Science.gov

Sample records for gli3 repressor controls

  1. Urogenital development in Pallister–Hall syndrome is disrupted in a cell-lineage-specific manner by constitutive expression of GLI3 repressor

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Joshua; Hu, Di; Cain, Jason E.; Rosenblum, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Pallister–Hall syndrome (PHS) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in GLI3 that produce a transcriptional repressor (GLI3R). Individuals with PHS present with a variably penetrant variety of urogenital system malformations, including renal aplasia or hypoplasia, hydroureter, hydronephrosis or a common urogenital sinus. The embryologic mechanisms controlled by GLI3R that result in these pathologic phenotypes are undefined. We demonstrate that germline expression of GLI3R causes renal hypoplasia, associated with decreased nephron number, and hydroureter and hydronephrosis, caused by blind-ending ureters. Mice with obligate GLI3R expression also displayed duplication of the ureters that was caused by aberrant common nephric duct patterning and ureteric stalk outgrowth. These developmental abnormalities are associated with suppressed Hedgehog signaling activity in the cloaca and adjacent vesicular mesenchyme. Mice with conditional expression of GLI3R were utilized to identify lineage-specific effects of GLI3R. In the ureteric bud, GLI3R expression decreased branching morphogenesis. In Six2-positive nephrogenic progenitors, GLI3R decreased progenitor cell proliferation reducing the number of nephrogenic precursor structures. Using mutant mice with Gli3R and Gli3 null alleles, we demonstrate that urogenital system patterning and development is controlled by the levels of GLI3R and not by an absence of full-length GLI3. We conclude that the urogenital system phenotypes observed in PHS are caused by GLI3R-dependent perturbations in nephric duct patterning, renal branching morphogenesis and nephrogenic progenitor self-renewal. PMID:26604140

  2. Gata6-Dependent GLI3 Repressor Function is Essential in Anterior Limb Progenitor Cells for Proper Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Akiyama, Ryutaro; Wong, Julia; Tahara, Naoyuki; Kawakami, Hiroko; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Gli3 is a major regulator of Hedgehog signaling during limb development. In the anterior mesenchyme, GLI3 is proteolytically processed into GLI3R, a truncated repressor form that inhibits Hedgehog signaling. Although numerous studies have identified mechanisms that regulate Gli3 function in vitro, it is not completely understood how Gli3 function is regulated in vivo. In this study, we show a novel mechanism of regulation of GLI3R activities in limb buds by Gata6, a member of the GATA transcription factor family. We show that conditional inactivation of Gata6 prior to limb outgrowth by the Tcre deleter causes preaxial polydactyly, the formation of an anterior extra digit, in hindlimbs. A recent study suggested that Gata6 represses Shh transcription in hindlimb buds. However, we found that ectopic Hedgehog signaling precedes ectopic Shh expression. In conjunction, we observed Gata6 and Gli3 genetically interact, and compound heterozygous mutants develop preaxial polydactyly without ectopic Shh expression, indicating an additional prior mechanism to prevent polydactyly. These results support the idea that Gata6 possesses dual roles during limb development: enhancement of Gli3 repressor function to repress Hedgehog signaling in the anterior limb bud, and negative regulation of Shh expression. Our in vitro and in vivo studies identified that GATA6 physically interacts with GLI3R to facilitate nuclear localization of GLI3R and repressor activities of GLI3R. Both the genetic and biochemical data elucidates a novel mechanism by Gata6 to regulate GLI3R activities in the anterior limb progenitor cells to prevent polydactyly and attain proper development of the mammalian autopod. PMID:27352137

  3. The role of primary cilia in corpus callosum formation is mediated by production of the Gli3 repressor.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Anselme, Isabelle; Besse, Laurianne; Catala, Martin; Palmyre, Aurélien; Baas, Dominique; Paschaki, Marie; Pedraza, Maria; Métin, Christine; Durand, Bénédicte; Schneider-Maunoury, Sylvie

    2015-09-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a frequent brain disorder found in over 80 human congenital syndromes including ciliopathies. Here, we report a severe AgCC in Ftm/Rpgrip1l knockout mouse, which provides a valuable model for Meckel-Grüber syndrome. Rpgrip1l encodes a protein of the ciliary transition zone, which is essential for ciliogenesis in several cell types in mouse including neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain. We show that AgCC in Rpgrip1l(-/-) mouse is associated with a disturbed location of guidepost cells in the dorsomedial telencephalon. This mislocalization results from early patterning defects and abnormal cortico-septal boundary (CSB) formation in the medial telencephalon. We demonstrate that all these defects primarily result from altered GLI3 processing. Indeed, AgCC, together with patterning defects and mispositioning of guidepost cells, is rescued by overexpressing in Rpgrip1l(-/-) embryos, the short repressor form of the GLI3 transcription factor (GLI3R), provided by the Gli3(Δ699) allele. Furthermore, Gli3(Δ699) also rescues AgCC in Rfx3(-/-) embryos deficient for the ciliogenic RFX3 transcription factor that regulates the expression of several ciliary genes. These data demonstrate that GLI3 processing is a major outcome of primary cilia function in dorsal telencephalon morphogenesis. Rescuing CC formation in two independent ciliary mutants by GLI3(Δ699) highlights the crucial role of primary cilia in maintaining the proper level of GLI3R required for morphogenesis of the CC.

  4. Gli3 controls corpus callosum formation by positioning midline guideposts during telencephalic patterning.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Dario; Hasenpusch-Theil, Kerstin; Benadiba, Carine; Yu, Tian; Basson, M Albert; Price, David J; Lebrand, Cécile; Theil, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) represents the major forebrain commissure connecting the 2 cerebral hemispheres. Midline crossing of callosal axons is controlled by several glial and neuronal guideposts specifically located along the callosal path, but it remains unknown how these cells acquire their position. Here, we show that the Gli3 hypomorphic mouse mutant Polydactyly Nagoya (Pdn) displays agenesis of the CC and mislocation of the glial and neuronal guidepost cells. Using transplantation experiments, we demonstrate that agenesis of the CC is primarily caused by midline defects. These defects originate during telencephalic patterning and involve an up-regulation of Slit2 expression and altered Fgf and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Mutations in sprouty1/2 which mimic the changes in these signaling pathways cause a disorganization of midline guideposts and CC agenesis. Moreover, a partial recovery of midline abnormalities in Pdn/Pdn;Slit2(-/-) embryos mutants confirms the functional importance of correct Slit2 expression levels for callosal development. Hence, Gli3 controlled restriction of Fgf and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and of Slit2 expression is crucial for positioning midline guideposts and callosal development.

  5. T-box3 is a ciliary protein and regulates stability of the Gli3 transcription factor to control digit number

    PubMed Central

    Emechebe, Uchenna; Kumar P, Pavan; Rozenberg, Julian M; Moore, Bryn; Firment, Ashley; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Moon, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Crucial roles for T-box3 in development are evident by severe limb malformations and other birth defects caused by T-box3 mutations in humans. Mechanisms whereby T-box3 regulates limb development are poorly understood. We discovered requirements for T-box at multiple stages of mouse limb development and distinct molecular functions in different tissue compartments. Early loss of T-box3 disrupts limb initiation, causing limb defects that phenocopy Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) mutants. Later ablation of T-box3 in posterior limb mesenchyme causes digit loss. In contrast, loss of anterior T-box3 results in preaxial polydactyly, as seen with dysfunction of primary cilia or Gli3-repressor. Remarkably, T-box3 is present in primary cilia where it colocalizes with Gli3. T-box3 interacts with Kif7 and is required for normal stoichiometry and function of a Kif7/Sufu complex that regulates Gli3 stability and processing. Thus, T-box3 controls digit number upstream of Shh-dependent (posterior mesenchyme) and Shh-independent, cilium-based (anterior mesenchyme) Hedgehog pathway function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07897.001 PMID:27046536

  6. The ciliary Evc/Evc2 complex interacts with Smo and controls Hedgehog pathway activity in chondrocytes by regulating Sufu/Gli3 dissociation and Gli3 trafficking in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Caparrós-Martín, Jose A; Valencia, María; Reytor, Edel; Pacheco, María; Fernandez, Margarita; Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Gean, Esther; Lapunzina, Pablo; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in patterning and morphogenesis of most organs in the developing mammalian embryo. Despite many advances in understanding core components of the pathway, little is known about how the activity of the Hh pathway is adjusted in organ- and tissue-specific developmental processes. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 disrupt Hh signaling in tooth and bone development. Using mouse models, we show here that Evc and Evc2 are mutually required for localizing to primary cilia and also for maintaining their normal protein levels. Consistent with Evc and Evc2 functioning as a complex, the skeletal phenotypes in either single or double homozygous mutant mice are virtually indistinguishable. Smo translocation to the cilium was normal in Evc2-deficient chondrocytes following Hh activation with the Smo-agonist SAG. However, Gli3 recruitment to cilia tips was reduced and Sufu/Gli3 dissociation was impaired. Interestingly, we found Smo to co-precipitate with Evc/Evc2, indicating that in some cells Hh signaling requires direct interaction of Smo with the Evc/Evc2 complex. Expression of a dominantly acting Evc2 mutation previously identified in Weyer's acrodental dysostosis (Evc2Δ43) caused mislocalization of Evc/Evc2Δ43 within the cilium and also reproduced the Gli3-related molecular defects observed in Evc2(-/-) chondrocytes. Moreover, Evc silencing in Sufu(-/-) cells attenuated the output of the Hh pathway, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 also promote Hh signaling in the absence of Sufu. Together our data reveal that the Hh pathway involves Evc/Evc2-dependent modulations that are necessary for normal endochondral bone formation.

  7. Cis-regulatory underpinnings of human GLI3 expression in embryonic craniofacial structures and internal organs.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Amir A; Minhas, Rashid; Schmidt, Ansgar; Koch, Sabine; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2013-10-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Gli3 is an important mediator of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. During early embryonic development Gli3 participates in patterning and growth of the central nervous system, face, skeleton, limb, tooth and gut. Precise regulation of the temporal and spatial expression of Gli3 is crucial for the proper specification of these structures in mammals and other vertebrates. Previously we reported a set of human intronic cis-regulators controlling almost the entire known repertoire of endogenous Gli3 expression in mouse neural tube and limbs. However, the genetic underpinning of GLI3 expression in other embryonic domains such as craniofacial structures and internal organs remain elusive. Here we demonstrate in a transgenic mice assay the potential of a subset of human/fish conserved non-coding sequences (CNEs) residing within GLI3 intronic intervals to induce reporter gene expression at known regions of endogenous Gli3 transcription in embryonic domains other than central nervous system (CNS) and limbs. Highly specific reporter expression was observed in craniofacial structures, eye, gut, and genitourinary system. Moreover, the comparison of expression patterns directed by these intronic cis-acting regulatory elements in mouse and zebrafish embryos suggests that in accordance with sequence conservation, the target site specificity of a subset of these elements remains preserved among these two lineages. Taken together with our recent investigations, it is proposed here that during vertebrate evolution the Gli3 expression control acquired multiple, independently acting, intronic enhancers for spatiotemporal patterning of CNS, limbs, craniofacial structures and internal organs.

  8. The interaction of RNA polymerase and lac repressor with the lac control region.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, A; Galas, D J

    1979-01-01

    We have examined the interactions of lac repressor and RNA polymerase with the DNA of the lac control region, using a method for direct visualization of the regions of DNA protected by proteins from DNAase attack. The repressor protects the operator essentially as reported by Gilbert and Maxam (1) with some small modifications. However, the evidence reported here concerning the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA of the promoter mutant UV5 indicates that : 1) the RNA polymerase molecule binds asymmetrically to the promoter DNA, 2) RNA polymerase protects DNA sequences to within a few bases of the CAP binding site, suggesting direct interaction between polymerase and the CAP protein at this site, 3) RNA polymerase still binds to the promoter when repressor is bound to the operator, but fails to form the same extensive complex. Images PMID:370784

  9. Expansion of the piriform cortex contributes to corticothalamic pathfinding defects in Gli3 conditional mutants.

    PubMed

    Amaniti, Eleni-Maria; Fu, Chaoying; Lewis, Sean; Saisana, Marina; Magnani, Dario; Mason, John O; Theil, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The corticothalamic and thalamocortical tracts play essential roles in the communication between the cortex and thalamus. During development, axons forming these tracts have to follow a complex path to reach their target areas. While much attention has been paid to the mechanisms regulating their passage through the ventral telencephalon, very little is known about how the developing cortex contributes to corticothalamic/thalamocortical tract formation. Gli3 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor widely expressed in telencephalic progenitors which has important roles in corticothalamic and thalamocortical pathfinding. Here, we conditionally inactivated Gli3 in dorsal telencephalic progenitors to determine its role in corticothalamic tract formation. In Emx1Cre;Gli3(fl/fl) mutants, only a few corticothalamic axons enter the striatum in a restricted dorsal domain. This restricted entry correlates with a medial expansion of the piriform cortex. Transplantation experiments showed that the expanded piriform cortex repels corticofugal axons. Moreover, expression of Sema5B, a chemorepellent for corticofugal axons produced by the piriform cortex, is similarly expanded. Finally, time course analysis revealed an expansion of the ventral pallial progenitor domain which gives rise to the piriform cortex. Hence, control of lateral cortical development by Gli3 at the progenitor level is crucial for corticothalamic pathfinding.

  10. Suppressor of Fused Is Required for Determining Digit Number and Identity via Gli3/Fgfs/Gremlin

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ying; Yang, Xueqin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qiu, Mengsheng; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Zunyi

    2015-01-01

    The anterior-posterior patterning of the vertebrate limb bud requires closely coordinated signaling interactions, including Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-mediated counteraction of the Gli3 transcription factor in the distal and posterior mesenchyme of the limb bud. Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), an intracellular negative regulator of Shh signaling via Gli2 and Gli3, is implicated in early development of the mouse limb bud. However, how Sufu is involved in the genetic regulation of limb bud patterning still remains elusive. In this study, we show that the conditional deletion of Sufu in the mesenchyme of the early limb bud results in polydactyly with loss of digit identity and supernumerary bones in the wrist and the ankle. These pattern alterations are associated with anterior expansion of HoxD genes located at the 5’ end of the cluster. By focusing on gene expression analysis of Shh/Gremlin1/Fgf signaling critical for the establishment and maintenance of anterior-posterior patterning, we show that early response to loss of Sufu involves anterior prolongation of Fgf4 and Fgf8 expression in the apical ectodermal ridge at E10.5. We also reveal the anterior activation of Shh-dependent posterior markers Ptc1, Gli1 and Gremlin in limb buds lacking Sufu. Furthermore, we find that loss of Sufu leads to attenuated levels of repressor Gli2 and repressor Gli3 in the early limb bud. Moreover, expression of Hand2 is activated in the entire limb bud at the early outgrowth stage in the mutant lacking Sufu. Thus, we provide evidence that Sufu is involved in the genetic network that restricts the posterior expression of Gli2/3/Hand2 and Gremlin/Fgf in limb bud patterning. PMID:26001200

  11. Transcriptional Analysis of Gli3 Mutants Identifies Wnt Target Genes in the Developing Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hasenpusch-Theil, Kerstin; Magnani, Dario; Amaniti, Eleni-Maria; Han, Lin; Armstrong, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Early development of the hippocampus, which is essential for spatial memory and learning, is controlled by secreted signaling molecules of the Wnt gene family and by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Despite its importance, little is known, however, about Wnt-regulated genes during hippocampal development. Here, we used the Gli3 mutant mouse extra-toes (XtJ), in which Wnt gene expression in the forebrain is severely affected, as a tool in a microarray analyses to identify potential Wnt target genes. This approach revealed 53 candidate genes with restricted or graded expression patterns in the dorsomedial telencephalon. We identified conserved Tcf/Lef-binding sites in telencephalon-specific enhancers of several of these genes, including Dmrt3, Gli3, Nfia, and Wnt8b. Binding of Lef1 to these sites was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Mutations in these Tcf/Lef-binding sites disrupted or reduced enhancer activity in vivo. Moreover, ectopic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in an ex vivo explant system led to increased telencephalic expression of these genes. Finally, conditional inactivation of Gli3 results in defective hippocampal growth. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that we have identified a set of direct Wnt target genes in the developing hippocampus and provide inside into the genetic hierarchy underlying Wnt-regulated hippocampal development. PMID:22235033

  12. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  13. A repressor-response regulator gene pair controlling jadomycin B production in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Han, L; He, J; Wang, L; Vining, L C

    2001-11-28

    A second regulatory gene (jadR(1)) is located immediately upstream of the putative repressor gene (jadR(2)) in the jad cluster for biosynthesis of the antibiotic jadomycin B in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. It encodes a 234-amino acid polypeptide with a sequence resembling those of response regulator proteins in two-component control systems. Features in the conserved C-terminal domain of JadR(1) place the protein in the OmpR-PhoB subfamily of response regulators. In mutants where jadR(1) was deleted or disrupted, jadomycin B was not produced, implying that the gene has an essential role in biosynthesis of the antibiotic. Cloning jadR(1) from S. venezuelae in pJV73A, and introducing additional copies of the gene into the wild-type parent by plasmid transformation gave unstable strains with pJV73A integrated into the chromosome. The transformants initially showed increased production of jadomycin B but gave lower titers as excess copies of jadR(1) were lost; mature cultures stabilized with a wild-type level of antibiotic production. The mutant from which jadR(1) had been deleted could not be transformed with pJV73A. Altering the composition of jadR genes in the chromosome by integration of vectors carrying intact and disrupted copies of jadR(1) and jadR(2) provided evidence that the two genes form a regulatory pair different in function from previously reported two-component systems controlling antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomycetes.

  14. Control of gene expression in Helicobacter pylori using the Tet repressor

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Mark S.; Duncan, Stacy S.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Cover, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a versatile system to control gene expression in Helicobacter pylori has hampered efforts to study H. pylori physiology and pathogenesis. To overcome these limitations, we evaluated the utility of an inducible system based on the well-characterized Tet repressor (TetR) and Tet operator (tetO). As validation of this system, we introduced three copies of tetO into the promoter region upstream of the cagUT operon (encoding two virulence factors required for function of the H. pylori Cag type IV secretion system) and expressed tetR by introducing a codon-optimized gene into the chromosomal ureA locus. Introduction of the tetO copies upstream of cagUT did not disrupt promoter activity, as determined by immunoblotting for CagT. The subsequent introduction of tetR, however, did repress CagT synthesis. Production of CagT was restored when strains were cultured in the presence of the inducer, anhydrotetracycline. To demonstrate one potential application of this new tool, we analyzed the function of the Cag type IV secretion system. When the modified H. pylori strains were co-cultured with AGS cells, activity of the Cag type IV secretion system was dependent on the presence of anhydrotetracycline as evidenced by inducer-dependent induction of IL-8 secretion, CagA translocation, and appearance of type IV secretion system pili at the bacteria-host interface. These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the tetR-tetO system to control gene expression in H. pylori and provide an improved system for studying H. pylori physiology and pathogenesis. PMID:24113399

  15. p21 as a Transcriptional Co-Repressor of S-Phase and Mitotic Control Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, Nuria; Caraballo, Juan M.; García-Gutierrez, Lucía; Devgan, Vikram; Rodriguez-Paredes, Manuel; Lafita, M. Carmen; Bretones, Gabriel; Quintanilla, Andrea; Muñoz-Alonso, M. Jose; Blanco, Rosa; Reyes, Jose C.; Agell, Neus; Delgado, M. Dolores; Dotto, G. Paolo; León, Javier

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562) with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene). Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes. PMID:22662213

  16. New insights into genotype–phenotype correlation for GLI3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Démurger, Florence; Ichkou, Amale; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Le Merrer, Martine; Goudefroye, Géraldine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Quélin, Chloé; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Baujat, Geneviève; Fradin, Mélanie; Pasquier, Laurent; Megarbané, André; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Roume, Joëlle; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Mercier, Sandra; Philip, Nicole; Schaefer, Elise; Holder, Muriel; Krause, Amanda; Laffargue, Fanny; Sinico, Martine; Amram, Daniel; André, Gwenaelle; Liquier, Alain; Rossi, Massimiliano; Amiel, Jeanne; Giuliano, Fabienne; Boute, Odile; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Afenjar, Alexandra; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marylin; Vincent- Delorme, Catherine; Chauvet, Marie-Liesse; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Devisme, Louise; Geneviève, David; Munnich, Arnold; Viot, Géraldine; Raoul, Odile; Romana, Serge; Gonzales, Marie; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Odent, Sylvie; Vekemans, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations includes autosomal dominant Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister–Hall syndrome (PHS). PHS was first described as a lethal condition associating hypothalamic hamartoma, postaxial or central polydactyly, anal atresia and bifid epiglottis. Typical GCPS combines polysyndactyly of hands and feet and craniofacial features. Genotype–phenotype correlations have been found both for the location and the nature of GLI3 mutations, highlighting the bifunctional nature of GLI3 during development. Here we report on the molecular and clinical study of 76 cases from 55 families with either a GLI3 mutation (49 GCPS and 21 PHS), or a large deletion encompassing the GLI3 gene (6 GCPS cases). Most of mutations are novel and consistent with the previously reported genotype–phenotype correlation. Our results also show a correlation between the location of the mutation and abnormal corpus callosum observed in some patients with GCPS. Fetal PHS observations emphasize on the possible lethality of GLI3 mutations and extend the phenotypic spectrum of malformations such as agnathia and reductional limbs defects. GLI3 expression studied by in situ hybridization during human development confirms its early expression in target tissues. PMID:24736735

  17. New insights into genotype-phenotype correlation for GLI3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Démurger, Florence; Ichkou, Amale; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Le Merrer, Martine; Goudefroye, Géraldine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Quélin, Chloé; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Baujat, Geneviève; Fradin, Mélanie; Pasquier, Laurent; Megarbané, André; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Roume, Joëlle; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Mercier, Sandra; Philip, Nicole; Schaefer, Elise; Holder, Muriel; Krause, Amanda; Laffargue, Fanny; Sinico, Martine; Amram, Daniel; André, Gwenaelle; Liquier, Alain; Rossi, Massimiliano; Amiel, Jeanne; Giuliano, Fabienne; Boute, Odile; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Afenjar, Alexandra; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marylin; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Chauvet, Marie-Liesse; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Devisme, Louise; Geneviève, David; Munnich, Arnold; Viot, Géraldine; Raoul, Odile; Romana, Serge; Gonzales, Marie; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Odent, Sylvie; Vekemans, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations includes autosomal dominant Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS). PHS was first described as a lethal condition associating hypothalamic hamartoma, postaxial or central polydactyly, anal atresia and bifid epiglottis. Typical GCPS combines polysyndactyly of hands and feet and craniofacial features. Genotype-phenotype correlations have been found both for the location and the nature of GLI3 mutations, highlighting the bifunctional nature of GLI3 during development. Here we report on the molecular and clinical study of 76 cases from 55 families with either a GLI3 mutation (49 GCPS and 21 PHS), or a large deletion encompassing the GLI3 gene (6 GCPS cases). Most of mutations are novel and consistent with the previously reported genotype-phenotype correlation. Our results also show a correlation between the location of the mutation and abnormal corpus callosum observed in some patients with GCPS. Fetal PHS observations emphasize on the possible lethality of GLI3 mutations and extend the phenotypic spectrum of malformations such as agnathia and reductional limbs defects. GLI3 expression studied by in situ hybridization during human development confirms its early expression in target tissues.

  18. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  19. Novel frame-shift mutations of GLI3 gene in non-syndromic postaxial polydactyly patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Li, Yuchan; Geng, Juan; Fu, Qihua; Xu, Yunlan; Shen, Yiping

    2014-06-10

    Polydactyly is a common congenital limb deformity. This anomaly may occur in isolation (non-syndromic) or as part of a syndrome. The glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 3 (GLI3) is known to be associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly. GLI3 plays a predominant role in the pathogenesis of syndromic polydactyly: mutations have been identified in 68% of patients with Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome and 91% of patients with Pallister-Hall syndrome. The knowledge regarding the contribution of GLI3 in non-syndromic polydactyly is currently very limited. In this study, we assembled a cohort of individuals of Chinese ethnicity with non-syndromic postaxial polydactyly. We presented the clinical features and molecular evaluations of 19 probands. GLI3 mutations were identified in 15.8% of probands (3/19) including two novel frame-shift mutations c.3855dupC (p.Met1286HisfsTer18) and c.4141delA (p.Arg1381GlyfsTer38) detected in sporadic cases and one previously reported nonsense mutation (c.1927C>T/p.Arg643Ter) in a familial case. Of note, GLI3 mutations were exclusively detected in patients with bilateral polydactyly affecting both hands and feet. Three out of five (60%) probands with bilateral polydactyly on both hands and feet carried pathogenic mutations in GLI3. Our study demonstrated the role of GLI3 in a significant fraction of patients with non-syndromic bilateral polydactyly affecting both hands and feet.

  20. GLI3 mutations in syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly in two Indian families.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmi; Singh, Chandra Bhan; Bhattacharya, Visweswar; Singh, Subodh Kumar; Ali, Akhtar

    2016-03-01

    The GLI3 protein is a zinc finger transcription factor, expressed early in development. The GLI3 gene exhibits allelic heterogeneity as mutations in this gene are associated with several developmental syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly. The present study reports two cases: first, a familial case of Greig Cephalopolysyndactyly Syndrome (GCPS); the second is a sporadic case with both postaxial polydactyly (PAP) type A and B. Resequencing of GLI3 gene reveals a previously reported nonsense truncation mutation g.42007251G > A (p.R792X; rs121917714) in the GCPS family and a novel single nucleotide insertion g.42004239_42004240insA (p.E1478X) in the sporadic case of postaxial polydactyly (PAP). Both nonsense truncation mutations; p.R792X (GCPS) and p.E1478X (PAP) introduce a premature stop codon leading to loss of C-terminal domains.

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 enhancer-controlled transcription by artificial enhancer-binding peptides derived from bacteriophage 434 repressor.

    PubMed

    Caderas, G; Klauser, S; Liu, N; Bienz, A; Gutte, B

    1999-12-01

    An artificial HIV-1 enhancer-binding 42-residue peptide (R42) that had been derived from bacteriophage 434 repressor inhibited the cell-free in vitro transcription of HIV-1 enhancer-containing plasmids [Hehlgans, T., Stolz, M., Klauser, S., Cui, T., Salgam, P., Brenz Verca, S., Widmann, M., Leiser, A., Städler, K. & Gutte, B. (1993) FEBS Lett. 315, 51-55; Caderas, G. (1997) PhD Thesis, University of Zürich]. Here we show that, after N-terminal extension of R42 with a viral nuclear localization signal, the resulting nucR42 peptide was active in intact cells. NucR42 could be detected immunologically in nuclear extracts and produced a 60-70% reduction of the rate of transcription of an HIV-1 enhancer-carrying plasmid in COS-1 cells that had been cotransfected with the HIV enhancer plasmid, an expression plasmid for nucR42, and a control. NucR42 was also synthesized chemically and the synthetic product characterized by HPLC, mass spectrometry, and quantitative amino acid analysis. Band shift, footprint, and in vitro transcription assays in the presence of exogenous NF-kappaBp50 indicated that the binding sites of nucR42 and NF-kappaB on the HIV enhancers overlapped and that a relatively small excess of nucR42 sufficed to displace NF-kappaBp50. Band shift and in vitro transcription experiments showed also that exchange of the 434 repressor-derived nine-residue recognition helix of nucR42 for four glycines abolished the HIV enhancer binding specificity whereas leucine zipper- or retro-leucine zipper-mediated dimerization of R42 analogues increased it suggesting the potential application of such dimeric HIV enhancer-binding peptides as intracellular inhibitors of HIV replication.

  2. Nonspecific DNA binding of genome-regulating proteins as a biological control mechanism: Measurement of DNA-bound Escherichia coli lac repressor in vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Kao-Huang, Ying; Revzin, Arnold; Butler, Andrew P.; O'Conner, Pamela; Noble, Daniel W.; Von Hippel, Peter H.

    1977-01-01

    Binding of genome regulatory proteins to nonspecific DNA sites may play an important role in controlling the thermodynamics and kinetics of the interactions of these proteins with their specific target DNA sequences. An estimate of the fraction of Escherichia coli lac repressor molecules bound in vivo to the operator region and to nonoperator sites on the E. coli chromosome is derived by measurement of the distribution of repressor between a minicell-producing E. coli strain (P678-54) and the DNA-free minicells derived therefrom. Assuming the minicell cytoplasm to be representative of that of the parent E. coli cells, we find that less than 10% of the repressor tetramers of the average cell are free in solution; the remainder are presumed to be bound to the bacterial chromosome. The minimum in vivo value of the association constant for repressor to bulk nonoperator DNA (KRD) calculated from these results is about 103 M-1, and analysis of the sources of error in the minicell experiment suggests that the actual in vivo value of KRD could be substantially greater. The value of KRD, coupled with in vitro data on the ionic strength dependence of this parameter, can be used to estimate that the effective intracellular cation activity of E. coli is no greater than about 0.24 M (and probably no less than 0.17 M) in terms of sodium ion equivalents. The minicell distribution experiments also confirm that the association constant for the binding of inducer-repressor complex to bulk nonoperator DNA (KRID) is [unk] KRDin vivo. These results are used to calculate minimum in vivo values of KRO and KRIO (association constants for repressor and for inducer-repressor complex binding to operator) of about 1012 M-1 and about 109 M-1, respectively. The results fit a quantitative model for operon regulation in which nonspecific DNA-repressor complexes play a key role in determining basal and constitutive levels of gene expression [von Hippel, P. H., Revzin, A., Gross, C. A. & Wang, A. C

  3. Differential requirements for Gli2 and Gli3 in the regional specification of the mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Paul, Fabian A.; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Zhou, Xunlei; Theil, Thomas; Puelles, Luis; Blaess, Sandra; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) ventralizes the neural tube by modulating the crucial balance between activating and repressing functions (GliA, GliR) of transcription factors Gli2 and Gli3. This balance—the Shh-Gli code—is species- and context-dependent and has been elucidated for the mouse spinal cord. The hypothalamus, a forebrain region regulating vital functions like homeostasis and hormone secretion, shows dynamic and intricate Shh expression as well as complex regional differentiation. Here we asked if particular combinations of Gli2 and Gli3 and of GliA and GliR functions contribute to the variety of hypothalamic regions, i.e., we wanted to approach the question of a possible hypothalamic version of the Shh-Gli code. Based on mouse mutant analysis, we show that: (1) hypothalamic regional heterogeneity is based in part on differentially stringent requirements for Gli2 or Gli3; (2) another source of diversity are differential requirements for Shh of neural vs. non-neural origin; (3) the medial progenitor domain known to depend on Gli2 for its development generates several essential hypothalamic nuclei plus the pituitary and median eminence; (4) the suppression of Gli3R by neural and non-neural Shh is essential for hypothalamic specification. Finally, we have mapped our results on a recent model which considers the hypothalamus as a transverse region with alar and basal portions. Our data confirm the model and are explained by it. PMID:25859185

  4. The auxin Sl-IAA17 transcriptional repressor controls fruit size via the regulation of endoreduplication-related cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Su, Liyan; Bassa, Carole; Audran, Corinne; Mila, Isabelle; Cheniclet, Catherine; Chevalier, Christian; Bouzayen, Mondher; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Chervin, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Auxin is known to regulate cell division and cell elongation, thus controlling plant growth and development. Part of the auxin signaling pathway depends on the fine-tuned degradation of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional repressors. Recent evidence indicates that Aux/IAA proteins play a role in fruit development in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.), a model species for fleshy fruit development. We report here on the functional characterization of Sl-IAA17 during tomato fruit development. Silencing of Sl-IAA17 by an RNA interference (RNAi) strategy resulted in the production of larger fruit than the wild type. Histological analyses of the fruit organ and tissues demonstrated that this phenotype was associated with a thicker pericarp, rather than larger locules and/or a larger number of seeds. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that the higher pericarp thickness in Sl-IAA17 RNAi fruits was not due to a larger number of cells, but to the increase in cell size. Finally, we observed that the cell expansion in the transgenic fruits is tightly coupled with higher ploidy levels than in the wild type, suggesting a stimulation of the endoreduplication process. In conclusion, this work provides new insights into the function of the Aux/IAA pathway in fleshy fruit development, especially fruit size and cell size determination in tomato.

  5. Set7 mediated Gli3 methylation plays a positive role in the activation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Wu, Hailong; Cheng, Steven Y; Gao, Daming; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling plays very important roles in development and cancers. Vertebrates have three transcriptional factors, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3. Among them, Gli3 is a very special transcriptional factor which closely resembles Cubitus interruptus (Ci, in Drosophila) structurally and functionally as a ‘double agent’ for Shh target gene expression. Here we show that Gli3 full-length, but not the truncated form, can be methylated at K436 and K595. This methylation is specifically catalyzed by Set7, a lysine methyltransferase (KMT). Methylation at K436 and K595 respectively increases the stability and DNA binding ability of Gli3, resulting in an enhancement of Shh signaling activation. Furthermore, functional experiments indicate that the Gli3 methylation contributes to the tumor growth and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we propose that Set7 mediated methylation is a novel PTM of Gli3, which positively regulates the transactivity of Gli3 and the activation of Shh signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15690.001 PMID:27146893

  6. MiRNA-133b promotes the proliferation of human Sertoli cells through targeting GLI3

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chencheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Chen, Zheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    Sertoli cells play critical roles in regulating spermatogenesis and they can be reprogrammed to the cells of other lineages, highlighting that they have significant applications in reproductive and regenerative medicine. The fate determinations of Sertoli cells are regulated precisely by epigenetic factors. However, the expression, roles, and targets of microRNA (miRNA) in human Sertoli cells remain unknown. Here we have for the first time revealed that 174 miRNAs were distinctly expressed in human Sertoli cells between Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) patients and obstructive azoospermia (OA) patients with normal spermatogenesis using miRNA microarrays and real time PCR, suggesting that these miRNAs may be associated with the pathogenesis of SCOS. MiR-133b is upregulated in Sertoli cells of SCOS patients compared to OA patients. Proliferation assays with miRNA mimics and inhibitors showed that miR-133b enhanced the proliferation of human Sertoli cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that GLI3 was a direct target of miR-133b and the expression of Cyclin B1 and Cyclin D1 was enhanced by miR-133b mimics but decreased by its inhibitors. Gene silencing of GLI3 using RNA inference stimulated the growth of human Sertoli cells. Collectively, miR-133b promoted the proliferation of human Sertoli cells by targeting GLI3. This study thus sheds novel insights into epigenetic regulation of human Sertoli cells and the etiology of azoospermia and offers new targets for treating male infertility PMID:26755652

  7. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway Is Controlled at Different Branches by a Set of R2R3-MYB C2 Repressors in Grapevine1

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  8. Sall4-Gli3 system in early limb progenitors is essential for the development of limb skeletal elements.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Ryutaro; Kawakami, Hiroko; Wong, Julia; Oishi, Isao; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-21

    Limb skeletal elements originate from the limb progenitor cells, which undergo expansion and patterning to develop each skeletal element. Posterior-distal skeletal elements, such as the ulna/fibula and posterior digits develop in a Sonic hedgehog (Shh)-dependent manner. However, it is poorly understood how anterior-proximal elements, such as the humerus/femur, the radius/tibia and the anterior digits, are developed. Here we show that the zinc finger factors Sall4 and Gli3 cooperate for proper development of the anterior-proximal skeletal elements and also function upstream of Shh-dependent posterior skeletal element development. Conditional inactivation of Sall4 in the mesoderm before limb outgrowth caused severe defects in the anterior-proximal skeletal elements in the hindlimb. We found that Gli3 expression is reduced in Sall4 mutant hindlimbs, but not in forelimbs. This reduction caused posteriorization of nascent hindlimb buds, which is correlated with a loss of anterior digits. In proximal development, Sall4 integrates Gli3 and the Plzf-Hox system, in addition to proliferative expansion of cells in the mesenchymal core of nascent hindlimb buds. Whereas forelimbs developed normally in Sall4 mutants, further genetic analysis identified that the Sall4-Gli3 system is a common regulator of the early limb progenitor cells in both forelimbs and hindlimbs. The Sall4-Gli3 system also functions upstream of the Shh-expressing ZPA and the Fgf8-expressing AER in fore- and hindlimbs. Therefore, our study identified a critical role of the Sall4-Gli3 system at the early steps of limb development for proper development of the appendicular skeletal elements.

  9. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  10. MicroRNA-378 limits activation of hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis by suppressing Gli3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jeongeun; Wang, Sihyung; Kim, Jieun; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Park, Soo Yong; Chung, Ildoo; Ha, Chang-Sik; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yun, Yang H.; Jung, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate various cellular processes; however, their role in liver fibrosis is unclear. Here we investigate regulation of miRNAs in chronically damaged fibrotic liver. MiRNA profiling shows that expression of miR-378 family members (miR-378a-3p, miR-378b and miR-378d) declines in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated compared with corn-oil-treated mice. Overexpression of miR-378a-3p, directly targeting Gli3 in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reduces expression of Gli3 and profibrotic genes but induces gfap, the inactivation marker of HSCs, in CCl4-treated liver. Smo blocks transcriptional expression of miR-378a-3p by activating the p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The hepatic level of miR-378a-3p is inversely correlated with the expression of Gli3 in tumour and non-tumour tissues in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Our results demonstrate that miR-378a-3p suppresses activation of HSCs by targeting Gli3 and its expression is regulated by Smo-dependent NF-κB signalling, suggesting miR-378a-3p has therapeutic potential for liver fibrosis. PMID:27001906

  11. A three-part signal governs differential processing of Gli1 and Gli3 proteins by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Erin K; Harstad, Kristine G; Holmgren, Robert A; Matouschek, Andreas

    2011-11-11

    The Gli proteins are the transcriptional effectors of the mammalian Hedgehog signaling pathway. In an unusual mechanism, the proteasome partially degrades or processes Gli3 in the absence of Hedgehog pathway stimulation to create a Gli3 fragment that opposes the activity of the full-length protein. In contrast, Gli1 is not processed but degraded completely, despite considerable homology with Gli3. We found that these differences in processing can be described by defining a processing signal that is composed of three parts: the zinc finger domain, an adjacent linker sequence, and a degron. Gli3 processing is inhibited when any one component of the processing signal is disrupted. We show that the zinc fingers are required for processing only as a folded structure and that the location but not the identity of the processing degron is critical. Within the linker sequence, regions of low sequence complexity play a crucial role, but other sequence features are also important. Gli1 is not processed because two components of the processing signal, the linker sequence and the degron, are ineffective. These findings provide new insights into the molecular elements that regulate Gli protein processing by the proteasome.

  12. Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 coordinate digit number in a Gli3-dependent manner☆

    PubMed Central

    Collette, Nicole M.; Yee, Cristal S.; Murugesh, Deepa; Sebastian, Aimy; Taher, Leila; Gale, Nicholas W.; Economides, Aris N.; Harland, Richard M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2013-01-01

    WNT signaling is critical in most aspects of skeletal development and homeostasis, and antagonists of WNT signaling are emerging as key regulatory proteins with great promise as therapeutic agents for bone disorders. Here we show that Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 emerged through ancestral genome duplication and their expression patterns have diverged to delineate non-overlapping domains in most organ systems including musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, digestive, reproductive and respiratory. In the developing limb, Sost and Sostdc1 display dynamic expression patterns with Sost being restricted to the distal ectoderm and Sostdc1 to the proximal ectoderm and the mesenchyme. While Sostdc1–/– mice lack any obvious limb or skeletal defects, Sost–/– mice recapitulate the hand defects described for Sclerosteosis patients. However, elevated WNT signaling in Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice causes misregulation of SHH signaling, ectopic activation of Sox9 in the digit 1 field and preaxial polydactyly in a Gli1- and Gli3-dependent manner. In addition, we show that the syndactyly documented in Sclerosteosis is present in both Sost–/– and Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice, and is driven by misregulation of Fgf8 in the AER, a region lacking Sost and Sostdc1 expression. This study highlights the complexity of WNT signaling in skeletal biology and disease and emphasizes how redundant mechanism and non-cell autonomous effects can synergize to unveil new intricate phenotypes caused by elevated WNT signaling. PMID:23994639

  13. Recent insights into Groucho co-repressor recruitment and function.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Aamna K; Schuster, Eugene F; Jennings, Barbara H

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is often controlled by transcriptional repressors during development. Many transcription factors lack intrinsic repressive activity but recruit co-factors that inhibit productive transcription. Here we discuss new insights and models for repression mediated by the Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of split (Gro/TLE) family of co-repressor proteins.

  14. Control of sex-specific apoptosis in C. elegans by the BarH homeodomain protein CEH-30 and the transcriptional repressor UNC-37/Groucho.

    PubMed

    Peden, Erin; Kimberly, Elizabeth; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Mitani, Shohei; Xue, Ding

    2007-12-01

    Apoptosis is essential for proper development and tissue homeostasis in metazoans. It plays a critical role in generating sexual dimorphism by eliminating structures that are not needed in a specific sex. The molecular mechanisms that regulate sexually dimorphic apoptosis are poorly understood. Here we report the identification of the ceh-30 gene as a key regulator of sex-specific apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss-of-function mutations in ceh-30 cause the ectopic death of male-specific CEM neurons. ceh-30 encodes a BarH homeodomain protein that acts downstream from the terminal sex determination gene tra-1, but upstream of, or in parallel to, the cell-death-initiating gene egl-1 to protect CEM neurons from undergoing apoptosis in males. The second intron of the ceh-30 gene contains two adjacent cis-elements that are binding sites for TRA-1A and a POU-type homeodomain protein UNC-86 and acts as a sensor to regulate proper specification of the CEM cell fate. Surprisingly, the N terminus of CEH-30 but not its homeodomain is critical for CEH-30's cell death inhibitory activity in CEMs and contains a conserved eh1/FIL domain that is important for the recruitment of the general transcriptional repressor UNC-37/Groucho. Our study suggests that ceh-30 defines a critical checkpoint that integrates the sex determination signal TRA-1 and the cell fate determination and survival signal UNC-86 to control the sex-specific activation of the cell death program in CEMs through the general transcription repressor UNC-37.

  15. The transcriptional repressor Sum1p counteracts Sir2p in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, mitochondrial quality control and replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Vevea, Jason D.; Charalel, Joseph K.; Sapar, Maria L.; Pon, Liza A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the stability or dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton can extend lifespan in C. elegans and S. cerevisiae. Actin cables of budding yeast, bundles of actin filaments that mediate cargo transport, affect lifespan control through effects on mitochondrial quality control. Sir2p, the founding member of the Sirtuin family of lifespan regulators, also affects actin cable dynamics, assembly, and function in mitochondrial quality control. Here, we obtained evidence for novel interactions between Sir2p and Sum1p, a transcriptional repressor that was originally identified through mutations that genetically suppress sir2∆ phenotypes unrelated to lifespan. We find that deletion of SUM1 in wild-type cells results in increased mitochondrial function and actin cable abundance. Furthermore, deletion of SUM1 suppresses defects in actin cables and mitochondria of sir2∆ yeast, and extends the replicative lifespan and cellular health span of sir2∆ cells. Thus, Sum1p suppresses Sir2p function in control of specific aging determinants and lifespan in budding yeast. PMID:28357337

  16. On the ion selectivity in Ca-binding proteins: the cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3 peptide as a model.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, F; Weinstein, H

    1989-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. Its functions are directly dependent on the high specificity for Ca2+ exhibited by the proteins and ion carriers that bind divalent ions. To elucidate the basis for this specificity we have calculated the relative energies of solvation of calcium and magnesium ions in complexes with cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3, a small synthetic peptide that binds Ca2+ with an affinity comparable to those of the naturally occurring proteins. The results show that the ion selectivity of the peptide resides in the difference in the solvation energies of the competing ions in water. Although the peptide is able to complex Mg2+ better than Ca2+ in the stoichiometries in which cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3 binds divalent ions, it is not always able to provide as much stabilization for Mg2+ as water does. These results also explain why cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3 binds Ca2+ and Mg2+ with different stoichiometries and indicate the source for expected differences in the structures of complexes of the two ions. Images PMID:2813364

  17. SCF Ubiquitin Ligase F-box Protein Fbx15 Controls Nuclear Co-repressor Localization, Stress Response and Virulence of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Jöhnk, Bastian; Bayram, Özgür; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Mattern, Derek J.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins share the F-box domain to connect substrates of E3 SCF ubiquitin RING ligases through the adaptor Skp1/A to Cul1/A scaffolds. F-box protein Fbx15 is part of the general stress response of the human pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Oxidative stress induces a transient peak of fbx15 expression, resulting in 3x elevated Fbx15 protein levels. During non-stress conditions Fbx15 is phosphorylated and F-box mediated interaction with SkpA preferentially happens in smaller subpopulations in the cytoplasm. The F-box of Fbx15 is required for an appropriate oxidative stress response, which results in rapid dephosphorylation of Fbx15 and a shift of the cellular interaction with SkpA to the nucleus. Fbx15 binds SsnF/Ssn6 as part of the RcoA/Tup1-SsnF/Ssn6 co-repressor and is required for its correct nuclear localization. Dephosphorylated Fbx15 prevents SsnF/Ssn6 nuclear localization and results in the derepression of gliotoxin gene expression. fbx15 deletion mutants are unable to infect immunocompromised mice in a model for invasive aspergillosis. Fbx15 has a novel dual molecular function by controlling transcriptional repression and being part of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, which is essential for stress response, gliotoxin production and virulence in the opportunistic human pathogen A. fumigatus. PMID:27649508

  18. Polymorphism of collagen triple helix revealed by 19F NMR of model peptide [Pro-4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-Gly]3-[Pro-4(R)-fluoroprolyl-Gly]-[Pro-4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-Gly]3.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Nemoto, Nobuaki; Motooka, Daisuke; Nishi, Yoshinori; Doi, Masamitsu; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2012-06-14

    We have characterized various structures of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(3)-Pro-fPro(R)-Gly-(Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(3) in the process of cis-trans isomerization and helix-coil transition by exploiting the sole (19)F NMR probe in 4(R)-fluoroproline (fPro(R)). Around the transition temperature (T(m)), we detected a species with a triple helical structure distinct from the ordinary one concerning the alignment of three strands. The (19)F-(19)F exchange spectroscopy showed that this misaligned and that the ordinary triple helices were interchangeable only indirectly via an extended monomer strand with all-trans peptide bonds at Pro-fPro(R), Pro-Hyp(R), and Gly-Pro in the central segment. This finding demonstrates that the helix-coil transition of collagen peptides is not described with a simple two-state model. We thus elaborated a scheme for the transition mechanism of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(n) that the most extended monomer strand can be the sole source both to the misaligned and correctly folded triple-helices. The staggered ends could help misaligned triple helices to self-assemble to higher-order structures. We have also discussed the possible relationship between the misaligned triple helix accumulating maximally at T(m) and the kinetic hysteresis associated with the helix-coil transition of collagen.

  19. An interdigit signalling centre instructs coordinate phalanx-joint formation governed by 5′Hoxd–Gli3 antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bau-Lin; Trofka, Anna; Furusawa, Aki; Norrie, Jacqueline L.; Rabinowitz, Adam H.; Vokes, Steven A.; Mark Taketo, M.; Zakany, Jozsef; Mackem, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The number of phalanges and joints are key features of digit ‘identity' and are central to limb functionality and evolutionary adaptation. Prior chick work indicated that digit phalanges and their associated joints arise in a different manner than the more sparsely jointed long bones, and their identity is regulated by differential signalling from adjacent interdigits. Currently, there is no genetic evidence for this model, and the molecular mechanisms governing digit joint specification remain poorly understood. Using genetic approaches in mouse, here we show that functional 5′Hoxd–Gli3 antagonism acts indirectly, through Bmp signalling from the interdigital mesenchyme, to regulate specification of joint progenitors, which arise in conjunction with phalangeal precursors at the digit tip. Phalanx number, although co-regulated, can be uncoupled from joint specification. We propose that 5′Hoxd genes and Gli3 are part of an interdigital signalling centre that sets net Bmp signalling levels from different interdigits to coordinately regulate phalanx and joint formation. PMID:27713395

  20. Cell type-specific control of protein synthesis and proliferation by FGF-dependent signaling to the translation repressor 4E-BP.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Rachel; Katsara, Olga; Kolupaeva, Victoria

    2016-07-05

    Regulation of protein synthesis plays a vital role in posttranscriptional modulation of gene expression. Translational control most commonly targets the initiation of protein synthesis: loading 40S ribosome complexes onto mRNA and AUG start codon recognition. This step is initiated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) (the m7GTP cap-binding protein), whose binding to eIF4G (a scaffolding subunit) and eIF4A (an ATP-dependent RNA helicase) leads to assembly of active eIF4F complex. The ability of eIF4E to recognize the cap is prevented by its binding to eIF4E binding protein (4E-BP), which thereby inhibits cap-dependent translation by sequestering eIF4E. The 4E-BP activity is, in turn, inhibited by mTORC1 [mTOR (the mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1] mediated phosphorylation. Here, we define a previously unidentified mechanism of mTOR-independent 4E-BP1 regulation that is used by chondrocytes upon FGF signaling. Chondrocytes are responsible for the formation of the skeleton long bones. Unlike the majority of cell types where FGF signaling triggers proliferation, chondrocytes respond to FGF with inhibition. We establish that FGF specifically suppresses protein synthesis in chondrocytes, but not in any other cells of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, 4E-BP1 repressor activity is necessary not only for suppression of protein synthesis, but also for FGF-induced cell-cycle arrest. Importantly, FGF-induced changes in the 4E-BP1 activity observed in cell culture are likewise detected in vivo and reflect the action of FGF signaling on downstream targets during bone development. Thus, our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling differentially impacts protein synthesis through either stimulation or repression, in a cell-type-dependent manner, with 4E-BP1 being a key player.

  1. Gli3 coordinates three-dimensional patterning and growth of the tectum and cerebellum by integrating Shh and Fgf8 signaling.

    PubMed

    Blaess, Sandra; Stephen, Daniel; Joyner, Alexandra L

    2008-06-01

    The coordination of anterior-posterior (AP) and dorsal-ventral (DV) patterning of the mesencephalon (mes) and rhombomere 1 (r1) is instrumental for the development of three distinct brain structures: the tectum and cerebellum dorsally and the tegmentum ventrally. Patterning of the mes/r1 is primarily mediated by signaling molecules secreted from two organizers: sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the floor plate (DV) and Fgf8 from the isthmus (AP). Gli3, a zinc-finger transcription factor in the Shh signaling pathway, has been implicated in regulating Fgf8 expression and is therefore a potential candidate for coordinating the action of the two organizers. By inactivating mouse Gli3 at successive embryonic time points in vivo, we uncovered the extent and the underlying mechanism of Gli3 function in the mes/r1. We demonstrate that before E9.0, Gli3 is required for establishing a distinct posterior tectum, isthmus and cerebellum, but does not play a role in the development of the tegmentum. Between E9.0 and E11.0, Gli3 continues to be required for isthmus and cerebellum development, but primarily for defining the cerebellar foliation pattern. We show that Gli3 regulates patterning of the isthmus and cerebellar anlage by confining Fgf8 expression to the isthmus, and attenuates growth of dorsal r1 (before E11.0) and the dorsal mes and isthmus (beyond E11.0) through regulation of cell proliferation and viability. In conclusion, our results show that Gli3 is essential for the coordinated three-dimensional patterning and growth of the dorsal mes/r1.

  2. Mechanism of promoter repression by Lac repressor-DNA loops.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James; Lionberger, Troy A

    2013-01-07

    The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon encodes the first genetic switch to be discovered, and lac remains a paradigm for studying negative and positive control of gene expression. Negative control is believed to involve competition of RNA polymerase and Lac repressor for overlapping binding sites. Contributions to the local Lac repressor concentration come from free repressor and repressor delivered to the operator from remote auxiliary operators by DNA looping. Long-standing questions persist concerning the actual role of DNA looping in the mechanism of promoter repression. Here, we use experiments in living bacteria to resolve four of these questions. We show that the distance dependence of repression enhancement is comparable for upstream and downstream auxiliary operators, confirming the hypothesis that repressor concentration increase is the principal mechanism of repression loops. We find that as few as four turns of DNA can be constrained in a stable loop by Lac repressor. We show that RNA polymerase is not trapped at repressed promoters. Finally, we show that constraining a promoter in a tight DNA loop is sufficient for repression even when promoter and operator do not overlap.

  3. Central role of the flowering repressor ZCCT2 in the redox control of freezing tolerance and the initial development of flower primordia in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As both abiotic stress response and development are under redox control, it was hypothesised that the pharmacological modification of the redox environment would affect the initial development of flower primordia and freezing tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Results Pharmacologically induced redox changes were monitored in winter (T. ae. ssp. aestivum cv. Cheyenne, Ch) and spring (T. ae. ssp. spelta; Tsp) wheat genotypes grown after germination at 20/17°C for 9 d (chemical treatment: last 3 d), then at 5°C for 21 d (chemical treatment: first 4 d) and subsequently at 20/17°C for 21 d (recovery period). Thiols and their disulphide forms were measured and based on these data reduction potentials were calculated. In the freezing-tolerant Ch the chemical treatments generally increased both the amount of thiol disulphides and the reduction potential after 3 days at 20/17°C. In the freezing-sensitive Tsp a similar effect of the chemicals on these parameters was only observed after the continuation of the treatments for 4 days at 5°C. The applied chemicals slightly decreased root fresh weight and increased freezing tolerance in Ch, whereas they increased shoot fresh weight in Tsp after 4 days at 5°C. As shown after the 3-week recovery at 20/17°C, the initial development of flower primordia was accelerated in Tsp, whereas it was not affected by the treatments in Ch. The chemicals differently affected the expression of ZCCT2 and that of several other genes related to freezing tolerance and initial development of flower primordia in Ch and Tsp after 4 d at 5°C. Conclusions Various redox-altering compounds and osmotica had differential effects on glutathione disulphide content and reduction potential, and consequently on the expression of the flowering repressor ZCCT2 in the winter wheat Ch and the spring wheat Tsp. We propose that the higher expression of ZCCT2 in Ch may be associated with activation of genes of cold acclimation and its lower

  4. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  5. Neisseria prophage repressor implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; McClure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W; Genco, Caroline A

    2013-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the -10 and -35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis.

  6. Neisseria Prophage Repressor Implicated in Gonococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; Mcclure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the −10 and −35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:23876804

  7. Complex postaxial polydactyly types A and B with camptodactyly, hypoplastic third toe, zygodactyly and other digit anomalies caused by a novel GLI3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Sara; Yıldız, Esra; Lal, Karmoon; Tolun, Aslıhan; Malik, Sajid

    2017-03-14

    Polydactyly is a phenotypically and genetically highly heterogeneous limb malformation with preaxial and postaxial subtypes and subtypes A and B. Most polydactyly entities are associated with GLI3 mutation. We report on 10 affected individuals from a large Pakistani kindred initially evaluated as a possible new condition. The phenotype is postaxial polydactyly types A and B associated with zygodactyly, postaxial webbing of toes and additional features not previously reported for isolated polydactyly such as camptodactyly, hypoplasia of third toe, and wide space between hallux and second toe. Hypothesizing that the disorder could have resulted from a mutation in a novel gene responsible for polydactyly, we launched a genetic investigation. By linkage mapping and exome sequencing in the most severe case, we identified novel heterozygous frameshift mutation NM_000168.5 (GLI3): c.3635delG (p.(Gly1212Alafs*18)) but did not detect any other possibly deleterious mutation that could explain the unusual features of camptodactyly, hypoplasia of third toe and wide space between first and second toes. Our findings further expand the phenotypic variability of GLI3 polydactyly. We also present a review of GLI3-associated isolated limb anomalies, which indicates that GLI3 mutation leads primarily to two well-established polydactyly types: postaxial types A and B and crossed polydactyly type I. In addition, a variety of other minor digit anomalies generally accompany polydactyly, and there is no straightforward genotype-polydactyly phenotype correlation.

  8. Adult Gli2+/–;Gli3Δ699/+ Male and Female Mice Display a Spectrum of Genital Malformation

    PubMed Central

    He, Fei; Akbari, Pedram; Mo, Rong; Zhang, Jennifer J.; Hui, Chi-Chung; Kim, Peter C.; Farhat, Walid A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD) encompass a broad spectrum of urogenital malformations and are amongst the most common congenital birth defects. Although key genetic factors such as the hedgehog (Hh) family have been identified, a unifying postnatally viable model displaying the spectrum of male and female urogenital malformations has not yet been reported. Since human cases are diagnosed and treated at various stages postnatally, equivalent mouse models enabling analysis at similar stages are of significant interest. Additionally, all non-Hh based genetic models investigating DSD display normal females, leaving female urogenital development largely unknown. Here, we generated compound mutant mice, Gli2+/–;Gli3Δ699/+, which exhibit a spectrum of urogenital malformations in both males and females upon birth, and also carried them well into adulthood. Analysis of embryonic day (E)18.5 and adult mice revealed shortened anogenital distance (AGD), open ventral urethral groove, incomplete fusion of scrotal sac, abnormal penile size and structure, and incomplete testicular descent with hypoplasia in male mice, whereas female mutant mice displayed reduced AGD, urinary incontinence, and a number of uterine anomalies such as vaginal duplication. Male and female fertility was also investigated via breeding cages, and it was identified that male mice were infertile while females were unable to deliver despite becoming impregnated. We propose that Gli2+/–;Gli3Δ699/+ mice can serve as a genetic mouse model for common DSD such as cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and incomplete fusion of the scrotal sac in males, and a spectrum of uterine and vaginal abnormalities along with urinary incontinence in females, which could prove essential in revealing new insights into their equivalent diseases in humans. PMID:27814383

  9. A tale of two repressors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-05-27

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field, as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology in bacteria. The genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking the transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. Jacob, F. & Monod, J. (1961). Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins. J. Mol. Biol. 3, 318-356. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation is presented.

  10. The Arabidopsis RING-Type E3 Ligase TEAR1 Controls Leaf Development by Targeting the TIE1 Transcriptional Repressor for Degradation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinzhe; Wei, Baoye; Yuan, Rongrong; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The developmental plasticity of leaf size and shape is important for leaf function and plant survival. However, the mechanisms by which plants form diverse leaves in response to environmental conditions are not well understood. Here, we identified TIE1-ASSOCIATED RING-TYPE E3 LIGASE1 (TEAR1) and found that it regulates leaf development by promoting the degradation of TCP INTERACTOR-CONTAINING EAR MOTIF PROTEIN1 (TIE1), an important repressor of CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors, which are key for leaf development. TEAR1 contains a typical C3H2C3-type RING domain and has E3 ligase activity. We show that TEAR1 interacts with the TCP repressor TIE1, which is ubiquitinated in vivo and degraded by the 26S proteasome system. We demonstrate that TEAR1 is colocalized with TIE1 in nuclei and negatively regulates TIE1 protein levels. Overexpression of TEAR1 rescued leaf defects caused by TIE1 overexpression, whereas disruption of TEAR1 resulted in leaf phenotypes resembling those caused by TIE1 overexpression or TCP dysfunction. Deficiency in TEAR partially rescued the leaf defects of TCP4 overexpression line and enhanced the wavy leaf phenotypes of jaw-5D. We propose that TEAR1 positively regulates CIN-like TCP activity to promote leaf development by mediating the degradation of the TCP repressor TIE1. PMID:28100709

  11. Cell type-specific control of protein synthesis and proliferation by FGF-dependent signaling to the translation repressor 4E-BP

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, Rachel; Katsara, Olga; Kolupaeva, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis plays a vital role in posttranscriptional modulation of gene expression. Translational control most commonly targets the initiation of protein synthesis: loading 40S ribosome complexes onto mRNA and AUG start codon recognition. This step is initiated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) (the m7GTP cap-binding protein), whose binding to eIF4G (a scaffolding subunit) and eIF4A (an ATP-dependent RNA helicase) leads to assembly of active eIF4F complex. The ability of eIF4E to recognize the cap is prevented by its binding to eIF4E binding protein (4E-BP), which thereby inhibits cap-dependent translation by sequestering eIF4E. The 4E-BP activity is, in turn, inhibited by mTORC1 [mTOR (the mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1] mediated phosphorylation. Here, we define a previously unidentified mechanism of mTOR-independent 4E-BP1 regulation that is used by chondrocytes upon FGF signaling. Chondrocytes are responsible for the formation of the skeleton long bones. Unlike the majority of cell types where FGF signaling triggers proliferation, chondrocytes respond to FGF with inhibition. We establish that FGF specifically suppresses protein synthesis in chondrocytes, but not in any other cells of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, 4E-BP1 repressor activity is necessary not only for suppression of protein synthesis, but also for FGF-induced cell-cycle arrest. Importantly, FGF-induced changes in the 4E-BP1 activity observed in cell culture are likewise detected in vivo and reflect the action of FGF signaling on downstream targets during bone development. Thus, our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling differentially impacts protein synthesis through either stimulation or repression, in a cell-type–dependent manner, with 4E-BP1 being a key player. PMID:27313212

  12. A genetic biosensor for identification of transcriptional repressors of target promoters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Li, Yue; Li, Shanshan; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian

    2015-10-29

    Transcriptional repressors provide widespread biological significance in the regulation of gene expression. However, in prokaryotes, it is particularly difficult to find transcriptional repressors that recognize specific target promoters on genome-scale. To address this need, a genetic biosensor for identifying repressors of target promoters was developed in Escherichia coli from a de novo designed genetic circuit. This circuit can convert the negative input of repressors into positive output of reporters, thereby facilitating the selection and identification of repressors. After evaluating the sensitivity and bias, the biosensor was used to identify the repressors of scbA and aco promoters (PscbA and Paco), which control the transcription of signalling molecule synthase genes in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis, respectively. Two previously unknown repressors of PscbA were identified from a library of TetR family regulators in S. coelicolor, and three novel repressors of Paco were identified from a genomic library of S. avermitilis. Further in vivo and in vitro experiments confirmed that these newly identified repressors attenuated the transcription of their target promoters by direct binding. Overall, the genetic biosensor developed here presents an innovative and powerful strategy that could be applied for identifying genome-wide unknown repressors of promoters in bacteria.

  13. Transcription of Sialic Acid Catabolism Genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum Is Subject to Catabolite Repression and Control by the Transcriptional Repressor NanR

    PubMed Central

    Uhde, Andreas; Brühl, Natalie; Goldbeck, Oliver; Matano, Christian; Gurow, Oksana; Rückert, Christian; Marin, Kay; Wendisch, Volker F.; Krämer, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corynebacterium glutamicum metabolizes sialic acid (Neu5Ac) to fructose-6-phosphate (fructose-6P) via the consecutive activity of the sialic acid importer SiaEFGI, N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NanA), N-acetylmannosamine kinase (NanK), N-acetylmannosamine-6P epimerase (NanE), N-acetylglucosamine-6P deacetylase (NagA), and glucosamine-6P deaminase (NagB). Within the cluster of the three operons nagAB, nanAKE, and siaEFGI for Neu5Ac utilization a fourth operon is present, which comprises cg2936, encoding a GntR-type transcriptional regulator, here named NanR. Microarray studies and reporter gene assays showed that nagAB, nanAKE, siaEFGI, and nanR are repressed in wild-type (WT) C. glutamicum but highly induced in a ΔnanR C. glutamicum mutant. Purified NanR was found to specifically bind to the nucleotide motifs A[AC]G[CT][AC]TGATGTC[AT][TG]ATGT[AC]TA located within the nagA-nanA and nanR-sialA intergenic regions. Binding of NanR to promoter regions was abolished in the presence of the Neu5Ac metabolism intermediates GlcNAc-6P and N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate (ManNAc-6P). We observed consecutive utilization of glucose and Neu5Ac as well as fructose and Neu5Ac by WT C. glutamicum, whereas the deletion mutant C. glutamicum ΔnanR simultaneously consumed these sugars. Increased reporter gene activities for nagAB, nanAKE, and nanR were observed in cultivations of WT C. glutamicum with Neu5Ac as the sole substrate compared to cultivations when fructose was present. Taken together, our findings show that Neu5Ac metabolism in C. glutamicum is subject to catabolite repression, which involves control by the repressor NanR. IMPORTANCE Neu5Ac utilization is currently regarded as a common trait of both pathogenic and commensal bacteria. Interestingly, the nonpathogenic soil bacterium C. glutamicum efficiently utilizes Neu5Ac as a substrate for growth. Expression of genes for Neu5Ac utilization in C. glutamicum is here shown to depend on the transcriptional regulator

  14. RflM functions as a transcriptional repressor in the autogenous control of the Salmonella Flagellar master operon flhDC.

    PubMed

    Singer, Hanna M; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T

    2013-09-01

    Motility of bacteria like Salmonella enterica is a highly regulated process that responds to a variety of internal and external stimuli. A hierarchy of three promoter classes characterizes the Salmonella flagellar system, and the onset of flagellar gene expression depends on the oligomeric regulatory complex and class 1 gene product FlhD(4)C(2). The flhDC promoter is a target for a broad range of transcriptional regulators that bind within the flhDC promoter region and either negatively or positively regulate flhDC operon transcription. In this work, we demonstrate that the RflM protein is a key component of flhDC regulation. Transposon mutagenesis was performed to investigate a previously described autoinhibitory effect of the flagellar master regulatory complex FlhD(4)C(2). RflM is a LuxR homolog that functions as a flagellar class 1 transcriptional repressor. RflM was found to be the negative regulator of flhDC expression that is responsible for the formerly described autoinhibitory effect of the FlhD(4)C(2) complex on flhDC operon transcription (K. Kutsukake, Mol. Gen. Genet. 254:440-448, 1997). We conclude that upon commencement of flagellar gene expression, the FlhD(4)C(2) complex initiates a regulatory feedback loop by activating rflM gene expression. rflM encodes a transcriptional repressor, RflM, which fine-tunes flhDC expression levels.

  15. Sox2, Tlx, Gli3, and Her9 converge on Rx2 to define retinal stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Robert; Centanin, Lázaro; Tavhelidse, Tinatini; Inoue, Daigo; Wittbrodt, Beate; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Martinez-Morales, Juan Ramón; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2015-06-03

    Transcriptional networks defining stemness in adult neural stem cells (NSCs) are largely unknown. We used the proximal cis-regulatory element (pCRE) of the retina-specific homeobox gene 2 (rx2) to address such a network. Lineage analysis in the fish retina identified rx2 as marker for multipotent NSCs. rx2-positive cells located in the peripheral ciliary marginal zone behave as stem cells for the neuroretina, or the retinal pigmented epithelium. We identified upstream regulators of rx2 interrogating the rx2 pCRE in a trans-regulation screen and focused on four TFs (Sox2, Tlx, Gli3, and Her9) activating or repressing rx2 expression. We demonstrated direct interaction of the rx2 pCRE with the four factors in vitro and in vivo. By conditional mosaic gain- and loss-of-function analyses, we validated the activity of those factors on regulating rx2 transcription and consequently modulating neuroretinal and RPE stem cell features. This becomes obvious by the rx2-mutant phenotypes that together with the data presented above identify rx2 as a transcriptional hub balancing stemness of neuroretinal and RPE stem cells in the adult fish retina.

  16. miR-506 acts as a tumor suppressor by directly targeting the hedgehog pathway transcription factor Gli3 in human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, S-Y; Lin, Y; Yu, Y-Q; Cao, S-J; Zhang, R; Yang, X-M; Li, J; Zhang, Y-L; Wang, Y-H; Ma, M-Z; Sun, W-W; Lou, X-L; Wang, J-H; Teng, Y-C; Zhang, Z-G

    2015-02-05

    Although significant advances have recently been made in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical carcinoma, the long-term survival rate for advanced cervical cancer remains low. Therefore, an urgent need exists to both uncover the molecular mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of cervical cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in cancer progression and could be used as either potential therapeutic agents or targets. miR-506 is a component of an X chromosome-linked miRNA cluster. The biological functions of miR-506 have not been well established. In this study, we found that miR-506 expression was downregulated in approximately 80% of the cervical cancer samples examined and inversely correlated with the expression of Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in human cervical cancer, Caski and SiHa cells, demonstrated that miR-506 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cervical cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Further studies showed that miR-506 induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition, and enhanced apoptosis and chemosensitivity of cervical cancer cell. We subsequently identified Gli3, a hedgehog pathway transcription factor, as a direct target of miR-506 in cervical cancer. Furthermore, Gli3 silencing recapitulated the effects of miR-506, and reintroduction of Gli3 abrogated miR-506-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that miR-506 exerts its anti-proliferative function by directly targeting Gli3. This newly identified miR-506/Gli3 axis provides further insight into the pathogenesis of cervical cancer and indicates a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  17. Two essential FtsH proteases control the level of the Fur repressor during iron deficiency in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Krynická, Vendula; Tichý, Martin; Krafl, Jaroslav; Yu, Jianfeng; Kaňa, Radek; Boehm, Marko; Nixon, Peter J; Komenda, Josef

    2014-11-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 expresses four different FtsH protease subunits (FtsH1-4) that assemble into specific homo- and heterocomplexes. The FtsH2/FtsH3 complex is involved in photoprotection but the physiological roles of the other complexes, notably the essential FtsH1/FtsH3 complex, remain unclear. Here we show that the FtsH1 and FtsH3 proteases are involved in the acclimation of cells to iron deficiency. A mutant conditionally depleted in FtsH3 was unable to induce normal expression of the IsiA chlorophyll-protein and FutA1 iron transporter upon iron deficiency due to a block in transcription, which is regulated by the Fur transcriptional repressor. Levels of Fur declined in the WT and the FtsH2 null mutant upon iron depletion but not in the FtsH3 downregulated strain. A similar stabilizing effect on Fur was also observed in a mutant conditionally depleted in the FtsH1 subunit. Moreover, a mutant overexpressing FtsH1 showed reduced levels of Fur and enhanced accumulation of both IsiA and FutA1 even under iron sufficiency. Analysis of GFP-tagged derivatives and biochemical fractionation supported a common location for FtsH1 and FtsH3 in the cytoplasmic membrane. Overall we propose that degradation of the Fur repressor mediated by the FtsH1/FtsH3 heterocomplex is critical for acclimation to iron depletion.

  18. The Transcriptional Repressor TupA in Aspergillus niger Is Involved in Controlling Gene Expression Related to Cell Wall Biosynthesis, Development, and Nitrogen Source Availability

    PubMed Central

    Schachtschabel, Doreen; Arentshorst, Mark; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Morris, Sam; Nielsen, Kristian F.; van den Hondel, Cees A. M. J. J.; Klis, Frans M.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Tup1-Cyc8 (Ssn6) complex is a well characterized and conserved general transcriptional repressor complex in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of the Tup1 (TupA) homolog in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger in a genetic screen for mutants with a constitutive expression of the agsA gene. The agsA gene encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase, which is induced in response to cell wall stress in A. niger. Apart from the constitutive expression of agsA, the selected mutant was also found to produce an unknown pigment at high temperatures. Complementation analysis with a genomic library showed that the tupA gene could complement the phenotypes of the mutant. Screening of a collection of 240 mutants with constitutive expression of agsA identified sixteen additional pigment-secreting mutants, which were all mutated in the tupA gene. The phenotypes of the tupA mutants were very similar to the phenotypes of a tupA deletion strain. Further analysis of the tupA-17 mutant and the ΔtupA mutant revealed that TupA is also required for normal growth and morphogenesis. The production of the pigment at 37°C is nitrogen source-dependent and repressed by ammonium. Genome-wide expression analysis of the tupA mutant during exponential growth revealed derepression of a large group of diverse genes, including genes related to development and cell wall biosynthesis, and also protease-encoding genes that are normally repressed by ammonium. Comparison of the transcriptome of up-regulated genes in the tupA mutant showed limited overlap with the transcriptome of caspofungin-induced cell wall stress-related genes, suggesting that TupA is not a general suppressor of cell wall stress-induced genes. We propose that TupA is an important repressor of genes related to development and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:24205111

  19. Transcription repressor HANABA TARANU controls flower development by integrating the actions of multiple hormones, floral organ specification genes, and GATA3 family genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhou, Yun; Ding, Lian; Wu, Zhigang; Liu, Renyi; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2013-01-01

    Plant inflorescence meristems and floral meristems possess specific boundary domains that result in proper floral organ separation and specification. HANABA TARANU (HAN) encodes a boundary-expressed GATA3-type transcription factor that regulates shoot meristem organization and flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Through time-course microarray analyses following transient overexpression of HAN, we found that HAN represses hundreds of genes, especially genes involved in hormone responses and floral organ specification. Transient overexpression of HAN also represses the expression of HAN and three other GATA3 family genes, HANL2 (HAN-LIKE 2), GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED), and GNL (GNC-LIKE), forming a negative regulatory feedback loop. Genetic analysis indicates that HAN and the three GATA3 family genes coordinately regulate floral development, and their expression patterns are partially overlapping. HAN can homodimerize and heterodimerize with the three proteins encoded by these genes, and HAN directly binds to its own promoter and the GNC promoter in vivo. These findings, along with the fact that constitutive overexpression of HAN produces an even stronger phenotype than the loss-of-function mutation, support the hypothesis that HAN functions as a key repressor that regulates floral development via regulatory networks involving genes in the GATA3 family, along with genes involved in hormone action and floral organ specification.

  20. Type I Repressors of P Element Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Gloor, G. B.; Preston, C. R.; Johnson-Schlitz, D. M.; Nassif, N. A.; Phillis, R. W.; Benz, W. K.; Robertson, H. M.; Engels, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe here a family of P elements that we refer to as type I repressors. These elements are identified by their repressor functions and their lack of any deletion within the first two-thirds of the canonical P sequence. Elements belonging to this repressor class were isolated from P strains and were made in vitro. We found that type I repressor elements could strongly repress both a cytotype-dependent allele and P element mobility in somatic and germline tissues. These effects wer very dependent on genomic position. Moreover, we observed that an element's ability to repress in one assay positively correlated with its ability to repress in either of the other two assays. The type I family of repressor elements includes both autonomous P elements and those lacking exon 3 of the P element. Fine structure deletion mapping showed that the minimal 3' boundary of a functional type I element lies between nucleotide position 1950 and 1956. None of 12 elements examined with more extreme deletions extending into exon 2 made repressor. We conclude that the type I repressors form a structurally distinct group that does not include more extensively deleted repressor elements such as the KP element described previously. PMID:8224830

  1. Gli3-mediated somitic Fgf10 expression gradients are required for the induction and patterning of mammary epithelium along the embryonic axes.

    PubMed

    Veltmaat, Jacqueline M; Relaix, Frédéric; Le, Lendy T; Kratochwil, Klaus; Sala, Frédéric G; van Veelen, Wendy; Rice, Ritva; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Mailleux, Arnaud A; Rice, David P; Thiery, Jean Paul; Bellusci, Saverio

    2006-06-01

    Little is known about the regulation of cell fate decisions that lead to the formation of five pairs of mammary placodes in the surface ectoderm of the mouse embryo. We have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) is required for the formation of mammary placodes 1, 2, 3 and 5. Here, we have found that Fgf10 is expressed only in the somites underlying placodes 2 and 3, in gradients across and within these somites. To test whether somitic FGF10 is required for the formation of these two placodes, we analyzed a number of mutants with different perturbations of somitic Fgf10 gradients for the presence of WNT signals and ectodermal multilayering, markers for mammary line and placode formation. The mammary line is displaced dorsally, and formation of placode 3 is impaired in Pax3ILZ/ILZ mutants, which do not form ventral somitic buds. Mammary line formation is impaired and placode 3 is absent in Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J and hypomorphic Fgf10 mutants, in which the somitic Fgf10 gradient is shortened dorsally and less overall Fgf10 is expressed, respectively. Recombinant FGF10 rescued mammogenesis in Fgf10(-/-) and Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J flanks. We correlate increasing levels of somitic FGF10 with progressive maturation of the surface ectoderm, and show that full expression of somitic Fgf10, co-regulated by GLI3, is required for the anteroposterior pattern in which the flank ectoderm acquires a mammary epithelial identity. We propose that the intra-somitic Fgf10 gradient, together with ventral elongation of the somites, determines the correct dorsoventral position of mammary epithelium along the flank.

  2. Repressor logic modules assembled by rolling circle amplification platform to construct a set of logic gates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Hu, Bo; Tang, Suming; Zhao, Guojie; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites and their allosterically regulated repressors play an important role in many gene expression and metabolic disorder processes. These natural sensors, though valuable as good logic switches, have rarely been employed without transcription machinery in cells. Here, two pairs of repressors, which function in opposite ways, were cloned, purified and used to control DNA replication in rolling circle amplification (RCA) in vitro. By using metabolites and repressors as inputs, RCA signals as outputs, four basic logic modules were constructed successfully. To achieve various logic computations based on these basic modules, we designed series and parallel strategies of circular templates, which can further assemble these repressor modules in an RCA platform to realize twelve two-input Boolean logic gates and a three-input logic gate. The RCA-output and RCA-assembled platform was proved to be easy and flexible for complex logic processes and might have application potential in molecular computing and synthetic biology. PMID:27869177

  3. Metalloregulatory properties of the ArsD repressor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Rosen, B P

    1997-05-30

    The plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operon of plasmid R773 produces resistance to trivalent and pentavalent salts of the metalloids arsenic and antimony in cells of Escherichia coli. The first two genes in the operon, arsR and arsD, were previously shown to encode trans-acting repressor proteins. ArsR controls the basal level of expression of the operon, while ArsD controls maximal expression. Thus, action of the two repressors form a homeostatic regulatory circuit that maintains the level of ars expression within a narrow range. In this study, we demonstrate that ArsD binds to the same site on the ars promoter element as ArsR but with 2 orders of magnitude lower affinity. The results of gel shift assays demonstrate that ArsD is released from the ars DNA promoter by phenylarsine oxide, sodium arsenite, and potassium antimonyl tartrate (in order of effectiveness), the same inducers to which ArsR responds. Using the quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to measure the affinity of the repressor for inducers, apparent Kd values for Sb(III) and As(III) of 2 and 60 microM, respectively, were obtained. These results demonstrate that the arsR-arsD pair provide a sensitive mechanism for sensing a wide range of environmental heavy metals.

  4. Identification of a global repressor gene, rsmA, of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora that controls extracellular enzymes, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, and pathogenicity in soft-rotting Erwinia spp.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Chatterjee, A; Liu, Y; Dumenyo, C K; Chatterjee, A K

    1995-09-01

    The production of extracellular enzymes such as pectate lyase (Pel), polygalacturonase (Peh), cellulase (Cel), and protease (Prt) is activated by the cell density (quorum)-sensing signal, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (HSL); plant signals; and aep genes during postexponential growth of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora 71. Studies with mutants of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 derepressed in exoenzyme production led to the identification of a negative regulator gene, rsmA (rsm, repressor of secondary metabolites). Nucleotide sequencing, transcript assays, and protein analysis established that a 183-bp open reading frame encodes the 6.8-kDa RsmA. rsmA has extensive homology with the csrA gene of Escherichia coli, which specifies a negative regulator of carbon storage. Moreover, the suppression of glycogen synthesis in E. coli by rsmA indicates that the Erwinia gene is functionally similar to csrA. Southern hybridizations revealed the presence of rsmA homologs in soft-rotting and non-soft-rotting Erwinia spp. and in other enterobacteria such as Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Serratia marcescens, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. rsmA suppresses production of Pel, Peh, Cel, and Prt, plant pathogenicity, and synthesis of HSL in E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. carotovora subsp. betavasculorum, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and E. chrysanthemi. In the E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71, rsmA reduces the levels of transcripts of hslI, a luxI homolog required for HSL biosynthesis. This specific effect and the previous finding that HSL is required for extracellular enzyme production and pathogenicity in soft-rotting Erwinia spp. support the hypothesis that rsmA controls these traits by modulating the levels of the cell density (quorum)-sensing signal.

  5. Plant Pathogenic Bacteria Utilize Biofilm Growth-associated Repressor (BigR), a Novel Winged-helix Redox Switch, to Control Hydrogen Sulfide Detoxification under Hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Barbosa, Rosicler L.; Soprano, Adriana S.; Campos, Bruna M.; de Souza, Tiago A.; Tonoli, Celisa C. C.; Leme, Adriana F. P.; Murakami, Mario T.; Benedetti, Celso E.

    2011-01-01

    Winged-helix transcriptional factors play important roles in the control of gene expression in many organisms. In the plant pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the winged-helix protein BigR, a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, regulates transcription of the bigR operon involved in bacterial biofilm growth. Previous studies showed that BigR represses transcription of its own operon through the occupation of the RNA polymerase-binding site; however, the signals that modulate its activity and the biological function of its operon are still poorly understood. Here we show that although BigR is a homodimer similar to metal sensors, it functions as a novel redox switch that derepresses transcription upon oxidation. Crystal structures of reduced and oxidized BigR reveal that formation of a disulfide bridge involving two critical cysteines induces conformational changes in the dimer that remarkably alter the topography of the winged-helix DNA-binding interface, precluding DNA binding. This structural mechanism of DNA association-dissociation is novel among winged-helix factors. Moreover, we demonstrate that the bigR operon is required for hydrogen sulfide detoxification through the action of a sulfur dioxygenase (Blh) and sulfite exporter. As hydrogen sulfide strongly inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, it must be eliminated to allow aerobic growth under low oxygen tension, an environmental condition found in bacterial biofilms, xylem vessels, and root tissues. Accordingly, we show that the bigR operon is critical to sustain bacterial growth under hypoxia. These results suggest that BigR integrates the transcriptional regulation of a sulfur oxidation pathway to an oxidative signal through a thiol-based redox switch. PMID:21632538

  6. Control of gdhR Expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae via Autoregulation and a Master Repressor (MtrR) of a Drug Efflux Pump Operon

    PubMed Central

    Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne E.; Zalucki, Yaramah M.; Dhulipala, Vijaya L.; Balthazar, Jacqueline T.; Doyle, Raúl G.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Begum, Afrin A.; Raterman, Erica L.; Jerse, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The MtrCDE efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae contributes to gonococcal resistance to a number of antibiotics used previously or currently in treatment of gonorrhea, as well as to host-derived antimicrobials that participate in innate defense. Overexpression of the MtrCDE efflux pump increases gonococcal survival and fitness during experimental lower genital tract infection of female mice. Transcription of mtrCDE can be repressed by the DNA-binding protein MtrR, which also acts as a global regulator of genes involved in important metabolic, physiologic, or regulatory processes. Here, we investigated whether a gene downstream of mtrCDE, previously annotated gdhR in Neisseria meningitidis, is a target for regulation by MtrR. In meningococci, GdhR serves as a regulator of genes involved in glucose catabolism, amino acid transport, and biosynthesis, including gdhA, which encodes an l-glutamate dehydrogenase and is located next to gdhR but is transcriptionally divergent. We report here that in N. gonorrhoeae, expression of gdhR is subject to autoregulation by GdhR and direct repression by MtrR. Importantly, loss of GdhR significantly increased gonococcal fitness compared to a complemented mutant strain during experimental murine infection. Interestingly, loss of GdhR did not influence expression of gdhA, as reported for meningococci. This variance is most likely due to differences in promoter localization and utilization between gonococci and meningococci. We propose that transcriptional control of gonococcal genes through the action of MtrR and GdhR contributes to fitness of N. gonorrhoeae during infection.

  7. Transcription factor co-repressors in cancer biology: roles and targeting.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Campbell, Moray J

    2010-06-01

    Normal transcription displays a high degree of flexibility over the choice, timing and magnitude of mRNA expression levels that tend to oscillate and cycle. These processes allow for combinatorial actions, feedback control and fine-tuning. A central role has emerged for the transcriptional co-repressor proteins such as NCOR1, NCOR2/SMRT, CoREST and CTBPs, to control the actions of many transcriptional factors, in large part, by recruitment and activation of a range of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Thus, co-repressors and chromatin remodeling factors are recruited to transcription factors at specific promoter/enhancer regions and execute changes in the chromatin structure. The specificity of this recruitment is controlled in a spatial-temporal manner. By playing a central role in transcriptional control, as they move and target transcription factors, co-repressors act as a key driver in the epigenetic economy of the nucleus. Co-repressor functions are selectively distorted in malignancy, by both loss and gain of function and contribute to the generation of transcriptional rigidity. Features of transcriptional rigidity apparent in cancer cells include the distorted signaling of nuclear receptors and the WNTs/beta-catenin axis. Understanding and predicting the consequences of altered co-repressor expression patterns in cancer cells has diagnostic and prognostic significance, and also have the capacity to be targeted through selective epigenetic therapies.

  8. Negative regulation of defence and stress genes by EAR-motif-containing repressors.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal

    2006-03-01

    Although positive control or activation mechanism(s) involved in plant defence- and stress-related gene expression is relatively well studied, little is known about what keeps defensive armoury under control when not needed. Recent reports suggest that transcriptional repression of gene expression by EAR-motif-containing repressor proteins plays a key role in modulating plant defence and stress responses.

  9. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-05-19

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion.

  10. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  11. Lac repressor: a genetic and nuclear magnetic resonance study of structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Jarema, M.A.C.; Lu, P.; Miller, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    The prototype gene control system, the lac operon of E. coli, has recently also become the best chemically characterized system to date. The complete primary sequence of both the gene and the protein reponsible for the regulation of this operon, the repressor, is known, along with the DNA sequence of its site of action, the operator. The lac repressor is a tetrametic protein with four identical subunits of 360 amino acids each, giving a total molecular weight of 154,000. The lac operator sequence is about 25 to 30 base pairs long. With the wealth of information about the primary structure the next question is one of geometry. This leads to the application of either x-ray diffraction or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, since these are the only approaches that yield information about the geometry and environment of specific groups and atoms in these molecules. Since we are interested in the interaction of repressor with a variety of small molecular weight inducers and anti-inducers, as well as the operator sequence in aqueous solution, we chose the NMR approach. As of this writing, no useful crystals of the lac repressor or the repressor and any of its ligands have been reported. Because of our extensive genetic work with this system, we have a unique advantage in taking this approach as well.

  12. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the C(α) atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the C(β) atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  13. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the Cα atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the Cβ atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  14. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene.

  15. DND protein functions as a translation repressor during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Manami; Tani-Matsuhana, Saori; Ohkawa, Yasuka; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kunio

    2017-03-04

    Germline and somatic cell distinction is regulated through a combination of microRNA and germ cell-specific RNA-binding proteins in zebrafish. An RNA-binding protein, DND, has been reported to relieve the miR-430-mediated repression of some germ plasm mRNAs such as nanos3 and tdrd7 in primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we showed that miR-430-mediated repression is not counteracted by the overexpression of DND protein in somatic cells. Using a λN-box B tethering assay in the embryo, we found that tethering of DND to reporter mRNA results in translation repression without affecting mRNA stability. Translation repression by DND was not dependent on another germline-specific translation repressor, Nanos3, in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, our data suggested that DND represses translation of nanog and dnd mRNAs, whereas an RNA-binding protein DAZ-like (DAZL) promotes dnd mRNA translation. Thus, our study showed that DND protein functions as a translation repressor of specific mRNAs to control PGC development in zebrafish.

  16. Heterodimeric Drosophila gap gene protein complexes acting as transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, F; Jäckle, H

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila gap gene Krüppel (Kr) encodes a transcriptional regulator. It acts both as an integral part of the Drosophila segmentation gene in the early blastoderm and in a variety of tissues and organs at later stages of embryogenesis. In transfected tissue culture cells, the Kr protein (Kr) was shown to both activate and repress gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner when acting from a single binding site close to the promoter. Here we show that KR can associate with the transcription factors encoded by the gap genes knirps (kni) and hunchback (hb) which affect KR-dependent gene expression in Drosophila tissue culture cells. The association of DNA-bound hb protein or free kni protein with distinct but different regions of KR results in the formation of DNA-bound transcriptional repressor complexes. Our results suggest that individual transcription factors can associate to form protein complexes which act as direct repressors of transcription. The interactions shown here add an unexpected level of complexity to the control of gene expression. Images PMID:7588607

  17. Loss of floral repressor function adapts rice to higher latitudes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Galbiati, Francesca; Goretti, Daniela; Brambilla, Vittoria; Shrestha, Roshi; Pappolla, Andrea; Courtois, Brigitte; Fornara, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate variations in day length allows plants to align flowering with the most favourable season of the year. This capacity has been altered by artificial selection when cultivated varieties became adapted to environments different from those of initial domestication. Rice flowering is promoted by short days when HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) and EARLY HEADING DATE 1 (Ehd1) induce the expression of florigenic proteins encoded by HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Repressors of flowering antagonize such induction under long days, maintaining vegetative growth and delaying flowering. To what extent artificial selection of long day repressor loci has contributed to expand rice cultivation to Europe is currently unclear. This study demonstrates that European varieties activate both Hd3a and RFT1 expression regardless of day length and their induction is caused by loss-of-function mutations at major long day floral repressors. However, their contribution to flowering time control varies between locations. Pyramiding of mutations is frequently observed in European germplasm, but single mutations are sufficient to adapt rice to flower at higher latitudes. Expression of Ehd1 is increased in varieties showing reduced or null Hd1 expression under natural long days, as well as in single hd1 mutants in isogenic backgrounds. These data indicate that loss of repressor genes has been a key strategy to expand rice cultivation to Europe, and that Ehd1 is a central node integrating floral repressive signals. PMID:25732533

  18. Weak operator binding enhances simulated Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Andrew V; Grosner, Michael A; Perez, Pamela J; Clauvelin, Nicolas; Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-12-01

    The 50th anniversary of Biopolymers coincides closely with the like celebration of the discovery of the Escherichia coli (lac) lactose operon, a classic genetic system long used to illustrate the influence of biomolecular structure on function. The looping of DNA induced by the binding of the Lac repressor protein to sequentially distant operator sites on DNA continues to serve as a paradigm for understanding long-range genomic communication. Advances in analyses of DNA structures and in incorporation of proteins in computer simulations of DNA looping allow us to address long-standing questions about the role of protein-mediated DNA loop formation in transcriptional control. Here we report insights gained from studies of the sequence-dependent contributions of the natural lac operators to Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping. Novel superposition of the ensembles of protein-bound operator structures derived from NMR measurements reveals variations in DNA folding missed in conventional structural alignments. The changes in folding affect the predicted ease with which the repressor induces loop formation and the ways that DNA closes between the protein headpieces. The peeling of the auxiliary operators away from the repressor enhances the formation of loops with the 92-bp wildtype spacing and hints of a structural reason behind their weak binding.

  19. A tale of two repressors – a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks1. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective is presented that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation. PMID:21392509

  20. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  1. Repressor Dimerization in the Zebrafish Somitogenesis Clock

    PubMed Central

    Cinquin, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The oscillations of the somitogenesis clock are linked to the fundamental process of vertebrate embryo segmentation, yet little is known about their generation. In zebrafish, it has been proposed that Her proteins repress the transcription of their own mRNA. However, in its simplest form, this model is incompatible with the fact that morpholino knockdown of Her proteins can impair expression of their mRNA. Simple self-repression models also do not account for the spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression, with waves of gene expression shrinking as they propagate. Here we study computationally the networks generated by the wealth of dimerization possibilities amongst transcriptional repressors in the zebrafish somitogenesis clock. These networks can reproduce knockdown phenotypes, and strongly suggest the existence of a Her1–Her7 heterodimer, so far untested experimentally. The networks are the first reported to reproduce the spatiotemporal pattern of the zebrafish somitogenesis clock; they shed new light on the role of Her13.2, the only known link between the somitogenesis clock and positional information in the paraxial mesoderm. The networks can also account for perturbations of the clock by manipulation of FGF signaling. Achieving an understanding of the interplay between clock oscillations and positional information is a crucial first step in the investigation of the segmentation mechanism. PMID:17305423

  2. The transcriptional repressor protein PRH interacts with the proteasome.

    PubMed Central

    Bess, Kirstin L; Swingler, Tracey E; Rivett, A Jennifer; Gaston, Kevin; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela

    2003-01-01

    PRH (proline-rich homeodomain protein)/Hex is important in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation. We have shown previously that PRH contains two domains that can bring about transcriptional repression independently; the PRH homeodomain represses transcription by binding to TATA box sequences, whereas the proline-rich N-terminal domain can repress transcription by interacting with members of the Groucho/TLE (transducin-like enhancer of split) family of co-repressor proteins. The proteasome is a multi-subunit protein complex involved in the processing and degradation of proteins. Some proteasome subunits have been suggested to play a role in the regulation of transcription. In the present study, we show that PRH interacts with the HC8 subunit of the proteasome in the context of both 20 and 26 S proteasomes. Moreover, we show that PRH is associated with the proteasome in haematopoietic cells and that the proline-rich PRH N-terminal domain is responsible for this interaction. Whereas PRH can be cleaved by the proteasome, it does not appear to be degraded rapidly in vitro or in vivo, and the proteolytic activity of the proteasome is not required for transcriptional repression by PRH. However, proteasomal digestion of PRH can liberate truncated PRH proteins that retain the ability to bind to DNA. We discuss these findings in terms of the biological role of PRH in gene regulation and the control of cell proliferation. PMID:12826010

  3. DWARF 53 acts as a repressor of strigolactone signalling in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Xiong, Guosheng; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Fulu; Wang, Lei; Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Guifu; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Yundong; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Honglei; He, Yuanzheng; Wu, Zhongshan; Melcher, Karsten; Qian, Qian; Xu, H. Eric; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCFD3 ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCFD3 ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.

  4. Dynamic equilibrium on DNA defines transcriptional regulation of a multidrug binding transcriptional repressor, LmrR.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Misaki; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-03-21

    LmrR is a multidrug binding transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of a major multidrug transporter, LmrCD, in Lactococcus lactis. Promiscuous compound ligations reduce the affinity of LmrR for the lmrCD operator by several fold to release the transcriptional repression; however, the affinity reduction is orders of magnitude smaller than that of typical transcriptional repressors. Here, we found that the transcriptional regulation of LmrR is achieved through an equilibrium between the operator-bound and non-specific DNA-adsorption states in vivo. The effective dissociation constant of LmrR for the lmrCD operator under the equilibrium is close to the endogenous concentration of LmrR, which allows a substantial reduction of LmrR occupancy upon compound ligations. Therefore, LmrR represents a dynamic type of transcriptional regulation of prokaryotic multidrug resistance systems, where the small affinity reduction induced by compounds is coupled to the functional relocalization of the repressor on the genomic DNA via nonspecific DNA adsorption.

  5. Engineering alternate cooperative-communications in the lactose repressor protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Ramot, Roee; Kishore Inampudi, Krishna; Luo, Beibei; Lin, Chenyu; Amere, Swathi; Wilson, Corey J

    2013-06-01

    To expand our understanding of the hallmarks of allosteric control we used directed-evolution to engineer alternate cooperative communication in the lactose repressor protein (LacI) scaffold. Starting with an I(s) type LacI mutant D88A (i.e. a LacI variant that is insensitive to the exogenous ligand isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and remains bound to operator DNA, + or -IPTG) we used error-prone polymerase chain reaction to introduce compensatory mutations to restore modulated DNA binding function to the allosterically 'dead' I(s)(D88A) background. Five variants were generated, three variants (C4, C32 and C80) with wild-type like function and two co-repressor variants (C101 and C140) that are functionally inverted. To better resolve the residues that define new allosteric networks in the LacI variants, we conducted mutational tolerance analysis via saturation mutagenesis at each of the evolved positions to assess sensitivity to mutation--a hallmark of allosteric residues. To better understand the physicochemical bases of alternate allosteric function, variant LacI(C80) was characterized to assess IPTG ligand binding at equilibrium, kinetically using stopped-flow, and via isothermal titration calorimetry. These data suggest that the conferred modulated DNA binding function observed for LacI(C80), while thermodynamically similar to wild-type LacI, is mechanistically different from the wild-type repressor, suggesting a new allosteric network and communication route.

  6. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  7. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-08-03

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages.

  8. SPOROCYTELESS is a novel embryophyte-specific transcription repressor that interacts with TPL and TCP proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Hui; Sun, Jia-Ying; Liu, Man; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2014-12-20

    Germlines in plants are formed de novo during post-embryonic development, while little is known about the mechanism that controls this process. In Arabidopsis, the earliest gene controlling this process is SPOROCYTELESS (SPL). A decade ago, we showed that loss of SPL function abolished sporogenesis in both male and female organs of Arabidopsis. However, its function is unclear up to now. In this study, we showed that SPL belongs to a novel transcription repressor family specific in embryophyte, which consists of 173 members in the land plants so far. All of them contain a conserved SPL-motif in their N-terminal and an ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in the C-terminal, therefore designated as SPL-like, EAR-containing proteins (SPEARs). Consistently, SPL acts as a transcriptional repressor in yeast and tobacco cells, and SPEAR proteins are able to form homodimer and/or heterodimer with each other in vitro. Furthermore, SPEARs interact with the TOPLESS (TPL) co-repressors via the EAR motif and TCP family transcription factors in yeast cells. Together, we propose that SPL and SPEARs most likely belong to a novel transcription repressor family in land plants which may play a variety of developmental roles in plants.

  9. Cooperative folding units of escherichia coli tryptophan repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A; Lavoie, T A; Chanatry, J A; Covell, D G; Carey, J

    1999-01-01

    A previously published computational procedure was used to identify cooperative folding units within tryptophan repressor. The theoretical results predict the existence of distinct stable substructures in the protein chain for the monomer and the dimer. The predictions were compared with experimental data on structure and folding of the repressor and its proteolytic fragments and show excellent agreement for the dimeric form of the protein. The results suggest that the monomer, the structure of which is currently unknown, is likely to have a structure different from the one it has within the context of the highly intertwined dimer. Application of this method to the repressor monomer represents an extension of the computations into the realm of evaluating hypothetical structures such as those produced by threading. PMID:10465773

  10. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  11. NINJA connects the co-repressor TOPLESS to jasmonate signalling.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Laurens; Barbero, Gemma Fernández; Geerinck, Jan; Tilleman, Sofie; Grunewald, Wim; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Chico, José Manuel; Bossche, Robin Vanden; Sewell, Jared; Gil, Eduardo; García-Casado, Gloria; Witters, Erwin; Inzé, Dirk; Long, Jeff A; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto; Goossens, Alain

    2010-04-01

    Jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is a plant hormone that regulates a broad array of plant defence and developmental processes. JA-Ile-responsive gene expression is regulated by the transcriptional activator MYC2 that interacts physically with the jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressor proteins. On perception of JA-Ile, JAZ proteins are degraded and JA-Ile-dependent gene expression is activated. The molecular mechanisms by which JAZ proteins repress gene expression remain unknown. Here we show that the Arabidopsis JAZ proteins recruit the Groucho/Tup1-type co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL) and TPL-related proteins (TPRs) through a previously uncharacterized adaptor protein, designated Novel Interactor of JAZ (NINJA). NINJA acts as a transcriptional repressor whose activity is mediated by a functional TPL-binding EAR repression motif. Accordingly, both NINJA and TPL proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonate responses. Our results point to TPL proteins as general co-repressors that affect multiple signalling pathways through the interaction with specific adaptor proteins. This new insight reveals how stress-related and growth-related signalling cascades use common molecular mechanisms to regulate gene expression in plants.

  12. Transcription of Two Adjacent Carbohydrate Utilization Gene Clusters in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 Is Controlled by LacI- and Repressor Open Reading Frame Kinase (ROK)-Type Regulators

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Liedtke, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Zomer, Aldert

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of mammals, including humans, where their growth is presumed to be dependent on various diet- and/or host-derived carbohydrates. To understand transcriptional control of bifidobacterial carbohydrate metabolism, we investigated two genetic carbohydrate utilization clusters dedicated to the metabolism of raffinose-type sugars and melezitose. Transcriptomic and gene inactivation approaches revealed that the raffinose utilization system is positively regulated by an activator protein, designated RafR. The gene cluster associated with melezitose metabolism was shown to be subject to direct negative control by a LacI-type transcriptional regulator, designated MelR1, in addition to apparent indirect negative control by means of a second LacI-type regulator, MelR2. In silico analysis, DNA-protein interaction, and primer extension studies revealed the MelR1 and MelR2 operator sequences, each of which is positioned just upstream of or overlapping the correspondingly regulated promoter sequences. Similar analyses identified the RafR binding operator sequence located upstream of the rafB promoter. This study indicates that transcriptional control of gene clusters involved in carbohydrate metabolism in bifidobacteria is subject to conserved regulatory systems, representing either positive or negative control. PMID:24705323

  13. Mapping DNA-Lac repressor interaction with ultra-fast optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Tempestini, Alessia; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2015-03-01

    The lac operon is a well-known example of gene expression regulation, based on the specific interaction of Lac repressor protein (LacI) with its target DNA sequence (operator). We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap technique capable of probing molecular interactions with sub-ms temporal resolution, under controlled pN-range forces. With this technique, we tested the interaction of LacI with different DNA constructs. Based on position along the DNA sequence, the observed interactions can be interpreted as specific binding to operator sequences and transient interactions with nonspecific sequences.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  15. Hexokinase 2 Is an Intracellular Glucose Sensor of Yeast Cells That Maintains the Structure and Activity of Mig1 Protein Repressor Complex.

    PubMed

    Vega, Montserrat; Riera, Alberto; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeis a bi-functional enzyme, being both a catalyst in the cytosol and an important regulator of the glucose repression signal in the nucleus. Despite considerable recent progress, little is known about the regulatory mechanism that controls nuclear Hxk2 association with theSUC2promoter chromatin and how this association is necessary forSUC2gene repression. Our data indicate that in theSUC2promoter context, Hxk2 functions through a variety of structurally unrelated factors, mainly the DNA-binding Mig1 and Mig2 repressors and the regulatory Snf1 and Reg1 factors. Hxk2 sustains the repressor complex architecture maintaining transcriptional repression at theSUC2gene. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we discovered that the Hxk2 in its open configuration, at low glucose conditions, leaves the repressor complex that induces its dissociation and promotesSUC2gene expression. In high glucose conditions, Hxk2 adopts a close conformation that promotes Hxk2 binding to the Mig1 protein and the reassembly of theSUC2repressor complex. Additional findings highlight the possibility that Hxk2 constitutes an intracellular glucose sensor that operates by changing its conformation in response to cytoplasmic glucose levels that regulate its interaction with Mig1 and thus its recruitment to the repressor complex of theSUC2promoter. Thus, our data indicate that Hxk2 is more intimately involved in gene regulation than previously thought.

  16. Drosophila CK2 phosphorylates Deadpan, a member of the HES family of basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) repressors.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Umesh C; Shaffer, Jonathan; Bishop, Clifton P; Bidwai, Ashok P

    2005-06-01

    In Drosophila, protein kinase CK2 regulates a diverse array of developmental processes. One of these is cell-fate specification (neurogenesis) wherein CK2 regulates basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) repressors encoded by the Enhancer of Split Complex (E(spl)C). Specifically, CK2 phosphorylates and activates repressor functions of E(spl)M8 during eye development. In this study we describe the interaction of CK2 with an E(spl)-related bHLH repressor, Deadpan (Dpn). Unlike E(spl)-repressors which are expressed in cells destined for a non-neural cell fate, Dpn is expressed in the neuronal cells and is thought to control the activity of proneural genes. Dpn also regulates sex-determination by repressing sxl, the primary gene involved in sex differentiation. We demonstrate that Dpn is weakly phosphorylated by monomeric CK2alpha, whereas it is robustly phosphorylated by the embryo-holoenzyme, suggesting a positive role for CK2beta. The weak phosphorylation by CK2alpha is markedly stimulated by the activator polylysine to levels comparable to those with the holoenzyme. In addition, pull down assays indicate a direct interaction between Dpn and CK2. This is the first demonstration that Dpn is a partner and target of CK2, and raises the possibility that its repressor functions might also be regulated by phosphorylation.

  17. SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE Up-Regulates TEMPRANILLO2 Floral Repressor at Low Ambient Temperatures1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marín-González, Esther; Matías-Hernández, Luis; Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Suárez-López, Paula; Pelaz, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Plants integrate day length and ambient temperature to determine the optimal timing for developmental transitions. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and its closest homolog TWIN SISTER OF FT promote flowering in response to their activator CONSTANS under long-day inductive conditions. Low ambient temperature (16°C) delays flowering, even under inductive photoperiods, through repression of FT, revealing the importance of floral repressors acting at low temperatures. Previously, we have reported that the floral repressors TEMPRANILLO (TEM; TEM1 and TEM2) control flowering time through direct regulation of FT at 22°C. Here, we show that tem mutants are less sensitive than the wild type to changes in ambient growth temperature, indicating that TEM genes may play a role in floral repression at 16°C. Moreover, we have found that TEM2 directly represses the expression of FT and TWIN SISTER OF FT at 16°C. In addition, the floral repressor SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) directly regulates TEM2 but not TEM1 expression at 16°C. Flowering time analyses of svp tem mutants indicate that TEM may act in the same genetic pathway as SVP to repress flowering at 22°C but that SVP and TEM are partially independent at 16°C. Thus, TEM2 partially mediates the temperature-dependent function of SVP at low temperatures. Taken together, our results indicate that TEM genes are also able to repress flowering at low ambient temperatures under inductive long-day conditions. PMID:26243615

  18. Structural Basis for the Differential Regulation of DNA by the Methionine Repressor MetJ

    SciTech Connect

    Augustus, Anne; Reardon, Patrick; Heller, William T; Spicer, Leonard D.

    2006-01-01

    The Met regulon in Escherichia coli encodes several proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of methionine. Regulation of the expression of most of these proteins is governed by the methionine repressor protein MetJ and its co-repressor, the methionine derivative S-adenosylmethionine. Genes controlled by MetJ contain from two to five sequential copies of a homologous 8-bp sequence called the metbox. A crystal structure for one of the complexes, the repressor tetramer bound to two metboxes, has been reported (Somers, W. S., and S. E. Phillips (1992) Nature 359, 387-393), but little structural work on the larger assemblies has been done presumably because of the difficulties in crystallization and the variability in the number and sequences of metboxes for the various genes. Small angle neutron scattering was used to study complexes of MetJ and S-adenosylmethionine with double-stranded DNA containing two, three, and five metboxes. Our results demonstrate that the crystal structure of the two-metbox complex is not the native solution conformation of the complex. Instead, the system adopts a less compact conformation in which there is decreased interaction between the adjacent MetJ dimers. Models built of the higher order complexes from the scattering data show that the three-metbox complex is organized much like the two-metbox complex. However, the five-metbox complex differs significantly from the smaller complexes, providing much closer packing of the adjacent MetJ dimers and allowing additional contacts not available in the crystal structure. The results suggest that there is a structural basis for the differences observed in the regulatory effectiveness of MetJ for the various genes of the Met regulon.

  19. Perspective on unraveling the versatility of 'co-repressor' complexes.

    PubMed

    Baymaz, H Irem; Karemaker, Ino D; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2015-08-01

    A multitude of post-translational modifications take place on histones, one of the best studied being acetylation on lysine residues, which is generally associated with gene activation. During the last decades, several so-called co-repressor protein complexes that carry out the reverse process, histone deacetylation, have been identified and characterized, such as the Sin3, N-CoR/SMRT and NuRD complexes. Although a repressive role for these complexes in regulating gene expression is well established, accumulating evidence also points to a role in gene activation. Here, we argue that integration of various state-of-the-art technologies, addressing different aspects of transcriptional regulation, is essential to unravel this apparent biological versatility of 'co-repressor' complexes.

  20. The lac repressor displays facilitated diffusion in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Petter; Leroy, Prune; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Erik G; Berg, Otto G; Elf, Johan

    2012-06-22

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the expression of genes by binding sequence-specific sites on the chromosome. It has been proposed that to find these sites fast and accurately, TFs combine one-dimensional (1D) sliding on DNA with 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm. This facilitated diffusion mechanism has been demonstrated in vitro, but it has not been shown experimentally to be exploited in living cells. We have developed a single-molecule assay that allows us to investigate the sliding process in living bacteria. Here we show that the lac repressor slides 45 ± 10 base pairs on chromosomal DNA and that sliding can be obstructed by other DNA-bound proteins near the operator. Furthermore, the repressor frequently (>90%) slides over its natural lacO(1) operator several times before binding. This suggests a trade-off between rapid search on nonspecific sequences and fast binding at the specific sequence.

  1. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  2. Engineering a root-specific, repressor-operator gene complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tehryung; Balish, Rebecca S; Heaton, Andrew C P; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-11-01

    Strong, tissue-specific and genetically regulated expression systems are essential tools in plant biotechnology. An expression system tool called a 'repressor-operator gene complex' (ROC) has diverse applications in plant biotechnology fields including phytoremediation, disease resistance, plant nutrition, food safety, and hybrid seed production. To test this concept, we assembled a root-specific ROC using a strategy that could be used to construct almost any gene expression pattern. When a modified E. coli lac repressor with a nuclear localization signal was expressed from a rubisco small subunit expression vector, S1pt::lacIn, LacIn protein was localized to the nuclei of leaf and stem cells, but not to root cells. A LacIn repressible Arabidopsis actin expression vector A2pot was assembled containing upstream bacterial lacO operator sequences, and it was tested for organ and tissue specificity using beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and mercuric ion reductase (merA) gene reporters. Strong GUS enzyme expression was restricted to root tissues of A2pot::GUS/S1pt::lacIn ROC plants, while GUS activity was high in all vegetative tissues of plants lacking the repressor. Repression of shoot GUS expression exceeded 99.9% with no evidence of root repression, among a large percentage of doubly transformed plants. Similarly, MerA was strongly expressed in the roots, but not the shoots of A2pot::merA/S1pt::lacIn plants, while MerA levels remained high in both shoots and roots of plants lacking repressor. Plants with MerA expression restricted to roots were approximately as tolerant to ionic mercury as plants constitutively expressing MerA in roots and shoots. The superiority of this ROC over the previously described root-specific tobacco RB7 promoter is demonstrated.

  3. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  4. DNA supercoiling: A regulatory signal for the λ repressor

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Manzo, Carlo; Fulcrand, Geraldine; Leng, Fenfei; Dunlap, David; Finzi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerases, polymerases, and the chirality introduced by the binding of histones or nucleoid-associated proteins affect DNA supercoiling in vivo. However, supercoiling is not just a by-product of DNA metabolism. Supercoiling is an indicator of cell health, it modifies the accessibility of chromatin, and coordinates the transcription of genes. This suggests that regulatory, protein-mediated loops in DNA may sense supercoiling of the genome in which they are embedded. The λ repressor (CI) maintains the quiescent (lysogenic) transcriptome of bacteriophage λ in infected Escherichia coli. CI-mediated looping prevents overexpression of the repressor protein to preserve sensitivity to conditions that trigger virulence (lysis). Experiments were performed to assess how well the CI-mediated DNA loop traps superhelicity and determine whether supercoiling enhances CI-mediated DNA looping. CI oligomers partitioned plasmids into topological domains and prevented the passage of supercoiling between them. Furthermore, in single DNA molecules stretched and twisted with magnetic tweezers, levels of superhelical density confined in CI-mediated DNA loops ranged from −15% or +11%. Finally, in DNA under tensions that may occur in vivo, supercoiling lowered the free energy of loop formation and was essential for DNA looping. Supercoiling-enhanced looping can influence the maintenance of lysogeny in the λ repressor system; it can encode sensitivity to the energy level of the cell and creates independent topological domains of distinct superhelical density. PMID:25319264

  5. Subspecialization of R2R3-MYB Repressors for Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Regulation in Forage Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of anthocyanin pigments and proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) is regulated by MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes in all angiosperms studied to date. Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 were isolated from Trifolium repens and encode R2R3-MYBs that antagonize the activity of MBW activation complexes. These two genes are conserved in other legume species, and form two sub-clades within the larger anthocyanin/proanthocyanidin clade of MYB repressors. However, unlike petunia and Arabidopsis, these R2R3-MYB repressors do not prevent ectopic accumulation of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins. Instead, they are expressed when anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins are being synthesized, and provide feedback regulation to MBW complexes. This feedback occurs because Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 are themselves regulated by MBW complexes. Tr-MYB133 is regulated by MBW complexes containing anthocyanin-related R2R3-MYB proteins (Tr-RED LEAF), while Tr-MYB134 is regulated by complexes containing the proanthocyanidin R2R3-MYBs (Tr-MYB14). Other features of the MBW gene regulation networks are also conserved within legumes, including the ability for the anthocyanin MBW complexes to activate the expression of the AN1/TT8 clade bHLH factor. The regulation of Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 by distinct, pathway-specific MBW complexes has resulted in subspecialization for controlling anthocyanin or proanthocyanidin synthesis. PMID:26779194

  6. Subspecialization of R2R3-MYB Repressors for Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Regulation in Forage Legumes.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of anthocyanin pigments and proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) is regulated by MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes in all angiosperms studied to date. Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 were isolated from Trifolium repens and encode R2R3-MYBs that antagonize the activity of MBW activation complexes. These two genes are conserved in other legume species, and form two sub-clades within the larger anthocyanin/proanthocyanidin clade of MYB repressors. However, unlike petunia and Arabidopsis, these R2R3-MYB repressors do not prevent ectopic accumulation of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins. Instead, they are expressed when anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins are being synthesized, and provide feedback regulation to MBW complexes. This feedback occurs because Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 are themselves regulated by MBW complexes. Tr-MYB133 is regulated by MBW complexes containing anthocyanin-related R2R3-MYB proteins (Tr-RED LEAF), while Tr-MYB134 is regulated by complexes containing the proanthocyanidin R2R3-MYBs (Tr-MYB14). Other features of the MBW gene regulation networks are also conserved within legumes, including the ability for the anthocyanin MBW complexes to activate the expression of the AN1/TT8 clade bHLH factor. The regulation of Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 by distinct, pathway-specific MBW complexes has resulted in subspecialization for controlling anthocyanin or proanthocyanidin synthesis.

  7. Epigenetic repressor-like genes are differentially regulated during grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) development.

    PubMed

    Almada, Rubén; Cabrera, Nuri; Casaretto, José A; Peña-Cortés, Hugo; Ruiz-Lara, Simón; González Villanueva, Enrique

    2011-10-01

    Grapevine sexual reproduction involves a seasonal separation between inflorescence primordia (flowering induction) and flower development. We hypothesized that a repression mechanism implicating epigenetic changes could play a role in the seasonal separation of these two developmental processes in grapevine. Therefore, the expression of five grapevine genes with homology to the Arabidopsis epigenetic repressor genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE), EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 (EMF2), CURLY LEAF (CLF), MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1) and SWINGER (SWN) was analyzed during the development of buds and vegetative and reproductive organs. During bud development, the putative grapevine epigenetic repressor genes VvCLF, VvEMF2, VvMSI1, VvSWN and VvFIE are mainly expressed in latent buds at the flowering induction period, but also detected during bud burst and inflorescence/flower development. The overlapping expression patterns of grapevine PcG-like genes in buds suggest that chromatin remodeling mechanisms could be operating during grapevine bud development for controlling processes such as seasonal flowering, dormancy and bud burst. Furthermore, the expression of grapevine PcG-like genes was also detected in fruits and vegetative organs, suggesting that epigenetic changes could be at the basis of the regulation of various proliferation-differentiation cell transitions that occur during grapevine development.

  8. Multi-petal cyclamen flowers produced by AGAMOUS chimeric repressor expression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuri; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yamamura, Tomomichi; Sugiyama, Masao; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Terakawa, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cyclamen persicum (cyclamen) is a commercially valuable, winter-blooming perennial plant. We cloned two cyclamen orthologues of AGAMOUS (AG), CpAG1 and CpAG2, which are mainly expressed in the stamen and carpel, respectively. Cyclamen flowers have 5 petals, but expression of a chimeric repressor of CpAG1 (CpAG1-SRDX) caused stamens to convert into petals, resulting in a flower with 10 petals. By contrast, CpAG2-SRDX only caused incomplete formation of stamens and carpels. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana showed similar effects on flower organ specification. Simultaneous expression of CpAG1-SRDX and CpAG2-SRDX in cyclamen induced rose-like, multi-petal flowers, a potentially valuable trait in commercial ornamental varieties. Expression of CpAG2-SRDX in a cyclamen mutant lacking expression of CpAG1 more effectively produced multi-petal flowers. Here, we controlled the number of petals in cyclamen by simple genetic engineering with a chimeric repressor. This strategy may be applicable useful for other ornamental plants with two distinct AG orthologues.

  9. Inhibition of the transcriptional repressor complex Bcl-6/BCoR induces endothelial sprouting but does not promote tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Elisabeth; Payrhuber, Dietmar; Harchi, Miriam El; Zagrapan, Branislav; Scheuba, Katharina; Zommer, Anna; Bugyik, Edina; Dome, Balazs; Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Schabbauer, Gernot; Petzelbauer, Peter; Gröger, Marion; Bilban, Martin; Brostjan, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the transcriptional repressor Bcl-6 (B-cell lymphoma 6) was originally discovered in non-Hodgkin patients and the soluble Bcl-6 inhibitor 79-6 was developed to treat diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with aberrant Bcl-6 expression. Since we found Bcl-6 and its co-repressor BCoR (Bcl-6 interacting co-repressor) to be regulated in human microvascular endothelium by colorectal cancer cells, we investigated their function in sprouting angiogenesis which is central to tumor growth. Based on Bcl-6/BCoR gene silencing we found that the transcriptional repressor complex in fact constitutes an endogenous inhibitor of vascular sprouting by supporting the stalk cell phenotype: control of Notch target genes (HES1, HEY1, DLL4) and cell cycle regulators (cyclin A and B1). Thus, when endothelial cells were transiently transfected with Bcl-6 and/or BCoR siRNA, vascular sprouting was prominently induced. Comparably, when the soluble Bcl-6 inhibitor 79-6 was applied in the mouse retina model of physiological angiogenesis, endothelial sprouting and branching were significantly enhanced. To address the question whether clinical treatment with 79-6 might therefore have detrimental therapeutic effects by promoting tumor angiogenesis, mouse xenograft models of colorectal cancer and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were tested. Despite a tendency to increased tumor vessel density, 79-6 therapy did not enhance tumor expansion. In contrast, growth of colorectal carcinomas was significantly reduced which is likely due to a combined 79-6 effect on cancer cells and tumor stroma. These findings may provide valuable information regarding the future clinical development of Bcl-6 inhibitors. PMID:27880939

  10. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  11. An ORF from Bacillus licheniformis encodes a putative DNA repressor.

    PubMed

    Naval, J; Aguilar, D; Serra, X; Pérez-Pons, J A; Piñol, J; Lloberas, J; Querol, E

    2000-01-01

    The complete sequence of a reading frame adjacent to the endo-beta-1,3-1,4-D-glucanase gene from Bacillus licheniformis is reported. It encodes a putative 171 amino acid residues protein with either, low significant sequence similarity in data banks or the corresponding orthologue in the recently sequenced Bacillus subtilis genome. Computer analyses predict a canonical Helix-Turn-Helix motif characteristic of bacterial repressors/DNA binding proteins. A maxicells assay shows that the encoded polypeptide is expressed. A DNA-protein binding, assay performed by gel electrophoresis shows that the expressed protein specifically binds to Bacillus licheniformis DNA.

  12. Protein Under Pressure: Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Arc Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Trzesniak, Daniel Rodrigo F.; Lins, Roberto D.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance results for the Arc Repressor have shown that this dimeric protein dissociates into a molten globule at high pressure. This structural change is accompanied by a modification of the hydrogenbonding pattern of the intermolecular -sheet: it changes its character from intermolecular to intramolecular with respect to the two monomers. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Arc Repressor, as a monomer and a dimer, at elevated pressure have been performed with the aim to study this hypothesis and to identify the major structural and dynamical changes of the protein under such conditions. The monomer appears less stable than the dimer. However, the complete dissociation has not been seen because of the long timescale needed to observe this phenomenon. In fact, the protein structure altered very little when increasing the pressure. It became slightly compressed and the dynamics of the side-chains and the unfolding process slowed down. Increasing both, temperature and pressure, a tendency of conversion of intermolecular into intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the -sheet region has been detected, supporting the mentioned hypothesis. Also, the onset of denaturation of the separated chains was observed.

  13. Protein under pressure: molecular dynamics simulation of the arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Trzesniak, Daniel; Lins, Roberto D; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2006-10-01

    Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance results for the Arc Repressor have shown that this dimeric protein dissociates into a molten globule at high pressure. This structural change is accompanied by a modification of the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the intermolecular beta-sheet: it changes its character from intermolecular to intramolecular with respect to the two monomers. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Arc Repressor, as a monomer and a dimer, at elevated pressure have been performed with the aim to study this hypothesis and to identify the major structural and dynamical changes of the protein under such conditions. The monomer appears less stable than the dimer. However, the complete dissociation has not been seen because of the long timescale needed to observe this phenomenon. In fact, the protein structure altered very little when increasing the pressure. It became slightly compressed and the dynamics of the side-chains and the unfolding process slowed down. Increasing both, temperature and pressure, a tendency of conversion of intermolecular into intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the beta-sheet region has been detected, supporting the mentioned hypothesis. Also, the onset of denaturation of the separated chains was observed.

  14. Inhibition of cell proliferation by the Mad1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Ashmun, R A; Sherr, C J; Eisenman, R N; Ayer, D E

    1996-01-01

    Mad1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that is induced upon differentiation of a number of distinct cell types. Mad1 dimerizes with Max and recognizes the same DNA sequences as do Myc:Max dimers. However, Mad1 and Myc appear to have opposing functions. Myc:Max heterodimers activate transcription while Mad:Max heterodimers repress transcription from the same promoter. In addition Mad1 has been shown to block the oncogenic activity of Myc. Here we show that ectopic expression of Mad1 inhibits the proliferative response of 3T3 cells to signaling through the colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor. The ability of over-expressed Myc and cyclin D1 to complement the mutant CSF-1 receptor Y809F (containing a Y-to-F mutation at position 809) is also inhibited by Mad1. Cell cycle analysis of proliferating 3T3 cells transfected with Mad1 demonstrates a significant decrease in the fraction of cells in the S and G2/M phases and a concomitant increase in the fraction of G1 phase cells, indicating that Mad1 negatively influences cell cycle progression from the G1 to the S phase. Mutations in Mad1 which inhibit its activity as a transcription repressor also result in loss of Mad1 cell cycle inhibitory activity. Thus, the ability of Mad1 to inhibit cell cycle progression is tightly coupled to its function as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:8649388

  15. Neuronal Transcriptional Repressor REST Suppresses an Atoh7-Independent Program for Initiating Retinal Ganglion Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chai-An; Tsai, Wen-Wei; Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Pan, Ping; Barton, Michelle Craig; Klein, William H.

    2010-01-01

    As neuronal progenitors differentiate into neurons, they acquire a unique set of transcription factors. The transcriptional repressor REST prevents progenitors from undergoing differentiation. Notably, REST binding sites are often associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genes whose expression in the retina is positively controlled by Atoh7, a factor essential for RGC formation. The key regulators that enable a retinal progenitor cell (RPC) to commit to an RGC fate have not been identified. We show here that REST suppresses RGC gene expression in RPCs. REST inactivation causes aberrant expression of RGC transcription factors in proliferating RPCs, independent of Atoh7, resulting in increased RGC formation. Strikingly, inactivating REST in Atoh7-null retinas restores transcription factor expression, which partially activates downstream RGC genes but is insufficient to prevent RGC loss. Our results demonstrate an Atoh7-independent program for initial activation of RGC genes and suggest a novel role for REST in preventing premature expression in RPCs. PMID:20969844

  16. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  17. Arousal Level in Repressors and Sensitizers as a Function of Response Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Steven H.

    1971-01-01

    Repressors and sensitizers were given "noncontextual" and "contextual" tasks, with galvanic skin response as a measure of arousal. Results from the noncontextual task showed that repressors had lower arousal levels than sensitizers during perception and verbal report, but higher during free association. Findings were reversed, however, in the…

  18. The Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor ERF9 participates in resistance against necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yosuke; Yamoto, Natsuko; Suzuki, Yuya; Chiba, Yukako; Yamazaki, Ken-ichi; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2013-12-01

    Complex plant defenses that include the hypersensitive response (HR) are mediated by plant hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene. We previously isolated the Arabidopsis DEAR1 (DREB AND EAR MOTIF PROTEIN 1) regulator and showed that its overexpression DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) resulted in a dwarf phenotype and lesion-like cell death, accompanied by elevated expression of PR (PATHOGENESIS-RELATED) genes. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) has enhanced resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea). This result indicates that DEAR1 represses negative regulators of plant defense responses, including transcriptional repressors belonging to the ERF (ETHYLEN RESPONSE FACTOR) family. Knockout mutants of ERF9 (erf9), which were down-regulated in DEAR1ox plants, showed transcriptional promotion of PDF1.2 (PATHOGEN-INDUCIBLE PLANT DEFENSIN) genes, which serve as positive markers for the ethylene/jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway and provide enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the ERF9 in capable of binding to the GCC box, a cis-element contained in the promoters of the PDF1.2 gene that possesses trans-repression activity. Moreover, infection with B. cinerea resulted in the promotion of the PDF1.2 expression, coinciding with suppression of the ERF9 gene under the control of the DEAR1 gene. These results indicate that the transcriptional repressor ERF9 participates in plant defense mechanisms against necrotic fungi mediated by the DEAR1-dependent ethylene/JA signaling pathway.

  19. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A transcriptional repressor of the ERF family confers drought tolerance to rice and regulates genes preferentially located on chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Joo, Joungsu; Choi, Hae Jong; Lee, Youn Hab; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Song, Sang Ik

    2013-07-01

    Plant-specific ethylene response factors (ERFs) play important roles in abiotic and biotic stress responses in plants. Using a transgenic approach, we identified two rice ERF genes, OsERF4a and OsERF10a, which conferred drought stress tolerance. In particular, OsERF4a contains a conserved ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in its C-terminal region that has been shown to function as a transcriptional repression domain. Expression profiling of transgenic rice plants over-expressing OsERF4a using either a constitutively active or an ABA-inducible promoter identified 45 down-regulated and 79 up-regulated genes in common. The increased stress tolerance by over-expression of the EAR domain-containing protein OsERF4a could result from suppression of a repressor of the defense response. Expression of the putative silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) repressor protein was repressed, and expression of several stress-response genes were induced by OsERF4a over-expression. The Sir2 and 7 out of 9 genes that were down-regulated by OsERF4a over-expression were induced by high salinity and drought treatments in non-transgenic control plants. Genes that were down- and up-regulated by OsERF4a over-expression were highly biased toward chromosome 11. Rice chromosome 11 has several large clusters of disease-resistance and defense-response genes. Taken together, our results suggest that OsERF4a is a positive regulator of shoot growth and water-stress tolerance in rice during early growth stages. We propose that OsERF4a could work by suppressing a repressor of the defense responses and/or by controlling the expression of a large number of genes located on chromosome 11.

  1. PML-associated repressor of transcription (PAROT), a novel KRAB-zinc finger repressor, is regulated through association with PML nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, Sandra; Wiemann, Stefan; Will, Hans; Hofmann, Thomas G. . E-mail: t.hofmann@dkfz.de

    2006-04-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are implicated in transcriptional regulation. Here we identify a novel transcriptional repressor, PML-associated repressor of transcription (PAROT), which is regulated in its repressor activity through recruitment to PML-NBs. PAROT is a Krueppel-associated box ( KRAB) zinc-finger (ZNF) protein, which comprises an amino terminal KRAB-A and KRAB-B box, a linker domain and 8 tandemly repeated C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-ZNF motifs at its carboxy terminus. Consistent with its domain structure, when tethered to DNA, PAROT represses transcription, and this is partially released by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A. PAROT colocalizes with members of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family and with transcriptional intermediary factor-1{beta}/KRAB-associated protein 1 (TIF-1{beta}/KAP1), a transcriptional corepressor for the KRAB-ZNF family. Interestingly, PML isoform IV, in contrast to PML-III, efficiently recruits PAROT and TIF-1{beta} from heterochromatin to PML-NBs. PML-NB recruitment of PAROT partially releases its transcriptional repressor activity, indicating that PAROT can be regulated through subnuclear compartmentalization. Taken together, our data identify a novel transcriptional repressor and provide evidence for its regulation through association with PML-NBs.

  2. Correlation between UV dose requirement for lambda bacteriophage induction and lambda repressor concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Baluch, J; Sussman, R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 wild type and a uvrA mutant derivative were used to construct isogenic strains bearing one, two, three, or more phage lambda cI genomes and containing increasing concentration of lambda repressor as measured by in vitro operator DNA-binding assays. The survival and phage induction in response to UV irradiation were determined. In both strains, dose-response relationships were obtained as a function of the cellular repressor concentration. The uvrA lysogens required one-tenth the UV fluence of the wild-type counterparts for induction. Lysogenic strains containing plasmids that overproduce the lambdaind+ repressor and the same lysogens with plasmids overproducing the lambdaind- repressor displayed the same survival curves as the nonlysogenic parental strain; however, only the former produced infectious centers (at a frequency of 2 x 10(-3) to 5 x 10(-4) in response to radiation. PMID:353300

  3. Escherichia coli K-12 lexA2 gene encodes a hypocleavable repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.; Ossanna, N.; Mount, D.W.

    1988-04-01

    LexA2 repressor was partially inactivated after mitomycin C or UV light treatment in a recA+ or recA85(Prtc) (protease constitutive) host background. LexA2 protein was cleaved, but the reaction was slower than that observed for LexA+ repressor. lexA2 had a C-to-T transition at nucleotide 461 (Thr-154 to Ile).

  4. Akt phosphorylates Tal1 oncoprotein and inhibits its repressor activity.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Aqeilan, Rami I; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2005-06-01

    The helix-loop-helix transcription factor Tal1 is required for blood cell development and its activation is a frequent event in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The Akt (protein kinase B) kinase is a key player in transduction of antiapoptotic and proliferative signals in T cells. Because Tal1 has a putative Akt phosphorylation site at Thr90, we investigated whether Akt regulates Tal1. Our results show that Akt specifically phosphorylates Thr90 of the Tal1 protein within its transactivation domain in vitro and in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed the presence of Tal1 in Akt immune complexes, suggesting that Tal1 and Akt physically interact. We further showed that phosphorylation of Tal1 by Akt causes redistribution of Tal1 within the nucleus. Using luciferase assay, we showed that phosphorylation of Tal1 by Akt decreased repressor activity of Tal1 on EpB42 (P4.2) promoter. Thus, these data indicate that Akt interacts with Tal1 and regulates Tal1 by phosphorylation at Thr90 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent manner.

  5. Heat-induced fibrillation of BclXL apoptotic repressor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Kurouski, Dmitry; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Shareef, Mohammed M; Gupta, Vineet; Lednev, Igor K; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-09-01

    The BclXL apoptotic repressor bears the propensity to associate into megadalton oligomers in solution, particularly under acidic pH. Herein, using various biophysical methods, we analyze the effect of temperature on the oligomerization of BclXL. Our data show that BclXL undergoes irreversible aggregation and assembles into highly-ordered rope-like homogeneous fibrils with length in the order of mm and a diameter in the μm-range under elevated temperatures. Remarkably, the formation of such fibrils correlates with the decay of a largely α-helical fold into a predominantly β-sheet architecture of BclXL in a manner akin to the formation of amyloid fibrils. Further interrogation reveals that while BclXL fibrils formed under elevated temperatures show no observable affinity toward BH3 ligands, they appear to be optimally primed for insertion into cardiolipin bicelles. This salient observation strongly argues that BclXL fibrils likely represent an on-pathway intermediate for insertion into mitochondrial outer membrane during the onset of apoptosis. Collectively, our study sheds light on the propensity of BclXL to form amyloid-like fibrils with important consequences on its mechanism of action in gauging the apoptotic fate of cells in health and disease.

  6. HTLV-1 p30II: selective repressor of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Green, Patrick L

    2004-11-24

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 pX ORF II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II whose roles are beginning to be defined in the virus life cycle. Previous studies indicate the importance of these viral proteins in the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads and persist in an animal model of HTLV-1 infection. Intriguing new studies indicate that p30II is a multifunctional regulator that differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and specifically binds and represses tax/rex mRNA nuclear export. A new study characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression using comprehensive human gene arrays. Interestingly, p30II is an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively favoring the expression of regulatory gene pathways important to T lymphocytes. These new findings suggest that HTLV-1, which is associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, uses p30II to selectively repress cellular and viral gene expression to favor the survival of cellular targets ultimately resulting in leukemogenesis.

  7. Novel INHAT repressor (NIR) is required for early lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi A; Pusso, Antonia; Wu, Liming; Zhao, Yongge; Hoffmann, Victoria; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Fowlkes, B J; Jain, Ashish

    2014-09-23

    Novel inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase repressor (NIR) is a transcriptional corepressor with inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase activity and is a potent suppressor of p53. Although NIR deficiency in mice leads to early embryonic lethality, lymphoid-restricted deletion resulted in the absence of double-positive CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes, whereas bone-marrow-derived B cells were arrested at the B220(+)CD19(-) pro-B-cell stage. V(D)J recombination was preserved in NIR-deficient DN3 double-negative thymocytes, suggesting that NIR does not affect p53 function in response to physiologic DNA breaks. Nevertheless, the combined deficiency of NIR and p53 provided rescue of DN3L double-negative thymocytes and their further differentiation to double- and single-positive thymocytes, whereas B cells in the marrow further developed to the B220(+)CD19(+) pro-B-cell stage. Our results show that NIR cooperate with p53 to impose checkpoint for the generation of mature B and T lymphocytes.

  8. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  9. PICKLE is a repressor in seedling de-etiolation pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yanjun; Lin, Rongcheng

    2013-08-01

    Light plays a vital role in seedling de-etiolation during which it remarkably inhibits hypocotyl growth and promotes cotyledon opening and the synthesis of chlorophyll and anthocyanin. After light perception, photoreceptors act to repress two main branches of the light signaling, PIFs and COP1-HY5. We recently identified PKL/EPP1, a chromatin remodeling factor, as a new component in regulating light-mediated hypocotyl growth. In this study, we found that EPP1 acts additively with SPA1 to repress seedling de-etiolation. Moreover, the expression of EPP1 is downregulated specifically in the hypocotyl region of the cop1 mutant compared with that of the wild type. We further found that EPP1 drastically inhibits both the protein and transcript levels of HY5, but not vice versa, indicating that HY5 acts downstream of EPP1. We thus propose a model in which EPP1 defines a new repressor and mediates a distinct signaling pathway of photomorphogenesis.

  10. RREB-1 is a transcriptional repressor of HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Poras, Isabelle; Carosella, Edgardo D; Moreau, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    The nonclassical HLA-G is a molecule specifically involved in immune tolerance with highly restricted tissue distribution in healthy conditions. Yet it is overexpressed in numerous tumors and in allografts with better acceptance. Major mechanisms involved in regulation of HLA-G transcription are still poorly described. Thus, to characterize these mechanisms we have developed a specific proteomic approach to identify proteins that bind differentially to the HLA-G gene promoter by promoter pull-down assay followed by spectrometry mass analysis. Among specific binding factors, we focused on RREB-1, a ras-responsive element binding protein 1. We demonstrated that RREB-1 represses HLA-G transcriptional activity and binds three ras response elements within the HLA-G promoter. RREB-1 protein, specifically in HLA-G-negative cells, interacts with subunits of CtBP complex implicated in chromatin remodeling. This demonstration is the first of a repressor factor of HLA-G transcriptional activity taking part in HLA-G repression by epigenetic mechanisms.

  11. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σS-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σS has been proposed to result largely from competition between σS and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σS binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σS protein proficient for EσS complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σS requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σS are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by EσS. PMID:25578965

  12. Identification of ribosomal protein S7 as a repressor of translation within the str operon of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Dean, D; Yates, J L; Nomura, M

    1981-05-01

    A DNA-directed in vitro protein-synthesizing system was used to demonstrate that r protein S7 has the capacity to inhibit the translation of mRNA for the second and third gene products of the str operon (S7 and EF-G) but not for the first gene product (S12). Translation of mRNA of the last gene product in the operon (EF-Tu) is also probably not inhibited by S7. In addition, we localized the target site for S7 repressor action on the polycistronic str mRNA by examining the repressor activity of S7 in vitro using various template DNAs that contain the gene. The target site was found not to include a promoter-proximal portion of the mRNA for S12. To test for regulatory properties of S7 in vivo, we inserted the S7 gene into a plasmid vector containing the ara regulatory elements such that S7 synthesis was placed under ara control. A specific increase in S7 synthesis caused by stimulation in transcription originating from the arabinose promoter decreased the synthetic rate for EF-G but had no effect on S12 or EF-Tu synthesis.

  13. Anaphase promoting complex-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Denis; Solomon, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an essential ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation in mitosis and G1. The APC regulates a number of cell cycle processes, including spindle assembly, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis, but the full range of its functions is still unknown. To better understand cellular pathways controlled by the APC, we performed a proteomic screen to identify additional APC substrates. We analyzed cell cycle-regulated proteins whose expression peaked during the period when other APC substrates were expressed. Subsequent analysis identified several proteins, including the transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1, as authentic APC substrates. We found that APC(Cdh1) targeted Nrm1 and Yhp1 for degradation in early G1 through Destruction-box motifs and that the degradation of these repressors coincided with transcriptional activation of MBF and Mcm1 target genes, respectively. In addition, Nrm1 was stabilized by phosphorylation, most likely by the budding yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28. We found that expression of stabilized forms of Nrm1 and Yhp1 resulted in reduced cell fitness, due at least in part to incomplete activation of G1-specific genes. Therefore, in addition to its known functions, APC-mediated targeting of Nrm1 and Yhp1 coordinates transcription of multiple genes in G1 with other cell cycle events.

  14. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  15. Arc-repressor dimerization on DNA: folding rate enhancement by colocalization.

    PubMed

    Marcovitz, Amir; Levy, Yaakov

    2009-05-20

    Multimeric proteins are ubiquitous in many cellular processes that require high levels of regulation. Eukaryotic gene expression is often regulated by a mechanism of combinatorial control that involves the binding of dimeric transcription factors to DNA together with the coordinated activity of additional proteins. In this study, we investigated the dimerization of the Arc-repressor on DNA with the aim of achieving microscopic insight into the possible advantages of interacting with DNA as a complex rather than as a monomeric single-domain protein. We used a computational coarse-grained model in which the protein dynamics was governed by native interactions and protein-DNA interactions were dictated by electrostatic forces. Inspired by previous experimental work that showed an enhanced refolding rate for the Arc-repressor in the presence of DNA and other polyanions, we focused on the mechanism and kinetics of the assembly of Arc monomers in the presence of single- (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules in a low-salt concentration environment. The electrostatic interactions that attract the protein to the dsDNA were shown to be fundamental in colocalizing the unfolded Arc chains and in accelerating refolding. Arc monomers bind the dsDNA efficiently and nonspecifically, and search for each other via one-dimensional diffusion. The fastest folding of Arc is observed for DNA of 30 bp. Longer DNA is significantly less efficient in accelerating the Arc refolding rate, since the two subunits search distinct regions of the one-dimensional DNA and are therefore much less colocalized. The probability that the two unfolded chains will meet on 200 bp DNA is similar to that in the bulk. The colocalization of Arc subunits on ssDNA results in much faster folding compared to that obtained on dsDNA of the same length. Differences in the rate of Arc refolding, cooperativity, and the structure of its transition state ensemble introduced by ssDNA and dsDNA molecules

  16. Alanine screening mutagenesis establishes the critical inactivating damage of irradiated E. coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, Stephane; Villette, Sandrine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of lactose repressor to operator DNA. We have previously shown that γ rradiation destabilizes the repressor-operator complex because the repressor loses its DNA-binding ability. It was suggested that the observed oxidation of the four tyrosines (Y7, Y12, Y17, Y47) and the concomitant structural changes of the irradiated DNA-binding domains (headpieces) could be responsible for the inactivation. To pinpoint the tyrosine whose oxidation has the strongest effect, four headpieces containing the product of tyrosine oxidation, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), were simulated by molecular dynamics. We have observed that replacing Y47 by DOPA triggers the largest change of structure and stability of the headpiece and have concluded that Y47 oxidation is the greatest contributor to the decrease of repressor binding to DNA. To experimentally verify this conclusion, we applied the alanine screening mutagenesis approach. Tetrameric mutated repressors bearing an alanine instead of each one of the tyrosines were prepared and their binding to operator DNA was checked. Their binding ability is quite similar to that of the wild-type repressor, except for the Y47A mutant whose binding is strongly reduced. Circular dichroism determinations revealed small reductions of the proportion of α helices and of the melting temperature for Y7A, Y12A and Y17A headpieces, but much larger ones were revealed for Y47A headpiece. These results established the critical role of Y47 oxidation in modifying the structure and stability of the headpiece, and in reduction of the binding ability of the whole lactose repressor.

  17. The general transcriptional repressor Tup1 is required for dimorphism and virulence in a fungal plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Ibeas, José I

    2011-09-01

    A critical step in the life cycle of many fungal pathogens is the transition between yeast-like growth and the formation of filamentous structures, a process known as dimorphism. This morphological shift, typically triggered by multiple environmental signals, is tightly controlled by complex genetic pathways to ensure successful pathogenic development. In animal pathogenic fungi, one of the best known regulators of dimorphism is the general transcriptional repressor, Tup1. However, the role of Tup1 in fungal dimorphism is completely unknown in plant pathogens. Here we show that Tup1 plays a key role in orchestrating the yeast to hypha transition in the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. Deletion of the tup1 gene causes a drastic reduction in the mating and filamentation capacity of the fungus, in turn leading to a reduced virulence phenotype. In U. maydis, these processes are controlled by the a and b mating-type loci, whose expression depends on the Prf1 transcription factor. Interestingly, Δtup1 strains show a critical reduction in the expression of prf1 and that of Prf1 target genes at both loci. Moreover, we observed that Tup1 appears to regulate Prf1 activity by controlling the expression of the prf1 transcriptional activators, rop1 and hap2. Additionally, we describe a putative novel prf1 repressor, named Pac2, which seems to be an important target of Tup1 in the control of dimorphism and virulence. Furthermore, we show that Tup1 is required for full pathogenic development since tup1 deletion mutants are unable to complete the sexual cycle. Our findings establish Tup1 as a key factor coordinating dimorphism in the phytopathogen U. maydis and support a conserved role for Tup1 in the control of hypha-specific genes among animal and plant fungal pathogens.

  18. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy to probe lac repressor-DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Capitanio, Marco; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap capable to probe, under controlled force, bimolecular interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution. Here we present the technique in the framework of protein-DNA interactions, specifically on Lactose repressor protein (LacI). The high temporal resolution of the method reveals the kinetics of both short- and long-lived interactions of LacI along the DNA template (from ˜100 μs to tens of seconds), as well the dependence on force of such interaction kinetics. The two kinetically well-distinct populations of interactions observed clearly represent specific interactions with the operator sequences and a fast scanning of LacI along non-cognate DNA. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method to study the sequence-dependent affinity of DNA-binding proteins along the DNA and the effects of force on a wide range of interaction durations, including μs time scales not accessible to other single-molecule methods. This improvement in time resolution provides also important means of investigation on the long-puzzled mechanism of target search on DNA and possible protein conformational changes occurring upon target recognition.

  19. Functional analysis of NsrR, a nitric oxide sensing Rrf2 repressor in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Isabella, Vincent M.; Lapek, John D.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Clark, Virginia L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be an important component of the human immune response, and as such, it is important to understand how pathogenic organisms respond to its presence. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, recent work has revealed that NsrR, an Rrf2-type transcriptional repressor, can sense NO and control the expression of genes responsible for NO metabolism. A highly pure extract of epitope tagged NsrR was isolated and mass spectroscopic analysis suggested that the protein contained a [2Fe-2S] cluster. NsrR/DNA interactions were thoroughly analyzed in vitro. Using EMSA analysis, NsrR::FLAG was shown to interact with predicted operators in the norB, aniA, and nsrR upstream regions with a Kd of 7 nM, 19 nM, and 35 nM respectively. DNase I footprint analysis was performed on the upstream regions of norB and nsrR, where NsrR was shown to protect the predicted 29 bp binding sites. The presence of exogenously added NO inhibited DNA binding by NsrR. Alanine substitution of C90, C97, or C103 in NsrR abrogated repression of norB::lacZ and inhibited DNA binding, consistent with their presumed role in coordination of a NO-sensitive Fe-S center required for DNA binding. PMID:19007408

  20. The Capicua repressor – a general sensor of RTK signaling in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Gerardo; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.; Paroush, Ze'ev

    2012-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways control multiple cellular decisions in metazoans, often by regulating the expression of downstream genes. In Drosophila melanogaster and other systems, E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors are considered to be the predominant nuclear effectors of RTK pathways. Here, we highlight recent progress in identifying the HMG-box protein Capicua (CIC) as a key sensor of RTK signaling in both Drosophila and mammals. Several studies have shown that CIC functions as a repressor of RTK-responsive genes, keeping them silent in the absence of signaling. Following the activation of RTK signaling, CIC repression is relieved, and this allows the expression of the targeted gene in response to local or ubiquitous activators. This regulatory switch is essential for several RTK responses in Drosophila, from the determination of cell fate to cell proliferation. Furthermore, increasing evidence supports the notion that this mechanism is conserved in mammals, where CIC has been implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration. In addition to summarizing our current knowledge on CIC, we also discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of RTK signaling specificity in different biological processes. PMID:22526417

  1. NIR is a novel INHAT repressor that modulates the transcriptional activity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Hublitz, Philip; Kunowska, Natalia; Mayer, Ulrich P.; Müller, Judith M.; Heyne, Kristina; Yin, Na; Fritzsche, Claudia; Poli, Cecilia; Miguet, Laurent; Schupp, Ingo W.; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Potiers, Noëlle; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Metzger, Eric; Roemer, Klaus; Schüle, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Most transcriptional repression pathways depend on the targeted deacetylation of histone tails. In this report, we characterize NIR, a novel transcriptional corepressor with inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (INHAT) activity. NIR (Novel INHAT Repressor) is ubiquitously expressed throughout embryonic development and adulthood. NIR is a potent transcriptional corepressor that is not blocked by histone deacetylase inhibitors and is capable of silencing both basal and activator-driven transcription. NIR directly binds to nucleosomes and core histones and prevents acetylation by histone acetyltransferases, thus acting as a bona fide INHAT. Using a tandem affinity purification approach, we identified the tumor suppressor p53 as a NIR-interacting partner. Association of p53 and NIR was verified in vitro and in vivo. Upon recruitment by p53, NIR represses transcription of both p53-dependent reporters and endogenous target genes. Knock-down of NIR by RNA interference significantly enhances histone acetylation at p53-regulated promoters. Moreover, p53-dependent apoptosis is robustly increased upon depletion of NIR. In summary, our findings describe NIR as a novel INHAT that plays an important role in the control of p53 function. PMID:16322561

  2. The Capicua repressor--a general sensor of RTK signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Gerardo; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Paroush, Ze'ev

    2012-03-15

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways control multiple cellular decisions in metazoans, often by regulating the expression of downstream genes. In Drosophila melanogaster and other systems, E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors are considered to be the predominant nuclear effectors of RTK pathways. Here, we highlight recent progress in identifying the HMG-box protein Capicua (CIC) as a key sensor of RTK signaling in both Drosophila and mammals. Several studies have shown that CIC functions as a repressor of RTK-responsive genes, keeping them silent in the absence of signaling. Following the activation of RTK signaling, CIC repression is relieved, and this allows the expression of the targeted gene in response to local or ubiquitous activators. This regulatory switch is essential for several RTK responses in Drosophila, from the determination of cell fate to cell proliferation. Furthermore, increasing evidence supports the notion that this mechanism is conserved in mammals, where CIC has been implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration. In addition to summarizing our current knowledge on CIC, we also discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of RTK signaling specificity in different biological processes.

  3. New diphtheria toxin repressor types depicted in a Romanian collection of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates.

    PubMed

    Dinu, Sorin; Damian, Maria; Badell, Edgar; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Guiso, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is the etiological agent of diphtheria, a potential fatal disease caused by a corynephage toxin. The expression of this diphtheria toxin is controlled via an iron-dependent repressor with various functions (DtxR). Some mutations in the dtxR gene are associated with diminished activity or even with total loss of DtxR function. We conducted a molecular study to characterize the dtxR alleles harbored by 34 isolates of C. diphtheriae recovered from Romanian patients between 1961 and 2007. Three of the seven alleles identified in this study have not previously been described. Two new DtxR types were identified, one of which has an unusual polypeptide length. All the new DtxR types were found in toxigenic isolates, suggesting that they effectively regulate the expression of diphtheria toxin. Furthermore, one of the new DtxR identified was also found in a non-toxigenic isolate, making it a potential source of toxigenic isolates after lysogenic conversion.

  4. Mutations in the TGF-β repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Alexander J; Doyle, Jefferson J; Bessling, Seneca L; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A; Huso, Nicholas D; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W; Caulfield, Mark J; Scott, Alan F; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C; Arn, Pamela H; Curry, Cynthia J; Van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S; Loeys, Bart L; Dietz, Harry C

    2012-11-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively imply diminished TGF-β signaling. Taken together, these data have engendered controversy regarding the specific role of TGF-β in disease pathogenesis. Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) has considerable phenotypic overlap with MFS and LDS, including aortic aneurysm. We identified causative variation in ten individuals with SGS in the proto-oncogene SKI, a known repressor of TGF-β activity. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from affected individuals showed enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling cascades and higher expression of TGF-β-responsive genes relative to control cells. Morpholino-induced silencing of SKI paralogs in zebrafish recapitulated abnormalities seen in humans with SGS. These data support the conclusions that increased TGF-β signaling is the mechanism underlying SGS and that high signaling contributes to multiple syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm.

  5. Sulfur deficiency–induced repressor proteins optimize glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Aarabi, Fayezeh; Kusajima, Miyuki; Tohge, Takayuki; Konishi, Tomokazu; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Takamune, Makiko; Sasazaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Nakashita, Hideo; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Hoefgen, Rainer; Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) in the plant order of the Brassicales are sulfur-rich secondary metabolites that harbor antipathogenic and antiherbivory plant-protective functions and have medicinal properties, such as carcinopreventive and antibiotic activities. Plants repress GSL biosynthesis upon sulfur deficiency (−S); hence, field performance and medicinal quality are impaired by inadequate sulfate supply. The molecular mechanism that links –S to GSL biosynthesis has remained understudied. We report here the identification of the –S marker genes sulfur deficiency induced 1 (SDI1) and SDI2 acting as major repressors controlling GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis under –S condition. SDI1 and SDI2 expression negatively correlated with GSL biosynthesis in both transcript and metabolite levels. Principal components analysis of transcriptome data indicated that SDI1 regulates aliphatic GSL biosynthesis as part of –S response. SDI1 was localized to the nucleus and interacted with MYB28, a major transcription factor that promotes aliphatic GSL biosynthesis, in both yeast and plant cells. SDI1 inhibited the transcription of aliphatic GSL biosynthetic genes by maintaining the DNA binding composition in the form of an SDI1-MYB28 complex, leading to down-regulation of GSL biosynthesis and prioritization of sulfate usage for primary metabolites under sulfur-deprived conditions. PMID:27730214

  6. The Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation in Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koe, Chwee Tat; Li, Song; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Keng; Aw, Sherry Shiying; Richardson, Helena E; Robson, Paul; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The control of self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells is a crucial issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages are prone to developing impaired neuroblast homeostasis if the limited self-renewing potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) is unrestrained. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling Brahma (Brm) complex functions cooperatively with another chromatin remodeling factor, Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to suppress the formation of ectopic type II neuroblasts. We show that multiple components of the Brm complex and HDAC3 physically associate with Earmuff (Erm), a type II-specific transcription factor that prevents dedifferentiation of INPs into neuroblasts. Consistently, the predicted Erm-binding motif is present in most of known binding loci of Brm. Furthermore, brm and hdac3 genetically interact with erm to prevent type II neuroblast overgrowth. Thus, the Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation of INPs back into type II neuroblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01906.001 PMID:24618901

  7. Apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain (ARC) restrains Bax-mediated pathogenesis in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Kwong, Jennifer Q; Kitsis, Richard N; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2013-01-01

    Myofiber wasting in muscular dystrophy has largely been ascribed to necrotic cell death, despite reports identifying apoptotic markers in dystrophic muscle. Here we set out to identify the contribution of canonical apoptotic pathways to skeletal muscle degeneration in muscular dystrophy by genetically deleting a known inhibitor of apoptosis, apoptosis repressor with a card domain (Arc), in dystrophic mouse models. Nol3 (Arc protein) genetic deletion in the dystrophic Sgcd or Lama2 null backgrounds showed exacerbated skeletal muscle pathology with decreased muscle performance compared with single null dystrophic littermate controls. The enhanced severity of the dystrophic phenotype associated with Nol3 deletion was caspase independent but dependent on the mitochondria permeability transition pore (MPTP), as the inhibitor Debio-025 partially rescued skeletal muscle pathology in Nol3 (-/-) Sgcd (-/-) double targeted mice. Mechanistically, Nol3 (-/-) Sgcd (-/-) mice showed elevated total and mitochondrial Bax protein levels, as well as greater mitochondrial swelling, suggesting that Arc normally restrains the cell death effects of Bax in skeletal muscle. Indeed, knockdown of Arc in mouse embryonic fibroblasts caused an increased sensitivity to cell death that was fully blocked in Bax Bak1 (genes encoding Bax and Bak) double null fibroblasts. Thus Arc deficiency in dystrophic muscle exacerbates disease pathogenesis due to a Bax-mediated sensitization of mitochondria-dependent death mechanisms.

  8. Fourteen Ways to Reroute Cooperative Communication in the Lactose Repressor: Engineering Regulatory Proteins with Alternate Repressive Functions.

    PubMed

    Richards, David H; Meyer, Sarai; Wilson, Corey J

    2017-01-20

    The lactose repressor (LacI) is a classic genetic switch that has been used as a fundamental component in a host of synthetic genetic networks. To expand the function of LacI for use in the development of novel networks and other biotechnological applications, we engineered alternate communication in the LacI scaffold via laboratory evolution. Here we produced 14 new regulatory elements based on the LacI topology that are responsive to isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) with variation in repression strengths and ligand sensitivities-on solid media. The new variants exhibit repressive as well as antilac (i.e., inverse-repression + IPTG) functions and variations in the control of gene output upon exposure to different concentrations of IPTG. In addition, examination of this collection of variants in solution results in the controlled output of a canonical florescent reporter, demonstrating the utility of this collection of new regulatory proteins under standard conditions.

  9. A novel GDNF-inducible gene, BMZF3, encodes a transcriptional repressor associated with KAP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chikage; Murakumo, Yoshiki Kawase, Yukari; Sato, Tomoko; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Fukuda, Naoyuki; Enomoto, Atsushi; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2008-02-01

    The Krueppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise the largest family of zinc finger transcription factors that function as transcriptional repressors. In the study of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-RET signaling, we have identified bone marrow zinc finger 3 (BMZF3), encoding a KRAB-ZFP, as a GDNF-inducible gene by differential display analysis. The expression of BMZF3 transcripts in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW increased 1 h after GDNF stimulation, as determined by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The BMZF3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity in the KRAB domain. BMZF3 interacts with a co-repressor protein, KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), through the KRAB domain and siRNA-mediated knockdown of KAP-1 abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of BMZF3, indicating that KAP-1 is necessary for BMZF3 function. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated silencing of BMZF3 inhibited cell proliferation. These findings suggest that BMZF3 is a transcriptional repressor induced by GDNF that plays a role in cell proliferation.

  10. Crystal Structure of the lamda Repressor and a Model for Pairwise Cooperative Operator Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stayrook,S.; Jaru-Ampornpan, P.; Ni, J.; Hochschild, A.; Lewis, M.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage {lambda} has for many years been a model system for understanding mechanisms of gene regulation1. A 'genetic switch' enables the phage to transition from lysogenic growth to lytic development when triggered by specific environmental conditions. The key component of the switch is the cI repressor, which binds to two sets of three operator sites on the chromosome that are separated by about 2,400 base pairs (bp)2, 3. A hallmark of the system is the pairwise cooperativity of repressor binding4. In the absence of detailed structural information, it has been difficult to understand fully how repressor molecules establish the cooperativity complex. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the intact cI repressor dimer bound to a DNA operator site. The structure of the repressor, determined by multiple isomorphous replacement methods, reveals an unusual overall architecture that allows it to adopt a conformation that appears to facilitate pairwise cooperative binding to adjacent operator sites.

  11. Visualization of trp repressor and its complexes with DNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Margeat, E; Le Grimellec, C; Royer, C A

    1998-01-01

    We used tapping mode atomic force microscopy to visualize the protein/protein and the protein/DNA complexes involved in transcriptional regulation by the trp repressor (TR). Plasmid fragments bearing the natural operators trp EDCBA and trp R, as well as nonspecific fragments, were deposited onto mica in the presence of varying concentrations of TR and imaged. In the presence of L-tryptophan, both specific and nonspecific complexes of TR with DNA are apparent, as well as free TR assemblies directly deposited onto the mica surface. We observed the expected decrease in specificity of TR for its operators with increasing protein concentration (1-5 nM). This loss of DNA-binding specificity is accompanied by the formation of large protein assemblies of varying sizes on the mica surface, consistent with the known tendency of the repressor to oligomerize in solution. When the co-repressor is omitted, no repressor molecules are seen, either on the plasmid fragments or free on the mica surface, probably because of the formation of larger aggregates that are removed from the surface upon washing. All these findings support a role for protein/protein interactions as an additional mechanism of transcriptional regulation by the trp repressor. PMID:9826594

  12. Repression domains of class II ERF transcriptional repressors share an essential motif for active repression.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Matsui, K; Hiratsu, K; Shinshi, H; Ohme-Takagi, M

    2001-08-01

    We reported previously that three ERF transcription factors, tobacco ERF3 (NtERF3) and Arabidopsis AtERF3 and AtERF4, which are categorized as class II ERFs, are active repressors of transcription. To clarify the roles of these repressors in transcriptional regulation in plants, we attempted to identify the functional domains of the ERF repressor that mediates the repression of transcription. Analysis of the results of a series of deletions revealed that the C-terminal 35 amino acids of NtERF3 are sufficient to confer the capacity for repression of transcription on a heterologous DNA binding domain. This repression domain suppressed the intermolecular activities of other transcriptional activators. In addition, fusion of this repression domain to the VP16 activation domain completely inhibited the transactivation function of VP16. Comparison of amino acid sequences of class II ERF repressors revealed the conservation of the sequence motif (L)/(F)DLN(L)/(F)(x)P. This motif was essential for repression because mutations within the motif eliminated the capacity for repression. We designated this motif the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, and we identified this motif in a number of zinc-finger proteins from wheat, Arabidopsis, and petunia plants. These zinc finger proteins functioned as repressors, and their repression domains were identified as regions that contained an EAR motif.

  13. Inhibition of the association of RNA polymerase II with the preinitiation complex by a viral transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Wu, J; Luu, P; Ghazal, P; Flores, O

    1996-03-19

    Transcriptional repression is an important component of regulatory networks that govern gene expression. In this report, we have characterized the mechanisms by which the immediate early protein 2 (IE2 or IE86), a master transcriptional regulator of human cytomegalovirus, down-regulates its own expression. In vitro transcription and DNA binding experiments demonstrate that IE2 blocks specifically the association of RNA polymerase II with the preinitiation complex. Although, to our knowledge, this is the first report to describe a eukaryotic transcriptional repressor that selectively impedes RNA polymerase II recruitment, we present data that suggest that this type of repression might be widely used in the control of transcription by RNA polymerase II.

  14. Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effector HopBB1 Promotes Host Transcriptional Repressor Degradation to Regulate Phytohormone Responses and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Biswas, Surojit; Finkel, Omri M; He, Yijian; Salas-Gonzalez, Isai; English, Marie E; Epple, Petra; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2017-02-08

    Independently evolved pathogen effectors from three branches of life (ascomycete, eubacteria, and oomycete) converge onto the Arabidopsis TCP14 transcription factor to manipulate host defense. However, the mechanistic basis for defense control via TCP14 regulation is unknown. We demonstrate that TCP14 regulates the plant immune system by transcriptionally repressing a subset of the jasmonic acid (JA) hormone signaling outputs. A previously unstudied Pseudomonas syringae (Psy) type III effector, HopBB1, interacts with TCP14 and targets it to the SCF(COI1) degradation complex by connecting it to the JA signaling repressor JAZ3. Consequently, HopBB1 de-represses the TCP14-regulated subset of JA response genes and promotes pathogen virulence. Thus, HopBB1 fine-tunes host phytohormone crosstalk by precisely manipulating part of the JA regulon to avoid pleiotropic host responses while promoting pathogen proliferation.

  15. Energetic methods to study bifunctional biotin operon repressor.

    PubMed

    Beckett, D

    1998-01-01

    measurements. The results of quantitative studies of the biotin regulatory system can be interpreted in the context of the biological function of the system. The biotin holoenzyme ligases are a class of enzymes found across the evolutionary spectrum. Only a subset of these enzymes, including BirA, also function as transcriptional repressors. The tight binding of the allosteric effector may be understood in light of the bifunctional nature of the BirA-bio-5'-AMP complex. It is possible that the unusually high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the complex ensures that the most probable state of the protein in vivo is the adenylate-bound form. This complex, not the unliganded protein, is active in both enzymatic transfer of biotin and site-specific DNA binding. This ensures that on depletion of the intracellular pool of apoBCCP, BirA-bio-5'-AMP accumulates and binds to bioO to repress transcription of the biotin biosynthesis operon. The intracellular demand for and synthesis of biotin are, consequently, tightly coupled in the system. The dimerization that accompanies adenylate binding to BirA appears to be significant for site-specific binding of the protein to bioO. Functionally, the simultaneous binding of the two monomers to the two operator half-sites, regardless of the kinetic mechanism by which it occurs, ensures coordinate regulation of transcription initiation from both biotin operon promoters. The multifaceted approach utilized in studies of the biotin regulatory system can serve as a model for studies of any complex transcriptional regulatory system. It is critical in elucidating the functional energetics of any of these systems that the assembly first be dissected into the constituent interactions and that each of these interactions be studied in isolation. This is not only critical for understanding the physicochemical properties of each individual contributing interaction, but is also a necessary precursor to studies of thermodynamic linkage in the system. (AB

  16. Evidence that the Dictyostelium Dd-STATa protein is a repressor that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation and is also required for efficient chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, S; Jermyn, K A; Early, A; Kawata, T; Aubry, L; Ceccarelli, A; Schaap, P; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    1999-08-01

    Dd-STATa is a structural and functional homologue of the metazoan STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) proteins. We show that Dd-STATa null cells exhibit several distinct developmental phenotypes. The aggregation of Dd-STATa null cells is delayed and they chemotax slowly to a cyclic AMP source, suggesting a role for Dd-STATa in these early processes. In Dd-STATa null strains, slug-like structures are formed but they have an aberrant pattern of gene expression. In such slugs, ecmB/lacZ, a marker that is normally specific for cells on the stalk cell differentiation pathway, is expressed throughout the prestalk region. Stalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium has been proposed to be under negative control, mediated by repressor elements present in the promoters of stalk cell-specific genes. Dd-STATa binds these repressor elements in vitro and the ectopic expression of ecmB/lacZ in the null strain provides in vivo evidence that Dd-STATa is the repressor protein that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation. Dd-STATa null cells display aberrant behavior in a monolayer assay wherein stalk cell differentiation is induced using the stalk cell morphogen DIF. The ecmB gene, a general marker for stalk cell differentiation, is greatly overinduced by DIF in Dd-STATa null cells. Also, Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to DIF for expression of ST/lacZ, a marker for the earliest stages in the differentiation of one of the stalk cell sub-types. We suggest that both these manifestations of DIF hypersensitivity in the null strain result from the balance between activation and repression of the promoter elements being tipped in favor of activation when the repressor is absent. Paradoxically, although Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to the inducing effects of DIF and readily form stalk cells in monolayer assay, the Dd-STATa null cells show little or no terminal stalk cell differentiation within the slug. Dd-STATa null slugs remain

  17. Effects of transgenic sterilization constructs and their repressor compounds on hatch, developmental rate and early survival of electroporated channel catfish embryos and fry.

    PubMed

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Li, Chao; Perera, Dayan A; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Peatman, Eric; Grewe, Peter; Patil, Jawahar G; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) embryos were electroporated with sterilization constructs targeting primordial germ cell proteins or with buffer. Some embryos then were treated with repressor compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate, sodium chloride or doxycycline, to prevent expression of the transgene constructs. Promoters included channel catfish nanos and vasa, salmon transferrin (TF), modified yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper transport protein (MCTR) and zebrafish racemase (RM). Knock-down systems were the Tet-off (nanos and vasa constructs), MCTR, RM and TF systems. Knock-down genes included shRNAi targeting 5' nanos (N1), 3' nanos (N2) or dead end (DND), or double-stranded nanos RNA (dsRNA) for overexpression of nanos mRNA. These constructs previously were demonstrated to knock down nanos, vasa and dead end, with the repressors having variable success. Exogenous DNA affected percentage hatch (% hatch), as all 14 constructs, except for the TF dsRNA, TF N1 (T), RM DND (C), vasa DND (C), vasa N1 (C) and vasa N2 (C), had lower % hatch than the control electroporated with buffer. The MCTR and RM DND (T) constructs resulted in delayed hatch, and the vasa and nanos constructs had minimal effects on time of hatch (P < 0.05). Cadmium chloride appeared to counteract the slow development caused by the TF constructs in two TF treatments (P < 0.05). The 4 ppt sodium chloride treatment for the RM system decreased % hatch (P < 0.05) and slowed development. In the case of nanos constructs, doxycycline greatly delayed hatch (P < 0.05). Adverse effects of the transgenes and repressors continued for several treatments for the first 6 days after hatch, but only in a few treatments during the next 10 days. Repressors and gene expression impacted the yield of putative transgenic channel catfish fry, and need to be considered and accounted for in the hatchery phase of producing transgenically sterilized catfish fry and their fertile counterparts. This fry output

  18. Conversion of the lac repressor into an allosterically regulated transcriptional activator for mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Labow, M A; Baim, S B; Shenk, T; Levine, A J

    1990-01-01

    A novel mammalian regulatory system was created by using the Escherichia coli lac repressor. The lac repressor was converted into a mammalian transcriptional activator by modifying the lac repressor coding region to include a nuclear localization signal from the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen and the transcription activation domain from the herpes simplex virus type 1 virion protein 16. The lac activator protein (LAP) fusions were potent activators of several promoters containing lac operator sequences positioned either upstream or downstream of the transcription unit. A single lac operator allowed for transactivation, whereas multiple operators acted synergistically when separated by a small distance. Promoters containing 14 or 21 operator sequences were induced at least 1,000-fold in response to LAP, reaching levels of activity 20 to 30 times greater than that of the SV40 early promoter in HeLa cells. Activation was strongly inhibited by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG), indicating that LAP retained the functions needed for allosteric regulation. LAP was bifunctional, also acting as a repressor of expression of an SV40 promoter containing an operator immediately downstream of the TATA box. Finally, genetic selection schemes were developed such that LAP-expressing cell lines can be generated at high frequency from either established or primary cells in culture. Images PMID:2162473

  19. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  20. Diverse roles of Groucho/Tup1 co-repressors in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanne E; Golz, John F

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation involves coordinated and often complex interactions between activators and repressors that together dictate the temporal and spatial activity of target genes. While the study of developmental regulation has often focused on positively acting transcription factors, it is becoming increasingly clear that transcriptional repression is a key regulatory mechanism underpinning many developmental processes in both plants and animals. In this review, we focus on the plant Groucho (Gro)/Tup1-like co-repressors and discuss their roles in establishing the apical-basal axis of the developing embryo, maintaining the stem cell population in the shoot apex and determining floral organ identity.  As well as being developmental regulators, recent studies have shown that these co-repressors play a central role in regulating auxin and jasmonate signalling pathways and are also linked to the regulation of pectin structure in the seed coat. These latest findings point to the Gro/Tup1-like co-repressors playing a much broad role in plant growth and development than previously thought; an observation that underlines the central importance of transcriptional repression in plant gene regulation.

  1. CRES-T, an effective gene silencing system utilizing chimeric repressors.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Matsui, Kyoko; Ikeda, Miho; Nakata, Masaru; Oshima, Yoshimi; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Chimeric REpressor gene Silencing Technology (CRES-T) is a useful tool for functional analysis of plant transcription factors. In this system, a chimeric repressor that is produced by fusion of a transcription factor to the plant-specific EAR-motif repression domain (SRDX) suppresses target genes of a transcription factor dominantly over the activity of endogenous and functionally redundant transcription factors. As a result, the transgenic plants that express a chimeric repressor exhibit phenotypes similar to loss-of-function of the alleles of the gene encoding the transcription factor. This system is simple and effective and can be used as a powerful tool not only for functional analysis of redundant transcription factors but also for the manipulation of plant traits by active suppression of the gene expression. Strategies for construction of the chimeric repressors and their expression in transgenic plants are described. Transient effector-reporter assays for functional analysis of transcription factors and detection of protein-protein interactions using the trans-repressive activity of SRDX repression domain are also described.

  2. Genes regulated by the Escherichia coli SOS repressor LexA exhibit heterogenous expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phenotypic heterogeneity may ensure that a small fraction of a population survives environmental perturbations or may result in lysis in a subpopulation, to increase the survival of siblings. Genes involved in DNA repair and population dynamics play key roles in rapid responses to environmental conditions. In Escherichia coli the transcriptional repressor LexA controls a coordinated cellular response to DNA damage designated the SOS response. Expression of LexA regulated genes, e.g. colicin encoding genes, recA, lexA and umuDC, was examined utilizing transcription fusions with the promoterless gfp at the single cell level. Results The investigated LexA regulated genes exhibited heterogeneity, as only in a small fraction of the population more intense fluorescence was observed. Unlike recA and lexA, the pore forming and nuclease colicin activity genes as well as umuDC, exhibited no basal level activity. However, in a lexA defective strain high level expression of the gene fusions was observed in the large majority of the cells. All of the investigated genes were expressed in a recA defective strain, albeit at lower levels, revealing expression in the absence of a spontaneous SOS response. In addition, the simultaneous expression of cka, encoding the pore forming colicin K, and lexA, investigated at the single cell level revealed high level expression of only cka in rare individual cells. Conclusion LexA regulated genes exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity as high level expression is observed in only a small subpopulation of cells. Heterogenous expression is established primarily by stochastic factors and the binding affinity of LexA to SOS boxes. PMID:21070632

  3. Molecular Binding Mechanism of TtgR Repressor to Antibiotics and Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Escamilla, Ana Maria; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Morel, Bertrand; Casares-Atienza, Salvador; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    A disturbing phenomenon in contemporary medicine is the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Efflux pumps contribute strongly to this antimicrobial drug resistance, which leads to the subsequent failure of clinical treatments. The TtgR protein of Pseudomonas putida is a HTH-type transcriptional repressor that controls expression of the TtgABC efflux pump, which is the main contributor to resistance against several antimicrobials and toxic compounds in this microbe. One of the main strategies to modulate the bacterial resistance is the rational modification of the ligand binding target site. We report the design and characterization of four mutants-TtgRS77A, TtgRE78A, TtgRN110A and TtgRH114A - at the active ligand binding site. The biophysical characterization of the mutants, in the presence and in the absence of different antimicrobials, revealed that TtgRN110A is the variant with highest thermal stability, under any of the experimental conditions tested. EMSA experiments also showed a different dissociation pattern from the operator for TtgRN110A, in the presence of several antimicrobials, making it a key residue in the TtgR protein repression mechanism of the TtgABC efflux pump. We found that TtgRE78A stability is the most affected upon effector binding. We also probe that one mutation at the C-terminal half of helix-α4, TtgRS77A, provokes a severe protein structure distortion, demonstrating the important role of this residue in the overall protein structure and on the ligand binding site. The data provide new information and deepen the understanding of the TtgR-effector binding mechanism and consequently the TtgABC efflux pump regulation mechanism in Pseudomonas putida. PMID:26422008

  4. The Translational Repressor 4E-BP1 Contributes to Diabetes-Induced Visual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William P.; Mihailescu, Maria L.; Yang, Chen; Barber, Alistair J.; Kimball, Scot R.; Jefferson, Leonard S.; Dennis, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The translational repressor 4E-BP1 interacts with the mRNA cap-binding protein eIF4E and thereby promotes cap-independent translation of mRNAs encoding proteins that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Interaction of 4E-BP1 with eIF4E is enhanced in the retina of diabetic rodents, at least in part, as a result of elevated 4E-BP1 protein expression. In the present study, we examined the role of 4E-BP1 in diabetes-induced visual dysfunction, as well as the mechanism whereby hyperglycemia promotes 4E-BP1 expression. Methods Nondiabetic and diabetic wild-type and 4E-BP1/2 knockout mice were evaluated for visual function using a virtual optomotor test (Optomotry). Retinas were harvested from nondiabetic and type 1 diabetic mice and analyzed for protein abundance and posttranslational modifications. Similar analyses were performed on cells in culture exposed to hyperglycemic conditions or an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor (Thiamet G [TMG]). Results Diabetes-induced visual dysfunction was delayed in mice deficient of 4E-BP1/2 as compared to controls. 4E-BP1 protein expression was enhanced by hyperglycemia in the retina of diabetic rodents and by hyperglycemic conditions in retinal cells in culture. A similar elevation in 4E-BP1 expression was observed with TMG. The rate of 4E-BP1 degradation was significantly prolonged by either hyperglycemic conditions or TMG. A PEST motif in the C-terminus of 4E-BP1 regulated polyubiquitination, turnover, and binding of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing CUL3. Conclusions The findings support a model whereby elevated 4E-BP1 expression observed in the retina of diabetic rodents is the result of O-GlcNAcylation of 4E-BP1 within its PEST motif. PMID:26998719

  5. The Central Region of the Drosophila Co-repressor Groucho as a Regulatory Hub*

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Pak N.; Chambers, Michael; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Turki-Judeh, Wiam; Yau, Tak Yu; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Courey, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Groucho (Gro) is a Drosophila co-repressor that regulates the expression of a large number of genes, many of which are involved in developmental control. Previous studies have shown that its central region is essential for function even though its three domains are poorly conserved and intrinsically disordered. Using these disordered domains as affinity reagents, we have now identified multiple embryonic Gro-interacting proteins. The interactors include protein complexes involved in chromosome organization, mRNA processing, and signaling. Further investigation of the interacting proteins using a reporter assay showed that many of them modulate Gro-mediated repression either positively or negatively. The positive regulators include components of the spliceosomal subcomplex U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP). A co-immunoprecipitation experiment confirms this finding and suggests that a sizable fraction of nuclear U1 snRNP is associated with Gro. The use of RNA-seq to analyze the gene expression profile of cells subjected to knockdown of Gro or snRNP-U1-C (a component of U1 snRNP) showed a significant overlap between genes regulated by these two factors. Furthermore, comparison of our RNA-seq data with Gro and RNA polymerase II ChIP data led to a number of insights, including the finding that Gro-repressed genes are enriched for promoter-proximal RNA polymerase II. We conclude that the Gro central domains mediate multiple interactions required for repression, thus functioning as a regulatory hub. Furthermore, interactions with the spliceosome may contribute to repression by Gro. PMID:26483546

  6. Target gene analysis by microarrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation identifies HEY proteins as highly redundant bHLH repressors.

    PubMed

    Heisig, Julia; Weber, David; Englberger, Eva; Winkler, Anja; Kneitz, Susanne; Sung, Wing-Kin; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Wei, Chia-Lin; Gessler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    HEY bHLH transcription factors have been shown to regulate multiple key steps in cardiovascular development. They can be induced by activated NOTCH receptors, but other upstream stimuli mediated by TGFß and BMP receptors may elicit a similar response. While the basic and helix-loop-helix domains exhibit strong similarity, large parts of the proteins are still unique and may serve divergent functions. The striking overlap of cardiac defects in HEY2 and combined HEY1/HEYL knockout mice suggested that all three HEY genes fulfill overlapping function in target cells. We therefore sought to identify target genes for HEY proteins by microarray expression and ChIPseq analyses in HEK293 cells, cardiomyocytes, and murine hearts. HEY proteins were found to modulate expression of their target gene to a rather limited extent, but with striking functional interchangeability between HEY factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a much greater number of potential binding sites that again largely overlap between HEY factors. Binding sites are clustered in the proximal promoter region especially of transcriptional regulators or developmental control genes. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that HEY proteins primarily act as direct transcriptional repressors, while gene activation seems to be due to secondary or indirect effects. Mutagenesis of putative DNA binding residues supports the notion of direct DNA binding. While class B E-box sequences (CACGYG) clearly represent preferred target sequences, there must be additional and more loosely defined modes of DNA binding since many of the target promoters that are efficiently bound by HEY proteins do not contain an E-box motif. These data clearly establish the three HEY bHLH factors as highly redundant transcriptional repressors in vitro and in vivo, which explains the combinatorial action observed in different tissues with overlapping expression.

  7. Conversion of the LIN-1 ETS protein of Caenorhabditis elegans from a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor to a phosphorylated transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Leight, Elizabeth R; Murphy, John T; Fantz, Douglas A; Pepin, Danielle; Schneider, Daniel L; Ratliff, Thomas M; Mohammad, Duaa H; Herman, Michael A; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    The LIN-1 ETS transcription factor plays a pivotal role in controlling cell fate decisions during development of the Caenorhabditis elegans vulva. Prior to activation of the RTK/Ras/ERK-signaling pathway, LIN-1 functions as a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor that inhibits vulval cell fate. Here we demonstrate using the yeast two-hybrid system that SUMOylation of LIN-1 mediates interactions with a protein predicted to be involved in transcriptional repression: the RAD-26 Mi-2β/CHD4 component of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) transcriptional repression complex. Genetic studies indicated that rad-26 functions to inhibit vulval cell fates in worms. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we showed that the EGL-27/MTA1 component of the NuRD complex binds the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 independently of LIN-1 SUMOylation. EGL-27 also binds UBC-9, an enzyme involved in SUMOylation, and MEP-1, a zinc-finger protein previously shown to bind LIN-1. Genetic studies indicate that egl-27 inhibits vulval cell fates in worms. These results suggest that LIN-1 recruits multiple proteins that repress transcription via both the SUMOylated amino-terminus and the unSUMOylated carboxy-terminus. Assays in cultured cells showed that the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 was converted to a potent transcriptional activator in response to active ERK. We propose a model in which LIN-1 recruits multiple transcriptional repressors to inhibit the 1° vulval cell fate, and phosphorylation by ERK converts LIN-1 to a transcriptional activator that promotes the 1° vulval cell fate.

  8. The Groucho Co-repressor Is Primarily Recruited to Local Target Sites in Active Chromatin to Attenuate Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by the complex interaction between transcriptional activators and repressors, which function in part by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to control accessibility of DNA to RNA polymerase. The evolutionarily conserved family of Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of split (Gro/TLE) proteins act as co-repressors for numerous transcription factors. Gro/TLE proteins act in several key pathways during development (including Notch and Wnt signaling), and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human cancers. Gro/TLE proteins form oligomers and it has been proposed that their ability to exert long-range repression on target genes involves oligomerization over broad regions of chromatin. However, analysis of an endogenous gro mutation in Drosophila revealed that oligomerization of Gro is not always obligatory for repression in vivo. We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to profile Gro recruitment in two Drosophila cell lines. We find that Gro predominantly binds at discrete peaks (<1 kilobase). We also demonstrate that blocking Gro oligomerization does not reduce peak width as would be expected if Gro oligomerization induced spreading along the chromatin from the site of recruitment. Gro recruitment is enriched in “active” chromatin containing developmentally regulated genes. However, Gro binding is associated with local regions containing hypoacetylated histones H3 and H4, which is indicative of chromatin that is not fully open for efficient transcription. We also find that peaks of Gro binding frequently overlap the transcription start sites of expressed genes that exhibit strong RNA polymerase pausing and that depletion of Gro leads to release of polymerase pausing and increased transcription at a bona fide target gene. Our results demonstrate that Gro is recruited to local sites by transcription factors to attenuate rather than silence gene expression by promoting histone deacetylation

  9. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  10. A novel phase variation mechanism in the meningococcus driven by a ligand-responsive repressor and differential spacing of distal promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Metruccio, Matteo M E; Pigozzi, Eva; Roncarati, Davide; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Hill, Stuart A; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Delany, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    Phase variable expression, mediated by high frequency reversible changes in the length of simple sequence repeats, facilitates adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environments and is frequently important in bacterial virulence. Here we elucidate a novel phase variable mechanism for NadA, an adhesin and invasin of Neisseria meningitidis. The NadR repressor protein binds to operators flanking the phase variable tract and contributes to the differential expression levels of phase variant promoters with different numbers of repeats likely due to different spacing between operators. We show that IHF binds between these operators, and may permit looping of the promoter, allowing interaction of NadR at operators located distally or overlapping the promoter. The 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, a metabolite of aromatic amino acid catabolism that is secreted in saliva, induces NadA expression by inhibiting the DNA binding activity of the repressor. When induced, only minor differences are evident between NadR-independent transcription levels of promoter phase variants and are likely due to differential RNA polymerase contacts leading to altered promoter activity. Our results suggest that NadA expression is under both stochastic and tight environmental-sensing regulatory control, both mediated by the NadR repressor, and may be induced during colonization of the oropharynx where it plays a major role in the successful adhesion and invasion of the mucosa. Hence, simple sequence repeats in promoter regions may be a strategy used by host-adapted bacterial pathogens to randomly switch between expression states that may nonetheless still be induced by appropriate niche-specific signals.

  11. A Flowering Locus C Homolog Is a Vernalization-Regulated Repressor in Brachypodium and Is Cold Regulated in Wheat1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neha; Ruelens, Philip; D'hauw, Mariëlla; Maggen, Thomas; Dochy, Niklas; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Rohde, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Winter cereals require prolonged cold to transition from vegetative to reproductive development. This process, referred to as vernalization, has been extensively studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In Arabidopsis, a key flowering repressor called FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) quantitatively controls the vernalization requirement. By contrast, in cereals, the vernalization response is mainly regulated by the VERNALIZATION genes, VRN1 and VRN2. Here, we characterize ODDSOC2, a recently identified FLC ortholog in monocots, knowing that it belongs to the FLC lineage. By studying its expression in a diverse set of Brachypodium accessions, we find that it is a good predictor of the vernalization requirement. Analyses of transgenics demonstrated that BdODDSOC2 functions as a vernalization-regulated flowering repressor. In most Brachypodium accessions BdODDSOC2 is down-regulated by cold, and in one of the winter accessions in which this down-regulation was evident, BdODDSOC2 responded to cold before BdVRN1. When stably down-regulated, the mechanism is associated with spreading H3K27me3 modifications at the BdODDSOC2 chromatin. Finally, homoeolog-specific gene expression analyses identify TaAGL33 and its splice variant TaAGL22 as the FLC orthologs in wheat (Triticum aestivum) behaving most similar to Brachypodium ODDSOC2. Overall, our study suggests that ODDSOC2 is not only phylogenetically related to FLC in eudicots but also functions as a flowering repressor in the vernalization pathway of Brachypodium and likely other temperate grasses. These insights could prove useful in breeding efforts to refine the vernalization requirement of temperate cereals and adapt varieties to changing climates. PMID:28034954

  12. Lac repressor: Crystallization of intact tetramer and its complexes with inducer and operator DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, H.C.; Lu, P. ); Lewis, M. Smith Kline and French Labs., King of Prussia, PA )

    1990-03-01

    The intact lac repressor tetramer, which regulates expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli, has been crystallized in the native form, with an inducer, and in a ternary complex with operator DNA and an anti-inducer. The crystals without DNA diffract to better than 3.5 {angstrom}. They belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have cell dimensions a = 164.7 {angstrom}, b = 75.6 {angstrom}, and c = 161.2 {angstrom}, with {alpha} = {gamma} = 90{degree} and {beta} = 125.5{degree}. Cocrystals have been obtained with a number of different lac operator-related DNA fragments. The complex with a blunt-ended 16-base-pair strand yielded tetragonal bipyramids that diffract to 6.5 {angstrom}. These protein-DNA cocrystals crack upon exposure to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactoside, suggesting a conformational change in the repressor-operator complex.

  13. Inducible protein expression in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells using the lac operator-repressor system.

    PubMed

    Wakiyama, Motoaki; Muramatsu, Reiko; Kaitsu, Yoko; Ikeda, Mariko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-01

    Schneider line 2 cells, derived from Drosophila melanogaster, can be used as a highly versatile gene expression system. Two powerful promoters derived from the actin5C (Ac5) and metallothionein (Mtn) genes are available. The Mtn promoter can be used for the inducible expression of heterologous proteins unsuitable for constitutive expression. However, to circumvent using CuSO(4) or CdCl(2) as inducers of the Mtn promoter, we created a modified Ac5 promoter, Ac5LacO, in which two short lac operator sequences are embedded. Expression from the Ac5LacO promoter was regulated with co-expression of the lac repressor and IPTG. More than 25-fold induction of firefly luciferase expression was achieved in transient transfection experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the lac operator-repressor regulatory system functioned in chromosomally integrated cell lines.

  14. Suppression of the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidin in Arabidopsis by a chimeric PAP1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kyoko; Tanaka, Hideo; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2004-11-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites that are specific to higher plants. PAP1, a member of the family of MYB domain transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is a positive regulator of the biosynthesis of anthocyanin. We show here that a chimeric PAP1 repressor, in which the EAR-motif repression domain from SUPERMAN was fused to PAP1, suppressed the expression of four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, namely CHS, DFR, LDOX, and BAN, in siliques, and inhibited the accumulation of proanthocyanidin, even in the presence of an endogenous positive regulator, such as TT2. This suppression resulted in the formation of light yellow seeds in 35S::PAP1SRDX transgenic plants. Our results indicate that PAP1 has the potential ability to regulate the biosynthesis not only of anthocyanin but also of proanthocyanidin. Our gene silencing system, using chimeric repressors, appears to be a useful tool for the manipulation of the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in plants.

  15. Situational Discrimination in Repressor-type and Sensitizer-type Approval Seekers and the Birth Order by Subject Sex Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Five experiments are reported. One conclusion in that repressor-type high need-for-approval subjects made the discrimination and permitted less favorable self-description, but sensitizer-type high need-for-approval subjects did not. (DB)

  16. Competition studies with repressors and activators of viral enhancer function in F9 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, M J; Lockett, T J; Kelly, J; Lewy, D

    1987-01-01

    DNA competition studies have been used to investigate the presence of a repressor of viral enhancer function in F9 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells. The complete polyoma virus enhancer region, cotransfected into F9 cells with the SV40 promoter/enhancer attached to a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase marker gene, induced a small increase in pSV2CAT expression. This can be explained by preferential but weak binding by polyoma sequences of a molecule repressing pSV2CAT transcription. Repressor activity substantially disappeared when the cells were induced to differentiate by retinoic acid. Repressor binding was localised to one half of the polyoma enhancer, but was lost on further fragmentation of this region. It appears that multiple sequence elements may be required for repressor binding and that these are at least partially separable from the complement of elements binding enhancer activating molecules. PMID:3035489

  17. Dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase: molecular size-dependence of repression by polynuclear hydrocarbons. Nonhydrocarbon repressors.

    PubMed

    Arcos, J C; Valle, R T; Bryant, G M; Buu-Hoi, N P; Argus, M F

    1976-01-01

    Studies with 58 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons have shown that to repress demethylation of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) in rat liver, the hydrocarbons must satisfy specific requirements of molecular geometry regarding size, shape, and coplanarity. Expressing the molecular size of these planar compounds by the two-dimensional area occupied, the size for maximal repressor activity ranges between about 85 and 150 A2. In addition to being within the correct molecular size range the hydrocarbons must have an elongated-rather than compact-molecular shape; circularly shaped and/or highly symmetrical hydrocarbons, such as coronene, triphenylene, ovalene, and tetrabenzonaphthalene, have very low activity or are inactive, in spite of being in the optimum size range. Coplanarity of the molecule is a critical requirement; thus, the potent carcinogen, 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene, is inactive as repressor of DMN-demethylase synthesis. Two exceptions, fluoranthene and benzol[ghi] fluoranthene, showed significant induction of DMN-demethylase. The molecular size distribution of hydrocarbons that repress the DMN-demethylase shows a mirror-image relationship with respect to the earlier reported molecular size requirement for indcution of azo dye N-demethylase. Compounds other than hydrocarbons also show the mirror-image relationship in the sense that pregnenolene-16alpha-carbonitrile, alpha- and beta-naphthoflavone, and Aroclor 1254 (known to be inducers of various mixed-function oxidases) are strong repressors of DMN-demethylase. Aminoacetonitrile, a strong inhibitor of carcinogenesis by DMN, is also a potent repressor of DMN-demethylase. The enzyme is inhibited by pretreatment of the animals with cobaltous chloride, an inhibitor of the synthesis of cytochrome P-450. Pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile and 3-methylcholanthrene, despite their similarity of action on DMN-demethylase, have different effects on azo reductase, which is repressed by the former and induced by the latter

  18. All Tcf HMG box transcription factors interact with Groucho-related co-repressors

    PubMed Central

    Brantjes, Helen; Roose, Jeroen; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Tcf/Lef family transcription factors are the downstream effectors of the Wingless/Wnt signal transduction pathway. Upon Wingless/Wnt signalling, β-catenin translocates to the nucleus, interacts with Tcf (1–3) and thus activates transcription of target genes (4,5). Tcf factors also interact with members of the Groucho (Grg/TLE) family of transcriptional co-repressors (6). We have now tested all known mammalian Groucho family members for their ability to interact specifically with individual Tcf/Lef family members. Transcriptional activation by any Tcf could be repressed by Grg-1, Grg-2/TLE-2, Grg-3 and Grg-4 in a reporter assay. Specific interactions between Tcf and Grg proteins may be achieved in vivo by tissue- or cell type-limited expression. To address this, we determined the expression of all Tcf and Grg/TLE family members in a panel of cell lines. Within any cell line, several Tcfs and TLEs are co-expressed. Thus, redundancy in Tcf/Grg interactions appears to be the rule. The ‘long’ Groucho family members containing five domains are repressors of Tcf-mediated transactivation, whereas Grg-5, which only contains the first two domains, acts as a de-repressor. As previously shown for Drosophila Groucho, we show that long Grg proteins interact with histone deacetylase-1. Although Grg-5 contains the GP homology domain that mediates HDAC binding in long Grg proteins, Grg-5 fails to bind this co-repressor, explaining how it can de-repress transcription. PMID:11266540

  19. The transcriptional repressor ARR1-SRDX suppresses pleiotropic cytokinin activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Alexander; Ramireddy, Eswar; Brenner, Wolfram G; Riefler, Michael; Allemeersch, Joke; Schmülling, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The signal transduction of the phytohormone cytokinin is mediated by a multistep histidine-to-aspartate phosphorelay system. One component of this system are B-type response regulators, transcription factors mediating at least part of the response to cytokinin. In planta functional analysis of this family is hampered by the high level of functional redundancy of its 11 members. We generated a dominant repressor version of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) response regulator ARR1 (ARR1-SRDX) using chimeric repressor silencing technology in order to study the extent of the contribution of B-type response regulators to cytokinin activities. In a protoplast test system, ARR1-SRDX suppressed ARR6:beta-glucuronidase reporter gene activation by different B-type ARRs. 35S:ARR1-SRDX transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed phenotypic changes reminiscent of plants with a reduced cytokinin status, such as a strongly reduced leaf size, an enhanced root system, and larger seeds. Several bioassays showed that 35S:ARR1-SRDX plants have an increased resistance toward cytokinin. The rapid induction of a large part of the cytokinin response genes was dampened. The transcript levels of more than 500 genes were more than 2.5-fold reduced in 35S:ARR1-SRDX transgenic seedlings, suggesting a broad function of B-type ARRs. Collectively, the suppression of pleiotropic cytokinin activities by a dominant repressor version of a B-type ARR indicates that this protein family is involved in mediating most, if not all, of the cytokinin activities in Arabidopsis. In addition, a role for B-type ARRs in mediating cross talk with other pathways is supported by the resistance of 35S:ARR1-SRDX seeds to phytochrome B-mediated inhibition of germination by far-red light. This study demonstrates the usefulness of chimeric repressor silencing technology to overcome redundancy in transcription factor families for functional studies.

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  1. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  2. A chimeric NST repressor has the potential to improve glucose productivity from plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akira; Hideno, Akihiro; Watanabe, Keiji; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-07-15

    Bioethanol might be produced more economically and with less ecological impact (with reduced exploitation of food crops) if we could increase the production of glucose from the cellulosic materials in plant cell walls. However, plant cell walls are relatively resistant to enzymatic and physicochemical hydrolysis and, therefore, it is necessary to develop methods for reducing such resistance. Changes in plant cell wall materials, by genetic engineering, that render them more easily hydrolyzable to glucose might be a valuable approach to this problem. We showed previously that, in Arabidopsis, NAC secondary wall thickening-promoting factor1 (NST1) and NST3 are key regulators of secondary wall formation. We report here that transgenic Arabidopsis plants that expressed a chimeric repressor derived from NST1 produced cell wall materials that were twice as susceptible to both enzymatic and physicochemical hydrolysis as those from wild-type plants. The yields of glucose from both fresh and dry biomass were increased in the chimeric repressor lines. Use of the NST1 chimeric repressor might enhance production of glucose from plant cell walls, by changing the nature of the cell walls themselves.

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel repressor of beta-interferon gene expression.

    PubMed

    Keller, A D; Maniatis, T

    1991-05-01

    We have identified and characterized a novel repressor of human beta-interferon (beta-IFN) gene expression. This protein, designated PRDI-BF1, binds specifically to the PRDI element of the beta-IFN gene promoter and is distinct from previously reported proteins that bind to this sequence. PRDI-BF1 is an 88-kD protein containing five zinc-finger motifs. Cotransfection experiments in cultured mammalian cells revealed that PRDI-BF1 is a potent repressor of PRDI-dependent transcription. PRDI-BF1 blocks virus induction of the intact beta-IFN gene promoter and of synthetic promoters containing multiple PRDI sites. PRDI-BF1 can also block the SV40 enhancer when PRDI sites are located between the enhancer and the promoter. This repression is highly dependent on the location of the PRDI sites, however, indicating that PRDI-BF1 cannot act at a distance. On the basis of the properties of PRDI-BF1 and the observation that PRDI-BF1 mRNA accumulation is virus inducible, we propose that PRDI-BF1 may act as a postinduction repressor of the beta-IFN gene by displacing positive regulatory proteins from the PRDI site of the promoter.

  4. High-resolution specificity from DNA sequencing highlights alternative modes of Lac repressor binding.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor-operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection.

  5. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  6. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2016-12-20

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (eg. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated Conserved Sequence-guided Repressor Inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectral enhancement of proteins: biological incorporation and fluorescence characterization of 5-hydroxytryptophan in bacteriophage lambda cI repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J B; Senear, D F; Waxman, E; Kombo, B B; Rusinova, E; Huang, Y T; Laws, W R; Hasselbacher, C A

    1992-01-01

    We have used a tryptophan-requiring Escherichia coli auxotroph to replace the three tryptophan residues of lambda cI repressor with 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-OHTrp). By using a nonleaky promoter, we have achieved > 95% replacement of tryptophan in the repressor. We show that the absorbance and fluorescence properties of 5-OHTrp-lambda cI are clearly distinct from lambda cI repressor and that the fluorescence of 5-OHTrp-lambda cI repressor can be observed selectively in the presence of exogenous tryptophan. We also show that the 5-OHTrp-lambda cI repressor functional properties, as assessed by measurement of binding constants for self-association and for association to operator DNA, and structural properties, as assessed by fluorescence, are indistinguishable from the native repressor. Based on these results, we anticipate that the availability of spectrally enhanced proteins will significantly enhance the utility of both fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopies to study protein structure and function in complex interacting systems. PMID:1465434

  8. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  9. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 Are New Targets of JAZ Repressors Negatively Regulating JA Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Sandra; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Fernández, Guillermo M.; Díez-Díaz, Monica; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; López-Vidriero, Irene; Godoy, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Van Leene, Jelle; De Jaeger, Geert; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Cell reprogramming in response to jasmonates requires a tight control of transcription that is achieved by the activity of JA-related transcription factors (TFs). Among them, MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 have been described as activators of JA responses. Here we characterized the function of bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 that conform a phylogenetic clade closely related to MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4. We found that these bHLHs form homo- and heterodimers and also interact with JAZ repressors in vitro and in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of JA-regulated processes, including root and rosette growth, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll loss and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, on mutants and overexpression lines, suggested that these bHLHs are repressors of JA responses. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are mainly nuclear proteins and bind DNA with similar specificity to that of MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4, but lack a conserved activation domain, suggesting that repression is achieved by competition for the same cis-regulatory elements. Moreover, expression of bHLH017 is induced by JA and depends on MYC2, suggesting a negative feed-back regulation of the activity of positive JA-related TFs. Our results suggest that the competition between positive and negative TFs determines the output of JA-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:24465948

  10. GLIS3, a novel member of the GLIS subfamily of Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins with repressor and activation functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Nakanishi, Gen; Lewandoski, Mark; Jetten, Anton M

    2003-10-01

    In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel transcription factor GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3). GLIS3 is an 83.8 kDa nuclear protein containing five C2H2-type Krüppel-like zinc finger motifs that exhibit 93% identity with those of GLIS1, however, little homology exists outside their zinc finger domains. GLIS3 can function as a repressor and activator of transcription. Deletion mutant analysis determined that the N- and C-termini are required for optimal transcriptional activity. GLIS3 binds to the GLI-RE consensus sequence and is able to enhance GLI-RE-dependent transcription. GLIS3(DeltaC496), a dominant-negative mutant, inhibits transcriptional activation by GLIS3 and GLI1. Whole mount in situ hybridization on mouse embryos from stage E6.5 through E14.5 demonstrated that GLIS3 is expressed in specific regions in developing kidney and testis and in a highly dynamic pattern during neurulation. From E11.5 through E12.5 GLIS3 was strongly expressed in the interdigital regions, which are fated to undergo apoptosis. The temporal and spatial pattern of GLIS3 expression observed during embryonic development suggests that it may play a critical role in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes during development. Both the repressor and activation functions of GLIS3 may be involved in this control.

  11. Yet1p-Yet3p interacts with Scs2p-Opi1p to regulate ER localization of the Opi1p repressor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Thompson, Sarah L; Barlowe, Charles

    2011-05-01

    Lipid sensing mechanisms at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) coordinate an array of biosynthetic pathways. A major phospholipid regulatory circuit in yeast is controlled by Scs2p, an ER membrane protein that binds the transcriptional repressor protein Opi1p. Cells grown in the absence of inositol sequester Scs2p-Opi1p at the ER and derepress target genes including INO1. We recently reported that Yet1p and Yet3p, the yeast homologues of BAP29 and BAP31, are required for normal growth in the absence of inositol. Here we show that the Yet1p-Yet3p complex acts in derepression of INO1 through physical association with Scs2p-Opi1p. Yet complex binding to Scs2p-Opi1p was enhanced by inositol starvation, although the interaction between Scs2p and Opi1p was not influenced by YET1 or YET3 deletion. Interestingly, live-cell imaging analysis indicated that Opi1p does not efficiently relocalize to the ER during inositol starvation in yet3Δ cells. Together our data demonstrate that a physical association between the Yet complex and Scs2p-Opi1p is required for proper localization of the Opi1p repressor to ER membranes and subsequent INO1 derepression.

  12. Mutations in the transcriptional repressor REST predispose to Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Hanks, Sandra; Karlin, Kristen L; Zachariou, Anna; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Ruark, Elise; Shaw, Chad A; Renwick, Alexander; Ramsay, Emma; Yost, Shawn; Elliott, Anna; Birch, Jillian; Capra, Michael; Gray, Juliet; Hale, Juliet; Kingston, Judith; Levitt, Gill; McLean, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Stiller, Charles; Sebire, Neil; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rahman, Nazneen

    2015-12-01

    Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal cancer. To identify mutations that predispose to Wilms tumor, we are conducting exome sequencing studies. Here we describe 11 different inactivating mutations in the REST gene (encoding RE1-silencing transcription factor) in four familial Wilms tumor pedigrees and nine non-familial cases. Notably, no similar mutations were identified in the ICR1000 control series (13/558 versus 0/993; P < 0.0001) or in the ExAC series (13/558 versus 0/61,312; P < 0.0001). We identified a second mutational event in two tumors, suggesting that REST may act as a tumor-suppressor gene in Wilms tumor pathogenesis. REST is a zinc-finger transcription factor that functions in cellular differentiation and embryonic development. Notably, ten of 11 mutations clustered within the portion of REST encoding the DNA-binding domain, and functional analyses showed that these mutations compromise REST transcriptional repression. These data establish REST as a Wilms tumor predisposition gene accounting for ∼2% of Wilms tumor.

  13. Change of function of the wheat stress-responsive transcriptional repressor TaRAP2.1L by repressor motif modification.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Amritha; Luang, Sukanya; Kumar, Manoj Yadav; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Eini, Omid; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Bazanova, Natalia; Li, Yuan; Yang, Nannan; Eliby, Serik; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2016-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses by changes in gene regulation, including stress-inducible expression of transcriptional activators and repressors. One of the best characterized families of drought-related transcription factors are dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) proteins, known as C-repeat binding factors (CBF). The wheat DREB/CBF gene TaRAP2.1L was isolated from drought-affected tissues using a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) as bait in a yeast one-hybrid screen. TaRAP2.1L is induced by elevated abscisic acid, drought and cold. A C-terminal ethylene responsive factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, known to be responsible for active repression of target genes, was identified in the TaRAP2.1L protein. It was found that TaRAP2.1L has a unique selectivity of DNA-binding, which differs from that of DREB activators. This binding selectivity remains unchanged in a TaRAP2.1L variant with an inactivated EAR motif (TaRAP2.1Lmut). To study the role of the TaRAP2.1L repressor activity associated with the EAR motif in planta, transgenic wheat overexpressing native or mutated TaRAP2.1L was generated. Overexpression of TaRAP2.1L under constitutive and stress-inducible promoters in transgenic wheat and barley led to dwarfism and decreased frost tolerance. By contrast, constitutive overexpression of the TaRAP2.1Lmut gene had little or no negative influence on wheat development or grain yield. Transgenic lines with the TaRAP2.1Lmut transgene had an enhanced ability to survive frost and drought. The improved stress tolerance is attributed to up-regulation of several stress-related genes known to be downstream genes of DREB/CBF activators.

  14. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  15. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Kateřina; Cermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Rezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector L-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The L-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K(d) value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of L-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  16. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, Maria L; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation.

  17. Overexpression of the Transcriptional Repressor Complex BCL-6/BCoR Leads to Nuclear Aggregates Distinct from Classical Aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Elisabeth; El Harchi, Miriam; Payrhuber, Dietmar; Zommer, Anna; Schauer, Dominic; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Bilban, Martin; Brostjan, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear inclusions of aggregated proteins have primarily been characterized for molecules with aberrant poly-glutamine repeats and for mutated or structurally altered proteins. They were termed “nuclear aggresomes” and misfolding was shown to promote association with molecular chaperones and proteasomes. Here, we report that two components of a transcriptional repressor complex (BCL-6 and BCoR) of wildtype amino acid sequence can independently or jointly induce the formation of nuclear aggregates when overexpressed. The observation that the majority of cells rapidly downregulate BCL-6/BCoR levels, supports the notion that expression of these proteins is under tight control. The inclusions occur when BCL-6/BCoR expression exceeds 150-fold of endogenous levels. They preferentially develop in the nucleus by a gradual increase in aggregate size to form large, spheroid structures which are not associated with heat shock proteins or marked by ubiquitin. In contrast, we find the close association of BCL-6/BCoR inclusions with PML bodies and a reduction in aggregation upon the concomitant overexpression of histone deacetylases or heat shock protein 70. In summary, our data offer a perspective on nuclear aggregates distinct from classical “nuclear aggresomes”: Large complexes of spheroid structure can evolve in the nucleus without being marked by the cellular machinery for protein refolding and degradation. However, nuclear proteostasis can be restored by balancing the levels of chaperones. PMID:24146931

  18. Activator and repressor functions of the Mot3 transcription factor in the osmostress response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Rienzo, Alessandro; Poveda-Huertes, Daniel; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Proft, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Mot3 and Rox1 are transcriptional repressors of hypoxic genes. Both factors recently have been found to be involved in the adaptive response to hyperosmotic stress, with an important function in the adjustment of ergosterol biosynthesis. Here, we determine the gene expression profile of a mot3 rox1 double mutant under acute osmostress at the genomic scale in order to identify the target genes affected by both transcription factors upon stress. Unexpectedly, we find a specific subgroup of osmostress-inducible genes to be under positive control of Mot3. These Mot3-activated stress genes also depend on the general stress activators Msn2 and Msn4. We confirm that both Mot3 and Msn4 bind directly to some promoter regions of this gene group. Furthermore, osmostress-induced binding of the Msn2 and Msn4 factors to these target promoters is severely affected by the loss of Mot3 function. The genes repressed by Mot3 and Rox1 preferentially encode proteins of the cell wall and plasma membrane. Cell conjugation was the most significantly enriched biological process which was negatively regulated by both factors and by osmotic stress. The mating response was repressed by salt stress dependent on Mot3 and Rox1 function. Taking our findings together, the Mot3 transcriptional regulator has unanticipated diverse functions in the cellular adjustment to osmotic stress, including transcriptional activation and modulation of mating efficiency.

  19. WRKY76 is a rice transcriptional repressor playing opposite roles in blast disease resistance and cold stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Naoki; Sato, Yuko; Tanabe, Shigeru; Chujo, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takafumi; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Kaku, Hisatoshi; Minami, Eiichi; Nishizawa, Yoko

    2013-11-01

    OsWRKY76 encodes a group IIa WRKY transcription factor of rice. The expression of OsWRKY76 was induced within 48h after inoculation with rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe oryzae), and by wounding, low temperature, benzothiadiazole, and abscisic acid. Green fluorescent protein-fused OsWRKY76 localized to the nuclei in rice epidermal cells. OsWRKY76 showed sequence-specific DNA binding to the W-box element in vitro and exhibited W-box-mediated transcriptional repressor activity in cultured rice cells. Overexpression of OsWRKY76 in rice plants resulted in drastically increased susceptibility to M. oryzae, but improved tolerance to cold stress. Microarray analysis revealed that overexpression of OsWRKY76 suppresses the induction of a specific set of PR genes and of genes involved in phytoalexin synthesis after inoculation with blast fungus, consistent with the observation that the levels of phytoalexins in the transgenic rice plants remained significantly lower than those in non-transformed control plants. Furthermore, overexpression of OsWRKY76 led to the increased expression of abiotic stress-associated genes such as peroxidase and lipid metabolism genes. These results strongly suggest that OsWRKY76 plays dual and opposing roles in blast disease resistance and cold tolerance.

  20. NRG1, a repressor of filamentous growth in C.albicans, is down-regulated during filament induction

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Burkhard R.; Kadosh, David; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2001-01-01

    In response to a variety of external signals, the fungal pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a transition between ellipsoidal single cells (blastospores) and filaments composed of elongated cells attached end-to-end. Here we identify a DNA-binding protein, Nrg1, that represses filamentous growth in Candida probably by acting through the co-repressor Tup1. nrg1 mutant cells are predominantly filamentous under non-filament-inducing conditions and their colony morphology resembles that of tup1 mutants. We also identify two filament-specific genes, ECE1 and HWP1, whose transcription is repressed by Nrg1 under non-inducing conditions. These genes constitute a subset of those under Tup1 control, providing further evidence that Nrg1 acts by recruiting Tup1 to target genes. We show that growth in serum at 37°C, a potent inducer of filamentous growth, causes a reduction of NRG1 mRNA, suggesting that filamentous growth is induced by the down-regulation of NRG1. Consistent with this idea, expression of NRG1 from a non-regulated promoter partially blocks the induction of filamentous growth. PMID:11532939

  1. Enhancing succinic acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by engineering its global transcription factor, catabolite repressor/activator (Cra)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Xia, Shi-Tao; Wei, Li-Na; Li, Hong-Mei; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    This study was initiated to improve E. coli succinate production by engineering the E. coli global transcription factor, Cra (catabolite repressor/activator). Random mutagenesis libraries were generated through error-prone PCR of cra. After re-screening and mutation site integration, the best mutant strain was Tang1541, which provided a final succinate concentration of 79.8 ± 3.1 g/L: i.e., 22.8% greater than that obtained using an empty vector control. The genes and enzymes involved in phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation and the glyoxylate pathway were activated, either directly or indirectly, through the mutation of Cra. The parameters for interaction of Cra and DNA indicated that the Cra mutant was bound to aceBAK, thereby activating the genes involved in glyoxylate pathway and further improving succinate production even in the presence of its effector fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). It suggested that some of the negative effect of FBP on Cra might have been counteracted through the enhanced binding affinity of the Cra mutant for FBP or the change of Cra structure. This work provides useful information about understanding the transcriptional regulation of succinate biosynthesis. PMID:27811970

  2. Increased myogenic repressor Id mRNA and protein levels in hindlimb muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Degens, Hans; Lowe, Dawn A; Krishnamurthy, Gururaj

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if levels of repressors to myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) differ between muscles from young adult and aged animals. Total RNA from plantaris, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles of Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats aged 9 mo (young adult, n = 10) and 37 mo (aged, n = 10) was reverse transcribed and then amplified by PCR. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of the mRNA levels, PCR signals were normalized to cyclophilin or 18S signals from the corresponding reverse transcription product. Normalization to cyclophilin and 18S gave similar results. The mRNA levels of MyoD and myogenin were approximately 275-650% (P < 0.001) and approximately 500-1,100% (P < 0.001) greater, respectively, in muscles from aged compared with young adults. In contrast, the protein levels were lower in plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles and similar in the soleus muscle of aged vs. young adult rats. Id repressor mRNA levels were approximately 300-900% greater in fast and slow muscles of aged animals (P < or = 0.02), and Mist 1 mRNA was approximately 50% greater in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles (P < 0.01). The mRNA level of Twist mRNA was not significantly affected by aging. Id-1, Id-2, and Id-3 protein levels were approximately 17-740% greater (P < 0.05) in hindlimb muscles of aged rats compared with young adult rats. The elevated levels of Id mRNA and protein suggest that MRF repressors may play a role in gene regulation of fast and slow muscles in aged rats.

  3. CDP Is a Repressor of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Expression in the Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quan; Gregg, Keqin; Lozano, Mary; Liu, Jinqi; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2000-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription is highest in the lactating mammary gland but is detectable in a variety of other tissues. Previous results have shown that MMTV expression is suppressed in lymphoid and other tissues through the binding of the homeodomain-containing repressor special AT-rich binding protein 1 to a negative regulatory element (NRE) in the MMTV long terminal repeat (LTR). Another homeoprotein repressor, CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), also binds to the MMTV NRE, but a role for CDP in MMTV transcriptional suppression has not yet been demonstrated. In this paper, we show that the level of CDP decreases during development of the mammary gland and that this decline in CDP level correlates with the known increase in MMTV expression observed during mammary gland differentiation. Moreover, CDP overexpression was able to suppress MMTV LTR-reporter gene activity up to 20-fold in transient-transfection assays of mouse mammary cells. To determine if this effect was due to direct binding of CDP to the promoter-proximal NRE, we performed DNase I protection assays to map two CDP-binding sites from +835 to +845 and +920 to +931 relative to the first base of the LTR. Mutations engineered into each of these sites decreased CDP binding to the proximal NRE, whereas a combination of these mutations further reduced binding. Subsequently, each of these mutations was introduced into the full-length MMTV LTR upstream of the luciferase reporter gene. Analysis of stable transfectants of LTR constructs showed that CDP binding site mutations in the proximal NRE elevated reporter gene expression two- to sixfold compared to wild-type LTR constructs. Thus, MMTV expression increases during mammary gland development, in part due to decreased CDP levels and CDP binding to the LTR. Together, these experiments provide the first evidence that CDP acts as a repressor of MMTV transcription in the mammary gland. PMID:10864645

  4. Structural basis for recognition of diverse transcriptional repressors by the TOPLESS family of corepressors.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jiyuan; Ma, Honglei; Gu, Xin; Thelen, Adam; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Li, Jiayang; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2015-07-01

    TOPLESS (TPL) and TOPLESS-related (TPR) proteins comprise a conserved family of plant transcriptional corepressors that are related to Tup1, Groucho, and TLE (transducin-like enhancer of split) corepressors in yeast, insects, and mammals. In plants, TPL/TPR corepressors regulate development, stress responses, and hormone signaling through interaction with small ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motifs found in diverse transcriptional repressors. How EAR motifs can interact with TPL/TPR proteins is unknown. We confirm the amino-terminal domain of the TPL family of corepressors, which we term TOPLESS domain (TPD), as the EAR motif-binding domain. To understand the structural basis of this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of the TPD of rice (Os) TPR2 in apo (apo protein) state and in complexes with the EAR motifs from Arabidopsis NINJA (novel interactor of JAZ), IAA1 (auxin-responsive protein 1), and IAA10, key transcriptional repressors involved in jasmonate and auxin signaling. The OsTPR2 TPD adopts a new fold of nine helices, followed by a zinc finger, which are arranged into a disc-like tetramer. The EAR motifs in the three different complexes adopt a similar extended conformation with the hydrophobic residues fitting into the same surface groove of each OsTPR2 monomer. Sequence alignments and structure-based mutagenesis indicate that this mode of corepressor binding is highly conserved in a large set of transcriptional repressors, thus providing a general mechanism for gene repression mediated by the TPL family of corepressors.

  5. Structure of the MecI repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the cognate DNA operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Musayev, Faik N.; Zhao, Qixun; Archer, Gordon L.

    2006-04-01

    The up-and-down binding of dimeric MecI to mecA dyad DNA may account for the cooperative effect of the repressor. The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of β-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Å resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI–mec complex, but unlike the MecI–bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  6. Cold denaturation of a repressor-operator complex: the role of entropy in protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Foguel, D; Silva, J L

    1994-08-16

    The mechanisms by which regulatory proteins recognize specific DNA sequences are not fully understood. Here we examine the basis for the stability of a protein-DNA complex, using hydrostatic pressure and low temperature. Pressure converts the DNA-binding Arc repressor protein from a native state to a denatured, molten-globule state. Our data show that the folding and dimerization of Arc repressor in the temperature range 0-20 degrees C are favored by a large positive entropy value, so that the reaction proceeds in spite of an unfavorable positive enthalpy. On binding operator DNA, Arc repressor becomes extremely stable against denaturation. However, the Arc repressor-operator DNA complex is cold-denatured at subzero temperatures under pressure, demonstrating that the favorable entropy increases greatly when Arc repressor binds tightly to its operator sequence but not a nonspecific sequence. We show how an increase in entropy may operate to provide the protein with a mechanism to distinguish between a specific and a nonspecific DNA sequence. It is postulated that the formation of the Arc-operator DNA complex is followed by an increase in apolar interactions and release of solvent which would explain its entropy-driven character, whereas this solvent would not be displaced in nonspecific complexes.

  7. BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor with dual roles in brassinosteroid homeostasis and growth responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Xian; Gendron, Joshua M.; Sun, Yu; Gampala, Srinivas S. L.; Gendron, Nathan; Sun, Catherine Qing; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) homeostasis and signaling are crucial for normal growth and development of plants. BR signaling through cell-surface receptor kinases and intracellular components leads to dephosphorylation and accumulation of the nuclear protein BZR1. How BR signaling regulates gene expression, however, remains unknown. Here we show that BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor that has a previously unknown DNA binding domain and binds directly to the promoters of feedback-regulated BR biosynthetic genes. Microarray analyses identified additional potential targets of BZR1 and illustrated, together with physiological studies, that BZR1 coordinates BR homeostasis and signaling by playing dual roles in regulating BR biosynthesis and downstream growth responses. PMID:15681342

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the diphtheria Tox repressor from Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Schiering, N; Tao, X; Murphy, J R; Petsko, G A; Ringe, D

    1994-12-16

    Crystals of the diphtheria tox repressor (DtxR) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae suitable for structure determination have been obtained. DtxR activated with transition metal ions represses the expression of the structural gene for the diphtheria toxin, tox, which is encoded on the genome of a family of closely related corynebacteriophages. The space group of the obtained crystals is trigonal P3(1)21 or its enantiomorph P3(2)21 with a = b = 64.2 A, c = 220.5 A, alpha = beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 120 degrees. Two monomers comprise the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to a resolution of better than 3 A.

  9. SatR Is a Repressor of Fluoroquinolone Efflux Pump SatAB

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; San Millan, Alvaro; Montero, Natalia; Gutierrez, Belen; Ovejero, Cristina Martinez; Carrilero, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic agent responsible for high-mortality outbreaks among the human population in China. In this species, the ABC transporter SatAB mediates fluoroquinolone resistance when overexpressed. Here, we describe and characterize satR, an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a MarR superfamily regulator that acts as a repressor of satAB. satR is cotranscribed with satAB, and its interruption entails the overexpression of the pump, leading to a clinically relevant increase in resistance to fluoroquinolones. PMID:23650171

  10. The Reduction of R1, a Novel Repressor Protein for Monoamine Oxidase A, in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shakevia; Stockmeier, Craig A; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Austin, Mark C; Albert, Paul R; Wang, Junming; May, Warren L; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Overholser, James C; Jurjus, George; Dieter, Lesa; Johnson, Chandra; Sittman, Donald B; Ou, Xiao-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The novel transcriptional repressor protein, R1 (JPO2/CDCA7L/RAM2), inhibits monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) gene expression and influences cell proliferation and survival. MAO A is implicated in several neuropsychiatric illnesses and highly elevated in major depressive disorder (MDD); however, whether R1 is involved in these disorders is unknown. This study evaluates the role of R1 in depressed subjects either untreated or treated with antidepressant drugs. R1 protein levels were determined in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of 18 untreated MDD subjects and 12 medicated MDD subjects compared with 18 matched psychiatrically normal control subjects. Western blot analysis showed that R1 was significantly decreased by 37.5% (p<0.005) in untreated MDD subjects. The R1 level in medicated MDD subjects was also significantly lower (by 30% p<0.05) compared with control subjects, but was not significantly different compared with untreated MDD subjects. Interestingly, the reduction in R1 was significantly correlated with an increase (approximately 40% p<0.05) in MAO A protein levels within the MDD groups compared with controls. Consistent with the change in MAO A protein expression, the MAO A catalytic activity was significantly greater in both MDD groups compared with controls. These results suggest that reduced R1 may lead to elevated MAO A levels in untreated and treated MDD subjects; moreover, the reduction of R1 has been implicated in apoptotic cell death and apoptosis has also been observed in the brains of MDD subjects. Therefore, modulation of R1 levels may provide a new therapeutic target in the development of more effective strategies to treat MDD. PMID:21654740

  11. Overexpression of the chimeric gene of the floral regulator CONSTANS and the EAR motif repressor causes late flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takase, Tomoyuki; Yasuhara, Masahiro; Geekiyanage, Sudarshanee; Ogura, Yasunobu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2007-06-01

    The transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) plays a central role in the photoperiod pathway by integrating the circadian clock and light signals into a control for flowering time. CO induces flowering locus T (FT) and suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1) expression, and thereby promotes flowering. The ethylene-responsive element-binding factor associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif was used to construct a CONSTANS-EAR motif repressor gene (CO-Rep), which was overexpressed in Arabidopsis under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in order to test its potential for flowering time regulation under inductive long day conditions. Morphological abnormalities in the root and cotyledon formation, and dwarfness were frequently seen in the transgenic plants, suggesting that the proper timing, location, and/or level of CO-Rep expression are important for its application. In morphologically normal CO-Rep plants, both bolting and flowering times under inductive long day conditions were twofold greater than in controls. As a result of the delay in flowering, rosette leaf number at bolting, and rosette and cauline leaf number at flowering increased significantly in CO-Rep plants. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that FT expression was greatly reduced in the CO-Rep plants, while endogenous CO and SOC1 expression levels were not markedly affected. Conservation of CO among a diverse range of plant species, and its involvement in a variety of photoperiodic responses including flowering, suggests a high potential for use of CO-Rep to manipulate such responses in an agronomically desirable manner.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  13. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  14. CO-REPRESSOR CBFA2T2 REGULATES PLURIPOTENCY AND GERMLINE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shengjiang; Narendra, Varun; Yamaji, Masashi; Vidal, Simon E; Rojas, Luis Alejandro; Wang, Xiaoshi; Kim, Sang Yong; Garcia, Benjamin A; Tuschl, Thomas; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Reinberg, Danny

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Developmental specification of germ cells lies at the core of inheritance as germ cells contain all of the genetic and epigenetic information transmitted between generations. The critical developmental event distinguishing germline from somatic lineages is the differentiation of primordial germ cells (PGCs)1,2, precursors of sex specific gametes that produce an entire organism upon fertilization. Germ cells toggle between uni- and pluripotent states as they exhibit their own “latent” form of pluripotency. For example, PGCs express a number of transcription factors (TFs) in common with embryonic stem cells (ESCs), including OCT4, SOX2, NANOG and PRDM142–4. A biochemical mechanism by which these TFs converge on chromatin to produce the dramatic rearrangements underlying ESC- and PGC-specific transcriptional programs remains poorly understood. Here, we discover a novel co-repressor protein, CBFA2T2, that regulates pluripotency and germline specification. Cbfa2t2−/− mice display severe defects in PGC maturation and epigenetic reprogramming. CBFA2T2 forms a biochemical complex with PRDM14, a germline-specific transcription factor. Mechanistically, CBFA2T2 oligomerizes to form a scaffold upon which PRDM14 and OCT4 are stabilized on chromatin. Thus, in contrast to the traditional “passenger” role of a co-repressor, CBFA2T2 functions synergistically with TFs at the crossroads of the fundamental developmental plasticity between uni- and pluripotency PMID:27281218

  15. Heat shock factor-4 (HSF-4a) is a repressor of HSF-1 mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Frejtag, W; Dai, R; Mivechi, N F

    2001-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) regulate the expression of heat shock proteins and other molecular chaperones that are involved in cellular processes from higher order assembly to protein degradation and apoptosis. Among the human HSFs, HSF-4 is expressed as at least two splice variants. One isoform (HSF-4b) possesses a transcriptional activation domain, but this region is absent in the other isoform (HSF-4a). We have recently shown that the HSF-4a isoform represses basal transcription from heterologous promoters both in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that HSF-4a and HSF-4b have dramatically different effects on HSF-1-containing nuclear bodies, which form after heat shock. While the expression of HSF-4b colocalizes with nuclear granules, the expression of HSF-4a prevents their formation. In addition, there is a concurrent reduction of HSF-1 in the nucleus, and there is reduction in its DNA binding activity and in HSE-dependent transcription of a reporter gene. To better understand the mechanism by which HSF-4a represses transcription, we inducibly expressed HSF-4a in cells and found that HSF-4a binds to the heat shock element (HSE) during attenuation of the heat shock response. Thus HSF-4a is an active repressor of HSF-1-mediated transcription. This repressor function makes the HSF-4a isoform unique within the HSF family.

  16. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-01-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8622971

  17. The FLF MADS box gene: a repressor of flowering in Arabidopsis regulated by vernalization and methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, C C; Burn, J E; Perez, P P; Metzger, J; Edwards, J A; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1999-01-01

    A MADS box gene, FLF (for FLOWERING LOCUS F ), isolated from a late-flowering, T-DNA-tagged Arabidopsis mutant, is a semidominant gene encoding a repressor of flowering. The FLF gene appears to integrate the vernalization-dependent and autonomous flowering pathways because its expression is regulated by genes in both pathways. The level of FLF mRNA is downregulated by vernalization and by a decrease in genomic DNA methylation, which is consistent with our previous suggestion that vernalization acts to induce flowering through changes in gene activity that are mediated through a reduction in DNA methylation. The flf-1 mutant requires a greater than normal amount of an exogenous gibberellin (GA3) to decrease flowering time compared with the wild type or with vernalization-responsive late-flowering mutants, suggesting that the FLF gene product may block the promotion of flowering by GAs. FLF maps to a region on chromosome 5 near the FLOWERING LOCUS C gene, which is a semidominant repressor of flowering in late-flowering ecotypes of Arabidopsis. PMID:10072403

  18. Co-localization of a novel transcriptional repressor simiRP58 with RP58.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiyo; Hirai, Shinobu; Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Miwa, Akiko; Hata, Yutaka; Okabe, Shigeo; Okado, Haruo

    2008-04-11

    We have cloned a novel transcriptional repressor protein, termed simiRP58, which has high homology to RP58. Both simiRP58 and RP58 belong to the POZ domain and Kruppel Zn finger (POK) family of proteins. Using the luciferase assay system, we found that simiRP58 also has transcriptional repressor activity like RP58. Northern blotting and quantitative RT-PCR showed that simiRP58 was expressed in testes at the highest level. In situ hybridization of testes showed that simiRP58 is expressed by spermatocytes in only a portion of the seminiferous tubules. In contrast, expression of RP58 by spermatocytes was ubiquitous in all seminiferous tubules. Using COS-7 cells, we observed that simiRP58 was localized in the cytoplasm, which is in contrast to RP58 that was localized in the nucleus. Interestingly, co-transfection with simiRP58 and RP58 induced changes in the localization patterns of both proteins.

  19. ETO-2 associates with SCL in erythroid cells and megakaryocytes and provides repressor functions in erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Anna H; Tipping, Alex J; Clark, Allison J; Hamlett, Isla; Guyot, Boris; Iborra, Francesco J; Rodriguez, Patrick; Strouboulis, John; Enver, Tariq; Vyas, Paresh; Porcher, Catherine

    2005-12-01

    Lineage specification and cellular maturation require coordinated regulation of gene expression programs. In large part, this is dependent on the activator and repressor functions of protein complexes associated with tissue-specific transcriptional regulators. In this study, we have used a proteomic approach to characterize multiprotein complexes containing the key hematopoietic regulator SCL in erythroid and megakaryocytic cell lines. One of the novel SCL-interacting proteins identified in both cell types is the transcriptional corepressor ETO-2. Interaction between endogenous proteins was confirmed in primary cells. We then showed that SCL complexes are shared but also significantly differ in the two cell types. Importantly, SCL/ETO-2 interacts with another corepressor, Gfi-1b, in red cells but not megakaryocytes. The SCL/ETO-2/Gfi-1b association is lost during erythroid differentiation of primary fetal liver cells. Genetic studies of erythroid cells show that ETO-2 exerts a repressor effect on SCL target genes. We suggest that, through its association with SCL, ETO-2 represses gene expression in the early stages of erythroid differentiation and that alleviation/modulation of the repressive state is then required for expression of genes necessary for terminal erythroid maturation to proceed.

  20. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  1. Arginine 197 of lac repressor contributes significant energy to inducer binding. Confirmation of homology to periplasmic sugar binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spotts, R O; Chakerian, A E; Matthews, K S

    1991-12-05

    Based on primary sequence homology between the lactose repressor protein and periplasmic sugar-binding proteins (Müller-Hill, B. (1983) Nature 302, 163-164), a hypothetical sugar-binding site for the lac repressor was proposed using the solved x-ray crystallographic structure of the arabinose-binding protein (ABP) (Sams, C. F., Vyas, N. K., Quiocho, F. A., and Matthews, K. S. (1984) Nature 310, 429-430). By analogy to Arg151 in the ABP sugar site, Arg197 is predicted to play an important role in lac repressor binding to inducer sugars. Hydrogen bonding occurs between Arg151 and the ring oxygen and 4-hydroxyl of the sugar ligand, two backbone carbonyls, and a side chain in ABP, and similar interactions in the lac repressor would be anticipated. To test this hypothesis, Arg197 in the lac repressor protein was altered by oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis to substitute Gly, Leu, or Lys. Introduction of these substitutions at position 197 had no effect on operator binding parameters of the isolated mutant proteins, whereas the affinity for inducer was dramatically decreased, consistent with in vivo phenotypic behavior obtained by suppression of nonsense mutations at this site (Kleina, L. G., and Miller, J. H. (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 212, 295-318). Inducer binding affinity was reduced approximately 3 orders of magnitude for Leu, Gly, or Lys substitutions, corresponding to a loss of 50% of the free energy of binding. The pH shift characteristic of wild-type repressor is conserved in these mutants. Circular dichroic spectra demonstrated no significant alterations in secondary structure for these mutants. Thus, the primary effect of substitution for Arg197 is a very significant decrease in the affinity for inducer sugars. Arginine is uniquely able to make the multiple contacts found in the ABP sugar site, and we conclude that this residue plays a similar role in sugar binding for lactose repressor protein. These results provide experimental validation for the

  2. The activation domain of a basic helix-loop-helix protein is masked by repressor interaction with domains distinct from that required for transcription regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, P S; Hirst, K; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    While there are many examples of protein-protein interactions modulating the DNA-binding activity of transcription factors, little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the transcription activation function. Using a two-hybrid system we show here that transcription repression of the basic domain/helix-loop-helix factor PHO4 is mediated by complex formation with the PHO80 repressor. In contrast to other systems, such as inhibition of GAL4 by GAL80 or of p53 by MDM2, where repression is mediated by direct interaction at regions overlapping the transcription activation domain, interaction with PHO80 involves two regions of PHO4 distinct from those involved in transcription activation or DNA-binding and dimerization. The possibility that repression of PHO4 by PHO80 may represent a general mechanism of transcription control, including regulation of the cell-type-specific transcription activation domain of c-Jun, is discussed. Images PMID:8187772

  3. A Novel Repressor of the ica Locus Discovered in Clinically Isolated Super-Biofilm-Elaborating Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liansheng; Hisatsune, Junzo; Hayashi, Ikue; Tatsukawa, Nobuyuki; Sato’o, Yusuke; Mizumachi, Emiri; Kato, Fuminori; Hirakawa, Hideki; Pier, Gerald B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus TF2758 is a clinical isolate from an atheroma and a super-biofilm-elaborating/polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA)/poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG)-overproducing strain (L. Shrestha et al., Microbiol Immunol 60:148–159, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1111/1348-0421.12359). A microarray analysis and DNA genome sequencing were performed to identify the mechanism underlying biofilm overproduction by TF2758. We found high transcriptional expression levels of a 7-gene cluster (satf2580 to satf2586) and the ica operon in TF2758. Within the 7-gene cluster, a putative transcriptional regulator gene designated rob had a nonsense mutation that caused the truncation of the protein. The complementation of TF2758 with rob from FK300, an rsbU-repaired derivative of S. aureus strain NCTC8325-4, significantly decreased biofilm elaboration, suggesting a role for rob in this process. The deletion of rob in non-biofilm-producing FK300 significantly increased biofilm elaboration and PIA/PNAG production. In the search for a gene(s) in the 7-gene cluster for biofilm elaboration controlled by rob, we identified open reading frame (ORF) SAOUHSC_2898 (satf2584). Our results suggest that ORF SAOUHSC_2898 (satf2584) and icaADBC are required for enhanced biofilm elaboration and PIA/PNAG production in the rob deletion mutant. Rob bound to a palindromic sequence within its own promoter region. Furthermore, Rob recognized the TATTT motif within the icaR-icaA intergenic region and bound to a 25-bp DNA stretch containing this motif, which is a critically important short sequence regulating biofilm elaboration in S. aureus. Our results strongly suggest that Rob is a long-sought repressor that recognizes and binds to the TATTT motif and is an important regulator of biofilm elaboration through its control of SAOUHSC_2898 (SATF2584) and Ica protein expression in S. aureus. PMID:28143981

  4. Structure-based functional characterization of repressor of toxin (Rot), a central regulator of staphylococcus aureus virulence

    DOE PAGES

    Killikelly, April; Jakoncic, Jean; Benson, Meredith A.; ...

    2014-10-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of diverse infections worldwide. In order to support its pathogenic lifestyle, S. aureus has to regulate the expression of virulence factors in a coordinated fashion. One of the central regulators of the S. aureus virulence regulatory networks is the transcription factor repressor of toxin (Rot). Rot plays a key role in regulating S. aureus virulence through activation or repression of promoters that control expression of a large number of critical virulence factors. However, the mechanism by which Rot mediates gene regulation has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the crystal structure ofmore » Rot and used this information to probe the contribution made by specific residues to Rot function. Rot was found to form a dimer, with each monomer harboring a winged helix-turn-helix (WHTH) DNA-binding motif. Despite an overall acidic pI, the asymmetric electrostatic charge profile suggests that Rot can orient the WHTH domain to bind DNA. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that R91, at the tip of the wing, plays an important role in DNA binding, likely through interaction with the minor groove. We also found that Y66, predicted to bind within the major groove, contributes to Rot interaction with target promoters. Evaluation of Rot binding to different activated and repressed promoters revealed that certain mutations on Rot exhibit promoter-specific effects, suggesting for the first time that Rot differentially interacts with target promoters. As a result, this work provides insight into a precise mechanism by which Rot controls virulence factor regulation in S. aureus.« less

  5. Water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator complex recognition process.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Fajar R; Rauch, Christine; Trieb, Michael; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Liedl, Klaus R

    2004-04-15

    Water-mediated contacts are known as an important recognition tool in trp-repressor operator systems. One of these contacts involves two conserved base pairs (G(6).C(-6) and A(5). T(-5)) and three amino acids (Lys 72, Ile 79, and Ala 80). To investigate the nature of these contacts, we analyzed the X-ray structure (PDB code: 1TRO) of the trp-repressor operator complex by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This X-ray structure contains two dimers that exhibit structural differences. From these two different starting structures, two 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Both of our simulations show an increase of water molecules in the major groove at one side of the dimer, while the other side remains unchanged compared to the X-ray structure. Though the maximum residence time of the concerned water molecules decreases with an increase of solvent at the interface, these water molecules continue to play an important role in mediating DNA-protein contacts. This is shown by new stable amino acids-DNA distances and a long water residence time compared to free DNA simulation. To maintain stability of the new contacts, the preferential water binding site on O6(G6) is extended. This extension agrees with mutation experiment data on A5 and G6, which shows different relative affinity due to mutation on these bases [A. Joachimiak, T. E. Haran, P. B. Sigler, EMBO Journal 1994, Vol. 13, No. (2) pp. 367-372]. Due to the rearrangements in the system, the phosphate of the base G6 is able to interconvert to the B(II) substate, which is not observed on the other half side of the complex. The decrease of the number of hydrogen bonds between protein and DNA backbone could be the initial step of the dissociation process of the complex, or in other words an intermediate complex conformation of the association process. Thus, we surmise that these features show the importance of water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator recognition process.

  6. Structure of the Mecl Repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in Complex with the Cognate DNA Operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo,M.; Ko, T.; Musayev, F.; Zhao, Q.; Wang, A.; Archer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of {beta}-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Angstroms resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI-mec complex, but unlike the MecI-bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  7. IRF2BP2 transcriptional repressor restrains naive CD4 T cell activation and clonal expansion induced by TCR triggering.

    PubMed

    Sécca, Cristiane; Faget, Douglas V; Hanschke, Steffi C; Carneiro, Mayra S; Bonamino, Martin H; de-Araujo-Souza, Patricia S; Viola, João P B

    2016-11-01

    CD4 T cell activation and differentiation mechanisms constitute a complex and intricate signaling network involving several regulatory proteins. IRF2BP2 is a transcriptional repressor that is involved in gene-expression regulation in very diverse biologic contexts. Information regarding the IRF2BP2 regulatory function in CD4 T lymphocytes is very limited and suggests a role for this protein in repressing the expression of different cytokine genes. Here, we showed that Irf2bp2 gene expression was decreased in CD4 T cells upon activation. To investigate the possible regulatory roles for IRF2BP2 in CD4 T cell functions, this protein was ectopically expressed in murine primary-activated CD4 T lymphocytes through retroviral transduction. Interestingly, ectopic expression of IRF2BP2 led to a reduction in CD25 expression and STAT5 phosphorylation, along with an impaired proliferative capacity. The CD69 expression was also diminished in IRF2BP2-overexpressing cells, whereas CD44 and CD62L levels were not altered. In vivo, transferred, IRF2BP2-overexpressing, transduced cells displayed an impaired expansion capacity compared with controls. Furthermore, overexpression of IRF2BP2 in differentiated Th cells resulted in slightly reduced IL-4 and pro-TGF-β production in Th2 and iTregs but had no effect on IFN-γ or IL-17 expression in Th1 and Th17 cells, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest a role for IRF2BP2 in regulating CD4 T cell activation by repressing proliferation and the expression of CD25 and CD69 induced by TCR stimuli.

  8. Regulation of nif expression in Methanococcus maripaludis: roles of the euryarchaeal repressor NrpR, 2-oxoglutarate, and two operators.

    PubMed

    Lie, Thomas J; Wood, Gwendolyn E; Leigh, John A

    2005-02-18

    The methanogenic archaean Methanococcus maripaludis can use ammonia, alanine, or dinitrogen as a nitrogen source for growth. The euryarchaeal nitrogen repressor NrpR controls the expression of the nif (nitrogen fixation) operon, resulting in full repression with ammonia, intermediate repression with alanine, and derepression with dinitrogen. NrpR binds to two tandem operators in the nif promoter region, nifOR(1) and nifOR(2). Here we have undertaken both in vivo and in vitro approaches to study the way in which NrpR, nifOR(1), nifOR(2), and the effector 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) combine to regulate nif expression, leading to a comprehensive understanding of this archaeal regulatory system. We show that NrpR binds as a dimer to nifOR(1) and cooperatively as two dimers to both operators. Cooperative binding occurs only with both operators present. nifOR(1) has stronger binding and by itself can mediate the repression of nif transcription during growth on ammonia, unlike the weakly binding nifOR(2). However, nifOR(2) in combination with nifOR(1) is critical for intermediate repression during growth on alanine. Accordingly, NrpR binds to both operators together with higher affinity than to nifOR(1) alone. NrpR responds directly to 2OG, which weakens its binding to the operators. Hence, 2OG is an intracellular indicator of nitrogen deficiency and acts as an inducer of nif transcription via NrpR. This model is upheld by the recent finding (J. A. Dodsworth and J. A. Leigh, submitted for publication) in our laboratory that 2OG levels in M. maripaludis vary with growth on different nitrogen sources.

  9. The Coregulator, Repressor of Estrogen Receptor Activity (REA), Is a Crucial Regulator of the Timing and Magnitude of Uterine Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuechao; Park, Sunghee; Bagchi, Milan K.; Taylor, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Successful implantation and maintenance of pregnancy require the transformation of uterine endometrial stromal cells into distinct decidualized cells. Although estrogen and progesterone (P4) receptors are known to be essential for decidualization, the roles of steroid receptor coregulators in this process remain largely unknown. In this study, we have established a key role for the coregulator, repressor of estrogen receptor activity (REA), in the decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) in vitro and of the mouse uterus in vivo. Our studies revealed that the level of REA normally decreases to half as hESC decidualization proceeds and that uterine reduction of REA in transgenic heterozygous knockout mice or small interfering RNA knockdown of REA in hESC temporally accelerated and strongly enhanced the differentiation process, as indicated by changes in cell morphology and increased expression of biomarkers of decidualization, including P4 receptor. Findings in hESC cultured in vitro with estradiol, P4, and 8-bromo-cAMP over a 10-day period mirrored observations of enhanced decidualization response in transgenic mice with heterozygous deletion of REA. Importantly, gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses revealed changes in multiple components of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway, including marked up-regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and IL-11, master regulators of decidualization, and the down-regulation of several suppressor of cytokine signaling family members, upon reduction of REA. The findings highlight that REA physiologically restrains endometrial stromal cell decidualization, controlling the timing and magnitude of decidualization to enable proper coordination of uterine differentiation with concurrent embryo development that is essential for implantation and optimal fertility. PMID:23392257

  10. Identification of AcnR, a TetR-type repressor of the aconitase gene acn in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Krug, Andreas; Wendisch, Volker F; Bott, Michael

    2005-01-07

    In Corynebacterium glutamicum, the activity of aconitase is 2.5-4-fold higher on propionate, citrate, or acetate than on glucose. Here we show that this variation is caused by transcriptional regulation. In search for putative regulators, a gene (acnR) encoding a TetR-type transcriptional regulator was found to be encoded immediately downstream of the aconitase gene (acn) in C. glutamicum. Deletion of the acnR gene led to a 5-fold increased acn-mRNA level and a 5-fold increased aconitase activity, suggesting that AcnR functions as repressor of acn expression. DNA microarray analyses indicated that acn is the primary target gene of AcnR in the C. glutamicum genome. Purified AcnR was shown to be a homodimer, which binds to the acn promoter in the region from -11 to -28 relative to the transcription start. It thus presumably acts by interfering with the binding of RNA polymerase. The acn-acnR organization is conserved in all corynebacteria and mycobacteria with known genome sequence and a putative AcnR consensus binding motif (CAGNACnnncGTACTG) was identified in the corresponding acn upstream regions. Mutations within this motif inhibited AcnR binding. Because the activities of citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were previously reported not to be increased during growth on acetate, our data indicate that aconitase is a major control point of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in C. glutamicum, and they identify AcnR as the first transcriptional regulator of a tricarboxylic acid cycle gene in the Corynebacterianeae.

  11. FBI-1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiajun; Yang, Yutao; Zhang, Chuanfu; Hu, Pinliang; Kan, Wei; Bai, Xianhong; Liu, Xuelin; Song, Hongbin

    2011-03-01

    The pro-oncogene FBI-1, encoded by Zbtb7a, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ/BTB and Krüppel) protein family. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between androgen receptor (AR) signaling and FBI-1 and demonstrated that overexpression of FBI-1 inhibited ligand-dependent AR activation. A protein-protein interaction was identified between FBI-1 and AR in a ligand-dependent manner. Furthermore, FBI-1, AR and SMRT formed a ternary complex and FBI-1 enhanced the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT to endogenous PSA upstream sequences. Our data also indicated that the FBI-1-mediated inhibition of AR transcriptional activity is partially dependent on HDAC. Interestingly, FBI-1 plays distinct roles in regulating LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and PC-3 cell (androgen-independent) proliferation.

  12. Identification of a Drosophila Myb-E2F2/RBF transcriptional repressor complex.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Peter W; Beall, Eileen L; Fleischer, Tracey C; Georlette, Daphne; Link, Andrew J; Botchan, Michael R

    2004-12-01

    The Drosophila Myb complex has roles in both activating and repressing developmentally regulated DNA replication. To further understand biochemically the functions of the Myb complex, we fractionated Drosophila embryo extracts relying upon affinity chromatography. We found that E2F2, DP, RBF1, RBF2, and the Drosophila homolog of LIN-52, a class B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) protein, copurify with the Myb complex components to form the Myb-MuvB complex. In addition, we found that the transcriptional repressor protein, lethal (3) malignant brain tumor protein, L(3)MBT, and the histone deacetylase, Rpd3, associated with the Myb-MuvB complex. Members of the Myb-MuvB complex were localized to promoters and were shown to corepress transcription of developmentally regulated genes. These and other data now link together the Myb and E2F2 complexes in higher-order assembly to specific chromosomal sites for the regulation of transcription.

  13. Identification of a Drosophila Myb-E2F2/RBF transcriptional repressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Peter W.; Beall, Eileen L.; Fleischer, Tracey C.; Georlette, Daphne; Link, Andrew J.; Botchan, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The Drosophila Myb complex has roles in both activating and repressing developmentally regulated DNA replication. To further understand biochemically the functions of the Myb complex, we fractionated Drosophila embryo extracts relying upon affinity chromatography. We found that E2F2, DP, RBF1, RBF2, and the Drosophila homolog of LIN-52, a class B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) protein, copurify with the Myb complex components to form the Myb-MuvB complex. In addition, we found that the transcriptional repressor protein, lethal (3) malignant brain tumor protein, L(3)MBT, and the histone deacetylase, Rpd3, associated with the Myb-MuvB complex. Members of the Myb-MuvB complex were localized to promoters and were shown to corepress transcription of developmentally regulated genes. These and other data now link together the Myb and E2F2 complexes in higher-order assembly to specific chromosomal sites for the regulation of transcription. PMID:15545624

  14. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  15. Structure of the cro repressor from bacteriophage λ and its interaction with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. F.; Ohlendorf, D. H.; Takeda, Y.; Matthews, B. W.

    1981-04-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the 66-amino acid cro repressor protein of bacteriophage λ suggests how it binds to its operator DNA. We propose that a dimer of cro protein is bound to the B-form of DNA with the 2-fold axis of the dimer coincident with the 2-fold axis of DNA. A pair of 2-fold-related α-helices of the represser, lying within successive major grooves of the DNA, seem to be a major determinant in recognition and binding. In addition, the C-terminal residues of the protein, some of which are disordered in the absence of DNA, appear to contribute to the binding.

  16. Orf5/SolR: a transcriptional repressor of the sol operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum?

    PubMed

    Thormann, K; Dürre, P

    2001-11-01

    The gene of Orf5 (SolR) of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 was subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified with Ni-NTA agarose and used for DNA binding assays. No DNA binding of Orf5 to regions upstream of the sol operon from C. acetobutylicum was observed. Overexpression of Orf5 in C. acetobutylicum led to a change in the organism's pattern of glycosylated exoproteins. The Orf5 protein was localized in the cell membrane fraction and to a small extent in the supernatant medium. Based on these results Orf5 (SolR) appears not to act as a transcriptional repressor in C. acetobutylicum, but instead may be an enzyme involved in glycosylation or deglycosylation.

  17. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.

  18. Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the operator-repressor system, and least squares approaches.

    PubMed

    Hadeler, Karl Peter

    2013-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten (MM) function is a fractional linear function depending on two positive parameters. These can be estimated by nonlinear or linear least squares methods. The non-linear methods, based directly on the defect of the MM function, can fail and not produce any minimizer. The linear methods always produce a unique minimizer which, however, may not be positive. Here we give sufficient conditions on the data such that the nonlinear problem has at least one positive minimizer and also conditions for the minimizer of the linear problem to be positive. We discuss in detail the models and equilibrium relations of a classical operator-repressor system, and we extend our approach to the MM problem with leakage and to reversible MM kinetics. The arrangement of the sufficient conditions exhibits the important role of data that have a concavity property (chemically feasible data).

  19. The transcriptional repressor Hes1 attenuates inflammation via regulating transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yingli; Coppo, Maddalena; He, Teng; Ning, Fei; Yu, Li; Kang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Ju, Chanyang; Qiao, Yu; Zhao, Baohong; Gessler, Manfred; Rogatsky, Inez; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Most of the known regulatory mechanisms that curb inflammatory gene expression target pre-transcription initiation steps and evidence for regulation of inflammatory gene expression post initiation remains scarce. Here we show that transcription repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1) suppresses production of CXCL1, a chemokine crucial for recruiting neutrophils. Hes1 negatively regulates neutrophil recruitment in vivo in a manner that is dependent on macrophage-produced CXCL1 and attenuates severity of inflammatory arthritis. Mechanistically, inhibition of Cxcl1 expression by Hes1 does not involve modification of transcription initiation. Instead, Hes1 inhibits signal-induced recruitment of positive transcription elongation complex P-TEFb, thereby preventing phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II on serine-2 and productive elongation. Thus, our results identify Hes1 as a homeostatic suppressor of inflammatory responses which exerts its suppressive function by regulating transcription elongation. PMID:27322654

  20. E. coli trp repressor forms a domain-swapped array in aqueous alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Catherine L.; Benoff, Brian; Berger, Tatyana; Berman, Helen M.; Carey, Jannette

    2011-01-01

    The E. coli trp repressor (trpR) homodimer recognizes its palindromic DNA-binding site through a pair of flexible helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs displayed on an intertwined helical core. Flexible N-terminal arms mediate association between dimers bound to tandem DNA sites. The 2.5 Å X-ray structure of trpR crystallized in 30% (v/v) isopropanol reveals a substantial conformational rearrangement of HTH motifs and N-terminal arms, with the protein appearing in the unusual form of an ordered 3D domain-swapped supramolecular array. Small angle X-ray scattering measurements show that the self-association properties of trpR in solution are fundamentally altered by isopropanol. PMID:15274929

  1. In vivo interactions of the Drosophila Hairy and Runt transcriptional repressors with target promoters.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, G; Pinchin, S M; Ish-Horowicz, D

    1996-12-16

    The Hairy and Runt pair-rule proteins regulate Drosophila segmentation by repressing transcription. To explore the ability of these proteins to function as promoter-bound regulators in vivo, we examined the effects of Hairy and Runt derivatives containing heterologous transcriptional activation domains (HairyAct and RunAct). Using this approach, we find that Hairy and Runt efficiently target such activation domains to specific segmentation gene promoters, leading to rapid induction of transcription. Our results strongly suggest that Hairy normally acts as a promoter-bound repressor of fushi tarazu, runt and odd-skipped, and that Runt directly represses even-skipped. We also show that expressing HairyAct in early blastoderm embryos causes ectopic Sex-lethal expression and male-specific lethality, implying that the Hairy-related denominator element Deadpan represses Sex-lethal during sex determination by directly recognizing the early Sex-lethal promoter.

  2. Large-scale genetic perturbations reveal regulatory networks and an abundance of gene-specific repressors.

    PubMed

    Kemmeren, Patrick; Sameith, Katrin; van de Pasch, Loes A L; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; Margaritis, Thanasis; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Ko, Cheuk W; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Kashani, Mehdi M; Ampatziadis-Michailidis, Giannis; Brok, Mariel O; Brabers, Nathalie A C H; Miles, Anthony J; Bouwmeester, Diane; van Hooff, Sander R; van Bakel, Harm; Sluiters, Erik; Bakker, Linda V; Snel, Berend; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P

    2014-04-24

    To understand regulatory systems, it would be useful to uniformly determine how different components contribute to the expression of all other genes. We therefore monitored mRNA expression genome-wide, for individual deletions of one-quarter of yeast genes, focusing on (putative) regulators. The resulting genetic perturbation signatures reflect many different properties. These include the architecture of protein complexes and pathways, identification of expression changes compatible with viability, and the varying responsiveness to genetic perturbation. The data are assembled into a genetic perturbation network that shows different connectivities for different classes of regulators. Four feed-forward loop (FFL) types are overrepresented, including incoherent type 2 FFLs that likely represent feedback. Systematic transcription factor classification shows a surprisingly high abundance of gene-specific repressors, suggesting that yeast chromatin is not as generally restrictive to transcription as is often assumed. The data set is useful for studying individual genes and for discovering properties of an entire regulatory system.

  3. Methionine oxidation of monomeric lambda repressor: the denatured state ensemble under nondenaturing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chugha, Preeti; Sage, Harvey J; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-03-01

    Although poorly understood, the properties of the denatured state ensemble are critical to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of protein folding. The most relevant conformations to cellular protein folding are the ones populated under physiological conditions. To avoid the problem of low expression that is seen with unstable variants, we used methionine oxidation to destabilize monomeric lambda repressor and predominantly populate the denatured state under nondenaturing buffer conditions. The denatured ensemble populated under these conditions comprises conformations that are compact. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments indicate a small increase in Stokes radius over that of the native state. A significant degree of alpha-helical structure in these conformations is detected by far-UV circular dichroism, and some tertiary interactions are suggested by near-UV circular dichroism. The characteristics of the denatured state populated by methionine oxidation in nondenaturing buffer are very different from those found in chemical denaturant.

  4. Waking up Streptomyces secondary metabolism by constitutive expression of activators or genetic disruption of repressors.

    PubMed

    Aigle, Bertrand; Corre, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Streptomycete bacteria are renowned as a prolific source of natural products with diverse biological activities. Production of these metabolites is often subject to transcriptional regulation: the biosynthetic genes remain silent until the required environmental and/or physiological signals occur. Consequently, in the laboratory environment, many gene clusters that direct the biosynthesis of natural products with clinical potential are not expressed or at very low level preventing the production/detection of the associated metabolite. Genetic engineering of streptomycetes can unleash the production of many new natural products. This chapter describes the overexpression of pathway-specific activators, the genetic disruption of pathway-specific repressors, and the main strategy used to identify and characterize new natural products from these engineered Streptomyces strains.

  5. Co-factors and co-repressors of Engrailed: expression in the central nervous system and cerci of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Blagburn, Jonathan M

    2007-01-01

    In the larval cockroach (Periplaneta americana), knockout of Engrailed (En) in the medial sensory neurons of the cercal sensory system changes their axonal arborization and synaptic specificity. Immunocytochemistry has been used to investigate whether the co-repressor Groucho (Gro; vertebrate homolog: TLE) and the co-factor Extradenticle (Exd; vertebrate homolog: Pbx) are expressed in the cercal system. Gro/TLE is expressed ubiquitously in cell nuclei in the embryo, except for the distal pleuropodia. Gro is expressed in all nuclei of the thoracic and abdominal central nervous system (CNS) of first instar larva, although some neurons express less Gro than others. Cercal sensory neurons express Gro protein, which might therefore act as a co-repressor with En. Exd/Pbx is expressed in the proximal portion of all segmental appendages in the embryo, with the exception of the cerci. In the first instar CNS, Exd protein is expressed in subsets of neurons (including dorsal unpaired medial neurons) in the thoracic ganglia, in the first two abdominal ganglia, and in neuromeres A8-A11 of the terminal ganglion. Exd is absent from the cerci. Because Ultrabithorax/Abdominal-A (Ubx/Abd-A) can substitute for Exd as En co-factors in Drosophila, Ubx/Abd-A immunoreactivity has also been investigated. Ubx/Abd-A immunostaining is present in abdominal segments of the embryo and first instar CNS as far caudal as A7 and faintly in the T3 segment. However, Ubx/Abd-A is absent in the cerci and their neurons. Thus, in contrast to its role in Drosophila segmentation, En does not require the co-factors Exd or Ubx/Abd-A in order to control the synaptic specificity of cockroach sensory neurons.

  6. Retinoid X receptor alpha represses GATA-4-mediated transcription via a retinoid-dependent interaction with the cardiac-enriched repressor FOG-2.

    PubMed

    Clabby, Martha L; Robison, Trevor A; Quigley, Heather F; Wilson, David B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2003-02-21

    Dietary vitamin A and its derivatives, retinoids, regulate cardiac growth and development. To delineate mechanisms involved in retinoid-mediated control of cardiac gene expression, the regulatory effects of the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) on atrial naturietic factor (ANF) gene transcription was investigated. The transcriptional activity of an ANF promoter-reporter in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes was repressed by RXR alpha in the presence of 9-cis-RA and by the constitutively active mutant RXR alpha F318A indicating that liganded RXR confers the regulatory effect. The RXR alpha-mediated repression mapped to the proximal 147 bp of the rat ANF promoter, a region lacking a consensus retinoid response element but containing several known cardiogenic cis elements including a well characterized GATA response element. Glutathione S-transferase "pull-down" assays revealed that RXR alpha interacts directly with GATA-4, in a ligand-independent manner, via the DNA binding domain of RXR alpha and the second zinc finger of GATA-4. Liganded RXR alpha repressed the activity of a heterologous promoter-reporter construct containing GATA-response element recognition sites in cardiac myocytes but not in several other cell types, suggesting that additional cardiac-enriched factors participate in the repression complex. Co-transfection of liganded RXR alpha and the known cardiac-enriched GATA-4 repressor, FOG-2, resulted in additive repression of GATA-4 activity in ventricular myocytes. In addition, RXR alpha was found to bind FOG-2, in a 9-cis-RA-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which retinoids regulate cardiogenic gene expression through direct interaction with GATA-4 and its co-repressor, FOG-2.

  7. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-29

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of BigR, a transcription repressor from Xylella fastidiosa involved in biofilm formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Rosicler Lázaro; Rinaldi, Fábio Cupri; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. BigR (biofilm growth-associated repressor) is a novel repressor protein that regulates the transcription of an operon implicated in biofilm growth in both Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This protein binds to a palindromic TA-rich element located in the promoter of the BigR operon and strongly represses transcription of the operon. BigR contains a helix–turn–helix (HTH) domain that is found in some members of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, which control metal resistance in bacteria. Although functional studies have suggested that BigR does not act as a metal sensor, the presence of two cysteines and a methionine in its primary structure raised the possibility of BigR being a metal-ligand protein. In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and SeMet crystals to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group P321 and contain one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  9. Solution dynamics of the trp repressor: a study of amide proton exchange by T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gryk, M R; Finucane, M D; Zheng, Z; Jardetzky, O

    1995-03-10

    The amide proton exchange rates of Escherichia coli trp repressor have been measured through their effects on the longitudinal relaxation rates of the amide protons. Three types of exchange regimes have been observed: (1) slow exchange (on a minute/hour time-scale), measurable by isotope exchange, but not by relaxation techniques in the core of the molecule; (2) relatively rapid exchange, with the rates on a T1 relaxation time-scale (seconds) in the DNA-binding region and (3) very fast exchange at the N and C termini. The results have been analyzed in terms of the two-site exchange model originally proposed by Linderstrøm-Lang, and of a three-site extension of the model. The values of the intrinsic exchange rates calculated using the two-state model agree with the values expected from the studies of Englander and co-workers for the very fast case of the chain terminals, but disagree with the literature values by two orders of magnitude in the intermediate case found in the DNA-binding region. The implication of these findings is that the "open" state of the two-state model in the DNA-binding region is not completely open and has an intrinsic exchange rate different from that of a random coil peptide. Alternatively, if the literature values of the intrinsic exchange rates are assumed to apply to the open states in all parts of the repressor molecule, two "closed" helical states have to be postulated, in slow exchange with each other, with only one of them in rapid exchange with the open state and hence with the solvent. Kinetically, the two models are indistinguishable.

  10. The pathogenesis of ulnar polydactyly in humans.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M; Al-Motairi, M I

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of ulnar polydactyly in humans is not known. There are numerous syndromes that are associated with ulnar polydactyly. We have noted that the genetic defects in these syndromes lead to a disturbance of the normal balance between the two forms of the Gli3 protein (the active and repressor forms of Gli3, which are known as Gli3-A and Gli3-R, respectively), leading to a relative increase in the Gli3-R protein. We offer the hypothesis of a unified pathogenesis of ulnar polydactyly through the relative predominance of Gli3-R.

  11. APETALA2 negatively regulates multiple floral organ identity genes in Arabidopsis by recruiting the co-repressor TOPLESS and the histone deacetylase HDA19.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Hogan, Kendra; Long, Jeff A

    2012-11-01

    The development and coordination of complex tissues in eukaryotes requires precise spatial control of fate-specifying genes. Although investigations of such control have traditionally focused on mechanisms of transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression has emerged as being equally important in the establishment of gene expression territories. In the angiosperm flower, specification of lateral organ fate relies on the spatial regulation of the ABC floral organ identity genes. Our understanding of how the boundaries of these expression domains are controlled is not complete. Here, we report that the A-class organ identity gene APETALA2 (AP2), which is known to repress the C-class gene AGAMOUS, also regulates the expression borders of the B-class genes APETALA3 and PISTILLATA, and the E-class gene SEPALLATA3. We show that AP2 represses its target genes by physically recruiting the co-repressor TOPLESS and the histone deacetylase HDA19. These results demonstrate that AP2 plays a broad role in flower development by controlling the expression domains of numerous floral organ identity genes.

  12. An inhibitory RNA aptamer against the lambda cI repressor shows transcriptional activator activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Shoji; Suess, Beatrix

    2017-04-13

    An RNA aptamer is one of the promising components for constructing artificial genetic circuits. In this study, we developed a transcriptional activator based on an RNA aptamer against one of the most frequently applied repressor proteins, lambda phage cI. In vitro selection (SELEX), followed by in vivo screening identified an RNA aptamer with the intended transcriptional activator activity from an RNA pool containing a 40-nucleotide long random region. Quantitative analysis showed 35-fold elevation of reporter expression upon aptamer expression. These results suggest that the diversity of artificial transcriptional activators can be extended by employing RNA aptamers against repressor proteins to broaden the tools available for constructing genetic circuits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Zn2+-Inducible Expression Platform for Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Based on the smtA Promoter/Operator and smtB Repressor.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Adam A; Gajewski, John P; Ferlez, Bryan H; Ludwig, Marcus; Baker, Carol S; Golbeck, John H; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-02-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 has been gaining significance as both a model system for photosynthesis research and for industrial applications. Until recently, the genetic toolbox for this model cyanobacterium was rather limited and relied primarily on tools that only allowed constitutive gene expression. This work describes a two-plasmid, Zn(2+)-inducible expression platform that is coupled with a zurA mutation, providing enhanced Zn(2+) uptake. The control elements are based on the metal homeostasis system of a class II metallothionein gene (smtA7942) and its cognate SmtB7942 repressor from Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942. Under optimal induction conditions, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) levels were about half of those obtained with the strong, constitutive phycocyanin (cpcBA6803) promoter of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. This metal-inducible expression system in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 allowed the titratable gene expression of YFP that was up to 19-fold greater than the background level. This system was utilized successfully to control the expression of the Drosophila melanogaster β-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase, NinaB, which is toxic when constitutively expressed from a strong promoter in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Together, these properties establish this metal-inducible system as an additional useful tool that is capable of controlling gene expression for applications ranging from basic research to synthetic biology in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

  14. The Cdk1 and Ime2 protein kinases trigger exit from meiotic prophase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inhibiting the Sum1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Shin, Marcus E; Skokotas, Aikaterini; Winter, Edward

    2010-06-01

    The induction of middle meiotic promoters is a key regulatory event in the life cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls exit from prophase, meiosis, and spore formation. The Sum1 repressor and Ndt80 activator proteins control middle promoters by binding to overlapping DNA elements. NDT80 is controlled by a tightly regulated middle meiotic promoter through a positive autoregulatory loop and is repressed in vegetative cells by Sum1. It has previously been shown that the meiosis-specific kinase Ime2 promotes the removal of Sum1 from DNA. Here, we show that Sum1 is also regulated by the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdk1. While sum1 phosphosite mutants that are insensitive to Cdk1 or Ime2 complete meiosis and form spores, a mutant that is insensitive to both Ime2 and Cdk1 (sum1-ci) blocks meiotic development in prophase with an ndt80Delta-like phenotype. Ectopic expression of NDT80 or mutation of a Sum1-binding element in the NDT80 promoter bypasses the sum1-ci block. Hst1 is a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase that is linked to Sum1 by the Rfm1 tethering factor. Deletion of HST1 or RFM1 also bypasses the sum1-ci block. These results demonstrate that Sum1 functions as a key meiotic brake through the NDT80 promoter and that Cdk1 and Ime2 trigger exit from meiotic prophase by inhibiting the Sum1 transcriptional repression complex.

  15. Supercoiling and denaturation in Gal repressor/heat unstable nucleoid protein (HU)-mediated DNA looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lia, Giuseppe; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Dunlap, David; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Adhya, Sankar; Finzi, Laura

    2003-09-01

    The overall topology of DNA profoundly influences the regulation of transcription and is determined by DNA flexibility as well as the binding of proteins that induce DNA torsion, distortion, and/or looping. Gal repressor (GalR) is thought to repress transcription from the two promoters of the gal operon of Escherichia coli by forming a DNA loop of 40 nm of DNA that encompasses the promoters. Associated evidence of a topological regulatory mechanism of the transcription repression is the requirement for a supercoiled DNA template and the histone-like heat unstable nucleoid protein (HU). By using single-molecule manipulations to generate and finely tune tension in DNA molecules, we directly detected GalR/HU-mediated DNA looping and characterized its kinetics, thermodynamics, and supercoiling dependence. The factors required for gal DNA looping in single-molecule experiments (HU, GalR and DNA supercoiling) correspond exactly to those necessary for gal repression observed both in vitro and in vivo. Our single-molecule experiments revealed that negatively supercoiled DNA, under slight tension, denatured to facilitate GalR/HU-mediated DNA loop formation. Such topological intermediates may operate similarly in other multiprotein complexes of transcription, replication, and recombination.

  16. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2013-12-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution.

  17. [PPARγ up-regulates TGFβ/smad signal pathway repressor c-Ski].

    PubMed

    Li, Gong-bo; Li, Jun; Zeng, Yi-jun; Zhong, Dan; Wu, Geng-ze; Fu, Xiao-hong; He, Feng-tian; Dai, Shuang-shuang

    2011-02-25

    TGFβ/smad pathway is recognized as an important signal pathway to promote the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis (AS). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation is considered to be important in modulating AS. Herein, we investigated the regulation of PPARγ on c-Ski, the repressor of TGFβ/smad pathway, in rat AS model and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). c-Ski mRNA and protein expression were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively, in vivo and in vitro with treatment of PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone and antagonist GW9662. The proliferation and collagen secretion of VSMCs after c-Ski transfection were investigated. The underlying mechanism was further investigated by online program NUBIScan and luciferase reporter gene analysis. Results showed that both mRNA and protein expressions of c-Ski in the AS lesions was down-regulated in vivo, while in cultured VSMCs, c-Ski transfection significantly suppressed the proliferation and collagen secretion of rat VSMCs. Rosiglitazone significantly up-regulated mRNA and protein levels of c-Ski in VSMCs, which could be blocked by GW9662. Online NUBIScan analysis suggested possible PPARγ binding sites in the promoter region of c-Ski. In addition, luciferase activity of c-Ski reporter gene was also increased obviously in the presence of rosiglitazone. These results indicate that c-Ski is one of the newly found target genes of PPARγ and thus involved in the anti-AS effect of PPARγ.

  18. A Novel Function of δ Factor from Bacillus subtilis as a Transcriptional Repressor.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Sur, Runa; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2016-11-11

    δ, a small protein found in most Gram-positive bacteria was, for a long time, thought to be a subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) and was shown to be involved in recycling of RNAP at the end of each round of transcription. However, how δ participates in both up-regulation and down-regulation of genes in vivo remains unclear. We have recently shown, in addition to the recycling of RNAP, δ functions as a transcriptional activator by binding to an A-rich sequence located immediately upstream of the -35 element, consequently facilitating the open complex formation. The result had explained the mechanism of up-regulation of the genes by δ. Here, we show that Bacillus subtilis δ could also function as a transcriptional repressor. Our results demonstrate that δ binds to an A-rich sequence located near the -35 element of the spo0B promoter, the gene involved in the regulatory cascade of bacterial sporulation and inhibits the open complex formation due to steric clash with σ region 4.2. We observed a significant increase in the mRNA level of the spo0B gene in a δ-knock-out strain of B. subtilis compared with the wild-type. Thus, the results report a novel function of δ, and suggest the mechanism of down-regulation of genes in vivo by the protein.

  19. Inhibition of Snail Family Transcriptional Repressor 2 (SNAI2) Enhances Multidrug Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong-Jie; Lv, Ya-Ping; Jin, Wei; Meng, Chao; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    China accounts for almost half of the total number of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most primary liver cancer. Snail family transcriptional repressor 2 (SNAI2) is known as an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor that drives neoplastic epithelial cells into mesenchymal phenotype. However, the roles of endogenous SNAI2 remain controversial in different types of malignant tumors. Herein, we surprisingly identify that anchorage-independent growth, including the formation of tumor sphere and soft agar colony, is significantly increased when SNAI2 expression is inhibited by shRNAs in HCC cells. Suppression of SNAI2 suffices to up-regulate several cancer stem genes. Although unrelated to the metastatic ability, SNAI2 inhibition does increase the efflux of Hoechst 33342 and enhance multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. In agreement with this data, we demonstrate for the first time that decreasing SNAI2 level can transcriptionally upregulate several ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes such as ABCB1. Moreover, ABC transporters’ inhibitor verapamil can rescue the multidrug resistance induced by SNAI2 inhibition. Our results implicate that SNAI2 behaves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting multidrug resistance via suppressing ABC transporter genes in HCC cells. PMID:27760172

  20. Conversion of a gene-specific repressor to a regional silencer

    PubMed Central

    Rine, Laura N. Rusché and Jasper

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gene silencing at the HMR and HML loci is normally dependent on Sir2p, Sir3p, and Sir4p, which are structural components of silenced chromatin. Sir2p is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase required for silencing. Silencing can be restored in cells lacking Sir proteins by a dominant mutation in SUM1, which normally acts as a mitotic repressor of meiotic genes. This study found that mutant Sum1-1p, but not wild-type Sum1p, associated directly with HM loci. The origin recognition complex (ORC) was required for Sum1-1p-mediated silencing, and mutations in ORC genes reduced association of Sum1-1p with the HM loci. Sum1-1p-mediated silencing also depended on HST1, a paralog of SIR2. Both Sum1-1p and wild-type Sum1p interacted with Hst1p in coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Therefore, the SUM1-1 mutation did not change the affinity of Sum1p for Hst1p, but rather relocalized Sum1p to the HM loci. Sum1-1–Hst1p action led to hypoacetylation of the nucleosomes at HM loci. Thus, Sum1-1p and Hst1p could substitute for Sir proteins to achieve silencing through formation of a compositionally distinct type of heterochromatin. PMID:11316790

  1. Evolutionary conservation and predicted structure of the Drosophila extra sex combs repressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, J; Li, R; Morgan, K; Simon, J

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila extra sex combs (esc) protein, a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), is a transcriptional repressor of homeotic genes. Genetic studies have shown that esc protein is required in early embryos at about the time that other PcG proteins become engaged in homeotic gene repression. The esc protein consists primarily of multiple copies of the WD repeat, a motif that has been implicated in protein-protein interaction. To further investigate the domain organization of esc protein, we have isolated and characterized esc homologs from divergent insect species. We report that esc protein is highly conserved in housefly (72% identical to Drosophila esc), butterfly (55% identical), and grasshopper (56% identical). We show that the butterfly homolog provides esc function in Drosophila, indicating that the sequence similarities reflect functional conservation. Homology modeling using the crystal structure of another WD repeat protein, the G-protein beta-subunit, predicts that esc protein adopts a beta-propeller structure. The sequence comparisons and modeling suggest that there are seven WD repeats in esc protein which together form a seven-bladed beta-propeller. We locate the conserved regions in esc protein with respect to this predicted structure. Site-directed mutagenesis of specific loops, predicted to extend from the propeller surface, identifies conserved parts of esc protein required for function in vivo. We suggest that these regions might mediate physical interaction with esc partner proteins. PMID:9343430

  2. Repressor transcription factor 7-like 1 promotes adipogenic competency in precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Cristancho, Ana G; Schupp, Michael; Lefterova, Martina I; Cao, Shengya; Cohen, Daniel M; Chen, Christopher S; Steger, David J; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2011-09-27

    The identification of factors that define adipocyte precursor potential has important implications for obesity. Preadipocytes are fibroblastoid cells committed to becoming round lipid-laden adipocytes. In vitro, this differentiation process is facilitated by confluency, followed by adipogenic stimuli. During adipogenesis, a large number of cytostructural genes are repressed before adipocyte gene induction. Here we report that the transcriptional repressor transcription factor 7-like 1 (TCF7L1) binds and directly regulates the expression of cell structure genes. Depletion of TCF7L1 inhibits differentiation, because TCF7L1 indirectly induces the adipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in a manner that can be replaced by inhibition of myosin II activity. TCF7L1 is induced by cell contact in adipogenic cell lines, and ectopic expression of TCF7L1 alleviates the confluency requirement for adipocytic differentiation of precursor cells. In contrast, TCF7L1 is not induced during confluency of non-adipogenic fibroblasts, and, remarkably, forced expression of TCF7L1 is sufficient to commit non-adipogenic fibroblasts to an adipogenic fate. These results establish TCF7L1 as a transcriptional hub coordinating cell-cell contact with the transcriptional repression required for adipogenic competency.

  3. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models.

    PubMed

    Osman, Erkan Y; Miller, Madeline R; Robbins, Kate L; Lombardi, Abby M; Atkinson, Arleigh K; Brehm, Amanda J; Lorson, Christian L

    2014-09-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1(MO)-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection in the relatively severe mouse model of SMA (SMNΔ7 mouse model) elicited a robust induction of SMN protein, and mean life span was extended from an average survival of 13 to 54 days following a single dose, consistent with large weight gains and a correction of the neuronal pathology. Additionally, E1(MO)-ASO treatment in an intermediate SMA mouse (SMN(RT) mouse model) significantly extended life span by ∼700% and weight gain was comparable with the unaffected animals. While a number of experimental therapeutics have targeted the ISS-N1 element of SMN2 pre-mRNA, the development of E1 ASOs provides a new molecular target for SMA therapeutics that dramatically extends survival in two important pre-clinical models of disease.

  4. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  5. Transcription repressor Bach2 is required for pulmonary surfactant homeostasis and alveolar macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Ebina-Shibuya, Risa; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Muto, Akihiko; Shima, Hiroki; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Ebina, Masahito; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) results from a dysfunction of alveolar macrophages (AMs), chiefly due to disruptions in the signaling of granulocyte macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We found that mice deficient for the B lymphoid transcription repressor BTB and CNC homology 2 (Bach2) developed PAP-like accumulation of surfactant proteins in the lungs. Bach2 was expressed in AMs, and Bach2-deficient AMs showed alterations in lipid handling in comparison with wild-type (WT) cells. Although Bach2-deficient AMs showed a normal expression of the genes involved in the GM-CSF signaling, they showed an altered expression of the genes involved in chemotaxis, lipid metabolism, and alternative M2 macrophage activation with increased expression of Ym1 and arginase-1, and the M2 regulator Irf4. Peritoneal Bach2-deficient macrophages showed increased Ym1 expression when stimulated with interleukin-4. More eosinophils were present in the lung and peritoneal cavity of Bach2-deficient mice compared with WT mice. The PAP-like lesions in Bach2-deficient mice were relieved by WT bone marrow transplantation even after their development, confirming the hematopoietic origin of the lesions. These results indicate that Bach2 is required for the functional maturation of AMs and pulmonary homeostasis, independently of the GM-CSF signaling. PMID:24127487

  6. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator.

  7. The transcriptional repressor Nab1 is a specific regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Monika; Lorenz, Kristina; Maass, Alexander H; Oberdorf-Maass, Silke; Keller, Ursula; Schmitteckert, Eva M; Ivashchenko, Yuri; Lohse, Martin J; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2005-08-01

    Hypertrophy represents the major physiological response of the heart to adapt to chronically enhanced workload, but is also crucial in the development of heart failure. Although we know of numerous inducers of cardiac hypertrophy, little is known about mechanisms that limit cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe the transcriptional repressor NAB1 as an endogenous regulator of cardiac growth. We identified NAB1 as being upregulated in both mouse and human heart failure. Nab1 is highly expressed in mammalian cardiac myocytes and it inhibited cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through repression of its targets, transcription factor Egr. Transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of Nab1 showed that Nab1 is a potent inhibitor of cardiac growth in response to pathological stimuli in vivo. Nab1 overexpression suppressed adrenergically induced and pressure overload-induced hypertrophy, whereas physiological growth during development and in response to exercise was not affected. These findings implicate the Nab1-Egr1 axis as a crucial regulator of pathological cardiac growth.

  8. NLRP7, Involved in Hydatidiform Molar Pregnancy (HYDM1), Interacts with the Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB16

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Heike; Biswas, Arijit; Nuesgen, Nicole; Oldenburg, Johannes; El-Maarri, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the maternal effect gene NLRP7 cause biparental hydatidiform mole (HYDM1). HYDM1 is characterized by abnormal growth of placenta and lack of proper embryonic development. The molar tissues are characterized by abnormal methylation patterns at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes. It is not known whether this occurs before or after fertilization, but the high specificity of this defect to the maternal allele indicates a possible maternal germ line-specific effect. To better understand the unknown molecular mechanism leading to HYDM1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen against an ovarian library using NLRP7 as bait. We identified the transcriptional repressor ZBTB16 as an interacting protein of NLRP7 and verified this interaction in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Native protein analysis detected NLRP7 and ZBTB16 in a 480kD protein complex and both proteins co-localize in the cytoplasm in juxtanuclear aggregates. HYDM1-causing mutations in NLRP7 did not show altered patterns of interaction with ZBTB16. Hence, the biological significance of the NLRP7-ZBTB16 interaction remains to be revealed. However, a clear effect of harvesting ZBTB16 to the cytoplasm when the NLRP7 protein is overexpressed may be linked to the pathology of the molar pregnancy disease. PMID:26121690

  9. The BCG Moreau RD16 deletion inactivates a repressor reshaping transcription of an adjacent gene.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Teca Calcagno; Lima, Cristiane Rodrigues; Gomes, Leonardo Henrique Ferreira; Pagani, Talita Duarte; Ferreira, Marcelo Alves; Gonçalves, Antonio S; Correa, Paloma Rezende; Degrave, Wim Maurits; Mendonça-Lima, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian anti-tuberculosis vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) BCG Moreau is unique in having a deletion of 7608 bp (RD16) that results in the truncation of a putative TetR transcriptional regulator, the ortholog of Mycobacterium tuberculosis rv3405c, BCG_M3439c. We investigated the effect of this truncation on the expression of the rv3406 ortholog (BCG_M3440), lying 81 bp downstream in the opposite orientation. RT-PCR and western blot experiments show that rv3406 mRNA and Rv3406 accumulate in BCG Moreau but not in BCG Pasteur (strain that bears an intact rv3405c), suggesting this to be a result of rv3405c truncation. Recombinant Rv3405c forms a complex with the rv3405c-rv3406 intergenic region, which contains a characteristic transcription factor binding site, showing it to have DNA binding activity. Complementation of M. bovis BCG Moreau with an intact copy of rv3405c abolishes Rv3406 accumulation. These results show that Rv3405c is a DNA binding protein that acts as a transcriptional repressor of rv3406.

  10. A knockdown with smoke model reveals FHIT as a repressor of Heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Boylston, Jennifer A; Brenner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene deletions are among the earliest and most frequent events in carcinogenesis, particularly in carcinogen-exposed tissues. Though FHIT has been established as an authentic tumor suppressor, the mechanism underlying tumor suppression remains opaque. Most experiments designed to clarify FHIT function have analyzed the consequence of re-expressing FHIT in FHIT-negative cells. However, carcinogenesis occurs in cells that transition from FHIT-positive to FHIT-negative. To better understand cancer development, we induced FHIT loss in human bronchial epithelial cells with RNA interference. Because FHIT is a demonstrated target of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, we combined FHIT silencing with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and measured gene expression consequences by RNA microarray. The data indicate that FHIT loss enhances the expression of a set of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to CSE, including the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) at the RNA and protein levels. Data are consistent with a mechanism in which Fhit protein is required for accumulation of the transcriptional repressor of HMOX1, Bach1 protein. We posit that by allowing superinduction of oxidative stress response genes, loss of FHIT creates a survival advantage that promotes carcinogenesis.

  11. Sequence and expression analysis of the gene encoding inducible cAMP early repressor in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Gan, Xi; Lei, Aiying; Li, Chao; Yu, Xiaoli; Huang, Jun; Huang, Ting; Liang, Wanwen

    2010-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization library was generated by comparison of cDNA populations isolated from peripheral leukocytes of pre- and post-immunized tilapia. One cDNA sequence encoding complete inducible cAMP early repressor was obtained from the library. The sequence was characterized by the presence of the basic structure of ICER IIgamma. Expression of ICER was in the tissues of four types of tilapia was decreased after infection with Streptococcus. After immunization, expression of ICER was initially decreased and then increased after 7 days. In addition, the order for the overall expression of ICER gene after infection and the increases of ICER expression later after immunization in these four types of tilapia was positively correlated to the disease resistance and productivity of these four species of tilapia. Our results provided molecular mechanisms for the different disease resistance capability in different species of tilapia. In addition, our results also provided reference molecular marker for breeding disease resistant tilapia, cAMP responsive element modulator.

  12. A satellite phage-encoded antirepressor induces repressor aggregation and cholera toxin gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brigid M; Kimsey, Harvey H; Kane, Anne V; Waldor, Matthew K

    2002-08-15

    CTXphi is a filamentous bacteriophage whose genome encodes cholera toxin, the principal virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae. We have found that the CTXphi-related element RS1 is a satellite phage whose transmission depends upon proteins produced from a CTX prophage (its helper phage). However, unlike other satellite phages and satellite animal viruses, RS1 can aid the CTX prophage as well as exploit it, due to the RS1-encoded protein RstC. RstC, whose function previously was unknown, is an antirepressor that counteracts the activity of the phage repressor RstR. RstC promotes transcription of genes required for phage production and thereby promotes transmission of both RS1 and CTXphi. Antirepression by RstC also induces expression of the cholera toxin genes, ctxAB, and thus may contribute to the virulence of V.cholerae. In vitro, RstC binds directly to RstR, producing unusual, insoluble aggregates containing both proteins. In vivo, RstC and RstR are both found at the cell pole, where they again appear to form stable complexes. The sequestration/inactivation process induced by RstC resembles those induced by mutant polyglutamine-containing proteins implicated in human neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. A cellular repressor regulates transcription initiation from the minute virus of mice P38 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Krauskopf, A; Aloni, Y

    1994-01-01

    We previously reported that the P38 promoter of minute virus of mice (MVM) is trans activated by the viral nonstructural protein, NS1, through an interaction with a downstream promoter element designated DPE. In this communication we report the identification of a distinct downstream promoter element which inhibits transcription from the P38 promoter in vitro, in the absence of the DPE. Removal of 34 bp from the region between +95 and +129 downstream from the P38 initiation start site relieved inhibition of transcription in whole-cell extract. Inhibition was also relieved by the addition, to the transcription reaction, of excess DNA fragments which span the putative inhibiting element. This indicated the involvement of a trans-acting factor, in inhibition of transcription from the P38. Gel retardation experiments demonstrated the specific binding of a cellular protein to the inhibitory element. This P38 inhibitory element shows spacing and orientation dependence as well as promoter specificity. The regulation of viral transcription by a cellular repressor may play an important role in obtaining a fine temporal order of viral gene expression during the course of infection. Images PMID:8139925

  14. Backbone dynamics of the monomeric lambda repressor denatured state ensemble under nondenaturing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chugha, Preeti; Oas, Terrence G

    2007-02-06

    Oxidizing two native methionine residues predominantly populates the denatured state of monomeric lambda repressor (MetO-lambdaLS) under nondenaturing conditions. NMR was used to characterize the secondary structure and dynamics of MetO-lambdaLS in standard phosphate buffer. 13Calpha and 1Halpha chemical shift indices reveal a region of significant helicity between residues 9 and 29. This helical content is further supported by the observation of medium-range amide NOEs. The remaining residues do not exhibit significant helicity as determined by NMR. We determined 15N relaxation parameters for 64 of 85 residues at 600 and 800 MHz. There are two distinct regions of reduced flexibility, residues 8-32 in the N-terminal third and residues 50-83 in the C-terminal third. The middle third, residues 33-50, has greater flexibility. We have analyzed the amplitude of the backbone motions in terms of the physical properties of the amino acids and conclude that conformational restriction of the backbone MetO-lambdaLS is due to nascent helix formation in the region corresponding to native helix 1. The bulkiness of amino acid residues in the C-terminal third leads to the potential for hydrophobic interactions, which is suggested by chemical exchange detected by the difference in spectral density J(0) at the two static magnetic fields. The more flexible middle region is the result of a predominance of small side chains in this region.

  15. KRAB-Zinc Finger Proteins: A Repressor Family Displaying Multiple Biological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Angelo; Cesaro, Elena; Montano, Giorgia; Zurlo, Diana; Izzo, Paola; Costanzo, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins containing the Kruppel associated box (KRAB-ZFPs) constitute the largest individual family of transcriptional repressors encoded by the genomes of higher organisms. KRAB domain, positioned at the NH2 terminus of the KRAB-ZFPs, interacts with a scaffold protein, KAP-1, which is able to recruit various transcriptional factors causing repression of genes to which KRAB ZFPs bind. The relevance of such repression is reflected in the large number of the KRAB zinc finger protein genes in the human genome. However, in spite of their numerical abundance little is currently known about the gene targets and the physiological functions of KRAB- ZFPs. However, emerging evidence links the transcriptional repression mediated by the KRAB-ZFPs to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cancer. Moreover, the fact that KRAB containing proteins are vertebrate-specific suggests that they have evolved recently, and that their key roles lie in some aspects of vertebrate development. In this review, we will briefly discuss some regulatory functions of the KRAB-ZFPs in different physiological and pathological states, thus contributing to better understand their biological roles. PMID:24294107

  16. Transcriptional Repressor DAXX Promotes Prostate Cancer Tumorigenicity via Suppression of Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Puto, Lorena A.; Brognard, John; Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The DAXX transcriptional repressor was originally associated with apoptotic cell death. However, recent evidence that DAXX represses several tumor suppressor genes, including the DAPK1 and DAPK3 protein kinases, and is up-regulated in many cancers argues that a pro-survival role may predominate in a cancer context. Here, we report that DAXX has potent growth-enhancing effects on primary prostatic malignancy through inhibition of autophagy. Through stable gene knockdown and mouse subcutaneous xenograft studies, we demonstrate that DAXX promotes tumorigenicity of human ALVA-31 and PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vivo. Importantly, DAXX represses expression of essential autophagy modulators DAPK3 and ULK1 in vivo, revealing autophagy suppression as a mechanism through which DAXX promotes PCa tumorigenicity. Furthermore, DAXX knockdown increases autophagic flux in cultured PCa cells. Finally, interrogation of the OncomineTM database suggests that DAXX overexpression is associated with malignant transformation in several human cancers, including prostate and pancreatic cancers. Thus, DAXX may represent a new cancer biomarker for the detection of aggressive disease, whose tissue-specific down-regulation can serve as an improved therapeutic modality. Our results establish DAXX as a pro-survival protein in PCa and reveal that, in the early stages of tumorigenesis, autophagy suppresses prostate tumor formation. PMID:25903140

  17. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M.; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development. PMID:25538248

  18. Stepwise assembly of functional C-terminal REST/NRSF transcriptional repressor complexes as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Inui, Ken; Zhao, Zongpei; Yuan, Juan; Jayaprakash, Sakthidasan; Le, Le T M; Drakulic, Srdja; Sander, Bjoern; Golas, Monika M

    2017-02-20

    In human cells, thousands of predominantly neuronal genes are regulated by the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF). REST/NRSF represses transcription of these genes in stem cells and non-neuronal cells by tethering corepressor complexes. Aberrant REST/NRSF expression and intracellular localization are associated with cancer and neurodegeneration in humans. To date, detailed molecular analyses of REST/NRSF and its C-terminal repressor complex have been hampered largely by the lack of sufficient amounts of purified REST/NRSF and its complexes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to express and purify human REST/NRSF and its C-terminal interactors in a baculovirus multiprotein expression system as individual proteins and coexpressed complexes. All proteins were enriched in the nucleus, and REST/NRSF was isolated as a slower migrating form, characteristic of nuclear REST/NRSF in mammalian cells. Both REST/NRSF alone and its C-terminal repressor complex were functionally active in histone deacetylation and histone demethylation and bound to RE1/neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) sites. Additionally, the mechanisms of inhibition of the small-molecule drugs 4SC-202 and SP2509 were analyzed. These drugs interfered with the viability of medulloblastoma cells, where REST/NRSF has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Thus, a resource for molecular REST/NRSF studies and drug development has been established.

  19. A chimeric mammalian transactivator based on the lac repressor that is regulated by temperature and isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside.

    PubMed Central

    Baim, S B; Labow, M A; Levine, A J; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    LAP267 is a lacI activator protein (LAP) containing an insertion of the transcriptional activation domain of the herpes simplex virus virion protein 16 within the inducer-binding and dimerization domain of the lac repressor protein. LAP267 strongly induces expression in a conditional manner from a minimal simian virus 40 early promoter linked to lac operator sequences. LAP267 is temperature-sensitive, activating expression at 32 degrees C but not at 39.5 degrees C. It is allosterically regulated in a manner opposite that of wild-type lac repressor, in that LAP267 activity is rescued at the nonpermissive temperature by isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Stable mouse cell lines containing both the LAP267 gene and a LAP-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene were readily established and exhibited up to a 1200-fold increase in CAT activity within 24 hr upon addition of IPTG. Thus, LAP267 is a powerful inducible switch in mammalian cells, imparting a regulatory stringency similar to that observed with lac repressor in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:2052587

  20. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Pedersen, Margit; Varming, Anders K.; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein, whereas a truncated version, CI∆58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CI∆58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CI∆58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CI∆58 interacts with the OL operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than the isolated NTD domain thus demonstrating cooperativity between the two DNA binding domains. Finally, using small angle X-ray scattering data and state-of-the-art ensemble selection techniques, we delineate the conformational space sampled by CI∆58 in solution, and we discuss the possible role that the dynamics play in CI-repressor function. PMID:27403839

  1. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  2. Molecular mechanism of transcriptional repression of AhR repressor involving ANKRA2, HDAC4, and HDAC5

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Motohiko; Mimura, Junsei; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    2007-12-14

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) has been proposed to inhibit Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity by competing with AhR for forming a heterodimer with AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt) and subsequently binding to the xenobiotic responsive elements (XRE). However, the precise mechanism of AhRR inhibitory activity remains unknown. Analysis of the inhibitory activity of AhRR on the expression of a TK promoter-driven reporter has localized a core repressor domain in the sequence of amino acid residue 555-701. The inhibitory activity of AhRR is sensitive to a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A. By using the yeast two-hybrid screening method with the C-terminal sequence of AhRR as bait, we identified a binding partner, Ankyrin-repeat protein2 (ANKRA2), a protein known to interact with HDAC4 and HDAC5. RNA interference experiments using ANKRA2 and AhRR siRNAs indicate that ANKRA2 is important for transcriptional repression by AhRR. We have found that under normal conditions, CYP1A1 gene is kept silent in MEF cells by AhRR/Arnt heterodimer, which binds to the XRE sequence in its promoter and recruits ANKRA2, HDAC4, and HDAC5 as co-repressors.

  3. The mammalian TRIM-NHL protein TRIM71/LIN-41 is a repressor of mRNA function.

    PubMed

    Loedige, Inga; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Sack, Ragna; Meister, Gunter; Filipowicz, Witold

    2013-01-07

    TRIM-NHL proteins are conserved regulators of development and differentiation but their molecular function has remained largely elusive. Here, we report an as yet unrecognized activity for the mammalian TRIM-NHL protein TRIM71 as a repressor of mRNAs. We show that TRIM71 is associated with mRNAs and that it promotes translational repression and mRNA decay. We have identified Rbl1 and Rbl2, two transcription factors whose down-regulation is important for stem cell function, as TRIM71 targets in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, one of the defining features of TRIM-NHL proteins, the NHL domain, is necessary and sufficient to target TRIM71 to RNA, while the RING domain that confers ubiquitin ligase activity is dispensable for repression. Our results reveal strong similarities between TRIM71 and Drosophila BRAT, the best-studied TRIM-NHL protein and a well-documented translational repressor, suggesting that BRAT and TRIM71 are part of a family of mRNA repressors regulating proliferation and differentiation.

  4. Maternal Groucho and bHLH repressors amplify the dose-sensitive X chromosome signal in Drosophila sex determination.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Kozhina, Elena; Mahadevaraju, Sharvani; Yang, Dun; Avila, Frank W; Erickson, James W

    2008-11-15

    In Drosophila, XX embryos are fated to develop as females, and XY embryos as males, because the diplo-X dose of four X-linked signal element genes, XSEs, activates the Sex-lethal establishment promoter, SxlPe, whereas the haplo-X XSE dose leaves SxlPe off. The threshold response of SxlPe to XSE concentrations depends in part on the bHLH repressor, Deadpan, present in equal amounts in XX and XY embryos. We identified canonical and non-canonical DNA-binding sites for Dpn at SxlPe and found that cis-acting mutations in the Dpn-binding sites caused stronger and earlier Sxl expression than did deletion of dpn implicating other bHLH repressors in Sxl regulation. Maternal Hey encodes one such bHLH regulator but the E(spl) locus does not. Elimination of the maternal corepressor Groucho also caused strong ectopic Sxl expression in XY, and premature Sxl activation in XX embryos, but Sxl was still expressed differently in the sexes. Our findings suggest that Groucho and associated maternal and zygotic bHLH repressors define the threshold XSE concentrations needed to activate SxlPe and that they participate directly in sex signal amplification. We present a model in which the XSE signal is amplified by a feedback mechanism that interferes with Gro-mediated repression in XX, but not XY embryos.

  5. A Conserved Network of Transcriptional Activators and Repressors Regulates Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Eudicots[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Davies, Kevin M.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Montefiori, Mirco; Brendolise, Cyril; Boase, Murray R.; Ngo, Hanh; Jameson, Paula E.; Schwinn, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Plants require sophisticated regulatory mechanisms to ensure the degree of anthocyanin pigmentation is appropriate to myriad developmental and environmental signals. Central to this process are the activity of MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) complexes that regulate the transcription of anthocyanin genes. In this study, the gene regulatory network that regulates anthocyanin synthesis in petunia (Petunia hybrida) has been characterized. Genetic and molecular evidence show that the R2R3-MYB, MYB27, is an anthocyanin repressor that functions as part of the MBW complex and represses transcription through its C-terminal EAR motif. MYB27 targets both the anthocyanin pathway genes and basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1), itself an essential component of the MBW activation complex for pigmentation. Other features of the regulatory network identified include inhibition of AN1 activity by the competitive R3-MYB repressor MYBx and the activation of AN1, MYB27, and MYBx by the MBW activation complex, providing for both reinforcement and feedback regulation. We also demonstrate the intercellular movement of the WDR protein (AN11) and R3-repressor (MYBx), which may facilitate anthocyanin pigment pattern formation. The fundamental features of this regulatory network in the Asterid model of petunia are similar to those in the Rosid model of Arabidopsis thaliana and are thus likely to be widespread in the Eudicots. PMID:24642943

  6. Dominant repression of target genes by chimeric repressors that include the EAR motif, a repression domain, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Matsui, Kyoko; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2003-06-01

    The redundancy of genes for plant transcription factors often interferes with efforts to identify the biologic functions of such factors. We show here that four different transcription factors fused to the EAR motif, a repression domain of only 12 amino acids, act as dominant repressors in transgenic Arabidopsis and suppress the expression of specific target genes, even in the presence of the redundant transcription factors, with resultant dominant loss-of-function phenotypes. Chimeric EIN3, CUC1, PAP1, and AtMYB23 repressors that included the EAR motif dominantly suppressed the expression of their target genes and caused insensitivity to ethylene, cup-shaped cotyledons, reduction in the accumulation of anthocyanin, and absence of trichomes, respectively. This chimeric repressor silencing technology (CRES-T), exploiting the EAR-motif repression domain, is simple and effective and can overcome genetic redundancy. Thus, it should be useful not only for the rapid analysis of the functions of redundant plant transcription factors but also for the manipulation of plant traits via the suppression of gene expression that is regulated by specific transcription factors.

  7. Generation of Novel Floral Traits Using a Combination of Floral Organ-Specific Promoters and a Chimeric Repressor in Torenia fournieri Lind.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Katsutomo; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kasajima, Ichiro; Narumi, Takako; Ohtsubo, Norihiro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop a new biotechnological method for the efficient modification of floral traits. Because transcription factors play an important role in determining floral traits, chimeric repressors, which are generated by attaching a short transcriptional repressor domain to transcription factors, have been widely used as effective tools for modifying floral traits in many plant species. However, the overexpression of these chimeric repressors by the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter sometimes causes undesirable morphological alterations to other organs. We attempted simultaneously to generate new floral traits and avoid such quality loss by examining five additional floral organ-specific promoters, one Arabidopsis thaliana promoter and four Torenia fournieri promoters, for the expression of the chimeric repressor of Arabidopsis TCP3 (AtTCP3), whose overexpression drastically alters floral traits but also generates dwarf phenotypes and deformed leaves. We found that the four torenia promoters exhibited particularly strong activity in the petals but not in the leaves, and that the combination of these floral organ-specific promoters with the chimeric repressor of AtTCP3 caused changes in the color, color patterns and cell shapes of petals, whilst avoiding other unfavorable phenotypes. Interestingly, each promoter that we used in this study generated characteristic and distinguishable floral traits. Thus, the use of different floral organ-specific promoters with different properties enables us to generate diverse floral traits using a single chimeric repressor without changing the phenotypes of other organs.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes 10403S Arginine Repressor ArgR Finely Tunes Arginine Metabolism Regulation under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changyong; Dong, Zhimei; Han, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hang; Jiang, Li; Yang, Yongchun; Ma, Tiantian; Chen, Zhongwei; Yu, Jing; Fang, Weihuan; Song, Houhui

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is able to colonize human and animal intestinal tracts and to subsequently cross the intestinal barrier, causing systemic infection. For successful establishment of infection, L. monocytogenes must survive the low pH environment of the stomach. L. monocytogenes encodes a functional ArgR, a transcriptional regulator belonging to the ArgR/AhrC arginine repressor family. We aimed at clarifying the specific functions of ArgR in arginine metabolism regulation, and more importantly, in acid tolerance of L. monocytogenes. We showed that ArgR in the presence of 10 mM arginine represses transcription and expression of the argGH and argCJBDF operons, indicating that L. monocytogenes ArgR plays the classical role of ArgR/AhrC family proteins in feedback inhibition of the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Notably, transcription and expression of arcA (encoding arginine deiminase) and sigB (encoding an alternative sigma factor B) were also markedly repressed by ArgR when bacteria were exposed to pH 5.5 in the absence of arginine. However, addition of arginine enabled ArgR to derepress the transcription and expression of these two genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that ArgR binds to the putative ARG boxes in the promoter regions of argC, argG, arcA, and sigB. Reporter gene analysis with gfp under control of the argG promoter demonstrated that ArgR was able to activate the argG promoter. Unexpectedly, deletion of argR significantly increased bacterial survival in BHI medium adjusted to pH 3.5 with lactic acid. We conclude that this phenomenon is due to activation of arcA and sigB. Collectively, our results show that L. monocytogenes ArgR finely tunes arginine metabolism through negative transcriptional regulation of the arginine biosynthetic operons and of the catabolic arcA gene in an arginine-independent manner during lactic acid-induced acid stress. ArgR also appears to activate catabolism as well as sigB transcription by anti

  9. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ–mediated host defenses

    PubMed Central

    Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; De Bock, Pieter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii–targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ–stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ–mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism. PMID:27503074

  10. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain is regulated by MAPK/PI3K and confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P. Y.; Mak, D. H.; Mu, H.; Shi, Y.; Ruvolo, P.; Ruvolo, V.; Jacamo, R.; Burks, J. K.; Wei, W.; Huang, X.; Kornblau, S. M.; Andreeff, M.; Carter, B. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) protein is known to suppress both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. We previously reported that ARC expression is a strong, independent adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the regulation and role of ARC in AML. ARC expression is upregulated in AML cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and suppressed by inhibition of MAPK and PI3K signaling. AML patient samples with RAS mutations (N = 64) expressed significantly higher levels of ARC than samples without RAS mutations (N = 371) (P = 0.016). ARC overexpression protected and ARC knockdown sensitized AML cells to cytarabine and to agents that selectively induce intrinsic (ABT-737) or extrinsic (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) apoptosis. NOD-SCID mice harboring ARC-overexpressing KG-1 cells had significantly shorter survival than mice injected with control cells (median 84 versus 111 days) and significantly fewer leukemia cells were present when NOD/SCID IL2R null mice were injected with ARC knockdown as compared to control Molm13 cells (P = 0.005 and 0.03 at 2 and 3 weeks, respectively). Together, these findings demonstrate that MSCs regulate ARC in AML through activation of MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways. ARC confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML in vitro and in vivo, suggesting ARC as a novel target in AML therapy. PMID:24337870

  11. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ-mediated host defenses.

    PubMed

    Gay, Gabrielle; Braun, Laurence; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; Touquet, Bastien; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Coute, Yohann; Tardieux, Isabelle; Bougdour, Alexandre; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-08-22

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii-targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ-stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1(+) inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ-mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism.

  12. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Miguel A.; Fernández-Vázquez, José L.; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I.; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma. Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D.; González-y-Merchand, Jorge A.; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae. PMID:28278272

  13. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor.

    PubMed

    Ares, Miguel A; Fernández-Vázquez, José L; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; De la Cruz, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae.

  14. Erwinia carotovora has two KdgR-like proteins belonging to the IciR family of transcriptional regulators: identification and characterization of the RexZ activator and the KdgR repressor of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, N R; Nasser, W; McGowan, S; Sebaihia, M; Salmond, G P

    1999-07-01

    A novel Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora mutant designated RexZ, (regulator of exoenzymes) showed reduced production of the degradative exoenzymes. The rexZ gene product shows similarity of the KdgR regulatory protein from Erwinia chrysanthemi, described as the major repressor of the pectin catabolism pathway genes in the latter species. In vitro DNA-protein interaction experiments demonstrated that the synthesis of the RexZ protein is controlled by the cAMP-CRP (cAMP-receptor protein) complex. Western blot analysis also revealed the presence of a second KdgR homologue (distinct from RexZ) which, like RexZ, was present in all species of the genus Erwinia tested. The corresponding KdgR proteins from both E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica share a high level of sequence identity with the KdgR homologues from E. chrysanthemi and Escherichia coli. Although the E. carotovora subsp. carotovora rexZ regulatory region displayed specific interactions with both the purified E. chrysanthemi KdgR repressor and the partially purified E. carotovora subsp. carotovora KdgR, in vivo quantification revealed that the cellular level of RexZ protein was unaffected by the presence of pectic compounds. This study shows that the complex regulatory network governing virulence in the erwinias involves two totally distinct, but highly conserved, members of the IcIR class of DNA binding proteins: RexZ and KdgR.

  15. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  16. Plasticity in Repressor-DNA Interactions Neutralizes Loss of Symmetry in Bipartite Operators*

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepti; Narayanan, Naveen; Nair, Deepak T.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to gene regulation. Many transcription factors regulate multiple target genes and can bind sequences that do not conform strictly to the consensus. To understand the structural mechanism utilized by the transcription regulators to bind diverse target sequences, we have employed the repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis as a model system. AraR is known to bind to eight different operator sites in the bacterial genome. Although there are differences in the sequences of four of these operators, ORE1, ORX1, ORA1, and ORR3, the AraR-DNA binding domain (AraR-DBD) as well as full-length AraR unexpectedly binds to each of these sequences with similar affinities as measured by fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We have determined crystal structures of AraR-DBD in complex with two different natural operators ORE1 and ORX1 up to 2.07 and 1.97 Å resolution, respectively. These structures were compared with the previously reported structures of AraR-DBD bound to two other natural operators (ORA1 and ORR3). Interactions of two molecules of AraR-DBD with the symmetric operator, ORE1, are identical, but their interaction with the non-symmetric operator ORX1 results in breakdown of the symmetry in protein-DNA interactions. The novel interactions observed are accompanied by local conformational change in the DNA. ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data on other transcription factors has shown that they can bind to diverse targets, and hence the plasticity exhibited by AraR may be a general phenomenon. The ability of transcription factors to form alternate interactions may be important for employment in new functions and evolution of novel regulatory circuits. PMID:26511320

  17. Biophysical Basis of the Promiscuous Binding of Bcl2 Apoptotic Repressor to BH3 Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B.; Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    Bcl2 apoptotic repressor carries out its function by virtue of its ability to bind to BH3 domains of various pro-apoptotic regulators in a highly promiscuous manner. Herein, we investigate the biophysical basis of such promiscuity of Bcl2 toward its cognate BH3 ligands. Our data show that while the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif bind to Bcl2 with submicromolar affinity, those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif afford weak interactions. This implies that the replacement of alanine at the fourth position (A+4)—relative to the N-terminal leucine (L0) within the LXXXAD motif—to glycine/serine results in the loss of free energy of binding. Consistent with this notion, the A+4 residue within the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif engages in key intermolecular van der Waals contacts with A149 lining the ligand binding groove within Bcl2, while A+4G/S substitution results in the disruption of such favorable binding interactions. Of particular interest is the observation that while increasing ionic strength has little or negligible effect on the binding of high-affinity BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif, the binding of those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif in general experiences a varying degree of enhancement. This salient observation is indicative of the fact that hydrophobic forces not only play a dominant but also a universal role in driving the Bcl2-BH3 interactions. Taken together, our study sheds light on the molecular basis of the factors governing the promiscuous binding of Bcl2 to pro-apoptotic regulators and thus bears important consequences on the development of rational therapeutic approaches. PMID:23996493

  18. Investigation of Changes in Tetracycline Repressor Binding upon Mutations in the Tetracycline Operator

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tetracycline operon is an important gene network component, commonly used in synthetic biology applications because of its switch-like character. At the heart of this system is the highly specific interaction of the tet repressor protein (TetR) with its cognate DNA sequence (tetO). TetR binding on tetO practically stops expression of genes downstream of tetO by excluding RNA polymerase from binding the promoter and initiating transcription. Mutating the tetO sequence alters the strength of TetR–tetO binding and thus provides a tool to synthetic biologists to manipulate gene expression levels. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the free energy perturbation method to investigate the binding affinity of TetR to different tetO mutants. We also carry out in vivo tests in Escherichia coli for a series of promoters based on these mutants. We obtain reasonable agreement between experimental green fluorescent protein (GFP) repression levels and binding free energy differences computed from molecular simulations. In all cases, the wild-type tetO sequence yields the strongest TetR binding, which is observed both experimentally, in terms of GFP levels, and in simulation, in terms of free energy changes. Two of the four tetO mutants we tested yield relatively strong binding, whereas the other two mutants tend to be significantly weaker. The clustering and relative ranking of this subset of tetO mutants is generally consistent between our own experimental data, previous experiments with different systems and the free energy changes computed from our simulations. Overall, this work offers insights into an important synthetic biological system and demonstrates the potential, as well as limitations of molecular simulations to quantitatively explain biologically relevant behavior. PMID:25308994

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of small ligand binding to the Escherichia coli repressor of biotin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Johnson, C R; Beckett, D

    1996-04-30

    BirA is the transcriptional repressor of biotin biosynthesis and a biotin holoenzyme synthetase. It catalyzes synthesis of biotinyl-5'-AMP from the substrates biotin and ATP. The adenylate is the activated intermediate in the biotin transfer reaction as well as the positive allosteric effector for site-specific DNA binding. The affinity of BirA for the adenylate is considerably greater than its affinity for biotin, and both binding reactions are coupled to changes in the conformation of the protein. The temperature dependencies of the two binding interactions have been determined using kinetic techniques. Van't Hoff analysis of the equilibrium dissociation constants derived from the kinetic data indicate that while the two binding processes are characterized by large negative enthalpies, the entropic contributions are small for both. Binding enthalpies have also been determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Consistent with the results of the van't Hoff analyses, the calorimetric enthalpies are large and negative. The greater precision of the calorimetric measurements allowed more accurate estimation of the entropic contributions to the binding processes, which are of opposite sign for the two ligands. In addition, the heat capacity changes associated with the two binding reactions are small. The measured thermodynamic parameters for binding of biotin and bio-5'-AMP to BirA have been utilized to dissect out structural contributions to the binding energetics. Results of these calculations indicate equivalent contributions of burial of polar and apolar surface area to both binding processes. The total loss of solvent accessible surface area is, however, greater for biotin binding. The analysis indicates furthermore that although both binding reactions are coupled to losses in configurational entropy, the magnitude of the conformational change is significantly larger for biotin binding.

  20. JAZ Repressors: Potential Involvement in Nutrients Deficiency Response in Rice and Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajit P; Pandey, Bipin K; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K; Giri, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates (JA) are well-known phytohormones which play important roles in plant development and defense against pathogens. Jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are plant-specific proteins and act as transcriptional repressors of JA-responsive genes. JA regulates both biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants; however, its role in nutrient deficiency responses is very elusive. Although, JA is well-known for root growth inhibition, little is known about behavior of JAZ genes in response to nutrient deficiencies, under which root architectural alteration is an important adaptation. Using protein sequence homology and a conserved-domains approach, here we identify 10 novel JAZ genes from the recently sequenced Chickpea genome, which is one of the most nutrient efficient crops. Both rice and chickpea JAZ genes express in tissue- and stimuli-specific manners. Many of which are preferentially expressed in root. Our analysis further showed differential expression of JAZ genes under macro (NPK) and micronutrients (Zn, Fe) deficiency in rice and chickpea roots. While both rice and chickpea JAZ genes showed a certain level of specificity toward type of nutrient deficiency, generally majority of them showed induction under K deficiency. Generally, JAZ genes showed an induction at early stages of stress and expression declined at later stages of macro-nutrient deficiency. Our results suggest that JAZ genes might play a role in early nutrient deficiency response both in monocot and dicot roots, and information generated here can be further used for understanding the possible roles of JA in root architectural alterations for nutrient deficiency adaptations.

  1. The RpiR-like repressor IolR regulates inositol catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Petra R A; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-10-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and D-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5'-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3') in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-D-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA.

  2. Nuclear translocation of {alpha}N-catenin by the novel zinc finger transcriptional repressor ZASC1

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaerts, Sven; Vanlandschoot, Ann; Hengel, Jolanda van; Roy, Frans van . E-mail: F.Vanroy@dmbr.UGent.be

    2005-11-15

    Alpha-catenins anchor the transmembrane cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin indirectly to the actin cytoskeleton through interaction with {beta}-catenin or plakoglobin. Three different {alpha}-catenins are known at present: {alpha}E-, {alpha}T-, and {alpha}N-catenin. Despite their different expression patterns, no functional differences between the {alpha}-catenins are known. In a yeast two-hybrid screening with {alpha}N-catenin as bait, we identified the Cys{sub 2}-His{sub 2} zinc finger protein ZASC1. The mRNA and protein of ZASC1 were ubiquitously expressed in various cell lines and human tissues. Our results suggest an association of the ZASC1 protein with DNA, and luciferase reporter assays revealed that ZASC1 is a transcriptional repressor. Upon transient overexpression, the ZASC1 protein localized in the nucleus, to where it was able to recruit cytoplasmic {alpha}N-catenin. Neither the highly related {alpha}E-catenin nor {alpha}T-catenin interacted with ZASC1. By interchanging parts of {alpha}N-catenin and {alpha}E-catenin cDNAs, we were able to narrow down the interaction region of {alpha}N-catenin to two limited amino-terminal regions. On the other hand, the interaction of ZASC1 with {alpha}N-catenin can be mediated by the domain comprising zinc fingers six to eight of ZASC1. The interaction and nuclear cotranslocation of a neural {alpha}-catenin with a putative proto-oncogene product as reported here provides novel insights into the signaling functions of {alpha}-catenins.

  3. Deregulation of polycomb repressor complex 1 modifier AUTS2 in T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A.F.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified deregulated expression of the B-cell specific transcription factor MEF2C in T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we performed sequence analysis of a regulatory upstream section of MEF2C in T-ALL cell lines which, however, proved devoid of mutations. Unexpectedly, we found strong conservation between the regulatory upstream region of MEF2C (located at chromosomal band 5q14) and an intergenic stretch at 7q11 located between STAG3L4 and AUTS2, covering nearly 20 kb. While the non-coding gene STAG3L4 was inconspicuously expressed, AUTS2 was aberrantly upregulated in 6% of T-ALL patients (public dataset GSE42038) and in 3/24 T-ALL cell lines, two of which represented very immature differentiation stages. AUTS2 expression was higher in normal B-cells than in T-cells, indicating lineage-specific activity in lymphopoiesis. While excluding chromosomal aberrations, examinations of AUTS2 transcriptional regulation in T-ALL cells revealed activation by IL7-IL7R-STAT5-signalling and MEF2C. AUTS2 protein has been shown to interact with polycomb repressor complex 1 subtype 5 (PRC1.5), transforming this particular complex into an activator. Accordingly, expression profiling and functional analyses demonstrated that AUTS2 activated while PCGF5 repressed transcription of NKL homeobox gene MSX1 in T-ALL cells. Forced expression and pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 in addition to H3K27me3 analysis indicated that PRC2 repressed MSX1 as well. Taken together, we found that AUTS2 and MEF2C, despite lying on different chromosomes, share strikingly similar regulatory upstream regions and aberrant expression in T-ALL subsets. Our data implicate chromatin complexes PRC1/AUTS2 and PRC2 in a gene network in T-ALL regulating early lymphoid differentiation. PMID:27322685

  4. The Transcription Repressor REST in Adult Neurons: Physiology, Pathology, and Diseases1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract REST [RE1-silencing transcription factor (also called neuron-restrictive silencer factor)] is known to repress thousands of possible target genes, many of which are neuron specific. To date, REST repression has been investigated mostly in stem cells and differentiating neurons. Current evidence demonstrates its importance in adult neurons as well. Low levels of REST, which are acquired during differentiation, govern the expression of specific neuronal phenotypes. REST-dependent genes encode important targets, including transcription factors, transmitter release proteins, voltage-dependent and receptor channels, and signaling proteins. Additional neuronal properties depend on miRNAs expressed reciprocally to REST and on specific splicing factors. In adult neurons, REST levels are not always low. Increases occur during aging in healthy humans. Moreover, extensive evidence demonstrates that prolonged stimulation with various agents induces REST increases, which are associated with the repression of neuron-specific genes with appropriate, intermediate REST binding affinity. Whether neuronal increases in REST are protective or detrimental remains a subject of debate. Examples of CA1 hippocampal neuron protection upon depolarization, and of neurodegeneration upon glutamate treatment and hypoxia have been reported. REST participation in psychiatric and neurological diseases has been shown, especially in Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease, as well as epilepsy. Distinct, complex roles of the repressor in these different diseases have emerged. In conclusion, REST is certainly very important in a large number of conditions. We suggest that the conflicting results reported for the role of REST in physiology, pathology, and disease depend on its complex, direct, and indirect actions on many gene targets and on the diverse approaches used during the investigations. PMID:26465007

  5. Effects of physical, ionic, and structural factors on the binding of repressor of mycobacteriophage L1 to its cognate operator DNA.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Tridib; Chanda, Palas K; Bandhu, Amitava; Chattoraj, Partho; Das, Malabika; Sau, Subrata

    2006-01-01

    To determine the factors influencing the binding of L1 repressor to its cognate operator DNA, several gel shift as well as bioinformatic analyses have been carried out. The data show that time, temperature, salt, and pH each greatly affect the binding. In order to achieve optimum operator binding of L1 repressor in Tris buffer, the minimum requirements of time, temperature, salt, and pH were estimated to be 1 min, 32 degrees C, NaCl (50 mM), and 7.9, respectively. Interestingly Na+ but not NH4+, K+, or Li+ was found to augment significantly the binding activity of CI protein above the basal level. Anions like Cl-, citrate-, acetate-, and H2PO4- do not alter the binding of L1 repressor to its operator. We also show that an in frame deletion mutant of L1 repressor which does not carry the putative HTH motif (at its N-terminal end) fails to bind to its cognate operator DNA even at very high concentrations. The putative HTH motif was found highly conserved and evolutionarily very close to that of regulatory proteins of Y. pestis, H. marismortui, A. tumefaciens, etc. Taken together we suggest that N-terminal end of L1 repressor carries a HTH motif. Further analysis of the putative secondary structures of mycobacteriophage repressors reveals that two common regions encompassing more than 90% of primary sequence are present in all the four repressor molecules studied here. The results suggest that these common regions are utilized for carrying out identical functions.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of WdTUP1, a gene that encodes a potential transcriptional repressor important for yeast-hyphal transitions in Wangiella (Exophiala) dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbo; Abramczyk, Dariusz; Cooper, Chester R; Zheng, Li; Park, Changwon; Szaniszlo, Paul. J.

    2008-01-01

    The general transcriptional repressor Tup1p is known to influence cell development in many fungi. To determine whether the Tup1p ortholog (WdTup1p) of Wangiella dermatitidis also influences cellular development in this melanized, polymorphic human pathogen, the gene (WdTUP1) that encodes this transcription factor was isolated, sequenced and disrupted. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the WdTup1p sequence was closely related to homologues in other polymorphic, conidiogenous fungi. Disruption of WdTUP1 produced mutants (wdtup1Δ) with pronounced growth and cellular abnormalities, including slow growth on various agar media and exclusively as a filamentous morphotype in liquid media. We concluded that WdTup1p represents an important switch regulator that controls the yeast-to-filamentous growth transition. However, detailed observations of the filamentous growth of the disruption mutant showed that the hyphae produced by the wdtup1Δ mutants, unlike those of the wild type, were arrested at a stage prior to the formation of true hyphae and subsequent conidia production. PMID:18061494

  7. The banana fruit Dof transcription factor MaDof23 acts as a repressor and interacts with MaERF9 in regulating ripening-related genes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bi-hong; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fan, Zhong-qi; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-04-01

    The DNA binding with one finger (Dof) proteins, a family of plant-specific transcription factors, are involved in a variety of plant biological processes. However, little information is available on their involvement in fruit ripening. We have characterized 25 MaDof genes from banana fruit (Musa acuminata), designated as MaDof1-MaDof25 Gene expression analysis in fruit subjected to different ripening conditions revealed that MaDofs were differentially expressed during different stages of ripening. MaDof10, 23, 24, and 25 were ethylene-inducible and nuclear-localized, and their transcript levels increased during fruit ripening. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses demonstrated a physical interaction between MaDof23 and MaERF9, a potential regulator of fruit ripening reported in a previous study. We determined that MaDof23 is a transcriptional repressor, whereas MaERF9 is a transcriptional activator. We suggest that they might act antagonistically in regulating 10 ripening-related genes, including MaEXP1/2/3/5, MaXET7, MaPG1, MaPME3, MaPL2, MaCAT, and MaPDC, which are associated with cell wall degradation and aroma formation. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the transcriptional regulation network controlling banana fruit ripening.

  8. The banana fruit Dof transcription factor MaDof23 acts as a repressor and interacts with MaERF9 in regulating ripening-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bi-hong; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fan, Zhong-qi; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-01-01

    The DNA binding with one finger (Dof) proteins, a family of plant-specific transcription factors, are involved in a variety of plant biological processes. However, little information is available on their involvement in fruit ripening. We have characterized 25 MaDof genes from banana fruit (Musa acuminata), designated as MaDof1–MaDof25. Gene expression analysis in fruit subjected to different ripening conditions revealed that MaDofs were differentially expressed during different stages of ripening. MaDof10, 23, 24, and 25 were ethylene-inducible and nuclear-localized, and their transcript levels increased during fruit ripening. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses demonstrated a physical interaction between MaDof23 and MaERF9, a potential regulator of fruit ripening reported in a previous study. We determined that MaDof23 is a transcriptional repressor, whereas MaERF9 is a transcriptional activator. We suggest that they might act antagonistically in regulating 10 ripening-related genes, including MaEXP1/2/3/5, MaXET7, MaPG1, MaPME3, MaPL2, MaCAT, and MaPDC, which are associated with cell wall degradation and aroma formation. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the transcriptional regulation network controlling banana fruit ripening. PMID:26889012

  9. NSPc1 is a cell growth regulator that acts as a transcriptional repressor of p21Waf1/Cip1 via the RARE element

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yanhua; Yue, Jiping; Wu, Xudong; Wang, Xu; Wen, Jianyan; Lu, Lifang; Peng, Xiaozhong; Qiang, Boqin; Yuan, Jiangang

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian polycomb group proteins play an important role in cell cycle control and tumorigenesis. Nervous system polycomb 1 (NSPc1) is a newly identified transcription repressor, highly homologous with PcG protein Bmi-1. In this article, we showed that NSPc1 could promote tumor cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Semi-quantitative RT–PCR showed that NSPc1 did not affect the expression levels of most Cyclin-depentent kinases (CDK) inhibitors except for p21Waf1/Cip1. Repression activity assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and DNA pulldown assays all verified that NSPc1 represses the expression of p21Waf1/Cip1 by binding to the (−1357 to −1083) region of the p21Waf1/Cip1 promoter in vivo, and the repression effect is dependent on the retinoid acid response element (RARE element) within the above region of the p21Waf1/Cip1 promoter. Further analysis showed that NSPc1 could compete the RARE element site with RA receptors both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that NSPc1 has a positive role in tumor cell growth by down-regulating p21Waf1/Cip1 via the RARE element, which directly connects transcriptional repression of PcGs to CDKIs and RA signaling pathways. PMID:17088287

  10. Lymphoid progenitor cells from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia are functionally deficient and express high levels of the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1.

    PubMed

    Purizaca, Jessica; Contreras-Quiroz, Adriana; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Vadillo, Eduardo; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Fuentes-Figueroa, Silvestre; Villagomez-Barragán, Horacio; Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Alvarado-Moreno, Antonio; Mayani, Hector; Meza, Isaura; Hernandez, Rosaura; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Pelayo, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent malignancy of childhood. Substantial progress on understanding the cell hierarchy within ALL bone marrow (BM) has been recorded in the last few years, suggesting that both primitive cell fractions and committed lymphoid blasts with immature stem cell-like properties contain leukemia-initiating cells. Nevertheless, the biology of the early progenitors that initiate the lymphoid program remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of lymphoid progenitors from B-cell precursor ALL BM to proliferate and undergo multilineage differentiation. By phenotype analyses, in vitro proliferation assays, and controlled culture systems, the lymphoid differentiation potentials were evaluated in BM primitive populations from B-cell precursor ALL pediatric patients. When compared to their normal counterparts, functional stem and progenitor cell contents were substantially reduced in ALL BM. Moreover, neither B nor NK or dendritic lymphoid-cell populations developed recurrently from highly purified ALL-lymphoid progenitors, and their proliferation and cell cycle status revealed limited proliferative capacity. Interestingly, a number of quiescence-associated transcription factors were elevated, including the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1, which was highly expressed in primitive CD34⁺ cells. Together, our findings reveal major functional defects in the primitive hematopoietic component of ALL BM. A possible contribution of high levels of Gfi-1 expression in the regulation of the stem/progenitor cell biology is suggested.

  11. Characterization of novel DeoR-family member from the Streptomyces ahygroscopicus strain CK-15 that acts as a repressor of morphological development.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beibei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Binghua; Zhao, Wenjun; Zhang, Kecheng

    2016-10-01

    Wuyiencin is produced by Streptomyces ahygroscopicus var. wuyiensis, which has been widely used in China as an industrially produced biopesticide to control various fungal diseases. Although its mechanism of action, breeding, and fermentation had been extensively characterized, less is known about the regulatory functions that affect its biosynthesis or morphological development. The wysR3 gene of S. ahygroscopicus strain CK-15, a novel member of the DeoR family of regulatory genes, was assessed to determine its function by gene knockdown. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that DeoR family proteins derived from the same source are likely to be a single branch in a phylogenetic tree and show that wysR3 acts as a repressor for its morphological development without effecting wuyiencin production. We found that the ΔwysR3 strain can grow quickly to reach a plateau stage of maximum biomass at 60 h, which is ∼12 h faster than the wild-type strain. In the industrial fermentation production process, the ΔwysR3 strain can reduce consumption and save both time and money.

  12. KorSA from the Streptomyces Integrative Element pSAM2 Is a Central Transcriptional Repressor: Target Genes and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sezonov, Guennadi; Possoz, Christophe; Friedmann, Annick; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Guérineau, Michel

    2000-01-01

    pSAM2, a 10.9-kb mobile integrative genetic element from Streptomyces ambofaciens, possesses, as do a majority of Streptomyces conjugative plasmids, a kil-kor system associated with its transfer. The kor function of pSAM2 was attributed to the korSA gene, but its direct role remained unclear. The present study was focused on the determination of the KorSA targets. It was shown that KorSA acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a conserved 17-nucleotide sequence found upstream of only two genes: its own gene, korSA, and pra, a gene positively controlling pSAM2 replication, integration, and excision. A unique feature of KorSA, compared to Kor proteins from other Streptomyces conjugative plasmids, is that it does not directly regulate pSAM2 transfer. KorSA does not bind to the pSAM2 genes coding for transfer and intramycelial spreading. Through the repression of pra, KorSA is able to negatively regulate pSAM2 functions activated by Pra and, consequently, to maintain pSAM2 integrated in the chromosome. PMID:10671443

  13. KorSA from the Streptomyces integrative element pSAM2 is a central transcriptional repressor: target genes and binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sezonov, G; Possoz, C; Friedmann, A; Pernodet, J L; Guérineau, M

    2000-03-01

    pSAM2, a 10.9-kb mobile integrative genetic element from Streptomyces ambofaciens, possesses, as do a majority of Streptomyces conjugative plasmids, a kil-kor system associated with its transfer. The kor function of pSAM2 was attributed to the korSA gene, but its direct role remained unclear. The present study was focused on the determination of the KorSA targets. It was shown that KorSA acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a conserved 17-nucleotide sequence found upstream of only two genes: its own gene, korSA, and pra, a gene positively controlling pSAM2 replication, integration, and excision. A unique feature of KorSA, compared to Kor proteins from other Streptomyces conjugative plasmids, is that it does not directly regulate pSAM2 transfer. KorSA does not bind to the pSAM2 genes coding for transfer and intramycelial spreading. Through the repression of pra, KorSA is able to negatively regulate pSAM2 functions activated by Pra and, consequently, to maintain pSAM2 integrated in the chromosome.

  14. Analysis of a sugar response mutant of Arabidopsis identified a novel B3 domain protein that functions as an active transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Saijo, Takanori; Shibata, Daisuke; Morikami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Kenzo

    2005-06-01

    A recessive mutation hsi2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing luciferase (LUC) under control of a short promoter derived from a sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamin gene (Spo(min)LUC) caused enhanced LUC expression under both low- and high-sugar conditions, which was not due to increased level of abscisic acid. The hsi2 mutant contained a nonsense mutation in a gene encoding a protein with B3 DNA-binding domain. HSI2 and two other Arabidopsis proteins appear to constitute a novel subfamily of B3 domain proteins distinct from ABI3, FUS3, and LEC2, which are transcription activators involved in seed development. The C-terminal part of HSI2 subfamily proteins contained a sequence similar to the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. Deletion of the C-terminal portion of HSI2 lost in the hsi2 mutant caused reduced nuclear targeting of HSI2. Null allele of HSI2 showed even higher Spo(min)LUC expression than the hsi2 mutant, whereas overexpression of HSI2 reduced the LUC expression. Transient coexpression of 35SHSI2 with Spo(min)LUC in protoplasts repressed the expression of LUC activity, and deletion or mutation of the EAR motif significantly reduced the repression activity of HSI2. These results indicate that HSI2 and related proteins are B3 domain-EAR motif active transcription repressors.

  15. Lac Repressor Mediated DNA Looping: Monte Carlo Simulation of Constrained DNA Molecules Complemented with Current Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Biton, Yoav Y.; Kumar, Sandip; Dunlap, David; Swigon, David

    2014-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments can be used to detect time-resolved loop formation in a single DNA molecule by measuring changes in the length of a DNA tether. Interpretation of such experiments is greatly aided by computer simulations of DNA looping which allow one to analyze the structure of the looped DNA and estimate DNA-protein binding constants specific for the loop formation process. We here present a new Monte Carlo scheme for accurate simulation of DNA configurations subject to geometric constraints and apply this method to Lac repressor mediated DNA looping, comparing the simulation results with new experimental data obtained by the TPM technique. Our simulations, taking into account the details of attachment of DNA ends and fluctuations of the looped subsegment of the DNA, reveal the origin of the double-peaked distribution of RMS values observed by TPM experiments by showing that the average RMS value for anti-parallel loop types is smaller than that of parallel loop types. The simulations also reveal that the looping probabilities for the anti-parallel loop types are significantly higher than those of the parallel loop types, even for loops of length 600 and 900 base pairs, and that the correct proportion between the heights of the peaks in the distribution can only be attained when loops with flexible Lac repressor conformation are taken into account. Comparison of the in silico and in vitro results yields estimates for the dissociation constants characterizing the binding affinity between O1 and Oid DNA operators and the dimeric arms of the Lac repressor. PMID:24800809

  16. Structural and Functional Analysis of SmeT, the Repressor of the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Multidrug Efflux Pump SmeDEF*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Alvaro; Maté, María J.; Sánchez-Díaz, Patricia C.; Romero, Antonio; Rojo, Fernando; Martínez, José L.

    2009-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic pathogen characterized for its intrinsic low susceptibility to several antibiotics. Part of this low susceptibility relies on the expression of chromosomally encoded multidrug efflux pumps, with SmeDEF being the most relevant antibiotic resistance efflux pump so far studied in this bacterial species. Expression of smeDEF is down-regulated by the SmeT repressor, encoded upstream smeDEF, in its complementary DNA strand. In the present article we present the crystal structure of SmeT and analyze its interactions with its cognate operator. Like other members of the TetR family of transcriptional repressors, SmeT behaves as a dimer and presents some common structural features with other TetR proteins like TtgR, QacR, and TetR. Differing from other TetR proteins for which the structure is available, SmeT turned out to have two extensions at the N and C termini that might be relevant for its function. Besides, SmeT presents the smallest binding pocket so far described in the TetR family of transcriptional repressors, which may correlate with a specific type and range of effectors. In vitro studies revealed that SmeT binds to a 28-bp pseudopalindromic region, forming two complexes. This operator region was found to overlap the promoters of smeT and smeDEF. This finding is consistent with a role for SmeT simultaneously down-regulating smeT and smeDEF transcription, likely by steric hindrance on RNA polymerase binding to DNA. PMID:19324881

  17. Study of a noncovalent trp repressor: DNA operator complex by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Potier, N; Donald, L J; Chernushevich, I; Ayed, A; Ens, W; Arrowsmith, C H; Standing, K G; Duckworth, H W

    1998-06-01

    Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS) has been used to study noncovalent interactions between the trp apo-repressor (TrpR), its co-repressor tryptophan and its specific operator DNA. In 5 mM ammonium acetate, TrpR was detected as a partially unfolded monomer. In the presence of a 21-base-pair DNA possessing the two symmetrically arranged CTAG consensus sequences required for specific TrpR binding, a homodimer-dsDNA complex with a 1:1 stoichiometry was observed. Co-repressor was not needed for the complex to form under our experimental conditions. Collision induced dissociation (CID-MS) revealed that this complex was very stable in the gas phase since dissociation was achieved only at energies that also broke covalent bonds. We saw no evidence for the presence of the six water molecules that mediate the interaction between the protein and the DNA in the crystal structure. To check the binding specificity of the TrpR for its target DNA, a competitive experiment was undertaken: the protein was mixed with an equimolar amount of three different DNAs in which the two CTAG sequences were separated by 2, 4, and 6 bp, respectively. Only the DNA with the correct consensus spacing of 4 bp was able to form stable interactions with TrpR. This experiment demonstrates the potential of ESI-MS to test the sequence-specificity of protein-DNA complexes. The interactions between the TrpR-DNA complex and 5-methyl-, L- and D-tryptophan were also investigated. Two molecules of 5-methyl- or L-tryptophan were bound with high affinity to the TrpR-DNA complex. On the other hand, D-tryptophan appeared to bind to the complex with poor specificity and poor affinity.

  18. Study of a noncovalent trp repressor: DNA operator complex by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Potier, N.; Donald, L. J.; Chernushevich, I.; Ayed, A.; Ens, W.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Standing, K. G.; Duckworth, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS) has been used to study noncovalent interactions between the trp apo-repressor (TrpR), its co-repressor tryptophan and its specific operator DNA. In 5 mM ammonium acetate, TrpR was detected as a partially unfolded monomer. In the presence of a 21-base-pair DNA possessing the two symmetrically arranged CTAG consensus sequences required for specific TrpR binding, a homodimer-dsDNA complex with a 1:1 stoichiometry was observed. Co-repressor was not needed for the complex to form under our experimental conditions. Collision induced dissociation (CID-MS) revealed that this complex was very stable in the gas phase since dissociation was achieved only at energies that also broke covalent bonds. We saw no evidence for the presence of the six water molecules that mediate the interaction between the protein and the DNA in the crystal structure. To check the binding specificity of the TrpR for its target DNA, a competitive experiment was undertaken: the protein was mixed with an equimolar amount of three different DNAs in which the two CTAG sequences were separated by 2, 4, and 6 bp, respectively. Only the DNA with the correct consensus spacing of 4 bp was able to form stable interactions with TrpR. This experiment demonstrates the potential of ESI-MS to test the sequence-specificity of protein-DNA complexes. The interactions between the TrpR-DNA complex and 5-methyl-, L- and D-tryptophan were also investigated. Two molecules of 5-methyl- or L-tryptophan were bound with high affinity to the TrpR-DNA complex. On the other hand, D-tryptophan appeared to bind to the complex with poor specificity and poor affinity. PMID:9655343

  19. BTG2 is an LXXLL-dependent co-repressor for androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Meng, Qing-Hui; Xu, Jia-Ying; Jiao, Yang; Ge, Chun-Min; Jacob, Asha; Wang, Ping; Rosen, Eliot M; Fan, Saijun

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} BTG2 associates with AR, androgen causes an increase of the interaction. {yields} BTG2 as a co-repressor inhibits the AR-mediated transcription activity. {yields} BTG2 inhibits the transcription activity and expression of PSA. {yields} An intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is essential and necessary for these activities of BTG2, while the {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif is not required. {yields} Ectopic expression of BTG2 reduces proliferation of prostate cancer cells. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor gene, BTG2 has been down-regulated in prostate cancer and the ectopic expression of this gene has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Sequence analysis revealed that the BTG2 protein contains two leucine-rich motifs ({sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} and {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96}), which are usually found in nuclear receptor co-factors. Based on this, we postulated that there will be an association between BTG2 and AR. In this study, we discovered that BTG2 directly bound to the androgen receptor (AR) in the absence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and in the presence of the androgen, this interaction was increased. BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif bound to AR equally efficient as the wild-type BTG2, while BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif failed to interact with AR. Functional studies indicated that ectopic expression of BTG2 caused a significant inhibition of AR-mediated transcriptional activity and a decreased growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen-induced promoter activation and expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are significantly attenuated by BTG2. The intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is required for these activities. These findings, for the first time, demonstrate that BTG2 complexes with AR via an LxxLL-dependent mechanism and may play a role in prostate cancer via modulating the AR signaling pathway.

  20. The use of side-chain packing methods in modeling bacteriophage repressor and cro proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S. Y.; Subbiah, S.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that the coordinates of the main-chain atoms alone are sufficient to determine the side-chain conformations of buried residues of compact proteins. Given a perfect backbone, the side-chain packing method can predict the side-chain conformations to an accuracy as high as 1.2 A RMS deviation (RMSD) with greater than 80% of the chi angles correct. However, similarly rigorous studies have not been conducted to determine how well these apply, if at all, to the more important problem of homology modeling per se. Specifically, if the available backbone is imperfect, as expected for practical application of homology modeling, can packing constraints alone achieve sufficiently accurate predictions to be useful? Here, by systematically applying such methods to the pairwise modeling of two repressor and two cro proteins from the closely related bacteriophages 434 and P22, we find that when the backbone RMSD is 0.8 A, the prediction on buried side chain is accurate with an RMS error of 1.8 A and approximately 70% of the chi angles correctly predicted. When the backbone RMSD is larger, in the range of 1.6-1.8 A, the prediction quality is still significantly better than random, with RMS error at 2.2 A on the buried side chains and 60% accuracy on chi angles. Together these results suggest the following rules-of-thumb for homology modeling of buried side chains. When the sequence identity between the modeled sequence and the template sequence is > 50% (or, equivalently, the expected backbone RMSD is < 1 A), side-chain packing methods work well. When sequence identity is between 30-50%, reflecting a backbone RMS error of 1-2 A, it is still valid to use side-chain packing methods to predict the buried residues, albeit with care. When sequence identity is below 30% (or backbone RMS error greater than 2 A), the backbone constraint alone is unlikely to produce useful models. Other methods, such as those involving the use of database

  1. Probing the role of water in the tryptophan repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. P.; Grillo, A. O.; Boyer, M.; Royer, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Escherichia coli tryptophan repressor protein (TR) represses the transcription of several genes in response to the concentration of tryptophan in the environment. In the co-crystal structure of TR bound to a DNA fragment containing its target very few direct contacts between TR and the DNA were observed. In contrast, a number of solvent mediated contacts were apparent. NMR solution structures, however, did not resolve any solvent mediated bonds at the complex interface. To probe for the role of water in TR operator recognition, the effect of osmolytes on the interactions between TR and a target oligonucleotide bearing the operator site was examined. In the absence of specific solvent mediated hydrogen bonding interactions between the protein and the DNA, increasing osmolyte concentration is expected to strongly stabilize the TR operator interaction due to the large amount of macromolecular surface area buried upon complexation. The results of our studies indicate that xylose did not alter the binding affinity significantly, while glycerol and PEG had a small stabilizing effect. A study of binding as a function of betaine concentration revealed that this osmolyte at low concentration results in a stabilization of the 1:1 TR/operator complex, but at higher concentrations leads to a switching between binding modes to favor tandem binding. Analysis of the effects of betaine on the 1:1 complex suggest that this osmolyte has about 78% of the expected effect. If one accepts the analysis in terms of the number of water molecules excluded upon complexation, these results suggest that about 75 water molecules remain at the interface of the 1:1 dimer/DNA complex. This value is consistent with the number of water molecules found at the interface in the crystallographically determined structure and supports the notion that interfacial waters play an important thermodynamic role in the specific complexation of one TR dimer with its target DNA. However, the complexity of the

  2. Regulation of the dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is governed by HspR, an autoregulatory repressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bucca, G; Hindle, Z; Smith, C P

    1997-01-01

    The dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor contains four genes (5'-dnaK-grpE-dnaJ-hspR). The fourth gene encodes a novel heat shock protein, HspR, which appears so far to be unique to the high-G+C actinomycete group of bacteria. HspR binds with high specificity to three inverted repeat sequences in the promoter region of the S. coelicolor dnaK operon, strongly suggesting a direct role for HspR in heat shock gene regulation. Here we present genetic and biochemical evidence that HspR is the repressor of the dnaK operon. Disruption of hspR leads to high-level constitutive transcription of the dnaK operon. Parallel transcriptional analyses of groESL1 and groEL2 expression demonstrated that heat shock regulation of the groE genes was essentially unaffected in an hspR null mutant, although the basal (uninduced) level of groEL2 transcription was slightly elevated compared with the wild type. The results of HspR titration experiments, where the dnaK operon promoter region was cloned at ca. 50 copies per chromosome, were consistent with the prediction that HspR functions as a negative autoregulator. His-tagged HspR, overproduced and purified from Escherichia coli, was shown to repress transcription from the dnaK operon promoter in vitro, providing additional evidence for the proposal that HspR directly regulates transcription of the dnaK operon. These studies indicate that there are at least two transcriptional mechanisms for controlling heat shock genes in S. coelicolor--one controlling the dnaK operon and another controlling the groE genes. PMID:9324243

  3. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Noreen F.; Weaver, Jessica D.; Cram, Erin J.; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:27467510

  4. Oligogalacturonide-auxin antagonism does not require posttranscriptional gene silencing or stabilization of auxin response repressors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Savatin, Daniel V; Ferrari, Simone; Sicilia, Francesca; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2011-11-01

    α-1-4-Linked oligogalacturonides (OGs) derived from plant cell walls are a class of damage-associated molecular patterns and well-known elicitors of the plant immune response. Early transcript changes induced by OGs largely overlap those induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellin, a well-characterized microbe-associated molecular pattern, although responses diverge over time. OGs also regulate growth and development of plant cells and organs, due to an auxin-antagonistic activity. The molecular basis of this antagonism is still unknown. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), OGs inhibit adventitious root formation induced by auxin in leaf explants as well as the expression of several auxin-responsive genes. Genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological experiments indicate that inhibition of auxin responses by OGs does not require ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid signaling and is independent of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOGUE D-mediated reactive oxygen species production. Free indole-3-acetic acid levels are not noticeably altered by OGs. Notably, OG- as well as flg22-auxin antagonism does not involve any of the following mechanisms: (1) stabilization of auxin-response repressors; (2) decreased levels of auxin receptor transcripts through the action of microRNAs. Our results suggest that OGs and flg22 antagonize auxin responses independently of Aux/Indole-3-Acetic Acid repressor stabilization and of posttranscriptional gene silencing.

  5. The Banana Transcriptional Repressor MaDEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhong-qi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fu, Chang-chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Ye, Yu-jie; Lu, Wang-jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-wu; Chen, Jian-ye

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as MaDEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that MaDEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, MaDEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, MaDEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including MaEXP1/3, MaPG1, MaXTH10, MaPL3, and MaPME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that MaDEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening. PMID:27462342

  6. Cell type-specific regulation of von Willebrand factor expression by the E4BP4 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Hough, Christine; Cuthbert, Carla D; Notley, Colleen; Brown, Christine; Hegadorn, Carol; Berber, Ergul; Lillicrap, David

    2005-02-15

    Mechanisms of tissue-restricted patterns of von Willebrand factor (VWF) expression involve activators and repressors that limit expression to endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. The relative transcriptional activity of the proximal VWF promoter was assessed in VWF-producing and -nonproducing cells, and promoter activity was highest in endothelial cells followed by megakaryocytes. Only basal VWF promoter activity was seen in nonendothelial cells. Here we identify a negative response element located at nucleotides (nts) +96/+105 and demonstrate, using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis, that in vivo this sequence interacts with the E4BP4 transcriptional repressor. Differences in size and relative abundance of nuclear E4BP4 were observed. In HepG2 cells, low levels of larger forms of E4BP4 are present that directly interact with the negative response element. In VWF-expressing cells, high levels of smaller forms predominate with no evidence of direct DNA binding. However, in endothelial cells, mutation of the VWF E4BP4 binding motif not only restores but also further elevates VWF promoter activity, suggesting that E4BP4 may be part of a coordinated binding complex. These observations implicate this binding motif in repressing both activated and basal levels of VWF transcription by different cell type-specific mechanisms, and support the hypothesis that E4BP4 sequesters negative regulators of transcription, thereby enhancing activated gene expression.

  7. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A.; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M.; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G.; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Olszewski, Neil E.; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein–protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors—PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)—that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. PMID:26773002

  8. LexA repressor forms stable dimers in solution. The role of specific dna in tightening protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohana-Borges, R; Pacheco, A B; Sousa, F J; Foguel, D; Almeida, D F; Silva, J L

    2000-02-18

    Cooperativity in the interactions among proteins subunits and DNA is crucial for DNA recognition. LexA repressor was originally thought to bind DNA as a monomer, with cooperativity leading to tighter binding of the second monomer. The main support for this model was a high value of the dissociation constant for the LexA dimer (micromolar range). Here we show that the protein is a dimer at nanomolar concentrations under different conditions. The reversible dissociation of LexA dimer was investigated by the effects of hydrostatic pressure or urea, using fluorescence emission and polarization to monitor the dissociation process. The dissociation constant lies in the picomolar range (lower than 20 pM). LexA monomers associate with an unusual large volume change (340 ml/mol), indicating the burial of a large surface area upon dimerization. Whereas nonspecific DNA has no stabilizing effect, specific DNA induces tightening of the dimer and a 750-fold decrease in the K(d). In contrast to the previous model, a tight dimer rather than a monomer is the functional repressor. Accordingly, the LexA dimer only loses its ability to recognize a specific DNA sequence by RecA-induced autoproteolysis. Our work provides insights into the linkage between protein-protein interactions, DNA recognition, and DNA repair.

  9. Structure and Function of the Su(H)-Hairless Repressor Complex, the Major Antagonist of Notch Signaling in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Rubben; Preiss, Anette; Maier, Dieter; Kovall, Rhett A.

    2016-01-01

    Notch is a conserved signaling pathway that specifies cell fates in metazoans. Receptor-ligand interactions induce changes in gene expression, which is regulated by the transcription factor CBF1/Su(H)/Lag-1 (CSL). CSL interacts with coregulators to repress and activate transcription from Notch target genes. While the molecular details of the activator complex are relatively well understood, the structure-function of CSL-mediated repressor complexes is poorly defined. In Drosophila, the antagonist Hairless directly binds Su(H) (the fly CSL ortholog) to repress transcription from Notch targets. Here, we determine the X-ray structure of the Su(H)-Hairless complex bound to DNA. Hairless binding produces a large conformational change in Su(H) by interacting with residues in the hydrophobic core of Su(H), illustrating the structural plasticity of CSL molecules to interact with different binding partners. Based on the structure, we designed mutants in Hairless and Su(H) that affect binding, but do not affect formation of the activator complex. These mutants were validated in vitro by isothermal titration calorimetry and yeast two- and three-hybrid assays. Moreover, these mutants allowed us to solely characterize the repressor function of Su(H) in vivo. PMID:27404588

  10. A SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 transcriptional repressor complex promotes TGF-β mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Theresa; Neve, Etienne P. A.; Johnson, Jill R.; Kukalev, Alexander; Rojo, Federico; Albanell, Joan; Pietras, Kristian; Virtanen, Ismo; Philipson, Lennart; Leopold, Philip L.; Crystal, Ronald G.; de Herreros, Antonio Garcia; Moustakas, Aristidis; Pettersson, Ralf F.; Fuxe, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) are essential for organogenesis and triggered in carcinoma progression into an invasive state1. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) cooperates with signalling pathways, such as Ras and Wnt, to induce EMT2-5, but the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Here, we report that SMAD3 and SMAD4 interact and form a complex with SNAIL1, a transcriptional repressor and promoter of EMT6, 7. The SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 complex was targeted to the gene promoters of CAR, a tight junction protein, and E-cadherin during TGF-β-driven EMT in breast epithelial cells. SNAIL1 and SMAD3/4 acted as co-repressors of CAR, occludin, claudin-3 and E-cadherin promoters in transfected cells. Conversely, co-silencing of SNAIL1 and SMAD4 by siRNA inhibited the repression of CAR and occludin during EMT. Moreover, loss of CAR and E-cadherin correlated with nuclear co-expression of SNAIL1 and SMAD3/4 in a mouse model of breast carcinoma and at the invasive fronts of human breast cancer. We propose that activation of a SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 transcriptional complex represents a novel mechanism of gene repression during EMT. PMID:19597490

  11. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Olszewski, Neil E; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein-protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors-PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development.

  12. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Justin L; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2014-12-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR [Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor] represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60' interprotomer cross-links, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR.

  13. TOP mRNAs are translationally inhibited by a titratable repressor in both wheat germ extract and reticulocyte lysate.

    PubMed

    Biberman, Y; Meyuhas, O

    1999-08-13

    Vertebrate TOP mRNAs contain a 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5' TOP), which is subject to selective translational repression in non-growing cells or in cell-free translation systems. In the present study, we monitored in vitro the effect of increasing amounts of a 16 nucleotides long oligoribonucleotide representing the 5' terminus of mouse ribosomal protein S16 mRNA on the translation of TOP and non-TOP mRNAs. Our results demonstrate that the wild-type sequence (but not its mutant counterparts) derepresses the translation of mRNAs containing 5' TOP motifs, but failed to stimulate the translation of non-TOP mRNAs, even if the latter differed only by a single nucleotide from their 5' TOP-containing counterparts. Similar results have been obtained with both wheat germ extract and rabbit reticulocyte lysate. It appears, therefore, that translational repression of TOP mRNAs is achieved in vitro by the accumulation of a titratable repressor rather than by the loss of an activator and that this repressor recognizes multiple TOP mRNAs with a diverse set of 5' TOP motifs.

  14. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luebke, Justin L.; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P.; Giedroc, David P.

    2014-01-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR (Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor) represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60’ interprotomer crosslinks, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR. PMID:25318663

  15. In vivo localization of DNA sequences and visualization of large-scale chromatin organization using lac operator/repressor recognition

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We report a new method for in situ localization of DNA sequences that allows excellent preservation of nuclear and chromosomal ultrastructure and direct, in vivo observations. 256 direct repeats of the lac operator were added to vector constructs used for transfection and served as a tag for labeling by lac repressor. This system was first characterized by visualization of chromosome homogeneously staining regions (HSRs) produced by gene amplification using a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) expression vector with methotrexate selection. Using electron microscopy, most HSRs showed approximately 100-nm fibers, as described previously for the bulk, large-scale chromatin organization in these cells, and by light microscopy, distinct, large-scale chromatin fibers could be traced in vivo up to 5 microns in length. Subsequent experiments demonstrated the potential for more general applications of this labeling technology. Single and multiple copies of the integrated vector could be detected in living CHO cells before gene amplification, and detection of a single 256 lac operator repeat and its stability during mitosis was demonstrated by its targeted insertion into budding yeast cells by homologous recombination. In both CHO cells and yeast, use of the green fluorescent protein-lac repressor protein allowed extended, in vivo observations of the operator-tagged chromosomal DNA. Future applications of this technology should facilitate structural, functional, and genetic analysis of chromatin organization, chromosome dynamics, and nuclear architecture. PMID:8991083

  16. The Banana Transcriptional Repressor MaDEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhong-Qi; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Fu, Chang-Chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Ye, Yu-Jie; Lu, Wang-Jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-Wu; Chen, Jian-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as MaDEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that MaDEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, MaDEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, MaDEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including MaEXP1/3, MaPG1, MaXTH10, MaPL3, and MaPME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that MaDEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening.

  17. EsrC, an envelope stress-regulated repressor of the mexCD-oprJ multidrug efflux operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Purssell, Andrew; Fruci, Michael; Mikalauskas, Alaya; Gilmour, Christie; Poole, Keith

    2015-01-01

    mexCD-oprJ is an envelope stress-inducible multidrug efflux operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A gene encoding a homologue of the NfxB repressor of this operon, PA4596, occurs downstream of oprJ and was proposed as a second repressor of this efflux operon. Inactivation of this gene had no impact on mexCD-oprJ expression in cells not exposed to envelope stress although its loss under envelope stress conditions yielded a > 10-fold increase in mexCD-oprJ expression. Consistent with PA4596 functioning as a mexCD-oprJ repressor, the purified protein was able to bind to a DNA fragment carrying the mexCD-oprJ promoter region. Expression of PA4596 was induced under conditions of envelope stress dependent on the AlgU envelope stress sigma factor, consistent with PA4596 operating under envelope stress conditions where it possibly serves to moderate envelope stress-inducible mexCD-oprJ expression. nfxB mutants showed elevated PA4596 expression and purified NfxB bound to DNA encompassing the PA4596 upstream region, an indication that NfxB functions as a repressor of PA4596 expression. Elimination of PA4596 in P. aeruginosa lacking nfxB and hyperexpressing mexCD-oprJ had no additional impact on mexCD-oprJ expression, regardless of the presence of envelope stress, suggesting that PA4596 repressor activity may be dependent on NfxB. This envelope stress-regulated repressor of mexCD-oprJ has been renamed esrC.

  18. TGF-{beta} signals the formation of a unique NF1/Smad4-dependent transcription repressor-complex in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Luciakova, Katarina; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Kretova, Miroslava; Sabova, Ludmila; Nelson, B. Dean

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} TGF-{beta} induces the formation of unique nuclear NF1/Smad4 complexes that repress expression of the ANT-2 gene. {yields} Repression is mediated through an NF1-dependent repressor element in the promoter. {yields} The formation of NF1/Smad4 complexes and the repression of ANT2 are prevented by inhibitors of p38 kinase and TGF-{beta} RI. {yields} NF1/Smad complexes implicate novel role for NF1 and Smad proteins in the regulation of growth. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the formation of a unique nuclear NF1/Smad complex in serum-restricted fibroblasts that acts as an NF1-dependent repressor of the human adenine nucleotide translocase-2 gene (ANT2) [K. Luciakova, G. Kollarovic, P. Barath, B.D. Nelson, Growth-dependent repression of human adenine nucleotide translocator-2 (ANT2) transcription: evidence for the participation of Smad and Sp family proteins in the NF1-dependent repressor complex, Biochem. J. 412 (2008) 123-130]. In the present study, we show that TGF-{beta}, like serum-restriction: (a) induces the formation of NF1/Smad repressor complexes, (b) increases binding of the complexes to the repressor elements (Go elements) in the ANT2 promoter, and (c) inhibits ANT2 expression. Repression of ANT2 by TGF-{beta} is eliminated by mutating the NF1 binding sites in the Go repressor elements. All of the above responses to TGF-{beta} are prevented by inhibitors of TGF-{beta} RI and MAPK p38. These inhibitors also prevent NF1/Smad4 repressor complex formation and repression of ANT2 expression in serum-restricted cells, suggesting that similar signaling pathways are initiated by TGF-{beta} and serum-restriction. The present finding that NF1/Smad4 repressor complexes are formed through TGF-{beta} signaling pathways suggests a new, but much broader, role for these complexes in the initiation or maintenance of the growth-inhibited state.

  19. Structure-based functional characterization of repressor of toxin (Rot), a central regulator of staphylococcus aureus virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Killikelly, April; Jakoncic, Jean; Benson, Meredith A.; Ohneck, Elizabeth A.; Sampson, Jared M.; Spurrier, Brett; Torres, Victoer J.; Kong, Xian -Peng

    2014-10-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of diverse infections worldwide. In order to support its pathogenic lifestyle, S. aureus has to regulate the expression of virulence factors in a coordinated fashion. One of the central regulators of the S. aureus virulence regulatory networks is the transcription factor repressor of toxin (Rot). Rot plays a key role in regulating S. aureus virulence through activation or repression of promoters that control expression of a large number of critical virulence factors. However, the mechanism by which Rot mediates gene regulation has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of Rot and used this information to probe the contribution made by specific residues to Rot function. Rot was found to form a dimer, with each monomer harboring a winged helix-turn-helix (WHTH) DNA-binding motif. Despite an overall acidic pI, the asymmetric electrostatic charge profile suggests that Rot can orient the WHTH domain to bind DNA. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that R91, at the tip of the wing, plays an important role in DNA binding, likely through interaction with the minor groove. We also found that Y66, predicted to bind within the major groove, contributes to Rot interaction with target promoters. Evaluation of Rot binding to different activated and repressed promoters revealed that certain mutations on Rot exhibit promoter-specific effects, suggesting for the first time that Rot differentially interacts with target promoters. As a result, this work provides insight into a precise mechanism by which Rot controls virulence factor regulation in S. aureus.

  20. The nucleotide sequence of the bacteriocin promoters of plasmids Clo DF13 and Co1 E1: role of lexA repressor and cAMP in the regulation of promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    van den Elzen, P J; Maat, J; Walters, H H; Veltkamp, E; Nijkamp, H J

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of cells, harbouring the bacteriocinogenic plasmic Clo DF13 with mitomycin-C, which induces the cellular SOS response, results in a significantly increased transcription of the operon encoding the bacteriocin cloacin DF13, the immunity protein and the lysis protein H. The nucleotide sequences of the promoter regions and N-terminal parts of the bacteriocin genes of Clo DF13, Col E1 and the pMB1 derivative pBR324 have been determined. A comparison of these sequences with those of corresponding regions of the lexA, recA and uvrB genes revealed that the promoter regions of the bacteriocin genes studied contain binding sites for the lexA protein, which is the repressor of the E. coli DNA-repair system. Using both, a thermosensitive lexA host strain and a host with pACYC184 into which the lexA gene had been cloned, we were able to demonstrate, that in vivo the lexA protein is involved in the regulation of bacteriocin synthesis. From the data presented, we conclude that bacteriocin synthesis is controlled at least by the lexA repressor. It has been reported that also catabolite repression might play an essential role in the control of bacteriocin synthesis. Computer analysis of the DNA sequence data indicated that the promoter regions of both, the cloacin DF13 and colicin E1 genes contain potential binding sites for the cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP Receptor Protein complex. Images PMID:6281726

  1. Understanding Mechanisms of GLI-Mediated Transcription during Craniofacial Development and Disease Using the Ciliopathic Mutant, talpid2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chaturvedi, Praneet; Schock, Elizabeth N.; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is a ubiquitous, microtubule-based organelle that cells utilize to transduce molecular signals. Ciliopathies are a group of diseases that are caused by a disruption in the structure or function of the primary cilium. Over 30% of all ciliopathies are primarily defined by their craniofacial phenotypes, which typically include midfacial defects, cleft lip/palate, micrognathia, aglossia, and craniosynostosis. The frequency and severity of craniofacial phenotypes in ciliopathies emphasizes the importance of the cilium during development of the craniofacial complex. Molecularly, many ciliopathic mutants, including the avian talpid2 (ta2), report pathologically high levels of full-length GLI3 (GLI3FL), which can go on to function as an activator (GLIA), and reduced production of truncated GLI3 (GLI3T), which can go on to function as a repressor (GLIR). These observations suggest that the craniofacial phenotypes of ciliary mutants like ta2 are caused either by excessive activity of the GLIA or reduced activity of GLIR. To decipher between these two scenarios, we examined GLI3 occupation at the regulatory regions of target genes and subsequent target gene expression. Using in silico strategies we identified consensus GLI binding regions (GBRs) in the avian genome and confirmed GLI3 binding to the regulatory regions of its targets by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In ta2 mutants, there was a strikingly low number of GLI3 target genes that had significantly increased expression in facial prominences compared to the control embryo and GLI3 occupancy at GBRs associated with target genes was largely reduced. In vitro DNA binding assays, further supported ChIP results, indicated that the excessive GLI3FL generated in ta2 mutants did not bind to GBRs. In light of these results, we explored the possibility of GLI co-regulator proteins playing a role in regulatory mechanism of GLI-mediated transcription. Taken together our studies suggest that craniofacial

  2. A chimeric AtMYB23 repressor induces hairy roots, elongation of leaves and stems, and inhibition of the deposition of mucilage on seed coats in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kyoko; Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Tanaka, Hideo; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2005-01-01

    We reported previously that a chimeric repressor, in which a transcription factor was fused to the EAR motif repression domain, acted as a dominant repressor and suppressed the expression of target genes, such that resultant phenotypes were similar to those associated with loss-of-function alleles. We report here that expression of the chimeric AtMYB23 repressor induced a variety of morphological changes, namely the ectopic formation of root hairs, a short primary root, elongation of leaves and of inflorescence stems, and absence of the accumulation of mucilage on seed coats, in addition to disruption of the development of trichomes. The short primary root and the elongation of leaves and stems appeared to be due to the reduced and enhanced lengthwise expansion, respectively, of epidermal cells. Expression of the GL2 gene, which is involved in the formation of root hairs and the accumulation of mucilage, was suppressed in both the roots and siliques of the transgenic plants. In contrast, the expression of genes related to cell elongation, such as DWF1, SAUR, AQP, AGP15, DET3 and XET-1, was enhanced in leaves of the transgenic plants. Results suggest that the AtMYB23 transcription factor has the molecular function of regulating the development of epidermal cells not only in leaves but also in stems, roots and seeds. We describe that this type of chimeric repressor can be exploited as a useful tool for the functional analysis of redundant transcription factors.

  3. LitR Is a Repressor of syp Genes and Has a Temperature-Sensitive Regulatory Effect on Biofilm Formation and Colony Morphology in Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    Bjelland, Ane Mohn; Ronessen, Maria; Robertsen, Espen; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida is the etiological agent of cold water vibriosis, a disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that is kept under control due to an effective vaccine. A seawater temperature below 12°C is normally required for disease development. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-regulated communication system that bacteria use to coordinate activities involved in colonization and pathogenesis, and we have previously shown that inactivation of the QS master regulator LitR attenuates the V. salmonicida strain LFI1238 in a fish model. We show here that strain LFI1238 and a panel of naturally occurring V. salmonicida strains are poor biofilm producers. Inactivation of litR in the LFI1238 strain enhances medium- and temperature-dependent adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Chemical treatment and electron microscopy of the biofilm identified an extracellular matrix consisting mainly of a fibrous network, proteins, and polysaccharides. Further, by microarray analysis of planktonic and biofilm cells, we identified a number of genes regulated by LitR and, among these, were homologues of the Vibrio fischeri symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) genes. The syp genes were regulated by LitR in both planktonic and biofilm lifestyle analyses. Disruption of syp genes in the V. salmonicida ΔlitR mutant alleviated adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Hence, LitR is a repressor of syp transcription that is necessary for expression of the phenotypes examined. The regulatory effect of LitR on colony morphology and biofilm formation is temperature sensitive and weak or absent at temperatures above the bacterium's upper threshold for pathogenicity. PMID:24973072

  4. NdnR is an NAD-responsive transcriptional repressor of the ndnR operon involved in NAD de novo biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-04-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum ndnR gene, which is chromosomally located in a gene cluster involved in NAD de novo biosynthesis, negatively regulates expression of the cluster genes, i.e. nadA, nadC, nadS and ndnR itself. Although ndnR encodes a member of the recently identified NrtR family of transcriptional regulators, whether or not the NdnR protein directly regulates these NAD biosynthesis genes remains to be verified. Here, two NdnR binding sites in the promoter region of the ndnR-nadA-nadC-nadS operon in C. glutamicum were confirmed by in vitro DNA binding assay and analysis of in vivo expression of the chromosomally integrated ndnR promoter-lacZ reporter fusion. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that the NdnR protein binds to the 5'-upstream region of ndnR, and that the binding is significantly enhanced by NAD. Mutation in two 21 bp NdnR binding motifs in the ndnR promoter region inhibited the binding of NdnR in vitro. The mutation also enhanced the promoter activity in cells cultured in the presence of nicotinate, which is utilized in NAD biosynthesis, resulting in the loss of the repression in response to an exogenous NAD precursor; this is consistent with the effect of deletion of ndnR reported in our previous study. These results indicate that NAD acts as a co-repressor for the NdnR protein that directly regulates the ndnR operon involved in NAD de novo biosynthesis; the NAD-NdnR regulatory system likely plays an important role in the control of NAD homeostasis in C. glutamicum.

  5. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Elisabetta; Caselle, Michele; Fogolari, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield), a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary methodology to sequence

  6. The Transcriptional Repressor ID2 Can Interact with the Canonical Clock Components CLOCK and BMAL1 and Mediate Inhibitory Effects on mPer1 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah M.; Fernando, Shanik J.; Hou, Tim Y.; Duffield, Giles E.

    2010-01-01

    ID2 is a rhythmically expressed HLH transcriptional repressor. Deletion of Id2 in mice results in circadian phenotypes, highlighted by disrupted locomotor activity rhythms and an enhanced photoentrainment response. ID2 can suppress the transactivation potential of the positive elements of the clock, CLOCK-BMAL1, on mPer1 and clock-controlled gene (CCG) activity. Misregulation of CCGs is observed in Id2−/− liver, and mutant mice exhibit associated alterations in lipid homeostasis. These data suggest that ID2 contributes to both input and output components of the clock and that this may be via interaction with the bHLH clock proteins CLOCK and BMAL1. The aim of the present study was to explore this potential interaction. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed the capability of ID2 to complex with both CLOCK and BMAL1, and mammalian two-hybrid analysis revealed direct interactions of ID2, ID1 and ID3 with CLOCK and BMAL1. Deletion of the ID2 HLH domain rendered ID2 ineffective at inhibiting CLOCK-BMAL1 transactivation, suggesting that interaction between the proteins is via the HLH region. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed overlapping localization of ID2 with CLOCK and BMAL1 in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of CLOCK and BMAL1 in the presence of ID2 resulted in a significant reduction in their nuclear localization, revealing that ID2 can sequester CLOCK and BMAL1 to the cytoplasm. Serum stimulation of Id2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in an enhanced induction of mPer1 expression. These data provide the basis for a molecular mechanism through which ID2 could regulate aspects of both clock input and output through a time-of-day specific interaction with CLOCK and BMAL1. PMID:20861012

  7. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 Chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA Regulates Polycomb Function during Vegetative Development and Directly Activates the Flowering Repressor Gene SVP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development. PMID:25615622

  8. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  9. High density lipoprotein mediates anti-inflammatory transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages via the transcriptional repressor ATF3

    PubMed Central

    De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kono, Hajime; Seki, Reiko; Schmidt, Susanne V.; Beyer, Marc; Xu, Dakang; Zimmer, Sebastian; Lahrmann, Catharina; Schildberg, Frank A.; Vogelhuber, Johanna; Kraut, Michael; Ulas, Thomas; Kerksiek, Anja; Krebs, Wolfgang; Bode, Niklas; Grebe, Alena; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Hernandez, Nicholas J.; Williams, Bryan; Knolle, Percy; Kneilling, Manfred; Röcken, Martin; Lütjohann, Dieter; Wright, Samuel D.; Schultze, Joachim L.; Latz, Eicke

    2014-01-01

    High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) mediates reverse cholesterol transport and it is known to be protective against atherosclerosis. In addition, HDL has potent anti-inflammatory properties that may be critical for protection against other inflammatory diseases. The molecular mechanisms of how HDL can modulate inflammation, particularly in immune cells such as macrophages, remain poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor ATF3, as an HDL-inducible target gene in macrophages that down-regulates the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines. The protective effects of HDL against TLR-induced inflammation were fully dependent on ATF3 in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may explain the broad anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions of HDL and provide the basis for predicting the success of novel HDL-based therapies. PMID:24317040

  10. The product of the murine homolog of the Drosophila extra sex combs gene displays transcriptional repressor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Denisenko, O N; Bomsztyk, K

    1997-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein represents a novel class of proteins that may act as docking platforms that orchestrate cross-talk among molecules involved in signal transduction and gene expression. Using a fragment of K protein as bait in the yeast two-hybrid screen, we isolated a cDNA that encodes a protein whose primary structure has extensive similarity to the Drosophila melanogaster extra sex combs (esc) gene product, Esc, a putative silencer of homeotic genes. The cDNA that we isolated is identical to the cDNA of the recently positionally cloned mouse embryonic ectoderm development gene, eed. Like Esc, Eed contains six WD-40 repeats in the C-terminal half of the protein and is thought to repress homeotic gene expression during mouse embryogenesis. Eed binds to K protein through a domain in its N terminus, but interestingly, this domain is not found in the Drosophila Esc. Gal4-Eed fusion protein represses transcription of a reporter gene driven by a promoter that contains Gal4-binding DNA elements. Eed also represses transcription when recruited to a target promoter by Gal4-K protein. Point mutations within the eed gene that are responsible for severe embryonic development abnormalities abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of Eed. Results of this study suggest that Eed-restricted homeotic gene expression during embryogenesis reflects the action of Eed as a transcriptional repressor. The Eed-mediated transcriptional effects are likely to reflect the interaction of Eed with multiple molecular partners, including K protein. PMID:9234727

  11. Type II SOCS as a feedback repressor for GH-induced Igf1 expression in carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Xiao, Jia; He, Mulan; Ma, Ani; Wong, Anderson O L

    2016-05-01

    Type II suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) serve as feedback repressors for cytokines and are known to inhibit growth hormone (GH) actions. However, direct evidence for SOCS modulation of GH-induced insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression is lacking, and the post-receptor signaling for SOCS expression at the hepatic level is still unclear. To shed light on the comparative aspects of SOCS in GH functions, grass carp was used as a model to study the role of type II SOCS in GH-induced Igf1 expression. Structural identity of type II SOCS, Socs1-3 and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (Cish), was established in grass carp by 5'/3'-RACE, and their expression at both transcript and protein levels were confirmed in the liver by RT-PCR and LC/MS/MS respectively. In carp hepatocytes, GH treatment induced rapid phosphorylation of JAK2, STATs, MAPK, PI3K, and protein kinase B (Akt) with parallel rises in socs1-3 and cish mRNA levels, and these stimulatory effects on type II SOCS were shown to occur before the gradual loss of igf1 gene expression caused by prolonged exposure of GH. Furthermore, GH-induced type II SOCS gene expression could be negated by inhibiting JAK2, STATs, MEK1/2, P38 (MAPK), PI3K, and/or Akt respectively. In CHO cells transfected with carp GH receptor, over-expression of these newly cloned type II SOCS not only suppressed JAK2/STAT5 signaling with GH treatment but also inhibited GH-induced grass carp Igf1 promoter activity. These results, taken together, suggest that type II SOCS could be induced by GH in the carp liver via JAK2/STATs, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt cascades and serve as feedback repressors for GH signaling and induction of igf1 gene expression.

  12. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Matise, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functionally distinct neuronal subtypes within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) requires the precise regulation of progenitor gene expression in specific neuronal territories during early embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has implicated histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins in cell specification, proliferation, and differentiation in diverse embryonic and adult tissues. However, although HDAC proteins have shown to be expressed in the developing vertebrate neural tube, their specific role in CNS neural progenitor fate specification remains unclear. Prior work from our lab showed that the Tcf7l2/Tcf4 transcription factor plays a key role in ventral progenitor lineage segregation by differential repression of two key specification factors, Nkx2.2 and Olig2. In this study, we found that administration of HDAC inhibitors (Valproic Acid (VPA), Trichostatin-A (TSA), or sodium butyrate) in chick embryos in ovo disrupted normal progenitor gene segregation in the developing neural tube, indicating that HDAC activity is required for this process. Further, using functional and pharmacological approaches in vivo, we found that HDAC activity is required for the differential repression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 by Tcf7l2/Tcf4. Finally, using dominant-negative functional assays, we provide evidence that Tcf7l2/Tcf4 repression also requires Gro/TLE/Grg co-repressor factors. Together, our data support a model where the transcriptional repressor activity of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 involves functional interactions with both HDAC and Gro/TLE/Grg co-factors at specific target gene regulatory elements in the developing neural tube, and that this activity is required for the proper segregation of the Nkx2.2 (p3) and Olig2 (pMN) expressing cells from a common progenitor pool. PMID:27668865

  13. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  14. The transcription factors Slug and Snail act as repressors of Claudin-1 expression in epithelial cells1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Estrada, Ofelia M.; Cullerés, Albert; Soriano, Francesc X.; Peinado, Hector; Bolós, Victoria; Martínez, Fernando O.; Reina, Manuel; Cano, Amparo; Fabre, Myriam; Vilaró, Senén

    2005-01-01

    Claudin-1 is an integral membrane protein component of tight junctions. The Snail family of transcription factors are repressors that play a central role in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, a process that occurs during cancer progression. Snail and Slug members are direct repressors of E-cadherin and act by binding to the specific E-boxes of its proximal promoter. In the present study, we demonstrate that overexpression of Slug or Snail causes a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance. Overexpression of Slug and Snail in MDCK (Madin–Darby canine kidney) cells down-regulated Claudin-1 at protein and mRNA levels. In addition, Snail and Slug are able to effectively repress human Claudin-1-driven reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type promoter sequence, but not those with mutations in two proximal E-box elements. We also demonstrate by band-shift assay that Snail and Slug bind to the E-box motifs present in the human Claudin-1 promoter. Moreover, an inverse correlation in the levels of Claudin-1 and Slug transcripts were observed in breast cancer cell lines. E-box elements in the Claudin-1 promoter were found to play a critical negative regulatory role in breast cancer cell lines that expressed low levels of Claudin-1 transcript. Significantly, in invasive human breast tumours, high levels of Snail and Slug correlated with low levels of Claudin-1 expression. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Claudin-1 is a direct downstream target gene of Snail family factors in epithelial cells. PMID:16232121

  15. Involvement of elevated proline accumulation in enhanced osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis conferred by chimeric repressor gene silencing technology.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Daisuke; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Tada, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis plants transformed with a chimeric repressor for 6 transcription factors (TFs), including ADA2b, Msantd, DDF1, DREB26, AtGeBP, and ATHB23, that were converted by Chimeric REpressor gene Silencing Technology (CRES-T), show elevated salt and osmotic stress tolerance compared with wild type (WT) plants. However, the roles of TFs in salt and osmotic signaling remain largely unknown. Their hyper-osmotic stress tolerance was evaluated using 3 criteria: germination rate, root length, and rate of seedlings with visible cotyledons at the germination stage. All CRES-T lines tested exhibited better performance than WT, at least for one criterion under stress conditions. Under 600 mM mannitol stress, 3-week-old CRES-T lines accumulated proline, which is a major compatible solute involved in osmoregulation, at higher levels than WT. Expression levels of the delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase gene in CRES-T lines were similar to or lower than those in WT. In contrast, expression of the proline dehydrogenase (PHD) gene in DREB26-SRDX was significantly downregulated and that in ADA2b-SRDX and AtGeBP-SRDX was also rather downregulated compared with that in WT. Although plants at different stages were used for stress tolerance test and proline measurement in this study, we previously reported that 4 out of the 6 CRES-T lines showed better growth than WT after 4 weeks of incubation under 400 mM mannitol. These results suggest that proline accumulation caused by PHD gene suppression may be involved in enhanced osmotic stress tolerance in the CRES-T lines, and that these TFs may be involved in regulating proline metabolism in Arabidopsis.

  16. Assessing the Role of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR Transcriptional Repressors in Salicylic Acid-Mediated Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Caarls, Lotte; Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Hickman, Richard; Jansen, Wouter; Verk, Marcel C Van; Proietti, Silvia; Lorenzo, Oscar; Solano, Roberto; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2016-11-10

    Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) cross-communicate in the plant immune signaling network to finely regulate induced defenses. In Arabidopsis, SA antagonizes many JA-responsive genes, partly by targeting the ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-type transcriptional activator ORA59. Members of the ERF transcription factor family typically bind to GCC-box motifs in the promoters of JA- and ethylene-responsive genes, thereby positively or negatively regulating their expression. The GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Here, we investigated whether SA-induced ERF-type transcriptional repressors, which may compete with JA-induced ERF-type activators for binding at the GCC-box, play a role in SA/JA antagonism. We selected ERFs that are transcriptionally induced by SA and/or possess an EAR transcriptional repressor motif. Several of the 16 ERFs tested suppressed JA-dependent gene expression, as revealed by enhanced JA-induced PDF1.2 or VSP2 expression levels in the corresponding erf mutants, while others were involved in activation of these genes. However, SA could antagonize JA-induced PDF1.2 or VSP2 in all erf mutants, suggesting that the tested ERF transcriptional repressors are not required for SA/JA cross-talk. Moreover, a mutant in the co-repressor TOPLESS, that showed reduction in repression of JA signaling, still displayed SA-mediated antagonism of PDF1.2 and VSP2. Collectively, these results suggest that SA-regulated ERF transcriptional repressors are not essential for antagonism of JA-responsive gene expression by SA. We further show that de novo SA-induced protein synthesis is required for suppression of JA-induced PDF1.2, pointing to SA-stimulated production of an as yet unknown protein that suppresses JA-induced transcription.

  17. Multisite phosphorylation of the Sum1 transcriptional repressor by S-phase kinases controls exit from meiotic prophase in yeast.

    PubMed

    Corbi, Daniel; Sunder, Sham; Weinreich, Michael; Skokotas, Aikaterini; Johnson, Erica S; Winter, Edward

    2014-06-01

    Activation of the meiotic transcription factor Ndt80 is a key regulatory transition in the life cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae because it triggers exit from pachytene and entry into meiosis. The NDT80 promoter is held inactive by a complex containing the DNA-binding protein Sum1 and the histone deacetylase Hst1. Meiosis-specific phosphorylation of Sum1 by the protein kinases Cdk1, Ime2, and Cdc7 is required for NDT80 expression. Here, we show that the S-phase-promoting cyclin Clb5 activates Cdk1 to phosphorylate most, and perhaps all, of the 11 minimal cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phospho-consensus sites (S/T-P) in Sum1. Nine of these sites can individually promote modest levels of meiosis, yet these sites function in a quasiadditive manner to promote substantial levels of meiosis. Two Cdk1 sites and an Ime2 site individually promote high levels of meiosis, likely by preparing Sum1 for phosphorylation by Cdc7. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that the phosphorylation sites are required for removal of Sum1 from the NDT80 promoter. We also find that Sum1, but not its partner protein Hst1, is required to repress NDT80 transcription. Thus, while the phosphorylation of Sum1 may lead to dissociation from DNA by influencing Hst1, it is the presence of Sum1 on DNA that determines whether NDT80 will be expressed.

  18. The Chromobacterium violaceum ArsR Arsenite Repressor Exerts Tighter Control on Its Cognate Promoter Than the Escherichia coli System

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Letícia M.; Monteiro, Lummy M. O.; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Environmental bacteria are endowed with several regulatory systems that have potential applications in biotechnology. In this report, we characterize the arsenic biosensing features of the ars response system from Chromobacterium violaceum in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. We show that the native Pars/arsR system of C. violaceum outperforms the chromosomal ars copy of E. coli when exposed to micromolar concentrations of arsenite. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we analyzed the interaction between ArsR regulators and their promoter target sites as well as induction of the system at saturating concentrations of the regulators. In vivo titration experiments indicate that ArsR from C. violaceum has stronger binding affinity for its target promoter than the regulator from E. coli does. Additionally, arsenite induction experiments at saturating regulator concentration demonstrates that although the Pars/arsR system from E. coli displays a gradual response to increasing concentration of the inducer, the system from C. violaceum has a steeper response with a stronger promoter induction after a given arsenite threshold. Taken together, these data demonstrate the characterization of a novel arsenic response element from an environmental bacterium with potentially enhanced performance that could be further explored for the construction of an arsenic biosensor. PMID:27917165

  19. The Chromobacterium violaceum ArsR Arsenite Repressor Exerts Tighter Control on Its Cognate Promoter Than the Escherichia coli System.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Letícia M; Monteiro, Lummy M O; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Environmental bacteria are endowed with several regulatory systems that have potential applications in biotechnology. In this report, we characterize the arsenic biosensing features of the ars response system from Chromobacterium violaceum in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. We show that the native Pars/arsR system of C. violaceum outperforms the chromosomal ars copy of E. coli when exposed to micromolar concentrations of arsenite. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we analyzed the interaction between ArsR regulators and their promoter target sites as well as induction of the system at saturating concentrations of the regulators. In vivo titration experiments indicate that ArsR from C. violaceum has stronger binding affinity for its target promoter than the regulator from E. coli does. Additionally, arsenite induction experiments at saturating regulator concentration demonstrates that although the Pars/arsR system from E. coli displays a gradual response to increasing concentration of the inducer, the system from C. violaceum has a steeper response with a stronger promoter induction after a given arsenite threshold. Taken together, these data demonstrate the characterization of a novel arsenic response element from an environmental bacterium with potentially enhanced performance that could be further explored for the construction of an arsenic biosensor.

  20. Decreased expression of Freud-1/CC2D1A, a transcriptional repressor of the 5-HT1A receptor, in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depression.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Albert, Paul R; Rogaeva, Anastasia; Fitzgibbon, Heidi; May, Warren L; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose J; Stockmeier, Craig A; Woolverton, William L; Kyle, Patrick B; Wang, Zhixia; Austin, Mark C

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors are reported altered in the brain of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent studies have identified transcriptional regulators of the 5-HT(1A) receptor and have documented gender-specific alterations in 5-HT(1A) transcription factor and 5-HT(1A) receptors in female MDD subjects. The 5' repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1) is a calcium-regulated repressor that negatively regulates the 5-HT(1A) receptor gene. This study documented the cellular expression of Freud-1 in the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) and quantified Freud-1 protein in the PFC of MDD and control subjects as well as in the PFC of rhesus monkeys chronically treated with fluoxetine. Freud-1 immunoreactivity was present in neurons and glia and was co-localized with 5-HT(1A) receptors. Freud-1 protein level was significantly decreased in the PFC of male MDD subjects (37%, p=0.02) relative to gender-matched control subjects. Freud-1 protein was also reduced in the PFC of female MDD subjects (36%, p=0.18) but was not statistically significant. When the data was combined across genders and analysed by age, the decrease in Freud-1 protein level was greater in the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls as opposed to older depressed subjects. Similarly, 5-HT(1A) receptor protein was significantly reduced in the PFC of the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls. Adult male rhesus monkeys administered fluoxetine daily for 39 wk revealed no significant change in cortical Freud-1 or 5-HT(1A) receptor proteins compared to vehicle-treated control monkeys. Reduced protein expression of Freud-1 in MDD subjects may reflect dysregulation of this transcription factor, which may contribute to the altered regulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors observed in subjects with MDD. These data may also suggest that reductions in Freud-1 protein expression in the PFC may be associated with early onset of

  1. The metalloregulatory zinc site in Streptococcus pneumoniae AdcR, a zinc-activated MarR-family repressor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Caballero, Hermes; Guerra, Alfredo J.; Jacobsen, Faith E.; Kazmierczak, Krystyna M.; Cowart, Darin; Koppolu, Uma Mahendra Kumar; Scott, Robert A.; Winkler, Malcolm E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 AdcR (adhesin competence repressor) is the first metal-sensing member of the MarR (multiple antibiotic resistance repressor) family to be characterized. Expression profiling with a ΔadcR strain grown in liquid culture (brain heart infusion; BHI) under microaerobic conditions reveals upregulation of 13 genes including adcR and adcCBA, encoding a high affinity ABC uptake system for zinc, and genes encoding cell-surface zinc-binding pneumococcal histidine triad (Pht) proteins and AdcAII (Lmb, laminin binding). The ΔadcR, H108Q and H112Q adcR mutant allelic strains grown in 0.2 mM Zn(II) exhibit a slow-growth phenotype and a ≈2-fold increase in cell-associated Zn(II). Apo- and Zn(II)-bound AdcR are homodimers in solution and binding to a 28-mer DNA containing an adc operator is strongly stimulated by Zn(II) with KDNA-Zn = 2.4 ×108 M−1 (pH 6.0, 0.2 M NaCl, 25 °C). AdcR binds two Zn(II) per dimer, with step-wise Zn(II) affinities KZn1 and KZn2 of ≥109 M−1 at pH 6.0 and ≥1012 M−1 at pH 8.0. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the high affinity site reveals a pentacoordinate N/O complex and no cysteine coordination, the latter finding corroborated by wild-type-like functional properties of C30A AdcR. Alanine substitution of conserved residues His42 in the DNA binding domain, and His108 and His112 in the C-terminal regulatory domain, abolish high affinity Zn(II) binding and greatly reduce Zn(II)-activated binding to DNA. NMR studies reveal that these mutants adopt the same folded conformation as dimeric wild-type apo AdcR, but fail to conformationally switch upon Zn(II) binding. These studies clearly identify His42, His108 and H112 as metalloregulatory zinc ligands in S. pneumoniae AdcR. PMID:20804771

  2. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  3. Guanidinium chloride denaturation of the dimeric Bacillus licheniformis BlaI repressor highlights an independent domain unfolding pathway

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The Bacillus licheniformis 749/I BlaI repressor is a prokaryotic regulator that, in the absence of a β-lactam antibiotic, prevents the transcription of the blaP gene, which encodes the BlaP β-lactamase. The BlaI repressor is composed of two structural domains. The 82-residue NTD (N-terminal domain) is a DNA-binding domain, and the CTD (C-terminal domain) containing the next 46 residues is a dimerization domain. Recent studies have shown the existence of the monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric forms of BlaI in solution. In the present study, we analyse the equilibrium unfolding of BlaI in the presence of GdmCl (guanidinium chloride) using different techniques: intrinsic and ANS (8-anilinonaphthalene-l-sulphonic acid) fluorescence, far- and near-UV CD spectroscopy, cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the intact NTD and CTD were purified after proteolysis of BlaI by papain, and their unfolding by GdmCl was also studied. GdmCl-induced equilibrium unfolding was shown to be fully reversible for BlaI and for the two isolated fragments. The results demonstrate that the NTD and CTD of BlaI fold/unfold independently in a four-step process, with no significant co-operative interactions between them. During the first step, the unfolding of the BlaI CTD occurs, followed in the second step by the formation of an ‘ANS-bound’ intermediate state. Cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments suggest that the dissociation of the dimer into two partially unfolded monomers takes place in the third step. Finally, the unfolding of the BlaI NTD occurs at a GdmCl concentration of approx. 4 M. In summary, it is shown that the BlaI CTD is structured, more flexible and less stable than the NTD upon GdmCl denaturation. These results contribute to the characterization of the BlaI dimerization domain (i.e. CTD) involved in the induction process. PMID:15285720

  4. Expression, Purification And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of the C-Terminal Domain of An Arginine Repressor Protein From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.J.; Garen, C.R.; Cherney, M.M.; Cherney, L.T.; Lee, C.; James, M.N.J.

    2009-06-03

    The gene product of an open reading frame Rv1657 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a putative arginine repressor protein (ArgR), a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of arginine-biosynthetic enzymes. Rv1657 was expressed and purified and a C-terminal domain was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed to a resolution of 2.15 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group P1 and the Matthews coefficient suggests that the crystals contain six C-terminal domain molecules per unit cell. Previous structural and biochemical studies on the arginine repressor proteins from other organisms have likewise shown the presence of six molecules per unit cell.

  5. Drosophila Sir2 is required for heterochromatic silencing and by euchromatic Hairy/E(Spl) bHLH repressors in segmentation and sex determination.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Miriam I; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2002-05-17

    Yeast SIR2 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase required for heterochromatic silencing at telomeres, rDNA, and mating-type loci. We find that the Drosophila homolog of Sir2 (dSir2) also encodes deacetylase activity and is required for heterochromatic silencing, but unlike ySir2, is not required for silencing at telomeres. We show that dSir2 interacts genetically and physically with members of the Hairy/Deadpan/E(Spl) family of bHLH euchromatic repressors, key regulators of Drosophila development. dSir2 is an essential gene whose loss of function results in both segmentation defects and skewed sex ratios, associated with reduced activities of the Hairy and Deadpan bHLH repressors. These results indicate that Sir2 in higher organisms plays an essential role in both euchromatic repression and heterochromatic silencing.

  6. Human Sir2-related protein SIRT1 associates with the bHLH repressors HES1 and HEY2 and is involved in HES1- and HEY2-mediated transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takehiko; Ishikawa, Fuyuki

    2003-01-31

    The Hairy-related bHLH proteins function as transcriptional repressors in most cases and play important roles in diverse aspects of metazoan development. Recently, it was shown that the Drosophila bHLH repressor proteins, Hairy and Deadpan, bind to and function with the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, Sir2. Here we demonstrate that the human Sir2 homologue, SIRT1, also physically associates with the human bHLH repressor proteins, hHES1 and hHEY2, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, using the reporter assay, we show that both SIRT1-dependent and -independent deacetylase pathways are involved in the transcriptional repressions mediated by these bHLH repressors. These results indicate that the molecular association between bHLH proteins and Sir2-related proteins is conserved among metazoans, from Drosophila to human, and suggest that the Sir2-bHLH interaction also plays important roles in human cells.

  7. Rex (encoded by DVU_0916) in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a repressor of sulfate adenylyl transferase and is regulated by NADH.

    PubMed

    Christensen, G A; Zane, G M; Kazakov, A E; Li, X; Rodionov, D A; Novichkov, P S; Dubchak, I; Arkin, A P; Wall, J D

    2015-01-01

    Although the enzymes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction by microbes have been studied, the mechanisms for transcriptional regulation of the encoding genes remain unknown. In a number of bacteria the transcriptional regulator Rex has been shown to play a key role as a repressor of genes producing proteins involved in energy conversion. In the model sulfate-reducing microbe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, the gene DVU_0916 was observed to resemble other known Rex proteins. Therefore, the DVU_0916 protein has been predicted to be a transcriptional repressor of genes encoding proteins that function in the process of sulfate reduction in D. vulgaris Hildenborough. Examination of the deduced DVU_0916 protein identified two domains, one a winged helix DNA-binding domain common for transcription factors, and the other a Rossman fold that could potentially interact with pyridine nucleotides. A deletion of the putative rex gene was made in D. vulgaris Hildenborough, and transcript expression studies of sat, encoding sulfate adenylyl transferase, showed increased levels in the D. vulgaris Hildenborough Rex (RexDvH) mutant relative to the parental strain. The RexDvH-binding site upstream of sat was identified, confirming RexDvH to be a repressor of sat. We established in vitro that the presence of elevated NADH disrupted the interaction between RexDvH and DNA. Examination of the 5' transcriptional start site for the sat mRNA revealed two unique start sites, one for respiring cells that correlated with the RexDvH-binding site and a second for fermenting cells. Collectively, these data support the role of RexDvH as a transcription repressor for sat that senses the redox status of the cell.

  8. Effect of the detergent Tween-20 on the DNA affinity chromatography of Gal4, C/EBPalpha, and lac repressor with observations on column regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robinson, F Darlene; Moxley, Robert A; Jarrett, Harry W

    2004-01-23

    C/EBPalpha, Gal4, and lac repressor, representing three different transcription factor homology families, were expressed as fusion proteins and used to characterize the effects of column aging, Mg2+, the nonionic detergent Tween-20, column loading, and bovine serum albumin on DNA-affinity chromatography. When lac-repressor-beta-galactosidase fusion protein is loaded onto a new DNA-Sepharose column, less elutes from a new column than one that has been used two or more times. Higher amounts of lac repressor, the Green Fluorescent Protein fusions with CAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha) and Gal4, elute from the columns when 0.1% Tween-20 is added to the mobile phase. The amount of improvement found depends upon the transcription factor studied and the amount of the protein loaded on the column; lac repressor and Gal4 are eluted in higher amounts over a large range of protein loads while C/EBP shows the greatest effect at low protein loads. This detergent effect is seen when either Sepharose or silica is used for the stationary phase. Including bovine serum albumin in the mobile phase gives a similar though lesser improvement to that observed with Tween-20. Mg2+ or EDTA in the mobile phase gave similar chromatography for C/EBP; since EDTA protects columns from DNases, its inclusion in the mobile phase is preferred. After extended use, the DNA affinity columns no longer bind transcription factors and this is not due to losses of DNA from the columns. Two simple methods (sodium dodecylsulfate and KSCN) were developed to regenerate such worn out columns.

  9. Phosphorylation of the chromatin remodeling factor DPF3a induces cardiac hypertrophy through releasing HEY repressors from DNA.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huanhuan; Schlesinger, Jenny; Schoenhals, Sophia; Tönjes, Martje; Dunkel, Ilona; Meierhofer, David; Cano, Elena; Schulz, Kerstin; Berger, Michael F; Haack, Timm; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bulyk, Martha L; Sauer, Sascha; Sperling, Silke R

    2016-04-07

    DPF3 (BAF45c) is a member of the BAF chromatin remodeling complex. Two isoforms have been described, namely DPF3a and DPF3b. The latter binds to acetylated and methylated lysine residues of histones. Here, we elaborate on the role of DPF3a and describe a novel pathway of cardiac gene transcription leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Upon hypertrophic stimuli, casein kinase 2 phosphorylates DPF3a at serine 348. This initiates the interaction of DPF3a with the transcriptional repressors HEY, followed by the release of HEY from the DNA. Moreover, BRG1 is bound by DPF3a, and is thus recruited to HEY genomic targets upon interaction of the two components. Consequently, the transcription of downstream targets such as NPPA and GATA4 is initiated and pathological cardiac hypertrophy is established. In human, DPF3a is significantly up-regulated in hypertrophic hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or aortic stenosis. Taken together, we show that activation of DPF3a upon hypertrophic stimuli switches cardiac fetal gene expression from being silenced by HEY to being activated by BRG1. Thus, we present a novel pathway for pathological cardiac hypertrophy, whose inhibition is a long-term therapeutic goal for the treatment of the course of heart failure.

  10. What matters for lac repressor search in vivo--sliding, hopping, intersegment transfer, crowding on DNA or recognition?

    PubMed

    Mahmutovic, Anel; Berg, Otto G; Elf, Johan

    2015-04-20

    We have investigated which aspects of transcription factor DNA interactions are most important to account for the recent in vivo search time measurements for the dimeric lac repressor. We find the best agreement for a sliding model where non-specific binding to DNA is improbable at first contact and the sliding LacI protein binds at high probability when reaching the specific Osym operator. We also find that the contribution of hopping to the overall search speed is negligible although physically unavoidable. The parameters that give the best fit reveal sliding distances, including hopping, close to what has been proposed in the past, i.e. ∼40 bp, but with an unexpectedly high 1D diffusion constant on non-specific DNA sequences. Including a mechanism of inter-segment transfer between distant DNA segments does not bring down the 1D diffusion to the expected fraction of the in vitro value. This suggests a mechanism where transcription factors can slide less hindered in vivo than what is given by a simple viscosity scaling argument or that a modification of the model is needed. For example, the estimated diffusion rate constant would be consistent with the expectation if parts of the chromosome, away from the operator site, were inaccessible for searching.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the arginine repressor ArgR from Bacillus halodurans

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jina; Park, Young Woo; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) is a transcriptional regulator which regulates genes encoding proteins involved in arginine biosynthesis and the arginine catabolic pathway. ArgR from the alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus halodurans was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. ArgR (Bh2777) from B. halodurans is composed of 149 amino-acid residues with a molecular mass of 16 836 Da. ArgR was crystallized at 296 K using 1,2-propanediol as a precipitant. Crystals of N-terminally His-tagged ArgR were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Dehydrated crystals showed a dramatic improvement in diffraction quality and diffracted to 2.35 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the cubic space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 104.68 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one monomer of ArgR, which generates a trimer by the threefold axis of the space group, giving a crystal volume per mass (V M) of 2.98 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 56.8%. PMID:25760703

  12. Transcription factor Foxo3a prevents apoptosis by regulating calcium through the apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Daoyuan; Liu, Jinping; Jiao, Jianqin; Long, Bo; Li, Qian; Tan, Weiqi; Li, Peifeng

    2013-03-22

    Apoptosis can occur in the myocardium under a variety of pathological conditions, including myocardial infarction and heart failure. The forkhead family of transcription factor Foxo3a plays a pivotal role in apoptosis; however, its role in regulating cardiac apoptosis remains to be fully elucidated. We showed that enforced expression of Foxo3a inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis, whereas knockdown of endogenous Foxo3a sensitizes cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis. The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) is a potent anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we demonstrate that it attenuates the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and inhibits calcium elevations in the cytoplasm and mitochondria provoked by oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, Foxo3a is shown to maintain cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium homeostasis through ARC. We observed that Foxo3a knock-out mice exhibited enlarged myocardial infarction sizes upon ischemia/reperfusion, and ARC transgenic mice demonstrated reduced myocardial infarction and balanced calcium levels in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we showed that Foxo3a activates ARC expression by directly binding to its promoter. This study reveals that Foxo3a maintains calcium homeostasis and inhibits cardiac apoptosis through trans-activation of the ARC promoter. These findings provided novel evidence that Foxo3a and ARC constitute an anti-apoptotic pathway that regulates calcium homeostasis in the heart.

  13. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering.

  14. Dioxin Exposure Blocks Lactation through a Direct Effect on Mammary Epithelial Cells Mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Leonard, Christopher J.; Kieffer, Collin; Shelton, Dawne N.; McDowell, Maria E.; Bhonde, Vasudev R.; Looper, Ryan E.; Welm, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, lactation is a rich source of nutrients and antibodies for newborn animals. However, millions of mothers each year experience an inability to breastfeed. Exposure to several environmental toxicants, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), has been strongly implicated in impaired mammary differentiation and lactation. TCDD and related polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread industrial pollutants that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Despite many epidemiological and animal studies, the molecular mechanism through which AHR signaling blocks lactation remains unclear. We employed in vitro models of mammary differentiation to recapitulate lactogenesis in the presence of toxicants. We demonstrate AHR agonists directly block milk production in isolated mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we define a novel role for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) in mediating this response. Our mechanistic studies suggest AHRR is sufficient to block transcription of the milk gene β-casein. As TCDD is a prevalent environmental pollutant that affects women worldwide, our results have important public health implications for newborn nutrition. PMID:25265996

  15. Cutting Edge: T Follicular Helper Cell Differentiation Is Defective in the Absence of Bcl6 BTB Repressor Domain Function

    PubMed Central

    Nance, J. Philip; Bélanger, Simon; Johnston, Robert J.; Takemori, Toshitada

    2015-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are essential for germinal centers (GCs) and most long-term humoral immunity. Differentiation of Tfh cells depends on the transcriptional repressor B cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (Bcl6). Bcl6 mediates gene repression via the recruitment of corepressors. Currently, it is unknown how Bcl6 recruits corepressors to regulate gene expression of Tfh cells. In this article, we demonstrate, using a mutant form of Bcl6 with two BTB (bric-a-brac, tramtrack, broad-complex) mutations that abrogate corepressor binding, that the Bcl6 BTB domain is required for proper differentiation of Tfh and GC-Tfh cells in vivo. Importantly, we also observe a significant defect in GC B cell development. These results are consistent in multiple contexts, including a novel lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus nucleoprotein-specific TCR-transgenic mouse model. Taken together, these data suggest that the Bcl6 BTB domain is a key mediator of the differentiation of Tfh cells. PMID:25957170

  16. Transcriptional Repressor Rex Is Involved in Regulation of Oxidative Stress Response and Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Bitoun, Jacob P.; Nguyen, Anne H.; Fan, Yuwei; Burne, Robert A.; Wen, Zezhang T.

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Rex has been implicated in regulation of energy metabolism and fermentative growth in response to redox potential. Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of human dental caries, possesses a gene that encodes a protein with high similarity to members of the Rex family of proteins. In this study, we showed that Rex-deficiency compromised the ability of S. mutans to cope with oxidative stress and to form biofilms. The Rex-deficient mutant also accumulated less biofilm after 3-days than the wild-type strain, especially when grown in sucrose-containing medium, but produced more extracellular glucans than the parental strain. Rex-deficiency caused substantial alterations in gene transcription, including those involved in heterofermentative metabolism, NAD+ regeneration and oxidative stress. Among the up-regulated genes was gtfC, which encodes glucosyltransferase C, an enzyme primarily responsible for synthesis of water-insoluble glucans. These results reveal that Rex plays an important role in oxidative stress responses and biofilm formation by S. mutans. PMID:21521360

  17. Genome-wide gene regulation of biosynthesis and energy generation by a novel transcriptional repressor in Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species play important roles in bioremediation of contaminated environments and in electricity production from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. To better understand physiology of Geobacter species, expression and function of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in the TCA cycle that is important for organic acid oxidation in Geobacter species, was investigated. Geobacter sulfurreducens did not require citrate synthase for growth with hydrogen as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor. Expression of the citrate synthase gene, gltA, was repressed by a transcription factor under this growth condition. Functional and comparative genomics approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical assays, identified a novel transcription factor termed HgtR that acts as a repressor for gltA. Further analysis revealed that HgtR is a global regulator for genes involved in biosynthesis and energy generation in Geobacter species. The hgtR gene was essential for growth with hydrogen, during which hgtR expression was induced. These findings provide important new insights into the mechanisms by which Geobacter species regulate their central metabolism under different environmental conditions.

  18. Identification of intracellular localization signals and of mechanisms underlining the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Yuichiro Miyama, Yasuo; Takane, Yusuke; Nakahama, Takayuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2007-12-28

    Two members of the 'AhR family' (a family which is part of the bHLH-PAS superfamily), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR repressor (AhRR), originated from a common ancestor and form a regulatory circuit in xenobiotic signal transduction. AhRR is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein, harboring both a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a nuclear export signal (NES). Because NLS is dominant over NES, AhRR resides predominantly in the nuclear compartment. The NES of AhRR resembles that of AhR in sensitivity to leptomycin B, whereas the NLS of AhRR is monopartite and is, therefore, distinguished from the reported bipartite NLS of AhR. The NLS deletion mutant of GFP-AhRR was transported into the nuclear compartment in the presence of AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt), suggesting the assembly of an AhRR/Arnt heterodimer complex in the cytoplasmic compartment and Arnt-dependent nuclear translocation of this complex.

  19. Forkhead Protein FoxO1 Acts as a Repressor to Inhibit Cell Differentiation in Human Fetal Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zongzhe; Tian, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjian; Yan, Hao; Liu, Liping; Huang, Zhenhe; Lou, Jinning

    2017-01-01

    Our colleagues have reported previously that human pancreatic progenitor cells can readily differentiate into insulin-containing cells. Particularly, transplantation of these cell clusters upon in vitro induction for 3-4 w partially restores hyperglycemia in diabetic nude mice. In this study, we used human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells to identify the forkhead protein FoxO1 as the key regulator for cell differentiation. Thus, induction of human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells for 1 week led to increase of the pancreatic β cell markers such as Ngn3, but decrease of stem cell markers including Oct4, Nanog, and CK19. Of note, FoxO1 knockdown or FoxO1 inhibitor significantly upregulated Ngn3 and insulin as well as the markers such as Glut2, Kir6.2, SUR1, and VDCC, which are designated for mature β cells. On the contrary, overexpression of FoxO1 suppressed the induction and reduced expression of these β cell markers. Taken together, these results suggest that FoxO1 may act as a repressor to inhibit cell differentiation in human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells. PMID:28349071

  20. Molecular mechanism of quinone signaling mediated through S-quinonization of a YodB family repressor QsrR

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Quanjiang; Zhang, Liang; Jones, Marcus B.; Sun, Fei; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Cho, Hoonsik; Brugarolas, Pedro; Gao, Yihe N.; Peterson, Scott N.; Lan, Lefu; Bae, Taeok; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Quinone molecules are intracellular electron-transport carriers, as well as critical intra- and extracellular signals. However, transcriptional regulation of quinone signaling and its molecular basis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a thiol-stress-sensing regulator YodB family transcriptional regulator as a central component of quinone stress response of Staphylococcus aureus, which we have termed the quinone-sensing and response repressor (QsrR). We also identify and confirm an unprecedented quinone-sensing mechanism based on the S-quinonization of the essential residue Cys-5. Structural characterizations of the QsrR–DNA and QsrR–menadione complexes further reveal that the covalent association of menadione directly leads to the release of QsrR from operator DNA following a 10° rigid-body rotation as well as a 9-Å elongation between the dimeric subunits. The molecular level characterization of this quinone-sensing transcriptional regulator provides critical insights into quinone-mediated gene regulation in human pathogens. PMID:23479646

  1. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L.; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli. PMID:27184933

  2. Dioxin exposure blocks lactation through a direct effect on mammary epithelial cells mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor.

    PubMed

    Basham, Kaitlin J; Leonard, Christopher J; Kieffer, Collin; Shelton, Dawne N; McDowell, Maria E; Bhonde, Vasudev R; Looper, Ryan E; Welm, Bryan E

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, lactation is a rich source of nutrients and antibodies for newborn animals. However, millions of mothers each year experience an inability to breastfeed. Exposure to several environmental toxicants, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), has been strongly implicated in impaired mammary differentiation and lactation. TCDD and related polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread industrial pollutants that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Despite many epidemiological and animal studies, the molecular mechanism through which AHR signaling blocks lactation remains unclear. We employed in vitro models of mammary differentiation to recapitulate lactogenesis in the presence of toxicants. We demonstrate AHR agonists directly block milk production in isolated mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we define a novel role for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) in mediating this response. Our mechanistic studies suggest AHRR is sufficient to block transcription of the milk gene β-casein. As TCDD is a prevalent environmental pollutant that affects women worldwide, our results have important public health implications for newborn nutrition.

  3. Identification of a repressor gene involved in the regulation of NAD de novo biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, N; Olivera, B M; Roth, J R

    1988-01-01

    Mutations at the nadI locus affect expression of the first two genes of NAD synthesis, nadA and nadB, which are unlinked. Genetic data imply that the regulatory effects of nadI mutations are not due to indirect consequences of physiological alterations. Two types of mutations map in the nadI region. Common null mutations (nadI) show constitutive high-level expression of the nadB and nadA genes. Rare nadIs mutations cause constitutive low-level expression of nadB and nadA. Some nadIs mutations shut off the expression of the biosynthetic genes sufficiently to cause a nicotinic acid auxotrophy. Spontaneous revertants of auxotrophic nadIs mutants have a NadI- phenotype, including some with deletions of the nadI locus. The nadI locus encodes a repressor protein acting on the unlinked nadA and nadB genes. PMID:3275606

  4. Repressors Nrg1 and Nrg2 regulate a set of stress-responsive genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Valmik K; Berkey, Cristin D; Miyao, Takenori; Carlson, Marian

    2005-11-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to environmental stress by rapidly altering the expression of large sets of genes. We report evidence that the transcriptional repressors Nrg1 and Nrg2 (Nrg1/Nrg2), which were previously implicated in glucose repression, regulate a set of stress-responsive genes. Genome-wide expression analysis identified 150 genes that were upregulated in nrg1Delta nrg2Delta double mutant cells, relative to wild-type cells, during growth in glucose. We found that many of these genes are regulated by glucose repression. Stress response elements (STREs) and STRE-like elements are overrepresented in the promoters of these genes, and a search of available expression data sets showed that many are regulated in response to a variety of environmental stress signals. In accord with these findings, mutation of NRG1 and NRG2 enhanced the resistance of cells to salt and oxidative stress and decreased tolerance to freezing. We present evidence that Nrg1/Nrg2 not only contribute to repression of target genes in the absence of stress but also limit induction in response to salt stress. We suggest that Nrg1/Nrg2 fine-tune the regulation of a set of stress-responsive genes.

  5. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain enhances survival and promotes osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblast cells under Zoledronate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longwei; Han, Jing; Yang, Xi; Wang, Yang; Pan, Hongya; Xu, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Zoledronate is one of the most potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates which has been demonstrated to result in osteoblast apoptosis and impact osteogenic differentiation in vitro. This effect of Zoledronate on osteoblasts may partially explain bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, a serious complication associated with treatment with bisphosphonates. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) is a multifunctional inhibitor of apoptosis that is physiologically expressed predominantly in post-mitotic cells such as cardiomyocytes, neurons and skeletal muscle cells. However, its effect on human osteoblasts remains unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of ARC on human osteoblasts under the treatment of high concentrations of Zoledronate. ARC-overexpressed human osteoblasts were established and were exposed to Zoledronate with different concentrations (0, 1 and 5 µM) in vitro. Cell numbers were detected using the MTT assay, and flow cytometry was used to identity cell apoptosis. Alkaline phosphatase staining, quantitative analysis and ectopic osteogenesis in nude mice were used to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation of ARC-overexpressed osteoblasts. It was observed that ARC is able to reverse the inhibitory effect of Zoldronate on osteoblasts. ARC is additionally able to promote osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts and inhibit their apoptosis. These observations suggest a critical role for ARC in the regulation of human osteoblasts under Zoledronate treatment. PMID:27573706

  6. Genome-wide gene regulation of biosynthesis and energy generation by a novel transcriptional repressor in Geobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species play important roles in bioremediation of contaminated environments and in electricity production from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. To better understand physiology of Geobacter species, expression and function of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in the TCA cycle that is important for organic acid oxidation in Geobacter species, was investigated. Geobacter sulfurreducens did not require citrate synthase for growth with hydrogen as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor. Expression of the citrate synthase gene, gltA, was repressed by a transcription factor under this growth condition. Functional and comparative genomics approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical assays, identified a novel transcription factor termed HgtR that acts as a repressor for gltA. Further analysis revealed that HgtR is a global regulator for genes involved in biosynthesis and energy generation in Geobacter species. The hgtR gene was essential for growth with hydrogen, during which hgtR expression was induced. These findings provide important new insights into the mechanisms by which Geobacter species regulate their central metabolism under different environmental conditions. PMID:19939938

  7. Sliding and target location of DNA-binding proteins: an NMR view of the lac repressor system.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Gnida, Manuel; Romanuka, Julija; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    In non-specific lac headpiece-DNA complexes selective NMR line broadening is observed that strongly depends on length and composition of the DNA fragments. This broadening involves amide protons found in the non-specific lac-DNA structure to be interacting with the DNA phosphate backbone, and can be ascribed to DNA sliding of the protein along the DNA. This NMR exchange broadening has been used to estimate the 1D diffusion constant for sliding along non-specific DNA. The observed 1D diffusion constant of 4×10(-12) cm(2)/s is two orders of magnitude smaller than derived from previous kinetic experiments, but falls in the range of values determined more recently using single molecule methods. This strongly supports the notion that sliding could play at most a minor role in the association kinetics of binding of lac repressor to lac operator and that other processes such as hopping and intersegment transfer contribute to facilitate the DNA recognition process.

  8. X-ray structure of a Rex-family repressor/NADH complex insights into the mechanism of redox sensing.

    PubMed

    Sickmier, E Allen; Brekasis, Dimitris; Paranawithana, Shanthi; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Paget, Mark S B; Burley, Stephen K; Kielkopf, Clara L

    2005-01-01

    The redox-sensing repressor Rex regulates transcription of respiratory genes in response to the intra cellular NADH/NAD(+) redox poise. As a step toward elucidating the molecular mechanism of NADH/NAD(+) sensing, the X-ray structure of Thermus aquaticus Rex (T-Rex) bound to effector NADH has been determined at 2.9 A resolution. The fold of the C-terminal domain of T-Rex is characteristic of NAD(H)-dependent enzymes, whereas the N-terminal domain is similar to a winged helix DNA binding motif. T-Rex dimerization is primarily mediated by "domain-swapped" alpha helices. Each NADH molecule binds to the C-terminal domain near the dimer interface. In contrast to NAD(H)-dependent enzymes, the nicotinamide is deeply buried within a hydrophobic pocket that appears to preclude substrate entry. We show that T-Rex binds to the Rex operator, and NADH but not NAD(+) inhibits T-Rex/DNA binding activity. A mechanism for redox sensing by Rex family members is proposed by analogy with domain closure of NAD(H)-dependent enzymes.

  9. Expression and properties of wild-type and mutant forms of the Drosophila sex comb on midleg (SCM) repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, D; Miller, E; Simon, J

    1998-10-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) gene encodes a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Here we show that SCM protein is nuclear and that its expression is widespread during fly development. SCM protein contains a C-terminal domain, termed the SPM domain, which mediates protein-protein interactions. The biochemical function of another domain consisting of two 100-amino-acid-long repeats, termed "mbt" repeats, is unknown. We have determined the molecular lesions of nine Scm mutant alleles, which identify functional requirements for specific domains. The Scm alleles were tested for genetic interactions with mutations in other PcG genes. Intriguingly, three hypomorphic Scm mutations, which map within an mbt repeat, interact with PcG mutations more strongly than do Scm null alleles. The strongest interactions produce partial synthetic lethality that affects doubly heterozygous females more severely than males. We show that mbt repeat alleles produce stable SCM proteins that associate with normal sites in polytene chromosomes. We also analyzed progeny from Scm mutant germline clones to compare the effects of an mbt repeat mutation during embryonic vs. pupal development. We suggest that the mbt repeat alleles produce altered SCM proteins that incorporate into and impair function of PcG protein complexes.

  10. Robust specification of sensory neurons by dual functions of charlatan, a Drosophila NRSF/REST-like repressor of extramacrochaetae and hairy.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasutoyo; Lim, Young-Mi; Niwa, Nao; Hayashi, Shigeo; Tsuda, Leo

    2011-08-01

    Sensory bristle formation in Drosophila is a well-characterized system for studying sensory organ development at the molecular level. The master proneural genes of the achaete-scute (ac-sc) complex, which encode basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, are necessary and sufficient for sensory bristle formation. charlatan (chn) was originally identified as a transcriptional activator of ac-sc gene expression through interaction with its enhancer, an activity that promotes sensory bristle development. In contrast, Chn was also identified as a functional homologue of mammalian neuron-restrictive silencing factor or RE1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST), an important transcriptional repressor during vertebrate neurogenesis and stem cell development that acts through epigenetic gene silencing. Here, we report that Chn acts as a repressor of extramacrochaetae (emc) and hairy, molecules that inhibit ac-sc expression. This double-negative mechanism, together with direct activation via the achaete enhancer, increases expression of achaete and ensures robust development of sensory neurons. A mutation in the C-terminal repressor motif of Chn, which causes Chn to lose its repression activity, converted Chn to an activator of emc and hairy, suggesting that Chn is a dual functional regulator of transcription. Because chn-like sequences are found among arthropods, regulation of neuronal development by Chn-like molecules may be widely conserved.

  11. Isolation and identification of a repressor TetR for 3,17β-HSD expressional regulation in Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianyuan; Huang, Pu; Xiong, Guangming; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-05

    Comamonas testosteroni (C. testosteroni) is able to catabolize a variety of steroids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 3,17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3,17β-HSD) from C. testosteroni is a key enzyme in steroid degradation. Understanding the mechanism of 3,17β-HSD gene (βhsd) induction may help us to elucidate its complete molecular regulation. Sequencing the C. testosteroni ATCC11996 genome lead us to identify the tetR (522 bp) downstream of βhsd. Two repeat sequences (RS; 13 bp), that are separated to each other by 1661 bp, were found upstream of βhsd. A bioinformatic analysis revealed that TetR family proteins act as transcriptional repressors which are sensitive to environmental signals. Since, C. testosteroni responds to environmental steroid induction and upregulates steroid catabolic genes, we hypothesized that TetR might act in C. testosteroni as repressor for βhsd expression. The tetR was cloned into different plasmids, including an EGFP reporter system, for functional characterization and/or overexpression. The data indicate that, indeed, TetR acts as a repressor for 3,17β-HSD expression. Testosterone in turn, which is known to induce βhsd expression, could not resolve TetR repression. To further substantiate TetR as repressor for βhsd expression, a tetR gene knock-out mutant of C. testosteroni was generated. TetR gene knock-out mutants showed the same basal low level of βhsd expression as the C. testosteroni wild type cells. Interestingly, testosterone induction leads to a strong increase in βhsd expression, especially in the tetR gene knock-out mutants. The result with the knock-out mutant, in principle, supports our hypothesis that TetR is a repressor for βhsd expression, but the exact role of testosterone in this context remains unknown. Finally, it turned out that TetR is obviously also involved in the regulation of the hsdA gene.

  12. Design, Assembly, and Characterization of TALE-Based Transcriptional Activators and Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Pratiksha I.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are modular DNA-binding proteins that can be fused to a variety of effector domains to regulate the epigenome. Nucleotide recognition by TALE monomers follows a simple cipher, making this a powerful and versatile method to activate or repress gene expression. Described here are methods to design, assemble, and test TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) for control of endogenous gene expression. In this protocol, TALE arrays are constructed by Golden Gate cloning and tested for activity by transfection and quantitative RT-PCR. These methods for engineering TALE-TFs are useful for studies in reverse genetics and genomics, synthetic biology, and gene therapy. PMID:26443215

  13. Transcription Factor Ets-2 Acts as a Preinduction Repressor of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Transcription in Naive T Helper Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Panagoulias, Ioannis; Georgakopoulos, Tassos; Aggeletopoulou, Ioanna; Agelopoulos, Marios; Thanos, Dimitris; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-12-23

    IL-2 is the first cytokine produced when naive T helper (Th) cells are activated and differentiate into dividing pre-Th0 proliferating precursors. IL-2 expression is blocked in naive, but not activated or memory, Th cells by the transcription factor Ets-2 that binds to the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)-2 of the proximal IL-2 promoter. Ets-2 acts as an independent preinduction repressor in naive Th cells and does not interact physically with the transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) that binds to the ARRE-2 in activated Th cells. In naive Th cells, Ets-2 mRNA expression, Ets-2 protein levels, and Ets-2 binding to ARRE-2 decrease upon cell activation followed by the concomitant expression of IL-2. Cyclosporine A stabilizes Ets-2 mRNA and protein when the cells are activated. Ets-2 silences directly constitutive or induced IL-2 expression through the ARRE-2. Conversely, Ets-2 silencing allows for constitutive IL-2 expression in unstimulated cells. Ets-2 binding to ARRE-2 in chromatin is stronger in naive compared with activated or memory Th cells; in the latter, Ets-2 participates in a change of the IL-2 promoter architecture, possibly to facilitate a quick response when the cells re-encounter antigen. We propose that Ets-2 expression and protein binding to the ARRE-2 of the IL-2 promoter are part of a strictly regulated process that results in a physiological transition of naive Th cells to Th0 cells upon antigenic stimulation. Malfunction of such a repression mechanism at the molecular level could lead to a disturbance of later events in Th cell plasticity, leading to autoimmune diseases or other pathological conditions.

  14. The effect of the floral repressor FLC on the timing and progression of vegetative phase change in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Matthew R.; Poethig, R. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Plants undergo two major post-embryonic developmental transitions – the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition (vegetative phase change) and the adult-to-reproductive transition (flowering). In woody plants, these transitions can be separated by years, but in herbaceous species they are often very close together, making it difficult to differentiate the effects of vegetative phase change and floral induction on vegetative development. To distinguish between these factors, we have compared the vegetative morphology of plants highly expressing the floral repressor FLC (FRI;FLC) with plants mutant for this gene (FRI;flc-3) under both photoinductive (long day, LD and night interruption, NI) and non-photoinductive (short day, SD) conditions. We show that the onset of abaxial trichome production is insensitive to floral induction, but the distribution and overall number of abaxial trichomes, as well as several other leaf traits associated with vegetative change, are strongly influenced by flowering. Most of the major differences in leaf morphology between FRI;FLC and FRI;flc-3 plants grown in LD can be attributed to the early flowering phenotype of FRI;flc-3, because these differences are not apparent in plants grown in SD. These include differences in leaf size, hydathode number and the distribution of abaxial trichomes along the length of the leaf. Leaf shape and the total number of abaxial trichomes are affected by FLC independently of its effect on flowering. Our results demonstrate that the onset and the progression of vegetative phase change are regulated by different combinations of endogenous and environmental factors, and reveal a role for FLC in vegetative development. PMID:21228003

  15. Nuclear co-repressor (NCoR) is required to maintain insulin sensitivity in C2 C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Abhijeet K; Dey, Chinmoy S

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear co-repressor (NCoR) regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity; however, its role in modulating insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle remains elusive. Present study investigated protein expression and effect of NCoR on insulin sensitivity in murine skeletal muscle cell line C2 C12 . Myotubes as compared to myoblasts of C2 C12 cells were found to be more sensitive in response to insulin as increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of AKT at serine 473 residue (pAKT(S473) ) was significantly higher in myotubes. Incidentally, reduced protein level of NCoR coincided with differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes of C2 C12 cells. However, insulin stimulation per se failed to affect protein level of NCoR either in myoblasts or myotubes of C2 C12 cells. To assess the role of NCoR on insulin sensitivity, NCoR was transiently knocked down using siRNA in myotubes of C2 C12 . In fact, transient silencing of NCoR led to significant reduction in insulin-stimulated pAKT(S473) and impaired glucose uptake. This observation is in contrast to published studies where NCoR has been reported to negatively regulate insulin signaling cascade. Furthermore, transient silencing of NCoR failed to improve insulin sensitivity in chronic hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin-resistant model of C2 C12 cells. Importantly, inhibition of lysosomal protein degradation pathway using ammonium chloride restored protein level of NCoR but failed to increase glucose uptake in serum-starved C2 C12 myotubes. Collectively, data from present study show differential protein level of NCoR under different cell state (myoblast and myotubes) of C2 C12 cells and NCoR proves to be vital for maintaining insulin sensitivity in C2 C12 myotubes.

  16. Wheat flowering repressor VRN2 and promoter CO2 compete for interactions with NUCLEAR FACTOR-Y complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengxia; Distelfeld, Assaf; Comis, Alfio; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2011-09-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive development in the temperate cereals is mainly regulated by seasonal cues including vernalization (determined mainly by VRN1 and VRN2 genes) and photoperiod (determined mainly by PPD1 and CO2 genes). The wheat VRN3 gene, which is similar to Arabidopsis FT, plays a central role in the integration of the competing signals from these two pathways. Under long days, VRN3 transcription is down-regulated by VRN2, a unique flowering repressor in cereals, and up-regulated by CO2. Overexpression of VRN3 overcomes VRN2 repression and promotes VRN1 transcription and flowering initiation. Using yeast two- and three-hybrid assays we show here that the CCT domains present in VRN2 and CO2 proteins interact with the same subset of eight NF-Y proteins, and that these CCT proteins compete with NF-YA for interactions with NF-YB proteins. We have confirmed all these interactions in vitro, and the interactions between VRN2 and two of the three NF-YB proteins were further confirmed in planta. In addition, we show that mutations in the CCT domain of VRN2 that eliminate the vernalization requirement in winter wheat also reduce the strength of the interactions between VRN2 and NF-Y proteins, and the ability of VRN2 to compete with CO2. Taken together, our results suggest that the interactions between CCT and NF-Y proteins play an important role in the integration of the vernalization and photoperiod seasonal signals, and provide a flexible combinatorial system to integrate multiple developmental and environmental signals in the regulation of flowering initiation in the temperate cereals.

  17. Plk1 Regulates the Repressor Function of FoxM1b by inhibiting its Interaction with the Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K.; Chand, Vaibhav; Pandey, Akshay; Kopanja, Dragana; Carr, Janai R.; Chen, Yi-Ju; Liao, Xiubei; Raychaudhuri, Pradip

    2017-01-01

    FoxM1b is a cell cycle-regulated transcription factor, whose over-expression is a marker for poor outcome in cancers. Its transcriptional activation function requires phosphorylation by Cdk1 or Cdk2 that primes FoxM1b for phosphorylation by Plk1, which triggers association with the co-activator CBP. FoxM1b also possesses transcriptional repression function. It represses the mammary differentiation gene GATA3 involving DNMT3b and Rb. We investigated what determines the two distinct functions of FoxM1b: activation and repression. We show that Rb binds to the C-terminal activation domain of FoxM1b. Analyses with phospho-defective and phospho-mimetic mutants of FoxM1b identified a critical role of the Plk1 phosphorylation sites in regulating the binding of FoxM1b to Rb and DNMT3b. That is opposite of what was seen for the interaction of FoxM1b with CBP. We show that, in addition to GATA3, FoxM1b also represses the mammary luminal differentiation marker FoxA1 by promoter-methylation, and that is regulated by the Plk1 phosphorylation sites in FoxM1b. Our results show that the Plk1 phosphorylation sites in FoxM1b serve as a regulator for its repressor function, and they provide insights into how FoxM1b inhibits differentiation genes and activates proliferation genes during cancer progression. PMID:28387346

  18. Identification of the Flavonoid Luteolin as a Repressor of the Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Inoue, Jun; Choi, Jung-Min; Nakamura, Shugo; Yan, Zhen; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Kato, Hisanori; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes involved in the secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and in glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified a naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, as a repressor of HNF4α by screening for effectors of the human microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) promoter. Luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the activity of the MTP gene promoter was suppressed by luteolin and that the mutation of HNF4α-binding element abolished luteolin responsiveness. Luteolin treatment caused a significant decrease in the mRNA levels of HNF4α target genes in HepG2 cells and inhibited apoB-containing lipoprotein secretion in HepG2 and differentiated Caco2 cells. The interaction between luteolin and HNF4α was demonstrated using absorption spectrum analysis and luteolin-immobilized beads. Luteolin did not affect the DNA binding of HNF4α to the promoter region of its target genes but suppressed the acetylation level of histone H3 in the promoter region of certain HNF4α target genes. Short term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed the expression of HNF4α target genes in the liver. In addition, long term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed their diet-induced obesity and improved their serum glucose and lipid parameters. Importantly, long term luteolin treatment lowered serum VLDL and LDL cholesterol and serum apoB protein levels, which was not accompanied by fat accumulation in the liver. These results suggest that the flavonoid luteolin ameliorates an atherogenic lipid profile in vivo that is likely to be mediated through the inactivation of HNF4α. PMID:26272613

  19. Wood smoke enhances cigarette smoke-induced inflammation by inducing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Awji, Elias G; Chand, Hitendra; Bruse, Shannon; Smith, Kevin R; Colby, Jennifer K; Mebratu, Yohannes; Levy, Bruce D; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Our previous studies showed that cigarette smokers who are exposed to wood smoke (WS) are at an increased risk for chronic bronchitis and reduced lung function. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms for WS-induced adverse effects. We studied the effect of WS exposure using four cohorts of mice. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed for 4 or 12 weeks to filtered air, to 10 mg/m(3) WS for 2 h/d, to 250 mg/m(3) cigarette smoke (CS) for 6 h/d, or to CS followed by WS (CW). Inflammation was absent in the filtered air and WS groups, but enhanced by twofold in the bronchoalveolar lavage of the CW compared with CS group as measured by neutrophil numbers and levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant, keratinocyte-derived chemokine. The levels of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin, lipoxin A4, were reduced by threefold along with cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES)-1 in airway epithelial cells and PGE2 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage of CW compared with CS mice. We replicated, in primary human airway epithelial cells, the changes observed in mice. Immunoprecipitations showed that WS blocked the interaction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) with AHR nuclear transporter to reduce expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 by increasing expression of AHR repressor (AHRR). Collectively, these studies show that exposure to low concentrations of WS enhanced CS-induced inflammation by inducing AHRR expression to suppress AHR, COX-2, and mPGES-1 expression, and levels of PGE2 and lipoxin A4. Therefore, AHRR is a potential therapeutic target for WS-associated exacerbations of CS-induced inflammation.

  20. Methylation-independent DNA Binding Modulates Specificity of Repressor of Silencing 1 (ROS1) and Facilitates Demethylation in Long Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ponferrada-Marín, María Isabel; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R.

    2010-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mark that promotes gene silencing and performs critical roles during reproduction and development in both plants and animals. The genomic distribution of DNA methylation is the dynamic outcome of opposing methylation and demethylation processes. In plants, active demethylation occurs through a base excision repair pathway initiated by 5-methycytosine (5-meC) DNA glycosylases of the REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1)/DEMETER (DME) family. To gain insight into the mechanism by which Arabidopsis ROS1 recognizes and excises 5-meC, we have identified those protein regions that are required for efficient DNA binding and catalysis. We have found that a short N-terminal lysine-rich domain conserved in members of the ROS1/DME family mediates strong methylation-independent binding of ROS1 to DNA and is required for efficient activity on 5-meC·G, but not for T·G processing. Removal of this domain does not significantly affect 5-meC excision from short molecules, but strongly decreases ROS1 activity on long DNA substrates. This region is not required for product binding and is not involved in the distributive behavior of the enzyme on substrates containing multiple 5-meC residues. Altogether, our results suggest that methylation-independent DNA binding allows ROS1 to perform a highly redundant search for efficient excision of a nondamaged, correctly paired base such as 5-meC in long stretches of DNA. These findings may have implications for understanding the evolution of structure and target specificity in DNA glycosylases. PMID:20489198

  1. A binding site for activation by the Bacillus subtilis AhrC protein, a repressor/activator of arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Klingel, U; Miller, C M; North, A K; Stockley, P G; Baumberg, S

    1995-08-21

    In Bacillus subtilis, the AhrC protein represses genes encoding enzymes of arginine biosynthesis and activates those mediating its catabolism. To determine how this repressor also functions as an activator, we attempted to clone catabolic genes by searching for insertions of the Tn917-lacZ transposon that express AhrC-dependent, arginine-inducible beta-galactosidase activity. One such isolate was obtained. The region upstream of lacZ was subcloned in Escherichia coli in such a way that it could be replaced in the B. subtilis chromosome after appropriate manipulation. Analysis of exonuclease III-derived deletions located an AhrC-dependent, arginine-inducible promoter to within a ca. 1.9 kb fragment. The sequence revealed: the 3' end of an ORF homologous to gdh genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase, with highest homology to the homologue from Clostridium difficile; the 5' end of an ORF homologous to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding delta 1-pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH), an enzyme of arginine catabolism; and just upstream of the latter, a sequence with homology to known AhrC binding sites in the upstream part of the biosynthetic argCJBD-cpa-F cluster. The same region has also been sequenced by others as part of the B. subtilis genome sequencing project, revealing that the P5CDH gene is the first in a cluster termed rocABC. Restriction fragments containing the putative AhrC-binding sequence, but not those lacking it, showed retarded electrophoretic mobility in the presence of purified AhrC. A 277 bp AhrC-binding fragment also showed anomalous mobility in the absence of AhrC, consistent with its being intrinsically bent. DNAse I footprinting localized AhrC binding to bp -16/-22 to +1 (the transcription startpoint). Such a location for an activator binding site, i.e. overlapping the transcription start, is unusual.

  2. The switch from fermentation to respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the Ert1 transcriptional activator/repressor.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Najla; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Klimova, Natalia; Guo, Xiao; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Robert, François; Turcotte, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fermentation is the major pathway for energy production, even under aerobic conditions. However, when glucose becomes scarce, ethanol produced during fermentation is used as a carbon source, requiring a shift to respiration. This adaptation results in massive reprogramming of gene expression. Increased expression of genes for gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle is observed upon a shift to ethanol and, conversely, expression of some fermentation genes is reduced. The zinc cluster proteins Cat8, Sip4, and Rds2, as well as Adr1, have been shown to mediate this reprogramming of gene expression. In this study, we have characterized the gene YBR239C encoding a putative zinc cluster protein and it was named ERT1 (ethanol regulated transcription factor 1). ChIP-chip analysis showed that Ert1 binds to a limited number of targets in the presence of glucose. The strongest enrichment was observed at the promoter of PCK1 encoding an important gluconeogenic enzyme. With ethanol as the carbon source, enrichment was observed with many additional genes involved in gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. Use of lacZ reporters and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that Ert1 regulates expression of its target genes in a manner that is highly redundant with other regulators of gluconeogenesis. Interestingly, in the presence of ethanol, Ert1 is a repressor of PDC1 encoding an important enzyme for fermentation. We also show that Ert1 binds directly to the PCK1 and PDC1 promoters. In summary, Ert1 is a novel factor involved in the regulation of gluconeogenesis as well as a key fermentation gene.

  3. Indirect readout of DNA sequence by p22 repressor: roles of DNA and protein functional groups in modulating DNA conformation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lydia-Ann; Watkins, Derrick; Williams, Loren Dean; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2013-01-09

    The repressor of bacteriophage P22 (P22R) discriminates between its various DNA binding sites by sensing the identity of non-contacted base pairs at the center of its binding site. The "indirect readout" of these non-contacted bases is apparently based on DNA's sequence-dependent conformational preferences. The structures of P22R-DNA complexes indicate that the non-contacted base pairs at the center of the binding site are in the B' state. This finding suggests that indirect readout and therefore binding site discrimination depend on P22R's ability to either sense and/or impose the B' state on the non-contacted bases of its binding sites. We show here that the affinity of binding sites for P22R depends on the tendency of the central bases to assume the B'-DNA state. Furthermore, we identify functional groups in the minor groove of the non-contacted bases as the essential modulators of indirect readout by P22R. In P22R-DNA complexes, the negatively charged E44 and E48 residues are provocatively positioned near the negatively charged DNA phosphates of the non-contacted nucleotides. The close proximity of the negatively charged groups on protein and DNA suggests that electrostatics may play a key role in the indirect readout process. Changing either of two negatively charged residues to uncharged residues eliminates the ability of P22R to impose structural changes on DNA and to recognize non-contacted base sequence. These findings suggest that these negatively charged amino acids function to force the P22R-bound DNA into the B' state and therefore play a key role in indirect readout by P22R.

  4. Intramolecular signal transmission in a tetrameric repressor of the IclR family

    PubMed Central

    Fillet, Sandy; Krell, Tino; Morel, Bertrand; Lu, Duo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ramos, Juan L.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the IclR family control bacterial genes involved in a number of physiological processes. The IclR-family member TtgV crystallizes as a tetramer, with each TtgV monomer consisting of two domains—a DNA binding domain and an effector recognition domain, which are interconnected by an extended α-helix. When bound to DNA, a kink is introduced so that the extended helix is split in two α-helices (helix-4 and -5). Differential scanning calorimetry studies revealed that TtgV unfolds in a single event, suggesting that the two domains unfold cooperatively. When mutations are introduced in helix-5 that disrupt interactions between Arg98 and Glu102, the thermal unfolding of the TtgV domains becomes uncoupled without compromising effector binding. Two of these mutants (TtgVE102R and TtgVE102A) showed impaired release from target DNA, suggesting that these mutations alter signal transmission. By combining various mutants, we found that the mutations in the connecting α-helix exhibited a dominant effect over mutations in DNA binding and effector binding domains. We propose a model in which the loss of cooperativity of unfolding of TtgV reflects perturbed interdomain communication, and that the transition from the continuous to discontinuous helix may mediate interdomain communication necessary for the proper functioning of TtgV. PMID:21876158

  5. A Large-Scale Functional Screen to Identify Epigenetic Repressors of Retrotransposon Expression.

    PubMed

    Ecco, Gabriela; Rowe, Helen M; Trono, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of epigenetic marks is an important layer of the transcriptional control of retrotransposons, especially during early embryogenesis. Krüppel-associated box domain zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) are one of the largest families of transcription factors, and collectively partake in this process by tethering to thousands of retroelement-containing genomic loci their cofactor KAP1, which acts as a scaffold for a heterochromatin-inducing machinery. However, while the sequence-specific DNA binding potential of the poly-zinc finger-containing KRAB-ZFPs is recognized, very few members of the family have been assigned specific targets. In this chapter, we describe a large-scale functional screen to identify the retroelements bound by individual murine KRAB-ZFPs. Our method is based on the automated transfection of a library of mouse KRAB-ZFP-containing vectors into 293T cells modified to express GFP from a PGK promoter harboring in its immediate vicinity a KAP1-recruiting retroelement-derived sequence. Analysis is then performed by plate reader and flow cytometry fluorescence readout. Such large-scale DNA-centered functional approach can not only help to identify the trans-acting factors responsible for silencing retrotransposons, but also serve as a model for dissecting the transcriptional networks influenced by retroelement-derived cis-acting sequences.

  6. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1. We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  7. Miz1 Is a Critical Repressor of cdkn1a during Skin Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hönnemann, Jan; Sanz-Moreno, Adrián; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Elsässer, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor Miz1 forms repressive DNA-binding complexes with the Myc, Gfi-1 and Bcl-6 oncoproteins. Known target genes of these complexes encode the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) cdkn2b (p15Ink4), cdkn1a (p21Cip1), and cdkn1c (p57Kip2). Whether Miz1-mediated repression is important for control of cell proliferation in vivo and for tumor formation is unknown. Here we show that deletion of the Miz1 POZ domain, which is critical for Miz1 function, restrains the development of skin tumors in a model of chemically-induced, Ras-dependent tumorigenesis. While the stem cell compartment appears unaffected, interfollicular keratinocytes lacking functional Miz1 exhibit a reduced proliferation and an accelerated differentiation of the epidermis in response to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Tumorigenesis, proliferation and normal differentiation are restored in animals lacking cdkn1a, but not in those lacking cdkn2b. Our data demonstrate that Miz1-mediated attenuation of cell cycle arrest pathways via repression of cdkn1a has a critical role during tumorigenesis in the skin. PMID:22509363

  8. Gli activity is critical at multiple stages of embryonic mammary and nipple development.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Anupama; Hatsell, Sarah J; Pinderhughes, Alicia; Koetz, Lisa; Cowin, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Gli3 is a transcriptional regulator of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling that functions as a repressor (Gli3(R)) or activator (Gli3(A)) depending upon cellular context. Previously, we have shown that Gli3(R) is required for the formation of mammary placodes #3 and #5. Here, we report that this early loss of Gli3 results in abnormal patterning of two critical regulators: Bmp4 and Tbx3, within the presumptive mammary rudiment (MR) #3 zone. We also show that Gli3 loss leads to failure to maintain mammary mesenchyme specification and loss of epithelial Wnt signaling, which impairs the later development of remaining MRs: MR#2 showed profound evagination and ectopic hairs formed within the presumptive areola; MR#4 showed mild invagination defects and males showed inappropriate retention of mammary buds in Gli3(xt/xt) mice. Importantly, mice genetically manipulated to misactivate Hh signaling displayed the same phenotypic spectrum demonstrating that the repressor function of Gli3(R) is essential during multiple stages of mammary development. In contrast, positive Hh signaling occurs during nipple development in a mesenchymal cuff around the lactiferous duct and in muscle cells of the nipple sphincter. Collectively, these data show that repression of Hh signaling by Gli3(R) is critical for early placodal patterning and later mammary mesenchyme specification whereas positive Hh signaling occurs during nipple development.

  9. The ZEB1 Transcription Factor Is a Novel Repressor of Adiposity in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saykally, Jessica N.; Dogan, Soner; Cleary, Margot P.; Sanders, Michel M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Four genome-wide association studies mapped an “obesity” gene to human chromosome 10p11–12. As the zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) transcription factor is encoded by the TCF8 gene located in that region, and as it influences the differentiation of various mesodermal lineages, we hypothesized that ZEB1 might also modulate adiposity. The goal of these studies was to test that hypothesis in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings To ascertain whether fat accumulation affects ZEB1 expression, female C57BL/6 mice were fed a regular chow diet (RCD) ad libitum or a 25% calorie-restricted diet from 2.5 to 18.3 months of age. ZEB1 mRNA levels in parametrial fat were six to ten times higher in the obese mice. To determine directly whether ZEB1 affects adiposity, wild type (WT) mice and mice heterozygous for TCF8 (TCF8+/−) were fed an RCD or a high-fat diet (HFD) (60% calories from fat). By two months of age on an HFD and three months on an RCD, TCF8+/− mice were heavier than WT controls, which was attributed by Echo MRI to increased fat mass (at three months on an HFD: 0.517±0.081 total fat/lean mass versus 0.313±0.036; at three months on an RCD: 0.175±0.013 versus 0.124±0.012). No differences were observed in food uptake or physical activity, suggesting that the genotypes differ in some aspect of their metabolic activity. ZEB1 expression also increases during adipogenesis in cell culture. Conclusion/Significance These results show for the first time that the ZEB1 transcription factor regulates the accumulation of adipose tissue. Furthermore, they corroborate the genome-wide association studies that mapped an “obesity” gene at chromosome 10p11–12. PMID:20041147

  10. The Apoptosis Repressor with a CARD Domain (ARC) Gene Is a Direct Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Target Gene and Promotes Survival and Proliferation of VHL-Deficient Renal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Razorenova, Olga V.; Castellini, Laura; Colavitti, Renata; Edgington, Laura E.; Nicolau, Monica; Huang, Xin; Bedogni, Barbara; Mills, Edward M.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The induction of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) is essential for the adaptation of tumor cells to a low-oxygen environment. We found that the expression of the apoptosis inhibitor ARC (apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain) was induced by hypoxia in a variety of cancer cell types, and its induction is primarily HIF1 dependent. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and reporter assays also indicate that the ARC gene is regulated by direct binding of HIF1 to a hypoxia response element (HRE) located at bp −190 upstream of the transcription start site. HIFs play an essential role in the pathogenesis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) under normoxic conditions, through the loss of the Von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL). Accordingly, our results show that ARC is not expressed in normal renal tissue but is highly expressed in 65% of RCC tumors, which also express high levels of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a HIF1-dependent protein. Compared to controls, ARC-deficient RCCs exhibited decreased colony formation and increased apoptosis in vitro. In addition, loss of ARC resulted in a dramatic reduction of RCC tumor growth in SCID mice in vivo. Thus, HIF-mediated increased expression of ARC in RCC can explain how loss of VHL can promote survival early in tumor formation. PMID:24344197

  11. Identification of BRCA1 Deficiency Using Multi-Analyte Estimation of BRCA1 and Its Repressors in FFPE Tumor Samples from Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korlimarla, Aruna; Prabhu, Jyothi S.; Remacle, Jose; Rajarajan, Savitha; Raja, Uma; C. E., Anupama; Srinath, B. S.; Manjunath, Suraj; K. S., Gopinath; Correa, Marjorrie; M. S. N., Prasad; Sridhar, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Apart from germ-line BRCA1-mutated breast cancers, a significant proportion of women with sporadic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) sub-type are known to harbour varying levels of BRCA1-dysfuction. There is currently no established diagnostic method to identify these patients. Methods The analysis was performed on 183 primary breast cancer tumor specimens from our longitudinal case-series archived as formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks comprising 71 TNBCs and 112 Hormone receptor positive HER2 negative (HR+HER2-) tumors. Transcript levels of BRCA1 and two of its repressors ID4 and microRNA182 were determined by TaqMan quantitative PCR. BRCA1 protein was detected immunohistochemically with the MS110 antibody. Results The representation of BRCA1 and its repressor ID4 as a ratio led to improved separation of TNBCs from HR+HER2- compared to either measure by itself. We then dichotomised the continuous distribution of each of the three measurements (Protein, MIRNA and transcript:repressor ratio) into categories of deficient (0) and adequate (1). A composite BRCA1 Deficiency Score (BDS) was computed by the addition of the score for all three measures. Samples deficient on 2 or more measures were deemed to be BRCA1 deficient; and 40% of all TNBCs met this criterion. Conclusion We propose here a simple multi-level assay of BRCA1 deficiency using the BRCA1:ID4 ratio as a critical parameter that can be performed on FFPE samples in clinical laboratories by the estimation of only 3 bio-markers. The ease of testing will hopefully encourage adoption and clinical validation. PMID:27077368

  12. A high affinity HSF-1 binding site in the 5'-untranslated region of the murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene is a transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ishwar S; He, Ju-Ren; Calderwood, Stuart; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2002-02-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pivotal early mediator of host defenses that is essential for survival in infections. We previously reported that exposing macrophages to febrile range temperatures (FRT) (38.5-40 degrees C) markedly attenuates TNFalpha expression by causing abrupt and premature cessation of transcription. We showed that this inhibitory effect of FRT is mediated by an alternatively activated repressor form of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and that a fragment of the TNFalpha gene comprising a minimal 85-nucleotide (nt) proximal promoter and the 138-nt 5'-untranslated region (UTR) was sufficient for mediating this effect. In the present study we have used an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) to identify a high affinity binding site for HSF-1 in the 5'-UTR of the TNFalpha gene and have used a chromosome immunoprecipitation assay to show that HSF-1 binds to this region of the endogenous TNFalpha gene. Mutational inactivation of this site blocks the inhibitory effect of overexpressed HSF-1 on activity of the minimal TNFalpha promoter (-85/+138) in Raw 264.7 murine macrophages, identifying this site as an HSF-1-dependent repressor. However, the same mutation fails to block repression of a full-length (-1080/+138) TNFalpha promoter construct by HSF-1 overexpression, and HSF-1 binds to upstream sequences in the regions -1080/-845, -533/-196, and -326/-39 nt in EMSA, suggesting that additional HSF-1-dependent repressor elements are present upstream of the minimal -85-nt promoter. Furthermore, although mutation of the HSF-1 binding site in the minimal TNFalpha promoter construct abrogates HSF-1-mediated repression, the same mutation fails to abrogate repression of this construct by high levels of HSF-1 overexpression or exposure to 39.5 degrees C. This suggests that HSF-1 might repress TNFalpha transcription through redundant mechanisms, some of which might not require high affinity binding of HSF-1.

  13. The PaaX Repressor, a Link between Penicillin G Acylase and the Phenylacetyl-Coenzyme A Catabolon of Escherichia coli W

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Beatriz; García, José L.; Prieto, María A.

    2004-01-01

    The pac gene, encoding the penicillin G acylase from Escherichia coli W, is regulated by the PaaX repressor of the phenylacetate catabolic pathway. pac expression depends on the synthesis of phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. PaaX and the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) bind in vitro to the Ppac promoter region. A palindromic sequence proposed as the PaaX operator is located upstream of the −35 box overlapping a CRP binding site, an unusual position that suggests a novel regulatory mechanism. PMID:15028709

  14. Introduction of marker-free deletions in Bacillus subtilis using the AraR repressor and the ara promoter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenghao; Endo, Keiji; Ara, Katsutoshi; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ogasawara, Naotake

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a system for the induction of marker-free mutation of Bacillus subtilis. The system features both the advantages of the use of antibiotic-resistance markers for mutant selection, and the ability to efficiently remove the markers, leaving unmarked mutations in the genome. It utilizes both a selective marker cassette and a counter-selective marker cassette. The selective marker cassette contains a chloramphenicol-resistance gene and the araR gene, which encodes the repressor for the arabinose operon (ara) of B. subtilis. The counter-selective marker cassette consists of a promoterless neomycin (Nm)-resistance gene (neo) fused to the ara promoter. First, the chromosomal araR locus is replaced with the counter-selective marker cassette by double-crossover homologous recombination and positive selection for Nm resistance. The selective marker cassette is connected with upstream and downstream sequences from the target locus, and is integrated into the upstream region of the target locus by a double-crossover event. This integration is also positively selected for, using chloramphenicol resistance. In the resultant strain, AraR, encoded by araR on the selective marker cassette, represses the expression of neo in the absence of l-arabinose. Finally, the eviction of the selective marker cassette together with the target locus is achieved by an intra-genomic single-crossover event between the two downstream regions of the target locus, and can be selected for based on Nm resistance, because of the excision of araR. The counter-selective marker cassette remaining in the genome, whose expression is switched on or off based on the excision or introduction of the selective marker cassette, is used again for the next round of deletion. Using this system, the 3.8 kb iolS-csbC region and the 41.8 kb hutM-csbC region have been efficiently and successfully deleted, without leaving markers in the target loci. The positive selection and simple procedure will make it

  15. Prothymosin Alpha Selectively Enhances Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activity by Interacting with a Repressor of Estrogen Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Paolo G. V.; Delage-Mourroux, Regis; Kraichely, Dennis M.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2000-01-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTα) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTα interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTα, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTα increases the magnitude of ERα transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERβ transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTα or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTα (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTα or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTα, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTα to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain its ability to selectively enhance

  16. Glucose Repression of STA1 Expression Is Mediated by the Nrg1 and Sfl1 Repressors and the Srb8-11 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Soo; Lee, Sung Bae; Kang, Hyen Sam

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus, expression of the STA1 gene, which encodes an extracellular glucoamylase, is negatively regulated by glucose. Here we demonstrate that glucose-dependent repression of STA1 expression is imposed by both Sfl1 and Nrg1, which serve as direct transcriptional repressors. We show that Nrg1 acts only on UAS1, and Sfl1 acts only on UAS2, in the STA1 promoter. When bound to its specific site, Sfl1 (but not Nrg1) prevents the binding to UAS2 of two transcriptional activators, Ste12 and Tec1, required for STA1 expression. We also found that Sfl1 contributes to STA1 repression by binding to the promoter and inhibiting the expression of FLO8, a gene that encodes a third transcriptional activator involved in STA1 expression. In addition, we show that the levels of Nrg1 and Sfl1 increase in glucose-grown cells, suggesting that the effects of glucose are mediated, at least in part, through an increase in the abundance of these repressors. NRG1 and SFL1 expression requires the Srb8-11 complex, and correspondingly, the Srb8-11 complex is also necessary for STA1 repression. However, our evidence indicates that the Srb8-11 complex does not associate with either the SFL1 or the NRG1 promoter and thus plays an indirect role in activating NRG1 and SFL1 expression. PMID:15314176

  17. The Ssn6-Tup1 repressor complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in the osmotic induction of HOG-dependent and -independent genes.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, J A; Pascual-Ahuir, A; Proft, M; Serrano, R

    1998-01-01

    The response of yeast to osmotic stress has been proposed to rely on the HOG-MAP kinase signalling pathway and on transcriptional activation mediated by STRE promoter elements. However, the osmotic induction of HAL1, an important determinant of salt tolerance, is HOG independent and occurs through the release of transcriptional repression. We have identified an upstream repressing sequence in HAL1 promoter (URSHAL1) located between -231 and -156. This promoter region was able to repress transcription from a heterologous promoter and to bind proteins in non-stressed cells, but not in salt-treated cells. The repression conferred by URSHAL1 is mediated through the Ssn6-Tup1 protein complex and is abolished in the presence of osmotic stress. The Ssn6-Tup1 co-repressor is also involved in the regulation of HOG-dependent genes such as GPD1, CTT1, ALD2, ENA1 and SIP18, and its deletion can suppress the osmotic sensitivity of hog1 mutants. We propose that the Ssn6-Tup1 repressor complex might be a general component in the regulation of osmostress responses at the transcriptional level of both HOG-dependent and -independent genes. PMID:9564037

  18. The variant Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 component PCGF1 interacts with a pluripotency sub-network that includes DPPA4, a regulator of embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, Giorgio; Munawar, Nayla; Watson, Ariane; Streubel, Gundula; Manning, Gwendolyn; Bardwell, Vivian; Bracken, Adrian P.; Cagney, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    PCGF1 encodes one of six human Polycomb RING finger homologs that are linked to transcriptional repression and developmental gene regulation. Individual PCGF proteins define discrete Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 (PRC1) multi-protein complexes with diverse subunit composition whose functions are incompletely understood. PCGF1 is a component of a variant PRC1 complex that also contains the BCL6 co-repressor BCOR and the histone demethylase KDM2B. To further investigate the role of PCGF1, we mapped the physical interactions of the protein under endogenous conditions in a cell model of neuronal differentiation. Using stringent statistical cut-offs, 83 highly enriched interacting proteins were identified, including all previously reported members of the variant PRC1 complex containing PCGF1, as well as proteins linked to diverse cellular pathways such as chromatin and cell cycle regulation. Notably, a sub-network of proteins associated with the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency (NANOG, OCT4, PATZ1, and the developmental regulator DPPA4) were found to independently interact with PCGF1 in a subsequent round of physical interaction mapping experiments. Furthermore, knockdown of PCGF1 results in reduced expression of DPPA4 and other subunits of the variant PRC1 complex at both mRNA and protein levels. Thus, PCGF1 represents a physical and functional link between Polycomb function and pluripotency. PMID:26687479

  19. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative multiple antibiotic resistance repressor protein (MarR) from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Zhi-Le; Li, Juo-Ning; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Shr, Hui-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Gao, Fei Philip; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2005-07-01

    A putative repressor for the multiple antibiotic resistance operon from a plant pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å with good quality. The multiple antibiotic resistance operon (marRAB) is a member of the multidrug-resistance system. When induced, this operon enhances resistance of bacteria to a variety of medically important antibiotics, causing a serious global health problem. MarR is a marR-encoded protein that represses the transcription of the marRAB operon. Through binding with salicylate and certain antibiotics, however, MarR can derepress and activate the marRAB operon. In this report, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1739, a putative MarR repressor protein present in the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a Gram-negative bacterium causing major worldwide disease of cruciferous crops, are described. The XC1739 crystals diffracted to a resolution of at least 1.8 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.5, b = 54.2 and c = 139.5 Å, respectively. They contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit from calculation of the self-rotation function.

  20. In Vitro Analysis of Predicted DNA-Binding Sites for the Stl Repressor of the Staphylococcus aureus SaPIBov1 Pathogenicity Island

    PubMed Central

    Nyíri, Kinga; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation model of the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov1 transfer was recently reported. The repressor protein Stl obstructs the expression of SaPI proteins Str and Xis, latter which is responsible for mobilization initiation. Upon Φ11 phage infection of S. aureus. phage dUTPase activates the SaPI transfer via Stl-dUTPase complex formation. Our aim was to predict the binding sites for the Stl repressor within the S. aureus pathogenicity island DNA sequence. We found that Stl was capable to bind to three 23-mer oligonucleotides, two of those constituting sequence segments in the stl-str, while the other corresponding to sequence segment within the str-xis intergenic region. Within these oligonucleotides, mutational analysis revealed that the predicted binding site for the Stl protein exists as a palindromic segment in both intergenic locations. The palindromes are built as 6-mer repeat sequences involved in Stl binding. The 6-mer repeats are separated by a 5 oligonucleotides long, nonspecific sequence. Future examination of the interaction between Stl and its binding sites in vivo will provide a molecular explanation for the mechanisms of gene repression and gene activation exerted simultaneously by the Stl protein in regulating transfer of the SaPIbov1 pathogenicity island in S. aureus. PMID:27388898

  1. OsCOL10, a CONSTANS-Like Gene, Functions as a Flowering Time Repressor Downstream of Ghd7 in Rice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Junjie; Jin, Mingna; Wang, Jiachang; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Zheng, Xiaoming; Chen, Liping; Wang, Min; Zhu, Shanshan; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xuanming; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Flowering time, or heading date, is a critical agronomic trait that determines the cropping season and regional adaptability, and ultimately grain yield in rice. A number of genes involved in photoperiodic flowering have been cloned and their roles in modulating expression of the flowering genes have been characterized to a certain extent. However, much less is known about the pathway in transmitting the day length response signal(s) to induce transition to reproductive growth. Here, we report a constitutive flowering repressor OsCOL10, which encodes a member of the CONSTANS-like (COL) family. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCOL10 (driven by a strong promoter or by fusing it to the activation domain of VP64) showed delayed flowering time under both short and long days.OsCOL10 is affected by the circadian clock and is preferentially expressed in leaf mesophyll cells; it is localized to the nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Further studies show that OsCOL10 represses the expression of theFT-like genes RFT1 and Hd3a through Ehd1. Transcripts of OsCOL10 are more abundant in plants carrying a functional Ghd7 allele or overexpressing Ghd7 than in Ghd7-deficient plants, thus placing OsCOL10 downstream of Ghd7.Taking these findings together, we conclude that OsCOL10 functions as a flowering time repressor that links Ghd7 and Ehd1 in rice.

  2. Structure of Rev-erbalpha bound to N-CoR reveals a unique mechanism of nuclear receptor-co-repressor interaction.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Caroline A; Gampe, Robert T; Lambert, Millard H; Parks, Derek J; Montana, Valerie; Bynum, Jane; Broderick, Timothy M; Hu, Xiao; Williams, Shawn P; Nolte, Robert T; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2010-07-01

    Repression of gene transcription by the nuclear receptor Rev-erbalpha plays an integral role in the core molecular circadian clock. We report the crystal structure of a nuclear receptor-co-repressor (N-CoR) interaction domain 1 (ID1) peptide bound to truncated human Rev-erbalpha ligand-binding domain (LBD). The ID1 peptide forms an unprecedented antiparallel beta-sheet with Rev-erbalpha, as well as an alpha-helix similar to that seen in nuclear receptor ID2 crystal structures but out of register by four residues. Comparison with the structure of Rev-erbbeta bound to heme indicates that ID1 peptide and heme induce substantially different conformational changes in the LBD. Although heme is involved in Rev-erb repression, the structure suggests that Rev-erbalpha could also mediate repression via ID1 binding in the absence of heme. The previously uncharacterized secondary structure induced by ID1 peptide binding advances our understanding of nuclear receptor-co-repressor interactions.

  3. Light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus: evidence that CarS acts as an anti-repressor of CarA.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, D E; Hodgson, D A

    2001-11-01

    In the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus, carotenoids are produced in response to illumination, as a result of expression of the crt carotenoid biosynthesis genes. The majority of crt genes are clustered in the crtEBDC operon, which is repressed in the dark by CarA. Genetic data suggest that, in the light, CarS is synthesized and achieves activation of the crtEBDC operon by removing the repressive action of CarA. As CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif, the relief of CarA-mediated repression was postulated to result from a direct interaction between these two proteins. Use of the yeast two-hybrid system demonstrated direct interaction between CarA and CarS. The two-hybrid system also implied that CarA and, possibly, CarS are capable of homodimerization. Direct evidence for CarS anti-repressor action was provided in vitro. A glutathione S-transferase (GST)-CarA protein fusion was shown to bind specifically to a palindromic operator sequence within the crtEBDC promoter. CarA was prevented from binding to its operator, and prebound CarA was removed by the addition of purified CarS. CarS is therefore an anti-repressor.

  4. The Kruppel-like zinc finger protein ZNF224 recruits the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 on the transcriptional repressor complex of the aldolase A gene.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Elena; De Cegli, Rossella; Medugno, Lina; Florio, Francesca; Grosso, Michela; Lupo, Angelo; Izzo, Paola; Costanzo, Paola

    2009-11-20

    Gene transcription in eukaryotes is modulated by the coordinated recruitment of specific transcription factors and chromatin-modulating proteins. Indeed, gene activation and/or repression is/are regulated by histone methylation status at specific arginine or lysine residues. In this work, by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrate that PRMT5, a type II protein arginine methyltransferase that monomethylates and symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues, is physically associated with the Kruppel-like associated box-zinc finger protein ZNF224, the aldolase A gene repressor. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that PRMT5 is recruited to the L-type aldolase A promoter and that methylation of the nucleosomes that surround the L-type promoter region occurs in vivo on the arginine 3 of histone H4. Consistent with its association to the ZNF224 repressor complex, the decrease of PRMT5 expression produced by RNA interference positively affects L-type aldolase A promoter transcription. Finally, the alternating occupancy of the L-type aldolase A promoter by the ZNF224-PRMT5 repression complex in proliferating and growth-arrested cells suggests that these regulatory proteins play a significant role during the cell cycle modulation of human aldolase A gene expression. Our data represent the first experimental evidence that protein arginine methylation plays a role in ZNF224-mediated transcriptional repression and provide novel insight into the chromatin modifications required for repression of gene transcription by Kruppel-like associated box-zinc finger proteins.

  5. Quantitation of the DNA tethering effect in long-range DNA looping in vivo and in vitro using the Lac and λ repressors.

    PubMed

    Priest, David G; Cui, Lun; Kumar, Sandip; Dunlap, David D; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2014-01-07

    Efficient and specific interactions between proteins bound to the same DNA molecule can be dependent on the length of the DNA tether that connects them. Measurement of the strength of this DNA tethering effect has been largely confined to short separations between sites, and it is not clear how it contributes to long-range DNA looping interactions, such as occur over separations of tens to hundreds of kilobase pairs in vivo. Here, gene regulation experiments using the LacI and λ CI repressors, combined with mathematical modeling, were used to quantitate DNA tethering inside Escherichia coli cells over the 250- to 10,000-bp range. Although LacI and CI loop DNA in distinct ways, measurements of the tethering effect were very similar for both proteins. Tethering strength decreased with increasing separation, but even at 5- to 10-kb distances, was able to increase contact probability 10- to 20-fold and drive efficient looping. Tethering in vitro with the Lac repressor was measured for the same 600-to 3,200-bp DNAs using tethered particle motion, a single molecule technique, and was 5- to 45-fold weaker than in vivo over this range. Thus, the enhancement of looping seen previously in vivo at separations below 500 bp extends to large separations, underlining the need to understand how in vivo factors aid DNA looping. Our analysis also suggests how efficient and specific looping could be achieved over very long DNA separations, such as what occurs between enhancers and promoters in eukaryotic cells.

  6. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  7. Positive and Negative Control of the Lac Operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaddour, Jihad S.; Werman, Steven D.; Misra, Prasanta K.

    1997-03-01

    We present a mathematical model for the positive and negative control of lac operon. We investigate a steady state solution for the coupled nonlinear differential equations representing the dynamic behaviors of the repressor-inducer components of negative control as well as the cyclic AMP receptor components of the positive control. A dimensionless derivation of the lac operon system is employed to produce singularly perturbed models. The first model represents the dynamical behavior of the operator while the slow model represents the dynamical behaviors of the inducer and the repressor. We use the singular perturbation theory to show that the behavior of the system can be described as a rapid on-off switch of structural gene transformation.

  8. The PaaX-Type Repressor MeqR2 of Arthrobacter sp. Strain Rue61a, Involved in the Regulation of Quinaldine Catabolism, Binds to Its Own Promoter and to Catabolic Promoters and Specifically Responds to Anthraniloyl Coenzyme A

    PubMed Central

    Niewerth, Heiko; Parschat, Katja; Rauschenberg, Melanie; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2013-01-01

    The genes coding for quinaldine catabolism in Arthrobacter sp. strain Rue61a are clustered on the linear plasmid pAL1 in two upper pathway operons (meqABC and meqDEF) coding for quinaldine conversion to anthranilate and a lower pathway operon encoding anthranilate degradation via coenzyme A (CoA) thioester intermediates. The meqR2 gene, located immediately downstream of the catabolic genes, codes for a PaaX-type transcriptional repressor. MeqR2, purified as recombinant fusion protein, forms a dimer in solution and shows specific and cooperative binding to promoter DNA in vitro. DNA fragments recognized by MeqR2 contained a highly conserved palindromic motif, 5′-TGACGNNCGTcA-3′, which is located at positions −35 to −24 of the two promoters that control the upper pathway operons, at positions +4 to +15 of the promoter of the lower pathway genes and at positions +53 to +64 of the meqR2 promoter. Disruption of the palindrome abolished MeqR2 binding. The dissociation constants (KD) of MeqR2-DNA complexes as deduced from electrophoretic mobility shift assays were very similar for the four promoters tested (23 nM to 28 nM). Anthraniloyl-CoA was identified as the specific effector of MeqR2, which impairs MeqR2-DNA complex formation in vitro. A binding stoichiometry of one effector molecule per MeqR2 monomer and a KD of 22 nM were determined for the effector-protein complex by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses suggested that MeqR2 is a potent regulator of the meqDEF operon; however, additional regulatory systems have a major impact on transcriptional control of the catabolic operons and of meqR2. PMID:23275246

  9. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  10. The MarR-type repressor MhqR (YkvE) regulates multiple dioxygenases/glyoxalases and an azoreductase which confer resistance to 2-methylhydroquinone and catechol in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Töwe, Stefanie; Leelakriangsak, Montira; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Van Duy, Nguyen; Hecker, Michael; Zuber, Peter; Antelmann, Haike

    2007-10-01

    Catechol and 2-methylhydroquinone (2-MHQ) cause the induction of the thiol-specific stress response and four dioxygenases/glyoxalases in Bacillus subtilis. Using transcription factor arrays, the MarR-type regulator YkvE was identified as a repressor of the dioxygenase/glyoxalase-encoding mhqE gene. Transcriptional and proteome analyses of the DeltaykvE mutant revealed the upregulation of ykcA (mhqA), ydfNOP (mhqNOP), yodED (mhqED) and yvaB (azoR2) encoding multiple dioxygenases/glyoxalases, oxidoreductases and an azoreductase. Primer extension experiments identified sigma(A)-type promoter sequences upstream of mhqA, mhqNOP, mhqED and azoR2 from which transcription is elevated after thiol stress. DNase I footprinting analysis showed that YkvE protects a primary imperfect inverted repeat with the consensus sequence of tATCTcgaAtTCgAGATaaaa in the azoR2, mhqE and mhqN promoter regions. Analysis of mhqE-promoter-bgaB fusions confirmed the significance of YkvE binding to this operator in vivo. Adjacent secondary repeats were protected by YkvE in the azoR2 and mhqN promoter regions consistent with multiple DNA-protein binding complexes. DNA-binding activity of YkvE was not directly affected by thiol-reactive compounds in vitro. Mutational analyses showed that MhqA, MhqO and AzoR2 confer resistance to 2-MHQ. Moreover, the DeltaykvE mutant displayed a 2-MHQ and catechol resistant phenotype. YkvE was renamed as MhqR controlling a 2-MHQ and catechol-resistance regulon of B. subtilis.

  11. Functional analysis of basic transcription element (BTE)-binding protein (BTEB) 3 and BTEB4, a novel Sp1-like protein, reveals a subfamily of transcriptional repressors for the BTE site of the cytochrome P4501A1 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kaczynski, Joanna A; Conley, Abigail A; Fernandez Zapico, Martin; Delgado, Sharon M; Zhang, Jin-San; Urrutia, Raul

    2002-01-01

    The Sp1-like family of transcription factors is emerging as an integral part of the cellular machinery involved in the control of gene expression. Members of this family of proteins contain three highly homologous C-terminal zinc-finger motifs that bind GC-rich sequences found in the promoters of a diverse number of genes, such as the basic transcription element (BTE) in the promoter of the carcinogen-metabolizing cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) gene. In the present study, we report the molecular and functional characterization of BTE-binding protein (BTEB) 4, a novel ubiquitously expressed member of the Sp1-like proteins family. This protein represents a new homologue of BTEB1, originally described as a regulator of the BTE site in the CYP1A1 gene promoter. Similarly to the recently described BTEB3, we demonstrate that the N-terminal region of BTEB4 directly represses transcription and binds the co-repressor mSin3A. In addition, we show that the C-terminal zinc-finger domain of BTEB4 binds specifically the BTE site of the CYP1A1 promoter, similar to BTEB1 and BTEB3. Also, we show that both BTEB3 and BTEB4 repress the CYP1A1 gene promoter via the BTE site in HepG2 and BxPC3 cells. Thus the identification of this protein expands the repertoire of BTEB-like members of the Sp1-like protein family involved in transcriptional repression. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the BTEB subfamily can repress the CYP1A1 gene promoter via the BTE site. PMID:12036432

  12. The Sweet Potato NAC-Domain Transcription Factor IbNAC1 Is Dynamically Coordinated by the Activator IbbHLH3 and the Repressor IbbHLH4 to Reprogram the Defense Mechanism against Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi-Peng; Kuo, Chih-Hsien; Lu, Hsueh-Han; Lo, Hui-Shan; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-01-01

    IbNAC1 is known to activate the defense system by reprogramming a genetic network against herbivory in sweet potato. This regulatory activity elevates plant defense potential but relatively weakens plants by IbNAC1-mediated JA response. The mechanism controlling IbNAC1 expression to balance plant vitality and survival remains unclear. In this study, a wound-responsive G-box cis-element in the IbNAC1 promoter from -1484 to -1479 bp was identified. From a screen of wound-activated transcriptomic data, one transcriptional activator, IbbHLH3, and one repressor, IbbHLH4, were selected that bind to and activate or repress, respectively, the G-box motif in the IbNAC1 promoter to modulate the IbNAC1-mediated response. In the early wound response, the IbbHLH3-IbbHLH3 protein complex binds to the G-box motif to activate IbNAC1 expression. Thus, an elegant defense network is activated against wounding stress. Until the late stages of wounding, IbbHLH4 interacts with IbbHLH3, and the IbbHLH3-IbbHLH4 heterodimer competes with the IbbHLH3-IbbHLH3 complex to bind the G-box and suppress IbNAC1 expression and timely terminates the defense network. Moreover, the JAZs and IbEIL1 proteins interact with IbbHLH3 to repress the transactivation function of IbbHLH3 in non-wounded condition, but their transcription is immediately inhibited upon early wounding. Our work provides a genetic model that accurately switches the regulatory mechanism of IbNAC1 expression to adjust wounding physiology and represents a delicate defense regulatory network in plants. PMID:27780204

  13. A modular and optimized single marker system for generating Trypanosoma brucei cell lines expressing T7 RNA polymerase and the tetracycline repressor.

    PubMed

    Poon, S K; Peacock, L; Gibson, W; Gull, K; Kelly, S

    2012-02-01

    Here, we present a simple modular extendable vector system for introducing the T7 RNA polymerase and tetracycline repressor genes into Trypanosoma brucei. This novel system exploits developments in our understanding of gene expression and genome organization to produce a streamlined plasmid optimized for high levels of expression of the introduced transgenes. We demonstrate the utility of this novel system in bloodstream and procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei, including the genome strain TREU927/4. We validate these cell lines using a variety of inducible experiments that recapture previously published lethal and non-lethal phenotypes. We further demonstrate the utility of the single marker (SmOx) TREU927/4 cell line for in vivo experiments in the tsetse fly and provide a set of plasmids that enable both whole-fly and salivary gland-specific inducible expression of transgenes.

  14. The ETS domain transcriptional repressor Anterior open inhibits MAP kinase and Wingless signaling to couple tracheal cell fate with branch identity.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, Sara; Luschnig, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Cells at the tips of budding branches in the Drosophila tracheal system generate two morphologically different types of seamless tubes. Terminal cells (TCs) form branched lumenized extensions that mediate gas exchange at target tissues, whereas fusion cells (FCs) form ring-like connections between adjacent tracheal metameres. Each tracheal branch contains a specific set of TCs, FCs, or both, but the mechanisms that select between the two tip cell types in a branch-specific fashion are not clear. Here, we show that the ETS domain transcriptional repressor anterior open (aop) is dispensable for directed tracheal cell migration, but plays a key role in tracheal tip cell fate specification. Whereas aop globally inhibits TC and FC specification, MAPK signaling overcomes this inhibition by triggering degradation of Aop in tip cells. Loss of aop function causes excessive FC and TC specification, indicating that without Aop-mediated inhibition, all tracheal cells are competent to adopt a specialized fate. We demonstrate that Aop plays a dual role by inhibiting both MAPK and Wingless signaling, which induce TC and FC fate, respectively. In addition, the branch-specific choice between the two seamless tube types depends on the tracheal branch identity gene spalt major, which is sufficient to inhibit TC specification. Thus, a single repressor, Aop, integrates two different signals to couple tip cell fate selection with branch identity. The switch from a branching towards an anastomosing tip cell type may have evolved with the acquisition of a main tube that connects separate tracheal primordia to generate a tubular network.

  15. Functional characterization of a cadmium resistance operon in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600: CadC does not function as a repressor.

    PubMed

    Hoogewerf, Arlene J; Dyk, Lisa A Van; Buit, Tyler S; Roukema, David; Resseguie, Emily; Plaisier, Christina; Le, Nga; Heeringa, Lee; Griend, Douglas A Vander

    2015-02-01

    Sequencing of a cadmium resistance operon from a Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600 plasmid revealed that it is identical to a cadCA operon found in MRSA strains. Compared to plasmid-cured and cadC-mutant strains, cadC-positive ATCC12600 cells had increased resistance to cadmium (1 mg ml(-1) cadmium sulfate) and zinc (4 mg ml(-1) zinc sulfate), but not to other metal ions. After growth in media containing 20 µg ml(-1) cadmium sulfate, cadC-mutant cells contained more intracellular cadmium than cadC-positive ATCC12600 cells, suggesting that cadC absence results in impaired cadmium efflux. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with CadC proteins encoded by the S. aureus ATCC12600 plasmid and by the cadC gene of pI258, which is known to act as a transcriptional repressor and shares only 47% protein sequence identity with ATCC12600 CadC. Mobility shifts occurred when pI258 CadC protein was incubated with the promoter DNA-regions from the pI258 and S. aureus ATCC12600 cadCA operons, but did not occur with S. aureus ATCC12600 CadC protein, indicating that the ATCC12600 CadC protein does not interact with promoter region DNA. This cadCA operon, found in MRSA strains and previously functionally uncharacterized, increases resistance to cadmium and zinc by an efflux mechanism, and CadC does not function as a transcriptional repressor.

  16. The Stress Response Factors Yap6, Cin5, Phd1, and Skn7 Direct Targeting of the Conserved Co-Repressor Tup1-Ssn6 in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Sean E.; Rizzo, Jason M.; Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Lieb, Jason D.; Buck, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining the proper expression of the transcriptome during development or in response to a changing environment requires a delicate balance between transcriptional regulators with activating and repressing functions. The budding yeast transcriptional co-repressor Tup1-Ssn6 is a model for studying similar repressor complexes in multicellular eukaryotes. Tup1-Ssn6 does not bind DNA directly, but is directed to individual promoters by one or more DNA-binding proteins, referred to as Tup1 recruiters. This functional architecture allows the Tup1-Ssn6 to modulate the expression of genes required for the response to a variety of cellular stresses. To understand the targeting or the Tup1-Ssn6 complex, we determined the genomic distribution of Tup1 and Ssn6 by ChIP-chip. We found that most loci bound by Tup1-Ssn6 could not be explained by co-occupancy with a known recruiting cofactor and that deletion of individual known Tup1 recruiters did not significantly alter the Tup1 binding profile. These observations suggest that new Tup1 recruiting proteins remain to be discovered and that Tup1 recruitment typically depends on multiple recruiting cofactors. To identify new recruiting proteins, we computationally screened for factors with binding patterns similar to the observed Tup1-Ssn6 genomic distribution. Four top candidates, Cin5, Skn7, Phd1, and Yap6, all known to be associated with stress response gene regulation, were experimentally confirmed to physically interact with Tup1 and/or Ssn6. Incorporating these new recruitment cofactors with previously characterized cofactors now explains the majority of Tup1 targeting across the genome, and expands our understanding of the mechanism by which Tup1-Ssn6 is directed to its targets. PMID:21552514

  17. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  18. Effector-repressor interactions, binding of a single effector molecule to the operator-bound TtgR homodimer mediates derepression.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2006-03-17

    The RND family transporter TtgABC and its cognate repressor TtgR from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E were both shown to possess multidrug recognition properties. Structurally unrelated molecules such as chloramphenicol, butyl paraben, 1,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and several flavonoids are substrates of TtgABC and activate pump expression by binding to the TtgR-operator complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of these molecules to TtgR. Dissociation constants were in the range from 1 to 150 microm, the binding stoichiometry was one effector molecule per dimer of TtgR, and the process was driven by favorable enthalpy changes. Although TtgR exhibits a large multidrug binding profile, the plant-derived compounds phloretin and quercetin were shown to bind with the highest affinity (K(D) of around 1 microm), in contrast to other effectors (chloramphenicol and aromatic solvents) for which exhibited a more reduced affinity. Structure-function studies of effectors indicate that the presence of aromatic rings as well as hydroxyl groups are determinants for TtgR binding. The binding of TtgR to its operator DNA does not alter the protein effector profile nor the effector binding stoichiometry. Moreover, we demonstrate here for the first time that the binding of a single effector molecule to the DNA-bound TtgR homodimer induces the dissociation of the repressor-operator complex. This provides important insight into the molecular mechanism of effector-mediated derepression.

  19. A dominant repressor version of the tomato Sl-ERF.B3 gene confers ethylene hypersensitivity via feedback regulation of ethylene signaling and response components.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchun; Pirrello, Julien; Kesari, Ravi; Mila, Isabelle; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Li, Zhengguo; Latché, Alain; Pech, Jean-Claude; Bouzayen, Mondher; Regad, Farid

    2013-11-01

    Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are downstream components of the ethylene signal transduction pathway, although their role in ethylene-dependent developmental processes remains poorly understood. As the ethylene-inducible tomato Sl-ERF.B3 has been shown previously to display a strong binding affinity to GCC-box-containing promoters, its physiological significance was addressed here by a reverse genetics approach. However, classical up- and down-regulation strategies failed to give clear clues to its roles in planta, probably due to functional redundancy among ERF family members. Expression of a dominant repressor ERF.B3-SRDX version of Sl-ERF.B3 in the tomato resulted in pleiotropic ethylene responses and vegetative and reproductive growth phenotypes. The dominant repressor etiolated seedlings displayed partial constitutive ethylene response in the absence of ethylene and adult plants exhibited typical ethylene-related alterations such as leaf epinasty, premature flower senescence and accelerated fruit abscission. The multiple symptoms related to enhanced ethylene sensitivity correlated with the altered expression of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling genes and suggested the involvement of Sl-ERF.B3 in a feedback mechanism that regulates components of ethylene production and response. Moreover, Sl-ERF.B3 was shown to modulate the transcription of a set of ERFs and revealed the existence of a complex network interconnecting different ERF genes. Overall, the study indicated that Sl-ERF.B3 had a critical role in the regulation of multiple genes and identified a number of ERFs among its primary targets, consistent with the pleiotropic phenotypes displayed by the dominant repression lines.

  20. Crystal Structures of the Global Regulator DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor: Implications for the Allosteric Regulation of GntR/HutC Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Fillenberg, Simon B.; Friess, Mario D.; Körner, Samuel; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Muller, Yves A.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule effectors regulate gene transcription in bacteria by altering the DNA-binding affinities of specific repressor proteins. Although the GntR proteins represent a large family of bacterial repressors, only little is known about the allosteric mechanism that enables their function. DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor belongs to the GntR/HutC subfamily and specifically recognises operators termed DasR-responsive elements (dre-sites). Its DNA-binding properties are modulated by phosphorylated sugars. Here, we present several crystal structures of DasR, namely of dimeric full-length DasR in the absence of any effector and of only the effector-binding domain (EBD) of DasR without effector or in complex with glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P) and N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6-P). Together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a comparison with other GntR/HutC family members these data allowed for a structural characterisation of the different functional states of DasR. Allostery in DasR and possibly in many other GntR/HutC family members is best described by a conformational selection model. In ligand-free DasR, an increased flexibility in the EBDs enables the attached DNA-binding domains (DBD) to sample a variety of different orientations and among these also a DNA-binding competent conformation. Effector binding to the EBDs of DasR significantly reorganises the atomic structure of the latter. However, rather than locking the orientation of the DBDs, the effector-induced formation of β-strand β* in the DBD-EBD-linker segment merely appears to take the DBDs ‘on a shorter leash’ thereby impeding the ‘downwards’ positioning of the DBDs that is necessary for a concerted binding of two DBDs of DasR to operator DNA. PMID:27337024

  1. Crystal structure of the Staphylococcus aureus pI258 CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-responsive repressor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Kandegedara, Ashoka; Martin, Philip; Rosen, Barry P

    2005-06-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to the heavy metals Cd(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II). Expression of this heavy-metal efflux pump is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of CadC at 1.9 angstroms resolution. The dimensions of the protein dimer are approximately 30 angstroms by 40 angstroms by 70 angstroms. Each monomer contains six alpha-helices and a three-stranded beta-sheet. Helices 4 and 5 form a classic helix-turn-helix motif that is the putative DNA binding region. The alpha1 helix of one monomer crosses the dimer to approach the alpha4 helix of the other monomer, consistent with the previous proposal that these two regulatory metal binding sites for the inducer cadmium or lead are each formed by Cys-7 and Cys-11 from the N terminus of one monomer and Cys-58 and Cys-60 of the other monomer. Two nonregulatory metal binding sites containing zinc are formed between the two antiparallel alpha6 helices at the dimerization interface. This is the first reported three-dimensional structure of a member of the ArsR/SmtB family with regulatory metal binding sites at the DNA binding domain and the first structure of a transcription repressor that responds to the heavy metals Cd(II) and Pb(II).

  2. The B-subdomain of the Xenopus laevis XFIN KRAB-AB domain is responsible for its weaker transcriptional repressor activity compared to human ZNF10/Kox1.

    PubMed

    Born, Nadine; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Lorenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain interacts with the nuclear hub protein TRIM28 to initiate or mediate chromatin-dependent processes like transcriptional repression, imprinting or suppression of endogenous retroviruses. The prototype KRAB domain initially identified in ZNF10/KOX1 encompasses two subdomains A and B that are found in hundreds of zinc finger transcription factors studied in human and murine genomes. Here we demonstrate for the first time transcriptional repressor activity of an amphibian KRAB domain. After sequence correction, the updated KRAB-AB domain of zinc finger protein XFIN from the frog Xenopus laevis was found to confer transcriptional repression in reporter assays in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney cells as well as in human HeLa, but not in the minnow Pimephales promelas fish cell line EPC. Binding of the XFIN KRAB-AB domain to human TRIM28 was demonstrated in a classical co-immunoprecipitation approach and visualized in a single-cell compartmentalization assay. XFIN-AB displayed reduced potency in repression as well as lower strength of interaction with TRIM28 compared to ZNF10 KRAB-AB. KRAB-B subdomain swapping between the two KRAB domains indicated that it was mainly the KRAB-B subdomain of XFIN that was responsible for its lower capacity in repression and binding to human TRIM28. In EPC fish cells, ZNF10 and XFIN KRAB repressor activity could be partially restored to low levels by adding exogenous human TRIM28. In contrast to XFIN, we did not find any transcriptional repression activity for the KRAB-like domain of human PRDM9 in HeLa cells. PRDM9 is thought to harbor an evolutionary older domain related to KRAB whose homologs even occur in invertebrates. Our results support the notion that functional bona fide KRAB domains which confer transcriptional repression and interact with TRIM28 most likely co-evolved together with TRIM28 at the beginning of tetrapode evolution.

  3. Overexpression of the Novel MATE Fluoroquinolone Efflux Pump FepA in Listeria monocytogenes Is Driven by Inactivation of Its Local Repressor FepR

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, François; Galimand, Marc; Tuambilangana, Fabrice; Courvalin, Patrice; Cattoir, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fluoroquinolone resistance mainly results from target modifications in gram-positive bacteria, it is primarily due to active efflux in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to dissect a novel molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in this important human pathogen. Isogenic L. monocytogenes clinical isolates BM4715 and BM4716, respectively susceptible and resistant to fluoroquinolones, were studied. MICs of norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence or in the absence of reserpine (10 mg/L). Strain BM4715 was susceptible to norfloxacin (MIC, 4 mg/L) and ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.5 mg/L) whereas BM4716 was highly resistant to both drugs (MICs 128 and 32 mg/L, respectively). Reserpine was responsible for a 16-fold decrease in both norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin MICs against BM4716 suggesting efflux associated resistance. Whole-genome sequencing of the strains followed by comparative genomic analysis revealed a single point mutation in the gene for a transcriptional regulator, designated fepR (for fluoroquinolone efflux protein regulator) belonging to the TetR family. The frame-shift mutation was responsible for the introduction of a premature stop codon resulting in an inactive truncated protein. Just downstream from fepR, the structural gene for an efflux pump of the MATE family (named FepA) was identified. Gene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and demonstrated that fepA expression was more than 64-fold higher in BM4716 than in BM4715. The clean deletion of the fepR gene from BM4715 was responsible for an overexpression of fepA with resistance to norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, confirming the role of FepR as a local repressor of fepA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that overexpression of the new MATE efflux pump FepA is responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in L. monocytogenes and secondary to inactivation of the FepR repressor. PMID:25188450

  4. A root chicory MADS box sequence and the Arabidopsis flowering repressor FLC share common features that suggest conserved function in vernalization and de-vernalization responses.

    PubMed

    Périlleux, Claire; Pieltain, Alexandra; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Bouché, Frédéric; Detry, Nathalie; D'Aloia, Maria; Thiry, Laura; Aljochim, Pierre; Delansnay, Martin; Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Tocquin, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested to obtain root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures may vernalize seeds or plantlets, leading to incidental early flowering, and hence understanding the molecular basis of vernalization is important. A MADS box sequence was isolated by RT-PCR and named FLC-LIKE1 (CiFL1) because of its phylogenetic positioning within the same clade as the floral repressor Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). Moreover, over-expression of CiFL1 in Arabidopsis caused late flowering and prevented up-regulation of the AtFLC target FLOWERING LOCUS T by photoperiod, suggesting functional conservation between root chicory and Arabidopsis. Like AtFLC in Arabidopsis, CiFL1 was repressed during vernalization of seeds or plantlets of chicory, but repression of CiFL1 was unstable when the post-vernalization temperature was favorable to flowering and when it de-vernalized the plants. This instability of CiFL1 repression may be linked to the bienniality of root chicory compared with the annual lifecycle of Arabidopsis. However, re-activation of AtFLC was also observed in Arabidopsis when a high temperature treatment was used straight after seed vernalization, eliminating the promotive effect of cold on flowering. Cold-induced down-regulation of a MADS box floral repressor and its re-activation by high temperature thus appear to be conserved features of the vernalization and de-vernalization responses in distant species.

  5. Protein linear indices of the 'macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix' in bioinformatics. Part 1: prediction of protein stability effects of a complete set of alanine substitutions in Arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Medina-Marrero, Ricardo; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Romero-Zaldivar, Vicente; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-04-15

    TOMOCOMD-CAMPS method produced a linear piecewise regression (R=0.97) between protein backbone descriptors and tm values for alanine mutants of the Arc repressor. A break-point value of 51.87 degrees C characterized two mutant clusters and coincided perfectly with the experimental scale. For this reason, we can use the linear discriminant analysis and piecewise models in combination to classify and predict the stability of the mutant Arc homodimers. These models also permitted the interpretation of the driving forces of such folding process, indicating that topologic/topographic protein backbone interactions control the stability profile of wild-type Arc and its alanine mutants.

  6. Rhythmic melatonin secretion does not correlate with the expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, inducible cyclic amp early repressor, period1 or cryptochrome1 mRNA in the sheep pineal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D; Bashforth, R; Diack, A; Andersson, H; Lincoln, G A; Hazlerigg, D G

    2004-01-01

    The pineal gland, through nocturnal melatonin, acts as a neuroendocrine transducer of daily and seasonal time. Melatonin synthesis is driven by rhythmic activation of the rate-limiting enzyme, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT). In ungulates, AA-NAT mRNA is constitutively high throughout the 24-h cycle, and melatonin production is primarily controlled through effects on AA-NAT enzyme activity; this is in contrast to dominant transcriptional control in rodents. To determine whether there has been a selective loss of circadian control of AA-NAT mRNA expression in the sheep pineal, we measured the expression of other genes known to be rhythmic in rodents (inducible cAMP early repressor ICER, the circadian clock genes Period1 and Cryptochrome1, as well as AA-NAT). We first assayed gene expression in pineal glands collected from Soay sheep adapted to short days (Light: dark, 8-h: 16-h), and killed at 4-h intervals through 24-h. We found no evidence for rhythmic expression of ICER, AA-NAT or Cryptochrome1 under these conditions, whilst Period1 showed a low amplitude rhythm of expression, with higher values during the dark period. In a second group of animals, lights out was delayed by 8-h during the final 24-h sampling period, a manipulation that causes an immediate shortening of the period of melatonin secretion. This did not significantly affect the expression of ICER, AA-NAT or Cryptochrome1 in the pineal, whilst a slight suppressive effect on overall Per1 levels was observed. The attenuated response to photoperiod change appears to be specific to the ovine pineal, as the first long day induced rapid changes of Period1 and ICER expression in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and pituitary pars tuberalis, respectively. Overall, our data suggest a general reduction of circadian control of transcript abundance in the ovine pineal gland, consistent with a marked evolutionary divergence in the mechanism regulating melatonin production between terrestrial

  7. Electrostatic occlusion and quaternary structural ion pairing are key determinants of Cu(I)-mediated allostery in the copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR).

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Ming James; Martin, Julia E; Giedroc, David P

    2015-04-21

    The copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR) is an all-α-helical disc-shaped D2-symmetric homotetramer that forms a 2:1 tetramer/DNA operator complex and represses the expression of copper-resistance genes in a number of bacteria. A previous bioinformatics analysis of CsoR-family repressors distributes Cu(I)-sensing CsoRs in four of seven distinct clades on the basis of global sequence similarity. In this work, we define energetically important determinants of DNA binding in the apo-state (ΔΔGbind), and for allosteric negative coupling of Cu(I) binding to DNA binding (ΔΔGc) in a model clade IV CsoR from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (Gt) of known structure, by selectively targeting for mutagenesis those charged residues uniquely conserved in clade IV CsoRs. These include a folded N-terminal "tail" and a number of Cu(I)-sensor and clade-specific residues that when mapped onto a model of Cu(I)-bound Gt CsoR define a path across one face of the tetramer. We find that Cu(I)-binding prevents formation of the 2:1 "sandwich" complex rather than DNA binding altogether. Folding of the N-terminal tail (residues R18, E22, R74) upon Cu-binding to the periphery of the tetramer inhibits assembly of the 2:1 apoprotein-DNA complex. In contrast, Ala substitution of residues that surround the central "hole" (R65, K101) in the tetramer, as well R48, impact DNA binding. We also identify a quaternary structural ion-pair, E73-K101″, that crosses the tetramer interface, charge-reversal of which restores DNA binding activity, allosteric regulation by Cu(I), and transcriptional derepression by Cu(I) in cells. These findings suggest an "electrostatic occlusion" model, in which basic residues important for DNA binding and/or allostery become sequestered via ion-pairing specifically in the Cu(I)-bound state, and this aids in copper-dependent disassembly of a repression complex.

  8. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  9. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the

  10. Male-sterile and cleistogamous phenotypes in tall fescue induced by chimeric repressors of SUPERWOMAN1 and OsMADS58.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroko; Yoshida, Kouki; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Takamizo, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    Since tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is an anemophilous (wind-pollinated) grass species, male sterility is strongly desired for transgenic tall fescue to prevent pollen dispersal. To create male-sterile tall fescue, we applied Chimeric REpressor gene-Silencing Technology (CRES-T) based on rice APETALA3 (AP3) and AGAMOUS (AG) orthologues that specify the formation of stamens. We fused the coding regions of rice AP3 orthologue SUPERWOMAN1 (SPW1), and rice AG orthologues, Os12g0207000, Os01g0886200 and OsMADS58, respectively with the artificial sequence encoding the modified EAR-like motif repression domain (SRDX). We first introduced Os12g0207000SRDX, Os01g0886200SRDX and OsMADS58SRDX into rice for evaluation of their abilities to induce male sterility. The transgenic rice expressing OsMADS58SRDX had reiterated formation of lodicule-like organs instead of stamens and carpel, a typical phenotype of ag mutant. Thus, we found that OsMADS58SRDX was most suitable for our purpose. Next, we introduced SPW1SRDX and OsMADS58SRDX into tall fescue. Although the transgenic tall fescue did not have the stamen alterations seen in SPW1SRDX and OsMADS58SRDX rice, they either produced no pollen or produced immature pollen; thus, the anthers were not dehiscent and the plants were male-sterile. In addition to the male sterility, SPW1SRDX tall fescue showed a cleistogamous (closed) phenotype in which anthers were not observed outside the glumes, with thin, abnormally elongated lodicules. Some lines of OsMADS58SRDX tall fescue showed a cleistogamous phenotype in which the lodicules were homeotically transformed into lemma-like organs. In both cases, cleistogamous phenotype was associated with morphological changes to the lodicules. We also obtained a mild phenotype of OsMADS58SRDX tall fescue, which exhibited only the male sterility. In this study, we produced novel male-sterile phenotypes using chimeric repressors and thus suggest CRES-T as a tool for transgenic improvement

  11. Inhibition of IL-1{beta}-mediated inflammatory responses by the I{kappa}B{alpha} super-repressor in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Rae; Kweon, Suc-Hyun; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Park, Jin-Woo; Yoon, Taek-Rim Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-01-02

    The IL-1{beta}-NF-{kappa}B axis is a key pathway in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is central in the production of proinflammatory mediators in the inflamed synovium. Therefore, we examined whether fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) could be spared from IL-1{beta}-induced toxicity by an overexpressing I{kappa}B super-repressor. Infection of FLS with Ad-I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A, S36A), an adenovirus-containing mutant I{kappa}B{alpha}, inhibited IL-1{beta}-induced nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-{kappa}B. In addition, Ad-I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A, S36A) prevented IL-1{beta}-induced inflammatory responses; namely, the production of chemokines, such as ENA-78 and RANTES, and activation of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Finally, increased cellular proliferation of FLS after IL-1{beta} treatment was significantly reduced by Ad-I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A, S36A). However, Ad-I{kappa}B{beta} (S19A, S23A), the I{kappa}B{beta} mutant, was not effective in preventing IL-1{beta} toxicity. These results suggest that inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation is a potential target for the prevention of joint destruction in patients with RA.

  12. Steric mechanism of auto-inhibitory regulation of specific and non-specific DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6.

    PubMed

    De, Soumya; Chan, Anson C K; Coyne, H Jerome; Bhachech, Niraja; Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Okon, Mark; Murphy, Michael E P; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-04-03

    DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is auto-inhibited ~50-fold due to an α-helix that sterically blocks its ETS domain binding interface. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this marginally stable helix is unfolded, and not displaced to a non-inhibitory position, when ETV6 is bound to DNA containing a consensus (5')GGAA(3') recognition site. Although significantly lower in affinity, binding to non-specific DNA is auto-inhibited ~5-fold and is also accompanied by helix unfolding. Based on NMR chemical shift perturbations, both specific and non-specific DNA are bound via the same canonical ETS domain interface. However, spectral p