had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 96%. Latex agglutination test was found to be significantly sensitive (100%) and specific (96%) and could detect 75% more cases in group IV (possible typhoid cases). Thus latex agglutination test can be used for rapid

  16. Millisecond Pulsars in the Galactic Bulge? An Extended Discussion on the Wavelet Analysis of the Fermi-LAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Richard; Weniger, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A clear excess in the Fermi-LAT data is present at energies around a few GeV. The spectrum of this so-called 'GeV excess' is remarkably similar to the expected annihilation signal of WIMP dark matter. However, a large bulge population of millisecond pulsars living below the Fermi-LAT detection threshold could also explain the excess spectrum. In a recent work we optimized the search for sub-threshold sources, by applying a wavelet transform to the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data. In the Inner-Galaxy the wavelet signal is significantly enhanced, providing supportive evidence for the point source interpretation of the excess. In these proceedings we will extent our previous work with a spectral analysis and elaborate on the potential contamination from substructures in the gas.

  17. Searches for correlation between UHECR events and high-energy gamma­ray Fermi-LAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabal, Nestor; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Cuoco, Alessandro; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; Fermi Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The sources responsible for ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) continue to be one of the most intriguing mysteries in astrophysics.We present a comprehensive search for correlations between high-energy (>= 1 GeV) gamma-ray events from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and UHECRs (>= 60 EeV) detected by the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory. We perform two separate searches. First, we conduct a standard cross-correlation analysis between the arrival directions of UHECRs and gamma-ray sources in the Second Catalog of Hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL). Second,we search for a possible correlation between UHECR directions and unresolved Fermi-LAT gamma-ray emission. We report our findings and their implications in the search for the origin of UHECRs.

  18. Suenos Indocumentados: Using LatCrit to Explore the Testimonios of Undocumented and U.S. Born Chicana College Students on Discourses of Racist Nativism in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lindsay Perez

    2010-01-01

    Latina/o critical race theory (LatCrit) is used as an overarching framework that examines the intersectionality of race, class, and gender while also acknowledging the unique forms of subordination within the Latina/o community based on immigration status, language, phenotype, and ethnicity. LatCrit allows for the specific examination of race and…

  19. Clinical significance of coexpression of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2) in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kaira, Kyoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Atsumi, Jun; Obayashi, Kai; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Oyama, Tetsunari; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Background: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2) have been associated with tumor growth and progression. However, the clinical significance of LAT1 and ASCT2 coexpression in the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. Methods: In total, 222 patients with surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma were investigated retrospectively. Tumor sections were stained immunohistochemically for LAT1, ASCT2, CD98, phosphorylated mammalian target-of-rapamycin (p-mTOR), and Ki-67, and microvessel density (MVD) was determined by staining for CD34. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status was also examined. Results: LAT1 and ASCT2 were positively expressed in 22% and 40% of cases, respectively. Coexpression of LAT1 and ASCT2 was observed in 12% of cases and was associated significantly with disease stage, lymphatic permeation, vascular invasion, CD98, Ki-67, and p-mTOR. Only LAT1 and ASCT2 coexpression indicated a poor prognosis for lung adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, this characteristic was recognized in early-stage patients, especially those who had wild-type, rather than mutated, EGFR. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the coexpression of LAT1 and ASCT2 was an independent factor for predicting poor outcome. Conclusions: LAT1 and ASCT2 coexpression is an independent prognostic factor for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, especially during the early stages, expressing wild-type EGFR. PMID:26279756

  20. Constraints on the Galactic Halo Dark Matter from Fermi-LAT Diffuse Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, Theresa J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Guiriec, Sylvain Germain; McEnery, Julie E.; Scargle. J. D.; Troja, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    We have performed an analysis of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the Milky Way halo region, searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay. In the absence of a robust dark matter signal, constraints are presented. We consider both gamma rays produced directly in the dark matter annihilation/decay and produced by inverse Compton scattering of the e+/e- produced in the annihilation/decay. Conservative limits are derived requiring that the dark matter signal does not exceed the observed diffuse gamma-ray emission. A second set of more stringent limits is derived based on modeling the foreground astrophysical diffuse emission using the GALPROP code. Uncertainties in the height of the diffusive cosmic-ray halo, the distribution of the cosmic-ray sources in the Galaxy, the index of the injection cosmic-ray electron spectrum, and the column density of the interstellar gas are taken into account using a profile likelihood formalism, while the parameters governing the cosmic-ray propagation have been derived from fits to local cosmic-ray data. The resulting limits impact the range of particle masses over which dark matter thermal production in the early universe is possible, and challenge the interpretation of the PAMELA/Fermi-LAT cosmic ray anomalies as the annihilation of dark matter.

  1. Blind searches for radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormody, Michael Harry

    Blind searches for radio-quiet pulsars have been extremely fruitful, with over two dozen detected in searches of LAT point sources. While there is a general idea that the blind search sensitivity to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars is worse compared with the sensitivity to radio-loud pulsars, it has not been well established quantitatively. To achieve this, we simulate pulsars across a wide variety of rotational and spectral parameters, and search for pulsations in their corresponding LAT optimized positions. Using these results, we can estimate the detection threshold given a location on the sky and a spectral model. We also explore the benefit of using counterpart source locations from multiwavelength observations (e.g. X-rays). The sensitivity to blind searches can be used to estimate the gamma-ray pulsar birth distribution, an open question in pulsar astronomy. We use a model for galactic gamma-ray pulsars and evolve them to the present-day via the gravitational potential of the Galaxy. By comparing the resulting distribution with the known pulsar distribution, we can effectively rule out certain birth models at high confidence and place an estimate on the number of galactic gamma-ray pulsars.

  2. Gamma-ray blazars and active galactic nuclei seen by the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, B.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.

    2015-03-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected with a test statistic (TS) greater than 25 using the first 4 years of data. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes, |b| > 10 (with 28 duplicate associations, thus corresponding to 1563 gamma-ray sources among 2192 sources in the 3FGL catalog), a 71% increase over the second catalog based on 2 years of data. A very large majority of these AGNs (98%) are blazars. About half of the newly detected blazars are of unknown type, i.e., they lack spectroscopic information of sufficient quality to determine the strength of their emission lines. The general properties of the 3LAC sample confirm previous findings from earlier catalogs, but some new subclasses (e.g., intermediate- and high-synchrotron-peaked FSRQs) have now been significantly detected.

  3. Evaluation of the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid and Lat-Long Grid for Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Dahm, Johann; Oran, Elaine; Alexandrov, Natalia; Boris, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The Air Traffic Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (ATMLG) is used to simulate a 24 hour period of air traffic flow in the National Airspace System (NAS). During this time period, there are 41,594 flights over the United States, and the flight plan information (departure and arrival airports and times, and waypoints along the way) are obtained from an Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Enhanced Traffic Management System (ETMS) dataset. Two simulation procedures are tested and compared: one based on the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (MLG), and the other based on the stationary Latitude-Longitude (Lat- Long) grid. Simulating one full day of air traffic over the United States required the following amounts of CPU time on a single processor of an SGI Altix: 88 s for the MLG method, and 163 s for the Lat-Long grid method. We present a discussion of the amount of CPU time required for each of the simulation processes (updating aircraft trajectories, sorting, conflict detection and resolution, etc.), and show that the main advantage of the MLG method is that it is a general sorting algorithm that can sort on multiple properties. We discuss how many MLG neighbors must be considered in the separation assurance procedure in order to ensure a five-mile separation buffer between aircraft, and we investigate the effect of removing waypoints from aircraft trajectories. When aircraft choose their own trajectory, there are more flights with shorter duration times and fewer CD&R maneuvers, resulting in significant fuel savings.

  4. Fermi LAT Observations of Gamma-Ray Transients Near the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides unprecedented sensitivity for all-sky monitoring of gamma-ray activity from 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The observatory scans the entire sky every three hours and allows a general search for flaring activity on daily timescales. This search is conducted automatically as part of the ground processing and allows a fast response to transient events, typically less than a day. Most flares are spatially associated with known blazars, but in several cases during the first year of observations, gamma-ray flares occurring near the Galactic plane did not reveal any initially compelling counterparts. This prompted follow-up observations in X-ray, optical, and radio to attempt to identify the origin of the emission and probe the possible existence of a class of transient gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy. We will report on the details of these LAT events and the results of the multi-wavelength counterpart searches.

  5. The First Fermi-LAT Catalog of Sources Above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of gamma-ray sources at energies above 10 GeV based on data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) accumulated during the first 3 yr of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of >10 GeV sources (1FHL) has 514 sources. For each source we present location, spectrum, a measure of variability, and associations with cataloged sources at other wavelengths. We found that 449 (87%) could be associated with known sources, of which 393 (76% of the 1FHL sources) are active galactic nuclei. Of the 27 sources associated with known pulsars, we find 20 (12) to have significant pulsations in the range >10 GeV (>25 GeV). In this work we also report that, at energies above 10 GeV, unresolved sources account for 27% +/- 8% of the isotropic ? -ray background, while the unresolved Galactic population contributes only at the few percent level to the Galactic diffuse background. We also highlight the subset of the 1FHL sources that are best candidates for detection at energies above 50-100 GeV with current and future ground-based ? -ray observatories.

  6. POLARIZATION AND VARIATION OF NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT FROM FERMI/LAT {gamma}-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Ienaka, N.

    2012-10-01

    We present the results of our follow-up observation program of {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Twenty-six blazars and thirty-nine sources unidentified at other wavelengths were targeted at the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4 m telescope equipped with the SIRIUS/SIRPOL imager and polarimeter. H-band magnitudes of the blazars at the epoch of 2010 December-2011 February are presented, which reveal clear flux variation since the Two Micron All Sky Survey observations and can be useful data for variation analyses of these objects in longer periods. We also find that nearly half of the {gamma}-ray blazars are highly (>10%) polarized in near-infrared wavelengths. Combining the polarization and variation properties, most ({approx}90%) of the blazars are clearly distinguished from all other types of objects at high Galactic latitudes. On the other hand, we find only one highly polarized and/or variable object in the fields of unidentified sources. This object is a counterpart of the optical variable source PQV1 J131553.00-073302.0 and the radio source NVSS J131552-073301 and is a promising candidate of new {gamma}-ray blazars. From the measured polarization and variation statistics, we conclude that most of the Fermi/LAT unidentified sources are not likely similar types of objects to the known {gamma}-ray blazars.

  7. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Berenji, Bijan

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  8. Radio Detection of the Fermi-LAT Blind Search Millisecond Pulsar J1311-3430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311.3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for less than 10% of approximately 4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nan cay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311.3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm(exp -3) provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  9. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY γ-RAY EMISSION TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Atwood, W. B.; Caputo, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; and others

    2016-03-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission toward the Galactic center (GC) in high-energy γ-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1–100 GeV from a 15° × 15° region about the direction of the GC. Specialized interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed to enable the separation of the γ-ray emissions produced by cosmic ray particles interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation fields in the Milky Way into that from the inner ∼1 kpc surrounding the GC, and that from the rest of the Galaxy. A catalog of point sources for the 15° × 15° region is self-consistently constructed using these IEMs: the First Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy Point Source Catalog (1FIG). The spatial locations, fluxes, and spectral properties of the 1FIG sources are presented, and compared with γ-ray point sources over the same region taken from existing catalogs. After subtracting the interstellar emission and point-source contributions a residual is found. If templates that peak toward the GC are used to model the positive residual the agreement with the data improves, but none of the additional templates tried account for all of its spatial structure. The spectrum of the positive residual modeled with these templates has a strong dependence on the choice of IEM.

  10. GRB2-Mediated Recruitment of THEMIS to LAT Is Essential for Thymocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Wolfgang; Brockmeyer, Claudia; Fu, Guo; Simister, Philip C.; de Wet, Ben; Martinez-Riaño, Ana; Hoerter, John A. H.; Feller, Stephan M.; Wülfing, Christoph; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Thymocyte-expressed molecule involved in selection (THEMIS) is a recently identified regulator of thymocyte positive selection. THEMIS’s mechanism of action is unknown, and whether it has a role in TCR-proximal signaling is controversial. In this article, we show that THEMIS and the adapter molecule growth factor receptor–bound protein 2 (GRB2) associate constitutively through binding of a conserved PxRPxK motif within the proline-rich region 1 of THEMIS to the C-terminal SH3-domain of GRB2. This association is indispensable for THEMIS recruitment to the immunological synapse via the transmembrane adapter linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and for THEMIS phosphorylation by Lck and ZAP-70. Two major sites of tyrosine phosphorylation were mapped to a YY-motif close to proline-rich region 1. The YY-motif was crucial for GRB2 binding, suggesting that this region of THEMIS might control local phosphorylation-dependent conformational changes important for THEMIS function. Finally, THEMIS binding to GRB2 was required for thymocyte development. Our data firmly assign THEMIS to the TCR-proximal signaling cascade as a participant in the LAT signalosome and suggest that the THEMIS–GRB2 complex might be involved in shaping the nature of Ras signaling, thereby governing thymic selection. PMID:23460737

  11. EINSTEIN@HOME DISCOVERY OF FOUR YOUNG GAMMA-RAY PULSARS IN FERMI LAT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Papa, M. A.; Guillemot, L.; Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Ng, C.; Anderson, D.; Hammer, D.; Siemens, X.; Keith, M.; Ray, P. S. E-mail: lucas.guillemot@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2013-12-10

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422–6138, J1522–5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range 6 × 10{sup 34}—10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray pulsars found by volunteer computing, motivate continued blind pulsar searches of the many other unidentified LAT gamma-ray sources.

  12. The first fermi-lat catalog of sources above 10 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bernieri, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, E.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Orienti, M.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Łukasz; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.

    2013-11-14

    We present a catalog of gamma-ray sources at energies above 10 GeV based on data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) accumulated during the first three years of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of >10GeV sources (1FHL) has 514 sources. For each source we present location, spectrum, a measure of variability, and associations with cataloged sources at other wavelengths. We found that 449 (87%) could be associated with known sources, of which 393 (76% of the 1FHL sources) are active galactic nuclei. Of the 27 sources associated with known pulsars, we find 20 (12) to have significant pulsations in the range >10GeV (>25GeV). In this work we also report that, at energies above 10 GeV, unresolved sources account for 27+/-8 % of the isotropic gamma-ray background, while the unresolved Galactic population contributes only at the few percent level to the Galactic diffuse background. We also highlight the subset of the 1FHL sources that are best candidates for detection at energies above 50-100 GeV with current and future ground-based gamma-ray observatories.

  13. CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC HALO DARK MATTER FROM FERMI-LAT DIFFUSE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We have performed an analysis of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the Milky Way halo region, searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay. In the absence of a robust dark matter signal, constraints are presented. We consider both gamma rays produced directly in the dark matter annihilation/decay and produced by inverse Compton scattering of the e {sup +}/e {sup -} produced in the annihilation/decay. Conservative limits are derived requiring that the dark matter signal does not exceed the observed diffuse gamma-ray emission. A second set of more stringent limits is derived based on modeling the foreground astrophysical diffuse emission using the GALPROP code. Uncertainties in the height of the diffusive cosmic-ray halo, the distribution of the cosmic-ray sources in the Galaxy, the index of the injection cosmic-ray electron spectrum, and the column density of the interstellar gas are taken into account using a profile likelihood formalism, while the parameters governing the cosmic-ray propagation have been derived from fits to local cosmic-ray data. The resulting limits impact the range of particle masses over which dark matter thermal production in the early universe is possible, and challenge the interpretation of the PAMELA/Fermi-LAT cosmic ray anomalies as the annihilation of dark matter.

  14. RADIO DETECTION OF THE FERMI-LAT BLIND SEARCH MILLISECOND PULSAR J1311-3430

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2013-01-20

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311-3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for <10% of {approx}4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nancay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311-3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm{sup -3} provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  15. Fermi LAT Detection of a Hard Spectrum Gamma-ray Flare from the FSRQ S4 0954+65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Carpenter, Bryce; Tanaka, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed an unusually hard spectrum gamma-ray flare from the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S4 0954+65 (3FGL J0958.6+6534; RA: 149.696855, Dec: +65.565227, J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  16. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes. PMID:25870599

  17. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  18. ATel 7453: Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from the FSRQ PKS 2032+107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2032+107 (also known as 3FGL J2035.3+1055, Acero et al. ...

  19. ATel 7545: Fermi LAT Detection of a GeV flare from spectrally hard FSRQ S4 1800+44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S4 1800+44 (also known as 3FGL J1801.5+4403, Acero et al. ...

  20. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 1532+01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 1532+01 (also known as 3FGL J1534.5+0128, Acero et al.

  1. 50 CFR Table 1c to Part 660... - Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2013 1c Table 1c to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES...

  2. 50 CFR Table 2c to Part 660... - Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2014 and Beyond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2014 and Beyond 2c Table 2c to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  3. EIGHT {gamma}-RAY PULSARS DISCOVERED IN BLIND FREQUENCY SEARCHES OF FERMI LAT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Dormody, M.; Ziegler, M.; Belfiore, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Ray, P. S.; Abdo, A. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Ballet, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnson, T. J.; Freire, P. C. C. E-mail: mdormody@ucsc.ed E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of eight {gamma}-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches of {approx}650 source positions using the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. PSRs J1023-5746, J1044-5737, J1413-5205, J1429-5911, and J1954+2836 are young ({tau}{sub c} < 100 kyr), energetic (E-dot {approx}>10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}), and located within the Galactic plane (|b| < 3{sup 0}). The remaining three pulsars, PSRs J1846+0919, J1957+5033, and J2055+25, are less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the Fermi-LAT bright {gamma}-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age ({tau}{sub c} = 4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (E-dot = 1.1x10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) of all {gamma}-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. By analyzing >100 ks of publicly available archival Chandra X-ray data, we have identified the likely counterpart of PSR J1023-5746 as a faint, highly absorbed source, CXOU J102302.8-574606. The large X-ray absorption indicates that this could be among the most distant {gamma}-ray pulsars detected so far. PSR J1023-5746 is positionally coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575, located near the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2, while PSR J1954+2836 is coincident with a 4.3{sigma} excess reported by Milagro at a median energy of 35 TeV. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages ({tau}{sub c} {approx} 1 Myr) and are the least energetic (E-dot {approx}5x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}) of the newly discovered pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. Deep radio follow-up observations of the eight pulsars resulted in no detections of pulsations and upper limits comparable to the faintest known

  4. Extending the Fermi-LAT data processing pipeline to the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, S.; Arrabito, L.; Glanzman, T.; Johnson, T.; Lavalley, C.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.

    2015-05-12

    The Data Handling Pipeline ("Pipeline") has been developed for the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) Large Area Telescope (LAT) which launched in June 2008. Since then it has been in use to completely automate the production of data quality monitoring quantities, reconstruction and routine analysis of all data received from the satellite and to deliver science products to the collaboration and the Fermi Science Support Center. Aside from the reconstruction of raw data from the satellite (Level 1), data reprocessing and various event-level analyses are also reasonably heavy loads on the pipeline and computing resources. These other loads, unlike Level 1, can run continuously for weeks or months at a time. Additionally, it receives heavy use in performing production Monte Carlo tasks.

  5. Fermi-LAT and Suzaku Observations of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus B

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, Junichiro; Tanaka, Y.T.; Stawarz, L.; O'Sullivan, S.P.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Funk, S.; Yuasa, T.; Odaka, H.; Takahashi, T.; Svoboda, J.; /European Space Agency

    2012-08-17

    CentaurusB is a nearby radio galaxy positioned in the Southern hemisphere close to the Galactic plane. Here we present a detailed analysis of about 43 months accumulation of Fermi-LAT data and of newly acquired Suzaku X-ray data for Centaurus B. The source is detected at GeV photon energies, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that it is an artifact due to incorrect modeling of the bright Galactic diffuse emission in the region. The LAT image provides a weak hint of a spatial extension of the {gamma} rays along the radio lobes, which is consistent with the lack of source variability in the GeV range. We note that the extension cannot be established statistically due to the low number of the photons. Surprisingly, we do not detect any diffuse emission of the lobes at X-ray frequencies, with the provided upper limit only marginally consistent with the previously claimed ASCA flux. The broad-band modeling shows that the observed {gamma}-ray flux of the source may be produced within the lobes, if the diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission component is not significantly below the derived Suzaku upper limit. This association would imply that efficient in-situ acceleration of the ultrarelativistic particles is occurring and that the lobes are dominated by the pressure from the relativistic particles. However, if the diffuse X-ray emission is much below the Suzaku upper limits, the observed {gamma}-ray flux is not likely to be produced within the lobes, but instead within the unresolved core of Centaurus B. In this case, the extended lobes could be dominated by the pressure of the magnetic field.

  6. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in Recently Discovered Milky Way Satellites with Fermi-Lat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Meyer, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Strigari, L.; Wood, M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; DES Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We search for excess γ-ray emission coincident with the positions of confirmed and candidate Milky Way satellite galaxies using six years of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our sample of 45 stellar systems includes 28 kinematically confirmed dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and 17 recently discovered systems that have photometric characteristics consistent with the population of known dSphs. For each of these targets, the relative predicted γ-ray flux due to dark matter annihilation is taken from kinematic analysis if available, and estimated from a distance-based scaling relation otherwise, assuming that the stellar systems are DM-dominated dSphs. LAT data coincident with four of the newly discovered targets show a slight preference (each ∼ 2σ local) for γ-ray emission in excess of the background. However, the ensemble of derived γ-ray flux upper limits for individual targets is consistent with the expectation from analyzing random blank-sky regions, and a combined analysis of the population of stellar systems yields no globally significant excess (global significance < 1σ ). Our analysis has increased sensitivity compared to the analysis of 15 confirmed dSphs by Ackermann et al. The observed constraints on the DM annihilation cross section are statistically consistent with the background expectation, improving by a factor of ∼2 for large DM masses ({m}{DM,b\\bar{b}}≳ 1 {TeV} and {m}{DM,{τ }+{τ }-}≳ 70 {GeV}) and weakening by a factor of ∼1.5 at lower masses relative to previously observed limits.

  7. Fourth Workshop on Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massai, Marco Maria; Omodei, Nicola; Spandre, Gloria

    I. Space-based telescope. Integral-4 years in orbit / P. Umbertini, P. Caraveo. The Suzaku mission / K. Yamaoka. The Swift mission: two years of operation / A. Moretti. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE / F.Longo et al., The AGILE collaboration. The GLAST mission / J.E. McEnery -- II. Ground-based telescope. Recent results from CANGAROO / M. Mori for the CANGAROO team. The H.E.S.S. project / C. Masterson for the H.E.S.S. collaboration. The MAGIC experiment / N. Turini for the MAGIC collaboration. VERITAS: status and performance / J. Holder for the VERITAS collaboration -- III. Galactic variable sources. Galactic variable sky with EGRET and GLAST / S. Digel. Galactic variable sources observed with H.E.S.S. / N. Komin for the H.E.S.S collaboration. Gamma ray pulsars in the GLAST era / M. Razzano. Solving the riddle of unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources / P. Caraveo. Supernovae and gamma-ray burst / M. Della Valle. First cycle of MAGIC galactic observations / J. Cortina for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma-rays and neutrinos from a SNR in the galactic center / V. Cavasinni, D. Grasso, L. Maccione. Solving GRBs and SGRs puzzles by precessing jets / D. Fargion, O. Lanciano, P. Oliva -- IV. Extragalactic sources. Multiwavelength observations and theories of blazers / G. Tosti. AGN observations with the MAGIC telescope / C. Bigongiari for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma ray bursts/ L. Amati. X-rays and GeV flares in GRB light curves / A. Galli ... [et al.]. The highest energy emission from gamma ray bursts: MILAGRO's constraints and HAWC's potential / B. Dingus for the MILAGRO and HAWC collaborations. Observation of GRB with the MAGIC telescope / N. Galante, P. Piccioli for the MAGIC collaboration. GRB 060218 and the outliers with respect to the E-E correlation / G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghibellini -- V. Poster session. Study of the performance and calibration of the GLAST-LAT silicon tracker / M. Brigida, N. Giglietto, P. Spinelli. The online monitor for the GLAST

  8. Fermi LAT Observation of Diffuse Gamma-Rays Produced through Interactions Between Local Interstellar Matter and High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; /more authors..

    2012-03-30

    Observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi mission of diffuse {gamma}-rays in a mid-latitude region in the third quadrant (Galactic longitude l from 200{sup o} to 260{sup o} and latitude |b| from 22{sup o} to 60{sup o}) are reported. The region contains no known large molecular cloud and most of the atomic hydrogen is within 1 kpc of the solar system. The contributions of {gamma}-ray point sources and inverse Compton scattering are estimated and subtracted. The residual {gamma}-ray intensity exhibits a linear correlation with the atomic gas column density in energy from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. The measured integrated {gamma}-ray emissivity is (1.63 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} and (0.66 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} above 100 MeV and above 300 MeV, respectively, with an additional systematic error of {approx}10%. The differential emissivity from 100 MeV to 10 GeV agrees with calculations based on cosmic ray spectra consistent with those directly measured, at the 10% level. The results obtained indicate that cosmic ray nuclei spectra within 1 kpc from the solar system in regions studied are close to the local interstellar spectra inferred from direct measurements at the Earth within {approx}10%.

  9. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  10. Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, Y.; Cheung, C.C.; Hayashida, M.; Grandi, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Celotti, A.; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; Taylor, G.B.; Tosti, G.; Digel, S.W.; McConville, W.; Finke, J.; D'Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

    2012-06-07

    We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  11. LAT Region Factors Mediating Differential Neuronal Tropism of HSV-1 and HSV-2 Do Not Act in Trans

    PubMed Central

    Bertke, Andrea S.; Apakupakul, Kathleen; Ma, AyeAye; Imai, Yumi; Gussow, Anne M.; Wang, Kening; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Bloom, David C.; Margolis, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    After HSV infection, some trigeminal ganglion neurons support productive cycle gene expression, while in other neurons the virus establishes a latent infection. We previously demonstrated that HSV-1 and HSV-2 preferentially establish latent infection in A5+ and KH10+ sensory neurons, respectively, and that exchanging the latency-associated transcript (LAT) between HSV-1 and HSV-2 also exchanges the neuronal preference. Since many viral genes besides the LAT are functionally interchangeable between HSV-1 and HSV-2, we co-infected HSV-1 and HSV-2, both in vivo and in vitro, to determine if trans-acting viral factors regulate whether HSV infection follows a productive or latent pattern of gene expression in sensory neurons. The pattern of HSV-1 and HSV-2 latent infection in trigeminal neurons was no different following co-infection than with either virus alone, consistent with the hypothesis that a trans-acting viral factor is not responsible for the different patterns of latent infection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in A5+ and KH10+ neurons. Since exchanging the LAT regions between the viruses also exchanges neuronal preferences, we infected transgenic mice that constitutively express 2.8 kb of the LAT region with the heterologous viral serotype. Endogenous expression of LAT did not alter the pattern of latent infection after inoculation with the heterologous serotype virus, demonstrating that the LAT region does not act in trans to direct preferential establishment of latency of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Using HSV1-RFP and HSV2-GFP in adult trigeminal ganglion neurons in vitro, we determined that HSV-1 and HSV-2 do not exert trans-acting effects during acute infection to regulate neuron specificity. Although some neurons were productively infected with both HSV-1 and HSV-2, no A5+ or KH10+ neurons were productively infected with both viruses. Thus, trans-acting viral factors do not regulate preferential permissiveness of A5+ and KH10+ neurons for productive HSV infection and

  12. Onset and Rapid Increase of Gamma-Ray activity from the Binary System PSR B1259-63 detected by Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, K. S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cheung, C. C.; Li, J.; Torres, D. F.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, is measuring rapid brightening of the binary system PSR B1259-63/SS 2883 in the GeV energy range. ...

  13. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes is coupled to increased arginine transport by upregulated y(+)LAT2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Milewski, Krzysztof; Skowrońska, Marta; Gajos, Anna; Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Beręsewicz, Andrzej; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-12-01

    One of the aspects of ammonia toxicity to brain cells is increased production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOSs). Previously we showed that ammonia increases arginine (Arg) uptake in cultured rat cortical astrocytes specifically via y(+)L amino acid transport system, by activation of its member, a heteromeric y(+)LAT2 transporter. Here, we tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 underlies ammonia-dependent increase of NO production via inducible NOS (iNOS) induction, and protein nitration. Treatment of rat cortical astrocytes for 48 with 5 mM ammonium chloride ('ammonia') (i) increased the y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake, (ii) raised the expression of iNOS and endothelial NOS (eNOS), (iii) stimulated NO production, as manifested by increased nitrite+nitrate (Griess) and/or nitrite alone (chemiluminescence), and consequently, (iv) evoked nitration of tyrosine residues of proteins in astrocytes. Except for the increase of eNOS, all the above described effects of ammonia were abrogated by pre-treatment of astrocytes with either siRNA silencing of the Slc7a6 gene coding for y(+)LAT2 protein, or antibody to y(+)LAT2, indicating their strict coupling to y(+)LAT2 activity. Moreover, induction of y(+)LAT2 expression by ammonia was sensitive to Nf-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085, linking y(+)LAT2 upregulation to the Nf-κB activation in this experimental setting as reported earlier and here confirmed. Importantly, ammonia did not affect y(+)LAT2 expression nor y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake activity in the cultured cerebellar neurons, suggesting astroglia-specificity of the above described mechanism. The described coupling of up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 transporter with iNOS in ammonia-exposed astrocytes may be considered as a mechanism to ensure NO supply for protein nitration. Ammonia (NH4(+)) increases the expression and activity of the L-arginine (Arg) transporter (Arg/neutral amino acids [NAA] exchanger) y(+)LAT2 in cultured rat cortical astrocytes by a mechanism

  14. Transferable cefoxitin resistance in enterobacteria from Greek hospitals and characterization of a plasmid-mediated group 1 beta-lactamase (LAT-2).

    PubMed Central

    Gazouli, M; Tzouvelekis, L S; Prinarakis, E; Miriagou, V; Tzelepi, E

    1996-01-01

    Cefoxitin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae from Escherichia coli strains isolated in Greek hospitals was found to be due to the acquisition of similar plasmids coding for group 1 beta-lactamases. The plasmids were not self-transferable but were mobilized by conjugative plasmids. These elements have also been spread to Enterobacter aerogenes. The most common enzyme was a Citrobacter freundii-derived cephalosporinase (LAT-2) which differed from LAT-1 by three amino acids. PMID:8807075

  15. 50 CFR Table 3 (south) to Part 660... - 2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 3 Table 3 (South) to Part 660, Subpart F Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat. ER01OC10.022 ER01OC10.023...

  16. 50 CFR Table 5 (north) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 5 Table 5 (North) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR...

  17. 50 CFR Table 5 (south) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 5 Table 5 (South) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR...

  18. 50 CFR Table 3 (north) to Part 660... - 2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 3 Table 3 (North) to Part 660, Subpart F Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat. ER01OC10.020 ER01OC10.021...

  19. Analysis of the cumulative neutrino flux from Fermi LAT blazar populations using 3 years of IceCube data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glüsenkamp, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The recent discovery of a diffuse neutrino flux up to PeV energies raises the question of which populations of astrophysical sources contribute to this diffuse signal. One extragalactic candidate source population to produce high-energy neutrinos are Blazars. We present results from a likelihood analysis searching for cumulative neutrino emission from Blazar populations selected with the 2nd Fermi LAT AGN catalogue (2LAC) using an IceCube data set that has been optimized for the detection of individual sources. In contrast to previous searches with IceCube, the investigated populations contain up to hundreds of sources, the biggest one being the entire Blazar sample measured by the Fermi-LAT. No significant neutrino signal was found from any of these populations. Some implications of this non-observation for the origin of the observed PeV diffuse signal will be discussed.

  20. ['The spirit has left the bottle': the medieval Arabic physician 'Abd al-Latĭf ibn Yŭsuf al-Baghdădĭ: his medical work and his bizarre affiliation with twentieth-century spiritualism].

    PubMed

    Joosse, N Peter

    2007-01-01

    The Arabic physician 'Abd al-Latĭf ibn Yŭsuf al-Baghdădĭ, lived at the crossroads of the twelfth and the thirteenth century. His unbridled curiosity and his unquenchable thirst for knowledge of any kind brought him to far-away countries and regions and put him in contact with all sorts and conditions of people. The great Egyptian famine of the years 1200-1202 enabled him to study and examine thousands of human cadavers and skeletons at first hand. This led to a new understanding of the anatomical structure of the human body, and rejected the more or less antiquated ideas of the Greek doctor Galen of Pergamum. However, 'Abd al-Latĭf's vision was granted only a short life. After his death, his discovery sank into oblivion and as a consequence it was never again mentioned in Arabic medical manuals. From then on the Arabic physicians once more referred to the anatomical data which were developed and taught by Galen. Relatively few specimens of his remaining medical work were preserved for posterity. However, his Book of the two advices (or: K. al-Nasĭhatain) is of the utmost importance as a source for the medical thinking and the medical treatment in the late twelfth and the early thirteenth century A.D. During the years following World War I, 'Abd al-Latĭf's name reappeared within the spiritualistic movement in England. He became known as Abduhl Latif the great Persian physician and acted as a control of mediums. Until the late sixties, he practised the art of healing as the head of a medical mission somewhere in the Spheres.

  1. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from blazar NRAO 190 (PKS 0440-00)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Gasparrini, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed a gamma-ray outburst from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar NRAO 190 (also known as PKS 0440-00, DA 145, OF -067; RA: 04h 42m 38.661s, Dec: -00d 17m 43.42s, J2000.0) with redshift 0.844 (Hewitt & Burbidge 1987, 63, 1).

  2. Enhanced high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 detected by Fermi/LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2017-02-01

    Following the recent decrease of the hard X-ray emission from the high-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 as seen by the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (https://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/results/transients/CygX-3/), the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed significant gamma-ray emission originating from the microquasar.

  3. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the BL Lac object AP Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object AP Lib (also known as PKS 1514-24 and 3FGL J1517.6-2422), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 229.424221 deg, Dec.: -24.372076 deg, (J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  4. Fermi LAT Detection of a GeV Flare from the FSRQ S4 0954+65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Felicia

    2014-11-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with S4 0954+65 (RA: 149.696855, Dec: +65.565227, J2000, Johnston et al., 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at z = 0.368 (Wills et al., 1992, ApJ, 398, 454).

  5. Fermi LAT detection of renewed GeV activity from the high redshift blazar PKS 0458-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed flaring gamma rays from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0458-02 (also known as S3 0458-02, DA 157, OA 141, and 3FGL J0501.2-0157), with radio coordinates, (J2000), R.A.: 75.303374 deg, Dec.: -1.987293 deg (Johnston et al.

  6. Fermi LAT detection of increasing gamma-ray activity from NGC 1275 and B3 0908+416B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivato, G.; Buson, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from sources positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar B3 0908+416B (also known as 3FGL J0912.2+4126, Acero et al. 2015 ApJS, 218, 23) and the radio galaxy NGC 1275 (also known as Perseus A and 3FGL J0319.8+4130).

  7. Seven-year Collection of Well-monitored Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the light curves and spectra of 24 afterglows that have been monitored by Fermi-LAT at 0.1–100 GeV over more than a decade. All light curves (except 130427) are consistent with a single power law starting from their peaks, which occur in most cases before the burst end. The light curves display a brightness–decay rate correlation, with all but one (130427) of the bright afterglows decaying faster than the dimmer afterglows. We attribute this dichotomy to the quick deposition of relativistic ejecta energy in the external shock for the brighter/faster-decaying afterglows and to an extended energy injection in the afterglow shock for the dimmer/slower-decaying light curves. The spectra of six afterglows (090328, 100414, 110721, 110731, 130427, 140619B) indicate the existence of a harder component above a spectral dip or ankle at energies of 0.3–3 GeV, offering evidence for inverse-Compton emission at higher energies and suggesting that the harder power-law spectra of five other LAT afterglows (130327B, 131231, 150523, 150627, 160509) could also be inverse-Compton, while the remaining, softer LAT afterglows should be synchrotron emission. Marginal evidence for a spectral break and softening at higher energies is found for two afterglows (090902B and 090926).

  8. Searches for correlation between UHECR events and high-energy gamma-ray Fermi-LAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Ezequiel; Cuoco, Alessandro; Mirabal, Nestor; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2016-12-01

    The astrophysical sources responsible for ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) continue to be one of the most intriguing mysteries in astrophysics. We present a comprehensive search for correlations between high-energy (gtrsim 1 GeV) gamma-ray events from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and UHECRs (gtrsim 60 EeV) detected by the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory. We perform two separate searches. First, we conduct a standard cross-correlation analysis between the arrival directions of 148 UHECRs and 360 gamma-ray sources in the Second Catalog of Hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL). Second, we search for a possible correlation between UHECR directions and unresolved Fermi-LAT gamma-ray emission. For the latter, we use three different methods: a stacking technique with both a model-dependent and model-independent background estimate, and a cross-correlation function analysis. We also test for statistically significant excesses in gamma rays from signal regions centered on Cen A and the Telescope Array hotspot. No significant correlation is found in any of the analyses performed, except a weak (lesssim 2σ) hint of signal with the correlation function method on scales ~ 1°. Upper limits on the flux of possible power-law gamma-ray sources of UHECRs are derived.

  9. Gamma-Ray Observations of the Supernova Remnant RX J0852.0-4622 with the Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Funk, S.; Giordano, F.; Hewitt, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Tajima, H.; Tibolla, O.; Uchiyama, Y.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-12-13

    We report on gamma-ray observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In the Fermi LAT data, we find a spatially extended source at the location of the SNR. The extension is consistent with the SNR size seen in other wavelengths such as X-rays and TeV gamma rays, leading to the identification of the gamma-ray source with the SNR. The spectrum is well described as a power law with a photon index of {Lambda} = 1.85 {+-} 0.06 (stat){sub -0.19}{sup +0.18} (sys), which smoothly connects to the H.E.S.S. spectrum in the TeV energy band. We discuss the gamma-ray emission mechanism based on multiwavelength data. The broadband data can be fit well by a model in which the gamma rays are of hadronic origin. We also consider a scenario with inverse Compton scattering of electrons as the emission mechanism of the gamma rays. Although the leptonic model predicts a harder spectrum in the Fermi LAT energy range, the model can fit the data considering the statistical and systematic errors.

  10. Phosphotyrosine-mediated LAT assembly on membranes drives kinetic bifurcation in recruitment dynamics of the Ras activator SOS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, William Y. C.; Yan, Qingrong; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chung, Jean K.; Hansen, Scott D.; Christensen, Sune M.; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cell surface receptors with downstream signaling molecules is a commonly occurring theme in multiple signaling systems. However, little is known about how these assemblies modulate reaction kinetics and the ultimate propagation of signals. Here, we reconstitute phosphotyrosine-mediated assembly of extended linker for the activation of T cells (LAT):growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2):Son of Sevenless (SOS) networks, derived from the T-cell receptor signaling system, on supported membranes. Single-molecule dwell time distributions reveal two, well-differentiated kinetic species for both Grb2 and SOS on the LAT assemblies. The majority fraction of membrane-recruited Grb2 and SOS both exhibit fast kinetics and single exponential dwell time distributions, with average dwell times of hundreds of milliseconds. The minor fraction exhibits much slower kinetics, extending the dwell times to tens of seconds. Considering this result in the context of the multistep process by which the Ras GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) activity of SOS is activated indicates that kinetic stabilization from the LAT assembly may be important. This kinetic proofreading effect would additionally serve as a stochastic noise filter by reducing the relative probability of spontaneous SOS activation in the absence of receptor triggering. The generality of receptor-mediated assembly suggests that such effects may play a role in multiple receptor proximal signaling processes. PMID:27370798

  11. PTPN14 Forms a Complex with Kibra and LATS1 Proteins and Negatively Regulates the YAP Oncogenic Function*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kayla E.; Li, Ying-Wei; Yang, Nuo; Shen, He; Orillion, Ashley R.; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. Pivotal effectors of this pathway are YAP/TAZ, transcriptional co-activators whose dysfunction contributes to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and malignant transformation. Therefore, it is of great importance to decipher the mechanisms underlying the regulations of YAP/TAZ at various levels. Here we report that non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase 14 (PTPN14) interacts with the Kibra protein. The interaction between PTPN14 and Kibra is through the PPXY domain of PTPN14 and WW domain of Kibra. PTPN14 and Kibra can induce the LATS1 activation independently and cooperatively. Interestingly, activation of LATS1 by PTPN14 is dependent on the C terminus of PTPN14 and independent of the upstream mammalian STE20-like kinase (MST) proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PTPN14 increases the LAST1 protein stability. Last, overexpression of Kibra rescues the increased cell migration and aberrant three-dimensional morphogenesis induced by knockdown of PTPN14, and this rescue is mediated through the activation of the upstream LATS1 kinase and subsequent cytoplasmic sequestration of YAP. In summary, our results indicate a potential regulatory role of PTPN14 in the Hippo pathway and demonstrate another layer of regulation in the YAP oncogenic function. PMID:25023289

  12. Clustering of LAT light curves: a clue to the origin of high-energy emission in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, L.; Vianello, G.; Omodei, N.; Ghisellini, G.; Ghirlanda, G.; Celotti, A.; Longo, F.; Desiante, R.; Barniol Duran, R.

    2014-10-01

    The physical origin of the >0.1 GeV emission detected from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi satellite has not yet been completely understood. In this work, we consider the GeV light curves of 10 GRBs with measured redshift detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). These light curves are characterized by a long-lived (≳102 seconds) emission, whose luminosity decays in time as a power law. While the decay rate is similar for all GRBs (i.e. LLAT ∝ t-1.2), the normalization spans about two orders of magnitude in luminosity. However, after re-normalizing the luminosities to the prompt energetics Eprompt the light curves overlap. We consider the scenario in which the temporally extended LAT emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated at the forward external shock. According to this model, at high energies (i.e. above the typical synchrotron frequencies) a small dispersion of the Eprompt-normalized light curves is expected. The fact that the LAT temporally extended emission follows this behaviour reinforces its interpretation in terms of afterglow radiation from external shocks. Assuming this scenario, we argue that the parameters ɛe and ηγ (i.e. the fraction of shock-dissipated energy gained by the electrons, and the efficiency of the mechanism producing the prompt radiation, respectively) must be narrowly distributed.

  13. FERMI-LAT DETECTION OF PULSED GAMMA-RAYS ABOVE 50 GeV FROM THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Gene C. K.; Takata, J.; Ng, C. W.; Cheng, K. S.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Hui, C. Y. E-mail: takata@hku.hk

    2014-12-20

    The first Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog of sources above 10 GeV reported evidence of pulsed emission above 25 GeV from 12 pulsars, including the Vela pulsar, which showed evidence of pulsation at >37 GeV energy bands. Using 62 months of Fermi-LAT data, we analyzed the gamma-ray emission from the Vela pulsar and searched for pulsed emission above 50 GeV. Having confirmed the significance of the pulsation in 30-50 GeV with the H test (p-value ∼10{sup –77}), we extracted its pulse profile using the Bayesian block algorithm and compared it with the distribution of the five observed photons above 50 GeV using the likelihood ratio test. Pulsation was significantly detected for photons above 50 GeV with a p-value of =3 × 10{sup –5} (4.2σ). The detection of pulsation is significant above 4σ at >79 GeV and above 3σ at >90 GeV energy bands, making this the highest energy pulsation significantly detected by the LAT. We explore the non-stationary outer gap scenario of the very high-energy emissions from the Vela pulsar.

  14. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/LatGRBs - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Jarred

    2015-08-23

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new "Pass8" data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between Tc and the decay index, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  15. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/Lat GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Jarred

    2015-08-21

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new “Pass 8” data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between the Tc and the decay index, which makes the anti-correlation with brightness more clear. This results appears to be consistent with the External Shock model, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  16. PAMELA and Fermi LAT signals from long-lived Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2009-10-01

    We propose a simple extension of the minimal universal extra dimension model by introducing a small curvature. The model is formulated as a small anti-de Sitter curvature limit of the five-dimensional standard model (SM) in the Randall-Sundrum background geometry. While the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) particle can be thermal relic dark matter as usual in the universal extra dimension model, the KK parity is explicitly broken in the presence of the small curvature and the KK dark matter decays into the SM fermions with a long lifetime. Couplings of the KK dark matter with SM fermion pairs in the five-dimensional bulk are controlled by fermion bulk masses. By tuning bulk masses of quarks, we can suppress KK dark matter decay into quarks. With a suitable choice of bulk masses for leptons, KK dark matter decay into leptons can account for the cosmic-ray electron/positron excesses reported by the recent PAMELA and Fermi LAT satellite experiments.

  17. Anisotropies in the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background Measured by the Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of unresolved sources to the diffuse gamma-ray background could induce anisotropies in this emission on small angular scales. We analyze the angular power spectrum of the diffuse emission measured by the Fermi LAT at Galactic latitudes absolute value of b > 30 deg in four energy bins spanning 1 to 50 GeV. At multipoles l >= 155, corresponding to angular scales approx < 2 deg, angular power above the photon noise level is detected at > 99.99% CL in the 1-2 GeV, 2- 5 GeV, and 5- 10 GeV energy bins, and at > 99% CL at 10-50 GeV. Within each energy bin the measured angular power takes approximately the same value at all multipoles l >= 155, suggesting that it originates from the contribution of one or more unclustered source populations. The amplitude of the angular power normalized to the mean intensity in each energy bin is consistent with a constant value at all energies, C(sub p) / (I)(exp 2) = 9.05 +/- 0.84 x 10(exp -6) sr, while the energy dependence of C(sub p) is consistent with the anisotropy arising from one or more source populations with power-law photon spectra with spectral index Gamma (sub s) = 2.40 +/- 0.07. We discuss the implications of the measured angular power for gamma-ray source populations that may provide a contribution to the diffuse gamma-ray background.

  18. Implications of Fermi-LAT observations on the origin of IceCube neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bin; Li, Zhuo; Zhao, Xiaohong E-mail: zhaoxh@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-01

    The IceCube (IC) collaboration recently reported the detection of TeV-PeV extraterrestrial neutrinos whose origin is yet unknown. By the photon-neutrino connection in pp and pγ interactions, we use the Fermi-LAT observations to constrain the origin of the IC detected neutrinos. We find that Galactic origins, i.e., the diffuse Galactic neutrinos due to cosmic ray (CR) propagation in the Milky Way, and the neutrinos from the Galactic point sources, may not produce the IC neutrino flux, thus these neutrinos should be of extragalactic origin. Moreover, the extragalactic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may not account for the IC neutrino flux, the jets of active galactic nuclei may not produce the IC neutrino spectrum, but the starburst galaxies (SBGs) may be promising sources. As suggested by the consistency between the IC detected neutrino flux and the Waxman-Bahcall bound, GRBs in SBGs may be the sources of both the ultrahigh energy, ∼> 10{sup 19}eV, CRs and the 1–100 PeV CRs that produce the IC detected TeV-PeV neutrinos.

  19. NRAO Teams With NASA Gamma-Ray Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is teaming with NASA's upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to allow astronomers to use both the orbiting facility and ground-based radio telescopes to maximize their scientific payoff. Under the new, streamlined process, astronomers can compete for coordinated observing time and support from both GLAST and NRAO's radio telescopes. GLAST satellite Artist's rendering of the GLAST spacecraft in orbit above the Earth. CREDIT: General Dynamics C4 Systems Click on Image for Larger File Images of NRAO Telescopes Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope Very Long Baseline Array Very Large Array Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array GLAST is scheduled for launch no earlier than December 14. It will perform a survey of the entire sky at gamma-ray wavelengths every 3 hours using its primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). NRAO operates the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico, the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The NRAO is a research facility of the National Science Foundation (NSF). "Coordinated gamma-ray and radio observations of celestial objects will greatly enhance the ability to fully understand those objects. Astronomy today requires such multiwavelength studies, and this agreement paves the way for exciting, cutting-edge research," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. GLAST will be vastly more capable than previous gamma-ray satellites, and will carry an instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor, specifically designed to detect gamma-ray bursts. GLAST observers will study objects such as active galaxies, pulsars, and supernova remnants, which are also readily studied with radio telescopes. By working together, NASA's GLAST mission and NSF's NRAO facilities can study flares from blazars over the widest possible range of energies, which is crucial to understanding how black holes, notorious for drawing matter in, can

  20. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY ON THE HIGH-ENERGY BEHAVIOR OF THE FERMI/LAT PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Marelli, Martino; Luca, Andrea De; Caraveo, Patrizia A.

    2011-06-01

    Using archival as well as freshly acquired data, we assess the X-ray behavior of the Fermi/Large Area Telescope {gamma}-ray pulsars listed in the First Fermi source catalog. After revisiting the relationships between the pulsars' rotational energy losses and their X-ray and {gamma}-ray luminosities, we focus on the distance-independent {gamma}-to-X-ray flux ratios. When plotting our F{sub {gamma}}/F{sub X} values as a function of the pulsars' rotational energy losses, one immediately sees that pulsars with similar energetics have F{sub {gamma}}/F{sub X} spanning three decades. Such spread, most probably stemming from vastly different geometrical configurations of the X-ray and {gamma}-ray emitting regions, defies any straightforward interpretation of the plot. Indeed, while energetic pulsars do have low F{sub {gamma}}/F{sub X} values, little can be said for the bulk of the Fermi neutron stars. Dividing our pulsar sample into radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples, we find that, on average, radio-quiet pulsars do have higher values of F{sub {gamma}}/F{sub X}, implying an intrinsic faintness of their X-ray emission and/or a different geometrical configuration. Moreover, despite the large spread mentioned above, statistical tests show a lower scatter in the radio-quiet data set with respect to the radio-loud one, pointing to a somewhat more constrained geometry for the radio-quiet objects with respect to the radio-loud ones.

  1. Constraints on the dark matter annihilation from Fermi-LAT observation of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengwei; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Yuan, Qiang; Xu, Yupeng

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray is a good probe of dark matter (DM) particles in the Universe. We search for the DM annihilation signals in the direction of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) using 7.5 year Fermi-LAT pass 8 data. Similar to Pshirkov et al. (2016), we find that there is residual excess emission from the direction of M31 if only the galactic disk as traced by the far infrared emission is considered. Adding a point-like source will improve the fitting effectively, although additional slight improvements can be found if an extended component such as a uniform disk or two bubbles is added instead. Taking the far infrared disk plus a point source as the background model, we search for the DM annihilation signals in the data. We find that there is strong degeneracy between the emission from the galaxy and that from 10s GeV mass DM annihilation in the main halo with quark final state. However, the required DM annihilation cross section is about 10-25-10-24 cm3s-1, orders of magnitude larger than the constraints from observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, indicating a non-DM origin of the emission. If DM subhalos are taken into account, the degeneracy is broken. When considering the enhancement from DM subhalos, the constraints on DM model parameters are comparable to (or slightly weaker than) those from the population of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We also discuss the inverse Compton scattering component from DM annihilation induced electrons/positrons. For the first time we include an energy dependent template of the inverse Compton emission (i.e., a template cube) in the data analysis to take into account the effect of diffusion of charged particles. We find a significant improvement of the constraints in the high mass range of DM particles after considering the inverse Compton emission.

  2. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Borgland, A.W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R.A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M. E-mail: elliott@slac.stanford.edu [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU Collaboration: Fermi-LAT collaboration; and others

    2012-02-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  3. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  4. Fermi-LAT Constraints on the Pulsar Wind Nebula Nature of HESS J1857+026

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, R.; Grondin, M.-H.; VanEtten, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Camilo, F.; Casandjian, J. M.; Espinoza, C. M.; Johnston, S.; Lyne, A. G.; Smith, D. A.; Stappers, B. W.; Caliandro, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Since its launch, the Fermi satellite has firmly identified 5 pulsar wind nebulae plus a large number of candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. HESS J1857+026 is a spatially extended gamma-ray source detected by H.E.S.S. and classified as a possible pulsar wind nebula candidate powered by PSR J1856+0245. Aims. We search for -ray pulsations from PSR J1856+0245 and explore the characteristics of its associated pulsar wind nebula. Methods. Using a rotational ephemeris obtained from the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory at 1.5 GHz, we phase.fold 36 months of gamma-ray data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard Fermi. We also perform a complete gamma-ray spectral and morphological analysis. Results. No pulsation was detected from PSR J1856+0245. However, significant emission is detected at a position coincident with the TeV source HESS J1857+026. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by a simple power law with a spectral index of Gamma = 1.53 +/- 0.11(sub stat) +/- 0.55(sub syst) and an energy flux of G(0.1 C100 GeV) = (2.71 +/- 0.52(sub stat) +/- 1.51(sub syst) X 10(exp -11) ergs/ sq cm/s. This implies a gamma.ray efficiency of approx 5 %, assuming a distance of 9 kpc, the gamma-ray luminosity of L(sub gamma) (sub PWN) (0.1 C100 GeV) = (2.5 +/- 0.5(sub stat) +/- 1.5(sub syst)) X 10(exp 35)(d/(9kpc))(exp 2) ergs/s and E-dot = 4.6 X 10(exp 36) erg /s, in the range expected for pulsar wind nebulae. Detailed multi-wavelength modeling provides new constraints on its pulsar wind nebula nature.

  5. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  6. X-ray Follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: A Low-mass X-ray Binary with Gamma-ray Fermi-LAT Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deMartino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9- 4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity lowmass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims. To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods. We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results. The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d2 1 kpcerg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at approximately 13 kK and a cool one at approximately 4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions. The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB

  7. Probing the gamma-ray emission from HESS J1834-087 using H.E.S.S. and Fermi LAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Previous observations with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) have revealed an extended very-high-energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) γ-ray source, HESS J1834-087, coincident with the supernova remnant (SNR) W41. The origin of the γ-ray emission was investigated in more detail with the H.E.S.S. array and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods: The γ-ray data provided by 61 h of observations with H.E.S.S., and four years with the Fermi LAT were analyzed, covering over five decades in energy from 1.8 GeV up to 30 TeV. The morphology and spectrum of the TeV and GeV sources were studied and multiwavelength data were used to investigate the origin of the γ-ray emission toward W41. Results: The TeV source can be modeled with a sum of two components: one point-like and one significantly extended (σTeV = 0.17° ± 0.01°), both centered on SNR W41 and exhibiting spectra described by a power law with index ΓTeV ≃ 2.6. The GeV source detected with Fermi LAT is extended (σGeV = 0.15° ± 0.03°) and morphologically matches the VHE emission. Its spectrum can be described by a power-law model with an index ΓGeV = 2.15 ± 0.12 and smoothly joins the spectrum of the whole TeV source. A break appears in the γ-ray spectra around 100 GeV. No pulsations were found in the GeV range. Conclusions: Two main scenarios are proposed to explain the observed emission: a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or the interaction of SNR W41 with an associated molecular cloud. X-ray observations suggest the presence of a point-like source (a pulsar candidate) near the center of the remnant and nonthermal X-ray diffuse emission that could arise from the possibly associated PWN. The PWN scenario is supported by the compatible positions of the TeV and GeV sources with the putative pulsar. However, the spectral energy distribution from radio to γ-rays is reproduced by a one-zone leptonic model only if an excess of low-energy electrons is injected

  8. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels. PMID:26505631

  9. Searching the Gamma-Ray Sky for Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Sources: /Fermi GBM and LAT Observations of LVT151012 and GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Connaughton, V.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Broida, J.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Hui, C. M.; Littenberg, T.; Shawhan, P.; Singer, L.; Veitch, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Gibby, M. H.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O. J.; Stanbro, M.; Veres, P.; Zhang, B.-B.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Gill, R.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Granot, J.; Green, D.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Malyshev, D.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the LIGO binary black hole merger event GW151226 and candidate LVT151012. At the time of the LIGO triggers on LVT151012 and GW151226, GBM was observing 68% and 83% of the localization regions, and LAT was observing 47% and 32%, respectively. No candidate electromagnetic counterparts were detected by either the GBM or LAT. We present a detailed analysis of the GBM and LAT data over a range of timescales from seconds to years, using automated pipelines and new techniques for characterizing the flux upper bounds across large areas of the sky. Due to the partial GBM and LAT coverage of the large LIGO localization regions at the trigger times for both events, differences in source distances and masses, as well as the uncertain degree to which emission from these sources could be beamed, these non-detections cannot be used to constrain the variety of theoretical models recently applied to explain the candidate GBM counterpart to GW150914.

  10. Searching for γ-ray signature in WHSP blazars. Fermi-LAT detection of 150 excess signal in the 0.3-500 GeV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsioli, B.; Chang, Y.-L.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: A direct search of γ-ray emission centered on multifrequency selected candidates is a valuable complementary approach to the standard search adopted in current γ-ray Fermi-LAT catalogs. Our sources are part of the 2WHSP sample that was assembled with the aim of providing targets for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT). A likelihood analysis based on their known position enabled us to detect 150 γ-ray excess signals that have not yet been reported in previous γ-ray catalogs (1FGL, 2FGL, 3FGL). By identifying new sources, we solve a fraction of the extragalactic isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB) composition, improving the description of the γ-ray sky. Methods: We perform data reduction with the Fermi Science Tools using positions from 400 high synchrotron peaked (HSP) blazars as seeds of tentative γ-ray sources; none of them have counterparts from previous 1FGL, 2FGL and 3FGL catalogs. Our candidates are part of the 2WHSP sample (currently the largest set of HSP blazars). We focus on HSPs characterized by bright synchrotron component with peak flux νf(ν) ≥ 10-12.1 erg/cm2/s, testing the hypothesis of having a γ-ray source in correspondence to the WHSP positions. Our likelihood analysis considers the 0.3-500 GeV energy band, integrating over 7.2 yr of Fermi-LAT observation and making use of the Pass 8 data release. Results: From the 400 candidates tested, a total of 150 2WHSPs showed excess γ-ray signature: 85 high-significance detections with test statistic (TS) > 25, and 65 lower-significance detections with TS between 10 to 25. We assume a power law spectrum in the 0.3-500 GeV band and list the spectrum parameters describing all 150 new γ-ray sources. We study the γ-ray photon spectral index distribution, the likelihood of detection according to the synchrotron peak brightness (figure of merit parameter), and plot the measured γ-ray LogN-LogS of HSP blazars, also discussing the portion of the IGRB that has been resolved by the

  11. Gamma-Ray Flaring Activity from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar PKS 1830-211 Observed by Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; et al.

    2015-01-23

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ~3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10(50) erg s(–)(1), makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  12. GAMMA-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY FROM THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830–211 OBSERVED BY Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Amin, M. A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bulmash, D. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@asdc.asi.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it E-mail: sara.buson@pd.infn.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ∼3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10{sup 50} erg s{sup –1}, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  13. Fermi-LAT Discovery of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission in the Direction of Supernova Remnant W51C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-30

    The discovery of bright gamma-ray emission coincident with supernova remnant (SNR) W51C is reported using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. W51C is a middle-aged remnant ({approx}10{sup 4} yr) with intense radio synchrotron emission in its shell and known to be interacting with a molecular cloud. The gamma-ray emission is spatially extended, broadly consistent with the radio and X-ray extent of SNR W51C. The energy spectrum in the 0.2-50 GeV band exhibits steepening toward high energies. The luminosity is greater than 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} given the distance constraint of D > 5.5 kpc, which makes this object one of the most luminous gamma-ray sources in our Galaxy. The observed gamma-rays can be explained reasonably by a combination of efficient acceleration of nuclear cosmic rays at supernova shocks and shock-cloud interactions. The decay of neutral p mesons produced in hadronic collisions provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray emission. The product of the average gas density and the total energy content of the accelerated protons amounts to {bar n}{sub H} W{sub p} {approx_equal} 5 x 10{sup 51} (D/6 kpc){sup 2} erg cm{sup -3}. Electron density constraints from the radio and X-ray bands render it difficult to explain the LAT signal as due to inverse Compton scattering. The Fermi LAT source coincident with SNR W51C sheds new light on the origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  14. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 1313-333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1313-333 (also known as TXS 1313-333, OP -322, 2EG J1314-3430 and 3FGL J1316.0-3338), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 199.033275 deg, Dec.: -33.64977 deg, (J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) and with redshift z=1.210 (Jauncey et al. 1982, AJ, 87, 763).

  15. Fermi LAT detection of an increase of gamma-ray activity of S5 1044+71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Orienti, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar S5 1044+71 (also known as 2FGL J1048.3+7144, Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 31) with radio coordinates R.A.: 162.1150829 deg, Dec: 71.7266494 deg (J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.15 (Polatidis et al.

  16. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum gamma-ray flare from FSRQ S4 1800+44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparrini, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S4 1800+44 (also known as 3FGL J1801.5+4403, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio counterpart coordinates (J2000.0), R.A. = 270.3846454 deg, Dec. = 44.0727500 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  17. Fermi LAT observation of renewed and strong GeV gamma-ray activity from blazar CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed a new phase of strong gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 3FGL J2232.5+1143) with VLBI coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 338.151704 deg, Dec.: 11.730807 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  18. Fermi LAT Detection of a GeV Flare from the Blazar 4C +01.28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Felicia; Carpen, Bryce

    2014-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with 4C +01.28 (also known as PKS 1055+018) RA=10h58m29.6052s, Dec=+01d33m58.824s (J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at z= 0.888 (Wills and Lynds 1978, ApJS, 36, 317).

  19. Fermi LAT detection of GeV flares from blazars PKS 0458-02 and B2 1144+40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Buson, Sara

    2014-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from two sources positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasars PKS 0458-02 (also known as 2FGL J0501.2-0155, Nolan et al. 2012 ApJS, 199, 31) and B2 1144+40 (also known as S4 1144+40 and 2FGL J1146.9+4000). PKS 0458-02 has the radio coordinates RA=05h01m12.8098s, Dec=-1d59m14.255s (J2000, Johnston et al.

  20. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 0514-459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0514-459 (also known as RX J0515.7-4556 and 3FGL J0515.3-4557), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 78.938767 deg, Dec.: -45.945369 deg (J2000.0, Costa & Loyola 1996, A & AS, 115, 75) and with redshift z=0.194 (Stickel, Kuehr, & Fried 1993, A & AS, 97, 483).

  1. Fermi LAT detection of increasing gamma-ray emission from the radio-loud NLSy1 PKS 1502+036

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, Filippo; Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 PKS 1502+036 (also known as 3FGL J1505.1+0326, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23), with radio coordinates (J2000.0), R.A.: 226.2769879 deg, Dec.: 3.4418922 deg (Fey et al. 2004, AJ, 127, 3587) at redshift z = 0.4078 (Hewett & Wild 2010, MNRAS, 405, 2302).

  2. Space Detectors for Gamma Rays (100 MeV-100 GeV): from Egret to Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The design of spaceborne high-energy (E is greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray detectors depends on two principal factors: (1) the basic physics of detecting and measuring the properties of the gamma rays; and (2) the constraints of operating such a detector in space for an extended period. Improvements in technology have enabled major advances in detector performance, as illustrated by two successful instruments, EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and LAT on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  3. Limits to dark matter annihilation cross-section from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    MAGIC Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We present the first joint analysis of gamma-ray data from the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) to search for gamma-ray signals from dark matter annihilation in dwarf satellite galaxies. We combine 158 hours of Segue 1 observations with MAGIC with 6-year observations of 15 dwarf satellite galaxies by the Fermi-LAT. We obtain limits on the annihilation cross-section for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV—the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis. These limits improve on previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to a factor of two at certain masses. Our new inclusive analysis approach is completely generic and can be used to perform a global, sensitivity-optimized dark matter search by combining data from present and future gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.

  4. Extending the Fermi-LAT Data Processing Pipeline to the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, S.; Arrabito, L.; Glanzman, T.; Johnson, T.; Lavalley, C.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Data Handling Pipeline (“Pipeline”) has been developed for the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) Large Area Telescope (LAT) which launched in June 2008. Since then it has been in use to completely automate the production of data quality monitoring quantities, reconstruction and routine analysis of all data received from the satellite and to deliver science products to the collaboration and the Fermi Science Support Center. Aside from the reconstruction of raw data from the satellite (Level 1), data reprocessing and various event-level analyses are also reasonably heavy loads on the pipeline and computing resources. These other loads, unlike Level 1, can run continuously for weeks or months at a time. In addition it receives heavy use in performing production Monte Carlo tasks. In daily use it receives a new data download every 3 hours and launches about 2000 jobs to process each download, typically completing the processing of the data before the next download arrives. The need for manual intervention has been reduced to less than 0.01% of submitted jobs. The Pipeline software is written almost entirely in Java and comprises several modules. The software comprises web-services that allow online monitoring and provides charts summarizing work flow aspects and performance information. The server supports communication with several batch systems such as LSF and BQS and recently also Sun Grid Engine and Condor. This is accomplished through dedicated job control services that for Fermi are running at SLAC and the other computing site involved in this large scale framework, the Lyon computing center of IN2P3. While being different in the logic of a task, we evaluate a separate interface to the Dirac system in order to communicate with EGI sites to utilize Grid resources, using dedicated Grid optimized systems rather than developing our own. More recently the Pipeline and its associated data catalog have been generalized for use by other experiments, and are

  5. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) protects cells against cold-shock-induced apoptosis by maintaining phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT)

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Dale; Hsiang, Chinhui; Jiang, Xianzhi; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) blocks apoptosis and inhibits caspase-3 activation. We previously showed that serum starvation (removal of serum from tissue culture media), which takes several days to induce apoptosis, results in decreased levels of both AKT (protein kinase B) and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) in cells not expressing LAT. In contrast in mouse neuroblastoma cells expressing LAT, AKT, and pAKT levels remained high. AKT is a serine/threonine protein kinase that promotes cell survival. To examine the effect of LAT on AKT-pAKT using a different and more rapid method of inducing apoptosis, a stable cell line expressing LAT was compared to non-LAT expressing cells as soon as 15 min following recovery from cold-shock-induced apoptosis. Expression of LAT appeared to inhibit dephosphorylation of pAKT. This protection correlated with blocking numerous pro-apoptotic events that are inhibited by pAKT. These results support the hypothesis that inhibiting dephosphorylation of pAKT may be one of the pathways by which LAT protects cells against apoptosis. PMID:26071090

  6. Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS detection of increasing gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Magill, J. D.; Dorner, D.; Biland, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mukherjee, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS collaborations report the detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the very-high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (a.k.a 3FGL J2000.0+6509, in the 3rd LAT source catalog, 3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  7. First Fermi LAT detection of a strong GeV gamma-ray flare from blazar PKS 0403-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0403-13 (also known as TXS 0403-132, OF -105, RX J0405.5-1308, and 3FGL J0405.5-1307), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 61.391680 deg, Dec.: -13.137136 deg (J2000.0, Fey et al. 2004, AJ, 127, 3587) and with redshift z=0.5706+/-0.0001 (Marziani et al. 1996, ApJS, 104, 37). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 July 11, PKS 0403-13 was in a high state with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) of (1.6+/-0.3) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only), about 140 times greater than its four-year average flux reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). The corresponding daily averaged spectral photon index (E > 100 MeV) of 2.3+/-0.2 (statistical uncertainty only) is compatible with the 3FGL catalog value of 2.35+/-0.11.

  8. Search for Gamma-Ray Emission from AE Aquarii with Seven Years of Fermi-LAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Torres, Diego F.; Rea, Nanda; de Oña Wilhelmi, Emma; Papitto, Alessandro; Hou, Xian; Mauche, Christopher W.

    2016-11-01

    AE Aquarii (AE Aqr) is a cataclysmic binary hosting one of the fastest rotating ({P}{spin} = 33.08 s) white dwarfs (WDs) known. Based on seven years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data, we report on a deep search for gamma-ray emission from AE Aqr. Using X-ray observations from ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Swift, Suzaku, and NuSTAR, spanning 20 years, we substantially extend and improve the spin ephemeris of AE Aqr. Using this ephemeris, we searched for gamma-ray pulsations at the spin period of the WD. No gamma-ray pulsations were detected above 3σ significance. Neither phase-averaged gamma-ray emission nor gamma-ray variability of AE Aqr is detected by Fermi LAT. We impose the most restrictive upper limit to the gamma-ray flux from AE Aqr to date: 1.3× {10}-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 100 MeV-300 GeV energy range, providing constraints on models.

  9. Fermi-LAT Detection of Gravitational Lens Delayed Gamma-Ray Flares from Blazar B0218+357

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Larsson, S.; Scargle, J. D.; Amin, M. A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bulmash, D.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Corbet, R. D. H.; Falco, E. E.; Marshall, P. J.; Wood, D. L.; Ajello, M.; Bastieri, D.; Chekhtman, A.; D'Ammando, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grove, J. E.; Lott, B.; Ohja, R.; Orienti, M.; Perkins, J. S.; Razzano, M.; Smith, A. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), we report the first clear gamma-ray measurement of a delay between flares from the gravitationally lensed images of a blazar. The delay was detected in B0218+357, a known double-image lensed system, during a period of enhanced gamma-ray activity with peak fluxes consistently observed to reach greater than 20-50 times its previous average flux. An auto-correlation function analysis identified a delay in the gamma-ray data of 11.46 plus or minus 0.16 days (1 sigma) that is approximately 1 day greater than previous radio measurements. Considering that it is beyond the capabilities of the LAT to spatially resolve the two images, we nevertheless decomposed individual sequences of superposing gamma-ray flares/delayed emissions. In three such approximately 8-10 day-long sequences within an approximately 4-month span, considering confusion due to overlapping flaring emission and flux measurement uncertainties, we found flux ratios consistent with approximately 1, thus systematically smaller than those from radio observations. During the first, best-defined flare, the delayed emission was detailed with a Fermi pointing, and we observed flux doubling timescales of approximately 3-6 hours implying as well extremely compact gamma-ray emitting regions.

  10. Fermi-LAT γ-ray anisotropy and intensity explained by unresolved radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Mattia; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M.

    2014-11-01

    Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are expected to contribute substantially to both the intensity and anisotropy of the isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB). In turn, the measured properties of the IGRB can be used to constrain the characteristics of proposed contributing source classes. We consider individual subclasses of radio-loud AGN, including low-, intermediate-, and high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and misaligned AGN. Using updated models of the γ-ray luminosity functions of these populations, we evaluate the energy-dependent contribution of each source class to the intensity and anisotropy of the IGRB. We find that collectively radio-loud AGN can account for the entirety of the IGRB intensity and anisotropy as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Misaligned AGN provide the bulk of the measured intensity but a negligible contribution to the anisotropy, while high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects provide the dominant contribution to the anisotropy. In anticipation of upcoming measurements with the Fermi-LAT and the forthcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, we predict the anisotropy in the broader energy range that will be accessible to future observations.

  11. Fermi LAT detection of an increase in gamma-ray activity of the FSRQ S5 1044+71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Carpen, Bryce

    2017-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar S5 1044+71 (also known as 3FGL J1048.4+7144, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A: 10h48m27.6199s, Dec: +71d43m35.938s (J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) and redshift z=1.15 (Polatidis et al. 1995, ApJS, 98, 1). Preliminary results indicate that S5 1044+71 showed a marked increase in activity on 2016 December 29, with a daily flux (E > 100 MeV) of (1.1+/-0.2) x10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (errors are statistical only) which is a factor of about 16 greater than the average flux reported in the third Fermi LAT catalog (3FGL).

  12. Observations and Interpretation of Behind the Limb Solar Flares Detected by Fermi-LAT and Other Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe; Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the most sensitive instrument ever deployed in space for observing > 30 MeV gamma-rays. During the past active period of the Sun the LAT has detected more than 40 flares up to GeV energies some of which occur behind the limb as determined by STEREO observations. We will present the observations on two such flares with significant flux of > 100 MeV (and some indication of 1 to 10 MeV detected by Fermi-GBM) gamma-rays coming from the visible disk while the flare and associated CMEs are initiated in active regions tens of degrees behind the visible limb of the Sun. We will consider acceleration of particles, their transport and radiative signatures, and the transfer of these radiation in the solar atmosphere to distinguish between (i) acceleration in the low corona, in a high corona trap, and/or in the CME driven shock; (ii) between continuous and prompt acceleration; and (iii) between electron bremsstrahlung and decay of pions produced by accelerated ions.

  13. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 2023-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2023-07 (also known as NRAO 629, TXS 2022-077, 3EG J2025-0744, 1AGLR J2027-0747 and 3FGL J2025.6-0736), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 306.419418 deg, Dec.: -7.597969 deg (J2000.0, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) and with redshift z=1.388 (Drinkwater et al. 1997, MNRAS, 284, 85). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 April 9, PKS 2023-07 was in a high state with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) of (2.0+/-0.3) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only), about 16 times greater than its four-year average flux reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). The corresponding daily averaged spectral photon index (E > 100 MeV) of 2.4+/-0.2 (statistical uncertainty only) is compatible with the 3FGL catalog value of 2.18+/-0.03.

  14. A Statistical Approach to Recognizing Source Classes for Unassociated Sources in the First FERMI-LAT Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Celik, O.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A.K.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) First Source Catalog (1FGL) provided spatial, spectral, and temporal properties for a large number of gamma -ray sources using a uniform analysis method. After correlating with the mostcomplete catalogs of source types known to emit gamma rays, 630 of these sources are "unassociated" (i.e., have no obvious counterparts at other wavelengths). Here, we employ two statistical analyses of the primary gamma-ray characteristics for these unassociated sources in an effort to correlate their gamma-ray properties with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and pulsar populations in 1FGL. Based on the correlation results, we classify 221 AGN-like and 134 pulsar-like sources in the 1FGL unassociated sources. The results of these source "classifications" appear to match the expected source distributions, especially at high Galactic latitudes. While useful for planning future multiwavelength follow-up observations, these analyses use limited inputs, and their predictions should not be considered equivalent to "probable source classes" for these sources. We discuss multiwavelength results and catalog cross-correlations to date, and provide new source associations for 229 Fermi-LAT sources that had no association listed in the 1FGL catalog. By validating the source classifications against these new associations, we find that the new association matches the predicted source class in approximately 80% of the sources.

  15. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M.; Bruel, P.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Granot, J.; Longo, F.; Razzaque, S.; Zimmer, S. E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  16. Fermi/LAT Observations of Swift/BAT Seyfert Galaxies: On the Contribution of Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei to the Extragalactic gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Davis, David S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of 2.1 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data on 491 Seyfert galaxies detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey. Only the two nearest objects, NGC 1068 and NGC 4945, which were identified in the Fermi first year catalog, are detected. Using Swift/BAT and radio 20 cm fluxes, we define a new radio-loudness parameter R(sub X,BAT) where radio-loud objects have logR(sub X,BAT) > -4.7. Based on this parameter, only radio-loud sources are detected by Fermi/LAT. An upper limit to the flux of the undetected sources is derived to be approx.2x10(exp -11) photons/sq cm/s, approximately seven times lower than the observed flux of NGC 1068. Assuming a median redshift of 0.031, this implies an upper limit to the gamma-ray (1-100 GeV) luminosity of < approx.3x10(exp 41) erg/s. In addition, we identified 120 new Fermi/LAT sources near the Swift/BAT Seyfert galaxies with significant Fermi/LAT detections. A majority of these objects do not have Swift/BAT counterparts, but their possible optical counterparts include blazars, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and quasars.

  17. Fermi-LAT detection of ongoing gamma-ray activity from the new gamma-ray source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Ajello, M.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    During the week between February 8 and 15, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a new transient source, Fermi J1654-1055.

  18. MASTER-SAAO follow-up to Fermi-LAT detection of FSRQ PKS B1035-281 activity. And OTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Shurpakov, S.; Balanutsa, P.; Gress, O.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vladimirov, V.; Kornilov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Popova, E.; Kuvshinov, D.; Kniazev, A.; Potter, S. B.; Kotze, M.; Rebolo, R.; Ricart, M. Serra; Israelian, G.; Lodieu, N.

    2016-02-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system (Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 349171 ) detected the brightening of the FSRQ PKS B1035-281 (RA=10 37 42.457 -28 23 04.11) during inspection of Fermi-LAT Detection of its unusual hard spectrum (Carpenter et al., ATEL #8740).

  19. Constraining Gamma-Ray Emission from Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Fermi-LAT; Tentative Detection of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-05-01

    Star-forming galaxies produce gamma-rays primarily via pion production, resulting from inelastic collisions between cosmic-ray protons and the interstellar medium (ISM). The dense ISM and high star formation rates of luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) imply that they should be strong gamma-ray emitters, but so far only two LIRGs have been detected. Theoretical models for their emission depend on the unknown fraction of cosmic-ray protons that escape these galaxies before interacting. We analyze Fermi-LAT data for 82 of the brightest Infrared Astronomical Satellite LIRGs and ULIRGs. We examine each system individually and carry out a stacking analysis to constrain their gamma-ray fluxes. We report the detection of the nearest ULIRG Arp 220 (˜4.6σ). We observe a gamma-ray flux (0.8-100 GeV) of 2.4 × 10-10 phot cm-2 s-1 with a photon index of 2.23 (8.2 × 1041 erg s-1 at 77 Mpc). We also derive upper limits (ULs) for the stacked LIRGs and ULIRGs. The gamma-ray luminosity of Arp 220 and the stacked ULs agree with calorimetric predictions for dense star-forming galaxies. With the detection of Arp 220, we extend the gamma-ray-IR luminosity correlation to the high-luminosity regime with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.25× {log}{L}8-1000μ {{m}}+26.7 as well as the gamma-ray-radio continuum luminosity correlation with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.22× {log}{L}1.4{GHz}+13.3. The current survey of Fermi-LAT is on the verge of detecting more LIRGs/ULIRGs in the local universe, and we expect even more detections with deeper Fermi-LAT observations or the next generation of gamma-ray detectors.

  20. Tomography of the Fermi-LAT γ-Ray Diffuse Extragalactic Signal via Cross Correlations with Galaxy Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Cuoco, Alessandro; Branchini, Enzo; Viel, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    Building on our previous cross-correlation analysis (Xia et al. 2011) between the isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB) and different tracers of the large-scale structure of the universe, we update our results using 60 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We perform a cross-correlation analysis both in configuration and spherical harmonics space between the IGRB and objects that may trace the astrophysical sources of the IGRB: QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6, the SDSS DR8 Main Galaxy Sample, luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the SDSS catalog, infrared-selected galaxies in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and radio galaxies in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). The benefit of correlating the Fermi-LAT signal with catalogs of objects at various redshifts is to provide tomographic information on the IGRB, which is crucial in separating the various contributions and clarifying its origin. The main result is that, unlike in our previous analysis, we now observe a significant (>3.5σ) cross-correlation signal on angular scales smaller than 1° in the NVSS, 2MASS, and QSO cases and, at lower statistical significance (∼3.0σ), with SDSS galaxies. The signal is stronger in two energy bands, E > 0.5 GeV and E > 1 GeV, but it is also seen at E > 10 GeV. No cross-correlation signal is detected between Fermi data and the LRGs. These results are robust against the choice of the statistical estimator, estimate of errors, map cleaning procedure, and instrumental effects. Finally, we test the hypothesis that the IGRB observed by Fermi-LAT originates from the summed contributions of three types of unresolved extragalactic sources: BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs), flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We find that a model in which the IGRB is mainly produced by SFGs (72-37+23% with 2σ errors), with BL Lacs and FSRQs giving a minor contribution, provides a good fit to

  1. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Cohen, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The YAP and TAZ transcriptional coactivators promote oncogenic transformation. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in human tumors. YAP and TAZ are negatively regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The activity and stability of several Hippo pathway components, including YAP/TAZ, is regulated by ubiquitin mediated protein turnover and several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in human cancer. However, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these ubiquitin ligases in regulation of the Hippo pathway. Here we identify the DUB3 family deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor by limiting YAP activity.

  2. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The YAP and TAZ transcriptional coactivators promote oncogenic transformation. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in human tumors. YAP and TAZ are negatively regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The activity and stability of several Hippo pathway components, including YAP/TAZ, is regulated by ubiquitin mediated protein turnover and several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in human cancer. However, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these ubiquitin ligases in regulation of the Hippo pathway. Here we identify the DUB3 family deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor by limiting YAP activity. PMID:28061504

  3. The spectral energy distribution of the core of Cen A with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, Jeff; Prokhorov, Dmitry; Becherini, Yvonne; Buson, Sara; Gasparini, Dario; Perkins, Jeremy; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Cen A, the nearest radio galaxy, was detected as a faint emitter of very high energy (VHE) gamma rays by the H.E.S.S. telescopes in Namibia. The flux derived from the H.E.S.S. data is much higher than that expected from a single zone synchrotron self-Compton model, which adequately describes the emission from Cen A at lower frequencies. New observations with H.E.S.S. were performed to clarify the spectral characteristics of the VHE emission from Cen A. We report the results of the analysis of the complete H.E.S.S. dataset with twice the live time of the previously published spectrum and an update of the Cen A spectrum obtained with Fermi-LAT at GeV energies.

  4. FERMI LAT DISCOVERY OF EXTENDED GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS IN THE VICINITY OF THE HB 3 SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, H.; Yoshida, K.; Ballet, J.; Hewitt, J. W.; Kubo, H. E-mail: 13nm169s@gmail.com

    2016-02-20

    We report the discovery of extended gamma-ray emission measured by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) HB 3 (G132.7+1.3) and the W3 II complex adjacent to the southeast of the remnant. W3 is spatially associated with bright {sup 12}CO (J = 1–0) emission. The gamma-ray emission is spatially correlated with this gas and the SNR. We discuss the possibility that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon–nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray emission. The emission from W3 is consistent with irradiation of the CO clouds by the cosmic rays accelerated in HB 3.

  5. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew; ComPair Team

    2016-03-01

    The keV-MeV gamma-ray energy range has remained largely unexplored over the last decade despite offering an exciting window into many astrophysical questions. This energy range is particularly challenging because it is firmly in the Compton-dominated regime where the interaction cross section is minimized. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with good energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than previous instruments. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will use well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators. on behalf of the ComPair Team.

  6. A hydrodynamical model for the Fermi-LAT γ-ray light curve of blazar PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J. I.; Coronado, Y.; Benítez, E.; Mendoza, S.; Hiriart, D.; Sorcia, M.

    2013-12-01

    A physical description of the formation and propagation of working surfaces inside the relativistic jet of the blazar PKS 1510-089 are used to model its γ -ray variability light curve using Fermi-LAT data from 2008 to 2012. The physical model is based on conservation laws of mass and momentum at the working surface as explained by Mendoza et al. (2009). The hydrodynamical description of a working surface is parametrized by the initial velocity and mass injection rate at the base of the jet. We show that periodic variations on the injected velocity profiles are able to account for the observed luminosity, fixing model parameters such as mass ejection rates of the central engine injected at the base of the jet, oscillation frequencies of the flow and maximum Lorentz factors of the bulk flow during a particular burst.

  7. Constraints on WIMP annihilation for contracted dark matter in the inner Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Peiró, Miguel; Cerdeño, David G.; Muñoz, Carlos; Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Prada, Francisco; Morselli, Aldo; Klypin, Anatoly; Mambrini, Yann E-mail: masc@stanford.edu E-mail: miguel.peiro@uam.es E-mail: aldo.morselli@roma2.infn.it E-mail: davidg.cerdeno@uam.es E-mail: carlos.munnoz@uam.es

    2013-10-01

    We derive constraints on parameters of generic dark matter candidates by comparing theoretical predictions with the gamma-ray emission observed by the Fermi-LAT from the region around the Galactic Center. Our analysis is conservative since it simply requires that the expected dark matter signal does not exceed the observed emission. The constraints obtained in the likely case that the collapse of baryons to the Galactic Center is accompanied by the contraction of the dark matter are strong. In particular, we find that for b b-bar and τ{sup +}τ{sup −} or W{sup +}W{sup −} dark matter annihilation channels, the upper limits on the annihilation cross section imply that the thermal cross section is excluded for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) mass smaller than about 700 and 500 GeV, respectively. For the μ{sup +}μ{sup −} channel, where the effect of the inverse Compton scattering is important, depending on models of the Galactic magnetic field the exclusion of the thermal cross-section is for a WIMP mass smaller than about 150 to 400 GeV. The upper limits on the annihilation cross section of dark matter particles obtained are two orders of magnitude stronger than without contraction. In the latter case our results are compatible with the upper limits from the Galactic halo analysis reported by the Fermi-LAT collaboration for the case in which the same conservative approach without modeling of the astrophysical background is employed.

  8. Discovery of Nine Gamma-Ray Pulsars in Fermi-Lat Data Using a New Blind Search Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celik-Tinmaz, Ozlem; Ferrara, E. C.; Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Barr, E. D.; Champion, D. J.; Eatough, R. P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Reich, W.; Lyne, A. G.; Ray, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient, and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the search parameter space (frequency, frequency derivative and sky location) and the use of photon probability weights. The nine pulsars have spin frequencies between 3 and 12 Hz, and characteristic ages ranging from 17 kyr to 3 Myr. Two of them, PSRs Jl803-2149 and J2111+4606, are young and energetic Galactic-plane pulsars (spin-down power above 6 x 10(exp 35) ergs per second and ages below 100 kyr). The seven remaining pulsars, PSRs J0106+4855, J010622+3749, Jl620-4927, Jl746-3239, J2028+3332,J2030+4415, J2139+4716, are older and less energetic; two of them are located at higher Galactic latitudes (|b| greater than 10 degrees). PSR J0106+4855 has the largest characteristic age (3 Myr) and the smallest surface magnetic field (2x 10(exp 11)G) of all LAT blind-search pulsars. PSR J2139+4716 has the lowest spin-down power (3 x l0(exp 33) erg per second) among all non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars ever found. Despite extensive multi-frequency observations, only PSR J0106+4855 has detectable pulsations in the radio band. The other eight pulsars belong to the increasing population of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

  9. Probing gamma-ray emissions of Fermi-LAT pulsars with a non-stationary outer gap model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, J.; Ng, C. W.; Cheng, K. S.

    2016-02-01

    We explore a non-stationary outer gap scenario for gamma-ray emission process in pulsar magnetosphere. Electrons/positrons that migrate along the magnetic field line and enter the outer gap from the outer/inner boundaries activate the pair-creation cascade and high-energy emission process. In our model, the rate of the particle injection at the gap boundaries is key physical quantity to control the gap structure and properties of the gamma-ray spectrum. Our model assumes that the injection rate is time variable and the observed gamma-ray spectrum are superposition of the emissions from different gap structures with different injection rates at the gap boundaries. The calculated spectrum superposed by assuming power law distribution of the particle injection rate can reproduce sub-exponential cut-off feature in the gamma-ray spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT. We fit the phase-averaged spectra for 43 young/middle-age pulsars and 14 millisecond pulsars with the model. Our results imply that (1) a larger particle injection at the gap boundaries is more frequent for the pulsar with a larger spin-down power and (2) outer gap with an injection rate much smaller than the Goldreich-Julian value produces observed >10 GeV emissions. Fermi-LAT gamma-ray pulsars show that (i) the observed gamma-ray spectrum below cut-off energy tends to be softer for the pulsar with a higher spin-down rate and (ii) the second peak is more prominent in higher energy bands. Based on the results of the fitting, we describe possible theoretical interpretations for these observational properties. We also briefly discuss Crab-like millisecond pulsars that show phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray pulses.

  10. Dark matter constraints from the Fermi/LAT Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background and the role of halo substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel Angel

    2012-05-01

    After almost four years of operation, Fermi/LAT has measured the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background (EGB) with unprecedented sensitivity, furthermore extending, for the first time, the EGB spectrum down to 100 MeV and up to several hundred GeV. Although a large variety of extragalactic objects are expected to contribute to the EGB, according to recent estimates the sum of their different contributions is not enough to explain the measured EGB. Gamma-rays from annihilation products of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) particles may account for this missing emission. In this talk, I will discuss on the parameter space allowed for DM annihilation in the most recent EGB spectrum by Fermi/LAT. At present, the key ingredient in the determination of the expected contribution of DM annihilation to the EGB is the so-called substructure boost factor, thus special attention will be given to this parameter. Substructure boosts are related to the amount of DM subhalos hosted by larger DM halos. Up to now, attempts to precisely calculate it both analytically and/or making use of N-body cosmological simulations have failed due to the difficulty of examining in detail the properties of the smallest DM halos. Indeed, the DM contribution to the EGB can vary over several orders of magnitude depending on the assumed DM substructure model. Here, I will present a DM substructure model which is based on our current knowledge of DM halo formation and evolution in the framework of the state-of-the-art ΛCDM cosmological model. This model makes possible to confidently calculate substructure boosts for halos of different masses. After applying it, the uncertainty bands that bracket the contribution of DM annihilation to the EGB will become not only substantially narrower but also better physically motivated. The use of such a more sophisticated DM substructure model makes possible to assess other crucial EGB aspects as well.

  11. Variation in host specificity and gene content in strains from genetically isolated lineages of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus s. lat.

    PubMed

    Hedh, Jenny; Johansson, Tomas; Tunlid, Anders

    2009-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are known to vary in host range. Some fungi can enter into symbiosis with multiple plant species, while others have restricted host ranges. The aim of this study was to examine variation in host specificity among strains from the basidiomycete Paxillus involutus s. lat. Recent studies have shown that this fungus consists of at least four genetically isolated lineages, phylogenetic species (PS) I (which corresponds to the morphological species Paxillus obscurosporus), PS II (P. involutus s. str.), PS III (Paxillus validus), and PS IV (not yet supported by any reference material). Thirty-five Paxillus strains of PS I to IV were examined in microcosms for their capacity to infect birch (Betula pendula) and spruce (Picea abies). Seventeen strains were compatible and formed mycorrhizae with both tree species. Seven strains were incompatible with both birch and spruce. The gene content in three pairs of incompatible and compatible strains PS I, II, and III were compared using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations. Of 4,113 P. involutus gene representatives analyzed, 390 varied in copy numbers in at least one of the three pairwise comparisons. Only three reporters showed significant changes in all three pairwise comparisons, and none of these were changed in a similar way in three comparisons. Our data indicate that changes in host range have occurred frequently and independently among strains in P. obscurosporus, P. involutus s. str., and P. validus. No evidence was obtained demonstrating that these changes have been associated with the gain or loss of similar genes in these three species.

  12. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TeV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  13. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TcV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a Galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  14. Planck Lensing and Cosmic Infrared Background Cross-correlation with Fermi-LAT: Tracing Dark Matter Signals in the Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chang; Cooray, Asantha; Keating, Brian

    2017-02-01

    The extragalactic γ-ray background and its spatial anisotropy could potentially contain a signature of dark matter (DM) annihilation or particle decay. Astrophysical foregrounds, such as blazars and star-forming galaxies (SFGs), however, dominate the γ-ray background, precluding an easy detection of the signal associated with the DM annihilation or decay in the background intensity spectrum. The DM imprint on the γ-ray background is expected to be correlated with large-scale structure tracers. In some cases, such a cross-correlation is even expected to have a higher signal-to-noise ratio than the auto-correlation. One reliable tracer of the DM distribution in the large-scale structure is lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) is a reliable tracer of SFGs. We analyze Fermi-LAT data taken over 92 months and study the cross-correlation with Planck CMB lensing, Planck CIB, and Fermi-γ maps. We put upper limits on the DM annihilation cross-section from the cross-power spectra with the γ-ray background anisotropies. The unbiased power spectrum estimation is validated with simulations that include cross-correlated signals. We also provide a set of systematic tests and show that no significant contaminations are found for the measurements presented here. Using γ-ray background map from data gathered over 92 months, we find the best constraint on the DM annihilation with a 1σ confidence level upper limit of 10‑25–10‑24 cm3 s‑1, when the mass of DM particles is between 20 and 100 GeV.

  15. Characterizing the γ-ray long-term variability of PKS 2155-304 with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.

    2017-01-01

    Studying the temporal variability of BL Lac objects at the highest energies provides unique insights into the extreme physical processes occurring in relativistic jets and in the vicinity of super-massive black holes. To this end, the long-term variability of the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 is analyzed in the high (HE, 100 MeV < E < 300 GeV) and very high energy (VHE, E > 200 GeV) γ-ray domain. Over the course of 9 yr of H.E.S.S. observations the VHE light curve in the quiescent state is consistent with a log-normal behavior. The VHE variability in this state is well described by flicker noise (power-spectral-density index ) on timescales larger than one day. An analysis of 5.5 yr of HE Fermi-LAT data gives consistent results (, on timescales larger than 10 days) compatible with the VHE findings. The HE and VHE power spectral densities show a scale invariance across the probed time ranges. A direct linear correlation between the VHE and HE fluxes could neither be excluded nor firmly established. These long-term-variability properties are discussed and compared to the red noise behavior (β 2) seen on shorter timescales during VHE-flaring states. The difference in power spectral noise behavior at VHE energies during quiescent and flaring states provides evidence that these states are influenced by different physical processes, while the compatibility of the HE and VHE long-term results is suggestive of a common physical link as it might be introduced by an underlying jet-disk connection.

  16. Observation and Simulations of the Backsplash Effects in High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Containing a Massive Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.; Ormes, Jonathan F.; Hartman, Robert C.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Mitchell, John W.; Thompson, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Beam test and simulation results are presented for a study of the backsplash effects produced in a high-energy gamma-ray detector containing a massive calorimeter. An empirical formula is developed to estimate the probability (per unit area) of backsplash for different calorimeter materials and thicknesses, different incident particle energies, and at different distances from the calorimeter. The results obtained are applied to the design of Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST).

  17. Quantitative proteomics analysis of signalosome dynamics in primary T cells identifies the surface receptor CD6 as a Lat adaptor-independent TCR signaling hub.

    PubMed

    Roncagalli, Romain; Hauri, Simon; Fiore, Fréderic; Liang, Yinming; Chen, Zhi; Sansoni, Amandine; Kanduri, Kartiek; Joly, Rachel; Malzac, Aurélie; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Malissen, Marie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias; Malissen, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of T cells requires the interaction of dozens of proteins. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry and activated primary CD4(+) T cells from mice in which a tag for affinity purification was knocked into several genes to determine the composition and dynamics of multiprotein complexes that formed around the kinase Zap70 and the adaptors Lat and SLP-76. Most of the 112 high-confidence time-resolved protein interactions we observed were previously unknown. The surface receptor CD6 was able to initiate its own signaling pathway by recruiting SLP-76 and the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor Vav1 regardless of the presence of Lat. Our findings provide a more complete model of TCR signaling in which CD6 constitutes a signaling hub that contributes to the diversification of TCR signaling.

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis of signalosome dynamics in primary T cells identifies the CD6 surface receptor as a Lat-independent TCR signaling hub

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Fréderic; Liang, Yinming; Chen, Zhi; Sansoni, Amandine; Kanduri, Kartiek; Joly, Rachel; Malzac, Aurélie; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Malissen, Marie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias; Malissen, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated T cell activation requires the interaction of dozens of proteins. We used quantitative mass spectrometry and activated primary CD4+ T cells from mice in which a tag for affinity purification was knocked into several genes to determine the composition and dynamics of multiprotein complexes forming around the kinase Zap70 and the adaptors Lat and SLP-76. Most of the 112 high confidence time-resolved protein interactions we observed were novel. The CD6 surface receptor was found capable of initiating its own signaling pathway by recruiting SLP-76 and Vav1, irrespective of the presence of Lat. Our findings provide a more complete model of TCR signaling in which CD6 constitutes a signaling hub contributing to TCR signal diversification. PMID:24584089

  19. HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO PROPERTIES OF SOURCES IN THE FERMI-LAT 1 YEAR POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Murphy, Tara; Ekers, Ronald D.; Edwards, Philip G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2010-08-01

    The high-frequency radio sky, like the gamma-ray sky surveyed by the Fermi satellite, is dominated by flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects at bright flux levels. To investigate the relationship between radio and gamma-ray emission in extragalactic sources, we have cross-matched the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey catalog (AT20G) with the Fermi-LAT 1 year Point Source Catalog (1FGL). The 6.0 sr of sky covered by both catalogs ({delta} < 0{sup 0}, |b|>1.{sup 0}5) contains 5890 AT20G radio sources and 604 1FGL gamma-ray sources. The AT20G source positions are accurate to within {approx}1 arcsec and, after excluding known Galactic sources, 43% of Fermi 1FGL sources have an AT20G source within the 95% Fermi confidence ellipse. Monte Carlo tests imply that at least 95% of these matches are genuine associations. Only five gamma-ray sources (1% of the Fermi catalog) have more than one AT20G counterpart in the Fermi error box. The AT20G matches also generally support the active galactic nucleus (AGN) associations in the First LAT AGN Catalog. We find a trend of increasing gamma-ray flux density with 20 GHz radio flux density. The Fermi detection rate of AT20G sources is close to 100% for the brightest 20 GHz sources, decreasing to 20% at 1 Jy, and to roughly 1% at 100 mJy. Eight of the matched AT20G sources have no association listed in 1FGL and are presented here as potential gamma-ray AGNs for the first time. We also identify an alternative AGN counterpart to one 1FGL source. The percentage of Fermi sources with AT20G detections decreases toward the Galactic plane, suggesting that the 1FGL catalog contains at least 50 Galactic gamma-ray sources in the southern hemisphere that are yet to be identified.

  20. Implications of the Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements on annihilating or decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hütsi, Gert; Hektor, Andi; Raidal, Martti E-mail: andi.hektor@cern.ch

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the recently published Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements in the context of leptonically annihilating or decaying dark matter (DM) with the aim to explain simultaneously the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and the PAMELA, Fermi and HESS (PFH) anomalous e{sup ±} data. Five different DM annihilation/decay channels 2e, 2μ, 2τ, 4e, or 4μ (the latter two via an intermediate light particle φ) are generated with PYTHIA. We calculate both the Galactic and extragalactic prompt and inverse Compton (IC) contributions to the resulting gamma-ray spectra. To find the Galactic IC spectra we use the interstellar radiation field model from the latest release of GALPROP. For the extragalactic signal we show that the amplitude of the prompt gamma-emission is very sensitive to the assumed model for the extragalactic background light. For our Galaxy we use the Einasto, NFW and cored isothermal DM density profiles and include the effects of DM substructure assuming a simple subhalo model. Our calculations show that for the annihilating DM the extragalactic gamma-ray signal can dominate only if rather extreme power-law concentration-mass relation C(M) is used, while more realistic C(M) relations make the extragalactic component comparable or subdominant to the Galactic signal. For the decaying DM the Galactic signal always exceeds the extragalactic one. In the case of annihilating DM the PFH favored parameters can be ruled out by gamma-ray constraints only if power-law C(M) relation is assumed. For DM decaying into 2μ or 4μ the PFH favored DM parameters are not in conflict with the gamma-ray data. We find that, due to the (almost) featureless Galactic IC spectrum and the DM halo substructure, annihilating DM may give a good simultaneous fit to the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and to the PFH e{sup ±} data without being in clear conflict with the other Fermi-LAT gamma-ray measurements.

  1. Fermi/LAT observations of dwarf galaxies highly constrain a dark matter interpretation of excess positrons seen in AMS-02, HEAT, and PAMELA

    SciTech Connect

    López, Alejandro; Savage, Christopher; Spolyar, Douglas; Adams, Douglas Q. E-mail: chris@savage.name E-mail: doug.q.adams@gmail.com

    2016-03-01

    It is shown that a Weakly Interacting Massive dark matter Particle (WIMP) interpretation for the positron excess observed in a variety of experiments, HEAT, PAMELA, and AMS-02, is highly constrained by the Fermi/LAT observations of dwarf galaxies. In particular, this paper examines the annihilation channels that best fit the current AMS-02 data (Boudaud et al., 2014), specifically focusing on channels and parameter space not previously explored by the Fermi/LAT collaboration. The Fermi satellite has surveyed the γ-ray sky, and its observations of dwarf satellites are used to place strong bounds on the annihilation of WIMPs into a variety of channels. For the single channel case, we find that dark matter annihilation into (b b-bar ,e{sup +}e{sup -}, μ{sup +}μ{sup -}, τ{sup +}τ{sup -},4-e or 4-τ ) is ruled out as an explanation of the AMS positron excess (here b quarks are a proxy for all quarks, gauge and Higgs bosons). In addition, we find that the Fermi/LAT 2σ upper limits, assuming the best-fit AMS-02 branching ratios, exclude multichannel combinations into b b-bar and leptons. The tension between the results might relax if the branching ratios are allowed to deviate from their best-fit values, though a substantial change would be required. Of all the channels we considered, the only viable channel that survives the Fermi/LAT constraint and produces a good fit to the AMS-02 data is annihilation (via a mediator) to 4-μ, or mainly to 4-μ in the case of multichannel combinations.

  2. Fermi/LAT observations of dwarf galaxies highly constrain a dark matter interpretation of excess positrons seen in AMS-02, HEAT, and PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Alejandro; Savage, Christopher; Spolyar, Douglas; Adams, Douglas Q.

    2016-03-01

    It is shown that a Weakly Interacting Massive dark matter Particle (WIMP) interpretation for the positron excess observed in a variety of experiments, HEAT, PAMELA, and AMS-02, is highly constrained by the Fermi/LAT observations of dwarf galaxies. In particular, this paper examines the annihilation channels that best fit the current AMS-02 data (Boudaud et al., 2014), specifically focusing on channels and parameter space not previously explored by the Fermi/LAT collaboration. The Fermi satellite has surveyed the γ-ray sky, and its observations of dwarf satellites are used to place strong bounds on the annihilation of WIMPs into a variety of channels. For the single channel case, we find that dark matter annihilation into {bbar b,e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-,4-e or 4-τ } is ruled out as an explanation of the AMS positron excess (here b quarks are a proxy for all quarks, gauge and Higgs bosons). In addition, we find that the Fermi/LAT 2σ upper limits, assuming the best-fit AMS-02 branching ratios, exclude multichannel combinations into bbar b and leptons. The tension between the results might relax if the branching ratios are allowed to deviate from their best-fit values, though a substantial change would be required. Of all the channels we considered, the only viable channel that survives the Fermi/LAT constraint and produces a good fit to the AMS-02 data is annihilation (via a mediator) to 4-μ, or mainly to 4-μ in the case of multichannel combinations.

  3. Comparison study of intraocular pressure reduction efficacy and safety between latanoprost and tafluprost in Japanese with normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Tada, Kaori; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sotozono, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction efficacy and safety between the ophthalmic solutions 0.005% latanoprost (Lat) and 0.0015% tafluprost (Taf) in Japanese patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods In this randomized nonmasked study, we prospectively enrolled 30 Japanese NTG patients who had used Lat monotherapy for more than 4 weeks, and randomly divided them into the following two groups: 1) Lat-to-Taf group (LT group) and 2) Taf-to-Lat group (TL group). At the beginning of the study, both groups were switched from initial Lat to Lat or Taf for 12 weeks, and then switched over to the other drug (crossover) for 12 additional weeks. At 0, 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, we evaluated each patient’s IOP, conjunctival injection, and corneal epitheliopathy score, and at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, we evaluated their eyelash changes and pigmentation of the eyelids and irises. Results The mean IOP of the LT group (15 eyes) was 10.5, 10.6, and 11.1 mmHg, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively, whereas that of the TL group (15 eyes) was 11.7, 11.1, and 10.5 mmHg at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups and in the intragroup comparisons. Moreover, no significant differences were found between Lat and Taf in regard to the conjunctival injection score and corneal epitheliopathy score. Eyelash changes and eyelid and iris pigmentation were similar in both groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that Lat and Taf have equivalent efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with NTG. PMID:27601879

  4. New ALMA and Fermi/LAT Observations of the Large-scale Jet of PKS 0637‑752 Strengthen the Case Against the IC/CMB Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Breiding, Peter; Georganopoulos, Markos; Oteo, Iván; Zwaan, Martin A.; Laing, Robert; Godfrey, Leith; Ivison, R. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has discovered several dozen anomalously X-ray-bright jets associated with powerful quasars. A popular explanation for the X-ray flux from the knots in these jets is that relativistic synchrotron-emitting electrons inverse-Compton scatter cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons to X-ray energies (the IC/CMB model). This model predicts a high gamma-ray flux that should be detectable by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) for many sources. GeV-band upper limits from Fermi/LAT for the well-known anomalous X-ray jet in PKS 0637‑752 were previously shown in Meyer et al. to violate the predictions of the IC/CMB model. Previously, measurements of the jet synchrotron spectrum, important for accurately predicting the gamma-ray flux level, were lacking between radio and infrared wavelengths. Here, we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the large-scale jet at 100, 233, and 319 GHz, which further constrain the synchrotron spectrum, supporting the previously published empirical model. We also present updated limits from the Fermi/LAT using the new “Pass 8” calibration and approximately 30% more time on source. With these deeper limits, we rule out the IC/CMB model at the 8.7σ level. Finally, we demonstrate that complete knowledge of the synchrotron SED is critical in evaluating the IC/CMB model.

  5. Limits to dark matter annihilation cross-section from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnen, M. L.

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present the first joint analysis of gamma-ray data from the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) to search for gamma-ray signals from dark matter annihilation in dwarf satellite galaxies. We combine 158 hours of Segue 1 observations with MAGIC with 6-year observations of 15 dwarf satellite galaxies by the Fermi-LAT. We obtain limits on the annihilation cross-section for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV - the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis. These limits improve on previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to a factor of two at certain masses. Our new inclusive analysis approach is completely generic and can be used to perform a global, sensitivity-optimized dark matter search by combining data from present and future gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.

  6. Limits to dark matter annihilation cross-section from a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf satellite galaxies

    DOE PAGES

    Ahnen, M. L.

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present the first joint analysis of gamma-ray data from the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) to search for gamma-ray signals from dark matter annihilation in dwarf satellite galaxies. We combine 158 hours of Segue 1 observations with MAGIC with 6-year observations of 15 dwarf satellite galaxies by the Fermi-LAT. We obtain limits on the annihilation cross-section for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV - the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis. These limits improve on previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to amore » factor of two at certain masses. Our new inclusive analysis approach is completely generic and can be used to perform a global, sensitivity-optimized dark matter search by combining data from present and future gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.« less

  7. Seborrheic Keratoses as the First Sign of Bladder Carcinoma: Case Report of Leser-Trélat Sign in a Rare Association with Urinary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Bernardo Augusto; Mayer, Bruna Loise; Frandoloso, Gibran Avelino; Magalhães, Francisco Luiz Gomide Mafra; Marques, Gustavo Lenci

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Skin disorders can be the first manifestation of occult diseases. The recognition of typical paraneoplastic dermatoses may anticipate the cancer diagnosis and improve its prognosis. Although rarely observed, the sudden appearance and/or rapid increase in number and size of seborrheic keratoses can be associated with malignant neoplasms, known as the sign of Leser-Trélat. The aim of this report is to unveil a case of a patient whose recently erupted seborrheic keratoses led to investigation and consequent diagnosis of bladder cancer. Case Presentation. A 67-year-old man was admitted to the intensive care unit due to an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). On physical examination, multiple seborrheic keratoses on the back of the hands, elbows, and trunk were observed; the patient had a 4-month history of these lesions yet was asymptomatic. The possibility of Leser-Trélat syndrome justified the investigation for neoplasia, and a bladder carcinoma was detected by CT-scan. The patient denied previous hematuria or any other related symptoms. Many of the lesions regressed during oncologic treatment. Conclusion. Despite the critics on the validity of the sign of Leser-Trélat, our patient fulfills the description of the disease, though urinary malignancy is a rare association. That corroborates the need of further investigation when there is a possibility of paraneoplastic manifestation. PMID:27999595

  8. CD69 controls L-Trp uptake through LAT1-CD98 and AhR-dependent IL-22 secretion in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián Vera, Danay; Saiz, María Laura; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Sánchez-Díaz, Raquel; Moreno-Gonzalo, Olga; Jorge Cerrudo, Inmaculada; Ferrarini, Alessia; Vázquez, Jesús; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Daudén Tello, Esteban; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M.; Martín, Pilar; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The activation marker CD69 is expressed by skin γδ T cells. Here we demonstrate that CD69 controlled the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent interleukin 22 (IL-22) secretion in γδ T cells, which contributed to psoriasis development induced by IL-23. CD69 associated with the aromatic amino acid transporter complex LAT1-CD98 and regulated its surface expression, L-tryptophan (L-Trp) uptake and intracellular quantity of L-Trp-derived AhR activators. In vivo administration of L-Trp, an AhR inhibitor or IL-22 abrogated differences in skin inflammation between CD69-deficient and wild type mice. LAT1-mediated regulation of AhR activation and IL-22 secretion was also observed in circulating Vγ9 γδ T cells of psoriatic patients. Thus, CD69 is a key mediator of the pathogenesis of psoriasis by controlling LAT1-CD98-mediated metabolic cues. PMID:27376471

  9. Constraints on the bulk Lorentz factor of gamma-ray burst jets from Fermi /LAT upper limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, L.; Desiante, R.; Longo, F.; Celotti, A.; Omodei, N.; Vianello, G.; Bissaldi, E.; Piran, T.

    2017-02-01

    It is largely recognized that gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets involve ultrarelativistic motion. However, the value of the Lorentz factor Γ0 is still not clear and only lower limits are known for most bursts. We suggest here a new method to obtain upper limits on Γ0. The early high-energy synchrotron afterglow flux depends strongly on Γ0. Upper limits on GeV emission therefore provide upper limits on Γ0. Applying this method to 190 Fermi GRBs which have not been detected by the Fermi-LAT, we place upper limits on the high-energy afterglow flux, and in turn on Γ0. For bursts at a typical redshift z = 2, we find values of the order of 200 (and above) for a homogeneous density medium, and in the range 100-400 for a wind-like medium. These upper limits are consistent with (and are very close to) lower limits and direct estimates inferred using other methods, suggesting that the typical Lorentz factors of GRB jets are of the order of a few hundred.

  10. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Regina; ComPair Team

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy range from several hundred keV to a hundred MeV has remained largely unexplored, since the observations by instruments on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991- 2000) and on INTEGRAL (since 2002). Accurate measurements in this energy range are critical for answering a broad range of astrophysical questions, but they are particularly challenging because this range encompasses the Compton scattering/pairproduction transition zone (~10 MeV) where the interaction cross section is minimized. These interaction processes require different optimizations in both detection and event reconstruction. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with high energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than COMPTEL. This instrument will be capable of measuring both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, CGRO, INTEGRAL, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will utilize well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators.

  11. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  12. The Gamma-Ray and Neutrino Sky: A Consistent Picture of Fermi-LAT, Milagro, and IceCube Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Marinelli, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    We compute the γ-ray and neutrino diffuse emission of the Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially dependent cosmic-ray (CR) transport properties. We show how this model, designed to reproduce both Fermi-LAT γ-ray data and local CR observables, naturally reproduces the anomalous TeV diffuse emission observed by Milagro in the inner Galactic plane. Above 100 TeV our picture predicts a neutrino flux that is about five (two) times larger than the neutrino flux computed with conventional models in the Galactic Center region (full-sky). Explaining in that way up to ∼25% of the flux measured by IceCube, we reproduce the full-sky IceCube spectrum adding an extra-Galactic component derived from the muonic neutrinos flux in the northern hemisphere. We also present precise predictions for the Galactic plane region where the flux is dominated by the Galactic emission.

  13. THE GAMMA-RAY AND NEUTRINO SKY: A CONSISTENT PICTURE OF FERMI-LAT, MILAGRO, AND ICECUBE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaggero, Daniele; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro; Grasso, Dario; Marinelli, Antonio E-mail: alfredo.leonardo.urbano@cern.ch E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it

    2015-12-20

    We compute the γ-ray and neutrino diffuse emission of the Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially dependent cosmic-ray (CR) transport properties. We show how this model, designed to reproduce both Fermi-LAT γ-ray data and local CR observables, naturally reproduces the anomalous TeV diffuse emission observed by Milagro in the inner Galactic plane. Above 100 TeV our picture predicts a neutrino flux that is about five (two) times larger than the neutrino flux computed with conventional models in the Galactic Center region (full-sky). Explaining in that way up to ∼25% of the flux measured by IceCube, we reproduce the full-sky IceCube spectrum adding an extra-Galactic component derived from the muonic neutrinos flux in the northern hemisphere. We also present precise predictions for the Galactic plane region where the flux is dominated by the Galactic emission.

  14. Mars-solar wind interaction: LatHyS, an improved parallel 3-D multispecies hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modolo, Ronan; Hess, Sebastien; Mancini, Marco; Leblanc, Francois; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Brain, David; Leclercq, Ludivine; Esteban-Hernández, Rosa; Chanteur, Gerard; Weill, Philippe; González-Galindo, Francisco; Forget, Francois; Yagi, Manabu; Mazelle, Christian

    2016-07-01

    In order to better represent Mars-solar wind interaction, we present an unprecedented model achieving spatial resolution down to 50 km, a so far unexplored resolution for global kinetic models of the Martian ionized environment. Such resolution approaches the ionospheric plasma scale height. In practice, the model is derived from a first version described in Modolo et al. (2005). An important effort of parallelization has been conducted and is presented here. A better description of the ionosphere was also implemented including ionospheric chemistry, electrical conductivities, and a drag force modeling the ion-neutral collisions in the ionosphere. This new version of the code, named LatHyS (Latmos Hybrid Simulation), is here used to characterize the impact of various spatial resolutions on simulation results. In addition, and following a global model challenge effort, we present the results of simulation run for three cases which allow addressing the effect of the suprathermal corona and of the solar EUV activity on the magnetospheric plasma boundaries and on the global escape. Simulation results showed that global patterns are relatively similar for the different spatial resolution runs, but finest grid runs provide a better representation of the ionosphere and display more details of the planetary plasma dynamic. Simulation results suggest that a significant fraction of escaping O+ ions is originated from below 1200 km altitude.

  15. Impact of system L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) on proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells: a possible target for combination therapy with anti-proliferative aminopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetao; Ross, Douglas D; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Tamai, Ikumi; Nakanishi, Takeo

    2010-09-15

    Amino acids activate nutrient signaling via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), we therefore evaluated the relationship between amino acid transporter gene expression and proliferation in human ovarian cancer cell lines. Expression of three cancer-associated amino acid transporter genes, LAT1, ASCT2 and SN2, was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot. The effects of silencing the LAT1 gene and its inhibitor BCH on cell growth were evaluated by means of cell proliferation and colony formation assays. The system L amino acid transporter LAT1 was up-regulated in human ovarian cancer SKOV3, IGROV1, A2780, and OVCAR3 cells, compared to normal ovarian epithelial IOSE397 cells, whereas ASCT2 and SN2 were not. BCH reduced phosphorylation of p70S6K, a down-stream effector of mTOR, in SKOV3 and IGROV1 cells, and decreased their proliferation by 30% and 28%, respectively. Although proliferation of SKOV3 (S1) or IGROV1 (I10) cells was unaffected by LAT1-knockdown, plating efficiency in colony formation assays was significantly reduced in SKOV3(S1) and IGROV1(I10) cells to 21% and 52% of the respective plasmid transfected control cells, SKOV3(SC) and IGROV(IC), suggesting that LAT1 affects anchorage-independent cell proliferation. Finally, BCH caused 10.5- and 4.3-fold decrease in the IC(50) value of bestatin, an anti-proliferative aminopeptidase inhibitor, in IGROV1 and A2780 cells, respectively, suggesting that the combined therapy is synergistic. Our findings indicate that LAT1 expression is increased in human ovarian cancer cell lines; LAT1 may be a target for combination therapy with anti-proliferative aminopeptidase inhibitors to combat ovarian cancer.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XXVIII. Interstellar gas and dust in the Chamaeleon clouds as seen by Fermi LAT and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Fermi Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aniano, G.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casandjian, J. M.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Digel, S. W.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Fukui, Y.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Grenier, I. A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Tibaldo, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-10-01

    The nearby Chamaeleon clouds have been observed in γ rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and in thermal dust emission by Planck and IRAS. Cosmic rays and large dust grains, if smoothly mixed with gas, can jointly serve with the H i and 12CO radio data to (i) map the hydrogen column densities, NH, in the different gas phases, in particular at the dark neutral medium (DNM) transition between the H i-bright and CO-bright media; (ii) constrain the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO; and (iii) probe the dust properties per gas nucleon in each phase and map their spatial variations across the clouds. We have separated clouds at local, intermediate, and Galactic velocities in H i and 12CO line emission to model in parallel the γ-ray intensity recorded between 0.4 and 100 GeV; the dust optical depth at 353 GHz, τ353; the thermal radiance of the large grains; and an estimate of the dust extinction, AVQ, empirically corrected for the starlight intensity. The dust and γ-ray models have been coupled to account for the DNM gas. The consistent γ-ray emissivity spectra recorded in the different phases confirm that the GeV-TeV cosmic rays probed by the LAT uniformly permeate all gas phases up to the 12CO cores. The dust and cosmic rays both reveal large amounts of DNM gas, with comparable spatial distributions and twice as much mass as in the CO-bright clouds. We give constraints on the H i-DNM-CO transitions for five separate clouds. CO-dark H2 dominates the molecular columns up to AV ≃ 0.9 and its mass often exceeds the one-third of the molecular mass expected by theory. The corrected AVQ extinction largely provides the best fit to the total gas traced by the γ rays. Nevertheless, we find evidence for a marked rise in AVQ/NH with increasing NH and molecular fraction, and with decreasing dust temperature. The rise in τ353/NH is even steeper. We observe variations of lesser amplitude and orderliness for the specific power of the grains, except for a coherent decline

  17. Search for extended γ-ray emission around AGN with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Atäı, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemie`re, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Malyshev, D.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from blazars inevitably gives rise to electron-positron pair production through the interaction of these γ-rays with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Depending on the magnetic fields in the proximity of the source, the cascade initiated from pair production can result in either an isotropic halo around an initially beamed source or a magnetically broadened cascade flux. Aims: Both extended pair-halo (PH) and magnetically broadened cascade (MBC) emission from regions surrounding the blazars 1ES 1101-232, 1ES 0229+200, and PKS 2155-304 were searched for using VHE γ-ray data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) and high-energy (HE; 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) γ-ray data with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Methods: By comparing the angular distributions of the reconstructed γ-ray events to the angular profiles calculated from detailed theoretical models, the presence of PH and MBC was investigated. Results: Upper limits on the extended emission around 1ES 1101-232, 1ES 0229+200, and PKS 2155-304 are found to be at a level of a few per cent of the Crab nebula flux above 1 TeV, depending on the assumed photon index of the cascade emission. Assuming strong extra-Galactic magnetic field (EGMF) values, >10-12 G, this limits the production of pair haloes developing from electromagnetic cascades. For weaker magnetic fields, in which electromagnetic cascades would result in MBCs, EGMF strengths in the range (0.3-3)× 10-15 G were excluded for PKS 2155-304 at the 99% confidence level, under the assumption of a 1 Mpc coherence length.

  18. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE AGN 1ES 0414+009 WITH VERITAS, FERMI-LAT, SWIFT-XRT, AND MDM

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; and others

    2012-08-20

    We present observations of the BL Lac object 1ES 0414+009 in the >200 GeV gamma-ray band by the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes. 1ES 0414+009 was observed by VERITAS between 2008 January and 2011 February, resulting in 56.2 hr of good quality pointed observations. These observations resulted in a detection of 822 events from the source corresponding to a statistical significance of 6.4 standard deviations (6.4{sigma}) above the background. The source flux, showing no evidence for variability, is measured as (5.2 {+-} 1.1{sub stat} {+-} 2.6{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 200 GeV, equivalent to approximately 2% of the Crab Nebula flux above this energy. The differential photon spectrum from 230 GeV to 850 GeV is well fit by a power law with a photon index of {Gamma} = 3.4 {+-} 0.5{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub sys} and a flux normalization of (1.6 {+-} 0.3{sub stat} {+-} 0.8{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at 300 GeV. We also present multiwavelength results taken in the optical (MDM), x-ray (Swift-XRT), and GeV (Fermi-LAT) bands and use these results to construct a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED). Modeling of this SED indicates that homogenous one-zone leptonic scenarios are not adequate to describe emission from the system, with a lepto-hadronic model providing a better fit to the data.

  19. Multiwavelength Observations of the AGN 1ES 0414+009 with Veritas, Fermi-LAT, Swift-XRT, and MDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of the BL Lac object 1ES 0414+009 in the greater than 200 GeV gamma-ray band by the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes. 1ES 0414+009 was observed by VERITAS between January 2008 and February 2011, resulting in 56.2 hours of good quality pointed observations. These observations resulted in a detection of 822 events from the source corresponding to a statistical significance of 6.4 standard deviations (6.4 sigma) above the background. The source flux, showing no evidence for variability, is measured as (5.2 plus or minus 1.1(sub stat) plus or minus 2.6(sub sys) x 10(exp 12) photons per square centimeter per second above 200 GeV, equivalent to approximately 2% of the Crab Nebula flux above this energy. The differential photon spectrum from 230 GeV to 850 GeV is well fit by a power law with an photon index of TAU = 3.4 plus or minus 0.5(sub stat) plus or minus 0.3(sub sys) and a flux normalization of (1.6 plus or minus 0.3(sub stat) plus or minus 0.8(sub sys) x 10(exp -11) photons per square centimeter per second at 300 GeV. We also present multiwavelength results taken in the optical (MDM), X-ray (Swift-XRT), and GeV (Fermi-LAT) bands and use these results to construct a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED). Modeling of this SED indicates that homogenous one-zone leptonic scenarios are not adequate to describe emission from the system, with a lepto-hadronic model providing a better fit to the data.

  20. Search for sharp and smooth spectral signatures of μνSSM gravitino dark matter with Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; López-Fogliani, Daniel E.; Muñoz, Carlos; Perez, Andres D.; Ruiz de Austri, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    The μνSSM solves the μ problem of supersymmetric models and reproduces neutrino data, simply using couplings with right-handed neutrinos ν's. Given that these couplings break explicitly R parity, the gravitino is a natural candidate for decaying dark matter in the μνSSM. In this work we carry out a complete analysis of the detection of μνSSM gravitino dark matter through γ-ray observations. In addition to the two-body decay producing a sharp line, we include in the analysis the three-body decays producing a smooth spectral signature. We perform first a deep exploration of the low-energy parameter space of the μνSSM taking into account that neutrino data must be reproduced. Then, we compare the γ-ray fluxes predicted by the model with Fermi-LAT observations. In particular, with the 95% CL upper limits on the total diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background using 50 months of data, together with the upper limits on line emission from an updated analysis using 69.9 months of data. For standard values of bino and wino masses, gravitinos with masses larger than about 4 GeV, or lifetimes smaller than about 1028 s, produce too large fluxes and are excluded as dark matter candidates. However, when limiting scenarios with large and close values of the gaugino masses are considered, the constraints turn out to be less stringent, excluding masses larger than 17 GeV and lifetimes smaller than 4 × 1025 s.

  1. Detailed Investigation of the Gamma-Ray Emission in the Vicinity of SNR W28 with FERMI-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanabata, Y.; Katagiri, H.; Hewitt, John William; Ballet, J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Strong, A. W.; Torres, D. F.; Yamazaki, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the Gamma-ray emission in the vicinity of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28 (G6.4-0.1) observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We detected significant ? -ray emission spatially coincident with TeV sources HESS J1800-240A, B, and C, located outside the radio boundary of the SNR. Their spectra in the 2-100 GeV band are consistent with the extrapolation of the power-law spectra of the TeV sources. We also identified a new source of GeV emission, dubbed Source W, which lies outside the boundary of TeV sources and coincides with radio emission from the western part of W28. All of the GeV Gamma-ray sources overlap with molecular clouds in the velocity range from 0 to 20 km s (exp-1). Under the assumption that the Gamma-ray emission toward HESS J1800-240A, B, and C comes from 3.14(exp0) decay due to the interaction between the molecular clouds and cosmic rays (CRs) escaping from W28, they can be naturally explained by a single model in which the CR diffusion coefficient is smaller than the theoretical expectation in the interstellar space. The total energy of the CRs escaping from W28 is constrained through the same modeling to be larger than is approximately 2 × 10(exp49) erg. The emission from Source W can also be explained with the same CR escape scenario.

  2. Detailed investigation of the gamma-ray emission in the vicinity of SNR W28 with Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanabata, Y.; Katagiri, H.; Hewitt, J.W.; Ballet, J.; Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Strong, A. W.; Yamazaki, R. E-mail: katagiri@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

    2014-05-10

    We present a detailed investigation of the γ-ray emission in the vicinity of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28 (G6.4–0.1) observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We detected significant γ-ray emission spatially coincident with TeV sources HESS J1800–240A, B, and C, located outside the radio boundary of the SNR. Their spectra in the 2-100 GeV band are consistent with the extrapolation of the power-law spectra of the TeV sources. We also identified a new source of GeV emission, dubbed Source W, which lies outside the boundary of TeV sources and coincides with radio emission from the western part of W28. All of the GeV γ-ray sources overlap with molecular clouds in the velocity range from 0 to 20 km s{sup –1}. Under the assumption that the γ-ray emission toward HESS J1800–240A, B, and C comes from π{sup 0} decay due to the interaction between the molecular clouds and cosmic rays (CRs) escaping from W28, they can be naturally explained by a single model in which the CR diffusion coefficient is smaller than the theoretical expectation in the interstellar space. The total energy of the CRs escaping from W28 is constrained through the same modeling to be larger than ∼2 × 10{sup 49} erg. The emission from Source W can also be explained with the same CR escape scenario.

  3. EARLY-TIME VLA OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND AFTERGLOW ANALYSIS OF THE FERMI/LAT DETECTED GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A{sub *}), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  4. SNAT2 and LAT1 transporter abundance is developmentally regulated in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we demonstrated that the insulin and amino acid–induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated an important role of the System A transporters (SNAT2 and SLC1A5) and the L transporter...

  5. Deliberate Language Planning in Environmental Education: A CRT/LatCrit Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arreguin-Anderson, Maria G.; Kennedy, Kimberley D.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors narrate a deliberate language planning experience within the dynamics of the first Project WILD environmental workshop conducted in Spanish. Using critical race theory and critical Latino theory the authors explore ways in which an environmental program can be infused with Latino culture and Spanish language to address…

  6. Brain interstitial fluid glutamine homeostasis is controlled by blood-brain barrier SLC7A5/LAT1 amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Dolgodilina, Elena; Imobersteg, Stefan; Laczko, Endre; Welt, Tobias; Verrey, Francois; Makrides, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    L-glutamine (Gln) is the most abundant amino acid in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid and a precursor for the main central nervous system excitatory (L-glutamate) and inhibitory (γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) neurotransmitters. Concentrations of Gln and 13 other brain interstitial fluid amino acids were measured in awake, freely moving mice by hippocampal microdialysis using an extrapolation to zero flow rate method. Interstitial fluid levels for all amino acids including Gln were ∼5-10 times lower than in cerebrospinal fluid. Although the large increase in plasma Gln by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of (15)N2-labeled Gln (hGln) did not increase total interstitial fluid Gln, low levels of hGln were detected in microdialysis samples. Competitive inhibition of system A (SLC38A1&2; SNAT1&2) or system L (SLC7A5&8; LAT1&2) transporters in brain by perfusion with α-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid (MeAIB) or 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) respectively, was tested. The data showed a significantly greater increase in interstitial fluid Gln upon BCH than MeAIB treatment. Furthermore, brain BCH perfusion also strongly increased the influx of hGln into interstitial fluid following IP injection consistent with transstimulation of LAT1-mediated transendothelial transport. Taken together, the data support the independent homeostatic regulation of amino acids in interstitial fluid vs. cerebrospinal fluid and the role of the blood-brain barrier expressed SLC7A5/LAT1 as a key interstitial fluid gatekeeper.

  7. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE MONITORING OF FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES OF INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, Michael C.; Falcone, Abe D.

    2013-08-15

    We describe a long-term Swift monitoring program of Fermi gamma-ray sources, particularly the 23 gamma-ray ''sources of interest''.We present a systematic analysis of the Swift X-Ray Telescope light curves and hardness ratios of these sources, and we calculate excess variability. We present data for the time interval of 2004 December 22 through 2012 August 31. We describe the analysis methods used to produce these data products, and we discuss the availability of these data in an online repository, which continues to grow from more data on these sources and from a growing list of additional sources. This database should be of use to the broad astronomical community for long-term studies of the variability of these objects and for inclusion in multiwavelength studies.

  8. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum and highest-level gamma-ray outburst from the distant blazar PKS 1502+106

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed flaring gamma rays from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1502+106 (also known as OR 103, S3 1502+10 and 3FGL J1504.4+1029, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23), with radio coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 226.10408 deg, Dec: 10.49422 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880). This blazar has a redshift of z=1.8383 (Hewett & Wild 2010, MNRAS, 405, 2302).

  9. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum and enhanced gamma-ray emission from the BL Lac object PKS 1717+177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed a gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object PKS 1717+177 (also known as S3 1717+17, OT 129, and 3FGL J1719.2+1744, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23), with radio coordinates (J2000.0), R.A.: 259.804368 deg, Dec.: 17.751788 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  10. Cloning, large scale over-expression in E. coli and purification of the components of the human LAT 1 (SLC7A5) amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Michele; Pingitore, Piero; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Indiveri, Cesare

    2013-08-01

    The high yield expression of the human LAT1 transporter has been obtained for the first time using E. coli. The hLAT1 cDNA was amplified from HEK293 cells and cloned in pH6EX3 vector. The construct pH6EX3-6His-hLAT1 was used to express the 6His-hLAT1 protein in the Rosetta(DE3)pLysS strain of E. coli. The highest level of expression was detected 8 h after induction by IPTG at 28 °C. The expressed protein was collected in the insoluble fraction of cell lysate. On SDS-PAGE the apparent molecular mass of the polypeptide was 40 kDa. After solubilization with sarkosyl and denaturation with urea the protein carrying a 6His N-terminal tag was purified by Ni(2+)-chelating affinity chromatography and identified by anti-His antibody. The yield of the over-expressed protein after purification was 3.5 mg/L (cell culture). The human CD98 cDNA amplified from Imagene plasmid was cloned in pGEX-4T1. The construct pGEX-4T1-hCD98 was used to express the GST-hCD98 protein in the Rosetta(DE3)pLysS strain of E. coli. The highest level of expression was detected in this case 4 h after induction by IPTG at 28 °C. The expressed protein was accumulated in the soluble fraction of cell lysate. The molecular mass was determined on the basis of marker proteins on SDS-PAGE; it was about 110 kDa. GST was cleaved from the protein construct by incubation with thrombin for 12 h and the hCD98 was separated by Sephadex G-200 chromatography (size exclusion). hCD98 showed a 62 kDa apparent molecular mass, as determined on the basis of molecular mass markers using SDS-PAGE. The yield of CD98 was 2 mg/L of cell culture.

  11. Fermi LAT Detection of a GeV Flare from the Radio-Loud Narrow-Line Sy1 1H 0323+342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh

    2013-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with 1H 0323+342 (RA=03h24m41.1613s, Dec=+34d10m45.856s, J2000; Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) at z= 0.061 (Marcha et al. 1996, MNRAS, 281, 425). This is the second nearest radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy, a small and important class of gamma-ray loud AGN (Abdo et al.

  12. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum and high-level gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 1954-388

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutini, Sara; Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed flaring gamma rays from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1954-388 (also known as MRC 1954-388, RX J1958.0-3845, and 3FGL J1958.0-3847, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23), with radio coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 299.499247 deg, Dec.: -38.751766 deg, (Ma et. al. 1998, AJ, 116, 516).

  13. Fermi LAT detection of the first GeV gamma-ray flare from the BL Lac object TXS 2241+406

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, Sara

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed for the first time on daily timescales gamma-ray outburst activity from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object TXS 2241+406 (a.k.a.3FGL J2244.1+4057, Acero et al. 2015, arXiv:1501.02003) at RA=341.05305 deg, Dec=40.95378 deg (J2000, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) with redshift z=1.171 (Shaw et al. 2012, ApJ, 748, 49).

  14. Fermi LAT detection of increasing GeV gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the very-high energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (also known as TXS 1959+650 and 3FGL J2000.0+6509, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  15. Fermi-LAT Detection of a Hard Spectrum and Enhanced Gamma-ray Emission from the Blazar PMN J2052-5533

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Magill, Jeff; Ojha, Roopesh

    2015-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed an unusually hard spectrum gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the blazar PMN J2052-5533 (3FGL J2051.8-5535; Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23), with coordinates RA: 20h52m13.68s, Dec: -55d33m10.0s, J2000, (Healey et al. 2007, ApJS, 171, 61). There is no redshift reported for this source in the literature.

  16. Usnea cornuta Körb. and Usnea glabrescens (Vainio) Vainio sens. Lat.: Species to be protected in the peninsula of Edough (Algeria).

    PubMed

    Fekroune Chaker, A

    2016-05-30

    In the Mediterranean region, Edough Peninsula (Algerian Northeast) has a significant procession of rare plant species biogeographical interest. This communication is based on specimens collected by the author during the realization of a lichen herbarium when her attention was attracted by the striking presence of a fruticose lichen of Usnea genus, on a hawthorn at the entrance of a private neglected garden. One of the harvested species proved to be after identification, Usnea glabrescens (Vainio) Vainio sens. Lat. A second species was harvested meanwhile a few meters away, on a cork oak and identified as Usnea cornuta Körber species ever recorded in Algeria before.

  17. Search for gamma-ray lines towards galaxy clusters with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.; Zimmer, S.; Conrad, J.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Gustafsson, M.; Caputo, R. E-mail: stephan.zimmer@fysik.su.se E-mail: michael.gustafsson@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de E-mail: rcaputo@ucsc.edu

    2016-02-01

    We report on a search for monochromatic γ-ray features in the spectra of galaxy clusters observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Galaxy clusters are the largest structures in the Universe that are bound by dark matter (DM), making them an important testing ground for possible self-interactions or decays of the DM particles. Monochromatic γ-ray lines provide a unique signature due to the absence of astrophysical backgrounds and are as such considered a smoking-gun signature for new physics. An unbinned joint likelihood analysis of the sixteen most promising clusters using five years of data at energies between 10 and 400 GeV revealed no significant features. For the case of self-annihilation, we set upper limits on the monochromatic velocity-averaged interaction cross section. These limits are compatible with those obtained from observations of the Galactic Center, albeit weaker due to the larger distance to the studied clusters.

  18. Probing the EBL evolution at high redshifts using 22 GRBs detected with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitbhai Desai, Abhishek; Ajello, Marco; Omodei, Nicola; Hartmann, Dieter; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the collective emission of all the stars and galaxies over the history of the universe. The most efficient method to study the EBL is through the imprint it leaves via photon-photon annihilation in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources. Here we present a combined analysis of a sample of 22 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope. GRBs are short-lived, bright, high-energy sources detected up to very high redshifts. This allows us to probe the EBL at much higher redshifts than before. We report the first constrain on the EBL when the Universe was one fourth of its present age (z=1.8). This will be discussed in the context of the generation of the UV-optical background and the star-formation activity of the Universe.

  19. Examining the Fermi-LAT third source catalog in search of dark matter subhalos

    DOE PAGES

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-12-17

    Dark matter annihilations taking place in nearby subhalos could appear as gamma-ray sources without detectable counterparts at other wavelengths. In this study, we consider the collection of unassociated gamma-ray sources reported by the Fermi Collaboration in an effort to identify the most promising dark matter subhalo candidates. While we identify 24 bright, high-latitude, non-variable sources with spectra that are consistent with being generated by the annihilations of ~ 20–70 GeV dark matter particles (assuming annihilations to bbar b), it is not possible at this time to distinguish these sources from radio-faint gamma-ray pulsars. Deeper multi-wavelength observations will be essential tomore » clarify the nature of these sources. It is notable that we do not find any such sources that are well fit by dark matter particles heavier than ~100 GeV. We also study the angular distribution of the gamma-rays from this set of subhalo candidates, and find that the source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 prefers a spatially extended profile (of width ~ 0.15°) over that of a point source, with a significance of 4.2σ (3.6σ after trials factor). Although not yet definitive, this bright and high-latitude gamma-ray source is well fit as a nearby subhalo of mχ ≃ 20–50 GeV dark matter particles (annihilating to bb¯) and merits further multi-wavelength investigation. As a result, based on the subhalo distribution predicted by numerical simulations, we derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section that are competitive to those resulting from gamma-ray observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the Galactic Center, and the extragalactic gamma-ray background.« less

  20. Examining the Fermi-LAT third source catalog in search of dark matter subhalos

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-12-17

    Dark matter annihilations taking place in nearby subhalos could appear as gamma-ray sources without detectable counterparts at other wavelengths. In this study, we consider the collection of unassociated gamma-ray sources reported by the Fermi Collaboration in an effort to identify the most promising dark matter subhalo candidates. While we identify 24 bright, high-latitude, non-variable sources with spectra that are consistent with being generated by the annihilations of ~ 20–70 GeV dark matter particles (assuming annihilations to bbar b), it is not possible at this time to distinguish these sources from radio-faint gamma-ray pulsars. Deeper multi-wavelength observations will be essential to clarify the nature of these sources. It is notable that we do not find any such sources that are well fit by dark matter particles heavier than ~100 GeV. We also study the angular distribution of the gamma-rays from this set of subhalo candidates, and find that the source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 prefers a spatially extended profile (of width ~ 0.15°) over that of a point source, with a significance of 4.2σ (3.6σ after trials factor). Although not yet definitive, this bright and high-latitude gamma-ray source is well fit as a nearby subhalo of mχ ≃ 20–50 GeV dark matter particles (annihilating to bb¯) and merits further multi-wavelength investigation. As a result, based on the subhalo distribution predicted by numerical simulations, we derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section that are competitive to those resulting from gamma-ray observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the Galactic Center, and the extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  1. Examining The Fermi-LAT Third Source Catalog in search of dark matter subhalos

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov

    2015-12-01

    Dark matter annihilations taking place in nearby subhalos could appear as gamma-ray sources without detectable counterparts at other wavelengths. In this study, we consider the collection of unassociated gamma-ray sources reported by the Fermi Collaboration in an effort to identify the most promising dark matter subhalo candidates. While we identify 24 bright, high-latitude, non-variable sources with spectra that are consistent with being generated by the annihilations of ∼ 20–70 GeV dark matter particles (assuming annihilations to b b-bar ), it is not possible at this time to distinguish these sources from radio-faint gamma-ray pulsars. Deeper multi-wavelength observations will be essential to clarify the nature of these sources. It is notable that we do not find any such sources that are well fit by dark matter particles heavier than ∼100 GeV. We also study the angular distribution of the gamma-rays from this set of subhalo candidates, and find that the source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 prefers a spatially extended profile (of width ∼ 0.15°) over that of a point source, with a significance of 4.2σ (3.6σ after trials factor). Although not yet definitive, this bright and high-latitude gamma-ray source is well fit as a nearby subhalo of m{sub χ} ≅ 20–50 GeV dark matter particles (annihilating to b b-bar ) and merits further multi-wavelength investigation. Based on the subhalo distribution predicted by numerical simulations, we derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section that are competitive to those resulting from gamma-ray observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the Galactic Center, and the extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  2. Revealing W51C as a Cosmic Ray Source Using Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogler, T.; Funk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are commonly believed to be the primary sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Despite intensive study of the non-thermal emission of many SNRs the identification of the accelerated particle type relies heavily on assumptions of ambient-medium parameters that are only loosely constrained. Compelling evidence of hadronic acceleration can be provided by detecting a strong roll-off in the secondary γ-ray spectrum below the {π }0 production threshold energy of about 135 MeV, the so called “pion bump.” Here we use five years of Fermi-Large Area Telescope data to study the spectrum above 60 MeV of the middle-aged SNR W51C. A clear break in the power-law γ-ray spectrum at {E}{{break}}=290+/- 20 {{MeV}} is detected with 9σ significance and we show that this break is most likely associated with the energy production threshold of {π }0mesons. A high-energy break in the γ-ray spectrum at about 2.7 GeV is found with 7.5σ significance. The spectral index at energies beyond this second break is {{{Γ }}}2={2.52}-0.07+0.06 and closely matches the spectral index derived by the MAGIC Collaboration above 75 GeV. Therefore our analysis provides strong evidence to explain the γ-ray spectrum of W51C by a single particle population of protons with a momentum spectrum best described by a broken power law with break momentum {p}{{break}}∼ 80 {{G}}{{e}}{{V}}/c. W51C is the third middle-aged SNR that displays compelling evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration and thus strengthens the case of SNRs as the main source of Galactic cosmic rays.

  3. Fermi/LAT Study of Gamma-Ray Emission in the Direction of the Monoceros Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, H.; Sugiyama, S.; Ackermann, M.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M.; Hanabata, Y.; Hewitt, J. W.; Kerr, M.; Kubo, H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Ray, P. S.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) Monoceros Loop (G205.5+0.5). The brightest gamma-ray peak is spatially correlated with the Rosette Nebula, which is a molecular cloud complex adjacent to the southeast edge of the SNR. After subtraction of this emission by spatial modeling, the gamma-ray emission from the SNR emerges, which is extended and fit by a Gaussian spatial template. The gamma-ray spectra are significantly better reproduced by a curved shape than a simple power law. The luminosities between 0.2 and 300 GeV are ˜ 4× {10}34 erg s-1 for the SNR and ˜ 3× {10}34 erg s-1 for the Rosette Nebula, respectively. We argue that the gamma-rays likely originate from the interactions of particles accelerated in the SNR. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions of accelerated hadrons with interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray emission of both the Rosette Nebula and the Monoceros SNR.

  4. Molecular systematics of Acarus siro s. lat., a complex of stored food pests.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lucy M I; Thomas, Richard H; McCormack, Grace P

    2004-09-01

    The astigmatid mite Acarus siro (Linnaeus 1758) is an important agricultural pest and environmental allergen. However, it is likely that many mites described in the literature as A. siro, collected from both outdoor and stored product habitats, may belong to one of its sibling species, A. farris [Ent. Ber. Amst. 2 (26) (1905) 20] or A. immobilis [Bull. Br. Mus. Nat. Hist. 11 (1964a) 413; Acarologia. 6 (Suppl) (1964) 101]. The three species are difficult to separate morphologically, gene exchange between some of them is possible and, although each species displays environmental preferences, they occur together in some environments. This raises a question about their separate species status. In a pilot study, we investigated whether genetic data supported the separate species status of these forms. Both nuclear (the second internal transcribed spacer region [ITS-2] of the ribosomal cistron) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I, mtcoxI hereafter) loci were employed for this purpose. Mtcox1 data does not conflict the differentiation into three separate species and while the ITS2 data were problematic for this group of mites it suggested that a congener, Acarus gracilis [Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 10 (1957) 753], is basal to the A. siro species complex.

  5. Fermi LAT Pulsed Detection of PSR J0737-3039A in the Double Pulsar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Johnson, T. J.; Craig, H. A.; Romani, R. W.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Ferdman, R. D.; Stairs, I. H.; Kerr, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the 22.7 ms pulsar A in the double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B. This is the first mildly recycled millisecond pulsar (MSP) detected in the GeV domain. The 2.7 s companion object PSR J0737-3039B is not detected in gamma rays. PSR J0737-3039A is a faint gamma-ray emitter, so that its spectral properties are only weakly constrained; however, its measured efficiency is typical of other MSPs. The two peaks of the gamma-ray light curve are separated by roughly half a rotation and are well offset from the radio and X-ray emission, suggesting that the GeV radiation originates in a distinct part of the magnetosphere from the other types of emission. From the modeling of the radio and the gamma-ray emission profiles and the analysis of radio polarization data, we constrain the magnetic inclination alpha and the viewing angle zeta to be close to 90 deg., which is consistent with independent studies of the radio emission from PSR J0737-3039A. A small misalignment angle between the pulsar's spin axis and the system's orbital axis is therefore favored, supporting the hypothesis that pulsar B was formed in a nearly symmetric supernova explosion as has been discussed in the literature already.

  6. Observations of MilkyWay Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi-LAT detector and

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /IASF, Milan /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard

    2010-05-26

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky {gamma}-ray survey in the 20 MeV to >300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected {gamma}-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant {gamma}-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the {gamma}-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting integral flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Using recent stellar kinematic data, the {gamma}-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in 8 of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair annihilation cross-section ofWIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e.g. in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The {gamma}-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e{sup +}e{sup -} data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair

  7. High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its rst four years of operation. Interestingly, all ares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray ares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the rst two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 are, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive are followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 are, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and nd that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 are, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the are site. This work suggests that proton acceleration in solar ares is more common than previously thought, occurring for even modest X-ray ares, and for longer durations.

  8. LAT-independent Erk activation via Bam32-PLC-γ1-Pak1 complexes: GTPase-independent Pak1 activation.

    PubMed

    Rouquette-Jazdanian, Alexandre K; Sommers, Connie L; Kortum, Robert L; Morrison, Deborah K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2012-10-26

    In T cells, the adaptor Bam32 is coupled to Erk activation downstream of the TCR by an unknown mechanism. We characterized in Jurkat cells and primary T lymphocytes a pathway dependent on Bam32-PLC-γ1-Pak1 complexes, in which Pak1 kinase activates Raf-1 and Mek-1, both upstream of Erk. In the Bam32-PLC-γ1-Pak1 complex, catalytically inactive PLC-γ1 is used as a scaffold linking Bam32 to Pak1. PLC-γ1(C-SH2) directly binds S141 of Bam32, preventing LAT-mediated activation of Ras by PLC-γ1. The Bam32-PLC-γ1 interaction enhances the binding of the SH3 domain of the phospholipase with Pak1. The PLC-γ1(SH3)-Pak1 interaction activates Pak1 independently of the small GTPases Rac1/Cdc42, previously described as being the only activators of Pak1 in T cells. Direct binding of the SH3 domain of PLC-γ1 to Pak1 dissociates inactive Pak1 homodimers, a mechanism required for Pak1 activation. We have thus uncovered a LAT/Ras-independent, Bam32-nucleated pathway that activates Erk signaling in T cells.

  9. Blazar flaring patterns (B-FlaP) classifying blazar candidate of uncertain type in the third Fermi-LAT catalogue by artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaro, G.; Salvetti, D.; La Mura, G.; Giroletti, M.; Thompson, D. J.; Bastieri, D.

    2016-11-01

    The Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) is currently the most important facility for investigating the GeV γ-ray sky. With Fermi-LAT, more than three thousand γ-ray sources have been discovered so far. 1144 (˜40 per cent) of the sources are active galaxies of the blazar class, and 573 (˜20 per cent) are listed as blazar candidate of uncertain type (BCU), or sources without a conclusive classification. We use the empirical cumulative distribution functions and the artificial neural networks for a fast method of screening and classification for BCUs based on data collected at γ-ray energies only, when rigorous multiwavelength analysis is not available. Based on our method, we classify 342 BCUs as BL Lacs and 154 as flat-spectrum radio quasars, while 77 objects remain uncertain. Moreover, radio analysis and direct observations in ground-based optical observatories are used as counterparts to the statistical classifications to validate the method. This approach is of interest because of the increasing number of unclassified sources in Fermi catalogues and because blazars and in particular their subclass high synchrotron peak objects are the main targets of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes.

  10. A PAK1-PIX-PKL complex is activated by the T-cell receptor independent of Nck, Slp-76 and LAT.

    PubMed

    Ku, G M; Yablonski, D; Manser, E; Lim, L; Weiss, A

    2001-02-01

    Given the importance of the Rho GTPase family member Rac1 and the Rac1/Cdc42 effector PAK1 in T-cell activation, we investigated the requirements for their activation by the T-cell receptor (TCR). Rac1 and PAK1 activation required the tyrosine kinases ZAP-70 and Syk, but not the cytoplasmic adaptor Slp-76. Surprisingly, PAK1 was activated in the absence of the transmembrane adaptor LAT while Rac1 was not. However, efficient PAK1 activation required its binding sites for Rho GTPases and for PIX, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho GTPases. The overexpression of ssPIX that either cannot bind PAK1 or lacks GEF function blocked PAK1 activation. These data suggest that a PAK1-PIX complex is recruited to appropriate sites for activation and that PIX is required for Rho family GTPase activation upstream of PAK1. Furthermore, we detected a stable trimolecular complex of PAK1, PIX and the paxillin kinase linker p95PKL. Taken together, these data show that PAK1 contained in this trimolecular complex is activated by a novel LAT- and Slp-76-independent pathway following TCR stimulation.

  11. 50 CFR Table 3 (north) to Part 660... - Non-Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 3 Table 3 (North) to Part 660, Subpart F Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  12. 50 CFR Table 3 (south) to Part 660... - Non-Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 3 Table 3 (South) to Part 660, Subpart F Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  13. Studies on the seasonal variation of atmospheric electricity parameters at a tropical station in Kolkata, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, S. S.; Paul, Suman; Barui, S.; Pal, Pinaki; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Kala, D.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-12-01

    The paper deals with the analyses of the atmospheric vertical potential gradient (PG) from the ground for 90 fair weather days during 2006-2009 measured at Kolkata (Lat: 22.56°N). The variations of PG have been studied extensively to investigate their values during monsoon and winter seasons. Higher values of PG at Kolkata are observed due to higher abundance of pollutant particles. The observed PG are compared with the results of Potsdam station (Lat: 52°N) and Johannesburg station (Lat: 26°S), with 9 years data and 2 years data respectively. The correlations studies are carried out among PG, PDC (Point Discharge Current) as well as negative and positive carrier conductivities. The corresponding correlation coefficients are obtained as 0.93, -0.842 and -0.844.

  14. Selective interaction of LAT (linker of activated T cells) with the open-active form of Lck in lipid rafts reveals a new mechanism for the regulation of Lck in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S

    2003-01-01

    In T cells, the lipid raft-associated Lck is strongly tyrosine phosphorylated and has reduced enzymic activity in contrast with the detergent-soluble pool, which has substantial activity. Lck tagged at the C-terminus (Lck/V5-His) was efficiently captured by epitope-specific reagents from the detergent-soluble fraction but not from lipid rafts. Binding was restored following urea denaturation, suggesting that Lck/V5-His is in a 'closed' conformation in these domains. In agreement with this hypothesis, the Tyr(505) --> Phe/V5-His and Arg(154) --> Lys/V5-His mutants, which disrupt the SH2-Tyr(505) intramolecular interaction, were efficiently precipitated from lipid rafts. In contrast to Lck, Fyn/V5-His was precipitated equally well from both fractions. In the LAT(linker of activated T cells)-deficient J.CaM2 cells, Tyr(505) phosphorylation of raft-associated Lck was reduced whereas its enzymic activity was elevated. This correlated with decreased levels of raft-localized Csk (C-terminal Src kinase) kinase. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck was restored in LAT-reconstituted J.CaM2 cells suggesting that LAT negatively regulates Lck activity in lipid rafts. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments from Tyr(505) --> Phe/V5-His-expressing cells revealed that LAT preferentially interacts with the 'open' form of Lck in T cell raft domains. These results demonstrate that, unlike the non-raft pool, Lck in lipid rafts has a 'closed'-inactive structure, and that LAT plays a role in maintaining this conformation, possibly by facilitating critical associations within lipid rafts via its capacity to interact with the 'open' form of the kinase. PMID:12570875

  15. Fracture unicondylienne latérale sagittale du fémur associée à une fracture homolatérale verticale de la patella

    PubMed Central

    Sasbou, Youness; Boussaidane, Mohammed; Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Azzouz, Mohammed; Mhammdi, Youness; Benchebba, Driss; Chagar, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Un patient de 24 ans a subit un traumatisme du genou droit suite à un accident de la voie publique occasionnant une fracture simultanée uni condylienne latérale et patellaire verticale. Cette association est exceptionnelle et aucun cas n'as été retrouvé dans la littérature. Un diagnostic précis clinique et radiologique suivi d'une prise en charge précoce et adaptée par une ostéosynthèse interne et une rééducation fonctionnelle ont permis d'obtenir de bons résultats à long terme. PMID:26113949

  16. Search for a gamma-ray line feature from a group of nearby galaxy clusters with Fermi LAT Pass 8 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun-Feng; Shen, Zhao-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Lei, Shi-Jun; Feng, Lei; Liang, En-Wei; Chang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe and may be suitable targets for indirect dark matter searches. With 85 months of Fermi LAT Pass 8 publicly available data, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in the direction of 16 nearby galaxy clusters with an unbinned likelihood analysis. No statistically or globally significant γ -ray line feature is identified and a tentative line signal may present at ˜43 GeV . The 95% confidence level upper limits on the velocity-averaged cross section of dark matter particles annihilating into double γ rays (i.e., ⟨σ v ⟩χχ →γ γ) are derived. Unless very optimistic boost factors of dark matter annihilation in these galaxy clusters have been assumed, such constraints are much weaker than the bounds set by the Galactic γ -ray data.

  17. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  18. Multiwavelength observations of the TeV binary LS I +61° 303 with Veritas, Fermi-LAT, and Swift/xrt during a TeV outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S.; Berger, K.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Fortin, P.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sheidaei@physics.utah.edu; and others

    2013-12-10

    We present the results of a multiwavelength observational campaign on the TeV binary system LS I +61° 303 with the VERITAS telescope array (>200 GeV), Fermi-LAT (0.3-300 GeV), and Swift/XRT (2-10 keV). The data were taken from 2011 December through 2012 January and show a strong detection in all three wavebands. During this period VERITAS obtained 24.9 hr of quality selected livetime data in which LS I +61° 303 was detected at a statistical significance of 11.9σ. These TeV observations show evidence for nightly variability in the TeV regime at a post-trial significance of 3.6σ. The combination of the simultaneously obtained TeV and X-ray fluxes do not demonstrate any evidence for a correlation between emission in the two bands. For the first time since the launch of the Fermi satellite in 2008, this TeV detection allows the construction of a detailed MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution from LS I +61° 303. This spectrum shows a distinct cutoff in emission near 4 GeV, with emission seen by the VERITAS observations following a simple power-law above 200 GeV. This feature in the spectrum of LS I +61° 303, obtained from overlapping observations with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, may indicate that there are two distinct populations of accelerated particles producing the GeV and TeV emission.

  19. RAC-LATS1/2 signaling regulates YAP activity by switching between the YAP-binding partners TEAD4 and RUNX3.

    PubMed

    Jang, J-W; Kim, M-K; Lee, Y-S; Lee, J-W; Kim, D-M; Song, S-H; Lee, J-Y; Choi, B-Y; Min, B; Chi, X-Z; Bae, S-C

    2017-02-16

    The tumor-suppressor RUNX3 has a critical role in a lineage determination, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Lozenge (Lz), a Drosophila homolog of mammalian RUNX family members, has integral roles in these processes and specifically in eye cell fate determination. To elucidate the genetic modifiers of Lz/RUNX3, we performed a large-scale functional screen in a fly mutant library. The screen revealed genetic interactions between the Lz, Rac and Hippo pathways. Analysis of interactions among these genes revealed that the defective phenotype resulting from activation of Yki, an end point effector of the Hippo pathway, was suppressed by Lz and enhanced by Rac-Trio. Molecular biological analysis using mammalian homologs reveled that LATS1/2-mediated YAP phosphorylation-facilitated dissociation of the YAP-TEAD4 complex and association of the YAP-RUNX3 complex. When cells were stimulated to proliferate, activated RAC-TRIO signaling inhibited LATS1/2-mediated YAP phosphorylation; consequently, YAP dissociated from RUNX3 and associated with TEAD, thereby replacing the YAP-RUNX3 complex with YAP-TEAD. RUNX3 contributed to both association and dissociation of YAP-TEAD complex, most likely through the formation of the YAP-TEAD-RUNX3 ternary complex. Ectopic expression of RUNX3 in MKN28 gastric cancer cells reduced tumorigenicity, and the tumor-suppressive activity of RUNX3 was associated with its ability to interact with YAP. These results identify a novel regulatory mechanism, mediated by the Hippo and RAC-TRIO pathways, that changes the binding partner of YAP.

  20. The Fermi-LAT gamma-ray excess at the Galactic Center in the singlet-doublet fermion dark matter model

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Macias, Oscar; Restrepo, Diego; Rivera, Andrés; Zapata, Oscar; Silverwood, Hamish E-mail: oscar.macias@vt.edu E-mail: afelipe.rivera@udea.edu.co E-mail: h.g.m.silverwood@uva.nl

    2016-03-01

    The singlet-doublet fermion dark matter model (SDFDM) provides a good DM candidate as well as the possibility of generating neutrino masses radiatively. The search and identification of DM requires the combined effort of both indirect and direct DM detection experiments in addition to the LHC. Remarkably, an excess of GeV gamma rays from the Galactic Center (GCE) has been measured with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) which appears to be robust with respect to changes in the diffuse galactic background modeling. Although several astrophysical explanations have been proposed, DM remains a simple and well motivated alternative. In this work, we examine the sensitivities of dark matter searches in the SDFDM scenario using Fermi-LAT, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, LUX, PICO and LHC with an emphasis on exploring the regions of the parameter space that can account for the GCE. We find that DM particles present in this model with masses close to ∼ 99 GeV and ∼ (173–190) GeV annihilating predominantly into the W{sup +}W{sup −} channel and t t-bar channel respectively, provide an acceptable fit to the GCE while being consistent with different current experimental bounds. We also find that much of the obtained parameter space can be ruled out by future direct search experiments like LZ and XENON-1T, in case of null results by these detectors. Interestingly, we show that the most recent data by LUX is starting to probe the best fit region in the SDFDM model.