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Sample records for glial cell proliferation

  1. Temporal patterns of cortical proliferation of glial cell populations after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Bala T.S.; Villapol, Sonia; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Geller, Herbert M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2014-01-01

    TBI (traumatic brain injury) triggers an inflammatory cascade, gliosis and cell proliferation following cell death in the pericontusional area and surrounding the site of injury. In order to better understand the proliferative response following CCI (controlled cortical impact) injury, we systematically analyzed the phenotype of dividing cells at several time points post-lesion. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to mild to moderate CCI over the left sensory motor cortex. At different time points following injury, mice were injected with BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine) four times at 3-h intervals and then killed. The greatest number of proliferating cells in the pericontusional region was detected at 3 dpi (days post-injury). At 1 dpi, NG2+ cells were the most proliferative population, and at 3 and 7 dpi the Iba-1+ microglial cells were proliferating more. A smaller, but significant number of GFAP+ (glial fibrillary acidic protein) astrocytes proliferated at all three time points. Interestingly, at 3 dpi we found a small number of proliferating neuroblasts [DCX+ (doublecortin)] in the injured cortex. To determine the cell fate of proliferative cells, mice were injected four times with BrdU at 3 dpi and killed at 28 dpi. Approximately 70% of proliferative cells observed at 28 dpi were GFAP+ astrocytes. In conclusion, our data suggest that the specific glial cell types respond differentially to injury, suggesting that each cell type responds to a specific pattern of growth factor stimulation at each time point after injury. PMID:24670035

  2. Flavonoids modulate the proliferation of Neospora caninum in glial cell primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Matos, Rosan Barbosa de; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pitanga, Bruno Pena Seara; Silva, Victor Diógenes Amaral da; Jesus, Erica Etelvina Viana de; Pinheiro, Alexandre Morales; Costa, Maria de Fátima Dias; El-Bacha, Ramon dos Santos; Ribeiro, Cátia Suse de Oliveira; Costa, Silvia Lima

    2014-12-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation.

  3. Flavonoids Modulate the Proliferation of Neospora caninum in Glial Cell Primary Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa de Matos, Rosan; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pena Seara Pitanga, Bruno; Amaral da Silva, Victor Diógenes; Viana de Jesus, Erica Etelvina; Morales Pinheiro, Alexandre; Dias Costa, Maria de Fátima; dos Santos El-Bacha, Ramon; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Cátia Suse

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation. PMID:25548412

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles inhibit proliferation and induce morphological changes and apoptosis in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Ramírez, Sandra Gissela; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma Laura; Chirino, Yolanda Irasema; Iglesias, Gisela Gutiérrez; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2012-12-16

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2) NPs) are widely used in the chemical, electrical and electronic industries. TiO(2) NPs can enter directly into the brain through the olfactory bulb and be deposited in the hippocampus region. We determined the effect of TiO(2) NPs on rat and human glial cells, C6 and U373, respectively. We evaluated proliferation by crystal violet staining, internalization of TiO(2) NPs, and cellular morphology by TEM analysis, as well as F-actin distribution by immunostaining and cell death by detecting active caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. TiO(2) NPs inhibited proliferation and induced morphological changes that were related with a decrease in immuno-location of F-actin fibers. TiO(2) NPs were internalized and formation of vesicles was observed. TiO(2) NPs induced apoptosis after 96h of treatment. Hence, TiO(2) NPs had a cytotoxic effect on glial cells, suggesting that exposure to TiO(2) NPs could cause brain injury and be hazardous to health.

  5. Lin28B promotes Müller glial cell de-differentiation and proliferation in the regenerative rat retinas

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zui; Zhao, Chen; Jian, Qian; Gillies, Mark; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal regeneration and repair are severely impeded in higher mammalian animals. Although Müller cells can be activated and show some characteristics of progenitor cells when injured or under pathological conditions, they quickly form gliosis scars. Unfortunately, the basic mechanisms that impede retinal regeneration remain unknown. We studied retinas from Royal College of Surgeon (RCS) rats and found that let-7 family molecules, let-7e and let-7i, were significantly overexpressed in Müller cells of degenerative retinas. It demonstrated that down-regulation of the RNA binding protein Lin28B was one of the key factors leading to the overexpression of let-7e and let-7i. Lin28B ectopic expression in the Müller cells suppressed overexpression of let-7e and let-7i, stimulated and mobilized Müller glia de-differentiation, proliferation, promoted neuronal commitment, and inhibited glial fate acquisition of de-differentiated Müller cells. ERG recordings revealed that the amplitudes of a-wave and b-wave were improved significantly after Lin28B was delivered into the subretinal space of RCS rats. In summary, down-regulation of Lin28B as well as up-regulation of let-7e and let-7i may be the main factors that impede Müller cell de-differentiation and proliferation in the retina of RCS rats. PMID:27384999

  6. Coriandrum sativum Suppresses Aβ42-Induced ROS Increases, Glial Cell Proliferation, and ERK Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan Feng; Jeong, Haemin; Lee, Jang Ho; Hong, Yoon Ki; Oh, Youngje; Kim, Young-Mi; Suh, Yoon Seok; Bang, Semin; Yun, Hye Sup; Lee, Kyungho; Cho, Sung Man; Lee, Sung Bae; Jeon, Songhee; Chin, Young-Won; Koo, Byung-Soo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disease, has a complex and widespread pathology that is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid [Formula: see text]-peptide (A[Formula: see text]) in the brain and various cellular abnormalities, including increased oxidative damage, an amplified inflammatory response, and altered mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Based on the complex etiology of AD, traditional medicinal plants with multiple effective components are alternative treatments for patients with AD. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of an ethanol extract of Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum) leaves on A[Formula: see text] cytotoxicity and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects. Although recent studies have shown the benefits of the inhalation of C. sativum oil in an animal model of AD, the detailed molecular mechanisms by which C. sativum exerts its neuroprotective effects are unclear. Here, we found that treatment with C. sativum extract increased the survival of both A[Formula: see text]-treated mammalian cells and [Formula: see text]42-expressing flies. Moreover, C. sativum extract intake suppressed [Formula: see text]-induced cell death in the larval imaginal disc and brain without affecting A[Formula: see text]42 expression and accumulation. Interestingly, the increases in reactive oxygen species levels and glial cell number in AD model flies were reduced by C. sativum extract intake. Additionally, C. sativum extract inhibited the epidermal growth factor receptor- and A[Formula: see text]-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The constitutively active form of ERK abolished the protective function of C. sativum extract against the [Formula: see text]-induced eye defect phenotype in Drosophila. Taken together, these results suggest that C. sativum leaves have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and ERK signaling inhibitory properties that

  7. PDGF A chain homodimers drive proliferation of bipotential (O-2A) glial progenitor cells in the developing rat optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, N; Collarini, E J; Mosley, M J; Heldin, C H; Westermark, B; Richardson, W D

    1989-01-01

    The bipotential glial progenitor cells (O-2A progenitors), which during development of the rat optic nerve give rise to oligodendrocytes and type 2 astrocytes, are stimulated to divide in culture by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and there is evidence that PDGF is important for development of the O-2A cell lineage in vivo. We have visualized PDGF mRNA in the rat optic nerve by in situ hybridization, and its spatial distribution is compatible with the idea that type 1 astrocytes are the major source of PDGF in the nerve. We can detect mRNA encoding the A chain, but not the B chain of PDGF in the brain and optic nerve, suggesting that the major form of PDGF in the central nervous system is a homodimer of A chains (PDGF-AA). PDGF-AA is a more potent mitogen for O-2A progenitor cells than is PDGF-BB, while the reverse is true for human or rat fibroblasts. Fibroblasts display two types of PDGF receptors, type A receptors which bind to all three dimeric isoforms of PDGF, and type B receptors which bind PDGF-BB and PDGF-AB, but have low affinity for PDGF-AA. Our results suggest that O-2A progenitor cells possess predominantly type A receptors, and proliferate during development in response to PDGF-AA secreted by type 1 astrocytes. Images PMID:2545439

  8. PDGF A chain homodimers drive proliferation of bipotential (O-2A) glial progenitor cells in the developing rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Pringle, N; Collarini, E J; Mosley, M J; Heldin, C H; Westermark, B; Richardson, W D

    1989-04-01

    The bipotential glial progenitor cells (O-2A progenitors), which during development of the rat optic nerve give rise to oligodendrocytes and type 2 astrocytes, are stimulated to divide in culture by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and there is evidence that PDGF is important for development of the O-2A cell lineage in vivo. We have visualized PDGF mRNA in the rat optic nerve by in situ hybridization, and its spatial distribution is compatible with the idea that type 1 astrocytes are the major source of PDGF in the nerve. We can detect mRNA encoding the A chain, but not the B chain of PDGF in the brain and optic nerve, suggesting that the major form of PDGF in the central nervous system is a homodimer of A chains (PDGF-AA). PDGF-AA is a more potent mitogen for O-2A progenitor cells than is PDGF-BB, while the reverse is true for human or rat fibroblasts. Fibroblasts display two types of PDGF receptors, type A receptors which bind to all three dimeric isoforms of PDGF, and type B receptors which bind PDGF-BB and PDGF-AB, but have low affinity for PDGF-AA. Our results suggest that O-2A progenitor cells possess predominantly type A receptors, and proliferate during development in response to PDGF-AA secreted by type 1 astrocytes.

  9. Clodronate inhibits the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and NO by isolated microglial cells and reduces the number of proliferating glial cells in excitotoxically injured organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Faramarz; Conrad, Ariane; Kohl, Angelika; Korf, Horst-Werner; Hailer, Nils P

    2004-10-01

    Treatment of excitotoxically injured organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC) with clodronate is known to result in the inhibition of microglial activation. We hypothesized that this is due to direct effects of clodronate on microglial cells, and investigated microglial proliferation in OHSC, and cytokine and NO secretion in isolated microglial cells. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) lesioning of OHSC resulted in a massive increase in the number of proliferating, bromo-desoxy-uridine (BrdU)-labeled cells that was reduced to control levels after treatment with clodronate (0.1, 1, 10 microg/ml). Triple-labeling revealed that clodronate abrogated the proliferation of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-labeled astrocytes and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (IB4)-labeled microglial cells. Furthermore, isolated microglial cells were treated with clodronate after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Clodronate (0.01, 0.1, 1 microg/ml) significantly down-regulated the LPS-stimulated microglial secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, Interleukin (IL)-1beta and NO, but not of IL-6. In contrast, clodronate significantly reduced the microglial IL-6-release induced by M-CSF, indicating different intracellular pathways. The number and morphology of isolated microglial cells did not change significantly after treatment with clodronate. In summary, the number of proliferating microglial cells and astrocytes after excitotoxic injury is reduced to control levels after treatment with clodronate. Furthermore, clodronate inhibits microglial secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and NO. Clodronate could therefore prove to be a useful tool in the investigation of interactions between damaged neurons and microglial cells.

  10. Glial cells: Old cells with new twists

    PubMed Central

    Ndubaku, Ugo; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Summary Based on their characteristics and function – migration, neural protection, proliferation, axonal guidance and trophic effects – glial cells may be regarded as probably the most versatile cells in our body. For many years, these cells were considered as simply support cells for neurons. Recently, it has been shown that they are more versatile than previously believed – as true stem cells in the nervous system – and are important players in neural function and development. There are several glial cell types in the nervous system: the two most abundant are oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Although both of these cells are responsible for myelination, their developmental origins are quite different. Oligodendrocytes originate from small niche populations from different regions of the central nervous system, while Schwann cells develop from a stem cell population (the neural crest) that gives rise to many cell derivatives besides glia and which is a highly migratory group of cells. PMID:18068219

  11. Primary culture of glial cells from mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion: a valuable tool for studying glial cell biology.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2010-12-15

    Central nervous system glial cells as astrocytes and microglia have been investigated in vitro and many intracellular pathways have been clarified upon various stimuli. Peripheral glial cells, however, are not as deeply investigated in vitro despite its importance role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Based on our previous experience of culturing neuronal cells, our objective was to standardize and morphologically characterize a primary culture of mouse superior cervical ganglion glial cells in order to obtain a useful tool to study peripheral glial cell biology. Superior cervical ganglia from neonatal C57BL6 mice were enzymatically and mechanically dissociated and cells were plated on diluted Matrigel coated wells in a final concentration of 10,000cells/well. Five to 8 days post plating, glial cell cultures were fixed for morphological and immunocytochemical characterization. Glial cells showed a flat and irregular shape, two or three long cytoplasm processes, and round, oval or long shaped nuclei, with regular outline. Cell proliferation and mitosis were detected both qualitative and quantitatively. Glial cells were able to maintain their phenotype in our culture model including immunoreactivity against glial cell marker GFAP. This is the first description of immunocytochemical characterization of mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion glial cells in primary culture. This work discusses the uses and limitations of our model as a tool to study many aspects of peripheral glial cell biology.

  12. Cannabidiol stimulates Aml-1a-dependent glial differentiation and inhibits glioma stem-like cells proliferation by inducing autophagy in a TRPV2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nabissi, Massimo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Liberati, Sonia; Santoni, Matteo; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-10-15

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) correspond to a tumor cell subpopulation, involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor initiation and acquired chemoresistance. Currently, drug-induced differentiation is considered as a promising approach to eradicate this tumor-driving cell population. Recently, the effect of cannabinoids (CBs) in promoting glial differentiation and inhibiting gliomagenesis has been evidenced. Herein, we demonstrated that cannabidiol (CBD) by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid-2 (TRPV2) triggers GSCs differentiation activating the autophagic process and inhibits GSCs proliferation and clonogenic capability. Above all, CBD and carmustine (BCNU) in combination overcome the high resistance of GSCs to BCNU treatment, by inducing apoptotic cell death. Acute myeloid leukemia (Aml-1) transcription factors play a pivotal role in GBM proliferation and differentiation and it is known that Aml-1 control the expression of several nociceptive receptors. So, we evaluated the expression levels of Aml-1 spliced variants (Aml-1a, b and c) in GSCs and during their differentiation. We found that Aml-1a is upregulated during GSCs differentiation, and its downregulation restores a stem cell phenotype in differentiated GSCs. Since it was demonstrated that CBD induces also TRPV2 expression and that TRPV2 is involved in GSCs differentiation, we evaluated if Aml-1a interacted directly with TRPV2 promoters. Herein, we found that Aml-1a binds TRPV2 promoters and that Aml-1a expression is upregulated by CBD treatment, in a TRPV2 and PI3K/AKT dependent manner. Altogether, these results support a novel mechanism by which CBD inducing TRPV2-dependent autophagic process stimulates Aml-1a-dependent GSCs differentiation, abrogating the BCNU chemoresistance in GSCs.

  13. Glial cells and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Guerra-Cantera, Santiago; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2017-01-01

    The search for new strategies and drugs to abate the current obesity epidemic has led to the intensification of research aimed at understanding the neuroendocrine control of appetite and energy expenditure. This intensified investigation of metabolic control has also included the study of how glial cells participate in this process. Glia, the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, perform a wide spectrum of functions and are vital for the correct functioning of neurons and neuronal circuits. Current evidence indicates that hypothalamic glia, in particular astrocytes, tanycytes and microglia, are involved in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of appetite and metabolic control, at least in part by regulating the signals reaching metabolic neuronal circuits. Glia transport nutrients, hormones and neurotransmitters; they secrete growth factors, hormones, cytokines and gliotransmitters and are a source of neuroprogenitor cells. These functions are regulated, as glia also respond to numerous hormones and nutrients, with the lack of specific hormonal signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes disrupting metabolic homeostasis. Here, we review some of the more recent advances in the role of glial cells in metabolic control, with a special emphasis on the differences between glial cell responses in males and females.

  14. Melatonin promotes goat spermatogonia stem cells (SSCs) proliferation by stimulating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Bowen; Li, Bo; Wu, Chongyang; Wu, Jiang; Yan, Yuan; Shang, Rui; Bai, Chunling; Li, Guangpeng; Hua, Jinlian

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been reported to be an important endogenous hormone for regulating neurogenesis, immunityand the biological clock. Recently, the effects of melatonin on neural stem cells (NSCs), mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells(iPSCs) have been reported; however, the effects of melatonin on spermatogonia stem cells (SSCs) are not clear. Here, 1μM and 1nM melatonin was added to medium when goat SSCs were cultured in vitro, the results showed that melatonin could increase the formation and size of SSC colonies. Real-time quantitative PCR (QRT-PCR) and western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of SSC proliferation and self-renewal markers were up-regulated. Meanwhile, QRT-PCR results showed that melatonin inhibit the mRNA expression level of SSC differentiation markers. ELISA analysis showed an obvious increase in the concentration of GDNF (a niche factor secreted by Sertoli cells) in the medium when treated with melatonin. Meanwhile, the phosphorylation level of AKT, a downstream of GDNF-GFRa1-RET pathway was activated. In conclusion, melatonin promotes goat SSC proliferation by stimulating GDNF production in Sertoli cells. PMID:27769051

  15. Repressing Notch Signaling and Expressing TNFα Are Sufficient to Mimic Retinal Regeneration by Inducing Müller Glial Proliferation to Generate Committed Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Clay; Ackerman, Kristin M.; Lahne, Manuela; Hobgood, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal damage in teleosts, unlike mammals, induces robust Müller glia-mediated regeneration of lost neurons. We examined whether Notch signaling regulates Müller glia proliferation in the adult zebrafish retina and demonstrated that Notch signaling maintains Müller glia in a quiescent state in the undamaged retina. Repressing Notch signaling, through injection of the γ-secretase inhibitor RO4929097, stimulates a subset of Müller glia to reenter the cell cycle without retinal damage. This RO4929097-induced Müller glia proliferation is mediated by repressing Notch signaling because inducible expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) can reverse the effect. This RO4929097-induced proliferation requires Ascl1a expression and Jak1-mediated Stat3 phosphorylation/activation, analogous to the light-damaged retina. Moreover, coinjecting RO4929097 and TNFα, a previously identified damage signal, induced the majority of Müller glia to reenter the cell cycle and produced proliferating neuronal progenitor cells that committed to a neuronal lineage in the undamaged retina. This demonstrates that repressing Notch signaling and activating TNFα signaling are sufficient to induce Müller glia proliferation that generates neuronal progenitor cells that differentiate into retinal neurons, mimicking the responses observed in the regenerating retina. PMID:25339752

  16. Glial chain migration requires pioneer cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoît; Lepelletier, Léa; Giangrande, Angela

    2008-11-05

    The migration of glial chains along the nerve entails directional and coordinated movement. Despite its importance in the formation of the nervous system, this process remains poorly understood, because of the difficulty of manipulating identified cells. Using confocal time-lapse and cell ablation in the whole animal, we provide direct evidence for a discrete number of Drosophila peripheral glial cells acting as pioneers and guiding the rest of the migratory chain. These cells are in direct contact with several follower cells through a very long and stable cytoplasmic extension. The presence of pioneer cells and homotypic interactions at the tip of the chain allows coordinated movement and the formation of a continuous sheath around the nerve. These in vivo data open novel perspectives for understanding the cellular bases of vertebrate glial migration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Shiga toxin-2 enhances heat-shock-induced apoptotic cell death in cultured and primary glial cells.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Toma, Tomoko; Shimizu, Masaki; Kuroda, Mondo; Wada, Taizo; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively controls the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) environment using specific structural and biochemical features of the endothelial cells, pericytes, and glial limitans. Glial cells, which represent the cellular components of the mature BBB, are the most numerous cells in the brain and are indispensable for neuronal functioning. We investigated the effects of Shiga toxin on glial cells in vitro. Shiga toxin failed to inhibit cell proliferation but attenuated expression of heat shock protein 70, which is one of the chaperone proteins, in cultured and primary glial cells. Furthermore, the combination of Shiga toxin and a heat shock procedure induced cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation in both cells. Thus, we speculate that glial cell death in response to the combination of Shiga toxin and heat shock might weaken the BBB and induce central nervous system complications.

  18. Human brain glial cells synthesize thrombospondin.

    PubMed Central

    Asch, A S; Leung, L L; Shapiro, J; Nachman, R L

    1986-01-01

    Thrombospondin, a 450-kDa multinodular glycoprotein with lectin-type activity, is found in human platelets, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, monocytes, and granular pneumocytes. Thrombospondin interacts with heparin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen, histidine-rich glycoprotein, and plasminogen. Recently, thrombospondin synthesis by smooth muscle cells has been reported to be augmented by platelet-derived growth factor. We present evidence that thrombospondin is present within and synthesized by astrocytic neuroglial cells. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of material derived from a human brain homogenate yielded a protein that, when reduced, had an apparent size of 180 kDa and comigrated with reduced platelet thrombospondin on NaDodSO4/PAGE. Immunoblot analysis with monospecific anti-thrombospondin confirmed the presence of immunoreactive thrombospondin. Indirect immunofluorescence of cultured human glial cells indicated the presence of thrombospondin. Metabolic labeling of glial cell cultures with [35S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with monospecific anti-thrombospondin revealed synthesis of a 180-kDa polypeptide that comigrated with platelet thrombospondin on NaDodSO4/PAGE. Cultured human glial cells were incubated for 48 hr in serum-free medium with purified platelet-derived growth factor at concentrations up to 50 ng/ml. Aliquots taken at intervals were analyzed by a quantitative double-antibody ELISA. The growth factor stimulated the release of thrombospondin into the culture medium by as much as 10-fold over control cultures. The presence of thrombospondin within glial cells of the central nervous system and the augmentation of its synthesis by platelet-derived growth factor suggest that thrombospondin may play an important role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during periods of cell division and growth. Images PMID:2939460

  19. Physiological Functions of Glial Cell Hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    The brain performs exceptionally complex and dynamic tasks that depend on the coordinated interaction of neurons, glial cells, endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, ependymal cells, and circulating blood cells. Among these cells, glial cells have emerged as crucial protagonists in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neural function. Indeed, these cells express a wide range of receptors that enable them to sense changes in neuronal activity and the microenvironment by responding locally via the release of bioactive molecules known as gliotransmitters. In the central nervous system (CNS), a novel mechanism that allows gliotransmission via the opening of hemichannels has been proposed. These channels are composed of six protein subunits consisting of connexins or pannexins, which are two highly conserved protein families that are encoded by 21 and 3 genes, respectively, in humans. Typically, glial cell hemichannels exhibit low levels of activity, but this activity is sufficient to ensure the release of a broad spectrum of gliotransmitters, including ATP, D-serine, glutamate, adenosine, and glutathione. Here, we briefly review the current findings regarding the effects of the hemichannel-dependent release of gliotransmitters on the physiology of the CNS.

  20. Involvement of nucleotides in glial growth following scratch injury in avian retinal cell monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thayane Martins; França, Guilherme Rapozeiro; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Loiola, Erick Correia; Ulrich, Henning; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2015-06-01

    When retinal cell cultures were mechanically scratched, cell growth over the empty area was observed. Only dividing and migrating, 2 M6-positive glial cells were detected. Incubation of cultures with apyrase (APY), suramin, or Reactive Blue 2 (RB-2), but not MRS 2179, significantly attenuated the growth of glial cells, suggesting that nucleotide receptors other than P2Y1 are involved in the growth of glial cells. UTPγS but not ADPβS antagonized apyrase-induced growth inhibition in scratched cultures, suggesting the participation of UTP-sensitive receptors. No decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA(+)) cells was observed at the border of the scratch in apyrase-treated cultures, suggesting that glial proliferation was not affected. In apyrase-treated cultures, glial cytoplasm protrusions were smaller and unstable. Actin filaments were less organized and alfa-tubulin-labeled microtubules were mainly parallel to scratch. In contrast to control cultures, very few vinculin-labeled adhesion sites could be noticed in these cultures. Increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation was observed in UTP-treated cultures, effect that was inhibited by SRC inhibitor 1 and PI3K blocker LY294002. These inhibitors and the FAK inhibitor PF573228 also decreased glial growth over the scratch, suggesting participation of SRC, PI3K, and FAK in UTP-induced growth of glial cells in scratched cultures. RB-2 decreased dissociated glial cell attachment to fibronectin-coated dishes and migration through transwell membranes, suggesting that nucleotides regulated adhesion and migration of glial cells. In conclusion, mechanical scratch of retinal cell cultures induces growth of glial cells over the empty area through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of UTP-sensitive receptors, SRC, PI3K, and FAK.

  1. Glial Cell Development and Function in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, David A.; Talbot, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a premier vertebrate model system that offers many experimental advantages for in vivo imaging and genetic studies. This review provides an overview of glial cell types in the central and peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We highlight some recent work that exploited the strengths of the zebrafish system to increase the understanding of the role of Gpr126 in Schwann cell myelination and illuminate the mechanisms controlling oligodendrocyte development and myelination. We also summarize similarities and differences between zebrafish radial glia and mammalian astrocytes and consider the possibility that their distinct characteristics may represent extremes in a continuum of cell identity. Finally, we focus on the emergence of zebrafish as a model for elucidating the development and function of microglia. These recent studies have highlighted the power of the zebrafish system for analyzing important aspects of glial development and function. PMID:25395296

  2. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Taro Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  3. Glial Cell Contributions to Auditory Brainstem Development

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits. PMID:27818624

  4. DNA damage, neuronal and glial cell death and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key factor in the maintenance of genome stability. As such, it is a central axis in sustaining cellular homeostasis in a variety of contexts: development, growth, differentiation, and maintenance of the normal life cycle of the cell. It is now clear that diverse mechanisms encompassing cell cycle regulation, repair pathways, many aspects of cellular metabolism, and cell death are inter-linked and act in concert in response to DNA damage. Defects in the DDR in proliferating cells can lead to cancer, while DDR defects in neurons may result in neurodegeneration. Mature neurons are highly differentiated, post-mitotic cells that cannot be replenished after disease or trauma. Their high metabolic activity generates large amounts of reactive oxygen species with DNA damaging capacity. Moreover, their intense transcriptional activity increases the potential for genomic DNA damage. Respectively, neurons have elaborate mechanisms to defend the integrity of their genome, thus ensuring their longevity and functionality in the face of these threats. Over the course of the past two decades, there has been a substantial increase in our understanding of the role of glial cells in supporting the neuronal cell DDR and longevity. This review article focuses on the potential role of the DDR in the etiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and in addition, it describes various aspects of glial cell functionality in two genomic instability disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

  5. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    von Hilchen, Christian M; Bustos, Alvaro E; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo.

  6. Sex steroids inhibit osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Florian; Wurm, Antje; Linnertz, Regina; Pannicke, Thomas; Iandiev, Ianors; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. We investigated whether sex steroids inhibit the swelling of glial somata in acutely isolated retinal slices and glial cells of the rat. Superfusion of retinal slices or cells from control animals with a hypoosmolar solution did not induce glial swelling, whereas glial swelling was observed in slices of postischemic and diabetic retinas. Progesterone, testosterone, estriol, and 17beta-estradiol prevented glial swelling with half-maximal effects at approximately 0.3, 0.6, 6, and 20 microM, respectively. The effect of progesterone was apparently mediated by transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, P2Y1, and adenosine A1 receptors. The data suggest that sex steroids may inhibit cytotoxic edema in the retina.

  7. The role of Ca 2+-related signaling in photodynamic injury of nerve and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. V.; Petin, Y. O.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) inhibited and irreversibly abolished firing, caused necrosis of neurons, necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The role in these processes of the central components of Ca 2+-mediated signaling pathway: phospholipase C, calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II, and protein kinase C was studied using their inhibitors: ET-18, fluphenazine, KN-93, or staurosporine, respectively. ET-18 reduced functional inactivation of neurons, necrosis and apoptosis of glial cells. Fluphenazine and KN-93 reduced PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells. Staurosporine enhanced PDT-induced glial apoptosis. PDTinduced gliosis was prevented by KN-93 and staurosporine. Therefore, phospholipase C participated in neuron inactivation and glial necrosis and apoptosis. Calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase II were involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but not in glial apoptosis. Protein kinase C protected glia from apoptosis and participated in PDT-induced gliosis and loss of neuronal activity. These data may be used for modulation of PDT of brain tumors.

  8. The involvement of MAP kinases JNK and p38 in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Y. O.; Bibov, M. Y.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    The role of JNK and p38 MAP kinases in functional inactivation and necrosis of mechanoreceptor neurons as well as necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment (10 -7 M Photosens, 30 min incubation, 670 nm laser irradiation at 0.4 W/cm2) in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was studied using specific inhibitors SP600125 and SB202190, respectively. SP600125 enhanced PDT-induced apoptosis of photosensitized glial cells but did not influence PDT-induced changes in neuronal activity, density of glial nuclei around neuron body, and necrosis of receptor neurons and glial cells. SB202190 did not influence neuron activity and survival as well but reduced PDT-induced necrosis but not apoptosis of glial cells. Therefore, both MAP kinases influenced glial cells but not neurons. JNK protected glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis but did not influence necrosis and proliferation of these cells. In contrast, p38 did not influence apoptosis but contributed into PDT-induced necrosis of glial cells and PDT-induced gliosis. These MAP kinase inhibitors may be used for modulation of photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  9. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  10. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  11. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-03-31

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration.

  12. Glial cells in (patho)physiology

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Heneka, Michael T.; Montana, Vedrana; Oliet, Stéphane H.R.; Schousboe, Arne; Haydon, Philip. G.; Stout, Randy F.; Spray, David C.; Reichenbach, Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas; Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Zorec, Robert; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglial cells define brain homeostasis and mount defense against pathological insults. Astroglia regulate neurogenesis and development of brain circuits. In the adult brain, astrocytes enter into intimate dynamic relationship with neurons, especially at synaptic sites where they functionally form the tripartite synapse. At these sites astrocytes regulate ion and neurotransmitter homeostasis, metabolically support neurons and monitor synaptic activity; one of the readouts of the latter manifests in astrocytic intracellular Ca2+ signals. This form of astrocytic excitability can lead to release of chemical transmitters via Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Once in the extracellular space, gliotransmitters can modulate synaptic plasticity and cause changes in behavior. Besides these physiological tasks, astrocytes are fundamental for progression and outcome of neurological diseases. In Alzheimer’s disease, for example, astrocytes may contribute to the etiology of this disorder. Highly lethal glial-derived tumors use signaling trickery to coerce normal brain cells to assist tumor invasiveness. This review sheds new light on the brain operation in health and disease, but also points to many unknowns. PMID:22251135

  13. Gradient isolation of glial cells: evidence that flat epithelial cells are astroglial cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Meller, K

    1987-07-01

    Discontinuous gradients of metrizamide were used to separate the cell components of monolayers of primary cultures of embryonic rat brains. These primary cell cultures were of two types: long-term cultures (more than a year) of embryonic rat brain, which contained several glial cell types, and monolayers of cell cultures (several weeks old), which contained a complex population of cells, including neuronal elements. The gradient separation produces fractions of pure flat epithelial cells that are able to survive and proliferate. After a few days, all flat epithelial cells become confluent and show a positive reaction to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); this indicates that these cells astroglial precursor cells. Following their maintenance in vitro for several months, all cultures give rise to a pure population of astrocytes identified not only by their characteristic morphology, but also by their content of GFAP. It is proposed that the differentiation controls are dependent on cell interactions that are influenced by the composition of the cell population and/or the molecular growth and differentiation factors released by these cells into the medium.

  14. Glial cell dysregulation: a new perspective on Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major cause of dementia. Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain its pathogenesis, beta-amyloid (A beta toxicity, cholinergic dysfunction, Tau hyper-phosphorylation, oxidative damage, synaptic dysfunction and inflammation secondary to senile plaques, among others. Glial cells are the major producers of inflammatory mediators, and cytotoxic activation of glial cells is linked to several neurodegenerative diseases; however, whether inflammation is a consequence or the cause of neurodegeneration is still unclear. I propose that inflammation and cellular stress associated with aging are key events in the development of AD through the induction of glial dysfunction. Dysregulated inflammatory response can elicit glial cell activation by compounds which are normally poorly reactive. Inflammation can also be the major cause of defective handling of A beta and the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Here I review evidence that support the proposal that dysfunctional glia and the resulting neuroinflammation can explain many features of AD. Evidence supports the notion that damage caused by inflammation is not only a primary cause of neurodegeneration but also an inducer for the accumulation of A beta in AD. Dysfunctional glia can result in impaired neuronal function in AD, as well as in many progressive neurodegenerative disorders. We show that microglial cell activation is enhanced under pro-inflammatory conditions, indicating that glial cell responses to A beta related proteins can be critically dependent on the priming of glial cells by pro-inflammatory factors.

  15. [Death of neurons and glial cells, induced by a photodynamic injury: signaling processes and neurone-glial interactions].

    PubMed

    Uzdenskiĭ, A B; Kolosov, M S; Lobanov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of photodynamic (PD) injury of neurons and glial cells are reviewed. Neuron responses: firing stimulation at high photosensitizer concentrations and inhibition at low concentrations (< 10(-7) M) that were followed by necrosis, are described. Glial cells died from both necrosis and apoptosis. Local laser inactivation of a neuron enhanced PD-induced apoptosis of glial cells, thus indicating that neuron maintained the survival of glia. Inter- and intracellular signaling mediated photodamage of these cells. Using inhibitors or activators of signaling proteins, the involvement of Ca(2+)-, adenylate cyclase- and tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways in responses of neurons and glial cells to photosensitization was shown. Their pharmacological modulation can change selectivity of PD injury of neuronal and glial cells and efficiency of PD therapy.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-05-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus.

  17. Multipotent neural stem cells generate glial cells of the central complex through transit amplifying intermediate progenitors in Drosophila brain development.

    PubMed

    Viktorin, Gudrun; Riebli, Nadia; Popkova, Anna; Giangrande, Angela; Reichert, Heinrich

    2011-08-15

    The neural stem cells that give rise to the neural lineages of the brain can generate their progeny directly or through transit amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells (INPs). The INP-producing neural stem cells in Drosophila are called type II neuroblasts, and their neural progeny innervate the central complex, a prominent integrative brain center. Here we use genetic lineage tracing and clonal analysis to show that the INPs of these type II neuroblast lineages give rise to glial cells as well as neurons during postembryonic brain development. Our data indicate that two main types of INP lineages are generated, namely mixed neuronal/glial lineages and neuronal lineages. Genetic loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments show that the gcm gene is necessary and sufficient for gliogenesis in these lineages. The INP-derived glial cells, like the INP-derived neuronal cells, make major contributions to the central complex. In postembryonic development, these INP-derived glial cells surround the entire developing central complex neuropile, and once the major compartments of the central complex are formed, they also delimit each of these compartments. During this process, the number of these glial cells in the central complex is increased markedly through local proliferation based on glial cell mitosis. Taken together, these findings uncover a novel and complex form of neurogliogenesis in Drosophila involving transit amplifying intermediate progenitors. Moreover, they indicate that type II neuroblasts are remarkably multipotent neural stem cells that can generate both the neuronal and the glial progeny that make major contributions to one and the same complex brain structure.

  18. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Natalie; Bihari, Ofer; Kanner, Sivan; Barzilai, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a "hostile" environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  19. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions, designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. PMID:27170209

  20. Mechanisms of Aβ Clearance and Degradation by Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Miriam; Sastre, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells have a variety of functions in the brain, ranging from immune defense against external and endogenous hazardous stimuli, regulation of synaptic formation, calcium homeostasis, and metabolic support for neurons. Their dysregulation can contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One of the most important functions of glial cells in AD is the regulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in the brain. Microglia and astrocytes have been reported to play a central role as moderators of Aβ clearance and degradation. The mechanisms of Aβ degradation by glial cells include the production of proteases, including neprilysin, the insulin degrading enzyme, and the endothelin-converting enzymes, able to hydrolyse Aβ at different cleavage sites. Besides these enzymes, other proteases have been described to have some role in Aβ elimination, such as plasminogen activators, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and matrix metalloproteinases. Other relevant mediators that are released by glial cells are extracellular chaperones, involved in the clearance of Aβ alone or in association with receptors/transporters that facilitate their exit to the blood circulation. These include apolipoproteins, α2macroglobulin, and α1-antichymotrypsin. Finally, astrocytes and microglia have an essential role in phagocytosing Aβ, in many cases via a number of receptors that are expressed on their surface. In this review, we examine all of these mechanisms, providing an update on the latest research in this field. PMID:27458370

  1. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  2. Inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation of glioma cells with Datura stramonium agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Yamazaki, K; Yamori, T; Endo, T

    2002-10-07

    We found that a lectin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, induced irreversible differentiation in C6 glioma cells. The differentiated cells had long processes, a low rate of proliferation and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein. When the medium was replaced with Datura stramonium agglutinin-free medium after 1 h, cell proliferation continued to be inhibited. Experiments with several other lectins indicated that both recognition of linear N-acetyllactosamine repeats and recognition of multiantennary units of cell-surface glycans were required for the inhibition of C6 proliferation. Proliferation of four human glial tumour cells was also inhibited by Datura stramonium agglutinin. Further, these differentiated human glial tumour cells had long processes and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein similar to differentiated C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that Datura stramonium agglutinin may be useful as a new therapy for treating glioma without side effects.

  3. How Does Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Influence Glial Cells in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Carlie L.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely used in the clinic, and while it has a direct effect on neuronal excitability, the beneficial effects experienced by patients are likely to include the indirect activation of other cell types. Research conducted over the past two decades has made it increasingly clear that a population of non-neuronal cells, collectively known as glia, respond to and facilitate neuronal signaling. Each glial cell type has the ability to respond to electrical activity directly or indirectly, making them likely cellular effectors of TMS. TMS has been shown to enhance adult neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation, but the effect on cell survival and differentiation is less certain. Furthermore there is limited information regarding the response of astrocytes and microglia to TMS, and a complete paucity of data relating to the response of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to this treatment. However, due to the critical and yet multifaceted role of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), the influence that TMS has on glial cells is certainly an area that warrants careful examination. PMID:27092058

  4. Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia: from form to function.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2005-06-01

    Current information indicates that glial cells participate in all the normal and pathological processes of the central nervous system. Although much less is known about satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia, it appears that these cells share many characteristics with their central counterparts. This review presents information that has been accumulated recently on the physiology and pharmacology of SGCs. It appears that SGCs carry receptors for numerous neuroactive agents (e.g., ATP, bradykinin) and can therefore receive signals from other cells and respond to changes in their environment. Activation of SGCs might in turn influence neighboring neurons. Thus SGCs are likely to participate in signal processing and transmission in sensory ganglia. Damage to the axons of sensory ganglia is known to contribute to neuropathic pain. Such damage also affects SGCs, and it can be proposed that these cells have a role in pathological changes in the ganglia.

  5. Glial cell response to 3,4-(+/-)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Joseph M; Cholanians, Aram B; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J

    2014-03-01

    3,4-(±)-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-(±)-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), a primary metabolite of MDMA, are phenylethylamine derivatives that cause serotonergic neurotoxicity. Although several phenylethylamine derivatives activate microglia, little is known about the effects of MDMA on glial cells, and evidence of MDMA-induced microglial activation remains ambiguous. We initially determined microglial occupancy status of the parietal cortex in rats at various time points following a single neurotoxic dose of MDMA (20mg/kg, SC). A biphasic microglial response to MDMA was observed, with peak microglial occupancy occurring 12- and 72-h post-MDMA administration. Because direct injection of MDMA into the brain does not produce neurotoxicity, the glial response to MDMA metabolites was subsequently examined in vivo and in vitro. Rats were treated with MDA (20mg/kg, SC) followed by ex vivo biopsy culture to determine the activation of quiescent microglia. A reactive microglial response was observed 72 h after MDA administration that subsided by 7 days. In contrast, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of MDA failed to produce a microglial response. However, thioether metabolites of MDA derived from α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA) elicited a robust microglial response following icv injection. We subsequently determined the direct effects of various MDMA metabolites on primary cultures of E18 hippocampal mixed glial and neuronal cells. 5-(Glutathion-S-yl)-α-MeDA, 2,5-bis-(glutathion-S-yl)-α-MeDA, and 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-α-MeDA all stimulated the proliferation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes at a dose of 10 µM. The findings indicate that glial cells are activated in response to MDMA/MDA and support a role for thioether metabolites of α-MeDA in the neurotoxicity.

  6. Phenotypic changes in satellite glial cells in cultured trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Vitali; Shraer, Nathanael; Hanani, Menachem

    2010-11-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are specialized cells that form a tight sheath around neurons in sensory ganglia. In recent years, there is increasing interest in SGCs and they have been studied in both intact ganglia and in tissue culture. Here we studied phenotypic changes in SGCs in cultured trigeminal ganglia from adult mice, containing both neurons and SGCs, using phase optics, immunohistochemistry and time-lapse photography. Cultures were followed for up to 14 days. After isolation virtually every sensory neuron is ensheathed by SGCs, as in the intact ganglia. After one day in culture, SGCs begin to migrate away from their parent neurons, but in most cases the neurons still retain an intact glial cover. At later times in culture, there is a massive migration of SGCs away from the neurons and they undergo clear morphological changes, and at 7 days they become spindle-shaped. At one day in culture SGCs express the glial marker glutamine synthetase, and also the purinergic receptor P2X7. From day 2 in culture the glutamine synthetase expression is greatly diminished, whereas that of P2X7 is largely unchanged. We conclude that SGCs retain most of their characteristics for about 24 h after culturing, but undergo major phenotypic changes at later times.

  7. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain

  8. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain

  9. Reversal of developmental restrictions in neural crest lineages: Transition from Schwann cells to glial-melanocytic precursors in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dupin, Elisabeth; Real, Carla; Glavieux-Pardanaud, Corinne; Vaigot, Pierre; Le Douarin, Nicole M.

    2003-01-01

    In vertebrate embryos, diversification of the lineages arising from the neural crest (NC) is controlled to a large extent by environmental factors. In previous work, we showed that endothelin 3 (ET3) peptide favors the development of glial and melanocytic NC precursors in vitro. This factor is also capable of inducing proliferation of cultured epidermal pigment cells and their conversion to glia. ET3 therefore strongly promotes the emergence of melanocytic and glial phenotypes from precursors and acts on the maintenance of these phenotypes. In the present work, we explored the capacity of ET3 to reprogram glial cells into melanocytes. Schwann cells expressing glial-specific markers [such as the Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP)] were isolated from sciatic nerves of quail embryos and cultured in vitro. We found that ET3 promotes cell growth and sequential expression of melanocyte differentiation markers in cultures of purified SMP-expressing cells, whereas it had no significant effect on SMP-negative cells from the same nerves. Moreover, we provide evidence for the transition of differentiated Schwann cells to melanocytes in clonal cultures. This transition involves the production of a mixed progeny of melanoblasts/melanocytes, glia, and cells bearing differentiation markers of both phenotypes. Therefore, Schwann cells exposed to ET3 transdifferentiate to melanocytes through reversion to the stage of bipotent glial-melanocytic NC precursors. These findings show that NC-derived pigment and glial cells are phenotypically unstable in vitro and may undergo reversal of precursor hierarchy to function as bipotent stem cells. PMID:12702775

  10. Modification of glial response in hibernation: a patch-clamp study on glial cells acutely isolated from hibernating land snail.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ljiljana; Bataveljic, Danijela; Andjus, Pavle R; Moldovan, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Petkovic, Branka

    2014-12-01

    Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservation of brain function in the hibernating state implies accompanying modification of glial activity. A supportive role of glia in regulating neuronal activity is reflected through the activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kir). Therefore, we examined electrophysiological response, particularly Kir current response, of glial cells in mixture with neurons acutely isolated from active and hibernating land snail Helix pomatia. Our data show that hibernated glia have significantly lower inward current density, specific membrane conductance, and conductance density compared with active glia. The observed reduction could be attributed to the Kir currents, since the Ba2+-sensitive Kir current density was significantly lower in hibernated glia. Accordingly, a significant positive shift of the current reversal potential indicated a more depolarized state of hibernated glia. Data obtained show that modification of glial current response could be regulated by serotonin (5-HT) through an increase of cGMP as a secondary messenger, since extracellular addition of 5-HT or intracellular administration of cGMP to active glia induced a significant reduction of inward current density and thus mimicked the reduced response of hibernated glia. Lower Kir current density of hibernated glia accompanied the lower electrical activity of hibernated neurons, as revealed by a decrease in neuronal fast inward Na+ current density. Our findings reveal that glial response is reduced in the hibernating state and suggest seasonal modulation of glial activity. Maintenance of low glial activity in hibernation could be important for preservation of brain

  11. Cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of PAL31 overexpression in glial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a series of reactive changes and causes severe neurological deficits. A pronounced inflammation contributes to secondary pathology after SCI. Astroglia respond to SCI by proliferating, migrating, and altering phenotype. The impact of reactive gliosis on the pathogenesis of SCI is not fully understood. Our previous study has identified an inflammatory modulating protein, proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein (PAL31) which is upregulated in the microglia/macrophage of injured cords. Because PAL31 participates in cell cycle progression and reactive astroglia often appears in the injured cord, we aim to examine whether PAL31 is involved in glial modulation after injury. Results Enhanced PAL31 expression was shown not only in microglia/macrophages but also in spinal astroglia after SCI. Cell culture study reveal that overexpression of PAL31 in mixed glial cells or in C6 astroglia significantly reduced LPS/IFNγ stimulation. Further, enhanced PAL31 expression in C6 astroglia protected cells from H2O2 toxicity; however, this did not affect its proliferative activity. The inhibiting effect of PAL31 on LPS/IFNγ stimulation was observed in glia or C6 after co-culture with neuronal cells. The results demonstrated that the overexpressed PAL31 in glial cells protected neuronal damages through inhibiting NF-kB signaling and iNOS. Conclusions Our data suggest that PAL31upregulation might be beneficial after spinal cord injury. Reactive gliosis might become a good target for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:25034417

  12. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Gole, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226x delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  13. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  14. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development.

  15. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The word “glia” is derived from the Greek word “γλοια,” glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the “reactive glial phenotype” is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor–α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential. PMID:26689598

  16. Investigation of terahertz radiation influence on rat glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Borovkova, Mariia; Serebriakova, Maria; Fedorov, Viacheslav; Sedykh, Egor; Vaks, Vladimir; Lichutin, Alexander; Salnikova, Alina; Khodzitsky, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We studied an influence of continuous terahertz (THz) radiation (0.12 – 0.18 THz, average power density of 3.2 mW/cm2) on a rat glial cell line. A dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of THz radiation is demonstrated. After 1 minute of THz radiation exposure a relative number of apoptotic cells increased in 1.5 times, after 3 minutes it doubled. This result confirms the concept of biological hazard of intense THz radiation. Diagnostic applications of THz radiation can be restricted by the radiation power density and exposure time. PMID:28101417

  17. Sirt1 regulates glial progenitor proliferation and regeneration in white matter after neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Beata; Gierdalski, Marcin; Chew, Li-Jin; Hawley, Teresa; Catron, Mackenzie; Lichauco, Arturo; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Yuen, Tracy; Rowitch, David; Gallo, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative processes in brain pathologies require the production of distinct neural cell populations from endogenous progenitor cells. We have previously demonstrated that oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation is crucial for oligodendrocyte (OL) regeneration in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxia (HX) that reproduces diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) of premature infants. Here we identify the histone deacetylase Sirt1 as a Cdk2 regulator in OPC proliferation and response to HX. HX enhances Sirt1 and Sirt1/Cdk2 complex formation through HIF1α activation. Sirt1 deacetylates retinoblastoma (Rb) in the Rb/E2F1 complex, leading to dissociation of E2F1 and enhanced OPC proliferation. Sirt1 knockdown in culture and its targeted ablation in vivo suppresses basal and HX-induced OPC proliferation. Inhibition of Sirt1 also promotes OPC differentiation after HX. Our results indicate that Sirt1 is an essential regulator of OPC proliferation and OL regeneration after neonatal brain injury. Therefore, enhancing Sirt1 activity may promote OL recovery after DWMI. PMID:27991597

  18. Apobec1 Promotes Neurotoxicity-Induced Dedifferentiation of Müller Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian; Li, Xue; Chen, Lan; Han, Xin; Zhao, Wei; Li, Lianlian; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2017-02-02

    Retinal Müller glial cells in mammals acquire stem and progenitor cell properties after neurotoxic treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying proliferation and dedifferentiation of adult Müller cells in the mammalian retina were unclear. In this study, treatments with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) plus epidermal growth factor (EGF) led to the proliferation of Müller cells and expression of stem cell markers including Nanog and Nestin in the retina. The increased mRNA for Nanog and Nestin were coincident with reduced methylation of a Nanog promoter and a Nestin enhancer specific in the neural stem cells, respectively. We found that Apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic subunit 1 (Apobec1) was upregulated early in the retina treated with NMDA and EGF. Moreover, overexpression of Apobec1 in primary Müller cells increased expression of Nestin and reduced methylation of the Nestin enhancer. The data suggest that neurotoxicity-induced Apobec1 may promote expression of Nestin and help cell cycle reentry of retinal Müller cells via DNA demethylation. This study provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying dedifferentiation and proliferation of Müller cells in the mammalian retina.

  19. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-Jun; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Li-Ya, A; Kou, Yu-Hui; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  20. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  1. Glial cell plasticity in sensory ganglia induced by nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Hanani, M; Huang, T Y; Cherkas, P S; Ledda, M; Pannese, E

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have been done on the effect of nerve injury on neurons of sensory ganglia but little is known about the contribution of satellite glial cells (SCs) in these ganglia to post-injury events. We investigated cell-to-cell coupling and ultrastructure of SCs in mouse dorsal root ganglia after nerve injury (axotomy). Under control conditions SCs were mutually coupled, but mainly to other SCs around a given neuron. After axotomy SCs became extensively coupled to SCs that enveloped other neurons, apparently by gap junctions. Serial section electron microscopy showed that after axotomy SC sheaths enveloping neighboring neurons formed connections with each other. Such connections were absent in control ganglia. The number of gap junctions between SCs increased 6.5-fold after axotomy. We propose that axotomy induces growth of perineuronal SC sheaths, leading to contacts between SCs enveloping adjacent neurons and to formation of new gap junctions between SCs. These changes may be an important mode of glial plasticity and can contribute to neuropathic pain.

  2. Environmental stress, ageing and glial cell senescence: a novel mechanistic link to Parkinson’s disease?

    PubMed Central

    Chinta, Shankar J; Lieu, Christopher A; DeMaria, Marco; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Campisi, Judith; Andersen, Julie K

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental toxins is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. For example, in Parkinson’s disease (PD), chronic environmental exposure to certain toxins has been linked to the age-related development of neuropathology. Neuronal damage is believed to involve the induction of neuroinflammatory events as a consequence of glial cell activation. Cellular senescence is a potent anti-cancer mechanism that occurs in a number of proliferative cell types and causes the arrest of proliferation of cells at risk of malignant transformation following exposure to potentially oncogenic stimuli. With age, senescent cells accumulate and express a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP; i.e. the robust secretion of many inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and proteases). Whereas cell senescence in peripheral tissues has been causally linked to a number of age-related pathologies, little is known about the induction of cellular senescence and the SASP in the brain. Based on recently reported findings, we propose that environmental stressors associated with PD may act in part by eliciting senescence and the SASP within non-neuronal glial cells in the ageing brain, thus contributing to the characteristic decline in neuronal integrity that occurs in this disorder. PMID:23600398

  3. Environmental stress, ageing and glial cell senescence: a novel mechanistic link to Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Chinta, S J; Lieu, C A; Demaria, M; Laberge, R-M; Campisi, J; Andersen, J K

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to environmental toxins is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. For example, in Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic environmental exposure to certain toxins has been linked to the age-related development of neuropathology. Neuronal damage is believed to involve the induction of neuroinflammatory events as a consequence of glial cell activation. Cellular senescence is a potent anti-cancer mechanism that occurs in a number of proliferative cell types and causes the arrest of proliferation of cells at risk of malignant transformation following exposure to potentially oncogenic stimuli. With age, senescent cells accumulate and express a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP; that is the robust secretion of many inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and proteases). Whereas cell senescence in peripheral tissues has been causally linked to a number of age-related pathologies, little is known about the induction of cellular senescence and the SASP in the brain. On the basis of recently reported findings, we propose that environmental stressors associated with PD may act in part by eliciting senescence and the SASP within non neuronal glial cells in the ageing brain, thus contributing to the characteristic decline in neuronal integrity that occurs in this disorder.

  4. Induction of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in rat glial cells by acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kamendulis, L M; Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1999-08-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylonitrile (ACN) resulted in a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas). While the exact mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unresolved, non-genotoxic and possibly tumor promotion modes of action appear to be involved in the induction of glial tumors. Recent studies have shown that ACN induced oxidative stress selectively in rat brain in a dose-responsive manner. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in a rat glial cell line, a target tissue, and in cultured rat hepatocytes, a non-target tissue of ACN carcinogenicity. Glial cells and hepatocytes were treated for 1, 4 and 24 h with sublethal concentrations of ACN. ACN induced an increase in oxidative DNA damage, as evidenced by increased production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in glial cells but not in rat hepatocytes. Hydroxyl radical formation following ACN treatment was also selectively increased in glial cells. Following 1 and 4 h of ACN exposure, the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione, as well as the activities of the enzymatic antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the rat glial cells. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of glutathione peroxidase were not affected by ACN treatment in rat glial cells. No changes in any of these biomarkers of oxidative stress were observed in hepatocytes treated with ACN. These data indicate that ACN selectively induced oxidative stress in rat glial cells.

  5. Comparative effect of immature neuronal or glial cell transplantation on motor functional recovery following experimental traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Chen, Jian; Zhong, Yuan; Ren, Wen-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the comparative effect of stereotaxically transplanted immature neuronal or glial cells in brain on motor functional recovery and cytokine expression after cold-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adult rats. A total of 60 rats were divided into four groups (n=15/group): Sham group; TBI only group; TBI plus neuronal cells-transplanted group (NC-G); and TBI plus glial cells-transplanted group (GC-G). Cortical lesions were induced by a touching metal stamp, frozen with liquid nitrogen, to the dura mater over the motor cortex of adult rats. Neuronal and glial cells were isolated from rat embryonic and newborn cortices, respectively, and cultured in culture flasks. Rats received neurons or glia grafts (~1×106 cells) 5 days after TBI was induced. Motor functional evaluation was performed with the rotarod test prior to and following glial and neural cell grafts. Five rats from each group were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-cell transplantation. Immunofluorescence staining was performed on brain section to identify the transplanted neuronal or glial cells using neural and astrocytic markers. The expression levels of cytokines, including transforming growth factor-β, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, which have key roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural cells, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. A localized cortical lesion was evoked in all injured rats, resulting in significant motor deficits. Transplanted cells successfully migrated and survived in the injured brain lesion, and the expression of neuronal and astrocyte markers were detected in the NC-G and GC-G groups, respectively. Rats in the NC-G and GC-G cell-transplanted groups exhibited significant motor functional recovery and reduced histopathologic lesions, as compared with the TBI-G rats that did not receive neural cells (P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, GC-G treatment

  6. Nucleotide P2Y13-stimulated phosphorylation of CREB is required for ADP-induced proliferation of late developing retinal glial progenitors in culture.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Flavia Jesus; Silva, Thayane Martins; da Silva, Flavia Emenegilda; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2017-03-24

    Nucleotides stimulate phosphorylation of CREB to induce cell proliferation and survival in diverse cell types. We report here that ADP induces the phosphorylation of CREB in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in chick embryo retinal progenitors in culture. ADP-induced increase in phospho-CREB is mediated by P2 receptors as it is blocked by PPADS but not by the adenosine antagonists DPCPX or ZM241385. Incubation of the cultures with the CREB inhibitor KG-501 prevents ADP-induced incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine, indicating that CREB is involved in retinal cell proliferation. No effect of this compound is observed on the viability of retinal progenitors. While no significant increase in CREB phosphorylation is observed with the P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS2365, ADP-induced phosphorylation of CREB is blocked by the P2Y13 receptor selective antagonist MRS2211, but not by MRS2179 or PSB0739, two antagonists of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, respectively, suggesting that ADP-induced CREB phosphorylation is mediated by P2Y13 receptors. ADP-induced increase in phospho-CREB is attenuated by the PI3K inhibitor LY241385 and completely prevented by the MEK inhibitor U0126, suggesting that at least ERK is involved in ADP-induced CREB phosphorylation. A pharmacological profile similar to the activation and inhibition of CREB phosphorylation is observed in the phosphorylation of ERK, suggesting that P2Y13 receptors mediate ADP induced ERK/CREB pathway in the cultures. While no increase in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation is observed with the P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS2365, both MRS2179 and MRS2211 prevent ADP-mediated increase in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, but not progenitor's survival, suggesting that both P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptor subtypes are involved in ADP-induced cell proliferation. P2Y1 receptor-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i is observed in glial cells only when cultures maintained for 9days are used. In glia from cultures cultivated for only 2days, no increase in [Ca

  7. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  8. Satellite glial cell responses to neuronal firing in the nervous system of Helix pomatia.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1994-03-01

    Patch clamp experiments were conducted on satellite glial cells attached to the cell body of neurons in place within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The glial cells were studied using cell-attached and whole-cell patch clamp configurations while the underlying neurons were under current or voltage clamp control. The resting potential of the glial cells (-69 mV) was more negative than that of the underlying neurons (-53 mV), due to their high K+ selectivity. Densely packed K+ channels were present, some of which were active at the cell resting potential. Neuronal firing elicited a cumulative depolarization of the glial cells. Large K+ currents flowing from V-clamped neurons depolarized the glial layer by up to 30 mV. The glial depolarization was directly correlated with the size of the neuronal K+ current. The glial cells recovered their resting potential within 2-5 sec. The neuronal depolarization induced a delayed (20-30 sec) and persistent (3-4 min) increase in the glial K+ channel opening probability. Likewise, pulses of K+ (20-50 mM)-rich saline activated the glial channels, unless the underlying neuron was held hyperpolarized. In low Ca(2+)-high Mg2+ saline, neuron depolarization and K(+)-rich saline did not activate the glial K+ channels. These data indicate that a calcium-dependent signal released from the neuronal cell body was involved in glial channel regulation. Neuron-induced channel opening may help eliminate the K+ ions flowing from active neurons.

  9. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Tsacopoulos, M; Evêquoz-Mercier, V; Perrottet, P; Buchner, E

    1988-01-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy[3H]glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy[3H]glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O2 and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system. Images PMID:3186756

  10. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O/sub 2/ and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  11. Effects of Flavonoids from Food and Dietary Supplements on Glial and Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Marko; Rozman, Damjana; Komel, Radovan

    2015-10-23

    Quercetin, catechins and proanthocyanidins are flavonoids that are prominently featured in foodstuffs and dietary supplements, and may possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most dangerous form of glioma, a malignancy of the brain connective tissue. This review assesses molecular structures of these flavonoids, their importance as components of diet and dietary supplements, their bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, their reported beneficial health effects, and their effects on non-malignant glial as well as glioblastoma tumor cells. The reviewed flavonoids appear to protect glial cells via reduction of oxidative stress, while some also attenuate glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and reduce neuroinflammation. Most of the reviewed flavonoids inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induce their death. Moreover, some of them inhibit pro-oncogene signaling pathways and intensify the effect of conventional anti-cancer therapies. However, most of these anti-glioblastoma effects have only been observed in vitro or in animal models. Due to limited ability of the reviewed flavonoids to access the brain, their normal dietary intake is likely insufficient to produce significant anti-cancer effects in this organ, and supplementation is needed.

  12. Glial cell responses, complement, and clusterin in the central nervous system following dorsal root transection.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Persson, J K; Svensson, M; Aldskogius, H

    1998-07-01

    We have examined the glial cell response, the possible expression of compounds associated with the complement cascade, including the putative complement inhibitor clusterin, and their cellular association during Wallerian degeneration in the central nervous system. Examination of the proliferation pattern revealed an overall greater mitotic activity after rhizotomy, an exclusive involvement of microglia in this proliferation after peripheral nerve injury, but, in addition, a small fraction of proliferating astrocytes after rhizotomy. Immunostaining with the phagocytic cell marker ED1 gradually became very prominent after rhizotomy, possibly reflecting a response to the extensive nerve fiber disintegration. Lumbar dorsal rhizotomy did not induce endogenous immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition or complement expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn, dorsal funiculus, or gracile nucleus. This is in marked contrast to the situation after peripheral nerve injury, which appears to activate the entire complement cascade in the vicinity of the central sensory processes. Clusterin, a multifunctional protein with complement inhibitory effects, was markedly upregulated in the dorsal funiculus in astrocytes. In addition, there was an intense induction of clusterin expression in the degenerating white matter in oligodendrocytes, possibly reflecting a degeneration process in these cells. The findings suggest that 1) complement expression by microglial cells is intimately associated with IgG deposition; 2) axotomized neuronal perikarya, but not degenerating central fibers, undergo changes which induce such deposition; and 3) clusterin is not related to complement expression following neuronal injury but participates in regulating the state of oligodendrocytes during Wallerian degeneration.

  13. Gliopathic pain: when satellite glial cells go bad.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Peter T; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Bhargava, Aditi; Romero, Marcela; Sundberg, Christopher; Charles, Andrew C; Jasmin, Luc

    2009-10-01

    Neurons in sensory ganglia are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs) that perform similar functions to the glia found in the CNS. When primary sensory neurons are injured, the surrounding SGCs undergo characteristic changes. There is good evidence that the SGCs are not just bystanders to the injury but play an active role in the initiation and maintenance of neuronal changes that underlie neuropathic pain. In this article the authors review the literature on the relationship between SGCs and nociception and present evidence that changes in SGC potassium ion buffering capacity and glutamate recycling can lead to neuropathic pain-like behavior in animal models. The role that SGCs play in the immune responses to injury is also considered. We propose the term gliopathic pain to describe those conditions in which central or peripheral glia are thought to be the principal generators of principal pain generators.

  14. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  15. Minocycline blocks glial cell activation and ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer Ann; Arbogast, Tara Elizabeth; Moya, Esteban A; Fu, Zhenxing; Powell, Frank L

    2017-01-18

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) is the time-dependent increase in ventilation, which persists upon return to normoxia, and involves plasticity in both central nervous system respiratory centers and peripheral chemoreceptors. We investigated the role of glial cells in VAH in male Sprague Dawley rats using minocycline, an antibiotic that inhibits microglia activation and has anti-inflammatory properties, and barometric pressure plethysmography to measure ventilation. Rats received either minocycline (45mg/kg, i.p. daily) or saline beginning one day before and during 7 days of chronic hypoxia (CH, PIO2 = 70 Torr). Minocycline had no effect on normoxic control rats or the hypercapnic ventilatory response in CH rats, but minocycline significantly (p < 0.001) decreased ventilation during acute hypoxia in CH rats. However, minocycline administration during only the last 3 days of CH did not reverse VAH. Microglia and astrocyte activation in the nucleus tractus solitarius was quantified from 30 minutes to 7 days of CH. Microglia showed an active morphology (shorter and fewer branches) after 1 hour of hypoxia and returned to the control state (longer filaments and extensive branching) after 4 hours of CH. Astrocytes increased GFAP antibody immunofluorescent intensity, indicating activation, at both 4 and 24 hours of CH. Minocycline had no effect on glia in normoxia, but significantly decreased microglia activation at 1 hour of CH and astrocyte activation at 24 hours of CH. These results support a role for glial cells providing an early signal for the induction but not maintenance of neural plasticity underlying ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

  16. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Contributes to a Shift in the Angioregulatory Activity of Retinal Glial (Müller) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yafai, Yousef; Iandiev, Ianors; Lange, Johannes; Yang, Xiu Mei; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Eichler, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with pro-angiogenic and neurotrophic effects. The angioregulatory role of this molecule may become especially significant in retinal neovascularization, which is a hallmark of a number of ischemic eye diseases. This study was undertaken to reveal expression characteristics of bFGF, produced by retinal glial (Müller) cells, and to determine conditions under which glial bFGF may stimulate the proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling detected bFGF in Müller cells of the rat retina and in acutely isolated Müller cells with bFGF levels, which increased after ischemia-reperfusion in postischemic retinas. In patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or myopia, the immunoreactivity of bFGF co-localized to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in surgically excised retinal tissues. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses indicated that cultured Müller cells produce bFGF, which is elevated under hypoxia or oxidative stress, as well as under stimulation with various growth factors and cytokines, including pro-inflammatory factors. When retinal endothelial cells were cultured in the presence of media from hypoxia (0.2%)-conditioned Müller cells, a distinct picture of endothelial cell proliferation emerged. Media from 24-h cultured Müller cells inhibited proliferation, whereas 72-h conditioned media elicited a stimulatory effect. BFGF-neutralizing antibodies suppressed the enhanced endothelial cell proliferation to a similar extent as anti-VEGF antibodies. Furthermore, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK−1/−2) in retinal endothelial cells was increased when the cells were cultured in 72-h conditioned media, while neutralizing bFGF attenuated the activation of this signaling pathway. These data provide evidence that retinal (glial) Müller cells are major sources of bFGF in the ischemic retina. Müller cells under

  17. Social Behavior in Medulloblastoma: Functional Analysis of Tumor-Supporting Glial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    neuron precursors (GNPs) in developing cerebellum proliferate exponentially , and the misregulation of which has been linked to medulloblastoma formation...sustains the tumor growth . In the past year, we have completed most of the work proposed in aim 1. Our data showed that the glial-ablation treatment not...cerebellum proliferate exponentially . The misregulation of GNP proliferation has been linked to medulloblastoma formation. Fate mapping experiments

  18. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  19. Cell Proliferation, Cell Death, and Size Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Cell Death , and Size Regulation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas E. Baker, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Cell Proliferation, Cell Death , and Size Regulation DAMD17-97-1-7034 6. AUTHOR(S) Nicholas E. Baker, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...Contains unpublished data 5 CELL PROLIFERATION, CELL DEATH , AND SIZE REGULATION INTRODUCTION Cell proliferation and cell death come to attention through

  20. NG2 glial cells regulate neuroimmunological responses to maintain neuronal function and survival

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masayuki; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Kume, Satoshi; Eguchi, Asami; Takata, Kumi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    NG2-expressing neural progenitor cells (i.e., NG2 glial cells) maintain their proliferative and migratory activities even in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and produce myelinating oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Although NG2 glial cells have been observed in close proximity to neuronal cell bodies in order to receive synaptic inputs, substantive non-proliferative roles of NG2 glial cells in the adult CNS remain unclear. In the present study, we generated NG2-HSVtk transgenic rats and selectively ablated NG2 glial cells in the adult CNS. Ablation of NG2 glial cells produced defects in hippocampal neurons due to excessive neuroinflammation via activation of the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) pro-inflammatory pathway, resulting in hippocampal atrophy. Furthermore, we revealed that the loss of NG2 glial cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exacerbated these abnormalities. Our findings suggest that NG2 glial cells maintain neuronal function and survival via the control of neuroimmunological function. PMID:28195192

  1. Single-channel and whole-cell recordings from on-neurone glial cells in Helix pomatia ganglia.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Jacquet, G; Chagneux, H; Gola, M

    1993-11-01

    A procedure is described for performing patch-clamp recordings on satellite glial cells kept in place within the nervous ganglia in the mollusc Helix. Glial cell properties were deduced from whole-cell and cell-attached recordings. The glial membrane was found to contain densely packed inwardly rectifying K+ channels. Activation of the neurones, under either current-clamp or voltage-clamp conditions, depolarized the glial cell layer wrapped around the neurones and induced a delayed persistent increase in the K+ channel opening probability. These results suggest that the glial channels opened in response to a signal emanating from the active neurones. This preparation provides a useful means of detecting and analysing neurone-glial interactions at the cell and unitary channel levels.

  2. Glial cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M.; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M.; Pavan, William J.; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers1. ILC3 development has been considered to be programmed1. Nevertheless, how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a novel glial-ILC3-epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate II22, downstream of p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Strikingly, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic factor expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88 dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired ILC3-derived IL-22 and pronounced propensity to gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light into a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing glial cells as central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation via neurotrophic factor signals. PMID:27409807

  3. Radial glial cells play a key role in echinoderm neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the CNS of echinoderms is capable of fast and efficient regeneration following injury and constitutes one of the most promising model systems that can provide important insights into evolution of the cellular and molecular events involved in neural repair in deuterostomes. So far, the cellular mechanisms of neural regeneration in echinoderm remained obscure. In this study we show that radial glial cells are the main source of new cells in the regenerating radial nerve cord in these animals. Results We demonstrate that radial glial cells of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima react to injury by dedifferentiation. Both glia and neurons undergo programmed cell death in the lesioned CNS, but it is the dedifferentiated glial subpopulation in the vicinity of the injury that accounts for the vast majority of cell divisions. Glial outgrowth leads to formation of a tubular scaffold at the growing tip, which is later populated by neural elements. Most importantly, radial glial cells themselves give rise to new neurons. At least some of the newly produced neurons survive for more than 4 months and express neuronal markers typical of the mature echinoderm CNS. Conclusions A hypothesis is formulated that CNS regeneration via activation of radial glial cells may represent a common capacity of the Deuterostomia, which is not invoked spontaneously in higher vertebrates, whose adult CNS does not retain radial glial cells. Potential implications for biomedical research aimed at finding the cure for human CNS injuries are discussed. PMID:23597108

  4. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  5. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  6. How a radial glial cell decides to become a multiciliated ependymal cell.

    PubMed

    Kyrousi, Christina; Lygerou, Zoi; Taraviras, Stavros

    2017-02-07

    The V-SVZ adult neurogenic niche is located in the wall of the lateral ventricles and contains neural stem cells, with self-renewing and differentiating ability and postmitotic multiciliated ependymal cells, an important structural and trophic component of the niche. The niche is established at postnatal stages from a subpopulation of radial glial cells, determined during embryogenesis. Radial glial cells constitute a heterogeneous population, which give rise, in addition to niche cellular components, to neurons and glial cells. The mechanisms that direct their fate commitment towards V-SVZ niche cells are largely unknown. In the present review, we discuss recent findings on the signaling networks governing fate commitment decisions of radial glial cells towards multiciliated ependymal cells. We highlight the role of two novel factors: McIdas and GemC1/Lynkeas and the molecular pathways which they activate in order to promote ependymal cell differentiation. Finally, we discuss a possible crosstalk of known signaling pathways, such as Notch, STAT3, and BMPs, for the specification of ependymal versus adult neural stem cells in the V-SVZ niche. GLIA 2017.

  7. DOPAL is Transmissible to and Oligomerizes Alpha-Synuclein in Human Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patricia; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) containing alpha-synuclein (AS) are a neuropathologic hallmark of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Oligomerized AS is thought to be the pathogenic form of the protein. Glial cells normally express little AS, but they can take up AS from the extracellular fluid. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), an obligate intermediate in the intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine (DA), potently oligomerizes AS. In this study we tested whether DOPAL is taken up by human glial cells and augments intracellular oligomerization of AS. Methods DOPAL (exogenous or endogenous from co-incubation with PC12 cells) and AS (native or A53T mutant form) were added to the incubation medium of glial cells (glioblastoma or MO3.13 oligodendrocytes). Glial cellular contents of DOPAL and its intracellular metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were measured at up to 180 minutes of incubation. Glial cellular AS oligomers were quantified by Western blotting. Results Neither glioblastoma nor MO3.13 cells contained endogenous catecholamines or AS. Co-incubation of the cells with DA-producing PC12 cells produced time-related increases in DOPAL and DOPAC contents. Similarly, glial cellular DOPAL and DOPAC contents increased rapidly after addition of DOPAL to the medium. After addition of native or A53T-AS, intracellular AS also increased. Incubation of glial cells with both DOPAL and AS enhanced the intracellular oligomerization of native and A53T-AS. Conclusions DOPAL is transmissible to glial cells and enhances intracellular oligomerization of AS. An interaction of DOPAL with AS might help explain the formation of CGIs in MSA. PMID:26777075

  8. Photodynamic therapy-induced nitric oxide production in neuronal and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Vera D.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been recently demonstrated to enhance apoptosis of glial cells induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT), but to protect glial cells from PDT-induced necrosis in the crayfish stretch receptor, a simple neuroglial preparation that consists of a single mechanosensory neuron enveloped by satellite glial cells. We used the NO-sensitive fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to study the distribution and dynamics of PDT-induced NO production in the mechanosensory neuron and surrounding glial cells. The NO production in the glial envelope was higher than in the neuronal soma axon and dendrites both in control and in experimental conditions. In dark NO generator, DEA NONOate or NO synthase substrate L-arginine hydrochloride significantly increased the NO level in glial cells, whereas NO scavenger 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) or inhibitors of NO synthase L-NG-nitro arginine methyl ester and Nω-nitro-L-arginine decreased it. PDT induced the transient increase in NO production with a maximum at 4 to 7 min after the irradiation start followed by its inhibition at 10 to 40 min. We suggested that PDT stimulated neuronal rather than inducible NO synthase isoform in glial cells, and the produced NO could mediate PDT-induced apoptosis.

  9. [Fine structure of glial cells in the central nervous system of the tapeworm Grillotia erinaceus (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha)].

    PubMed

    Biserova, N M

    2008-01-01

    The problem of glial cells existing in parasitic and free living flatworms is correlated with organization of parenchyma in platyhelmintes. In the contrary to the widespread opinion that myelin-like envelopes and glial cells do not exist in the nervous system of parasitic flatworms, it has been shown by ultrastructural researches that Amphilina foliacea (Cestoda, Amphilinidea) has well developed glial cells and myelin-like envelopes in the ganglia and main cords, which include both glial cells and intercellular components. The aim of our research was to reveal and investigate in details structural components corresponding to the concept of the glial cell in the CNS of Grillotia erinaceus (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha). Three types of glial cells have been found. The first type is the fibroblast-like glial cells; cells locate in the cerebral ganglion, contain in cytoplasm and extract out fibrillar matrix, form desmosomes and have supporting function. The glial cells of the second type form myeline-like envelope of the giant axons and bulbar nerves in scolex and have laminar cytoplasm. These cells are numerous and exceed in number the neurons bodies into the nerve. The glial cells of the third type form multilayer envelopes in the main nerve cords; extra cellular fibers and gap-junctions take place between the layers. There are contacts between the glial cells of the third type and excretory epithelium but specialized contacts with neurons have been not found. The existing of glial cells in free living and parasitic flatworms is discussed.

  10. Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke: The Role of Leukocytes and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Park, Joohyun; Chang, Ji Young; Kim, Sa-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The immune response after stroke is known to play a major role in ischemic brain pathobiology. The inflammatory signals released by immune mediators activated by brain injury sets off a complex series of biochemical and molecular events which have been increasingly recognized as a key contributor to neuronal cell death. The primary immune mediators involved are glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocyte. After ischemic stroke, activation of glial cells and subsequent release of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals are important for modulating both neuronal cell damage and wound healing. Infiltrated leukocytes release inflammatory mediators into the site of the lesion, thereby exacerbating brain injury. This review describes how the roles of glial cells and circulating leukocytes are a double-edged sword for neuroinflammation by focusing on their detrimental and protective effects in ischemic stroke. Here, we will focus on underlying characterize of glial cells and leukocytes under inflammation after ischemic stroke. PMID:27790058

  11. Serum albumin induces osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Silvana; Wurm, Antje; Kutzera, Franziska; Pannicke, Thomas; Krügel, Katja; Linnertz, Regina; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-03-04

    Edema in the ischemic neural tissue develops by increased vascular permeability associated with extravasation of albumin, and by glial swelling. Here, we show that bovine serum albumin acutely administered to slices of the rat retina causes swelling of glial somata under hypoosmotic conditions. The effect of albumin was dose-dependent, with half-maximal and maximal effects at 10 nM and 1 microM, respectively, and was mediated by activation of transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II, oxidative stress, and the production of arachidonic acid and prostaglandins. Albumin-induced glial swelling was prevented by glutamate and purinergic receptor agonists. The data suggest that serum albumin may induce glial swelling in the presence of osmotic gradients.

  12. Glial Cell Calcium Signaling Mediates Capillary Regulation of Blood Flow in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Biesecker, Kyle R.; Srienc, Anja I.; Shimoda, Angela M.; Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E.; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The brain is critically dependent on the regulation of blood flow to nourish active neurons. One widely held hypothesis of blood flow regulation holds that active neurons stimulate Ca2+ increases in glial cells, triggering glial release of vasodilating agents. This hypothesis has been challenged, as arteriole dilation can occur in the absence of glial Ca2+ signaling. We address this controversy by imaging glial Ca2+ signaling and vessel dilation in the mouse retina. We find that sensory stimulation results in Ca2+ increases in the glial endfeet contacting capillaries, but not arterioles, and that capillary dilations often follow spontaneous Ca2+ signaling. In IP3R2−/− mice, where glial Ca2+ signaling is reduced, light-evoked capillary, but not arteriole, dilation is abolished. The results show that, independent of arterioles, capillaries actively dilate and regulate blood flow. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that glial Ca2+ signaling regulates capillary but not arteriole blood flow. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show that a Ca2+-dependent glial cell signaling mechanism is responsible for regulating capillary but not arteriole diameter. This finding resolves a long-standing controversy regarding the role of glial cells in regulating blood flow, demonstrating that glial Ca2+ signaling is both necessary and sufficient to dilate capillaries. While the relative contributions of capillaries and arterioles to blood flow regulation remain unclear, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate capillary blood flow may ultimately lead to the development of therapies for treating diseases where blood flow regulation is disrupted, including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and diabetic retinopathy. This finding may also aid in revealing the underlying neuronal activity that generates BOLD fMRI signals. PMID:27605617

  13. Rapid, Dynamic Activation of Müller Glial Stem Cell Responses in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes, Christopher J.; Kim, Jung-Woong; Swaroop, Anand; Raymond, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Zebrafish neurons regenerate from Müller glia following retinal lesions. Genes and signaling pathways important for retinal regeneration in zebrafish have been described, but our understanding of how Müller glial stem cell properties are regulated is incomplete. Mammalian Müller glia possess a latent neurogenic capacity that might be enhanced in regenerative therapies to treat degenerative retinal diseases. Methods To identify transcriptional changes associated with stem cell properties in zebrafish Müller glia, we performed a comparative transcriptome analysis from isolated cells at 8 and 16 hours following an acute photic lesion, prior to the asymmetric division that produces retinal progenitors. Results We report a rapid, dynamic response of zebrafish Müller glia, characterized by activation of pathways related to stress, nuclear factor–κB (NF-κB) signaling, cytokine signaling, immunity, prostaglandin metabolism, circadian rhythm, and pluripotency, and an initial repression of Wnt signaling. When we compared publicly available transcriptomes of isolated mouse Müller glia from two retinal degeneration models, we found that mouse Müller glia showed evidence of oxidative stress, variable responses associated with immune regulation, and repression of pathways associated with pluripotency, development, and proliferation. Conclusions Categories of biological processes/pathways activated following photoreceptor loss in regeneration-competent zebrafish Müller glia, which distinguished them from mouse Müller glia in retinal degeneration models, included cytokine signaling (notably NF-κB), prostaglandin E2 synthesis, expression of core clock genes, and pathways/metabolic states associated with pluripotency. These regulatory mechanisms are relatively unexplored as potential mediators of stem cell properties likely to be important in Müller glial cells for successful retinal regeneration. PMID:27699411

  14. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  15. ATM kinase inhibition in glial cells activates the innate immune response and causes neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew J; Rimkus, Stacey A; Wassarman, David A

    2012-03-13

    To investigate the mechanistic basis for central nervous system (CNS) neurodegeneration in the disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), we analyzed flies mutant for the causative gene A-T mutated (ATM). ATM encodes a protein kinase that functions to monitor the genomic integrity of cells and control cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis programs. Mutation of the C-terminal amino acid in Drosophila ATM inhibited the kinase activity and caused neuron and glial cell death in the adult brain and a reduction in mobility and longevity. These data indicate that reduced ATM kinase activity is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration in A-T. ATM kinase mutant flies also had elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells. ATM knockdown in glial cells, but not neurons, was sufficient to cause neuron and glial cell death, a reduction in mobility and longevity, and elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells, indicating that a non-cell-autonomous mechanism contributes to neurodegeneration in A-T. Taken together, these data suggest that early-onset CNS neurodegeneration in A-T is similar to late-onset CNS neurodegeneration in diseases such as Alzheimer's in which uncontrolled inflammatory response mediated by glial cells drives neurodegeneration.

  16. Anti-aging effects of guanosine in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-12-01

    Guanosine, a guanine-based purine, has been shown to exert beneficial roles in in vitro and in vivo injury models of neural cells. Guanosine is released from astrocytes and modulates important astroglial functions, including glutamatergic metabolism, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Astrocytes are crucial for regulating the neurotransmitter system and synaptic information processes, ionic homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and the inflammatory response. Aging is a natural process that induces numerous changes in the astrocyte functionality. Thus, the search for molecules able to reduce the glial dysfunction associated with aging may represent an approach for avoiding the onset of age-related neurological diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-aging effects of guanosine, using primary astrocyte cultures from newborn, adult, and aged Wistar rats. Concomitantly, we evaluated the role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in guanosine-mediated glioprotection. We observed age-dependent changes in glutamate uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, the glutathione (GSH) system, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β)) release, and the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor kB (NFkB), which were prevented by guanosine in an HO-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest guanosine to be a promising therapeutic agent able to provide glioprotection during the aging process. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of guanosine in the aging process.

  17. TDP-43 causes differential pathology in neuronal versus glial cells in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sen; Wang, Chuan-En; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2014-05-15

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are associated with familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although recent studies have revealed that mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells is toxic, how mutant TDP-43 causes primarily neuronal degeneration in an age-dependent manner remains unclear. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) that expresses mutant TDP-43 (M337V) ubiquitously, we found that mutant TDP-43 accumulates preferentially in neuronal cells in the postnatal mouse brain. We then ubiquitously or selectively expressed mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells in the striatum of adult mouse brains via stereotaxic injection of AAV vectors and found that it also preferentially accumulates in neuronal cells. Expression of mutant TDP-43 in neurons in the striatum causes more severe degeneration, earlier death and more robust symptoms in mice than expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells; however, aging increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells, and expression of mutant TDP-43 in older mice caused earlier onset of phenotypes and more severe neuropathology than that in younger mice. Although expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells via stereotaxic injection does not lead to robust neurological phenotypes, systemic inhibition of the proteasome activity via MG132 in postnatal mice could exacerbate glial TDP-43-mediated toxicity and cause mice to die earlier. Consistently, this inhibition increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells in mouse brains. Thus, the differential accumulation of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal versus glial cells contributes to the preferential toxicity of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells and age-dependent pathology.

  18. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, R; Yamamoto, H; Niwano, M; Hirano-Iwata, A

    2016-01-11

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  19. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  20. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    PubMed

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  1. Neuronal Injury, Gliosis, and Glial Proliferation in Two Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Jaycie L; Barker-Haliski, Melissa L; Dahle, E Jill; White, H Steve; Wilcox, Karen S

    2016-04-01

    It is estimated that 30%-40% of epilepsy patients are refractory to therapy and animal models are useful for the identification of more efficacious therapeutic agents. Various well-characterized syndrome-specific models are needed to assess their relevance to human seizure disorders and their validity for testing potential therapies. The corneal kindled mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) allows for the rapid screening of investigational compounds, but there is a lack of information as to the specific inflammatory pathology in this model. Similarly, the Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model of TLE may prove to be useful for screening, but quantitative assessment of hippocampal pathology is also lacking. We used immunohistochemistry to characterize and quantitate acute neuronal injury and inflammatory features in dorsal CA1 and dentate gyrus regions and in the directly overlying posterior parietal cortex at 2 time points in each of these TLE models. Corneal kindled mice were observed to have astrogliosis, but not microgliosis or neuron cell death. In contrast, TMEV-injected mice had astrogliosis, microgliosis, neuron death, and astrocyte and microglial proliferation. Our results suggest that these 2 animal models might be appropriate for evaluation of distinct therapies for TLE.

  2. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  3. Osmotic swelling characteristics of glial cells in the murine hippocampus, cerebellum, and retina in situ.

    PubMed

    Hirrlinger, Petra G; Wurm, Antje; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Bringmann, Andreas; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Glial cells are proposed to play a major role in the ionic and osmotic homeostasis in the CNS. Swelling of glial cells contributes to the development of edema in neural tissue under pathological conditions such as trauma and ischemia. In this study, we compared the osmotic swelling characteristics of murine hippocampal astrocytes, cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, and retinal Müller glial cells in acutely isolated tissue slices in response to hypoosmotic stress and pharmacological blockade of Kir channels. Hypoosmotic challenge induced an immediate swelling of somata in the majority of Bergmann glial cells and hippocampal astrocytes investigated, whereas Müller cell bodies displayed a substantial delay in the onset of swelling and hippocampal astroglial processes remained unaffected. Blockade of Kir channels under isoosmotic conditions had no swelling-inducing effect in Müller cell somata but caused a swelling in brain astrocytic somata and processes. Blockade of Kir channels under hypoosmotic conditions induced an immediate and strong swelling in Müller cell somata, but had no cumulative effect to brain astroglial somata. No regulatory volume decrease could be observed in all cell types. The data suggest that Kir channels are differently implicated in cell volume homeostasis of retinal Müller cells and brain astrocytes and that Müller cells and brain astrocytes differ in their osmotic swelling properties.

  4. The glia doctrine: addressing the role of glial cells in healthy brain ageing.

    PubMed

    Nagelhus, Erlend A; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Bergersen, Linda H; Bjaalie, Jan G; Eriksson, Jens; Gundersen, Vidar; Leergaard, Trygve B; Morth, J Preben; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Torp, Reidun; Walhovd, Kristine B; Tønjum, Tone

    2013-10-01

    Glial cells in their plurality pervade the human brain and impact on brain structure and function. A principal component of the emerging glial doctrine is the hypothesis that astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells, trigger major molecular processes leading to brain ageing. Astrocyte biology has been examined using molecular, biochemical and structural methods, as well as 3D brain imaging in live animals and humans. Exosomes are extracelluar membrane vesicles that facilitate communication between glia, and have significant potential for biomarker discovery and drug delivery. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may indirectly influence the structure and function of membrane proteins expressed in glial cells and predispose specific cell subgroups to degeneration. Physical exercise may reduce or retard age-related brain deterioration by a mechanism involving neuro-glial processes. It is most likely that additional information about the distribution, structure and function of glial cells will yield novel insight into human brain ageing. Systematic studies of glia and their functions are expected to eventually lead to earlier detection of ageing-related brain dysfunction and to interventions that could delay, reduce or prevent brain dysfunction.

  5. Fractalkine mediates inflammatory pain through activation of satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Guilherme R; Talbot, Jhimmy; Lotufo, Celina M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sérgio H

    2013-07-02

    The activation of the satellite glial cells (SGCs) surrounding the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons appears to play a role in pathological pain. We tested the hypothesis that fractalkine, which is constitutively expressed by primary nociceptive neurons, is the link between peripheral inflammation and the activation of SGCs and is thus responsible for the genesis of the inflammatory pain. The injection of carrageenin into the rat hind paw induced a decrease in the mechanical nociceptive threshold (hypernociception), which was associated with an increase in mRNA and GFAP protein expression in the DRG. Both events were inhibited by anti-fractalkine antibody administered directly into the DRG (L5) [intraganglionar (i.gl.)]. The administration of fractalkine into the DRG (L5) produced mechanical hypernociception in a dose-, time-, and CX3C receptor-1 (CX3CR1)-dependent manner. Fractalkine's hypernociceptive effect appears to be indirect, as it was reduced by local treatment with anti-TNF-α antibody, IL-1-receptor antagonist, or indomethacin. Accordingly, the in vitro incubation of isolated and cultured SGC with fractalkine induced the production/release of TNF-α, IL-1β, and prostaglandin E2. Finally, treatment with i.gl. fluorocitrate blocked fractalkine (i.gl.)- and carrageenin (paw)-induced hypernociception. Overall, these results suggest that, during peripheral inflammation, fractalkine is released in the DRG and contributes to the genesis of inflammatory hypernociception. Fractalkine's effect appears to be dependent on the activation of the SGCs, leading to the production of TNFα, IL-1β, and prostanoids, which are likely responsible for the maintenance of inflammatory pain. Thus, these results indicate that the inhibition of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in SGCs may serve as a target to control inflammatory pain.

  6. Embryonic development of glial cells and myelin in the shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum

    PubMed Central

    Rotenstein, Lisa; Milanes, Anthony; Juarez, Marilyn; Reyes, Michelle; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    Glial cells are responsible for a wide range of functions in the nervous system of vertebrates. The myelinated nervous systems of extant elasmobranchs have the longest independent history of all gnathostomes. Much is known about the development of glia in other jawed vertebrates, but research in elasmobranchs is just beginning to reveal the mechanisms guiding neurodevelopment. This study examines the development of glial cells in the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum, by identifying the expression pattern of several classic glial and myelin proteins. We show for the first time that glial development in the bamboo shark (Ch. punctamum) embryo follows closely the one observed in other vertebrates and that neural development seems to proceed at a faster rate in the PNS than in the CNS. In addition, we observed more myelinated tracts in the PNS than in the CNS, and as early as stage 32, suggesting that the ontogeny of myelin in sharks is closer to osteichthyans than agnathans. PMID:19733690

  7. Photodynamic injury of isolated crayfish neuron and surrounding glial cells: the role of p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifulina, S. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 is involved in cell responses to injurious impacts. Using its inhibitor pifithrin- α and activators tenovin-1, RITA and WR-1065, we studied its potential participation in inactivation and death of isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron and satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In dark, p53 activation by tenovin-1 or WR-1065 shortened activity of isolated neurons. Tenovin-1 and WR-1065 induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas pifithrin-α was anti-apoptotic. Therefore, p53 mediated glial apoptosis and suppression of neuronal activity after axotomy. Tenovin-1 but not other p53 modulators induced necrosis of axotomized neurons and surrounding glia, possibly, through p53-independent pathway. Under photodynamic treatment, p53 activators tenovin-1 and RITA enhanced glial apoptosis indicating the pro-apoptotic activity of p53. Photoinduced necrosis of neurons and glia was suppressed by tenovin-1 and, paradoxically, by pifithrin-α. Modulation of photoinduced changes in the neuronal activity and necrosis of neurons and glia was possibly p53-independent. The different effects of p53 modulators on neuronal and glial responses to axotomy and photodynamic impact were apparently associated with different signaling pathways in neurons and glial cells.

  8. Impaired dental cytodifferentiation in glial cell-line derived growth factor (GDNF) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, J C; Cabo, R; Ciriaco, E; Laurà, R; Naves, F J; Silos-Santiago, I; Vega, J A

    2002-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes the survival of multiple neuron types in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, it plays a key role in the development of the enteric nervous system and in the kidney organogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and their receptors are expressed in the developing tooth as well as in the trigeminal ganglion. However, the precise role of this growth factor in tooth morphogenesis and cell differentiation, or in the development of trigeminal ganglion cells, is still elusive. Using structural and ultrastructural techniques we analyzed in detail the first molar tooth germ of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor deficient mice as well as the neuronal density in trigeminal ganglion. The length and width of first molar tooth germ in knockout deficient animals showed no differences in the knockout animals in comparison with age-matched heterozygous or wild-type littermates. Nevertheless, in mice lacking glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, both ameloblasts and odontoblasts failed to fully develop and differentiate, and the enamel matrix and predentin layers were absent. On the other hand, the number of trigeminal sensory neurons and the structure of the nerves supplying first molar tooth germ were largely normal. Present results suggest a new non-neuronal role for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in tooth development. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor seems not to be involved in tooth initiation and morphogenesis, whereas it seems essential for cytodifferentiation. Conversely, neither development of trigeminal neuron nor nerve fibers supplying teeth are directly dependent on glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Involvement of Glial Cells in Brain Plastic Remodeling in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Khaspekov, L G; Frumkina, L E

    2017-03-01

    In this review we summarize published data on the involvement of glial cells in molecular mechanisms underlying brain plastic reorganization in epilepsy. The role of astrocytes as glial elements in pathological plasticity in epilepsy is discussed. Data on the involvement of aquaporin-4 in epileptogenic plastic changes and on participation of microglia and extracellular matrix in dysregulation of synaptic transmission and plastic remodeling in epileptic brain tissue are reviewed.

  10. The involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-κB in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-κB modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-κB during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-κB during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-κB modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-κB-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-κB is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  11. Purinergic receptor activation inhibits osmotic glial cell swelling in the diabetic rat retina.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Antje; Iandiev, Ianors; Hollborn, Margrit; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zimmermann, Herbert; Bringmann, Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, triamcinolone acetonide, is used clinically for the rapid resolution of diabetic macular edema. Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. Triamcinolone inhibits the swelling of retinal glial cells of diabetic rats. Here, we determined whether the effect of triamcinolone is mediated by a receptor-dependent mechanism. Hyperglycemia was induced in rats with streptozotocin injection. After 6-10 months, the swelling properties of glial cells in retinal slices upon hypotonic challenge were determined. Nucleotide-degrading ecto-enzymes were immunostained in retinal slices and glial cells. Hypotonic challenge did not change the size of glial cell bodies from control retinas but induced swelling of cells from diabetic animals. Triamcinolone inhibited glial cell swelling; this effect was prevented by a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters, inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A activation, and inhibitors of potassium and chloride channels. In diabetic (but not control) retinas, the effect of triamcinolone apparently involves extracellular nucleotide degradation. Glial cells from diabetic retinas displayed immunolabeling against nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) which was not observed in control retinas. The mRNA expression for NTPDase1 was significantly increased in the retina of diabetic rats. It is suggested that triamcinolone induces the release and formation of endogenous adenosine that subsequently activates A1 receptors resulting in ion efflux through potassium and chloride channels and prevention of osmotic swelling. Whereas adenosine is liberated via facilitated transport in control retinas, an extracellular formation of adenosine contributes to the effect of triamcinolone in diabetic retinas.

  12. Selective control of human glioma cell proliferation by specific cell interaction.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Freshney, R I; Hart, E; Graham, D I

    1985-01-01

    Cells cultured from anaplastic astrocytoma (Kernohan and Sayre, grades III and IV) will proliferate on confluent monolayers of normal glia, while cells cultured from normal brain will not. The growth of a cell line containing a high proportion of well-differentiated glioma cells (G-CCM) was partially inhibited, though not as much as normal glia, while the growth of a cell line made up of less differentiated cells (G-UVW) was enhanced by the normal glia. Although non-glial confluent monolayers also inhibited the growth of normal glia, this was less specific, as one normal glial line (N-DUT) grew on fibroblasts and intestinal epithelium, although it was unable to do so on normal glia. It is suggested that this may be a useful method for examining reduced density limitation of growth, discriminating between normal and malignant glia, and for separating glioma cells from contaminating normal cells.

  13. Central neuron-glial and glial-glial interactions following axon injury.

    PubMed

    Aldskogius, H; Kozlova, E N

    1998-05-01

    Axon injury rapidly activates microglial and astroglial cells close to the axotomized neurons. Following motor axon injury, astrocytes upregulate within hour(s) the gap junction protein connexin-43, and within one day glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Concomitantly, microglial cells proliferate and migrate towards the axotomized neuron perikarya. Analogous responses occur in central termination territories of peripherally injured sensory ganglion cells. The activated microglia express a number of inflammatory and immune mediators. When neuron degeneration occurs, microglia act as phagocytes. This is uncommon after peripheral nerve injury in the adult mammal, however, and the functional implications of the glial cell responses in this situation are unclear. When central axons are injured, the glial cell responses around the affected neuron perikarya appears to be minimal or absent, unless neuron degeneration occurs. Microglia proliferate, and astrocytes upregulate GFAP along central axons undergoing anterograde, Wallerian, degeneration. Although microglia develop into phagocytes, they eliminate the disintegrating myelin very slowly, presumably because they fail to release molecules which facilitate phagocytosis. During later stages of Wallerian degeneration, oligodendrocytes express clusterin, a glycoprotein implicated in several conditions of cell degeneration. A hypothetical scheme for glial cell activation following axon injury is discussed, implying the injured neurons initially interact with adjacent astrocytes. Subsequently, neighbouring resting microglia are activated. These glial reactions are amplified by paracrine and autocrine mechanisms, in which cytokines appear to be important mediators. The specific functional properties of the activated glial cells will determine their influence on neuronal survival, axon regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. The control of the induction and progression of these responses are therefore likely to be critical

  14. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  15. The Neurosteroid Allopregnanolone Modulates Specific Functions in Central and Peripheral Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faroni, Alessandro; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Since the first observations on the existence of “neurosteroids” in the 1980s, our understanding of the importance of these endogenous steroids in the control of the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) has increased progressively. Although most of the observations were made in neuronal cells, equally important are the effects that neurosteroids exert on glial cells. Among the different classes of neurosteroids acting on glial cells, the progesterone 5α-3α metabolite, allopregnanolone, displays a particular mechanism of action involving primarily the modulation of classic GABA receptors. In this review, we focus our attention on allopregnanolone because its effects on the physiology of glial cells of the central and PNS are intriguing and could potentially lead to the development of new strategies for neuroprotection and/or regeneration of injured nervous tissues. PMID:22654838

  16. Functional study of endothelin B receptors in satellite glial cells in trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Hanani, Menachem

    2011-07-13

    There is immunohistochemical evidence for endothelin (ET) receptors in satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia, but there is no information on the function of these receptors. We used calcium imaging to study this question in isolated mouse trigeminal ganglia and found that satellite glial cells are highly sensitive to ET-1, with threshold at 0.05 nM. Responses displayed strong desensitization at ET-1 concentrations of more than 1 nM. A large component of the response persisted when Ca was deleted from the external medium, consistent with Ca release from internal stores. The use of receptor selective agents showed that the responses were mediated by ETB receptors. We conclude that satellite glial cells display endothelin receptors, which may participate in neuron-glia communications in the trigeminal ganglia.

  17. Platelets: cell proliferation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, R

    1979-04-01

    Intimal smooth muscle proliferation is the hallmark of the lesions of atherosclerosis. Endothelial injury is postulated to precede this intimal smooth muscle proliferative response, which is mediated by a potent mitogenic factor derived from adherence, aggregation, and release by platelets at sites of endothelial injury. Smooth muscle proliferation is accompanied by varying amounts of connective tissue formation and intracellular and extracellular lipid deposition, dependent upon the risk factors encountered in each patient. The platelet-derived mitogen (PF) is a stable, cationic, relatively low molecular weight (10,000-30,000) protein that has been partially purified by ion exchange chromotography and gel filtration. Less than 100 ng of PF/ml culture medium can stimulate sparse 3T3 cells or smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, to undergo multiple cell divisions in the presence of 5% cell-free, plasma-derived serum. The latter contains no mitogenic activity. The interaction of the platelet mitogen and plasma-derived components, including lipoproteins, plays a critical role in smooth muscle proliferation in vitro and in vivo in the induction of the lesions of atherosclerosis.

  18. [Electron microscopic and cytochemical research on the function of the glial cells in a focus of local cortical destruction].

    PubMed

    Kleshchinov, V N; Koĭdan, E I; Kolomeets, N S

    1986-08-01

    The activity of DNA-RNA-protein synthesizing system of some glial cells was studied using electron cytochemical method for determination of chromatin state and RNA-particles. A dependence of functional state of satellite glial cells (oligodendroglia and astroglia) on the tinctorial neuron state (hyper- and hypochromic scale) was shown. The functional state of interfascicular oligodendroglial cells has been characterized.

  19. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  20. Basic features of bovine spermatogonial culture and effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Pedro M; Soda, Takeshi; van de Kant, H J G; de Rooij, Dirk G

    2006-06-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) are a small self-renewing subpopulation of type A spermatogonia, which for the rest are composed of differentiating cells with a very similar morphology. We studied the development of primary co-cultures of prepubertal bovine Sertoli cells and A spermatogonia and the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) on the numbers and types of spermatogonia, the formation of spermatogonial colonies and the capacity of the cultured SSC to colonize a recipient mouse testis. During the first week of culture many, probably differentiating, A spermatogonia entered apoptosis while others formed pairs and chains of A spermatogonia. After 1 week colonies started to appear that increased in size with time. Numbers of single (A(s)) and paired (A(pr)) spermatogonia were significantly higher in GDNF treated cultures at Days 15 and 25 (P < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively), and the ratio of A(s) to A(pr) and spermatogonial chains (A(al)) was also higher indicating enhanced self-renewal of the SSC. Furthermore, spermatogonial outgrowths in the periphery of the colonies showed a significantly higher number of A spermatogonia with a more primitive morphology under the influence of GDNF (P < 0.05). Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation experiments revealed a 2-fold increase in stem cell activity in GDNF treated spermatogonial cultures (P < 0.01). We conclude that GDNF rather than inducing proliferation, enhances self-renewal and increases survival rates of SSC in the bovine spermatogonial culture system.

  1. Advancements in the Underlying Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia: Implications of DNA Methylation in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing-Shu; Huang, Nanxin; Michael, Namaka; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic and severe mental illness for which currently there is no cure. At present, the exact molecular mechanism involved in the underlying pathogenesis of SZ is unknown. The disease is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in SZ pathology. Specifically, DNA methylation, one of the earliest found epigenetic modifications, has been extensively linked to modulation of neuronal function, leading to psychiatric disorders such as SZ. However, increasing evidence indicates that glial cells, especially dysfunctional oligodendrocytes undergo DNA methylation changes that contribute to the pathogenesis of SZ. This review primarily focuses on DNA methylation involved in glial dysfunctions in SZ. Clarifying this mechanism may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventional strategies for the treatment of SZ and other illnesses by correcting abnormal methylation in glial cells. PMID:26696822

  2. Forebrain engraftment by human glial progenitor cells enhances synaptic plasticity and learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoning; Chen, Michael; Wang, Fushun; Windrem, Martha; Wang, Su; Shanz, Steven; Xu, Qiwu; Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Bekar, Lane; Betstadt, Sarah; Silva, Alcino J; Takano, Takahiro; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-03-07

    Human astrocytes are larger and more complex than those of infraprimate mammals, suggesting that their role in neural processing has expanded with evolution. To assess the cell-autonomous and species-selective properties of human glia, we engrafted human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient mice. Upon maturation, the recipient brains exhibited large numbers and high proportions of both human glial progenitors and astrocytes. The engrafted human glia were gap-junction-coupled to host astroglia, yet retained the size and pleomorphism of hominid astroglia, and propagated Ca2+ signals 3-fold faster than their hosts. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was sharply enhanced in the human glial chimeric mice, as was their learning, as assessed by Barnes maze navigation, object-location memory, and both contextual and tone fear conditioning. Mice allografted with murine GPCs showed no enhancement of either LTP or learning. These findings indicate that human glia differentially enhance both activity-dependent plasticity and learning in mice.

  3. Satellite glial cells in situ within mammalian prevertebral ganglia express K+ channels active at rest potential.

    PubMed

    Gola, M; Niel, J P; Delmas, P; Jacquet, G

    1993-10-01

    Patch-clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells wrapped around sympathetic neurons in the rabbit coeliac ganglion. With the cleaning method used, the glial cells could be kept in place and were directly accessible to the patch-clamp pipettes. Whole-cell recordings showed that glial cells had almost ohmic properties. Their resting potential (-79.1 +/- 1.2 mV) was found to be very nearly the same as the K+ reversal potential and approximately 20 mV more negative than that of the neurons they encapsulated. Unitary currents from ionic channels present in the glial membrane were recorded in the cell-attached configuration with pipettes filled with various amounts of K+, Na+ and gluconate. Only K(+)-selective channels with slight inwardly rectifying properties (in the presence of 150 mM [K+]o) were detected. These channels were active (Po = 0.7-0.8) at the cell resting potential. The channel conductance, but not its opening probability, was dependent on the [K+] in the pipette. Cl(-)-selective channels (outwardly rectifying and large conductance channels) were detected in excised patches. The properties of the K+ channels (increased inward current with [K+] and detectable outward current at low [K+]) are well suited for siphoning the K+ released by active neurons.

  4. The role of NO synthase isoforms in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger, involved in the implementation of various cell functions. It regulates various physiological and pathological processes such as neurotransmission, cell responses to stress, and neurodegeneration. NO synthase is a family of enzymes that synthesize NO from L-arginine. The activity of different NOS isoforms depends both on endogenous and exogenous factors. In particular, it is modulated by oxidative stress, induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the possible role of NOS in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Antinecrotic and proapoptotic effects of NO on the glial cells were found using inhibitory analysis. We have shown the role of inducible NO synthase in photoinduced apoptosis and involvement of neuronal NO synthase in photoinduced necrosis of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The activation of NO synthase was evaluated using NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of neurons expressing the enzyme. The activation of NO synthase in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was evaluated as a function of time after PDT. Photodynamic treatment induced transient increase in NO synthase activity and then slowly inhibited this enzyme.

  5. Age-Dependent Netrin-1 Signaling Regulates NG2+ Glial Cell Spatial Homeostasis in Normal Adult Gray Matter.

    PubMed

    Birey, Fikri; Aguirre, Adan

    2015-04-29

    Neuron-glial antigen 2-positive (NG2(+)) glial cells are the most proliferative glia type in the adult CNS, and their tile-like arrangement in adult gray matter is under tight regulation. However, little is known about the cues that govern this unique distribution. To this end, using a NG2(+) glial cell ablation model in mice, we examined the repopulation dynamics of NG2(+) glial cells in the mature and aged mice gray matter. We found that some resident NG2(+) glial cells that escaped depletion rapidly enter the cell cycle to repopulate the cortex with altered spatial distribution. We reveal that netrin-1 signaling is involved in the NG2(+) glial cell early proliferative, late repopulation, and distribution response after ablation in the gray matter. However, ablation of NG2(+) glial cell in older animals failed to stimulate a similar repopulation response, possibly because of a decrease in the sensitivity to netrin-1. Our findings indicate that endogenous netrin-1 plays a role in NG2(+) glial cell homeostasis that is distinct from its role in myelination.

  6. Rapid induction of neurotrophin mRNAs in rat glial cell cultures by Semax, an adrenocorticotropic hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, M I; Dolotov, O V; Grivennikov, I A; Slominsky, P A; Andreeva, L A; Inozemtseva, L S; Limborska, S A; Myasoedov, N F

    2001-08-03

    The proliferation, differentiation and survival of neuronal and glial cells are affected by a number of neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and others. In a previous study, we observed the effects of 'Semax' (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro), the physiologically active analogue of adrenocorticotropic hormone(4--10), on neuronal cell survival in vitro. We hypothesized that these effects may be mediated by the regulation of expression of some neurotrophic factors. To test this hypothesis we analyzed NGF and BDNF gene expression in glial cells obtained from the basal forebrain of newborn rats, following in vitro treatment with 'Semax'. We observed changes in mRNA levels for both the NGF and BDNF genes. The greatest increase in expression was found after 30 min of 'Semax' administration. At this time, BDNF mRNA level was increased eight-fold in comparison with control, and NGF mRNA level was increased five-fold.

  7. Juliprosopine and juliprosine from prosopis juliflora leaves induce mitochondrial damage and cytoplasmic vacuolation on cocultured glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Silva, Victor Diogenes A; Pitanga, Bruno P S; Nascimento, Ravena P; Souza, Cleide S; Coelho, Paulo Lucas C; Menezes-Filho, Noélio; Silva, André Mário M; Costa, Maria de Fátima D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Velozo, Eudes S; Costa, Silvia L

    2013-12-16

    Prosopis juliflora is a shrub largely used for animal and human consumption. However, ingestion has been shown to induce intoxication in animals, which is characterized by neuromuscular alterations induced by mechanisms that are not yet well understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of a total alkaloid extract (TAE) and one alkaloid fraction (F32) obtained from P. juliflora leaves to rat cortical neurons and glial cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of F32 showed that this fraction is composed of a mixture of two piperidine alkaloids, juliprosopine (majority constituent) and juliprosine. TAE and F32 at concentrations between 0.3 and 45 μg/mL were tested for 24 h on neuron/glial cell primary cocultures. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test revealed that TAE and F32 were cytotoxic to cocultures, and their IC50 values were 31.07 and 7.362 μg/mL, respectively. Exposure to a subtoxic concentration of TAE or F32 (0.3-3 μg/mL) induced vacuolation and disruption of the astrocyte monolayer and neurite network, ultrastructural changes, characterized by formation of double-membrane vacuoles, and mitochondrial damage, associated with changes in β-tubulin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression. Microglial proliferation was also observed in cultures exposed to TAE or F32, with increasing levels of OX-42-positive cells. Considering that F32 was more cytotoxic than TAE and that F32 reproduced in vitro the main morphologic and ultrastructural changes of "cara torta" disease, we can also suggest that piperidine alkaloids juliprosopine and juliprosine are primarily responsible for the neurotoxic damage observed in animals after they have consumed the plant.

  8. Satellite glial cells in sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia: in search of function.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2010-09-24

    Glial cells are established as essential for many functions of the central nervous system, and this seems to hold also for glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. The main type of glial cells in most types of peripheral ganglia - sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic - is satellite glial cells (SGCs). These cells usually form envelopes around single neurons, which create a distinct functional unit consisting of a neuron and its attending SGCs. This review presents the knowledge on the morphology of SGCs in sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia, and the (limited) available information on their physiology and pharmacology. It appears that SGCs carry receptors for ATP and can thus respond to the release of this neurotransmitter by the neurons. There is evidence that SGCs have an uptake mechanism for GABA, and possibly other neurotransmitters, which enables them to control the neuronal microenvironment. Damage to post- or preganglionic nerve fibers influences both the ganglionic neurons and the SGCs. One major consequence of postganglionic nerve section is the detachment of preganglionic nerve terminals, resulting in decline of synaptic transmission. It appears that, at least in sympathetic ganglia, SGCs participate in the detachment process, and possibly in the subsequent recovery of the synaptic connections. Unlike sensory neurons, neurons in autonomic ganglia receive synaptic inputs, and SGCs are in very close contact with synaptic boutons. This places the SGCs in a position to influence synaptic transmission and information processing in autonomic ganglia, but this topic requires much further work.

  9. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification. PMID:26106302

  10. Expression of a set of glial cell-specific markers in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hui Jeong; Jeon, Sang-Hak; Kim, Sang Hee

    2014-06-01

    The types of glia in the central nervous system (CNS) of the Drosophila embryo include longitudinal glia (LG), cell body glia (CBG), and peripheral glia (PG). Transcription factors, such as glial cell missing and reverse polarity, are well-established general glial cell markers. Only a few glial cell-specific markers have been identified in the Drosophila embryonic CNS, thus far. In the present study, we employed the glial cell-specific markers for LG (vir-1/CG5453 and CG31235), CBG (fabp/CG6783 and CG11902), and PG (CG2310 and moody/CG4322), and comprehensively analyzed their expression patterns, during the embryonic CNS development. Our study validated the specificity of a set of glial markers, and further revealed their spatio-temporal expression patterns, which will aid in the understanding of the developmental lineage, and investigating their role in the development and homeostasis of the Drosophila CNS in vivo.

  11. Stereological Analysis of Neuron, Glial and Endothelial Cell Numbers in the Human Amygdaloid Complex

    PubMed Central

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC) might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL), corticomedial and central groups), 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm3 and mean cell numbers (x106) were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals’ age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions. PMID:22719923

  12. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    PubMed

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC) might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL), corticomedial and central groups), 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3) and mean cell numbers (x10(6)) were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  13. Maintenance of Fura-2 fluorescence in glial cells and neurons of the leech central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Munsch, T; Deitmer, J W

    1995-04-01

    Identified glial cells and neurones of the leech central nervous system (CNS) were injected iontophoretically with the calcium indicator dye Fura-2 to measure intracellular Ca2+, while simultaneously recording the membrane potential using a double-barrelled theta-type microelectrode. Both glial cells and neurones responded with Ni(2+)-sensitive Ca2+ transients upon membrane depolarization, indicating Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. In contrast to neurones, the glial cells showed a rapid loss of fluorescence with a half-time of 6.3 +/- 1.8 min (n = 6) after dye injection. Both kinetics and amplitudes of the stimulus-induced Ca2+ transients were affected by this rapid dye loss. The anion exchange inhibitor probenicid (2 mM) significantly reduced, but did not prevent, the loss of Fura-2 fluorescence, suggesting that some dye left the glial cell via an anion exchanger. In order to compensate this fluorescence loss, we injected Fura-2 throughout the experiment. Under this condition, similar Ca2+ transients could be elicited repeatedly for more than 1 h. In Retzius neurones single injections of Fura-2 yielded enough intracellularly trapped dye to allow measurement of intracellular Ca2+ for up to 30 min after the end of injection without large decrease in absolute fluorescence.

  14. The hypoparathyroidism-associated mutation in Drosophila Gcm compromises protein stability and glial cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao; Lu, Lu; Zhuge, Chun-Chun; Chen, Xuebing; Zhai, Yuanfen; Cheng, Jingjing; Mao, Haian; Yang, Chang-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lee, Yi-Nan; Chien, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Margaret S.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated neurons and glia are acquired from immature precursors via transcriptional controls exerted by factors such as proteins in the family of Glial Cells Missing (Gcm). Mammalian Gcm proteins mediate neural stem cell induction, placenta and parathyroid development, whereas Drosophila Gcm proteins act as a key switch to determine neuronal and glial cell fates and regulate hemocyte development. The present study reports a hypoparathyroidism-associated mutation R59L that alters Drosophila Gcm (Gcm) protein stability, rendering it unstable, and hyperubiquitinated via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). GcmR59L interacts with the Slimb-based SCF complex and Protein Kinase C (PKC), which possibly plays a role in its phosphorylation, hence altering ubiquitination. Additionally, R59L causes reduced Gcm protein levels in a manner independent of the PEST domain signaling protein turnover. GcmR59L proteins bind DNA, functionally activate transcription, and induce glial cells, yet at a less efficient level. Finally, overexpression of either wild-type human Gcmb (hGcmb) or hGcmb carrying the conserved hypoparathyroidism mutation only slightly affects gliogenesis, indicating differential regulatory mechanisms in human and flies. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the significance of this disease-associated mutation in controlling Gcm protein stability via UPS, hence advance our understanding on how glial formation is regulated. PMID:28051179

  15. Glial Cell Contribution to Basal Vessel Diameter and Pressure-Initiated Vascular Responses in Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Bui, Bang V.; Cull, Grant; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that retinal glial cells modify basal vessel diameter and pressure-initiated vascular regulation in rat retina. Methods In rats, L-2-aminoadipic acid (LAA, 10 nM) was intravitreally injected to inhibit glial cell activity. Twenty-four hours following injection, retinal glial intracellular calcium (Ca2+) was labeled with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-4/AM (F4, 1 mM). At 110 minutes after injection, intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated from 20 to 50 mm Hg. Prior to and during IOP elevation, Ca2+ and retinal vessel diameter were assessed using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography/confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Dynamic changes in Ca2+ and diameter from IOP elevation were quantified. The response in LAA-treated eyes was compared with vehicle treated control eyes. Results L-2-Aminoadipic acid treatment significantly reduced F4-positive cells in the retina (LAA, 16 ± 20 vs. control, 55 ± 37 cells/mm2; P = 0.02). Twenty-four hours following LAA treatment, basal venous diameter was increased from 38.9 ± 3.9 to 51.8 ± 6.4 μm (P < 0.0001, n = 20), whereas arterial diameter was unchanged (from 30.3 ± 3.5 to 30.7 ± 2.8 μm; P = 0.64). In response to IOP elevation, LAA-treated eyes showed a smaller increase in glial cell Ca2+ around both arteries and veins in comparison with control (P < 0.001 for both). There was also significantly greater IOP-induced vasoconstriction in both vessel types (P = 0.05 and P = 0.02, respectively; n = 6 each). Conclusions The results suggest that glial cells can modulate basal retinal venous diameter and contribute to pressure-initiated vascular responses. PMID:28055098

  16. The interface between glial progenitors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain and spinal cord contain heterogeneous populations of cycling, immature cells. These include cells with stem cell-like properties as well as progenitors in various stages of early glial differentiation. This latter population is distributed widely throughout gray and white matter and numerically represents an extremely large cell pool. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glial progenitors that populate the adult CNS are one source of gliomas. Indeed, the marker phenotypes, morphologies, and migratory properties of cells in gliomas strongly resemble glial progenitors in many ways. We review briefly some salient features of normal glial development and then examine the similarities and differences between normal progenitors and cells in gliomas, focusing on the phenotypic plasticity of glial progenitors and the responses to growth factors in promoting proliferation and migration of normal and glioma cells, and discussing known mutational changes in gliomas in the context of how these might affect the proliferative and migratory behaviors of progenitors. Finally, we will discuss the “cancer stem cell” hypothesis in light of the possibility that glial progenitors can generate gliomas. PMID:18784926

  17. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin; Fex-Svenningsen, Asa

    2011-07-01

    The development of powerful analytical techniques for specific molecular characterization of neural cell types is of central relevance in neuroscience research for elucidating cellular functions in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examines the use of differential protein expression profiling of mammalian neural cells using direct analysis by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). MALDI-MS analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and specific for large biomolecules in complex matrices. Here, we describe a newly developed and straightforward methodology for direct characterization of rodent CNS glial cells using MALDI-MS-based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS). This molecular phenotyping approach enables monitoring of cell growth stages, (stem) cell differentiation, as well as probing cellular responses towards different stimulations. Glial cells were separated into pure astroglial, microglial, and oligodendroglial cell cultures. The intact cell suspensions were then analyzed directly by MALDI-TOF-MS, resulting in characteristic mass spectra profiles that discriminated glial cell types using principal component analysis. Complementary proteomic experiments revealed the identity of these signature proteins that were predominantly expressed in the different glial cell types, including histone H4 for oligodendrocytes and S100-A10 for astrocytes. MALDI imaging MS was performed, and signature masses were employed as molecular tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination of different cell types with molecular specificity.

  18. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  19. Postnatal development of neurons, interneurons and glial cells in the substantia nigra of mice.

    PubMed

    Abe, Manami; Kimoto, Hiroki; Eto, Risa; Sasaki, Taeko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2010-08-01

    We investigated postnatal alterations of neurons, interneurons and glial cells in the mouse substantia nigra using immunohistochemistry. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), parvalbumin (PV), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba 1), CNPase (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) immunoreactivity were measured in 1-, 2-, 4- and 8-week-old mice. In the present study, the maturation of NeuN-immunopositive neurons preceded the production of TH in the substantia nigra during postnatal development in mice. Furthermore, the maturation of nNOS-immunopositive interneurons preceded the maturation of PV-immunopositive interneurons in the substantia nigra during postnatal development. Among astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes, in contrast, the development process of oligodendrocytes is delayed in the substantia nigra. Our double-labeled immunohistochemical study suggests that the neurotrophic factors such as BDNF and GDNF secreted by GFAP-positive astrocytes may play some role in maturation of neurons, interneurons and glial cells of the substantia nigra during postnatal development in mice. Thus, our findings provide valuable information on the development processes of the substantia nigra.

  20. The culture of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs)—a distinct glial cell type

    PubMed Central

    Higginson, Jennifer R.; Barnett, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have become a popular candidate for the transplant-mediated repair of the damaged CNS. In this review a description is made of the origins of these cells and a historical development of their purification and maintenance in culture. In addition, we illustrate the cellular and molecular characteristics of OECs and emphasise that although they share many properties with Schwann cells, they possess several inherent differences which may allow them to be more beneficial for CNS repair. In summary, OECs are distinct glial cells and the detailed understanding of their biological and molecular properties is essential in ensuring their clinical efficacy after cell transplantation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. PMID:20816825

  1. Fine Surface Images That Reflect Cytoskeletal Structures in Cultured Glial Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Yukako; Hatakeyama, Dai; Tojima, Takuro; Kawabata, Kazushige; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Ogura, Shigeaki; Abe, Kazuhiro; Ito, Etsuro

    1998-06-01

    The morphology of cultured glial cells was examined using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and immunofluorescence staining for cytoskeletons. The meshwork of type-1 astrocytes consisted of thick longitudinal and thin lateral lines on the cell surfaces observed by AFM; the former lines were confirmed to be reflections of actin filaments. The astrocytic processes of type-2 astrocytes were observed to be rugged on AFM. These structures were mainly affected by microtubules. Immunofluorescence imaging of microglia revealed that actin filaments and microtubules were arranged radially and wavily along the cell edge, respectively. AFM could detect these radial and wavy structures clearly. These results show that AFM can provide information on the cytoskeletons of glial cells, indicating that AFM is a useful tool for the morphological characterization of cells.

  2. Stress proteins and glial cell functions during chronic aluminium exposures: protective role of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Sood, Pooja Khanna; Nahar, Uma; Nehru, Bimla

    2012-03-01

    Involved in the ongoing debate is the speculation that aluminium is somehow toxic for neurons. Glial cells cope up to protect neurons from this toxic insult by maintaining the glutathione homeostasis. Of late newer and newer roles of glial cells have been depicted. The present work looks into the other regulatory mechanisms that show the glial cells response to pro-oxidant effects of aluminium exposure. In the present investigation we have evaluated the inflammatory responses of the glial cells as well as HSP70-induction during aluminium exposure. Further, the protective role of curcumin is also evaluated. Aluminium was administered by oral gavage at a dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt/day for a period of 8 weeks. Curcumin was administered i.p. at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.wt./day on alternate days. Enhanced gene and protein expression of HSP70 in the glial fractions of the aluminium exposed animals as compared to the corresponding neuronal population. Aluminium exposure resulted in a significant increase in the NF-κB and TNF-α expression suggesting inflammatory responses. In the conjunctive treatment group of aluminium and curcumin exposure marked reduction in the gene and protein expression of NF-κB and TNF-α was observed. This was further reflected in histopathological studies showing no evidence of inflammation in conjunctive group as compared to aluminium treatment. From the present study, it can be concluded that curcumin has a potential anti-inflammatory action and can be exploited in other toxicological conditions also.

  3. Long-term proliferation in culture and germline transmission of mouse male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Ogonuki, Narumi; Inoue, Kimiko; Miki, Hiromi; Ogura, Atsuo; Toyokuni, Shinya; Shinohara, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process that originates in a small population of spermatogonial stem cells. Here we report the in vitro culture of spermatogonial stem cells that proliferate for long periods of time. In the presence of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and leukemia inhibitory factor, gonocytes isolated from neonatal mouse testis proliferated over a 5-month period (>10(14)-fold) and restored fertility to congenitally infertile recipient mice following transplantation into seminiferous tubules. Long-term spermatogonial stem cell culture will be useful for studying spermatogenesis mechanism and has important implications for developing new technology in transgenesis or medicine.

  4. Age-dependent responses of glial cells and leptomeninges during systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Tokuda, Yukie; Zhang, Xin-Wen; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Systemic inflammation causes the age-dependent differential glial responses, but little is known about how age influences the barrier function of leptomeninges during systemic inflammation. This study was conducted to elucidate the relationship between the glial responses and the levels of tight junction proteins, occludin and ZO-1, in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. In young AA rats, microglia and astrocytes localized to the proximity of the leptomeninges expressed interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. The level of occludin significantly increased. In middle-aged AA rats, however, glial cells expressed IL-1beta and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-synthesizing enzymes. Furthermore, occludin and ZO-1 significantly decreased, resulting in the increased permeability of leptomeninges. In the cultured leptomeningeal cells, IL-1beta and PGE(2) caused a marked loss of occludin and ZO-1, respectively. Pretreatment with IL-10 and TGF-beta1 significantly antagonized their effects. These findings establish that age strongly influences the barrier functions of the leptomeninges through the age-dependent differential glial responses during systemic inflammation.

  5. Systemic Injection of CD34+-Enriched Human Cord Blood Cells Modulates Poststroke Neural and Glial Response in a Sex-Dependent Manner in CD1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Shilpa D.; Chen, HuiGen; Markowitz, Geoffrey J.; Raja, Saba; George, Shanu; Shotwell, Elisabeth; Loechelt, Brett; Johnston, Michael V.; Kamani, Naynesh; Fatemi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Stroke in the developing brain is an important cause of neurological morbidity. We determined the impact of human cord blood-derived CD34+-enriched mononuclear cells (CBSC) intraperitoneally injected 48 h after an ischemic stroke at postnatal day 12 by evaluating poststroke neurogenic niche proliferation, glial response, and recovery in CD1 mice. Percent brain atrophy was quantified from Nissl-stained sections. Density of BrdU, Iba-1, and GFAP staining were quantified in the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Immunohistochemistry for human nuclear antibody, human mitochondrial antibody, and human CD34+ cells was done on injured and uninjured brains from CBSC- and vehicle-treated mice. Developmental neurobehavioral milestones were evaluated pre- and post-treatment. No significant differences in stroke severity were noted between CBSC and vehicle-treated injured animals. With a 1×105 CBSC dose, there was a significant increase in subgranular zone (SGZ) proliferation in the CBSC-versus vehicle-treated stroke-injured male mice. SVZ glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was increased contralaterally in injured females treated with CBSC but suppressed in injured males. Significant negative correlations between severity of the stroke-injury and spleen weights, and between spleen weights and SGZ proliferation, and a positive correlation between GFAP expression and severity of brain injury were noted in the vehicle-treated injured mice but not in the CBSC-treated mice. GFAP expression and SVZ proliferation were positively correlated. In conclusion, neurogenic niche proliferation and glial brain responses to CBSC after neonatal stroke may involve interactions with the spleen and are sex dependent. PMID:25121827

  6. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor activates the receptor tyrosine kinase RET and promotes kidney morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Q C; Worby, C A; Lechner, M S; Dixon, J E; Dressler, G R

    1996-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET functions during the development of the kidney and the enteric nervous system, yet no ligand has been identified to date. This report demonstrates that the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) activates RET, as measured by tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular catalytic domain. GDNF also binds RET with a dissociation constant of 8 nM, and 125I-labeled GDNF can be coimmunoprecipitated with anti-RET antibodies. In addition, exogenous GDNF stimulates both branching and proliferation of embryonic kidneys in organ culture, whereas neutralizing antibodies against GDNF inhibit branching morphogenesis. These data indicate that RET and GDNF are components of a common signaling pathway and point to a role for GDNF in kidney development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855235

  7. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, Jakub; Marycz, Krzysztof; Szarek, Dariusz; Bednarz, Paulina; Laska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane-polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane-polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells.

  8. Glutamate release from satellite glial cells of the murine trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Lysann; Warwick, Rebekah A; Pannicke, Thomas; Reichenbach, Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Hanani, Menachem

    2014-08-22

    It has been proposed that glutamate serves as a mediator between neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia and that SGCs release glutamate. Using a novel method, we studied glutamate release from SGCs from murine trigeminal ganglia. Sensory neurons with adhering SGCs were enzymatically isolated from wild type and transgenic mice in which vesicular exocytosis was suppressed in glial cells. Extracellular glutamate was detected by microfluorimetry. After loading the cells with a photolabile Ca(2+) chelator, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was raised in SGCs by a UV pulse, which resulted in glutamate release. The amount of released glutamate was decreased in cells with suppressed exocytosis and after pharmacological block of hemichannels. The data demonstrate that SGCs of the trigeminal ganglion release glutamate in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner.

  9. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  10. Comparative study of human neuronal and glial cell sensitivity for in vitro neurogenotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Laffon, Blanca; Fernández-Bertólez, Natalia; Costa, Carla; Pásaro, Eduardo; Valdiglesias, Vanessa

    2017-04-01

    Cell cultures from neuronal and glial origin have proven to be powerful tools for elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms of nervous system development and physiology, and as neurotoxicity models to evaluate in vitro the possible effects of chemicals. But cellular heterogeneity of nervous system is considerable and these cells have been shown to respond diversely to neurotoxic insults, leading to disparate results from different studies. To shed more light on suitability of cellular models of nervous origin for neurotoxicity screening, the objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity to genetic damage induction of two nervous cell lines. To this aim, neurons (SH-SY5Y) and glial (A172) cells were treated with differently-acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin, actinomycin-D, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and griseofulvin). After discarding cytotoxicity, genotoxicity was evaluated by a battery of assays encompassing detection of different genetic lesions. Results obtained showed that glial cells are generally more resistant to genotoxic damage induced by clastogenic agents, but more sensitive to aneugenic effects. These results highlight the need of proper design of in vitro neurotoxicology studies, especially for neurogenotoxicity screening, emphasizing the importance of employing more than one nervous cell type for testing the potential toxicity of a particular exposure.

  11. Development of a glial network in the olfactory nerve: role of calcium and neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Koussa, Mounir A; Tolbert, Leslie P; Oland, Lynne A

    2010-11-01

    In adult olfactory nerves of mammals and moths, a network of glial cells ensheathes small bundles of olfactory receptor axons. In the developing antennal nerve (AN) of the moth Manduca sexta, the axons of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) migrate from the olfactory sensory epithelium toward the antennal lobe. Here we explore developmental interactions between ORN axons and AN glial cells. During early stages in AN glial-cell migration, glial cells are highly dye coupled, dividing glia are readily found in the nerve and AN glial cells label strongly for glutamine synthetase. By the end of this period, dye-coupling is rare, glial proliferation has ceased, glutamine synthetase labeling is absent, and glial processes have begun to extend to enwrap bundles of axons, a process that continues throughout the remainder of metamorphic development. Whole-cell and perforated-patch recordings in vivo from AN glia at different stages of network formation revealed two potassium currents and an R-like calcium current. Chronic in vivo exposure to the R-type channel blocker SNX-482 halted or greatly reduced AN glial migration. Chronically blocking spontaneous Na-dependent activity by injection of tetrodotoxin reduced the glial calcium current implicating an activity-dependent interaction between ORNs and glial cells in the development of glial calcium currents.

  12. Diverse neurotoxicants target the differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells into neuronal and glial phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2016-11-30

    The large number of compounds that needs to be tested for developmental neurotoxicity drives the need to establish in vitro models to evaluate specific neurotoxic endpoints. We used neural stem cells derived from rat neuroepithelium on embryonic day 14 to evaluate the impact of diverse toxicants on their ability to differentiate into glia and neurons: a glucocorticoid (dexamethasone), organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, parathion), insecticides targeting the GABAA receptor (dieldrin, fipronil), heavy metals (Ni(2+), Ag(+)), nicotine and tobacco smoke extract. We found three broad groupings of effects. One diverse set of compounds, dexamethasone, the organophosphate pesticides, Ni(2+) and nicotine, suppressed expression of the glial phenotype while having little or no effect on the neuronal phenotype. The second pattern was restricted to the pesticides acting on GABAA receptors. These compounds promoted the glial phenotype and suppressed the neuronal phenotype. Notably, the actions of compounds eliciting either of these differentiation patterns were clearly unrelated to deficits in cell numbers: dexamethasone, dieldrin and fipronil all reduced cell numbers, whereas organophosphates and Ni(2+) had no effect. The third pattern, shared by Ag(+) and tobacco smoke extract, clearly delineated cytotoxicity, characterized by major cell loss with suppression of differentiation into both glial and neuronal phenotypes; but here again, there was some selectivity in that glia were suppressed more than neurons. Our results, from this survey with diverse compounds, point to convergence of neurotoxicant effects on a specific "decision node" that controls the emergence of neurons and glia from neural stem cells.

  13. Glial Cells and Their Function in the Adult Brain: A Journey through the History of Their Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Jäkel, Sarah; Dimou, Leda

    2017-01-01

    Glial cells, consisting of microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocyte lineage cells as their major components, constitute a large fraction of the mammalian brain. Originally considered as purely non-functional glue for neurons, decades of research have highlighted the importance as well as further functions of glial cells. Although many aspects of these cells are well characterized nowadays, the functions of the different glial populations in the brain under both physiological and pathological conditions remain, at least to a certain extent, unresolved. To tackle these important questions, a broad range of depletion approaches have been developed in which microglia, astrocytes, or oligodendrocyte lineage cells (i.e., NG2-glia and oligodendrocytes) are specifically ablated from the adult brain network with a subsequent analysis of the consequences. As the different glial populations are very heterogeneous, it is imperative to specifically ablate single cell populations instead of inducing cell death in all glial cells in general. Thanks to modern genetic manipulation methods, the approaches can now directly be targeted to the cell type of interest making the ablation more specific compared to general cell ablation approaches that have been used earlier on. In this review, we will give a detailed summary on different glial ablation studies, focusing on the adult mouse central nervous system and the functional readouts. We will also provide an outlook on how these approaches could be further exploited in the future. PMID:28243193

  14. Zirconium oxide ceramic foam: a promising supporting biomaterial for massive production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Li, Wen-qiang; Wang, Jun-kui; Ma, Xian-cang; Liang, Chen; Liu, Peng; Chu, Zheng; Dang, Yong-hui

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential application of a zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramic foam culturing system to the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Three sets of ZrO2 ceramic foams with different pore densities of 10, 20, and 30 pores per linear inch (PPI) were prepared to support a 3D culturing system. After primary astrocytes were cultured in these systems, production yields of GDNF were evaluated. The biomaterial biocompatibility, cell proliferation and activation of cellular signaling pathways in GDNF synthesis and secretion in the culturing systems were also assessed and compared with a conventional culturing system. In this study, we found that the ZrO2 ceramic foam culturing system was biocompatible, using which the GDNF yields were elevated and sustained by stimulated cell proliferation and activation of signaling pathways in astrocytes cultured in the system. In conclusion, the ZrO2 ceramic foam is promising for the development of a GDNF mass production device for Parkinson’s disease treatment. PMID:25471830

  15. Zirconium oxide ceramic foam: a promising supporting biomaterial for massive production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Li, Wen-qiang; Wang, Jun-kui; Ma, Xian-cang; Liang, Chen; Liu, Peng; Chu, Zheng; Dang, Yong-hui

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the potential application of a zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramic foam culturing system to the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Three sets of ZrO2 ceramic foams with different pore densities of 10, 20, and 30 pores per linear inch (PPI) were prepared to support a 3D culturing system. After primary astrocytes were cultured in these systems, production yields of GDNF were evaluated. The biomaterial biocompatibility, cell proliferation and activation of cellular signaling pathways in GDNF synthesis and secretion in the culturing systems were also assessed and compared with a conventional culturing system. In this study, we found that the ZrO2 ceramic foam culturing system was biocompatible, using which the GDNF yields were elevated and sustained by stimulated cell proliferation and activation of signaling pathways in astrocytes cultured in the system. In conclusion, the ZrO2 ceramic foam is promising for the development of a GDNF mass production device for Parkinson's disease treatment.

  16. γ-Aminobutyric acid-ρ expression in ependymal glial cells of the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; González-González, María Alejandra; Pétriz, Adriana; Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Kettenmann, Helmut; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataulfo

    2013-04-01

    The ependymal glial cells (EGCs) from the periventricular zone of the cerebellum were studied to determine their distribution and the functional properties of their γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A) ) receptors. EGCs were identified by the presence of ciliated structures on their ventricular surface and their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Interestingly, diverse cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, and other types of glia, were identified in the subventricular zone by their current profiles. Electron microscopy showed ciliated cells and myelinated axons in this zone, but we found no collateral connections to suggest the presence of functional synapses. GABA-mediated currents were recorded from EGCs in cerebellar slices from postnatal days 13 to 35 (PN13-PN35). These currents were blocked by TPMPA (a highly specific GABA(A) ρ subunit antagonist) and bicuculline (a selective antagonist for classic GABA(A) receptors). Pentobarbital failed to modulate GABA(A)-mediated currents despite the expression of GABAα1 and GABAγ2 subunits. In situ hybridization, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed GABAρ1 expression in EGCs of the cerebellum. We conclude that cerebellar EGCs express GABAρ1, which is functionally involved in GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses that are unique among glial cells of the brain.

  17. Properties of angiotensin II receptors in glial cells from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Pulakat, L; Río, C; Valcárcel, C; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    The existence and the properties of angiotensin II receptors in the adult bovine and human corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by using Xenopus oocytes and primary glial cell cultures. In oocytes injected with CC mRNA, angiotensin II elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate/Ca(2+)-receptor-channel coupling system. The receptors expressed in oocytes and in CC cultures were pharmacologically similar to the AT1 receptor type as assayed by binding. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies in sections from CC and in glial cultures revealed that the receptors were molecularly related to the AT1 receptor and that they were present in astrocytes. In these cells, activation of the receptors with angiotensin II increased de novo DNA synthesis, promoted the release of aldosterone, and induced c-Fos expression. These findings indicate that CC astrocytes possess functional AT1 receptors that participate in various physiological processes. Images PMID:8170986

  18. The Role of NG2 Glial Cells in ALS Pathogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    morphology to multiple process-bearing cells. These cells started to show O4 expression (Figure 3C and 3D). Slowly, the O4+ cells started to express...the mature oligodendrocyte marker, MBP (Figure 3D). After at least about one month, there were some MBP+ oligodendrocytes with multiple processes and...of gray matter oligodendrocytes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis . Nat Neurosci. 2013;16(5):571-9. 3. Morrison BM, Lee Y, Rothstein JD. Oligodendroglia: metabolic supporters of axons. Trends Cell Biol. 2013.

  19. Stress Changes the Spatial Arrangement of Neurons and Glial Cells of Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Sertraline and Curcumin Prevent It

    PubMed Central

    Noorafshan, Ali; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study explored the three-dimensional spatial arrangements of the neurons and glial cells within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats. Methods It evaluated the arrangement for differences after stress with or without treatment with curcumin and sertraline using second-order stereology. Orientator method was applied to obtain isotropic uniform random sections of mPFC. The pair correlation g(r) and cross-correlation functions were estimated by counting dipole probes superimposed on histological sections of mPFC. Results The mean total volume of neurons and glial cells was 0.80 (0.05) and 0.40 (0.07), respectively in the control group. The corresponding values decreased by 50% in the stressed group. The curve of g(r) for the neurons and glial cells showed a wider gap between the stressed rats' mPFC. Theses indicate a negative correlation (repulsion) between the neurons and glial cells in the stressed rats. Evaluation of the cross-correlation function of the neurons and glial cells also showed a negative correlation in the stressed group. The estimated values of the global degree of order in the spatial point pattern for neurons and glial cells were 0.62 and 0.20 in control and stressed animals, respectively. Curcumin and sertraline protected the spatial arrangements of the cells after stress induction in rats. In addition, the volume of the neurons and glial cells remained unchanged after stress. Conclusion Dissociation of the neurons and glial cells can is seen at some places in the stressed rats' cortex. However, the spatial arrangement of the cells was remained unchanged in curcumin+stress and sertraline+stress rats. PMID:25670949

  20. Several synthetic progestins disrupt the glial cell specific-brain aromatase expression in developing zebra fish.

    PubMed

    Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Garoche, Clémentine; Hinfray, Nathalie; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Boujrad, Noureddine; Pakdel, Farzad; Kah, Olivier; Brion, François

    2016-08-15

    The effects of some progestins on fish reproduction have been recently reported revealing the hazard of this class of steroidal pharmaceuticals. However, their effects at the central nervous system level have been poorly studied until now. Notwithstanding, progesterone, although still widely considered primarily a sex hormone, is an important agent affecting many central nervous system functions. Herein, we investigated the effects of a large set of synthetic ligands of the nuclear progesterone receptor on the glial-specific expression of the zebrafish brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) using zebrafish mechanism-based assays. Progesterone and 24 progestins were first screened on transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryos. We showed that progesterone, dydrogesterone, drospirenone and all the progesterone-derived progestins had no effect on GFP expression. Conversely, all progestins derived from 19-nortesterone induced GFP in a concentration-dependent manner with EC50 ranging from the low nM range to hundreds nM. The 19-nortestosterone derived progestins levonorgestrel (LNG) and norethindrone (NET) were further tested in a radial glial cell context using U251-MG cells co-transfected with zebrafish ER subtypes (zfERα, zfERβ1 or zfERβ2) and cyp19a1b promoter linked to luciferase. Progesterone had no effect on luciferase activity while NET and LNG induced luciferase activity that was blocked by ICI 182,780. Zebrafish-ERs competition assays showed that NET and LNG were unable to bind to ERs, suggesting that the effects of these compounds on cyp19a1b require metabolic activation prior to elicit estrogenic activity. Overall, we demonstrate that 19-nortestosterone derived progestins elicit estrogenic activity by inducing cyp19a1b expression in radial glial cells. Given the crucial role of radial glial cells and neuro-estrogens in early development of brain, the consequences of exposure of fish to these compounds require further investigation.

  1. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  2. The QKI-5 and QKI-6 RNA binding proteins regulate the expression of microRNA 7 in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunling; Vogel, Gillian; Yu, Zhenbao; Richard, Stéphane

    2013-03-01

    The quaking (qkI) gene encodes 3 major alternatively spliced isoforms that contain unique sequences at their C termini dictating their cellular localization. QKI-5 is predominantly nuclear, whereas QKI-6 is distributed throughout the cell and QKI-7 is cytoplasmic. The QKI isoforms are sequence-specific RNA binding proteins expressed mainly in glial cells modulating RNA splicing, export, and stability. Herein, we identify a new role for the QKI proteins in the regulation of microRNA (miRNA) processing. We observed that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated QKI depletion of U343 glioblastoma cells leads to a robust increase in miR-7 expression. The processing from primary to mature miR-7 was inhibited in the presence QKI-5 and QKI-6 but not QKI-7, suggesting that the nuclear localization plays an important role in the regulation of miR-7 expression. The primary miR-7-1 was bound by the QKI isoforms in a QKI response element (QRE)-specific manner. We observed that the pri-miR-7-1 RNA was tightly bound to Drosha in the presence of the QKI isoforms, and this association was not observed in siRNA-mediated QKI or Drosha-depleted U343 glioblastoma cells. Moreover, the presence of the QKI isoforms led to an increase presence of pri-miR-7 in nuclear foci, suggesting that pri-miR-7-1 is retained in the nucleus by the QKI isoforms. miR-7 is known to target the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR), and indeed, QKI-deficient U343 cells had reduced EGFR expression and decreased ERK activation in response to EGF. Elevated levels of miR-7 are associated with cell cycle arrest, and it was observed that QKI-deficient U343 that harbor elevated levels of miR-7 exhibited defects in cell proliferation that were partially rescued by the addition of a miR-7 inhibitor. These findings suggest that the QKI isoforms regulate glial cell function and proliferation by regulating the processing of certain miRNAs.

  3. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce strong oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Huerta-García, Elizabeth; Pérez-Arizti, José Antonio; Márquez-Ramírez, Sandra Gissela; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma Laura; Chirino, Yolanda Irasema; Iglesias, Gisela Gutiérrez; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2014-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used in the chemical, electrical, and electronic industries. TiO2 NPs can enter directly into the brain through the olfactory bulb and can be deposited in the hippocampus region; therefore, we determined the toxic effect of TiO2 NPs on rat and human glial cells, C6 and U373, respectively. We evaluated some events related to oxidative stress: (1) redox-signaling mechanisms by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate; (2) peroxidation of lipids by cis-parinaric acid; (3) antioxidant enzyme expression by PCR in real time; and (4) mitochondrial damage by MitoTracker Green FM staining and Rh123. TiO2 NPs induced a strong oxidative stress in both glial cell lines by mediating changes in the cellular redox state and lipid peroxidation associated with a rise in the expression of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase 2. TiO2 NPs also produced morphological changes, damage of mitochondria, and an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating toxicity. TiO2 NPs had a cytotoxic effect on glial cells; however, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to ascertain that exposure to TiO2 NPs can cause brain injury and be hazardous to health.

  4. The glial cell response is an essential component of hypoxia-induced erythropoiesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, Alexander; Kerdiles, Yann M.; Knaup, Karl X.; Rafie, Christopher A.; Boutin, Adam T.; Stockmann, Christian; Takeda, Norihiko; Scadeng, Miriam; Shih, Andy Y.; Haase, Volker H.; Simon, M. Celeste; Kleinfeld, David; Johnson, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    A key adaptation to environmental hypoxia is an increase in erythropoiesis, driven by the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) through what is traditionally thought to be primarily a renal response. However, both neurons and astrocytes (the largest subpopulation of glial cells in the CNS) also express EPO following ischemic injury, and this response is known to ameliorate damage to the brain. To investigate the role of glial cells as a component of the systemic response to hypoxia, we created astrocyte-specific deletions of the murine genes encoding the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α and their negative regulator von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) as well as astrocyte-specific deletion of the HIF target gene Vegf. We found that loss of the hypoxic response in astrocytes does not cause anemia in mice but is necessary for approximately 50% of the acute erythropoietic response to hypoxic stress. In accord with this, erythroid progenitor cells and reticulocytes were substantially reduced in number in mice lacking HIF function in astrocytes following hypoxic stress. Thus, we have demonstrated that the glial component of the CNS is an essential component of hypoxia-induced erythropoiesis. PMID:19809162

  5. Bioengineered 3D Glial Cell Culture Systems and Applications for Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Watson, P Marc D; Kavanagh, Edel; Allenby, Gary; Vassey, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are key features in a range of chronic central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, as well as acute conditions like stroke and traumatic brain injury, for which there remains significant unmet clinical need. It is now well recognized that current cell culture methodologies are limited in their ability to recapitulate the cellular environment that is present in vivo, and there is a growing body of evidence to show that three-dimensional (3D) culture systems represent a more physiologically accurate model than traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Given the complexity of the environment from which cells originate, and their various cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, it is important to develop models that can be controlled and reproducible for drug discovery. 3D cell models have now been developed for almost all CNS cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocyte cells. This review will highlight a number of current and emerging techniques for the culture of astrocytes and microglia, glial cell types with a critical role in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. We describe recent advances in glial cell culture using electrospun polymers and hydrogel macromolecules, and highlight how these novel culture environments influence astrocyte and microglial phenotypes in vitro, as compared to traditional 2D systems. These models will be explored to illuminate current trends in the techniques used to create 3D environments for application in research and drug discovery focused on astrocytes and microglial cells.

  6. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-06-13

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes.

  7. The Role of NG2 Glial Cells in ALS Pathogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    contributor to neuronal metabolism and survival in vivo. Preliminary data from our laboratory indicates that genetic knockdown or pharmacological...Relevant published articles: 1. Lee, Y., B. M. Morrison, et al. (2012). "Oligodendroglia metabolically support axons and contribute to...Rothstein JD. Oligodendroglia: metabolic supporters of axons. Trends Cell Biol. 2013. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11314

  8. Cells transplanted onto the surface of the glial scar reveal hidden potential for functional neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Holley, Matthew C.; Hashido, Kento; Ono, Kazuya; Shimomura, Koichiro; Horie, Rie T.; Hamaguchi, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    Cell transplantation therapy has long been investigated as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative disorders, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, patients have high hopes for a cell-based therapy. However, there are numerous practical challenges for clinical translation. One major problem is that only very low numbers of donor cells survive and achieve functional integration into the host. Glial scar tissue in chronic neurodegenerative disorders strongly inhibits regeneration, and this inhibition must be overcome to accomplish successful cell transplantation. Intraneural cell transplantation is considered to be the best way to deliver cells to the host. We questioned this view with experiments in vivo on a rat glial scar model of the auditory system. Our results show that intraneural transplantation to the auditory nerve, preceded by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC)-treatment, is ineffective. There is no functional recovery, and almost all transplanted cells die within a few weeks. However, when donor cells are placed on the surface of a ChABC-treated gliotic auditory nerve, they autonomously migrate into it and recapitulate glia- and neuron-guided cell migration modes to repair the auditory pathway and recover auditory function. Surface transplantation may thus pave the way for improved functional integration of donor cells into host tissue, providing a less invasive approach to rescue clinically important neural tracts. PMID:26080415

  9. Satellite glial cells in dorsal root ganglia are activated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Rebekah A; Ledgerwood, Craig J; Brenner, Talma; Hanani, Menachem

    2014-05-21

    Pain is a serious and common problem with patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). Very little has been done to investigate the peripheral mechanisms of pain in MS. Here we used a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) to investigate the possible contribution of satellite glial cells (SGCs) to pain in MS. EAE mice had reduced pain thresholds 10 days after disease induction. We examined dorsal root ganglia and found increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in SGCs, a marker of SGC activation, and increased coupling among SGCs, a known component of activated SGCs. Activated SGCs have previously been shown to contribute to pain in other classical neuropathic pain models, suggesting that pain in multiple sclerosis has a peripheral component.

  10. Emerging role of glial cells in the control of body weight

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glia are the most abundant cell type in the brain and are indispensible for the normal execution of neuronal actions. They protect neurons from noxious insults and modulate synaptic transmission through affectation of synaptic inputs, release of glial transmitters and uptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft. They also transport nutrients and other circulating factors into the brain thus controlling the energy sources and signals reaching neurons. Moreover, glia express receptors for metabolic hormones, such as leptin and insulin, and can be activated in response to increased weight gain and dietary challenges. However, chronic glial activation can be detrimental to neurons, with hypothalamic astrocyte activation or gliosis suggested to be involved in the perpetuation of obesity and the onset of secondary complications. It is now accepted that glia may be a very important participant in metabolic control and a possible therapeutical target. Here we briefly review this rapidly advancing field. PMID:24024117

  11. Low Concentration Microenvironments Enhance the Migration of Neonatal Cells of Glial Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Able, Richard A.; Ngnabeuye, Celestin; Beck, Cade; Holland, Eric C.; Vazquez, Maribel

    2013-01-01

    Glial tumors have demonstrated abilities to sustain growth via recruitment of glial progenitor cells (GPCs), which is believed to be driven by chemotactic cues. Previous studies have illustrated that mouse GPCs of different genetic backgrounds are able to replicate the dispersion pattern seen in the human disease. How GPCs with genetic backgrounds transformed by tumor paracrine signaling respond to extracellular cues via migration is largely unexplored, and remains a limiting factor in utilizing GPCs as therapeutic targets. In this study, we utilized a microfluidic device to examine the chemotaxis of three genetically-altered mouse GPC populations towards tumor conditioned media, as well as towards three growth factors known to initiate the chemotaxis of cells excised from glial tumors: Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and Transforming Growth Factor-α (TGF-α). Our results illustrate that GPC types studied exhibited chemoattraction and chemorepulsion by different concentrations of the same ligand, as well as enhanced migration in the presence of ultra-low ligand concentrations within environments of high concentration gradient. These findings contribute towards our understanding of the causative and supportive roles that GPCs play in tumor growth and reoccurrence, and also point to GPCs as potential therapeutic targets for glioma treatment. PMID:24285985

  12. Satellite glial cells in dorsal root ganglia are activated in streptozotocin-treated rodents.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem; Blum, Erez; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Liang, Shangdong

    2014-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a very common complication in diabetes mellitus (DM), and treatment for it is limited. As DM is becoming a global epidemic it is important to understand and treat this problem. The mechanisms of diabetic neuropathic pain are largely obscure. Recent studies have shown that glial cells are important for a variety of neuropathic pain types, and we investigated what are the changes that satellite glial cells (SGCs) in dorsal root ganglia undergo in a DM type 1 model, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in mice and rats. We carried out immunohistochemical studies to learn about changes in the activation marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in SGCs. We found that after STZ-treatment the number of neurons surrounded with GFAP-positive SGCs in dorsal root ganglia increased 4-fold in mice and 5-fold in rats. Western blotting for GFAP, which was done only on rats because of the larger size of the ganglia, showed an increase of about 2-fold in STZ-treated rats, supporting the immunohistochemical results. These results indicate for the first time that SGCs are activated in rodent models of DM1. As SGC activation appears to contribute to chronic pain, these results suggest that SGCs may participate in the generation and maintenance of diabetic neuropathic pain, and can serve as a potential therapeutic target.

  13. Osteopontin inhibits osmotic swelling of retinal glial (Müller) cells by inducing release of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Wahl, V; Vogler, S; Grosche, A; Pannicke, T; Ueffing, M; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Hauck, S M; Bringmann, A

    2013-08-29

    Osmotic swelling of retinal neurons and glial cells is an important pathogenic factor of retinal edema formation. Here, we show that the neuroprotective factor osteopontin (OPN), which is released from retinal glial (Müller) cells after stimulation of the cells with glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Del Río et al., 2011, Glia 59:821-832), inhibits the swelling of rat Müller cells induced by hypoosmotic exposure of retinal slices in the presence of barium ions and H₂O₂, respectively, and in slices of postischemic retinas. OPN did not inhibit the hypoosmotic swelling of bipolar cells in slices of control and postischemic retinas. The inhibitory effect of OPN on Müller cell swelling was dose-dependent, with a half-maximal effect at ∼0.6 ng/ml. The effect of OPN was abrogated in the presence of pharmacological blockers of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2, metabotropic glutamate receptors, and purinergic receptors (P2Y₁, adenosine A1 receptors), as well as of a neutralizing anti-VEGF antibody. The data suggest that OPN induces the release of VEGF, glutamate, ATP, and adenosine from Müller cells. The effect of OPN was also prevented by blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels (tetrodotoxin), T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (kurtoxin), potassium channels (clofilium), and chloride channels 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB). The swelling-inhibitory effect of OPN was dependent on intracellular calcium signaling, activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C, and vesicular exocytosis of glutamate. In retinal slices, Müller glial cells display immunoreactivity of OPN. The data suggest that Müller cell-derived OPN has (in addition to the effects on photoreceptors and retinal neurons) autocrine effects. The neuroprotective effects of OPN may be in part mediated by the prevention of cytotoxic Müller cell swelling and the release of VEGF and adenosine from Müller cells.

  14. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  15. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline activates fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in glial cells: involvement in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, Kazue; Tsuchioka, Mami; Yano, Ryoya; Maeda, Natsuko; Kajitani, Naoto; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2011-06-17

    Recently, both clinical and animal studies demonstrated neuronal and glial plasticity to be important for the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Antidepressants increase glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production through monoamine-independent protein-tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) activation in glial cells (Hisaoka, K., Takebayashi, M., Tsuchioka, M., Maeda, N., Nakata, Y., and Yamawaki, S. (2007) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 321, 148-157; Hisaoka, K., Maeda, N., Tsuchioka, M., and Takebayashi, M. (2008) Brain Res. 1196, 53-58). This study clarifies the type of tyrosine kinase and mechanism of antidepressant-induced GDNF production in C6 glioma cells and normal human astrocytes. The amitriptyline (a tricyclic antidepressant)-induced ERK activation was specifically and completely inhibited by fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors and siRNA for FGFR1 and -2. Treatment with amitriptyline or several different classes of antidepressants, but not non-antidepressants, acutely increased the phosphorylation of FGFRs and FGFR substrate 2α (FRS2α). Amitriptyline-induced CREB phosphorylation and GDNF production were blocked by FGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore, antidepressants activate the FGFR/FRS2α/ERK/CREB signaling cascade, thus resulting in GDNF production. Furthermore, we attempted to elucidate how antidepressants activate FGFR signaling. The effect of amitriptyline was inhibited by heparin, non-permeant FGF-2 neutralizing antibodies, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors. Serotonin (5-HT) also increased GDNF production through FGFR2 (Tsuchioka, M., Takebayashi, M., Hisaoka, K., Maeda, N., and Nakata, Y. (2008) J. Neurochem. 106, 244-257); however, the effect of 5-HT was not inhibited by heparin and MMP inhibitors. These results suggest that amitriptyline-induced FGFR activation might occur through an extracellular pathway

  16. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-05

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  17. Cell proliferation in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, D; Reidy, M A; Benditt, E P; Schwartz, S M

    1990-01-01

    Despite the lack of direct evidence for cell multiplication, proliferation of smooth muscle cells in human atherosclerotic lesions has been assumed to play a central role in ontogeny of the plaque. We used antibodies to cell cycle-related proteins on tissue sections of human arteries and coronary atherosclerotic plaques. Specific cell types were identified by immunochemical reagents for smooth muscle, monocyte-macrophages, and other blood cells. Low rates of smooth muscle cell proliferation were observed. Macrophages were also observed with rates of proliferation comparable to that of the smooth muscle. Additional replicating cells could not be defined as belonging to specific cell types with the reagents used in this study. These findings imply that smooth muscle replication in advanced plaques is indolent and raise the possibility of a role for proliferating leukocytes. Images PMID:1972277

  18. Stochastic synchronization analysis of cultured human glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Cornell-Bell, Ann; Simonotto, Enrico; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    The production of calcium waves is a property of a healthy astrocyte culture when exposed to the neurotransmitter kainate [Jung et al, J. Neurophys, 79, 1098 (1998)]. Healthy and epileptic tissues differ to a great extent in their dynamics: while a healthy cell culture shows much pattern formation, and wave propagation, the epileptic tissue shows spatially irregular flickering activity or global oscillation. Developing statistical tools to describe healthy versus epileptic tissue dynamics could be very important in order to study the effects of specific drugs, or to identify oscillation centers in the epileptic brain. We perform a statistical analysis in terms of phase synchronization. We show that hyper active epileptic astrocyte cultures are characterized by synchronization between different regions of the network taken from the uncus part of the brain.

  19. CLC3 IS A CRITICAL REGULATOR OF THE CELL CYCLE IN NORMAL AND MALIGNANT GLIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Habela, Christa W.; Olsen, Michelle L.; Sontheimer, Harald

    2008-01-01

    While most brain cells are post-mitotic, small populations of progenitor or stem cells can divide throughout life. These cells are believed to be the most likely source for primary brain malignancies including gliomas. Such tumors share many common features with non-malignant glial cells but owing to their insidious growth form cancers that are typically incurable. In studying the growth regulation of these tumors, we recently discovered that glioma cell division is preceded by a cytoplasmic condensation that we called pre-mitotic condensation (PMC). PMC represents an obligatory step in cell replication and is linked to chromatin condensation. If perturbed, the time required to complete a division is significantly prolonged. We now show that PMC is a feature shared more commonly among normal and malignant cells and that the reduction of cell volume is accomplished by Cl− efflux through ClC3 Cl− channels. Patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated a significant upregulation of chloride currents at M phase of the cell cycle. Colocalization studies and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed the channel on the plasma membrane and at the mitotic spindle. In order to demonstrate a mechanistic role for ClC3 in PMC we knocked down ClC3 expression using shRNA constructs. This resulted in a significant reduction of chloride currents at M-phase that was associated with a decrease in the rate of PMC and a similar impairment of DNA condensation. This data suggests that PMC is an integral part of cell division and is dependent on ClC3 channel function. PMID:18784301

  20. Communication between neuronal somata and satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Yen M; Gu, Yanping; Chen, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Studies of the structural organization and functions of the cell body of a neuron (soma) and its surrounding satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia have led to the realization that SGCs actively participate in the information processing of sensory signals from afferent terminals to the spinal cord. SGCs use a variety ways to communicate with each other and with their enwrapped soma. Changes in this communication under injurious conditions often lead to abnormal pain conditions. "What are the mechanisms underlying the neuronal soma and SGC communication in sensory ganglia?" and "how do tissue or nerve injuries affect the communication?" are the main questions addressed in this review.

  1. Glial differentiation of human inferior turbinate-derived stem cells: a new source of cells for nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sheng, Ying; Liang, JianMin; Ren, XiaoYong; Cheng, Yan

    2017-03-22

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation as a cell-based therapy can enhance peripheral and central nerve repair experimentally, but it is limited by donor site morbidity for clinical application. We investigated whether human turbinate-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hTMSCs) isolated from discarded inferior turbinate during surgery can differentiate into functional SC-like cells. hTMSCs expressed mesenchymal cell surface markers CD29, CD44, CD90, and CD105 and did not express neural crest markers P75 and Nestin. After monolayer culture in predifferentiation medium and transdifferentiation medium with a mixture of glial growth factors and chemical regents for 14 days, the differentiated hTMSCs exhibited a spindle-like morphology similar to that of SCs. RT-PCR, immunocytochemical staining, and western blotting analysis indicated that SC-like cells expressed the glial markers S100β, P75, and glial fibrillary acidic protein at the gene and protein level. Compared with hTMSCs, differentiated hTMSCs secreted more neurotrophins, and significantly enhanced the neurite length when cocultured with dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells. Our data indicated that hTMSCs can differentiate into functional SC-like cells and have the ability to facilitate the neurite growth of dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells in vitro, representing a promising source of cells for nerve repair.

  2. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes in vivo proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Ning-li; Wang, Si-ying; Lu, Qing-jun; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-fai

    2015-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine prescription for protection of optic nerve. However, it remains unclear regarding the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides, the main component of Lycium barbarum, on in vivo proliferation of adult ciliary body cells. In this study, adult rats were intragastrically administered low- and high-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (1 and 10 mg/kg) for 35 days and those intragastrically administered phosphate buffered saline served as controls. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in rat ciliary body in the Lycium barbarum polysaccharides groups, in particular low-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides group, was significantly greater than that in the phosphate buffered saline group. Ki-67-positive rat ciliary body cells expressed nestin but they did not express glial fibrillary acidic protein. These findings suggest that Lycium barbarum polysaccharides can promote the proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells and the proliferated cells present with neuronal phenotype. PMID:26889185

  3. Depletion of GSH in glial cells induces neurotoxicity: relevance to aging and degenerative neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; Cho, Taesup; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Wang, Yu Tian; McGeer, Edith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress induced by inhibition of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis with D,L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) causes human microglia, human astrocytes, THP-1 cells, and U373 cells to secrete materials toxic to human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and stimulates them to release TNF-alpha, IL-6, and nitrite ions. The effect is correlated with activation of the inflammatory pathways P38 MAP- kinase, Jun-N-terminal kinase, and NF-kappaB. The effect is reduced by adding to the medium GSH or clotrimazole (CTM), an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-influx through TRPM2 channels. It is also produced by inhibiting TRPM2 protein expression in microglia and astrocytes through introduction of its small inhibitory RNA (siRNA). TRPM2 mRNA is expressed by glial cells but not by SH-SY5Y cells. BSO in the culture medium causes an almost 3-fold increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in microglia and astrocytes over a 24-h period, which is reduced to half by the addition of CTM. The data strongly suggest that inhibiting intracellular GSH synthesis induces a neuroinflammatory response in human microglia and astrocytes, which is linked to Ca(2+) influx through TRPM2 channels. It represents a new model for inducing neuroinflammation and suggests that increasing GSH levels in glial cells may confer neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, which have a prominent neuroinflammatory component.

  4. A Novel Cytokine Pathway Suppresses Glial Cell Melanogenesis after Injury to Adult Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Tilat A.; Huang, Yuan; Sidani, Amer; Atit, Radhika; Largaespada, David A.; Boissy, Raymond E.; Ratner, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    The neural crest gives rise to numerous cell types, including Schwann cells, neurons, and melanocytes. The extent to which adult neural crest-derived cells retain plasticity has not been tested previously. We report that cutting adult mouse sciatic nerve induces pigmentation around nerve fascicles, among muscle bundles, and in the hypodermis. Pigmented cells are derived from adult nerve, because pigmentation occurs even when nerve fragments are grafted into tyrosinase null albino mice. Pigmentation defects are pervasive in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Mice hemizygous for Nf1 mutations show enhanced pigmentation after nerve lesion and occasionally form pigmented and unpigmented tumors. The Nf1 nerve and the Nf1 host environment both contribute to enhanced pigmentation. Grafted purified Nf1 mutant glial cells [S100+–p75NGFR+–GFAP+–EGFR+ or S100+–p75NGFR+–GFAP+–EGFR−] mimic nerve-derived pigmentation. The NF1 protein, neurofibromin, is a Ras-GAP that acts downstream of a few defined receptor tyrosine kinases, including [β-common (βc)] the shared common receptor for granulocyte and monocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3 (IL3), and IL5. Cytokines in the environment have the potential to suppress pigmentation as shown by nerve injury experiments in null mice; when is βc absent or Nf1 is mutant, melanogenesis is increased. Thus, the adult nerve glial cell phenotype is maintained after nerve injury by response to cytokines, through neurofibromin. PMID:12427839

  5. Growth and differentiation factor 10 (Gdf10) is involved in Bergmann glial cell development under Shh regulation.

    PubMed

    Mecklenburg, Nora; Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E; Moreno-Bravo, Juan Antonio; Perez-Balaguer, Ariadna; Puelles, Eduardo; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-10-01

    Growth differentiation factor 10 (Gdf10), also known as Bmp3b, is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-ß superfamily. Gdf10 is expressed in Bergmann glial cells, which was investigated by single-cell transcriptional profiling (Koirala and Corfas, (2010) PLoS ONE 5: e9198). Here we provide a detailed characterization of Gdf10 expression from E14, the stage at which Gdf10 is expressed for the first time in the cerebellum, until P28. We detected Gdf10 expression in both germinal zones: in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the 4th ventricle as well as in the rhombic lip (RL). The VZ has been postulated to give rise to GABAergic neurons and glial cells, whereas the RL gives rise to glutamatergic neurons. Thus, it was very surprising to discover a gene that is expressed exclusively in glial cells and is not restricted to an expression in the VZ, but is also present in the RL. At postnatal stages Gdf10 was distributed equally in Bergmann glial cells of the cerebellum. Furthermore, we found Gdf10 to be regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which is secreted by Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. In the conditional Shh mutants, glial cells showed a reduced expression of Gdf10, whereas the expression of Nestin and Vimentin was unchanged. Thus, we show for the first time, that Gdf10, expressed in Bergmann glial cells, is affected by the loss of Shh as early as E18.5, suggesting a regulation of glial development by Shh.

  6. Glial Cells - The Key Elements of Alzheimer´s Disease.

    PubMed

    Dzamba, David; Harantova, Lenka; Butenko, Olena; Anderova, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with major clinical hallmarks of memory loss, dementia, and cognitive impairment. Besides the extensive neuron-oriented research, an increasing body of evidence suggests that glial cells, namely astrocytes, microglia, NG2 glia and oligodendrocytes, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In the first part of this review, AD pathophysiology in humans is briefly described and compared with disease progression in routinely used animal models. The relevance of findings obtained in animal models of AD is also discussed with respect to AD pathology in humans. Further, this review summarizes recent findings regarding the role/participation of glial cells in pathogenesis of AD, focusing on changes in their morphology, functions, proteins and gene expression profiles. As for astrocytes and microglia, they are fundamental for the progression and outcome of AD either because they function as effector cells releasing cytokines that play a role in neuroprotection, or because they fail to fulfill their homeostatic functions, ultimately leaving neurons to face excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Next, we turn our attention towards NG2 glia, a novel and distinct class of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), whose role in a variety of human CNS diseases has begun to emerge, and we also consider the participation of oligodendrocytes in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. Since AD is currently an incurable disease, in the last part of our review we hypothesize about possible glia-oriented treatments and provide a perspective of possible future advancements in this field.

  7. High-fat diet and age-dependent effects on enteric glial cell populations of mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Stenkamp-Strahm, Chloe; Patterson, Savannah; Boren, Jennifer; Gericke, Martin; Balemba, Onesmo

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes and obesity are increasing in prevalence at an alarming rate throughout the world. Autonomic diabetic neuropathy is evident in individuals that experience a long-standing diabetic disease state, and gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is thought to be the outcome of neuropathies within the enteric nervous system (ENS) of these patients. To date, an analysis of enteric glial cell population changes during diabetic symptoms has not been performed, and may bring insight into disease pathology and neuropathy, given glial cell implications in gastrointestinal and neuronal homeostasis. Diabetes and obesity were monitored in C57Bl/6J mice fed a 72% high-fat diet, and duodenal glial expression patterns were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for S100β, Sox10 and GFAP proteins and transcripts, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The high-fat diet caused obesity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance after 4 weeks. These changes were associated with a significant decline in the area density indices of mucosa-associated glial cell networks, evidenced by S100β staining at 8 and 20 weeks. All three markers and TEM showed that myenteric glial cells were unaffected by early and late disease periods. However, analysis of Sox10 transcript expression and immunoreactivity showed a diet independent, age-associated decline in glial cell populations. This is the first study showing that mucosal glia cell damage occurs during diabetic symptoms, suggesting that mucosal enteric glia injury may have a pathophysiological significance during this disease. Our results also provide support for age-associated changes in longitudinal studies of enteric glial cells.

  8. Healthy human CSF promotes glial differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells while retaining spontaneous activity in existing neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Heikki; Aänismaa, Riikka; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Hagman, Sanna; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Aho, Antti; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Bendel, Stepani; Skottman, Heli; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2013-06-15

    The possibilities of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells from the basic research tool to a treatment option in regenerative medicine have been well recognized. These cells also offer an interesting tool for in vitro models of neuronal networks to be used for drug screening and neurotoxicological studies and for patient/disease specific in vitro models. Here, as aiming to develop a reductionistic in vitro human neuronal network model, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neural cells could be cultured in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in order to better mimic the in vivo conditions. Our results showed that CSF altered the differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells towards glial cells at the expense of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation rate was reduced in CSF cultures. However, even though the use of CSF as the culture medium altered the glial vs. neuronal differentiation rate, the pre-existing spontaneous activity of the neuronal networks persisted throughout the study. These results suggest that it is possible to develop fully human cell and culture-based environments that can further be modified for various in vitro modeling purposes.

  9. Cell-to-cell transfer of glial proteins to the squid giant axon: The glia- neuron protein transfer hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, RJ; Gainer, H; Barker, JL

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that glial cells synthesize proteins which are transferred to adjacent neurons was evaluated in the giant fiber of the squid (Loligo pealei). When giant fibers are separated from their neuron cell bodies and incubated in the presence of radioactive amino acids, labeled proteins appear in the glial cells and axoplasm. Labeled axonal proteins were detected by three methods: extrusion of the axoplasm from the giant fiber, autoradiography, and perfusion of the giant fiber. This protein synthesis is completely inhibited by puromycin but is not affected by chloramphenicol. The following evidence indicates that the labeled axonal proteins are not synthesized within the axon itself. (a) The axon does not contain a significant amount of ribosomes or ribosomal RNA. (b) Isolated axoplasm did not incorporate [(3)H]leucine into proteins. (c) Injection of Rnase into the giant axon did not reduce the appearance of newly synthesized proteins in the axoplasm of the giant fiber. These findings, coupled with other evidence, have led us to conclude that the adaxonal glial cells synthesize a class of proteins which are transferred to the giant axon. Analysis of the kinetics of this phenomenon indicates that some proteins are transferred to the axon within minutes of their synthesis in the glial cells. One or more of the steps in the transfer process appear to involve Ca++, since replacement of extracellular Ca++ by either Mg++ or Co++ significantly reduces the appearance of labeled proteins in the axon. A substantial fraction of newly synthesized glial proteins, possibly as much as 40 percent, are transferred to the giant axon. These proteins are heterogeneous and range in size from 12,000 to greater than 200,000 daltons. Comparisons of the amount of amino acid incorporation in glia cells and neuron cell bodies raise the possibility that the adaxonal glial cells may provide an important source of axonal proteins which is supplemental to that provided by axonal transport

  10. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  11. Enhanced survival of retinal ganglion cells is mediated by Müller glial cell-derived PEDF.

    PubMed

    Unterlauft, Jan Darius; Claudepierre, Thomas; Schmidt, Manuela; Müller, Katja; Yafai, Yousef; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Eichler, Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) leads to visual impairment and blindness in ocular neurodegenerative diseases, primarily in glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy; hence, mechanisms that contribute to protecting RGC from ischemia/hypoxia are of great interest. We here address the role of retinal glial (Müller) cells and of pigment-epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), one of the main neuroprotectants released from the glial cells. We show that the hypoxia-induced loss in the viability of cultured purified RGC is due to apoptosis, but that the number of viable RGC increases when co-cultured with Müller glial cells suggesting that glial soluble mediators attenuate the death of RGC. When PEDF was ablated from Müller cells a significantly lower number of RGC survived in RGC-Müller cell co-cultures indicating that PEDF is a major survival factor allowing RGC to escape cell death. We further found that RGC express a PEDF receptor known as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 (PNPLA2) and that PEDF exposure, as well as the presence of Müller cells, leads to an activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RGC. Furthermore, adding an NF-κB inhibitor (SN50) to PEDF-treated RGC cultures reduced the survival of RGC. These findings strongly suggest that NF-κB activation in RGC is critically involved in the pro-survival action of Müller-cell derived PEDF and plays an important role in maintaining neuronal survival.

  12. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive signals in murine enteric glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Nakahara, Jin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the possible involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in maturation of enteric glial cells (EGCs). METHODS Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical techniques were used to analyze EGC markers in myenteric plexus (MP) as well as cultured MP cells and EGCs using TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. RESULTS We detected TRPV1-immunoreactive signals in EGC in the MP of wild-type (WT) but not KO mice. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactive signals was lower at postnatal day (PD) 6 in KO mice, though the difference was not clear at PD 13 and PD 21. When MP cells were isolated and cultured from isolated longitudinal muscle-MP preparation from WT and KO mice, the yield of KO EGC was lower than that of WT EGC, while the yield of KO and WT smooth muscle cells showed no difference. Addition of BCTC, a TRPV1 antagonist, to enriched EGC culture resulted in a decrease in the protein ratio of GFAP to S100B, another EGC/astrocyte-specific marker. CONCLUSION These results address the possibility that TRPV1 may be involved in the maturation of EGC, though further studies are necessary to validate this possibility. PMID:27956799

  13. ICV-transplanted human glial precursor cells are short-lived yet exert immunomodulatory effects in mice with EAE.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heechul; Walczak, Piotr; Muja, Naser; Campanelli, James T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2012-07-01

    Human glial precursor cells (hGPs) have potential for remyelinating lesions and are an attractive cell source for cell therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate whether transplanted hGPs can affect the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of transplanted hGPs together with the in vivo fate of these cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI). At 14 days post-EAE induction, mice (n = 19) were intracerebroventricularly (ICV) injected with 5 × 10(5) hGPs that were magnetically labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles as MR contrast agent and transduced with firefly luciferase for BLI of cell survival. Control mice (n = 18) received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) vehicle only. The severity of EAE clinical disability in the hGP-transplanted group was significantly suppressed (P < 0.05) with concomitant inhibition of ConA and MOG-specific T cell proliferation in the spleen. Astrogliosis was reduced and a lower activity of macrophages and/or microglia was observed in the spinal cord (P < 0.05). On MRI, SPIO signal was detected within the lateral ventricle from 1 day post-transplantation and remained there for up to 34 days. BLI indicated that most cells did not survive beyond 5-10 days, consistent with the lack of detectable migration into the brain parenchyma and the histological presence of an abundance of apoptotic cells. Transplanted hGPs could not be detected in the spleen. We conclude that ICV transplantation of short-lived hGPs can have a remote therapeutic effect through immunomodulation from within the ventricle, without cells directly participating in remyelination.

  14. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  15. Murine neural stem cells model Hunter disease in vitro: glial cell-mediated neurodegeneration as a possible mechanism involved.

    PubMed

    Fusar Poli, E; Zalfa, C; D'Avanzo, F; Tomanin, R; Carlessi, L; Bossi, M; Nodari, L Rota; Binda, E; Marmiroli, P; Scarpa, M; Delia, D; Vescovi, A L; De Filippis, L

    2013-11-07

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII or Hunter Syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficit of iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS) activity and characterized by progressive systemic and neurological impairment. As the early mechanisms leading to neuronal degeneration remain elusive, we chose to examine the properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from an animal model of the disease in order to evaluate whether their neurogenic potential could be used to recapitulate the early phases of neurogenesis in the brain of Hunter disease patients. Experiments here reported show that NSCs derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of early symptomatic IDS-knockout (IDS-ko) mouse retained self-renewal capacity in vitro, but differentiated earlier than wild-type (wt) cells, displaying an evident lysosomal aggregation in oligodendroglial and astroglial cells. Consistently, the SVZ of IDS-ko mice appeared similar to the wt SVZ, whereas the cortex and striatum presented a disorganized neuronal pattern together with a significant increase of glial apoptotic cells, suggesting that glial degeneration likely precedes neuronal demise. Interestingly, a very similar pattern was observed in the brain cortex of a Hunter patient. These observations both in vitro, in our model, and in vivo suggest that IDS deficit seems to affect the late phases of neurogenesis and/or the survival of mature cells rather than NSC self-renewal. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFR-α+) glial progenitors appeared reduced in both the IDS-ko NSCs and in the IDS-ko mouse and human Hunter brains, compared with the respective healthy controls. Treatment of mutant NSCs with IDS or PDGF throughout differentiation was able to increase the number of PDGFR-α+ cells and to reduce that of apoptotic cells to levels comparable to wt. This evidence supports IDS-ko NSCs as a reliable in vitro model of the disease, and suggests the rescue of PDGFR-α+ glial cells as a

  16. Microarray analysis of glial cells resistant to JCV infection suggests a correlation between viral infection and inflammatory cytokine gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Kate; Gee, Gretchen V; Simkevich, Carl P; Sedivy, John M; Atwood, Walter J

    2007-01-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCV, has a highly restricted tropism and primarily infects glial cells. The mechanisms restricting infection of cells by JCV are poorly understood. Previously we developed and described a glial cell line that was resistant to JCV infection with the aim of using these cells to identify factors that determine JCV tropism. Gene expression profiling of susceptible and resistant glial cells revealed a direct correlation between the expression of inflammatory cytokines and susceptibility to JCV infection. This correlation manifested at the level of viral gene transcription. Previous studies have suggested a link between an increase in cytokine gene expression in HIV patients and the development of PML and these data support this hypothesis. PMID:17555786

  17. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: a possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    PubMed

    Cornet, A; Savidge, T C; Cabarrocas, J; Deng, W L; Colombel, J F; Lassmann, H; Desreumaux, P; Liblau, R S

    2001-11-06

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Zika virus induces inflammasome activation in the glial cell line U87-MG.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Caracciolo, Ilaria; Crovella, Sergio; D'Agaro, Pierlanfranco

    2017-01-30

    In the last years, neurological complications related to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection have emerged as an important threat to public health worldwide. ZIKV infection has been associated to neurological disorders such as congenital microcephaly in newborns and Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelopathy and encephalitis in adults. ZIKV is characterized by neurotropism and neurovirulence. Several studies have identified microglial nodules, gliosis, neuronal and glial cells degeneration and necrosis in the brain of ZIKV infected infants, suggesting that ZIKV could play a role in these neurological disorders through neuroinflammation and microglial activation. Little information is available about neuroinflammation and ZIKV-related neurological disorders. Therefore, we investigated if ZIKV is able to infect a glial cell line (U87-MG) and how the glial cell line responds to this infection in terms of inflammation (IL-1β, NLRP-3 and CASP-1), oxidative stress (SOD2 and HemeOX) and cell death. We observed a significant increase of ZIKV load in both cells and supernatants after 72 h, compared to 48 h of infection. We found that ZIKV infection induces an increase of IL-1β, NLRP-3 and CASP-1 genes expression. Significant increase of IL-1β and unchanged pro-IL-1β protein levels have also been detected. Moreover, we observed SOD2 and HemeOX increased gene expression mainly after 72 h post ZIKV infection. Subsequently, we found a decrease of U87-MG cell viability, after both 48 h and 72 h of ZIKV infection. Our results show that U87-MG cells are susceptible to ZIKV infection. ZIKV is able to successfully replicate in infected cells causing oxidative stress, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent release of mature IL-1β; this process culminates in cell death. Thus, considering the central role of neuroinflammation in neurological disorders, it is important to comprehend every aspect of this mechanism in order to better understand the pathogenesis of ZIKV infection and to

  20. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  1. AMPA receptor mediated D-serine release from retinal glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Steve J.; Miller, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    The NMDA receptor coagonist D-serine is important in a number of different processes in the central nervous system, ranging from synaptic plasticity to disease states, including schizophrenia. D-serine appears to be the major coagonist acting on retinal ganglion cell NMDA receptors, but the cell type from which it originates and whether its release can be modulated by activity are unknown. In this study, we utilized a mutant mouse line with elevated D-serine to investigate this question. Direct measurements of extracellular D-serine using capillary electrophoresis demonstrate that D-serine can be released from the intact mouse retina through an AMPA receptor dependent mechanism. AMPA-evoked D-serine release persisted in the presence of a cocktail of neural inhibitors but was abolished after administration of a glial toxin. These findings provide the first evidence that extracellular D-serine levels in the retina can be modulated, and that such modulation is contingent upon glial cell activity. PMID:20969576

  2. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression. PMID:25883550

  3. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

  4. Retinal Mueller glial cells trigger the hallmark inflammatory process in autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Gerhards, Hartmut; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2007-06-01

    Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an incurable autoimmune disease affecting the eye. Although retinal-autoantigen specific T-helper 1 cells have been demonstrated to trigger disease progression and relapses, the molecular processes leading to retinal degeneration and consequent blindness remain unknown. To elucidate such processes, we studied changes in the total retinal proteome of ERU-diseased horses compared to healthy controls. Severe changes in the retinal proteome were found for several markers for blood-retinal barrier breakdown and whose emergence depended upon disease severity. Additionally, uveitic changes in the retina were accompanied by upregulation of aldose 1-epimerase, selenium-binding protein 1, alpha crystallin A chain, phosphatase 2A inhibitor (SET), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the latter indicating an involvement of retinal Mueller glial cells (RMG) in disease process. To confirm this, we screened for additional RMG-specific markers and could demonstrate that, in uveitic retinas, RMG concomitantly upregulate vimentin and GFAP and downregulate glutamine synthetase. These expression patterns suggest for an activated state of RMG, which further downregulate the expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and begin expressing interferon-gamma, a pro-inflammatory cytokine typical for T-helper 1 cells. We thus propose that RMG may play a fatal role in uveitic disease progression by directly triggering inflammatory processes through the expression and secretion of interferon-gamma.

  5. Involvement of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komandirov, M. A.; Knyazeva, E. A.; Fedorenko, Y. P.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Stetsurin, D. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells. It is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neuronal and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β signaling pathway in photodynamic damage to normal neurons and glia, we used isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists only of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens (100 nM). The laser diode (670nm, 0.4W/cm2) was used as a light source. Application of specific inhibitors of the enzymes involved in this pathway showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase did not participate in photoinduced death of neurons and glia. Protein kinase Akt was involved in photoinduced necrosis but not in apoptosis of neurons and glia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β participated in photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells and in necrosis of neurons. Therefore, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway was not involved as a whole in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells but its components, protein kinase Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, independently and cell-specifically regulated photoinduced death of neurons and glial cells. These data showed that in this system necrosis was not non-regulated and catastrophic mode of cell death. It was controlled by some signaling proteins. The obtained results may be used for search of pharmacological agents that selectively modulate injury of normal neurons and glial cells during photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  6. Involvement of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komandirov, M. A.; Knyazeva, E. A.; Fedorenko, Y. P.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Stetsurin, D. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells. It is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neuronal and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β signaling pathway in photodynamic damage to normal neurons and glia, we used isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists only of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens (100 nM). The laser diode (670nm, 0.4W/cm2) was used as a light source. Application of specific inhibitors of the enzymes involved in this pathway showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase did not participate in photoinduced death of neurons and glia. Protein kinase Akt was involved in photoinduced necrosis but not in apoptosis of neurons and glia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β participated in photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells and in necrosis of neurons. Therefore, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway was not involved as a whole in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells but its components, protein kinase Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, independently and cell-specifically regulated photoinduced death of neurons and glial cells. These data showed that in this system necrosis was not non-regulated and catastrophic mode of cell death. It was controlled by some signaling proteins. The obtained results may be used for search of pharmacological agents that selectively modulate injury of normal neurons and glial cells during photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  7. Cell proliferation and differentiation in chemical leukemogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tissues such as bone marrow with normally high rates of cell division, proliferation is tightly coordinated with cell differentiation. Survival, proliferation and differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells depend on the growth factors, interleukin 3 (IL-3) and/or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and their synergism with other cytokines. We provide evidence that a characteristic shared by a diverse group of compounds with demonstrated leukemogenic potential is the ability to act synergistically with GM-CSF. This results in an increase in recruitment of a resting population of hematopoietic progenitor cells normally unresponsive to the cytokine and a twofold increase in the size of the proliferating cell population normally regarded to be at risk of transformation in leukemogenesis. These findings support the possibility that transient alterations in hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation may be an important factor in the early stages of development of leukemia secondary to chemical or drug exposure.

  8. Müller glial cells--the mediators of vascular disorders with vitreomacular interface pathology in diabetic maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Robaszkiewicz, Jacek; Chmielewska, Katarzyna; Figurska, Małgorzata; Wierzbowska, Joanna; Stankiewicz, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The key to identifying the type of diabetic maculopathy is determining the status of posterior vitreous adhesion. In the pathological state, the breakdown of the internal and external blood-retina barrier is evident, however the mechanism is usually complex. The common denominator for these disorders are Müller glial cells, which mediate in maintaining the blood-retina barrier by linking the vessels, neurons and the vitreous in anatomical network and into functional dependence. The breakdown of the blood-retina barrier results in proliferation of Müller cells. Molecular changes in these cells increase endothelial barrier properties, but also induce pathological processes on the vitreo-retinal junction, resulting in increased adhesiveness of the collagen fibers of vitreous to retinal internal limiting membrane. The ability of Müller cells to reactive gliosis is influenced by the healthy functioning of the retinal pigment epithelium, which is a source of trophic factors necessary for appropriate Müller cells morphogenesis. Vitrectomy with the removal of ILM eliminates the vitreofoveal interface pathology, additionally provoking reactive gliosis within the macula. Intraoperative use of anti-VEGF supports short-term tightness of the blood-retina barrier in the perioperative neuralgic period. In the future, supplying astrocytes may be a strategy that will allow not only the inhibition of pathological neovascularization but also the restoration of the physiological network of capillaries in avascular retina areas. The delivery of recombinant PEDF allows for the recovery of Müller cells, and thus creates the conditions favourable for the survival of nerve cells in loss of retinal homeostasis.

  9. Grafted bone marrow stromal cells: a contributor to glial repair after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Xin; Yin, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2015-06-01

    In the CNS, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglias are involved in not only development but also pathology such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Glial cells play dual roles (negative vs. positive effects) in these processes. After SCI, detrimental effects usually dominate and significantly retard functional recovery, and curbing these effects is critical for promoting neurological improvement. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) represent a new therapeutic approach for SCI by enabling improved sensory and motor functions in animal models. Although transdifferentiation to spinal neurons was poor, because of their pleiotropic nature, the protective effects of BMSCs are broad and are primarily mediated through modulation of transdifferentiation into host spinal glial components. Transplantation of BMSCs can positively alter the spinal microenvironment and enhance recovery. The objective of this review is to discuss these and other related mechanisms. Since BMSCs transplantation has been applied in other clinical fields, we hope to provide useful clues for the clinical application of BMSCs to treat the SCI in the near future.

  10. Long term effects of lipopolysaccharide on satellite glial cells in mouse dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Blum, E; Procacci, P; Conte, V; Sartori, P; Hanani, M

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been used extensively to study neuroinflammation, but usually its effects were examined acutely (24h<). We have shown previously that a single intraperitoneal LPS injection activated satellite glial cells (SGCs) in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and altered several functional parameters in these cells for at least one week. Here we asked whether the LPS effects would persist for 1 month. We injected mice with a single LPS dose and tested pain behavior, assessed SGCs activation in DRG using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining, and injected a fluorescent dye intracellularly to study intercellular coupling. Electron microscopy was used to quantitate changes in gap junctions. We found that at 30 days post-LPS the threshold to mechanical stimulation was lower than in controls. GFAP expression, as well as the magnitude of dye coupling among SGCs were greater than in controls. Electron microscopy analysis supported these results, showing a greater number of gap junctions and an abnormal growth of SGC processes. These changes were significant, but less prominent than at 7 days post-LPS. We conclude that a single LPS injection exerts long-term behavioral and cellular changes. The results are consistent with the idea that SGC activation contributes to hyperalgesia.

  11. Peripheral inflammation augments gap junction-mediated coupling among satellite glial cells in mouse sympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem; Caspi, Anna; Belzer, Vitali

    2010-02-01

    Intercellular coupling by gap junctions is one of the main features of glial cells, but very little is known about this aspect of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sympathetic ganglia. We used the dye coupling method to address this question in both a prevertebral ganglion (superior mesenteric) and a paravertebral ganglion (superior cervical) of mice. We found that in control ganglia, the incidence of dye coupling among SGCs that form the envelope around a given neuron was 10-20%, and coupling between SGCs around different envelopes was rare (1.5-3%). The dye injections also provided novel information on the structure of SGCs. Following peripheral inflammation, both types of coupling were increased, but most striking was the augmentation of coupling between SGCs forming envelopes around different neurons, which rose by 8-14.6-fold. This effect appeared to be non-systemic, and was blocked by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. These changes in SGCs may affect signal transmission and processing in sympathetic ganglia.

  12. Nogo receptor 1 is expressed in both primary cultured glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ukai, Junichi; Imagama, Shiro; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nogo receptor (NgR) is common in myelin-derived molecules, i.e., Nogo, MAG, and OMgp, and plays important roles in both axon fasciculation and the inhibition of axonal regeneration. In contrast to NgR’s roles in neurons, its roles in glial cells have been poorly explored. Here, we found a dynamic regulation of NgR1 expression during development and neuronal injury. NgR1 mRNA was consistently expressed in the brain from embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 25. In contrast, its expression significantly decreased in the spinal cord during development. Primary cultured neurons, microglia, and astrocytes expressed NgR1. Interestingly, a contusion injury in the spinal cord led to elevated NgR1 mRNA expression at the injury site, but not in the motor cortex, 14 days after injury. Consistent with this, astrocyte activation by TGFβ1 increased NgR1 expression, while microglia activation rather decreased NgR1 expression. These results collectively suggest that NgR1 expression is enhanced in a milieu of neural injury. Our findings may provide insight into the roles of NgR1 in glial cells. PMID:27578914

  13. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Chrast, Roman; Saher, Gesine; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Verheijen, Mark H. G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid synthesis of myelinating glial cells because of blood barriers shielding the nervous system from circulating lipids. Recent insights from analysis of inherited lipid disorders, especially those with prevailing lipid depletion and from mouse models with glia-specific disruption of lipid metabolism, shed new light on this issue. The particular lipid composition of myelin, the transport of lipid-associated myelin proteins, and the necessity for timely assembly of the myelin sheath all contribute to the observed vulnerability of myelin to perturbed lipid metabolism. Furthermore, the uptake of external lipids may also play a role in the formation of myelin membranes. In addition to an improved understanding of basic myelin biology, these data provide a foundation for future therapeutic interventions aiming at preserving glial cell integrity in metabolic disorders. PMID:21062955

  14. Possible role of glial cells in the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Mami

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that there is a close relationship between the endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS). Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and function of the CNS; not only for neuronal cells but also for glial development and differentiation. Any impairment of TH supply to the developing CNS causes severe and irreversible changes in the overall architecture and function of the human brain, leading to various neurological dysfunctions. In the adult brain, impairment of THs, such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, can cause psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Although impact of hypothyroidism on synaptic transmission and plasticity is known, its effect on glial cells and related cellular mechanisms remain enigmatic. This mini-review article summarizes how THs are transported into the brain, metabolized in astrocytes and affect microglia and oligodendrocytes, demonstrating an example of glioendocrine system. Neuroglial effects may help to understand physiological and/or pathophysiological functions of THs in the CNS and how hypo- and hyper-thyroidism may cause mental disorders. PMID:26089777

  15. HIV-1 alters neural and glial progenitor cell dynamics in the central nervous system: coordinated response to opiates during maturation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Podhaizer, Elizabeth M; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E

    2012-12-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs) are common sequelae of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, even when viral titers are well controlled by antiretroviral therapy. Evidence in patients and animal models suggests that neurologic deficits are increased during chronic opiate exposure. We have hypothesized that central nervous system (CNS) progenitor cells in both adult and developing CNS are affected by HIV infection and that opiates exacerbate these effects. To examine this question, neural progenitors were exposed to HIV-1 Tat(1-86) in the developing brain of inducible transgenic mice and in vitro. We examined whether Tat affected the proliferation or balance of progenitor populations expressing nestin, Sox2, and Olig2. Disease relevance was further tested by exposing human-derived progenitors to supernatant from HIV-1 infected monocytes. Studies concentrated on striatum, a region preferentially targeted by HIV and opiates. Results were similar among experimental paradigms. Tat or HIV exposure reduced the proliferation of undifferentiated (Sox2(+)) progenitors and oligodendroglial (Olig2(+)) progenitors. Coexposure to morphine exacerbated the effects of Tat or HIV-1(SF162) supernatant, but partially reversed HIV-1(IIIB) supernatant effects. Populations of Sox2(+) and Olig2(+) cells were also reduced by Tat exposure, although progenitor survival was unaffected. In rare instances, p24 immunolabeling was detected in viable human progenitors by confocal imaging. The vulnerability of progenitors is likely to distort the dynamic balance among neuron/glial populations as the brain matures, perhaps contributing to reports that neurologic disease is especially prevalent in pediatric HIV patients. Pediatric disease is atypical in developed regions but remains a serious concern in resource-limited areas where infection occurs commonly at birth and through breast feeding.

  16. Adult ependymal cells are postmitotic and are derived from radial glial cells during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spassky, Nathalie; Merkle, Florian T; Flames, Nuria; Tramontin, Anthony D; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2005-01-05

    Ependymal cells on the walls of brain ventricles play essential roles in the transport of CSF and in brain homeostasis. It has been suggested that ependymal cells also function as stem cells. However, the proliferative capacity of mature ependymal cells remains controversial, and the developmental origin of these cells is not known. Using confocal or electron microscopy (EM) of adult mice that received bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or [3H]thymidine for several weeks, we found no evidence that ependymal cells proliferate. In contrast, ependymal cells were labeled by BrdU administration during embryonic development. The majority of them are born between embryonic day 14 (E14) and E16. Interestingly, we found that the maturation of ependymal cells and the formation of cilia occur significantly later, during the first postnatal week. We analyzed the early postnatal ventricular zone at the EM and found a subpopulation of radial glia in various stages of transformation into ependymal cells. These cells often had deuterosomes. To directly test whether radial glia give rise to ependymal cells, we used a Cre-lox recombination strategy to genetically tag radial glia in the neonatal brain and follow their progeny. We found that some radial glia in the lateral ventricular wall transform to give rise to mature ependymal cells. This work identifies the time of birth and early stages in the maturation of ependymal cells and demonstrates that these cells are derived from radial glia. Our results indicate that ependymal cells are born in the embryonic and early postnatal brain and that they do not divide after differentiation. The postmitotic nature of ependymal cells strongly suggests that these cells do not function as neural stem cells in the adult.

  17. Synergistic action of hypoosmolarity and glutamine in inducing acute swelling of retinal glial (Müller) cells.

    PubMed

    Karl, Anett; Wurm, Antje; Pannicke, Thomas; Krügel, Katja; Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Albrecht, Jan; Bringmann, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    High blood ammonia, elevated glutamine, and hyponatremia are pathogenic factors contributing to astrocytic swelling and brain edema in liver failure. We investigated the effects of hypoosmolarity, ammonia, and glutamine on the induction of glial cell swelling in freshly isolated slices of the rat retina. Glutamine, but not ammonia or hypoosmolarity per se, evoked a rapid (within one minute) swelling of retinal glial (Müller) cell bodies under hypoosmotic conditions. Under isoosmotic conditions, glutamine evoked a delayed swelling after 10 min of exposure. The effect of glutamine was concentration-dependent, with half-maximal and maximal effects at ∼ 0.1 and 0.5 mM. Glutamine in hypoosmotic solution induced a dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential and the glial soma size were reduced by (i) agents which inhibit the transfer of glutamine into mitochondria and its hydrolysis there, (ii) inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition, (iii) inhibitors of oxidative-nitrosative stress, and (iv) inhibitors of phospholipase A(2) and cyclooxygenase. Glutamine-induced glial swelling was also prevented by ATP and adenosine, acting at adenosine A(1) receptors. The data suggest that hypoosmolarity accelerates the swelling-inducing effect of glutamine on retinal glial cells, and that swelling induction by glutamine is mediated by inducing oxidative-nitrosative stress, inflammatory lipid mediators, and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Induction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human glial cells after proinflammatory cytokines stimulation: effect of IFNgamma, IL1beta, and TNFalpha on differentiation and chemokine production in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Janabi, N; Di Stefano, M; Wallon, C; Hery, C; Chiodi, F; Tardieu, M

    1998-08-01

    Although evidence for human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) presence in the central nervous system (CNS) of infected patients is well established, the intensity of viral replication within the brain is not usually known. In vitro, human embryonic microglial cells internalized HIV-1 through a CD4-dependent pathway but were not permissive to viral replication. We observed that HIV replication was induced when CNS cell cultures were stimulated for 14 days by a combination of proinflammatory cytokines including IFNgamma, IL1beta, and TNFalpha. After long-term cytokine stimulation, morphologically differentiated glial cells appeared, in which HIV-1 tat antigen was detected after infection. Thus, variations in the stage of maturation/activation of CNS cells under inflammatory conditions probably play a major role in facilitating massive production of HIV-1. We then studied the effect of prolonged cytokine stimulation on the secretion of inflammatory mediators by glial cells. An early increased secretion of prostaglandin F2alpha and chemokines (RANTES>MIP-1alpha>MIP-1beta) was observed, due to both microglia and astrocytes. In contrast to persistent PGF2alpha production, an extinction of RANTES and MIP-1beta but not of MIP-1alpha secretion occurred during the 14 days of stimulation and was inversely correlated with the ability of glial cells to replicate HIV-1. The study of the secretory factors produced in response to a persistent inflammation could provide a better understanding of the modulation of HIV replication in glial cells.

  19. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  20. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoon Hee

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  1. Light microscopic identification of immature glial cells in semithin sections of the developing mouse corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, R R

    1976-01-01

    Four distinct types of glial cell were recognized in the corpus callosum of young postnatal mice: the early glioblast; the small glioblast; the large glioblast; and the young astrocyte. As well as these, mature microglia could be recognized from birth. In semithin, toluidine blue stained sections early glioblasts had large, fair to moderately stained nuclei, and a thin rim of pale cytoplasm; small glioblasts had small, dark nuclei and a rim of darkly stained cytoplasm; large glioblasts had moderately unevenly stained nuclei and a thin rim of moderately stained cytoplasm; and young astrocytes had fairly small nuclei, moderately stained cytoplasm, and one or more processes, which could usually be seen extending for 5 mum or more from the perikaryon. Differential glial counts using the criteria described above, in conjunction with electron microscopic analysis, suggested that early glioblasts gave rise to small glioblasts and large glioblasts; that small glioblasts gave rise directly to astrocytes, large glioblasts, oligodendrocytes and possibly microglia; that large glioblasts formed oligodendrocytes only, and might be immature light oligodendrocytes; and that part of the microglial population might arise from vascular pericytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:795801

  2. Differential Sulfation Remodelling of Heparan Sulfate by Extracellular 6-O-sulfatases Regulates Fibroblast Growth Factor-induced Boundary Formation By Glial Cells: Implications for Glial Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Higginson, Jennifer R; Thompson, Sophie M; Santos-Silva, Alessandra; Guimond, Scott E; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Barnett, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that rat Schwann cells (SCs), but not olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), form a boundary with astrocytes, due to a SC-specific secreted factor. Here, we identify highly sulfated heparan sulfates (HS), and fibroblast growth factors (FGF) 1 and FGF9, as possible determinants of boundary formation induced by rat SCs. Disaccharide analysis of HS in SC and rat OEC conditioned medium showed that SCs secrete more highly sulfated HS than OECs. The dependence of the boundary-forming activity on high levels of sulfation was confirmed using a panel of semi-synthetic modified heparins with variable levels of sulfation. Furthermore, extracellular HS 6-O-endosulfatase enzymes, Sulf 1 and Sulf 2, were expressed at a significantly lower level by SCs compared to OECs and siRNA reduction of Sulfs in OECs was, in itself, sufficient to induce boundary formation. This demonstrates a key role for remodelling (reduction) of HS 6-O-sulfation by OECs to suppress boundary formation, in comparison to SCs. Furthermore, specific anti-FGF1 and FGF9 antibodies disrupted SC/astrocyte boundary formation, supporting a role for an HS sulfation-dependent FGF signalling mechanism via FGF receptors (FGFR) on astrocytes. We propose a model in which FGF1 and FGF9 signalling is differentially modulated by patterns of glial cell HS sulfation, dependent on Sulf 1 and Sulf 2 expression, to control FGFR3-IIIb mediated astrocytic responses. Moreover, these data suggest manipulation of HS sulfation after CNS injury as a potential novel approach for therapeutic intervention in CNS repair. PMID:23136428

  3. Differential sulfation remodelling of heparan sulfate by extracellular 6-O-sulfatases regulates fibroblast growth factor-induced boundary formation by glial cells: implications for glial cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Higginson, Jennifer R; Thompson, Sophie M; Santos-Silva, Alessandra; Guimond, Scott E; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Barnett, Susan C

    2012-11-07

    Previously, it has been shown that rat Schwann cells (SCs), but not olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), form a boundary with astrocytes, due to a SC-specific secreted factor. Here, we identify highly sulfated heparan sulfates (HSs) and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) 1 and 9 as possible determinants of boundary formation induced by rat SCs. Disaccharide analysis of HS in SC-conditioned and rat OEC-conditioned media showed that SCs secrete more highly sulfated HS than OECs. The dependence of the boundary-forming activity on high levels of sulfation was confirmed using a panel of semisynthetic modified heparins with variable levels of sulfation. Furthermore, extracellular HS 6-O-endosulfatase enzymes, Sulf 1 and Sulf 2, were expressed at a significantly lower level by SCs compared with OECs, and siRNA reduction of Sulfs in OECs was, in itself, sufficient to induce boundary formation. This demonstrates a key role for remodelling (reduction) of HS 6-O-sulfation by OECs, compared with SCs, to suppress boundary formation. Furthermore, specific anti-FGF1 and anti-FGF9 antibodies disrupted SC-astrocyte boundary formation, supporting a role for an HS sulfation-dependent FGF signaling mechanism via FGF receptors on astrocytes. We propose a model in which FGF1 and FGF9 signaling is differentially modulated by patterns of glial cell HS sulfation, dependent on Sulf 1 and Sulf 2 expression, to control FGF receptor 3-IIIb-mediated astrocytic responses. Moreover, these data suggest manipulation of HS sulfation after CNS injury as a potential novel approach for therapeutic intervention in CNS repair.

  4. Protection of Radial Glial-Like Cells in the Hippocampus of APP/PS1 Mice: a Novel Mechanism of Memantine in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayu; Chen, Junhua; Bao, Xiaohang; Cai, Yulong; Zhao, Jinghui; Huang, Jing; Huang, Wei; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei

    2015-08-01

    The failure of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is closely correlated with memory decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Radial glial-like cells (RGLs) localized to the adult DG generate intermediate progenitor cells and immature neurons and thus contribute to adult hippocampus neurogenesis. Memantine (MEM) has been indicated to dramatically increase hippocampal neurogenesis by promoting the proliferation of RGLs. In this study, we examined the effect of MEM on the capacity for hippocampal cell proliferation and the amount of RGLs in APPswe/PS1∆E9 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice between 9 and 13 months of age. MEM could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis and increase the number of RGLs in the DG subgranular zone (DG-SGZ) of APP/PS1 mice of both ages. Moreover, MEM decreased amyloidogenesis in 13-month-old APP/PS1 mice and protected cultured radial glia cells (RGCs, L2.3 cells) from apoptosis induced by the β amyloid peptide (Aβ). Additionally, MEM inhibited microglial activation in a vertical process in DG-SGZ of APP/PS1 mice and decreased interacting with RGL processes. Reelin is involved in the proliferation of RGLs in the hippocampus, which was typically upregulated in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice by MEM and thought to be an active signaling pathway associated with the MEM-induced increase in RGLs. Our data suggest a previously uncharacterized role for MEM in treating AD.

  5. Lensless imaging system to quantify cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinjimore Kesavan, S.; Allier, C. P.; Navarro, F.; Mittler, F.; Chalmond, B.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2013-02-01

    Owing to its simplicity, lensless imaging system is adept at continuous monitoring of adherent cells inside the incubator. The setup consists of a CMOS sensor with pixel pitch of 2.2 μm and field of view of 24 mm2, LED with a dominating wavelength of 525 nm, along with a pinhole of 150 μm as the source of illumination. The in-line hologram obtained from cells depends on the degree of cell-substrate adhesion. Drastic difference is observed between the holographic patterns of floating and adherent cells. In addition, the well-established fact of reduction of cell-substrate contact during cell division is observed with our system based on corresponding spontaneous transition in the holographic pattern. Here, we demonstrate that by recognizing this specific holographic pattern, number of cells undergoing mitosis in a cell culture with a population of approximately 5000 cells, can be estimated in real-time. The method is assessed on comparison with Edu-based proliferation assay. The approach is straightforward and it eliminates the use of markers to estimate the proliferation rate of a given cell culture. Unlike most proliferation assays, the cells are not harvested enabling continuous monitoring of cell culture.

  6. Poly-Thymidine Oligonucleotides Mediate Activation of Murine Glial Cells Primarily Through TLR7, Not TLR8

    PubMed Central

    Du, Min; Butchi, Niranjan B.; Woods, Tyson; Peterson, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    The functional role of murine TLR8 in the inflammatory response of the central nervous system (CNS) remains unclear. Murine TLR8 does not appear to respond to human TLR7/8 agonists, due to a five amino acid deletion in the ectodomain. However, recent studies have suggested that murine TLR8 may be stimulated by alternate ligands, which include vaccinia virus DNA, phosphothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) or the combination of phosphothioate poly-thymidine oligonucleotides (pT-ODNs) with TLR7/8 agonists. In the current study, we analyzed the ability of pT-ODNs to induce activation of murine glial cells in the presence or absence of TLR7/8 agonists. We found that TLR7/8 agonists induced the expression of glial cell activation markers and induced the production of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mixed glial cultures. In contrast, pT-ODNs alone induced only low level expression of two cytokines, CCL2 and CXCL10. The combination of pT-ODNs along with TLR7/8 agonists induced a synergistic response with substantially higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared to CL075. This enhancement was not due to cellular uptake of the agonist, indicating that the pT-ODN enhancement of cytokine responses was due to effects on an intracellular process. Interestingly, this response was also not due to synergistic stimulation of both TLR7 and TLR8, as the loss of TLR7 abolished the activation of glial cells and cytokine production. Thus, pT-ODNs act in synergy with TLR7/8 agonists to induce strong TLR7-dependent cytokine production in glial cells, suggesting that the combination of pT-ODNs with TLR7 agonists may be a useful mechanism to induce pronounced glial activation in the CNS. PMID:21811614

  7. Blue eye disease porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) infects pig neurons and glial cells using sialo-glycoprotein as receptor.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Godoy-Martinez, Diana V; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Rodriguez-Peredo, Alejandra; Dueñas-Jimenez, Judith M; Dueñas-Jiménez, Sergio H; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A

    2007-03-01

    Pig neural cells express glycoproteins with sialylated N-linked oligosaccharide chains (SNOC) which are used by the porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) as receptors. Pig neuronal or glial cell cultures were employed to investigate (a) whether PoRv infects such cells using a molecule expressing SNOC, and (b) the role of viral envelope glycoproteins in establishing the infection. Enriched neuronal or glial cell cultures were exposed to PoRv and infection was detected immunocytochemically. Neuronal cultures prepared from neonatal pigs were treated enzymatically to eliminate sialic acid or N-linked oligosaccharide chains. Primary neural cultures were exposed to anti-HN or anti-F preincubated with PoRv to study the role of the viral glycoproteins. In enriched cultures, PoRv infected neurons and glial cells, and sialic acid expressed in N-linked oligosaccharide chains appeared to play a central role in infection. It was concluded that HN and F viral glycoproteins are required to infect neurons and glial cells.

  8. Manipulation of the delayed rectifier Kv1.5 potassium channel in glial cells by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Roy, M L; Saal, D; Perney, T; Sontheimer, H; Waxman, S G; Kaczmarek, L K

    1996-11-01

    Glial cells have been shown to express several biophysically and pharmacology distinct potassium channel types. However, the molecular identity of most glial K+ channels is unknown. We have developed an antibody specific for the Shaker type potassium channel Kv1.5 protein, and demonstrate by immunohistochemistry the presence of this channel in glial cells of adult rat hippocampal and cerebellar slices, as well as in cultured spinal cord astrocytes. Immunoreactivity was particularly intense in the endfoot processes of astrocytes surrounding the microvasculature of the hippocampus. The specific contribution of this channel protein to the delayed rectifying K+ current of spinal cord astrocytes was determined by incubating these cells with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to the mRNA coding for Kv1.5 protein. Such treatment reduced delayed rectifier current density and shifted the potassium current steadystate inactivation, without altering current activation, cell capacitance, or cell resting potential. The tetraethylammonium acetate (TEA) sensitivity of astrocytic delayed rectifier current was enhanced following antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment, suggesting that Kv1.5 channel protein may provide a significant component of the TEA-insensitive current in this preparation. Our results suggest that Kv1.5 is widely expressed in glial cells of brain and spinal cord and that delayed rectifying K+ currents in astrocytes are largely mediated by Kv1.5 channel protein.

  9. Effects of aging and sensory loss on glial cells in mouse visual and auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Zettel, Martha L; Ison, James R; Allen, Paul D; Majewska, Ania K

    2012-04-01

    Normal aging is often accompanied by a progressive loss of receptor sensitivity in hearing and vision, whose consequences on cellular function in cortical sensory areas have remained largely unknown. By examining the primary auditory (A1) and visual (V1) cortices in two inbred strains of mice undergoing either age-related loss of audition (C57BL/6J) or vision (CBA/CaJ), we were able to describe cellular and subcellular changes that were associated with normal aging (occurring in A1 and V1 of both strains) or specifically with age-related sensory loss (only in A1 of C57BL/6J or V1 of CBA/CaJ), using immunocytochemical electron microscopy and light microscopy. While the changes were subtle in neurons, glial cells and especially microglia were transformed in aged animals. Microglia became more numerous and irregularly distributed, displayed more variable cell body and process morphologies, occupied smaller territories, and accumulated phagocytic inclusions that often displayed ultrastructural features of synaptic elements. Additionally, evidence of myelination defects were observed, and aged oligodendrocytes became more numerous and were more often encountered in contiguous pairs. Most of these effects were profoundly exacerbated by age-related sensory loss. Together, our results suggest that the age-related alteration of glial cells in sensory cortical areas can be accelerated by activity-driven central mechanisms that result from an age-related loss of peripheral sensitivity. In light of our observations, these age-related changes in sensory function should be considered when investigating cellular, cortical, and behavioral functions throughout the lifespan in these commonly used C57BL/6J and CBA/CaJ mouse models.

  10. A label-free and high-throughput separation of neuron and glial cells using an inertial microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tiantian; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Yuan, Dan; Huang, Xu-Feng; Li, Weihua

    2016-05-01

    While neurons and glial cells both play significant roles in the development and therapy of schizophrenia, their specific contributions are difficult to differentiate because the methods used to separate neurons and glial cells are ineffective and inefficient. In this study, we reported a high-throughput microfluidic platform based on the inertial microfluidic technique to rapidly and continuously separate neurons and glial cells from dissected brain tissues. The optimal working condition for an inertial biochip was investigated and evaluated by measuring its separation under different flow rates. Purified and enriched neurons in a primary neuron culture were verified by confocal immunofluorescence imaging, and neurons performed neurite growth after separation, indicating the feasibility and biocompatibility of an inertial separation. Phencyclidine disturbed the neuroplasticity and neuron metabolism in the separated and the unseparated neurons, with no significant difference. Apart from isolating the neurons, purified and enriched viable glial cells were collected simultaneously. This work demonstrates that an inertial microchip can provide a label-free, high throughput, and harmless tool to separate neurological primary cells.

  11. Systemic inflammation alters satellite glial cell function and structure. A possible contribution to pain.

    PubMed

    Blum, E; Procacci, P; Conte, V; Hanani, M

    2014-08-22

    Local peripheral injury activates satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia, which may contribute to chronic pain. We hypothesized that systemic inflammation affects sensory ganglia like local injury. We induced systemic inflammation in mice by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally, and characterized SGCs and neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), using dye injection, calcium imaging, electron microscopy (EM), immunohistochemistry, and electrical recordings. Several days post-LPS, SGCs were activated, and dye coupling among SGCs increased 3-4.5-fold. EM showed abnormal growth of SGC processes and the formation of new gap junctions. Sensitivity of SGCs to ATP increased twofold, and neuronal excitability was augmented. Blocking gap junctions reduced pain behavior in LPS-treated mice. Thus, changes in DRG due to systemic inflammation are similar to those due to local injury, which may explain the pain in sickness behavior and in other systemic diseases.

  12. The expression of Toll-like receptors in murine Müller cells, the glial cells in retina.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaomin; Fang, Dan; Zhou, Hongyan; Su, Shao Bo

    2013-08-01

    Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, play an important role in immune responses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are members of the pattern recognition receptor family and mediate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we isolated, characterized Müller cells from mouse retina, and analyzed the expression of TLRs in these cells. We found that the mRNA of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR5 was highly expressed by Müller cells. PAM3 and LPS, the agonists for TLR2 and TLR4, promoted Müller cells to produce the inflammatory cytokine Interleukine-6 and the chemokine MIP-2/CXCL2. These results suggest that Müller cells may be involved in innate and adaptive responses via TLR signaling in the eye. Our study should facilitate further study of the role of Müller cell in eye diseases and identification of the potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Sex difference in cell proliferation in developing rat amygdala mediated by endocannabinoids has implications for social behavior.

    PubMed

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L; Hill, Matthew N; Hillard, Cecilia J; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2010-11-23

    The amygdala is a sexually dimorphic brain region critical for the regulation of social, cognitive, and emotional behaviors, but both the nature and the source of sex differences in the amygdala are largely unknown. We have identified a unique sex difference in the developing rat medial amygdala (MeA) that is regulated by cannabinoids. Newborn females had higher rates of cell proliferation than males. Treatment of neonates with the cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), reduced cell proliferation in females to that of males and a wide range of WIN doses had no effect on cell proliferation in males. The effect of WIN on cell proliferation in the MeA was prevented by coinfusions of a CB2 but not CB1 receptor antagonist. Females had higher amygdala content of the endocannabinoid degradation enzymes, fatty acid amid hydrolase, and monoacylglycerol lipase than males, and lower amounts of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and N-arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide). Inhibition of the degradation of 2-arachidonoylglycerol in females occluded the sex difference in cell proliferation. Analyses of cell fate revealed that females had significantly more newly generated glial cells but not more newly generated neurons than males, and treatment with WIN significantly decreased glial cell genesis in females but not males. Finally, early exposure to cannabinoids masculinized juvenile play behavior in females but did not alter this behavior in males. Collectively, our findings suggest that sex differences in endocannabinoids mediate a sex difference in glial cell genesis in the developing MeA that impacts sex-specific behaviors in adolescence.

  14. Populations of Radial Glial Cells Respond Differently to Reelin and Neuregulin1 in a Ferret Model of Cortical Dysplasia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-28

    out of the ventricular zone, but do not play a role in allowing further movement toward the cortical plate. Materials and Methods Ethics Statement...transformation into astrocytes. Anatomy and embryology 156(2): 115–152. 11. Voigt T (1989) Development of glial cells in the cerebral wall of ferrets

  15. NG2 glial cells integrate synaptic input in global and dendritic calcium signals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjing; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Nicolas, Vicky; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic signaling to NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells (NG2 cells) could be key to rendering myelination of axons dependent on neuronal activity, but it has remained unclear whether NG2 glial cells integrate and respond to synaptic input. Here we show that NG2 cells perform linear integration of glutamatergic synaptic inputs and respond with increasing dendritic calcium elevations. Synaptic activity induces rapid Ca2+ signals mediated by low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels under strict inhibitory control of voltage-gated A-type K+ channels. Ca2+ signals can be global and originate throughout the cell. However, voltage-gated channels are also found in thin dendrites which act as compartmentalized processing units and generate local calcium transients. Taken together, the activity-dependent control of Ca2+ signals by A-type channels and the global versus local signaling domains make intracellular Ca2+ in NG2 cells a prime signaling molecule to transform neurotransmitter release into activity-dependent myelination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16262.001 PMID:27644104

  16. NG2 glial cells integrate synaptic input in global and dendritic calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Nicolas, Vicky; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2016-09-19

    Synaptic signaling to NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells (NG2 cells) could be key to rendering myelination of axons dependent on neuronal activity, but it has remained unclear whether NG2 glial cells integrate and respond to synaptic input. Here we show that NG2 cells perform linear integration of glutamatergic synaptic inputs and respond with increasing dendritic calcium elevations. Synaptic activity induces rapid Ca(2+) signals mediated by low-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels under strict inhibitory control of voltage-gated A-type K(+) channels. Ca(2+) signals can be global and originate throughout the cell. However, voltage-gated channels are also found in thin dendrites which act as compartmentalized processing units and generate local calcium transients. Taken together, the activity-dependent control of Ca(2+) signals by A-type channels and the global versus local signaling domains make intracellular Ca(2+) in NG2 cells a prime signaling molecule to transform neurotransmitter release into activity-dependent myelination.

  17. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Majima, Takashi; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Miyoshi, Jun; Mandai, Kenji; Takai, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO) of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  18. Fibroblasts, glial, and neuronal cells are involved in extravascular prothrombin activation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Shikamoto, Y; Fukudome, K; Kimoto, M; Morita, T

    1999-10-01

    A membrane-associated prothrombin activator (MAPA) was found on various cultured cells derived from non-hematopoietic cells [Sekiya, F. et al. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 32441-32445]. In this study, we investigated the enzymatic properties of this enzyme using protease inhibitors. While the metalloproteinase inhibitor, o-phenanthroline, had no effect, some Kunitz type serine protease inhibitors attenuated MAPA activity. Recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rTFPI) also markedly reduced the activity (IC(50), 1. 3+/-0.6 x 10(-10) M). MAPA activity is, therefore, most likely to be due to factor Xa. We evaluated the effect of exogenous factor Xa on MAPA activity. Factor Xa-dependent prothrombin activation was observed on fibroblast cells (apparent K(d), 1.47+/-0.72 nM). Activation was also observed on glial and neuronal cells, which expressed MAPA activity. These results imply that membrane-bound factor Xa results in MAPA activity on these cells. Therefore, we considered the involvement of factor Va, a component of prothrombinase, in this activity. We examined whether or not the prothrombinase complex is assembled on these cells. Prothrombin was activated in a manner dependent on both exogenous factor Xa and factor Va (apparent K(d) of 0.51-1.81 nM for factor Va). These results indicate that the prothrombinase complex forms specifically on various extravascular cells. Although the prothrombinase complex can be assembled on monocytes and lymphocytes, it is not known why these cells can activate prothrombin specifically. These cells which have the capacity for prothrombin activator activity could also activate factor X; i.e. cells with factor X activation activity were able to convert prothrombin. These observations suggest that thrombin was generated via two procoagulant activities; factor X activation and subsequent prothrombinase complex formation on the surface of these cells. This mechanism may explain the various pathological states involving or resulting

  19. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  20. Effects of blast overpressure on neurons and glial cells in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna P; Shah, Alok S; Aperi, Brandy V; Budde, Matthew D; Pintar, Frank A; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N; Stemper, Brian D; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure.

  1. Systemic inflammation activates satellite glial cells in the mouse nodose ganglion and alters their functions.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Belzer, Vitali; Hanani, Menachem

    2015-06-23

    Satellite glial cell (SGCs) in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia are altered structurally and functionally under pathological conditions associated with chronic pain. These changes include reactive gliosis, augmented coupling by gap junctions, and increased responses to ATP via purinergic P2 receptors. Similar information for nodose ganglia (NG), which receive sensory inputs from internal organs via the vagus nerves, is missing. Here, we investigated changes in SGCs in mouse NG after the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which induces systemic inflammation. Using calcium imaging we found that SGCs in intact, freshly isolated NG are sensitive to ATP, acting largely via purinergic P2 receptors (mixed P2X and P2Y), with threshold at 0.1 μM. A single systemic injection of LPS (2.5 mg/kg) induced a 6-fold increase in the responses to ATP, largely by augmenting the sensitivity of P2X receptors. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that at 1-14 days post-LPS injection the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in SGCs was 2-3-fold greater than controls. The expression of pannexin 1 channels increased 2-fold at day 7 after LPS injection. Using intracellular labeling we examined dye coupling among SGCs around different neurons, and observed an over 2-fold higher incidence of dye coupling after the induction of inflammation. Incubating the ganglia with ATP increased dye coupling by acting on neuronal P2X receptors, suggesting a role for ATP in the LPS-induced changes. We conclude that inflammation induces prominent changes in SGCs of NG, which might have a role in vagal afferent functions, such as the inflammatory reflex. GLIA 2015.

  2. Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia: their possible contribution to inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Dublin, Pavel; Hanani, Menachem

    2007-07-01

    Neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are surrounded by an envelope of satellite glial cells (SGCs). Little is known about SGC physiology and their interactions with neurons. In this work, we investigated changes in mouse DRG neurons and SGC following the induction of inflammation in the hind paw by the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The electrophysiological properties of neurons were characterized by intracellular electrodes. Changes in coupling mediated by gap junctions between SGCs were monitored using intracellular injection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow. Pain was assessed with von Frey hairs. We found that two weeks after CFA injection there was a 38% decrease in the threshold for firing an action potential in DRG neurons, consistent with neuronal hyperexcitability. Injection of Lucifer yellow into SGCs revealed that, compared with controls, coupling by gap junctions among SGCs surrounding adjacent neurons increased 2.7-, 3.2-, and 2.5-fold one week, two weeks, and one month, respectively, after CFA injection. In SGCs enveloping neurons that project into the inflamed paw this effect was more enhanced (5.4-fold). Interneuronal coupling was augmented by up to 7% after CFA injection. Pain threshold in the injected paw decreased by 13%, 16%, and 11% compared with controls at one week, two weeks, and one month, respectively, after CFA injection. Intraperitoneal injection of the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone prevented the inflammation-induced decrease in pain threshold. The results show that augmented glial coupling is one of the major events occurring in DRG following inflammation. The elevation in pain threshold after carbenoxolone administration provides indirect support for the idea that augmented intercellular coupling might contribute to chronic pain.

  3. The search for true numbers of neurons and glial cells in the human brain: A review of 150 years of cell counting.

    PubMed

    von Bartheld, Christopher S; Bahney, Jami; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2016-12-15

    For half a century, the human brain was believed to contain about 100 billion neurons and one trillion glial cells, with a glia:neuron ratio of 10:1. A new counting method, the isotropic fractionator, has challenged the notion that glia outnumber neurons and revived a question that was widely thought to have been resolved. The recently validated isotropic fractionator demonstrates a glia:neuron ratio of less than 1:1 and a total number of less than 100 billion glial cells in the human brain. A survey of original evidence shows that histological data always supported a 1:1 ratio of glia to neurons in the entire human brain, and a range of 40-130 billion glial cells. We review how the claim of one trillion glial cells originated, was perpetuated, and eventually refuted. We compile how numbers of neurons and glial cells in the adult human brain were reported and we examine the reasons for an erroneous consensus about the relative abundance of glial cells in human brains that persisted for half a century. Our review includes a brief history of cell counting in human brains, types of counting methods that were and are employed, ranges of previous estimates, and the current status of knowledge about the number of cells. We also discuss implications and consequences of the new insights into true numbers of glial cells in the human brain, and the promise and potential impact of the newly validated isotropic fractionator for reliable quantification of glia and neurons in neurological and psychiatric diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3865-3895, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Microfluidic devices for cell cultivation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tehranirokh, Masoomeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Francis, Paul S.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technology provides precise, controlled-environment, cost-effective, compact, integrated, and high-throughput microsystems that are promising substitutes for conventional biological laboratory methods. In recent years, microfluidic cell culture devices have been used for applications such as tissue engineering, diagnostics, drug screening, immunology, cancer studies, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurite guidance. Microfluidic technology allows dynamic cell culture in microperfusion systems to deliver continuous nutrient supplies for long term cell culture. It offers many opportunities to mimic the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions of tissues by creating gradient concentrations of biochemical signals such as growth factors, chemokines, and hormones. Other applications of cell cultivation in microfluidic systems include high resolution cell patterning on a modified substrate with adhesive patterns and the reconstruction of complicated tissue architectures. In this review, recent advances in microfluidic platforms for cell culturing and proliferation, for both simple monolayer (2D) cell seeding processes and 3D configurations as accurate models of in vivo conditions, are examined. PMID:24273628

  5. Understanding the NG2 Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Amber R.; Lee, Jae K.

    2016-01-01

    NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, are located throughout the central nervous system and serve as a pool of progenitors to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. In response to spinal cord injury (SCI), NG2 cells increase their proliferation and differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. While astrocytes are typically associated with being the major cell type in the glial scar, many NG2 cells also accumulate within the glial scar but their function remains poorly understood. Similar to astrocytes, these cells hypertrophy, upregulate expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, inhibit axon regeneration, contribute to the glial-fibrotic scar border, and some even differentiate into astrocytes. Whether NG2 cells also have a role in other astrocyte functions, such as preventing the spread of infiltrating leukocytes and expression of inflammatory cytokines, is not yet known. Thus, NG2 cells are not only important for remyelination after SCI but are also a major component of the glial scar with functions that overlap with astrocytes in this region. In this review, we describe the signaling pathways important for the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 cells, as well as the role of NG2 cells in scar formation and tissue repair. PMID:27895617

  6. Neural Crest Cells Contribute an Astrocyte-like Glial Population to the Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Barlow-Anacker, Amanda J.; Fu, Ming; Erickson, Christopher S.; Bertocchini, Federica; Gosain, Ankush

    2017-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are multi-potent cells of ectodermal origin that colonize diverse organs, including the gastrointestinal tract to form the enteric nervous system (ENS) and hematopoietic organs (bone marrow, thymus) where they participate in lymphocyte trafficking. Recent studies have implicated the spleen as an anatomic site for integration of inflammatory signals from the intestine with efferent neural inputs. We have previously observed alterations in splenic lymphocyte subsets in animals with defective migration of NCC that model Hirschsprung’s disease, leading us to hypothesize that there may be a direct cellular contribution of NCC to the spleen. Here, we demonstrate that NCC colonize the spleen during embryogenesis and persist into adulthood. Splenic NCC display markers indicating a glial lineage and are arranged anatomically adjacent to blood vessels, pericytes and nerves, suggesting an astrocyte-like phenotype. Finally, we identify similar neural-crest derived cells in both the avian and non-human primate spleen, showing evolutionary conservation of these cells. PMID:28349968

  7. Phospholipase C-beta3 mediates the thrombin-induced Ca2+ response in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jong-Ik; Shin, Kum-Joo; Oh, Yong-Seok; Choi, Jung-Woong; Lee, Zee-Won; Kim, Daesoo; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Shin, Hee-Sup; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2005-06-30

    Phospholipase C-beta (PLC-beta) hydrolyses phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and generates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in response to activation of various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Using glial cells from knock-out mice lacking either PLC-beta1 [PLC-beta1 (-/-)] or PLC-beta3 [PLC-beta3 (-/-)], we examined which isotype of PLC-beta participated in the cellular signaling events triggered by thrombin. Generation of inositol phosphates (IPs) was enhanced by thrombin in PLC-beta1 (-/-) cells, but was negligible in PLC-beta3 (-/-) cells. Expression of PLC-beta3 in PLC-beta3 (-/-) cells resulted in an increase in pertussis toxin (PTx)-sensitive IPs in response to thrombin as well as to PAR1-specific peptide, while expression of PLC-beta1 in PLC-beta1 (-/-) cells did not have any effect on IP generation. The thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i increase was delayed and attenuated in PLC-beta3 (-/-) cells, but normal in PLC-beta1 (-/-) cells. Pertussis toxin evoked a delayed [Ca2+]i increase in PLC-beta3 (-/-) cells as well as in PLC-beta1 (-/-) cells. These results suggest that activation of PLC-beta3 by pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins is responsible for the transient [Ca2+]i increase in response to thrombin, whereas the delayed [Ca2+]i increase may be due to activation of some other PLC, such as PLC-beta4, acting via PTx-insensitive G proteins.

  8. Aging is associated with an increase in dye coupling and in gap junction number in satellite glial cells of murine dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, T Y; Hanani, M; Ledda, M; De Palo, S; Pannese, E

    2006-01-01

    Glial cells in both central and peripheral nervous systems are connected by gap junctions, which allow electrical and metabolic coupling between them. In spite of the great current interest in aging of the nervous system, the effect of aging on glial cell coupling received little attention. We examined coupling between satellite glial cells in murine dorsal root ganglia using the dye coupling technique and electron microscopy. We studied mice at ages of postnatal 90-730 days. Dye coupling incidence between satellite glial cells associated with a single neuron increased from 24.2% at postnatal day 90 to 50.5% at postnatal day 730. Dye coupling between satellite glial cells that are in contact with two or more neurons increased from 2.7% at postnatal day 90 to 18.6% at postnatal day 730 (P<0.05). Examination of the ganglia with the electron microscope showed that the number of gap junctions per 100 microm2 of surface area of satellite glial cells increased from 0.22 at postnatal day 90 to 1.56 at postnatal day 730 (P<0.01). The mean length of individual gap junctions did not change with age. These results provide strong evidence for an increase of functional coupling between satellite glial cells during life. This increase is apparently due to an increase in the total area of the system of gap junctions connecting these cells.

  9. Growth factors from tumor microenvironment possibly promote the proliferation of glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, JingJing; Niu, Rui; Huang, Wenhui; Zhou, Mengliang; Shi, Jixing; Zhang, Luyong; Liao, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiform is a lethal brain glial tumor characterized by low survival and high recurrence, partially attributed to the glioblastoma stem cells according to recent researches. Microenvironment or niche in tumor tissue is believed to provide essential support for the aberrant growth of tumor stem cells. In order to explore the effect of growth factors in tumor microenvironment on glioblastoma stem cells behavior, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GDSCs) were isolated from adult human glioblastoma specimen with antibody against surface marker CD133 and were co-cultured with various tumor cells including U87MG cells, unsorted glioblastoma tumor cells, CD133(-) cells and normal rat primary astrocytes. Results suggested that tumor cells could promote GDSCs proliferation while non-tumor cells could not, and several growth factors were exclusively detected in the co-culture system with tumor cells. It was concluded that growth factors derived from tumor microenvironment possibly contributed to the uncontrolled proliferation of GDSCs.

  10. Morphology and intercellular communication in glial cells of intramural ganglia from the guinea-pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Hanani, M; Maudlej, N; Härtig, W

    1999-04-16

    Neurons in most peripheral ganglia are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SCs), but these cells have so far received little attention. We used immunohistochemistry and intracellular injections of tracers to characterize SCs in the intramural ganglia of the guinea-pig urinary bladder, which are part of the parasympathetic system. Intracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) revealed two morphological types: cells that surrounded neurons and are SCs proper, and bipolar cells with processes that projected into the nerve fiber bundles connecting the ganglia. SCs were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase (GS) and S100beta and immunonegative for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Injections of Lucifer yellow (LY) or biocytin (molecules known to cross gap junctions) into single SCs showed that these cells have a very low degree of intercellular coupling. A mean of 0.31 and 0.71 cells were coupled to the injected cells, using LY and biocytin, respectively. It appears that SCs in the bladder ganglia are distinct from central and enteric glial cells in the small degree of their coupling and in the absence of GFAP immunostaining.

  11. Natural and lesion-induced decrease in cell proliferation in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body during hearing development.

    PubMed

    Saliu, Aminat; Adise, Shana; Xian, Sandy; Kudelska, Kamila; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián

    2014-04-01

    The functional interactions between neurons and glial cells that are important for nervous system function are presumably established during development from the activity of progenitor cells. In this study we examined proliferation of progenitor cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) located in the rat auditory brainstem. We performed DNA synthesis labeling experiments to demonstrate changes in cell proliferation activity during postnatal stages of development. An increase in cell proliferation correlated with MNTB growth and the presence of S100β-positive astrocytes among MNTB neurons. In additional experiments we analyzed the fate of newly born cells. At perinatal ages, newly born cells colabeled with the astrocyte marker S100β in higher numbers than when cells were generated at postnatal day 6. Furthermore, we identified newly born cells that were colabeled with caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and performed comparative experiments to demonstrate that there is a natural decrease in cell proliferation activity during postnatal development in rats, mice, gerbils, and ferrets. Lastly, we found that there is a stronger decrease in MNTB cell proliferation after performing bilateral lesions of the auditory periphery in rats. Altogether, these results identify important stages in the development of astrocytes in the MNTB and provide evidence that the proliferative activity of the progenitor cells is developmentally regulated. We propose that the developmental reduction in cell proliferation may reflect coordinated signaling between the auditory brainstem and the auditory periphery.

  12. Transcriptional analysis of glial cell differentiation in the postnatal murine spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Lehmbecker, Annika; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2015-05-01

    Postnatal murine spinal cord represents a good model system to study mammalian central nervous system myelination in vivo as a basis for further studies in demyelinating diseases. Transcriptional changes were analyzed in SJL/J mice on postnatal day 0, 14, 49 and 231 (P0, P14, P49, P231) employing Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Arrays. Additionally, marker gene signatures for astrocyte and oligodendrocyte lineage-stages were defined to study their gene expression in more detail. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the abundance of commonly used glial cell markers. 6092 differentially regulated genes (DEGs) were identified. The up-regulated DEGs at P14, P49 and P231 compared to P0 exhibited significantly enriched associations to gene ontology terms such as myelination and lipid metabolic transport and down-regulated DEGs to neurogenesis and axonogenesis. Expression values of marker gene signatures for neural stem cells, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, and developing astrocytes were constantly decreasing, whereas myelinating oligodendrocyte and mature astrocyte markers showed a steady increase. Molecular findings were substantiated by immunohistochemical observations. The transcriptional changes observed are an important reference for future analysis of degenerative and inflammatory conditions in the spinal cord.

  13. DNA amplification in glial cells of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: An image analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ariza, A.; Mate, J.L.; Serrano, S.

    1996-06-01

    JC virus (JCV), the agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), has been shown by both immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry to be associated with p53 protein stabilization. Since stabilization/inactivation of p53 is associated with the development of genomic instability, abnormal cell DNA contents are to be expected in JCV-infected cells of PML. This work explores that possibility by image analysis evaluation of DNA content in PML-infected oligodendrocytes and bizarre astrocytes. Brain paraffin sections of PML lesions from five adults male patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were treated with the Feulgen technique to obtain a stochiometric staining of DNA and analyzed with a microscope image processor. Inclusion-bearing oligodendrocytes exhibited near tetraploid DNA indices in each of the five cases, whereas atypical astrocytes were in the hypertetraploid range in all cases and were polyploid in four instances. This evidence of DNA amplification in PML glial cells is congruent with the functional abolition of p53 protein in association with JCV infection and lends further support to the role of p53 as a keeper of diploid status and guardian of genomic stability. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene therapy ameliorates chronic hyperprolactinemia in senile rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, G R; Sosa, Y E; Bellini, M J; Carri, N G; Rodriguez, S S; Bohn, M C; Goya, R G

    2010-05-19

    Progressive dysfunction of hypothalamic tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons during normal aging is associated in the female rat with chronic hyperprolactinemia. We assessed the effectiveness of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene therapy to restore TIDA neuron function in senile female rats and reverse their chronic hyperprolactinemia. Young (2.5 months) and senile (29 months) rats received a bilateral intrahypothalamic injection (10(10) pfu) of either an adenoviral vector expressing the gene for beta-galactosidase; (Y-betagal and S-betagal, respectively) or a vector expressing rat GDNF (Y-GDNF and S-GDNF, respectively). Transgenic GDNF levels in supernatants of GDNF adenovector-transduced N2a neuronal cell cultures were 25+/-4 ng/ml, as determined by bioassay. In the rats, serum prolactin (PRL) was measured at regular intervals. On day 17 animals were sacrificed and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive cells counted in the arcuate-periventricular hypothalamic region. The S-GDNF but not the S-betagal rats, showed a significant reduction in body weight. The chronic hyperprolactinemia of the senile females was significantly ameliorated in the S-GDNF rats (P<0.05) but not in the S-betagal rats. Neither age nor GDNF induced significant changes in the number of NeuN and TH neurons. We conclude that transgenic GDNF ameliorates chronic hyperprolactinemia in aging female rats, probably by restoring TIDA neuron function.

  15. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H. C.; Miranda, Moysés S.; Arrifano, Gabriela P. F.; Souza-Monteiro, José R.; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A.; Maia, Cristiane S. F.; Macchi, Barbarella M.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  16. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Miranda, Moysés S; Arrifano, Gabriela P F; Souza-Monteiro, José R; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A; Maia, Cristiane S F; Macchi, Barbarella M; do Nascimento, José Luiz M

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  17. Differential effects of glucocorticoids and gonadal steroids on glutathione levels in neuronal and glial cell systems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A J; Krieg, J -C; Vedder, H

    2002-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the short- and long-term effects of glucocorticoids [corticosterone (CORT), dexamethasone (DEX), 6-methylprednisolone (6-MP)] and gonadal steroids [17beta-estradiol (E(2)), progesterone (PROG), testosterone (TEST)] on the levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in different cell systems of the CNS (neuronal hippocampal HT22 cells, primary hippocampal and neocortical brain cells, and C(6) glioma cells). In HT22 cells, steroids exerted mainly long-term effects. Significant increases of GSH levels were detectable after a 24 hr treatment with 10(-7) M of DEX (122% +/- 5%), 6-MP (208% +/- 32%), E(2) (134% +/- 10%), and TEST (155% +/- 17%). A significant decrease occurred after incubation with PROG for 24 hr (79% +/- 9%). In primary hippocampal cultures, a 24 hr treatment with DEX (140% +/- 8%), E(2) (123% +/- 6%), and PROG (118% +/- 5%) led to significant increases of the GSH levels, whereas, in neocortical primary cultures, only an incubation with E(2) increased GSH (149% +/- 8%). In C(6) cells, hormone treatment led to both significant short-term (1 hr: CORT 114% +/- 5%, DEX 90% +/- 3%, E(2) 88% +/- 3%; 3 hr: DEX 115% +/- 5%, E(2) 122% +/- 6%, TEST 78% +/- 4%) and significant long-term (24 hr: CORT 74% +/- 4%, 6-MP 84% +/- 5%, E(2) 115% +/- 6%, PROG 91% +/- 4%, TEST 116% +/- 5%) effects. In summary, we were able to demonstrate differential effects of steroids on GSH levels in different cellular CNS models, showing an important influence of steroids and especially E(2) on antioxidative cellular functions in neuronal and glial cells.

  18. Müller glial cells induce stem cell properties in retinal progenitors in vitro and promote their further differentiation into photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Simón, María V; De Genaro, Pablo; Abrahan, Carolina E; de los Santos, Beatriz; Rotstein, Nora P; Politi, Luis E

    2012-02-01

    Using stem cells to replace lost neurons is a promising strategy for treating retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Among their multiple functions, Müller glial cells are retina stem cells, with a robust regenerative potential in lower vertebrates, which is much more restricted in mammals. In rodents, most retina progenitors exit the cell cycle immediately after birth, differentiate as neurons, and then cannot reenter the cell cycle. Here we demonstrate that, in mixed cultures with Müller glial cells, rat retina progenitor cells expressed stem cell properties, maintained their proliferative potential, and were able to preserve these properties and remain mitotically active after several consecutive passages. Notably, these progenitors retained the capacity to differentiate as photoreceptors, even after successive reseedings. Müller glial cells markedly stimulated differentiation of retina progenitors; these cells initially expressed Crx and then developed as mature photoreceptors that expressed characteristic markers, such as opsin and peripherin. Moreover, they were light responsive, insofar as they decreased their cGMP levels when exposed to light, and they also showed high-affinity glutamate uptake, a characteristic of mature photoreceptors. Our present findings indicate that, in addition to giving rise to new photoreceptors, Müller glial cells might instruct a pool of undifferentiated cells to develop and preserve stem cell characteristics, even after successive reseedings, and then stimulate their differentiation as functional photoreceptors. This complementary mechanism might contribute to enlarge the limited regenerative capacity of mammalian Müller cells.

  19. Immunolocalization of membrane skeletal protein, 4.1G, in enteric glial cells in the mouse large intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaorong; Terada, Nobuo; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Saitoh, Sei; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Shinichi

    2011-01-20

    4.1 family proteins are membrane skeletal proteins that interact with spectrin-actin networks and intramembraneous proteins. We reported that one of them, 4.1G, was immunolocalized in myelinated nerve fibers of the mouse peripheral nervous system, especially along cell membranes of paranodes and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in Schwann cells. In this study, to examine 4.1G's appearance in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, we focused on the enteric nervous system in mouse large intestines. In intestinal tissues prepared by an "in vivo cryotechnique" followed by freeze-substitution fixation, 4.1G was immunolocalized in Auerbach's myenteric plexus and connecting nerve fiber networks. Its immunostaining was mostly colocalized with glial fibrillar acidic protein, a marker of enteric glial cells, but not with c-Kit, a marker of interstitial cells of Cajal. Using whole-mount preparation after splitting inner and outer muscle layers, the nerve fiber networks including the plexus were clearly detected by the 4.1G immunostaining. By conventional pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy, 4.1G was detected along cell membranes of enteric glial cells and their processes surrounding axons. These indicate that 4.1G may have some roles in adhesion and/or signal transduction in unmylinated PNS nerve fibers.

  20. Modulation of the expression of integrins on glial cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. A central role for TNF-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Previtali, S. C.; Archelos, J. J.; Hartung, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins comprise a group of adhesion receptors involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Evidence is accumulating that integrins expressed on mononuclear cells play a central role in the induction of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system. The effects of integrins on glial cell behavior, myelination, and angiogenesis suggest that they may also have a role in resolving inflammation in the nervous system and in promoting tissue repair. We investigated the temporospatial expression of integrins in the rat central nervous system during the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. A higher expression of alpha v- and beta 4-integrin subunits in astrocytes and alpha 2 integrin in oligodendrocytes was observed in active lesions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, in comparison with controls. Proinflammatory cytokines, primarily TNF-alpha, also enhanced alpha v, beta 4, and alpha 2 expression in purified glial cells ex vivo. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of some integrin subunits was modulated in the cerebral vasculature during inflammation. Our results suggest an active role for glial and vascular integrins in the regulation of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system, opening an avenue for new potential immunotherapies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 9 PMID:9358769

  1. The autophagic- lysosomal pathway determines the fate of glial cells under manganese- induced oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Pomilio, C; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) overexposure is frequently associated with the development of a neurodegenerative disorder known as Manganism. The Mn-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes cellular damage, finally leading to apoptotic cell death in rat astrocytoma C6 cells. In this scenario, the autophagic pathway could play an important role in preventing cytotoxicity. In the present study, we found that Mn induced an increase in the amount and total volume of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), a process usually related to the activation of the autophagic pathway. Particularly, the generation of enlarged AVOs was a ROS- dependent event. In this report we demonstrated for the first time that Mn induces autophagy in glial cells. This conclusion emerged from the results obtained employing a battery of autophagy markers: a) the increase in LC3-II expression levels, b) the formation of autophagic vesicles labeled with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or LC3 and, c) the increase in Beclin 1/ Bcl-2 and Beclin 1/ Bcl-X(L) ratio. Autophagy inhibition employing 3-MA and mAtg5(K130R) resulted in decreased cell viability indicating that this event plays a protective role in Mn- induced cell death. In addition, mitophagy was demonstrated by an increase in LC3 and TOM-20 colocalization. On the other hand, we proposed the occurrence of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) based in the fact that cathepsins B and D activities are essential for cell death. Both cathepsin B inhibitor (Ca-074 Me) or cathepsin D inhibitor (Pepstatin A) completely prevented Mn- induced cytotoxicity. In addition, low dose of Bafilomycin A1 showed a similar effect, a finding that adds evidence about the lysosomal role in Mn cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that Mn induces injury and alters LC3 expression levels in rat striatal astrocytes. In summary, our results demonstrated that autophagy is activated to counteract the harmful effect caused by Mn. These data is valuable to

  2. Aging of myelinating glial cells predominantly affects lipid metabolism and immune response pathways.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Valérie; Csárdi, Gábor; de Preux-Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Bergmann, Sven; Chrast, Roman

    2012-05-01

    Both the central and the peripheral nervous systems are prone to multiple age-dependent neurological deficits, often attributed to still unknown alterations in the function of myelinating glia. To uncover the biological processes affected in glial cells by aging, we analyzed gene expression of the Schwann cell-rich mouse sciatic nerve at 17 time points throughout life, from day of birth until senescence. By combining these data with the gene expression data of myelin mouse mutants carrying deletions of either Pmp22, SCAP, or Lpin1, we found that the majority of age-related transcripts were also affected in myelin mutants (54.4%) and were regulated during PNS development (59.5%), indicating a high level of overlap in implicated molecular pathways. The expression profiles in aging copied the direction of transcriptional changes observed in neuropathy models; however, they had the opposite direction when compared with PNS development. The most significantly altered biological processes in aging involved the inflammatory/immune response and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, both these pathways were comparably changed in the aging optic nerve, suggesting that similar biological processes are affected in aging of glia-rich parts of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Our comprehensive comparison of gene expression in three distinct biological conditions including development, aging, and myelin disease thus revealed a previously unanticipated relationship among themselves and identified lipid metabolism and inflammatory/immune response pathways as potential therapeutical targets to prevent or delay so far incurable age-related and inherited forms of neuropathies.

  3. The Stochastic Theory of Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bronk, Burt V.; Dienes, G. J.; Paskin, Arthur

    1968-01-01

    A stochastic theory of cell kinetics has been developed based on a realistic model of cell proliferation. A characteristic transit time, t̄i, has been assigned to each of the four states (G1, S, G2, M) of the cell cycle. The actual transit time, ti, for any cell is represented by a distribution around t̄i with a variance σi2. Analytic and computer formulations have been used to describe the time development of such characteristics as age distribution, labeling experiments, and response to perturbations of the system by, for example, irradiation and temperature. The decay of synchrony is analyzed in detail and is shown to proceed as a damped wave. From the first few peaks of the synchrony decay one can obtain the distribution function for the cell cycle time. The later peaks decay exponentially with a characteristic decay constant, λ, which depends only on the average cell-cycle time, T̄, and the associated variance. It is shown that the system, upon any sudden disturbance, approaches new “equilibrium” proliferation characteristics via damped periodic transients, the damping being characterized by λ. Thus, the response time of the system, T̄/λ, is as basic a parameter of the system as the cell-cycle time. PMID:5696217

  4. Mitochondrial Regulation of Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Elguero, María Eugenia; Poderoso, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic mitochondria resulted from symbiotic incorporation of α-proteobacteria into ancient archaea species. During evolution, mitochondria lost most of the prokaryotic bacterial genes and only conserved a small fraction including those encoding 13 proteins of the respiratory chain. In this process, many functions were transferred to the host cells, but mitochondria gained a central role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in the modulation of metabolism; accordingly, defective organelles contribute to cell transformation and cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most cell and transcriptional effects of mitochondria depend on the modulation of respiratory rate and on the production of hydrogen peroxide released into the cytosol. The mitochondrial oxidative rate has to remain depressed for cell proliferation; even in the presence of O2, energy is preferentially obtained from increased glycolysis (Warburg effect). In response to stress signals, traffic of pro- and antiapoptotic mitochondrial proteins in the intermembrane space (B-cell lymphoma-extra large, Bcl-2-associated death promoter, Bcl-2 associated X-protein and cytochrome c) is modulated by the redox condition determined by mitochondrial O2 utilization and mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism. In this article, we highlight the traffic of the different canonical signaling pathways to mitochondria and the contributions of organelles to redox regulation of kinases. Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the mitochondrial population in cell cycle and apoptosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1150–1180. PMID:21967640

  5. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  6. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  7. High-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in cultured glial and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Balcar, V J; Mark, J; Borg, J; Mandel, P

    1979-06-01

    Both glial and neuronal cells maintained in primary culture were found to accumulate [3H]GABA by an efficient "high-affinity" uptake system (apparent Km = 9 muM, Vmax = 0.018 and 0.584 nmol/mg/min, respectively) which required sodium ions and was inhibited by 1 mM ouabain. Strychnine and parachloromercuriphenylsulfonate (pCS) (both at 1mM) also strongly inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, but metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, and malonate) were without effect. Only three structural analogs of GABA (nipecotate, beta-alanine, and 2,4-diaminobutyrate) inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, while several other compounds with structural similarities to GABA (e.g. glycine, L-proline, and taurine) did not interact with the system. The kinetic studies indicated presence of a second uptake (Km = 92 muM, Vmax = 0.124 nmol/mg/min) in the primary cultures containing predominantly glioblasts. On the other hand, only one of the neuronal cell lines transformed by simian virus SV40 appeared to accumulate [3H]GABA against a concentration gradient. Apparent Km of this uptake was relatively high (819 muM), and it was only weakly inhibited by 1 mM ouabain and 1 mM pCS. The structural specificity also differed from that of the uptake observed in the primary cultures. Significantly, non of the nontransformed continuous cell lines of either tumoral (glioma, C6; neuroblastoma, M1; M1NN) or normal (NN;I6) origin actively accumulated [3H]GABA. It is suggested that for the neurochemical studies related to GABA and requiring homogeneous cell populations, the primary cultures offer a better experimental model than the continuous cell lines.

  8. Mechanisms underlying the protective effects of myricetin and quercetin following oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake in glial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C6 glial cells were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in cell culture for 5 hr and cell swelling was determined 90 min after the end of OGD. The OGD-induced increase in swelling was significantly blocked by the two flavonoids studied, quercetin and myricetin. The OGD-induced increase in ...

  9. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  10. Pulsed magnetic field promotes proliferation and neurotrophic genes expression in Schwann cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Sun, Zhen; Ma, Teng; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most classic supportive cells, Schwann cells (SCs) have been considered as potential candidates for nerve regeneration. However, SCs cultured in vitro are found with attenuated biological activities, which limits their application. Pulsed magnetic field (PMF) has been demonstrated to be safe and efficient to regulate several cells activities. However, it is still unclear the effect of PMF on proliferation and expression of neurotrophic factors in SCs. Therefore, the present study was designed to examine such possible effects. The tolerance of SCs to PMF was examined by flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The proliferation of cells was detected by an EdU labeling assay and a Prestoblue assay. The expression and secretion of neurotrophic factors in SCs was assayed by RT-PCR and ELISA. We found that 2.0 mT was the optimal intensity that caused relatively little apoptosis with profound proliferation in SCs. The gene expression and protein level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were up-regulated following PMF stimulation, additionally, the gene expression and protein level of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) was not enhanced by PMF. Our results suggested that PMF could improve SC proliferation and biological function, which might shed a light on the potential utilization of PMF in nerve regeneration via SC activation. PMID:26045741

  11. Biofilms’ Role in Planktonic Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Elanna; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Aznaveh, Nahid B.; Greener, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    The detachment of single cells from biofilms is an intrinsic part of this surface-associated mode of bacterial existence. Pseudomonas sp. strain CT07gfp biofilms, cultivated in microfluidic channels under continuous flow conditions, were subjected to a range of liquid shear stresses (9.42 mPa to 320 mPa). The number of detached planktonic cells was quantified from the effluent at 24-h intervals, while average biofilm thickness and biofilm surface area were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis. Biofilm accumulation proceeded at the highest applied shear stress, while similar rates of planktonic cell detachment was maintained for biofilms of the same age subjected to the range of average shear rates. The conventional view of liquid-mediated shear leading to the passive erosion of single cells from the biofilm surface, disregards the active contribution of attached cell metabolism and growth to the observed detachment rates. As a complement to the conventional conceptual biofilm models, the existence of a biofilm surface-associated zone of planktonic cell proliferation is proposed to highlight the need to expand the traditional perception of biofilms as promoting microbial survival, to include the potential of biofilms to contribute to microbial proliferation. PMID:24201127

  12. Differentiation of human CD146-positive endometrial stem cells to adipogenic-, osteogenic-, neural progenitor-, and glial-like cells.

    PubMed

    Fayazi, Mehri; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Ziaei, Saeideh

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential differentiation of CD146(+) endometrial stem cells to several lineages. Endometrial stromal cells were cultured using Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/Hams F-12 (DMEM/F-12) and were passaged every 7-10 d when cultures reached 80-100% of confluency. The immunophenotypes of single endometrial cells were analyzed using flow cytometry at fourth passage. Then the CD146(+) cells were sorted using magnetic-activated cell sorting, and they were cultured and analyzed for in vitro differentiation to several lineages. Detection of adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells were assessed by oil red O and alizarin red staining, respectively. For detection of neural progenitor and oligodendrocyte-like cells, the cells were immunostained by neurofilament 68 and oligo2, respectively. The rates of CD90, CD105, CD146, CD31, CD34, and CD9 of cultured endometrial cells were 94.98 ± 3%, 95.77 ± 2.5%, 27.61 ± 2%, 0.79 ± 0.05%, 1.43 ± 0.1%, and 1.01 ± 0.06%, respectively. CD146(+) cells were isolated to high purity. CD146(+)-differentiated cells to adipogenic cell with typical lipid-rich vacuoles and osteogenic cells were observed and confirmed their mesenchymal origin. They also differentiated into neural progenitor and glial differentiation by retinoic acid, basic fibroblast growth factor, and epidermal growth factor signaling molecules, respectively, and confirmed by neurofilament 68 and oligo2 immunocytochemistry. The efficiency of differentiation to neural progenitor and oligodendrocyte-like cells was 90 ± 3.4% and 79 ± 2.8%, respectively. This study showed that CD146(+) cells from human endometrium after in vitro cultivation can differentiate into adipogenic-, osteogenic-, neural progenitor-, and glial-like cells. They may provide available alternative source of stem cells for future cell-based therapies and tissue engineering applications.

  13. Enteric glia modulate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation through 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Ngohou, Kalyane; Mahé, Maxime M; Aubert, Philippe; Abdo, Hind; Boni, Sébastien; Bourreille, Arnaud; Denis, Marc G; Lardeux, Bernard; Neunlist, Michel; Masson, Damien

    2010-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) and its major component, enteric glial cells (EGCs), have recently been identified as a major regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier functions. Indeed, EGCs inhibit intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and increase barrier resistance and IEC adhesion via the release of EGC-derived soluble factors. Interestingly, EGC regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier functions is reminiscent of previously reported peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-dependent functional effects. In this context, the present study aimed at identifying whether EGC could synthesize and release the main PPARγ ligand, 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), and regulate IEC functions such as proliferation and differentiation via a PPARγ dependent pathway. First, we demonstrated that the lipocalin but not the haematopoetic form for prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), the enzyme responsible of 15dPGJ2 synthesis, was expressed in EGCs of the human submucosal plexus and of the subepithelium, as well as in rat primary culture of ENS and EGC lines. Next, 15dPGJ2 was identified in EGC supernatants of various EGC lines. 15dPGJ2 reproduced EGC inhibitory effects upon IEC proliferation, and inhibition of lipocalin PGDS expression by shRNA abrogated these effects. Furthermore, EGCs induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ in IEC, and both EGC and 15dPGJ2 effects upon IEC proliferation were prevented by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Finally, EGC induced differentiation-related gene expression in IEC through a PPARγ-dependent pathway. Our results identified 15dPGJ2 as a novel glial-derived mediator involved in the control of IEC proliferation/differentiation through activation of PPARγ. They also suggest that alterations of glial PGDS expression may modify intestinal epithelial barrier functions and be involved in the development of pathologies such as cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:20478974

  14. The effects of axotomy on neurons and satellite glial cells in mouse trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Cherkas, Pavel S; Huang, Tian-Ying; Pannicke, Thomas; Tal, Michael; Reichenbach, Andreas; Hanani, Menachem

    2004-07-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves induces ectopic firing in sensory neurons, which can contribute to neuropathic pain. As most of the information on this topic is on dorsal root ganglia we decided to examine the influence of infra-orbital nerve section on cells of murine trigeminal ganglia. We characterized the electrophysiological properties of neurons with intracellular electrodes. Changes in the coupling of satellite glial cells (SGCs) were monitored by intracelluar injection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow. Electrophysiology of SGCs was studied with the patch-clamp technique. Six to eight days after axotomy, the percentage of neurons that fire spontaneously increased from 1.6 to 12.8%, the membrane depolarized from -51.1 to -45.5 mV, the percentage of cells with spontaneous potential oscillations increased from 19 to 37%, the membrane input resistance decreased from 44.4 to 39.5 MOmega, and the threshold for firing an action potential decreased from 0.61 to 0.42 nA. These changes are consistent with increased neuronal excitability. SGCs were mutually coupled around a given neuron in 21% of the cases, and to SGCs around neighboring neurons in only 4.8% of the cases. After axotomy these values increased to 37.1 and 25.8%, respectively. After axotomy the membrane resistance of SGCs decreased from 101 MOmega in controls to 40 MOmega, possibly due to increased coupling among these cells. We conclude that axotomy affects both neurons and SGCs in the trigeminal ganglion. The increased neuronal excitability and ectopic firing may play a major role in neuropathic pain.

  15. Calcium responses mediated by type 2 IP3-receptors are required for osmotic volume regulation of retinal glial cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Stephan; Wurm, Antje; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Chen, Ju; Bringmann, Andreas

    2009-06-26

    Prevention of osmotic swelling of retinal glial (Müller) cells is required to avoid detrimental decreases in the extracellular space volume during intense neuronal activity. Here, we show that glial cells in slices of the wildtype mouse retina maintain the volume of their somata constant up to approximately 4 min of perfusion with a hypoosmolar solution. However, calcium chelation with BAPTA/AM induced a rapid swelling of glial cell bodies. In glial cells of retinas from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-receptor type 2-deficient (IP(3)R2(-/-)) mice, hypotonic conditions caused swelling of the cell bodies without delay. Exogenous ATP (acting at P2Y(1) receptors) prevented the swelling of glial cells in retinal slices from wildtype but not from IP(3)R2(-/-) mice. Müller cells from IP(3)R2(-/-) mice displayed a strongly reduced amplitude of the ATP-evoked calcium responses as compared to cells from wildtype mice. It is concluded that endogenous calcium signaling mediated by IP(3)R2 is required for the osmotic volume regulation of retinal glial cells.

  16. Social Behavior in Medulloblastoma: Functional Analysis of Tumor-Supporting Glial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    screened through a panel of candidate growth factors, including EGF, PDGFa, PDGFb, NT-3, IGF1, HGF , KitL and FGF. We reasoned that any suitable candidate...would make it an autocrine rather than niche factor. Based on our qRT-PCR results from 5 tumor samples, we found that IGF1, HGF , and PDGFa fit the...increased proliferation and decreased cell death and differentation. 6 (comparable to the level in normal cerebellum). To a lesser extent, HGF also

  17. Brain-derived and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor fusion protein immobilization to laminin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Xu, Jiafeng; Chen, Xinwei; Ying, Xinjiang; Dong, Pin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve often causes hoarseness, dyspnea, dysphagia, and sometimes asphyxia due to vocal cord paralysis which result in a reduction of quality of life. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) play critical roles in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, methods for efficiently delivering these molecules are lacking, which limits their use in clinical applications. The present study reports an effective strategy for targeting BDNF and GDNF to laminin by fusing the N-terminal domains of these molecules with agrin (NtA). More specifically, laminin-binding efficacy was assessed and sustained release assays of the delivery of BDNF or GDNF fused with NtA (LBD-BDNF or LBD-GDNF) to laminin were conducted in vitro. In addition, the bioactivity of LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF on laminin in vitro was investigated. LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF were each able to specifically bind to laminin and maintain their activity in vitro. Moreover, neurotrophic factors with NtA retained higher concentrations and bioactivity levels compared with those without NtA. The ratio of LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF that produced optimal effects was 4:6. BDNF and GDNF fused with NtA were effective in specifically binding to laminin. As laminin is a major component of the extracellular matrix, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF may prove useful in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:28123487

  18. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-09-13

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated.

  19. Global Effects Of Early Life Stress On Neurons And Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zulma, Dueñas; Carlos, Caicedo-Mera Juan; Luz, Torner

    2017-02-24

    Early life stress is considered a risk factor for the development of many diseases in both adolescence and adulthood. It has been reported that chronic stress (for instance, due to maternal separation during breast feeding), causes damage to the central nervous system at the level of neurons and glial cells, which are reflected in behavioral disturbances and susceptibility to the development of primarily emotional psychopathology. The aim of this review is to identify the overall state of the scientific literature that relates the information about the consequences of early life stress, contextualizing the mechanisms that may be altered, the behavioral consequences that have been studied and the possible dimorphic effects and its causes. At the end a short overview of pharmacological treatments that have been proposed to reduce the behavioral and neuroendocrine consequences caused by early life stress is presented. This review pretends to integrate general but relevant information based primarily on studies in animal models, which allow the experimental approach and the study of the mechanisms involved. A series of questions remains for reflection and surely will be answered in the near future.

  20. Guiding migration of transplanted glial progenitor cells in the injured spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao-bing; Jin, Ying; Haas, Christopher; Yao, Lihua; Hayakawa, Kazuo; Wang, Yue; Wang, Chunlei; Fischer, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) is a promising strategy for generating a supportive environment for axon growth in the injured spinal cord. Here we explored the possibility of producing a migratory stream of GRPs via directional cues to create a supportive pathway for axon regeneration. We found that the axon growth inhibitor chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) strongly inhibited the adhesion and migration of GRPs, an effect that could be modulated by the adhesion molecule laminin. Digesting glycosaminoglycan side chains of CSPG with chondroitinase improved GRP migration on stripes of CSPG printed on cover glass, although GRPs were still responsive to the remaining repulsive signals of CSPG. Of all factors tested, the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) had the most significant effect in promoting the migration of cultured GRPs. When GRPs were transplanted into either normal spinal cord of adult rats or the injury site in a dorsal column hemisection model of spinal cord injury, a population of transplanted cells migrated toward the region that was injected with the lentivirus expressing chondroitinase or bFGF. These findings suggest that removing CSPG-mediated inhibition, in combination with guidance by attractive factors, can be a promising strategy to produce a migratory stream of supportive GRPs. PMID:26971438

  1. Sonic Hedgehog modulates EGFR dependent proliferation of neural stem cells during late mouse embryogenesis through EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Reinchisi, Gisela; Parada, Margarita; Lois, Pablo; Oyanadel, Claudia; Shaughnessy, Ronan; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Palma, Verónica

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh/GLI) and EGFR signaling pathways modulate Neural Stem Cell (NSC) proliferation. How these signals cooperate is therefore critical for understanding normal brain development and function. Here we report a novel acute effect of Shh signaling on EGFR function. We show that during late neocortex development, Shh mediates the activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway in Radial Glial cells (RGC) through EGFR transactivation. This process is dependent on metalloprotease activity and accounts for almost 50% of the EGFR-dependent mitogenic response of late NSCs. Furthermore, in HeLa cancer cells, a well-known model for studying the EGFR receptor function, Shh also induces cell proliferation involving EGFR activation, as reflected by EGFR internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms that regulate NSC proliferation during neurogenesis and may lead to novel approaches to the treatment of tumors. PMID:24133411

  2. Sonic Hedgehog modulates EGFR dependent proliferation of neural stem cells during late mouse embryogenesis through EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    Reinchisi, Gisela; Parada, Margarita; Lois, Pablo; Oyanadel, Claudia; Shaughnessy, Ronan; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Palma, Verónica

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh/GLI) and EGFR signaling pathways modulate Neural Stem Cell (NSC) proliferation. How these signals cooperate is therefore critical for understanding normal brain development and function. Here we report a novel acute effect of Shh signaling on EGFR function. We show that during late neocortex development, Shh mediates the activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway in Radial Glial cells (RGC) through EGFR transactivation. This process is dependent on metalloprotease activity and accounts for almost 50% of the EGFR-dependent mitogenic response of late NSCs. Furthermore, in HeLa cancer cells, a well-known model for studying the EGFR receptor function, Shh also induces cell proliferation involving EGFR activation, as reflected by EGFR internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms that regulate NSC proliferation during neurogenesis and may lead to novel approaches to the treatment of tumors.

  3. Endothelial cells regulate the proliferation of monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pakala, R; Benedict, C R

    1999-11-01

    Monocytes (MPhis) are among the first cells to accumulate in early atherosclerotic lesions and generally are believed to be incapable of proliferation. However, recent studies indicate that the number of MPhis in atherosclerotic lesion may increase due to induction of local proliferation. Since proliferation of hematopoietic lineage cells is strongly influenced by interaction with neighboring cell types, we examined the ability of vascular endothelial cells (EC), smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts to stimulate MPhi proliferation. In this study, we show that only when seeded at high densities MPhis could proliferate in culture. However, when contact co-cultured with EC, MPhis proliferated at a higher rate (260% on day 6) than those cultured alone or co-cultured with smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. Endothelial cells could stimulate the proliferation of MPhis even at non-proliferating densities. Only EC that were growth arrested or in lag phase could induce MPhi proliferation, whereas those in the exponential proliferating phase were non-stimulatory. Conditioned medium prepared from EC in growth arrested or lag phase failed to stimulate MPhi proliferation. Similarly physical separation of MPhis from EC also resulted in no proliferation. These results suggest that EC induced MPhi proliferation is contact dependent and no soluble factors are involved in this induction. This EC induced MPhi proliferation may have a profound effect on the rate of progression of atherosclerosis.

  4. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for glial and neural-related molecules in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures: neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lisak, Robert P; Benjamins, Joyce A; Bealmear, Beverly; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Yao, Bin; Land, Susan; Studzinski, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis, inflammatory cells are found in both active and chronic lesions, and it is increasingly clear that cytokines are involved directly and indirectly in both formation and inhibition of lesions. We propose that cytokine mixtures typical of Th1 or Th2 lymphocytes, or monocyte/macrophages each induce unique molecular changes in glial cells. Methods To examine changes in gene expression that might occur in glial cells exposed to the secreted products of immune cells, we have used gene array analysis to assess the early effects of different cytokine mixtures on mixed CNS glia in culture. We compared the effects of cytokines typical of Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M) on CNS glia after 6 hours of treatment. Results In this paper we focus on changes with potential relevance for neuroprotection and axon/glial interactions. Each mixture of cytokines induced a unique pattern of changes in genes for neurotrophins, growth and maturation factors and related receptors; most notably an alternatively spliced form of trkC was markedly downregulated by Th1 and M/M cytokines, while Th2 cytokines upregulated BDNF. Genes for molecules of potential importance in axon/glial interactions, including cell adhesion molecules, connexins, and some molecules traditionally associated with neurons showed significant changes, while no genes for myelin-associated genes were regulated at this early time point. Unexpectedly, changes occurred in several genes for proteins initially associated with retina, cancer or bone development, and not previously reported in glial cells. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures induced specific changes in gene expression that could be altered by pharmacologic strategies to promote protection of the central nervous system. PMID:18088439

  5. Cytokine-induced activation of glial cells in the mouse brain is enhanced at an advanced age.

    PubMed

    Deng, X-H; Bertini, G; Xu, Y-Z; Yan, Z; Bentivoglio, M

    2006-08-25

    Numerous neurological diseases which include neuroinflammatory components exhibit an age-related prevalence. The aging process is characterized by an increase of inflammatory mediators both systemically and in the brain, which may prime glial cells. However, little information is available on age-related changes in the glial response of the healthy aging brain to an inflammatory challenge. This problem was here examined using a mixture of the proinflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which was injected intracerebroventricularly in young (2-3.5 months), middle-aged (10-11 months) and aged (18-21 months) mice. Vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) was used as control. After a survival of 1 or 2 days (all age groups) or 4 days (young and middle-aged animals), immunohistochemically labeled astrocytes and microglia were investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively. In all age groups, astrocytes were markedly activated in periventricular as well as in deeper brain regions 2 days following cytokine treatment, whereas microglia activation was already evident at 24 h. Interestingly, cytokine-induced activation of both astrocytes and microglia was significantly more marked in the brain of aged animals, in which it included numerous ameboid microglia, than of younger age groups. Moderate astrocytic activation was also seen in the hippocampal CA1 field of vehicle-treated aged mice. FluoroJade B histochemistry and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP nick-end labeling technique, performed at 2 days after cytokine administration, did not reveal ongoing cell death phenomena in young or aged animals. This indicated that glial cell changes were not secondary to neuronal death. Altogether, the findings demonstrate for the first time enhanced activation of glial cells in the old brain, compared with young and middle-aged subjects, in response to cytokine exposure. Interestingly, the results also suggest that such enhancement

  6. Dye coupling among satellite glial cells in mammalian dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian-Ying; Cherkas, Pavel S; Rosenthal, David W; Hanani, Menachem

    2005-03-02

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are key elements in sensory signaling under physiological and pathological conditions. Little is known about electrical coupling among cells in these ganglia. In this study, we injected the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow (LY) into single cells to examine dye coupling in DRG. We found no dye coupling between neurons or between neurons and their attendant satellite glial cells (SGCs). In mouse DRG, we observed that in 26.2% of the cases SGCs that surround a given neuron were dye coupled. In only 3.2% of the cases SGCs that make envelopes around different neurons were coupled. The data from mouse ganglia were very similar to those from rat and guinea pig DRG. The results obtained by injection of the tracer biocytin were very similar to those observed with LY. The coupling incidence within the envelopes increased 3.1-fold by high extracellular pH (8.0), but coupling between envelopes was not affected. Acidic pH (6.8) reduced the coupling. High extracellular K+ (9.4 mM) increased the coupling 2.4-fold and 4.7-fold within and between envelopes, respectively. Low extracellular Ca2+ (0.5, 1.0 mM) partly reversed the effect of high K+ on coupling. The results showed that SGCs in mammalian sensory ganglia are connected by gap junctions. This coupling is very sensitive to changes in pH, and can therefore be modulated under various physiological and pathological conditions. The dependence of the coupling on extracellular K+ and Ca2+ suggests that the permeability of gap junctions can be altered by physiological and pharmacological stimuli.

  7. Beyond cell proliferation in avian facial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Linde-Medina, Marta; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Marcucio, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The upper jaw in vertebrates forms from several prominences that arise around the stomodeum or primitive mouth. These prominences undergo coordinated growth and morphogenesis to fuse and form the face. Undirected, regionalized cell proliferation is thought to be the driving force behind the morphogenesis of the facial prominences. However, recent findings suggest that directed cell behaviors in the mesenchyme (e.g., directed cell division, directed cell movement, convergent extension) might be required for successful face formation. Here we discuss the evidence for this view and how directed behaviors may interact with the basement membrane to regulate morphogenesis of the facial region. We believe that future research in these largely unexplored areas could significantly impact our understanding of facial morphogenesis. PMID:26637960

  8. Growth and turning properties of adult glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 nonpeptidergic sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, GuiFang; Singh, Vandana; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-09-01

    An overlapping population of adult primary sensory neurons that innervate the skin express the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 (GFRα1), the lectin IB4, and the "regenerative brake" phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10. Using an adapted turning and growth assay, we analyzed the growth cone behavior of adult immunoselected GFRα1 sensory neurons. These neurons had less robust baseline growth and reluctant responsiveness to individual growth factors but responded to synergistic types of input from glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, a phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor, or a downstream Rho kinase inhibitor. Hepatocyte growth factor and the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor were associated with growth cone turning. A gradient of protein extracted from skin samples, a primary target of GFRα1 axons, replicated the impact of synergistic support. Within the skin, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed within epidermal axons, indicating an autocrine role accompanying local hepatocyte growth factor synthesis. Taken together, our findings identify unique growth properties and plasticity of a distinct population of epidermal axons that are relevant to neurologic repair and skin reinnervation.

  9. Effects of aging on neurons and glial cells from the superficial layers of the superior colliculus in rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Florentina; Moreno, Paloma; Villena, Alicia; Vidal, Lourdes; Pérez De Vargas, Ignacio

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on glial cells and neurons from the superficial layers of the superior colliculus in rats. We used stereological methods to estimate the volume of the superficial layers, neuron size, and the number of neurons and glial cells in Wistar male rats aged 3, 24, 26, and 28 months. A 32.6% volume increase was found in the stratum griseum superficiale between the ages of 3 and 26 months, while in the 28-month-old animals a 19% decrease was observed. The stratum opticum did not show any changes in volume with age. Also, our analysis revealed a process of somatic and nuclear atrophy in the neurons of the superficial layers in animals aged 26 and 28 months. On the other hand, no statistically significant differences were found in the numbers of neurons. The number of glial cells in the stratum griseum superficiale showed an increase between the 3rd and 26th month, while the stratum opticum suffered no change.

  10. Stressor-dependent Alterations in Glycoprotein 130: Implications for Glial Cell Reactivity, Cytokine Signaling and Ganglion Cell Health in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, FD; Walker, CC; Abella, SK; Won, M; Sappington, RM

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and glial reactivity in glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glaucoma-related changes in glycoprotein-130 (gp130), the common signal transducer of the IL-6 family of cytokines, as they relate to RGC health, glial reactivity and expression of IL-6 cytokine family members. Methods: For all experiments, we examined healthy retina (young C57), aged retina (aged C57), retina predisposed to glaucoma (young DBA/2) and retina with IOP-induced glaucoma (aged DBA/2). We determined retinal gene expression of gp130 and IL-6 family members, using quantitative PCR, and protein expression of gp130, using multiplex ELISA. For protein localization and cell-specific expression, we performed co-immunolabeling for gp130 and cell type-specific markers. We used quantitative microscopy to measure layer-specific expression of gp130 and its relationships to astrocyte and Müller glia reactivity and RGC axonal transport, as determined by uptake and transport of cholera toxin β-subunit (CTB). Results: Gene expression of gp130 was elevated with all glaucoma-related stressors, but only normal aging increased protein levels. In healthy retina, gp130 localized primarily to the inner retina, where it was expressed by astrocytes, Müller cells and RGCs. Layer-specific analysis of gp130 expression revealed increased expression in aging retina and decreased expression in glaucomatous retina that was eccentricity-dependent. These glaucoma-related changes in gp130 expression correlated with the level of GFAP and glutamine synthetase expression, as well as axonal transport in RGCs. The relationships between gp130, glial reactivity and RGC health could impact signaling by many IL-6 family cytokines, which exhibited overall increased expression in a stressor-dependent manner. Conclusions: Glaucoma-related stressors, including normal aging, glaucoma predisposition and IOP

  11. Chitosan Feasibility to Retain Retinal Stem Cell Phenotype and Slow Proliferation for Retinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Girish K.; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Singh, Amar K.; Casado-Coterillo, Clara; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T.; Coronas, Joaquin; Pastor, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Retinal stem cells (RSCs) are promising in cell replacement strategies for retinal diseases. RSCs can migrate, differentiate, and integrate into retina. However, RSCs transplantation needs an adequate support; chitosan membrane (ChM) could be one, which can carry RSCs with high feasibility to support their integration into retina. RSCs were isolated, evaluated for phenotype, and subsequently grown on sterilized ChM and polystyrene surface for 8 hours, 1, 4, and 11 days for analysing cell adhesion, proliferation, viability, and phenotype. Isolated RSCs expressed GFAP, PKC, isolectin, recoverin, RPE65, PAX-6, cytokeratin 8/18, and nestin proteins. They adhered (28 ± 16%, 8 hours) and proliferated (40 ± 20 cells/field, day 1 and 244 ± 100 cells/field, day 4) significantly low (P < 0.05) on ChM. However, they maintained similar viability (>95%) and phenotype (cytokeratin 8/18, PAX6, and nestin proteins expression, day 11) on both surfaces (ChM and polystyrene). RSCs did not express alpha-SMA protein on both surfaces. RSCs express proteins belonging to epithelial, glial, and neural cells, confirming that they need further stimulus to reach a final destination of differentiation that could be provided in in vivo condition. ChM does not alternate RSCs behaviour and therefore can be used as a cell carrier so that slow proliferating RSCs can migrate and integrate into retina. PMID:24719852

  12. Plant cell proliferation inside an inorganic host.

    PubMed

    Perullini, Mercedes; Rivero, María Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías; Mentaberry, Alejandro; Bilmes, Sara A

    2007-01-10

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to plant cell culture as a tool for the production of secondary metabolites and the expression of recombinant proteins. Plant cell immobilization offers many advantages for biotechnological processes. However, the most extended matrices employed, such as calcium-alginate, cannot fully protect entrapped cells. Sol-gel chemistry of silicates has emerged as an outstanding strategy to obtain biomaterials in which living cells are truly protected. This field of research is rapidly developing and a large number of bacteria and yeast-entrapping ceramics have already been designed for different applications. But even mild thermal and chemical conditions employed in sol-gel synthesis may result harmful to cells of higher organisms. Here we present a method for the immobilization of plant cells that allows cell growth at cavities created inside a silica matrix. Plant cell proliferation was monitored for a 6-month period, at the end of which plant calli of more than 1 mm in diameter were observed inside the inorganic host. The resulting hybrid device had good mechanical stability and proved to be an effective barrier against biological contamination, suggesting that it could be employed for long-term plant cell entrapment applications.

  13. Cell Proliferation, Cell Death, and Size Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    predicted to encode a novel 582 amino acid protein, perhaps interacting with molybdopterin. It is possible that the pie gene encodes a novel enzyme protecting against cell death during growth and development.

  14. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-08

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities.

  15. Comparison of calcium ionophore and receptor-activated inositol phosphate formation in primary glial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Wigginton, S A; Minneman, K P

    1991-11-13

    The possible role of Ca2+ influx in alpha 1-adrenoceptor-stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate [( 3H]InsP) formation was examined in primary cultures of glial cells from 1-day-old rat brain. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 caused a concentration- and time-dependent increase in [3H]InsP formation similar in magnitude to that caused by norepinephrine (NE). Responses to A23187 and NE were both completely dependent on extracellular Ca2+, with a similar concentration dependence. However, cadmium was more potent in blocking the response to A23187 than to NE. Lanthanum (1 mM) blocked the response to NE, although cobalt (5 mM) did not. The [3H]InsP response to A23187 was not additive with the response to NE or to the muscarinic agonist carbachol, although responses to NE and carbachol were addictive Both A23187 and ionomycin inhibited the additive stimulation caused by a combination of NE and carbachol, and this inhibition was potentiated by cadmium. Ionomycin stimulated [3H]InsP formation at concentrations lower than those inhibiting receptor-mediated responses, and this stimulation was not additive with responses to NE or carbachol. High-performance liquid chromatography separation showed similar patterns of [3H]InsPs formed in response to both Ca2+ ionophore and receptor agonists. These results raise the possibility that receptor-activated Ca2+ influx may be involved in stimulation of [3H]InsP formation in these cells.

  16. Cabergoline Decreases Alcohol Drinking and Seeking Behaviors Via Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Carnicella, Sebastien; Ahmadiantehrani, Somayeh; He, Dao-Yao; Nielsen, Carsten K.; Bartlett, Selena E.; Janak, Patricia H.; Ron, Dorit

    2010-01-01

    Background Cabergoline is an ergotamine derivative that increases the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro. We recently showed that GDNF in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces the motivation to consume alcohol. We therefore set out to determine whether cabergoline administration decreases alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors via GDNF. Methods Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) were used to measure GDNF levels. Western blot analysis was used for phosphorylation experiments. Operant self-administration in rats and a two-bottle choice procedure in mice were used to assess alcohol-drinking behaviors. Instrumental performance tested during extinction was used to measure alcohol-seeking behavior. The [35S]GTPγS binding assay was used to assess the expression and function of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R). Results We found that treatment of the dopaminergic-like cell line SH-SY5Y with cabergoline and systemic administration of cabergoline in rats resulted in an increase in GDNF level and in the activation of the GDNF pathway. Cabergoline treatment decreased alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors including relapse, and its action to reduce alcohol consumption was localized to the VTA. Finally, the increase in GDNF expression and the decrease in alcohol consumption by cabergoline were abolished in GDNF heterozygous knockout mice. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that cabergoline-mediated upregulation of the GDNF pathway attenuates alcohol-drinking behaviors and relapse. Alcohol abuse and addiction are devastating and costly problems worldwide. This study puts forward the possibility that cabergoline might be an effective treatment for these disorders. PMID:19232578

  17. A mesenchymal-like ZEB1(+) niche harbors dorsal radial glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive stem cells in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Jean-Charles; Ackema, Karin B; Ohayon, David; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Perrin, Florence E; Garces, Alain; Ripoll, Chantal; Charité, Jeroen; Simonneau, Lionel; Kettenmann, H; Zine, Azel; Privat, Alain; Valmier, Jean; Pattyn, Alexandre; Hugnot, Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    In humans and rodents the adult spinal cord harbors neural stem cells located around the central canal. Their identity, precise location, and specific signaling are still ill-defined and controversial. We report here on a detailed analysis of this niche. Using microdissection and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, we demonstrate that neural stem cells are mostly dorsally located GFAP(+) cells lying ependymally and subependymally that extend radial processes toward the pial surface. The niche also harbors doublecortin protein (Dcx)(+) Nkx6.1(+) neurons sending processes into the lumen. Cervical and lumbar spinal cord neural stem cells maintain expression of specific rostro-caudal Hox gene combinations and the niche shows high levels of signaling proteins (CD15, Jagged1, Hes1, differential screening-selected gene aberrative in neuroblastoma [DAN]). More surprisingly, the niche displays mesenchymal traits such as expression of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition zinc finger E-box-binding protein 1 (ZEB1) transcription factor and smooth muscle actin. We found ZEB1 to be essential for neural stem cell survival in vitro. Proliferation within the niche progressively ceases around 13 weeks when the spinal cord reaches its final size, suggesting an active role in postnatal development. In addition to hippocampus and subventricular zone niches, adult spinal cord constitutes a third central nervous system stem cell niche with specific signaling, cellular, and structural characteristics that could possibly be manipulated to alleviate spinal cord traumatic and degenerative diseases.

  18. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-induced proliferation of astroglial cells by ethanol: mechanisms and implications for the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Guizzetti, Marina

    2002-12-01

    In utero exposure to ethanol is deleterious to fetal brain development. Children born with the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) display a number of abnormalities, the most significant of which are central nervous system (CNS) dysfunctions, such as microencephaly and mental retardation. An interaction of ethanol with glial cells, particularly astrocytes, has been suggested to contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of this alcohol. At low concentrations (10-100 mM) ethanol inhibits the proliferation of astroglial cells in vitro, particularly when stimulated by acetycholine through muscarinic M3 receptors. Of the several signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors in astrocytes or astrocytoma cells, which are involved in mitogenic signaling, only some (e.g. protein kinase C (PKC) zeta, p70S6 kinase) appear to be targeted by ethanol at the same low concentrations which effectively inhibit proliferation. Inhibition of astroglial proliferation by ethanol may contribute to the microencephaly seen in FAS.

  19. Morphological study of a connexin 43-GFP reporter mouse highlights glial heterogeneity, amacrine cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells.

    PubMed

    Theofilas, Panos; Steinhäuser, Christian; Theis, Martin; Derouiche, Amin

    2017-03-30

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the main astrocytic connexin and forms the basis of the glial syncytium. The morphology of connexin-expressing cells can be best studied in transgenic mouse lines expressing cytoplasmic fluorescent reporters, since immunolabeling the plaques can obscure the shapes of the individual cells. The Cx43kiECFP mouse generated by Degen et al. (FASEBJ 26:4576, 2012) expresses cytosolic ECFP and has previously been used to establish that Cx43 may not be expressed by all astrocytes within a population, and this can vary in a region-dependent way. To establish this mouse line as a tool for future astrocyte and connexin research, we sought to consolidate reporter authenticity, studying cell types and within-region population heterogeneity. Applying anti-GFP, all cell types related to astroglia were positive-namely, protoplasmic astrocytes in the hippocampus, cortex, thalamus, spinal cord, olfactory bulb, cerebellum with Bergmann glia and astrocytes also in the molecular layer, and retinal Müller cells and astrocytes. Labeled cell types further comprise white matter astrocytes, olfactory ensheathing cells, radial glia-like stem cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, ependymal cells, and meningeal cells. We furthermore describe a retinal Cx43-expressing amacrine cell morphologically reminiscent of ON-OFF wide-field amacrine cells, representing the first example of a mammalian CNS neuron-expressing Cx43 protein. In double staining with cell type-specific markers (GFAP, S100ß, glutamine synthetase), Cx43 reporter expression in the hippocampus and cortex was restricted to GFAP(+) astrocytes. Altogether, this mouse line is a highly reliable tool for studies of Cx43-expressing CNS cells and astroglial cell morphology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N

    2008-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cell cycle marker protein, is well known as a DNA sliding clamp for DNA polymerase delta and as an essential component for eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication and repair. Due to its mobility inside nuclei, PCNA is dynamically presented in a soluble or chromatin-associated form. The heterogeneity and specific modifications of PCNA may reflect its multiple functions and the presence of many binding partners in the cell. The recent proteomics approaches applied to characterizing PCNA interactions revealed multiple PCNA partners with a wide spectrum of activity and unveiled the possible existence of new PCNA functions. Since more than 100 PCNA-interacting proteins and several PCNA modifications have already been reported, a proteomics point of view seems exactly suitable to better understand the role of PCNA in cellular functions.

  1. Neonatal chimerization with human glial progenitor cells can both remyelinate and rescue the otherwise lethally hypomyelinated shiverer mouse

    PubMed Central

    Windrem, Martha; Schanz, Steve; Guo, Min; Tian, Guo-Feng; Washco, Vaughn; Stanwood, Nancy; Rasband, Matthew; Roy, Neeta S.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Havton, Leif A.; Wang, Su; Goldman, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Congenitally hypomyelinated shiverer mice fail to generate compact myelin, and die by 18–21 weeks of age. Using multifocal anterior and posterior fossa delivery of sorted fetal human glial progenitor cells into neonatal shiverer x rag2−/− immunodeficient and myelin-deficient mice, we achieved whole neuraxis myelination of the engrafted hosts, which in a significant fraction of cases rescued this otherwise lethal phenotype. The transplanted mice exhibited greatly prolonged survival, some surviving beyond a year, with progressive resolution of their neurological deficits. Accordingly, they exhibited substantial myelination of the brain, brainstem and cerebellum, as well as the spinal cord, optic nerves, and cranial ganglia. This was accompanied by the acquisition of normal nodes of Ranvier and transcallosal conduction velocities, ultrastructurally normal and complete myelination of most axons, and a restoration of a substantially normal neurological phenotype. Notably, the resultant mice were cerebral chimeras, with murine gray matter but a predominantly human white matter glial composition. These data demonstrate that the neonatal transplantation of human glial progenitor cells can effectively treat disorders of congenital and perinatal hypomyelination. PMID:18522848

  2. A paracrine effect for neuron-derived BDNF in development of dorsal root ganglia: stimulation of Schwann cell myelin protein expression by glial cells.

    PubMed

    Pruginin-Bluger, M; Shelton, D L; Kalcheim, C

    1997-01-01

    Addition of neurons to cultures of non-neuronal cells derived from quail embryonic dorsal root ganglia causes a 2.5-fold increase in the proportion of cells that express the glial marker Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP) when compared to cultures devoid of neurons. This effect is mediated by BDNF because incubation with a trkB immunoadhesin that sequesters BDNF, but not with trkA or trkC immunoadhesins, abolishes this stimulation. This neuronal activity can be mimicked by treatment with soluble BDNF that stimulates specifically the conversion of SMP-negative glial cells into cells that express this phenotype. That BDNF is the endogenous neuron-derived factor affecting glial development is further supported by the observation that BDNF is extensively expressed in developing sensory neurons of the avian ganglia both in vivo and in vitro, but not by the satellite cells. These results show for the first time a paracrine role for neuronal BDNF on differentiation of peripheral glial cells. This effect of BDNF is likely to be mediated by the p75 neurotrophin receptor because: (1) p75 immunoreactive protein is expressed by a subset of satellite cells; (2) neutralization of p75 abolishes the BDNF-induced stimulation; (3) a treatment of non-neuronal cell cultures with equimolar concentrations of either soluble NGF or NT-3 also affects the proportion of cells that become SMP-positive. Whereas NGF stimulates the acquisition of this glial antigen to a similar extent as BDNF, NT-3 inhibits its expression, suggesting that distinct neurotrophins signal differentially through p75. These findings also suggest that the definitive phenotype of peripheral glia is determined by a balance between positive and inhibitory signals arising in adjacent neurons.

  3. Ectonucleotidases in Müller glial cells of the rodent retina: Involvement in inhibition of osmotic cell swelling

    PubMed Central

    Iandiev, Ianors; Wurm, Antje; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Robson, Simon C.; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides mediate glia-to-neuron signalling in the retina and are implicated in the volume regulation of retinal glial (Müller) cells under osmotic stress conditions. We investigated the expression and functional role of ectonucleotidases in Müller cells of the rodent retina by cell-swelling experiments, calcium imaging, and immuno- and enzyme histochemistry. The swelling of Müller cells under hypoosmotic stress was inhibited by activation of an autocrine purinergic signalling cascade. This cascade is initiated by exogenous glutamate and involves the consecutive activation of P2Y1 and adenosine A1 receptors, the action of ectoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)ases, and a nucleoside-transporter-mediated release of adenosine. Inhibition of ectoapyrases increased the ATP-evoked calcium responses in Müller cell endfeet. Müller cells were immunoreactive for nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDase)2 (but not NTPDase1), ecto-5′-nucleotidase, P2Y1, and A1 receptors. Enzyme histochemistry revealed that ATP but not adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) is extracellularly metabolised in retinal slices of NTPDase1 knockout mice. NTPDase1 activity and protein is restricted to blood vessels, whereas activity of alkaline phosphatase is essentially absent at physiological pH. The data suggest that NTPDase2 is the major ATP-degrading ectonucleotidase of the retinal parenchyma. NTPDase2 expressed by Müller cells can be implicated in the regulation of purinergic calcium responses and cellular volume. PMID:18404455

  4. On the role of adenylate cyclase, tyrosine kinase, and tyrosine phosphatase in the response of nerve and glial cells to photodynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Bragin, D. E.; Dergacheva, Olga Y.; Vanzha, O.; Oparina, L.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2004-08-01

    The role of different intercellular signaling pathways involving adenylate cyclase (AC), receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), tyrosine and serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PTP or PP, respectively) in the response of crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron (MRN) and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic effect of aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens have been studied. AC inhibition by MDL-12330A decreased neuron lifetime, whereas AC activation by forskolin increase it. Thus, increase in cAMP produced by activated AC protects SRN against photodynamic inactivation. Similarly, RTK inhibition by genistein decreased neuron lifetime, while inhibition of PTP or PP that remove phosphate groups from proteins, prolonged neuronal activity. AC inhibition reduced photoinduced damage of the plasma membrane, and, therefore, necrosis in neuronal and glial cells. RTK inhibition protected only neurons against PDT-induced membrane permeabilization while glial cells became lesser permeable under ortovanadate-mediated PTP inhibition. AC activation also prevented PDT-induced apoptosis in glial cells. PP inhibition enhanced apoptotic processes in photosensitized glial cells. Therefore, both intercellular signaling pathways involving AC and TRK are involved in the maintenance of neuronal activity, integrity of the neuronal and glial plasma membranes and in apoptotic processes in glia under photosensitization.

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene delivery via a polyethylene imine grafted chitosan carrier.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Shiang; Lai, Po-Liang; Peng, Sydney; Wu, His-Chin; Yu, Siang; Tseng, Tsan-Yun; Wang, Li-Fang; Chu, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is known to result from the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Direct intracerebral injections of high doses of recombinant glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) have been shown to protect adult nigral dopaminergic neurons. Because GDNF does not cross the blood-brain barrier, intracerebral gene transfer is an ideal option. Chitosan (CHI) is a naturally derived material that has been used for gene transfer. However, the low water solubility often leads to decreased transfection efficiency. Grafting of highly water-soluble polyethylene imines (PEI) and polyethylene glycol onto polymers can increase their solubility. The purpose of this study was to design a non-viral gene carrier with improved water solubility as well as enhanced transfection efficiency for treating Parkinsonism. Two molecular weights (Mw =600 and 1,800 g/mol) of PEI were grafted onto CHI (PEI600-g-CHI and PEI1800-g-CHI, respectively) by opening the epoxide ring of ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EX-810). This modification resulted in a non-viral gene carrier with less cytotoxicity. The transfection efficiency of PEI600-g-CHI/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polyplexes was significantly higher than either PEI1800-g-CHI/DNA or CHI/DNA polyplexes. The maximal GDNF expression of PEI600-g-CHI/DNA was at the polymer:DNA weight ratio of 10:1, which was 1.7-fold higher than the maximal GDNF expression of PEI1800-g-CHI/DNA. The low toxicity and high transfection efficiency of PEI600-g-CHI make it ideal for application to GDNF gene therapy, which has potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  6. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene delivery via a polyethylene imine grafted chitosan carrier

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Shiang; Lai, Po-Liang; Peng, Sydney; Wu, His-Chin; Yu, Siang; Tseng, Tsan-Yun; Wang, Li-Fang; Chu, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is known to result from the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Direct intracerebral injections of high doses of recombinant glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) have been shown to protect adult nigral dopaminergic neurons. Because GDNF does not cross the blood–brain barrier, intracerebral gene transfer is an ideal option. Chitosan (CHI) is a naturally derived material that has been used for gene transfer. However, the low water solubility often leads to decreased transfection efficiency. Grafting of highly water-soluble polyethylene imines (PEI) and polyethylene glycol onto polymers can increase their solubility. The purpose of this study was to design a non-viral gene carrier with improved water solubility as well as enhanced transfection efficiency for treating Parkinsonism. Two molecular weights (Mw =600 and 1,800 g/mol) of PEI were grafted onto CHI (PEI600-g-CHI and PEI1800-g-CHI, respectively) by opening the epoxide ring of ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EX-810). This modification resulted in a non-viral gene carrier with less cytotoxicity. The transfection efficiency of PEI600-g-CHI/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polyplexes was significantly higher than either PEI1800-g-CHI/DNA or CHI/DNA polyplexes. The maximal GDNF expression of PEI600-g-CHI/DNA was at the polymer:DNA weight ratio of 10:1, which was 1.7-fold higher than the maximal GDNF expression of PEI1800-g-CHI/DNA. The low toxicity and high transfection efficiency of PEI600-g-CHI make it ideal for application to GDNF gene therapy, which has potential for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25061293

  7. The effects of endothelin-1 on satellite glial cells in peripheral ganglia.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Hanani, Menachem

    2017-03-18

    Endothelins (ET) are a family of highly active neuropeptides with manifold influences via ET receptors (ETR) in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. We have shown previously that satellite glial cells (SGCs) in mouse trigeminal ganglia (TG) are extremely sensitive to ET-1 in evoking [Ca(2+)]in increase, apparently via ETBR activation, but there is no functional information on ETR in SGCs of other peripheral ganglia. Here we tested the effects of ET-1 on SGCs in nodose ganglia (NG), which is sensory, and superior cervical ganglia (Sup-CG), which is part of the sympathetic nervous system, and further investigated the influence of ET-1 on SGCs in TG. Using calcium imaging we found that SGCs in intact, freshly isolated NG and Sup-CG are highly sensitive to ET-1, with threshold concentration at 0.1nM. Our results showed that [Ca(2+)]in elevation in response to ET-1 was partially due to Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space and partially to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Using receptor selective ETR agonists and antagonists, we found that the responses were mediated by mixed ETAR/ETBR in SGCs of NG and predominantly by ETBR in SGCs of Sup-CG. By employing intracellular dye injection we examined coupling among SGCs around different neurons in the presence of 5nM ET-1 and observed coupling inhibition in all the three ganglion types. In summary, our work showed that SGCs in mouse sensory and sympathetic ganglia are highly sensitive to ET-1 and that this peptide markedly reduces SGCs coupling. We conclude that ET-1, which may participate in neuron-glia communications, has similar functions in wide range of peripheral ganglia.

  8. Effect of sertraline on proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Jahromi, Maliheh; Amirpour, Nushin; Khosravizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant drugs are commonly employed for anxiety and mood disorders. Sertraline is extensively used as antidepressant in clinic. In addition, adipose tissue represents an abundant and accessible source of adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate in to multiple lineages. Therefore, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may be useful for autologous transplantation. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we assessed the effect of antidepressant drug Sertraline on the proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs using MTT assay and immunofluorescence technique respectively. Results: MTT assay analysis showed that 0.5 μM Sertraline significantly increased the proliferation rate of hADSCs induced cells (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining indicated that Sertraline treatment during neurogenic differentiation could be decreased the percentage of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Nestin-positive cells, but did not significantly effect on the percentage of MAP2 positive cells. Conclusion: Overall, our data show that Sertraline can be promoting proliferation rate during neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs after 6 days post-induction, while Sertraline inhibits gliogenesis of induced hADSCs. PMID:24800186

  9. MIO-M1 cells and similar muller glial cell lines derived from adult human retina exhibit neural stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jean M; Singhal, Shweta; Bhatia, Bhairavi; Keegan, David J; Reh, Thomas A; Luthert, Philip J; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, Gloria Astrid

    2007-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that glial cells may have a role as neural precursors in the adult central nervous system. Although it has been shown that Müller cells exhibit progenitor characteristics in the postnatal chick and rat retinae, their progenitor-like role in developed human retina is unknown. We first reported the Müller glial characteristics of the spontaneously immortalized human cell line MIO-M1, but recently we have derived similar cell lines from the neural retina of several adult eye donors. Since immortalization is one of the main properties of stem cells, we investigated whether these cells expressed stem cell markers. Cells were grown as adherent monolayers, responded to epidermal growth factor, and could be expanded indefinitely without growth factors under normal culture conditions. They could be frozen and thawed without losing their characteristics. In the presence of extracellular matrix and fibroblast growth factor-2 or retinoic acid, they acquired neural morphology, formed neurospheres, and expressed neural stem cell markers including betaIII tubulin, Sox2, Pax6, Chx10, and Notch 1. They also expressed markers of postmitotic retinal neurons, including peripherin, recoverin, calretinin, S-opsin, and Brn3. When grafted into the subretinal space of dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons rats or neonatal Lister hooded rats, immortalized cells migrated into the retina, where they expressed various markers of retinal neurons. These observations indicate that adult human neural retina harbors a population of cells that express both Müller glial and stem cell markers and suggest that these cells may have potential use for cell-based therapies to restore retinal function. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  10. Research Techniques Made Simple: Techniques to Assess Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Romar, George A; Kupper, Thomas S; Divito, Sherrie J

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation is commonly assayed in the laboratory for research purposes, but is increasingly used clinically to gauge tumor aggressiveness and potentially guide care. Therefore, both researchers and clinicians should have a basic understanding of techniques used to assess cell proliferation. Multiple cell proliferation assays exist, and the choice of method depends on the laboratory resources available, the types of cells/tissues to be studied, and the specific experimental goals. In this article, we identify four overarching categories of cell proliferation assays that signify various stages of the cell cycle: nucleoside-analog incorporation, cell cycle-associated protein detection, use of cytoplasmic proliferation dyes, and indirect measures of cell proliferation. Each method has strengths and limitations that should guide the dermatology investigator's choice of assay.

  11. Numb-deficient satellite cells have regeneration and proliferation defects

    PubMed Central

    George, Rajani M.; Biressi, Stefano; Beres, Brian J.; Rogers, Erik; Mulia, Amanda K.; Allen, Ronald E.; Rawls, Alan; Rando, Thomas A.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    The adaptor protein Numb has been implicated in the switch between cell proliferation and differentiation made by satellite cells during muscle repair. Using two genetic approaches to ablate Numb, we determined that, in its absence, muscle regeneration in response to injury was impaired. Single myofiber cultures demonstrated a lack of satellite cell proliferation in the absence of Numb, and the proliferation defect was confirmed in satellite cell cultures. Quantitative RT-PCR from Numb-deficient satellite cells demonstrated highly up-regulated expression of p21 and Myostatin, both inhibitors of myoblast proliferation. Transfection with Myostatin-specific siRNA rescued the proliferation defect of Numb-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, overexpression of Numb in satellite cells inhibited Myostatin expression. These data indicate a unique function for Numb during the initial activation and proliferation of satellite cells in response to muscle injury. PMID:24170859

  12. Splicing factors PTBP1 and PTBP2 promote proliferation and migration of glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Hannah C.; Hai, Tao; Zhu, Wen; Baggerly, Keith A.; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Krahe, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) is a multi-functional RNA-binding protein that is aberrantly overexpressed in glioma. PTBP1 and its brain-specific homologue polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 2 (PTBP2) regulate neural precursor cell differentiation. However, the overlapping and non-overlapping target transcripts involved in this process are still unclear. To determine why PTBP1 and not PTBP2 would promote glial cell-derived tumours, both PTBP1 and PTBP2 were knocked down in the human glioma cell lines U251 and LN229 to determine the role of these proteins in cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion. Surprisingly, removal of both PTBP1 and PTBP2 slowed cell proliferation, with the double knockdown having no additive effects. Decreased expression of both proteins individually and in combination inhibited cell migration and increased adhesion of cells to fibronectin and vitronectin. A global survey of differential exon expression was performed following PTBP1 knockdown in U251 cells using the Affymetrix Exon Array to identify PTBP1-specific splicing targets that enhance gliomagenesis. In the PTBP1 knockdown, previously determined targets were unaltered in their splicing patterns. A single gene, RTN4 (Nogo) had significantly enhanced inclusion of exon 3 when PTBP1 was removed. Overexpression of the splice isoform containing exon 3 decreased cell proliferation to a similar degree as the removal of PTBP1. These results provide the first evidence that RNA-binding proteins affect the invasive and rapid growth characteristics of glioma cell lines. Its actions on proliferation appear to be mediated, in part, through alternative splicing of RTN4. PMID:19506066

  13. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factors combined with all-trans retinoic acid treatment enhances glial transdifferentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Flora; Pezone, Lucia; Avitabile, Marianna; Acierno, Giovanni; Andolfo, Immacolata; Capasso, Mario; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-06-09

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is a heterogeneous tumor characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations. A high tumor cell differentiation grade correlates to a favorable stage and positive outcome. Expression of the hypoxia inducible factors HIF1-α (HIF1A gene) and HIF2-α (EPAS1 gene) and/or hypoxia-regulated pathways has been shown to promote the undifferentiated phenotype of NBL cells. Our hypothesis is that HIF1A and EPAS1 expression represent one of the mechanisms responsible for the lack of responsiveness of NBL to differentiation therapy. Clinically, high levels of HIF1A and EPAS1 expression were associated with inferior survival in two NBL microarray datasets, and patient subgroups with lower expression of HIF1A and EPAS1 showed significant enrichment of pathways related to neuronal differentiation. In NBL cell lines, the combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) with HIF1A or EPAS1 silencing led to an acquired glial-cell phenotype and enhanced expression of glial-cell differentiation markers. Furthermore, HIF1A or EPAS1 silencing might promote cell senescence independent of ATRA treatment. Taken together, our data suggest that HIF inhibition coupled with ATRA treatment promotes differentiation into a more benign phenotype and cell senescence in vitro. These findings open the way for additional lines of attack in the treatment of NBL minimal residue disease.

  14. Calcium channels, external calcium concentration and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Bidaux, Gabriel; Pigat, Natascha; Goffin, Vincent; Bernichtein, Sophie; Capiod, Thierry

    2014-09-15

    Evidence for a role for calcium channel proteins in cell proliferation is numerous suggesting that calcium influx is essential in this physiological process. Several studies in the past thirty years have demonstrated that calcium channel expression levels are determinant in cell proliferation. Voltage-gated, store-operated, second messengers and receptor-operated calcium channels have been associated to cell proliferation. However, the relationship between calcium influx and cell proliferation can be uncoupled in transformed and cancer cells, resulting in an external calcium-independent proliferation. Thus, protein expression could be more important than channel function to trigger cell proliferation suggesting that additional channel functions may be responsible to reconcile calcium channel expression and cell proliferation. When needed, external calcium concentration is obviously important for calcium channel function but it also regulates calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) activity. CaSR can up- or down-regulate cell proliferation depending on physiological conditions. CaSR sensitivity to external calcium is within the 0.5 to 5 mM range and therefore, the role of these receptors in cell proliferation must be taken into account. We therefore suggest here that cell proliferation rates could depend on the relative balance between calcium influx and CaSR activation.

  15. Glial kon/NG2 gene network for central nervous system repair

    PubMed Central

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Harrison, Neale; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The glial regenerative response to central nervous system (CNS) injury, although limited, can be harnessed to promote regeneration and repair. Injury provokes the proliferation of ensheathing glial cells, which can differentiate to remyelinate axons, and partially restore function. This response is evolutionarily conserved, strongly implying an underlying genetic mechanism. In mammals, it is elicited by NG2 glia, but most often newly generated cells fail to differentiate. Thus an important goal had been to find out how to promote glial differentiation following the proliferative response. A gene network involving Notch and prospero (pros) controls the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation in flies and mice, and promotes CNS repair at least in fruit-flies. A key missing link had been how to relate the function of NG2 to this gene network. Recent findings by Losada-Perez et al., published in JCB, demonstrated that the Drosophila NG2 homologue kon-tiki (kon) is functionally linked to Notch and pros in glia. By engaging in two feedback loops with Notch and Pros, in response to injury, Kon can regulate both glial cell number and glial shape homeostasis, essential for repair. Drosophila offers powerful genetics to unravel the control of stem and progenitor cells for regeneration and repair. PMID:28250735

  16. Genetically modified Schwann cells producing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor inhibit neuronal apoptosis in rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guomin; Wang, Xukai; Shao, Guoxi; Liu, Qinyi

    2014-04-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the major cells constituting the peripheral nerve structure and function, and also secret a variety of neurotrophic factors. Schwann cell (SC) transplantation has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, the ability of genetically modified SCs producing high levels of glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to promote spinal cord repair was assessed. The GDNF gene was transduced into SCs. The engineered SCs were characterized by their ability to express and secrete biologically active GDNF, which was shown to inhibit apoptosis of primary rat neurons induced by radiation, and upregulate the expression of B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and downregulate the expression of Bcl‑2 associated X protein (Bax) in vitro. Following SC implantation into the spinal cord of adult rats with SCI induced by weight‑drop impact, the survival of rats with transplanted SCs, histology of the spinal cord and expression levels of Bcl‑2 and Bax were examined. Transplantation of unmodified and genetically modified SCs producing GDNF attenuated SCI by inhibiting apoptosis via the Bcl‑2/Bax pathways. The genetically modified SCs demonstrated markedly improved recovery of SCI as compared with unmodified SCs. The present study combined the outgrowth‑promoting property of SCs with the neuroprotective effects of overexpressed GDNF and identified this as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for SCI.

  17. Alterations of Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in the Hypoplastic Reeler Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Cocito, Carolina; Merighi, Adalberto; Giacobini, Mario; Lossi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A mutation of the reln gene gives rise to the Reeler mouse (reln−∕−) displaying an ataxic phenotype and cerebellar hypoplasia. We have characterized the neurochemistry of postnatal (P0–P60) reln−∕− mouse cerebella with specific attention to the intervention of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the P0–P25 interval. Homozygous reln−∕− mice and age-matched controls were analyzed by immunofluorescence using primary antibodies against NeuN, calbindin, GFAP, vimentin, SMI32, and GAD67. Proliferation and apoptosis were detected after a single intraperitoneal BrdU injection and by the TUNEL assay with anti-digoxigenin rhodamine-conjugated antibodies. Quantitative analysis with descriptive and predictive statistics was used to calculate cell densities (number/mm2) after fluorescent nuclear stain (TCD, total cell density), labeling with BrdU (PrCD, proliferating cell density), or TUNEL (ApoCD, apoptotic cell density). By this approach we first have shown that the temporal pattern of expression of neuronal/glial markers in postnatal cerebellum is not affected by the Reeler mutation. Then, we have demonstrated that the hypoplasia in the Reeler mouse cerebellum is consequent to reduction of cortical size and cellularity (TCD), and that TCD is, in turn, linked to quantitative differences in the extent of cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as derangements in their temporal trends during postnatal maturation. Finally, we have calculated that PrCD is the most important predictive factor to determine TCD in the cerebellar cortex of the mutants. These results support the notion that, beside the well-known consequences onto the migration of the cerebellar neurons, the lack of Reelin results in a measurable deficit in neural proliferation. PMID:27252624

  18. Alterations of Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in the Hypoplastic Reeler Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cocito, Carolina; Merighi, Adalberto; Giacobini, Mario; Lossi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A mutation of the reln gene gives rise to the Reeler mouse (reln (-∕-)) displaying an ataxic phenotype and cerebellar hypoplasia. We have characterized the neurochemistry of postnatal (P0-P60) reln (-∕-) mouse cerebella with specific attention to the intervention of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the P0-P25 interval. Homozygous reln (-∕-) mice and age-matched controls were analyzed by immunofluorescence using primary antibodies against NeuN, calbindin, GFAP, vimentin, SMI32, and GAD67. Proliferation and apoptosis were detected after a single intraperitoneal BrdU injection and by the TUNEL assay with anti-digoxigenin rhodamine-conjugated antibodies. Quantitative analysis with descriptive and predictive statistics was used to calculate cell densities (number/mm(2)) after fluorescent nuclear stain (TCD, total cell density), labeling with BrdU (PrCD, proliferating cell density), or TUNEL (ApoCD, apoptotic cell density). By this approach we first have shown that the temporal pattern of expression of neuronal/glial markers in postnatal cerebellum is not affected by the Reeler mutation. Then, we have demonstrated that the hypoplasia in the Reeler mouse cerebellum is consequent to reduction of cortical size and cellularity (TCD), and that TCD is, in turn, linked to quantitative differences in the extent of cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as derangements in their temporal trends during postnatal maturation. Finally, we have calculated that PrCD is the most important predictive factor to determine TCD in the cerebellar cortex of the mutants. These results support the notion that, beside the well-known consequences onto the migration of the cerebellar neurons, the lack of Reelin results in a measurable deficit in neural proliferation.

  19. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated. Significance Statement The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic

  20. Cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor by skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Vianney, John-Mary; Spitsbergen, John M

    2011-05-16

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been identified as a potent survival factor for both central and peripheral neurons. GDNF has been shown to be a potent survival factor for motor neurons during programmed cell death and continuous treatment with GDNF maintains hyperinnervation of skeletal muscle in adulthood. However, little is known about factors regulating normal production of endogenous GDNF in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to examine the role that motor neurons play in regulating GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. A co-culture of skeletal muscle cells (C2C12) and cholinergic neurons, glioma×neuroblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) were used to create nerve-muscle interactions in vitro. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on nerve-myotube co-cultures were blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). GDNF protein content in cells and in culture medium was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and western blotting. GDNF localization was examined by immunocytochemistry. The nerve-muscle co-culture study indicated that the addition of motor neurons to skeletal muscle cells reduced the secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. The results also showed that blocking AChRs with α-BTX reversed the action of neural cells on GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. Although ELISA results showed no GDNF in differentiated NG108-15 cells grown alone, immunocytochemical analysis showed that GDNF was localized in NG108-15 cells co-cultured with C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that motor neurons may be regulating their own supply of GDNF secreted by skeletal muscle and that activation of AChRs may be involved in this process.

  1. Nitric Oxide-Proton Stimulation of Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons Increases MAP Kinase and Phosphatase Expression in Neurons and Satellite Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Stacy E.; Patil, Vinit V.; Durham, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Elevated nitric oxide (NO) and proton levels in synovial fluid are implicated in joint pathology. However, signaling pathways stimulated by these molecules that mediate inflammation and pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have not been investigated. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of NO-proton stimulation of trigeminal neurons on the in vivo expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatases (MKPs) in trigeminal ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells. Low levels of the active MAPKs ERK, JNK, and p38 were localized in the cytosol of neurons and satellite glial cells in unstimulated animals. However, increased levels of active ERK and p38, but not JNK, were detected in the cytosol and nucleus of V3 neurons and satellite glial cells 15 min and 2 h following bilateral TMJ injections of a NO donor diluted in pH 5.5 medium. While ERK levels returned to near basal levels 24 h after stimulation, p38 levels remained significantly elevated. In contrast to MKP-2 and MKP-3 levels that were barely detectable in neurons or satellite glial cells, MKP-1 staining was readily observed in satellite glial cells in ganglia from unstimulated animals. However, neuronal and satellite glial cell staining for MKP-1, MKP-2, and MKP-3 were all significantly increased in response to NO-protons. Increased active ERK and p38 levels as well as elevated MKP levels were also detected in neurons and satellite glial cells located in V2 and V1 regions of the ganglion. Our data provide evidence that NO-proton stimulation of V3 neurons results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of active ERK and p38 and MKPs in all regions of the ganglion. We propose that in trigeminal ganglia these cellular events, which are involved in peripheral sensitization as well as control of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, may play a role in TMJ pathology. PMID:18938228

  2. Toxicity and oxidative stress of acrylonitrile in rat primary glial cells: preventive effects of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Ahmed; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; El-Mesallamy, Hala; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2007-07-10

    Brain is a target organ for acrylonitrile (ACN) toxicity. The objective of the current work was to investigate ACN cytotoxicity in rat primary glial cells, using N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) as a potential protective agent. Cells were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of ACN for different time intervals. Cell membrane integrity was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Approximately 50% membrane damage was observed in the incubations containing 1.0mM ACN for 3h. Therefore, these experimental conditions were used in subsequent studies. ACN enhanced lipid peroxidation, as indicated by malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, and depleted reduced glutathione (GSH) level with no change in total glutathione. Also, ACN was activated to cyanide (CN(-)) with dramatic decrease in ATP level. Cell treatment with NAC prior to exposure to ACN afforded some protection; as indicated by reducing MDA level and elevating level of both reduced and total glutathione. Further, pretreatment with NAC inhibited CN(-) formation and caused an increase in ATP level. Our results indicate that ACN is toxic to rat primary glial cells as evidenced by induction of oxidative stress and generation of CN(-) with subsequent energy depletion. NAC can play an important role against ACN-induced oxidative damage.

  3. Glial Restricted Precursor Cell Transplant with Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Improved Some Autonomic Functions but Resulted in a Reduced Graft Size after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nout, Yvette S.; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H.; Tovar, C. Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, 1)uninjured control, 2)SCI+vehicle, and 3)SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] were increased 14 days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: 1)SCI+vehicle, 2)SCI+GRP, 3)SCI+cAMP, 4)SCI+GRP+cAMP, and 5)uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2 weeks after SCI. At 9 days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24 hrs when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24 hrs compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive effects were seen

  4. Glial restricted precursor cell transplant with cyclic adenosine monophosphate improved some autonomic functions but resulted in a reduced graft size after spinal cord contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Nout, Yvette S; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H; Tovar, C Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, (1) uninjured control, (2) SCI+vehicle, and (3) SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] was increased 14days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: (1) SCI+vehicle, (2) SCI+GRP, (3) SCI+cAMP, (4) SCI+GRP+cAMP, and (5) uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2weeks after SCI. At 9days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24hours when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24hours compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive

  5. MiR-330-5p suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasiveness through targeting ITGA5.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linsen; Ma, Jianhua; Ji, Jing; Ji, Haiming; Liu, Yichun; Hu, Weixing

    2017-03-23

    The present study intended to investigate the biological effects of miR-330-5p on glioblastoma (GBM) cell proliferation and invasiveness by targeting ITGA5. The expressions of miR-330-5p and ITGA5 mRNA in GBM cell lines (U87, U251 and U373) and normal brain glial cell line (HEB) were detected using RT-qPCR. Protein expression of ITGA5 was examined using Western blot.  This study used MTT assay, colony formation assay, Transwell assay, wound healing assay and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the biological functions of GBM cells (including cell proliferation, invasion, migration, apoptosis and cell cycle). This study applied dual-luciferase reporter gene assay to identify the target relationship between miR-330-5p and ITGA5. MiR-330-5p was low-expressed in GBM cell lines while ITGA5 was high-expressed compared with HEB. MiR-330-5p could directly target ITGA5 as well as suppress its expression in GBM cells. Up-regulation of miR-330-5p and down-regulation of ITGA5 both have an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Meanwhile they could also promote GBM cell apoptosis. MiR-330-5p could suppress proliferation and invasion of GBM cells through targeting ITGA5.

  6. A transcriptional network controlling glial development in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Bauke, Ann-Christin; Sasse, Sofia; Matzat, Till; Klämbt, Christian

    2015-06-15

    In the nervous system, glial cells need to be specified from a set of progenitor cells. In the developing Drosophila eye, perineurial glia proliferate and differentiate as wrapping glia in response to a neuronal signal conveyed by the FGF receptor pathway. To unravel the underlying transcriptional network we silenced all genes encoding predicted DNA-binding proteins in glial cells using RNAi. Dref and other factors of the TATA box-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2) complex were previously predicted to be involved in cellular metabolism and cell growth. Silencing of these genes impaired early glia proliferation and subsequent differentiation. Dref controls proliferation via activation of the Pdm3 transcription factor, whereas glial differentiation is regulated via Dref and the homeodomain protein Cut. Cut expression is controlled independently of Dref by FGF receptor activity. Loss- and gain-of-function studies show that Cut is required for glial differentiation and is sufficient to instruct the formation of membrane protrusions, a hallmark of wrapping glial morphology. Our work discloses a network of transcriptional regulators controlling the progression of a naïve perineurial glia towards the fully differentiated wrapping glia.

  7. The glial cell modulator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, AV411 (ibudilast), attenuates prime- and stress-induced methamphetamine relapse

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Patrick M.; Shelton, Keith L.; Hendrick, Elizabeth; Johnson, Kirk W.

    2010-01-01

    Stress and renewed contact with drug (a “slip”) have been linked to persisting relapse of methamphetamine abuse. Human brain microglial activation has been linked with methamphetamine abuse, and inhibitors of glial cell activation, certain phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors, and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) have been reported to modulate drug abuse effects. Our objective was to determine whether the glial cell attenuator, 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine (AV411, ibudilast), a non-selective PDE inhibitor and promoter of GDNF, could reduce stress- and methamphetamine prime-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior. Male Long-Evans hooded rats were trained to lever press reinforced with 0.1 mg/kg i.v. methamphetamine infusion according to fixed-ratio 1 (FR1) reinforcement schedules during daily, 2-h experimental sessions. After performance had stabilized, lever pressing was extinguished for 12 consecutive sessions and doses of 0 (vehicle), 2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg AV411 were then administered intraperitoneally b.i.d. on the last two days of extinction and then once on the testday to separate groups of 12 rats. During testing, the rats were given 15 min of intermittent footshock or a 1 mg/kg i.p. methamphetamine prime followed by a 2-h reinstatement test session. AV411 significantly reduced response levels of footshock-induced (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg) and prime-induced (7.5 mg/kg) reinstatement of extinguished methamphetamine-maintained responding. AV411 has properties consistent with the ability to attenuate relapse precipitated by stress and methamphetamine “slips” during abstinence. These results thus reinforce interest in atypical neurobiological mechanisms which could be exploited for developing novel medications for treating drug abuse disorders. PMID:20399770

  8. The glial cell modulator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, AV411 (ibudilast), attenuates prime- and stress-induced methamphetamine relapse.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Patrick M; Shelton, Keith L; Hendrick, Elizabeth; Johnson, Kirk W

    2010-07-10

    Stress and renewed contact with drug (a "slip") have been linked to persisting relapse of methamphetamine abuse. Human brain microglial activation has been linked with methamphetamine abuse, and inhibitors of glial cell activation, certain phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors, and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) have been reported to modulate drug abuse effects. Our objective was to determine whether the glial cell attenuator, 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine (AV411, ibudilast), a non-selective PDE inhibitor and promoter of GDNF, could reduce stress- and methamphetamine prime-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior. Male Long-Evans hooded rats were trained to lever press reinforced with 0.1 mg/kg i.v. methamphetamine infusion according to fixed-ratio 1 (FR1) reinforcement schedules during daily, 2-hour experimental sessions. After performance had stabilized, lever pressing was extinguished for 12 consecutive sessions and doses of 0 (vehicle), 2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg AV411 were then administered intraperitoneally b.i.d. on the last 2 days of extinction and then once on the testday to separate groups of 12 rats. During testing, the rats were given 15 min of intermittent footshock or a 1 mg/kg i.p. methamphetamine prime followed by a 2-hour reinstatement test session. AV411 significantly reduced response levels of footshock-induced (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg) and prime-induced (7.5 mg/kg) reinstatement of extinguished methamphetamine-maintained responding. AV411 has properties consistent with the ability to attenuate relapse precipitated by stress and methamphetamine "slips" during abstinence. These results thus reinforce interest in atypical neurobiological mechanisms which could be exploited for developing novel medications for treating drug abuse disorders.

  9. Proliferation status defines functional properties of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lipps, Christoph; Badar, Muhammad; Butueva, Milada; Dubich, Tatyana; Singh, Vivek Vikram; Rau, Sophie; Weber, Axel; Kracht, Michael; Köster, Mario; May, Tobias; Schulz, Thomas F; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Homeostasis of solid tissue is characterized by a low proliferative activity of differentiated cells while special conditions like tissue damage induce regeneration and proliferation. For some cell types it has been shown that various tissue-specific functions are missing in the proliferating state, raising the possibility that their proliferation is not compatible with a fully differentiated state. While endothelial cells are important players in regenerating tissue as well as in the vascularization of tumors, the impact of proliferation on their features remains elusive. To examine cell features in dependence of proliferation, we established human endothelial cell lines in which proliferation is tightly controlled by a doxycycline-dependent, synthetic regulatory unit. We observed that uptake of macromolecules and establishment of cell-cell contacts was more pronounced in the growth-arrested state. Tube-like structures were formed in vitro in both proliferating and non-proliferating conditions. However, functional vessel formation upon transplantation into immune-compromised mice was restricted to the proliferative state. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) infection resulted in reduced expression of endothelial markers. Upon transplantation of infected cells, drastic differences were observed: proliferation arrested cells acquired a high migratory activity while the proliferating counterparts established a tumor-like phenotype, similar to Kaposi Sarcoma lesions. The study gives evidence that proliferation governs endothelial functions. This suggests that several endothelial functions are differentially expressed during angiogenesis. Moreover, since proliferation defines the functional properties of cells upon infection with KSHV, this process crucially affects the fate of virus-infected cells.

  10. Induction of adipose-derived stem cells into Schwann-like cells and observation of Schwann-like cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiumei; Tong, Zhaoxue; Li, Qi; Niu, Qingfei; Zhang, Zhe; Tong, Xiaojie; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system has the potential for full regeneration following injury and recovery, predominantly controlled by Schwann cells (SCs). Therefore, obtaining a sufficient number of SCs in a short duration is crucial. In the present study, rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were isolated and cultured, following which characterization of the ADSCs was performed using flow cytometry. The results showed that the cells were positive for the CD29 and CD44 markers, and negative for the CD31, CD45, CD49 and CD106 markers. The multilineage differentiation potential of the ADSCs was assayed by determining the ability of the cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Following this, the ADSCs were treated with a specific medium and differentiated into Schwann-like cells. Immunofluorescence, western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that ~95% of the differentiated cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, S100 and p75. In addition, the present study found that a substantial number of SCs can be produced in a short duration via the mitotic feature of Schwann-like cells. These data indicated that Schwann-like cells derived from ADSCs can undergo mitotic proliferation, which may be beneficial for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury in the future. PMID:27279556

  11. Endothelins Inhibit Osmotic Swelling of Rat Retinal Glial and Bipolar Cells by Activation of Growth Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Grosche, Antje; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Here, we show that endothelin-1 (ET-1) dose-dependently inhibits the hypoosmotic swelling of Müller cells in freshly isolated retinal slices of control and diabetic rats, with a maximal inhibition at 100 nM. Osmotic Müller cell swelling was also inhibited by ET-2. The effect of ET-1 was mediated by activation of ETA and ETB receptors resulting in transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, purinergic P2Y1, and adenosine A1 receptors. ET-1 (but not ET-2) also inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cells in retinal slices, but failed to inhibit the swelling of freshly isolated bipolar cells. The inhibitory effect of ET-1 on the bipolar cell swelling in retinal slices was abrogated by inhibitors of the FGF receptor kinase (PD173074) and of TGF-β1 superfamily activin receptor-like kinase receptors (SB431542), respectively. Both Müller and bipolar cells displayed immunoreactivities of ETA and ETB receptor proteins. The data may suggest that neuroprotective effects of ETs in the retina are in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial and bipolar cells. ET-1 acts directly on Müller cells, while the inhibitory effect of ET-1 on bipolar cell swelling is indirectly mediated, via stimulation of the release of growth factors like bFGF and TGF-β1 from Müller cells.

  12. Development of glial cells cultured from prenatally alcohol treated rat brain: effect of supplementation of the maternal alcohol diet with a grape extract.

    PubMed

    Ledig, M; Holownia, A; Copin, J C; Tholey, G; Anokhina, I

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of supplementation of a maternal alcohol diet with a grape extract on glial cell development. Glial cells were cultured during 4 weeks from cortical brain cells of the new born offspring in DMEM medium supplemented with fetal calf serum. Enzymatic markers of nerve cell development were measured (enolase isoenzymes and glutamine synthetase). Since alcohol consumption produces free radicals the antioxidant system superoxide dismutase was also investigated. Compared to the decrease found in only alcohol treated animals, all parameters except neuron-specific enolase were antagonized and even stimulated after grape extract supplementation. The effect was more important after only 1 month than 3 months of treatment. Also in the total brain an alcohol antagonizing effect and a glutamine synthetase activation were found. Our data demonstrate that addition of a grape extract to the maternal alcohol diet may partially or completely overcome the alcohol induced retardation of glial cell development.

  13. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke.

  14. Müller glial cell-provided cellular light guidance through the vital guinea-pig retina.

    PubMed

    Agte, Silke; Junek, Stephan; Matthias, Sabrina; Ulbricht, Elke; Erdmann, Ines; Wurm, Antje; Schild, Detlev; Käs, Josef A; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2011-12-07

    In vertebrate eyes, images are projected onto an inverted retina where light passes all retinal layers on its way to the photoreceptor cells. Light scattering within this tissue should impair vision. We show that radial glial (Müller) cells in the living retina minimize intraretinal light scatter and conserve the diameter of a beam that hits a single Müller cell endfoot. Thus, light arrives at individual photoreceptors with high intensity. This leads to an optimized signal/noise ratio, which increases visual sensitivity and contrast. Moreover, we show that the ratio between Müller cells and cones-responsible for acute vision-is roughly 1. This suggests that high spatiotemporal resolution may be achieved by each cone receiving its part of the image via its individual Müller cell-light guide.

  15. Aging affects initiation and continuation of T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiu; Gross, Diara; Elbaum, Philip; Murasko, Donna M

    2007-04-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in immune responses, particularly within the T cell compartment. While the expansion of specific T cells in response to virus infections is consistently decreased in aged mice, the differences in T cell activation between young and aged mice as demonstrated in each round of proliferation remain poorly defined. In the present study, we utilized the T cell mitogen, ConA, to explore if fewer T cells of aged mice initiate proliferation upon mitogen stimulation or if similar numbers of T cells of aged mice begin proliferation but undergo fewer rounds of division. We also examined whether these age-associated changes in proliferation are reflected by differences in T cell activation by comparing activation markers (CD25, CD69, CD44, and CD62L) on T cells of young and aged mice at each round of proliferation. Not only was the kinetics of the expression of these markers greatly different between young and aged mice on the entire CD8 T cell population, but also at each round of proliferation. Our results demonstrate that a larger percentage of CD8 T cells of aged mice do not proliferate at all upon stimulation. Of the CD8 T cells of aged mice that do proliferate, a larger percentage start later and stop sooner. These results suggest that multiple levels of alteration may need to be considered when trying to maximize the immune response of aged individuals.

  16. Possible involvement of queuine in regulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2007-01-01

    An increase in cell number is one of the most prominent characteristics of cancer cells. This may be caused by an increase in cell proliferation or decrease in cell death. Queuine is one of the modified base which is found at first anticodon position of specific tRNAs. It is ubiquitously present throughout the living system except mycoplasma and yeast. The tRNAs of Q-family are completely modified to Q-tRNAs in terminally differentiated somatic cells, however hypomodification of Q-tRNA is closely associated with cell proliferation and malignancy. Queuine participates at various cellular functions such as regulation of cell proliferation, cell signaling and alteration in the expression of growth associated proto-oncogenes. Like other proto-oncogenes bcl2 is known to involve in cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. Queuine or Q-tRNA is suggested to inhibit cell proliferation but the mechanism of regulation of cell proliferation by queuine or Q-tRNA is not well understood. Therefore, in the present study regulation in cell proliferation by queuine in vivo and in vitro as well as the expression of cell death regulatory protein Bcl2 are investigated. For this DLAT cancerous mouse, U87 cell line and HepG2 cell line are treated with different concentrations of queuine and the effect of queuine on cell proliferation and apoptosis are studied. The results indicate that queuine down regulates cell proliferation and expression of Bcl2 protein, suggesting that queuine promotes cell death and participates in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  17. Tramtrack controls glial number and identity in the Drosophila embryonic CNS.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, P

    2001-10-01

    Neurons and glia are often derived from common multipotent stem cells. In Drosophila, neural identity appears to be the default fate of these precursors. Stem cells that generate either neurons or glia transiently express neural stem cell-specific markers. Further development as glia requires the activation of glial-specific regulators. However, this must be accompanied by simultaneous repression of the alternate neural fate. I show that the Drosophila transcriptional repressor Tramtrack is a key repressor of neuronal fates. It is expressed at high levels in all mature glia of the embryonic central nervous system. Analysis of the temporal profile of Tramtrack expression in glia shows that it follows that of existing glial markers. When expressed ectopically before neural stem cell formation, Tramtrack represses the neural stem cell-specific genes asense and deadpan. Surprisingly, Tramtrack protein levels oscillate in a cell cycle-dependent manner in proliferating glia, with expression dropping before replication, but re-initiating after S phase. Overexpression of Tramtrack blocks glial development by inhibiting S-phase and repressing expression of the S-phase cyclin, cyclin E. Conversely, in tramtrack mutant embryos, glia are disrupted and undergo additional rounds of replication. I propose that Tramtrack ensures stable mature glial identity by both repressing neuroblast-specific genes and controlling glial cell proliferation.

  18. Skin cell proliferation stimulated by microneedles.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C

    2012-03-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7-14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm(2) of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on "ablation" (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument.

  19. Skin Cell Proliferation Stimulated by Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C.

    2012-01-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7–14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm2 of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on “ablation” (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  20. Imipramine activates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor via early growth response gene 1 in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeni; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Young Han; Ha, Kyooseob; Shin, Soon Young

    2011-06-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that deficits in glial plasticity contribute to the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. The present study explored early growth response 1 (EGR-1) transcriptional regulation of imipramine-induced glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) expression in astrocytes. After we observed the induction of GDNF mRNA expression in rat astrocytes in response to imipramine, deletion mutant studies showed that the proximal region between -493 and -114 of the GDNF promoter, which contains three binding sites for EGR-1, was essential for maximal imipramine-induced activation of GDNF promoter. The dose-dependent upregulation of EGR-1 by imipramine, the activation of GDNF by the over-expression of EGR-1 without imipramine and the reduction in the imipramine-induced GDNF mRNA expression after silencing of endogenous EGR-1 demonstrated that EGR-1 is upregulated by imipramine to activate the GDNF promoter. Furthermore, imipramine-induced GDNF mRNA expression was strongly attenuated in primary astrocytes from Egr-1(-/-) mice, and the immunoreactivity to an anti-GDNF antibody in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells was lower in imipramine-treated astrocytes from Egr-1(-/-) mice than in those from Egr-1(+/-) mice. To determine whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were associated with imipramine-induced EGR-1 expression, we examined the induction of MAPK phosphorylation in response to imipramine. Pretreatment of rat primary astrocytes with the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125 strongly inhibited imipramine-stimulated EGR-1 expression. In conclusion, we found that imipramine induction of EGR-1 upregulated GDNF in astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This upregulation may occur through the MEK/ERK and JNK MAPK pathways, which suggests a new therapeutic mechanism of action for depressive disorders.

  1. Erythropoietin inhibits osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells by Janus kinase- and extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2-mediated release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Krügel, K; Wurm, A; Linnertz, R; Pannicke, T; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Bringmann, A

    2010-02-17

    The volume homeostasis of retinal glial cells is mediated by an autocrine purinergic mechanism of ion channel opening which is activated in response to a decrease in the extracellular osmolarity. Here, we show that erythropoietin (EPO) prevents the osmotic swelling of glial somata in retinal slices and of isolated glial cells from control and diabetic rats, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 0.01 nM. The downstream signaling evoked by EPO includes a release of vascular endothelial growth factor from the cells which was blocked by Janus kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 inhibitors. Transactivation of kinase insert domain-containing receptor/fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (KDR/flk-1) evokes a calcium-dependent, exocytotic release of glutamate, followed by activation of group I/II metabotropic glutamate receptors which results in calcium-independent release of ATP and adenosine from the cells. The final step in this cascade is the activation of adenosine A(1) receptors which results in protein kinase A- and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated opening of potassium and chloride channels. EPO receptor protein was immunohistochemically localized to the inner retina and photoreceptor inner segments. In isolated glial cells, EPO receptor protein is selectively localized to fibers which traverse the inner nuclear layer in situ. Inhibition of glial swelling might contribute to the neuroprotective action of EPO in the retina under pathological conditions.

  2. Effects of acetylcholine and electrical stimulation on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vianney, John-Mary; Miller, Damon A; Spitsbergen, John M

    2014-11-07

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophic factor required for survival of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically, GDNF has been characterized as a survival factor for spinal motor neurons. GDNF is synthesized and secreted by neuronal target tissues, including skeletal muscle in the peripheral nervous system; however, the mechanisms by which GDNF is synthesized and released by skeletal muscle are not fully understood. Previous results suggested that cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. In the current study, GDNF production by skeletal muscle myotubes following treatment with acetylcholine was examined. Acetylcholine receptors on myotubes were identified with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin and were blocked using unlabeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The question of whether electrical stimulation has a similar effect to that of acetylcholine was also investigated. Cells were stimulated with voltage pulses; at 1 and 5 Hz frequencies for times ranging from 30 min to 48 h. GDNF content in myotubes and GDNF in conditioned culture medium were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Results suggest that acetylcholine and short-term electrical stimulation reduce GDNF secretion, while treatment with carbachol or long-term electrical stimulation enhances GDNF production by skeletal muscle.

  3. β-Lactoglobulin Influences Human Immunity and Promotes Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chun San; Chen, Yi Yun

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (LG) is suspected to enhance or modulate human immune responses. Moreover, LG is also hypothesized to increase human cell proliferation. However, these potential functions of LG have not been directly or thoroughly addressed. In this study, we demonstrated that LG is a potent stimulator of cell proliferation using a hybridoma cell (a splenocyte fused with a myeloma cell) model. LG's ability to promote cell proliferation was lost when the protein is denatured. To further investigate the influence of LG's conformation on cell proliferation, we chemically modified LG by either carboxymethylation (CM) or acetylation and observed significantly reduced cell proliferation when the protein structure was altered. Furthermore, we proved that LG enhances cell proliferation via receptor-mediated membrane IgM receptor. These data indicated that nondenatured LG is the major component in milk that modulates cell proliferation. Collectively, our study showed that LG plays a key role in enhancing immune responses by promoting cell proliferation through IgM receptor. PMID:27957499

  4. Characterization of Panglial Gap Junction Networks in the Thalamus, Neocortex, and Hippocampus Reveals a Unique Population of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Griemsmann, Stephanie; Höft, Simon P; Bedner, Peter; Zhang, Jiong; von Staden, Elena; Beinhauer, Anna; Degen, Joachim; Dublin, Pavel; Cope, David W; Richter, Nadine; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Jabs, Ronald; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin; Seifert, Gerald; Kettenmann, Helmut; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-10-01

    The thalamus plays important roles as a relay station for sensory information in the central nervous system (CNS). Although thalamic glial cells participate in this activity, little is known about their properties. In this study, we characterized the formation of coupled networks between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the murine ventrobasal thalamus and compared these properties with those in the hippocampus and cortex. Biocytin filling of individual astrocytes or oligodendrocytes revealed large panglial networks in all 3 gray matter regions. Combined analyses of mice with cell type-specific deletion of connexins (Cxs), semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting showed that Cx30 is the dominant astrocytic Cx in the thalamus. Many thalamic astrocytes even lack expression of Cx43, while in the hippocampus astrocytic coupling is dominated by Cx43. Deletion of Cx30 and Cx47 led to complete loss of panglial coupling, which was restored when one allele of either Cxs was present. Immunohistochemistry revealed a unique antigen profile of thalamic glia and identified an intermediate cell type expressing both Olig2 and Cx43. Our findings further the emerging concept of glial heterogeneity across brain regions.

  5. Transplantation of Glial Cells Enhances Action Potential Conduction of Amyelinated Spinal Cord Axons in the Myelin-Deficient Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utzschneider, David A.; Archer, David R.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Duncan, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    A central issue in transplantation research is to determine how and when transplantation of neural tissue can influence the development and function of the mammalian central nervous system. Of particular interest is whether electrophysiological function in the traumatized or diseased mammalian central nervous system can be improved by the replacement of cellular elements that are missing or damaged. Although it is known that transplantation of neural tissue can lead to functional improvement in models of neurological disease characterized by neuronal loss, less is known about results of transplantation in disorders of myelin. We report here that transplantation of glial cells into the dorsal columns of neonatal myelin-deficient rat spinal cords leads to myelination and a 3-fold increase in conduction velocity. We also show that impulses can propagate into and out of the transplant region and that axons myelinated by transplanted cells do not have impaired frequency-response properties. These results demonstrate that myelination following central nervous system glial cell transplantation enhances action potential conduction in myelin-deficient axons, with conduction velocity approaching normal values.

  6. Characterization of Panglial Gap Junction Networks in the Thalamus, Neocortex, and Hippocampus Reveals a Unique Population of Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Griemsmann, Stephanie; Höft, Simon P.; Bedner, Peter; Zhang, Jiong; von Staden, Elena; Beinhauer, Anna; Degen, Joachim; Dublin, Pavel; Cope, David W.; Richter, Nadine; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Jabs, Ronald; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin; Seifert, Gerald; Kettenmann, Helmut; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus plays important roles as a relay station for sensory information in the central nervous system (CNS). Although thalamic glial cells participate in this activity, little is known about their properties. In this study, we characterized the formation of coupled networks between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the murine ventrobasal thalamus and compared these properties with those in the hippocampus and cortex. Biocytin filling of individual astrocytes or oligodendrocytes revealed large panglial networks in all 3 gray matter regions. Combined analyses of mice with cell type-specific deletion of connexins (Cxs), semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting showed that Cx30 is the dominant astrocytic Cx in the thalamus. Many thalamic astrocytes even lack expression of Cx43, while in the hippocampus astrocytic coupling is dominated by Cx43. Deletion of Cx30 and Cx47 led to complete loss of panglial coupling, which was restored when one allele of either Cxs was present. Immunohistochemistry revealed a unique antigen profile of thalamic glia and identified an intermediate cell type expressing both Olig2 and Cx43. Our findings further the emerging concept of glial heterogeneity across brain regions. PMID:25037920

  7. A Preliminary Investigation into the Impact of a Pesticide Combination on Human Neuronal and Glial Cell Lines In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Michael D.; O'Neil, John D.; Woehrling, Elizabeth K.; Ndunge, Oscar Bate Akide; Hill, Eric J.; Menache, Andre; Reiss, Claude J.

    2012-01-01

    Many pesticides are used increasingly in combinations during crop protection and their stability ensures the presence of such combinations in foodstuffs. The effects of three fungicides, pyrimethanil, cyprodinil and fludioxonil, were investigated together and separately on U251 and SH-SY5Y cells, which can be representative of human CNS glial and neuronal cells respectively. Over 48h, all three agents showed significant reductions in cellular ATP, at concentrations that were more than tenfold lower than those which significantly impaired cellular viability. The effects on energy metabolism were reflected in their marked toxic effects on mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, evidence of oxidative stress was seen in terms of a fall in cellular thiols coupled with increases in the expression of enzymes associated with reactive species formation, such as GSH peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. The glial cell line showed significant responsiveness to the toxin challenge in terms of changes in antioxidant gene expression, although the neuronal SH-SY5Y line exhibited greater vulnerability to toxicity, which was reflected in significant increases in caspase-3 expression, which is indicative of the initiation of apoptosis. Cyprodinil was the most toxic agent individually, although oxidative stress-related enzyme gene expression increases appeared to demonstrate some degree of synergy in the presence of the combination of agents. This report suggests that the impact of some pesticides, both individually and in combinations, merits further study in terms of their impact on human cellular health. PMID:22880100

  8. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  9. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor protects against high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing hepatic PPAR-γ expression

    PubMed Central

    Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Peng, Sophia; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Thorn, Natalie; Farris, Alton B.; Jain, Sanjay; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier; Anania, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice, however, the mechanisms involved are not known. In this study we investigated the effects of GDNF overexpression and nanoparticle delivery of GDNF in mice on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis and the expression of genes involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid uptake and de novo lipogenesis. Transgenic overexpression of GDNF in liver and other metabolically active tissues was protective against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. Mice overexpressing GDNF had significantly reduced P62/sequestosome 1 protein levels suggestive of accelerated autophagic clearance. They also had significantly reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CD36 gene expression and protein levels, and lower expression of mRNA coding for enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis. GDNF-loaded nanoparticles were protective against short-term HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and attenuated liver fibrosis in mice with long-standing HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. They also suppressed the liver expression of steatosis-associated genes. In vitro, GDNF suppressed triglyceride accumulation in Hep G2 cells through enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling and inhibition of PPAR-γ gene promoter activity. These results show that GDNF acts directly in the liver to protect against HFD-induced cellular stress and that GDNF may have a role in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26564715

  10. Glial commitment of mesencephalic neural precursor cells expanded as neurospheres precludes their engagement in niche-dependent dopaminergic neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baizabal, José-Manuel; Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Valencia, Concepción; Santa-Olalla, Jesús; Young, Kaylene M; Rietze, Rodney L; Bartlett, Perry F; Covarrubias, Luis

    2012-05-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) with high proliferative potential are commonly expanded in vitro as neurospheres. As a population, neurosphere cells show long-term self-renewal capacity and multipotentiality in vitro. These features have led to the assumption that neurosphere cells represent an expansion of the endogenous NPCs residing within the embryonic and adult brain. If this is the case, in principle, bona-fide expansion of endogenous NPCs should not significantly affect their capacity to respond to their original niche of differentiation. To address this issue, we generated primary neurospheres from the dopaminergic niche of the ventral mesencephalon and then transplanted these cells to their original niche within mesencephalic explant cultures. Primary neurosphere cells showed poor capacity to generate dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalic niche of dopaminergic neurogenesis. Instead, most primary neurosphere cells showed glial commitment as they differentiated into astrocytes in an exclusively neurogenic niche. Subculture of primary cells demonstrated that the neurosphere assay does not amplify niche-responsive dopaminergic progenitors. Further, neurospheres cells were largely unable to acquire the endogenous positional identity within the Nkx6.1(+), Nkx2.2(+), and Pax7(+) domains of mesencephalic explants. Finally, we demonstrate that our observations are not specific for embryonic mesencephalic cells, as NPCs in the adult subventricular zone also showed an intrinsic fate switch from neuronal to glial potential upon neurosphere amplification. Our data suggest that neurosphere formation does not expand the endogenous neurogenic NPCs but rather promotes amplification of gliogenic precursors that do not respond to niche-derived signals of cellular specification and differentiation.

  11. ErbB2 activation contributes to de-differentiation of astrocytes into radial glial cells following induction of scratch-insulted astrocyte conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Ling, Weng; Vitale, Angela; Olivera, Cathy; Min, Yan; You, Siwei

    2011-12-01

    Radial glial cells play a significant role in the repair of spinal cord injuries as they exert critical role in the neurogenesis and act as a scaffold for neuronal migration. Our previous study showed that mature astrocytes of spinal cord can undergo a de-differentiation process and further transform into pluripotential neural precursors; the occurrence of these complex events arise directly from the induction of diffusible factors released from scratch-insulted astrocytes. However, it is unclear whether astrocytes can also undergo rejuvenation to revert to a radial glial progenitor phenotype after the induction of scratch-insulted astrocytes conditioned medium (ACM). Furthermore, the mechanism of astrocyte de-differentiation to the progenitor cells is still unclear. Here we demonstrate that upon treating mature astrocytes with ACM for 10 days, the astrocytes exhibit progressive morphological and functional conversion to radial glial cells. These changes include the appearance of radial glial progenitor cells, changes in the immunophenotypical profiles, characterized by the co-expression of nestin, paired homeobox protein (Pax6) and RC2 as well as enhanced capability of multipotential differentiation. Concomitantly, ErbB2 protein level was progressively up-regulated. Thereby these results provide a potential mechanism by which ACM could induce mature astrocytes to regain the profile of radial glial progenitors due to activating the ErbB2 signaling pathways.

  12. Inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in myelinating glial cells results in significant loss of adult spiral ganglion neurons accompanied by age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Furusho, M; D'Sa, C; Kuwada, S; Conti, L; Morest, D K; Bansal, R

    2009-11-15

    Hearing loss has been attributed to many factors, including degeneration of sensory neurons in the auditory pathway and demyelination along the cochlear nerve. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which signal through four receptors (Fgfrs), are produced by auditory neurons and play a key role in embryonic development of the cochlea and in neuroprotection against sound-induced injury. However, the role of FGF signaling in the maintenance of normal auditory function in adult and aging mice remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the contribution of glial cells, which myelinate the cochlear nerves, is poorly understood. To address these questions, we generated transgenic mice in which Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 were specifically inactivated in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes but not in neurons. Adult mutant mice exhibited late onset of hearing impairment, which progressed markedly with age. The hearing impairment was accompanied by significant loss of myelinated spiral ganglion neurons. The pathology extended into the cochlear nucleus, without apparent loss of myelin or of the deletion-bearing glial cells themselves. This suggests that perturbation of FGF receptor-mediated glial function leads to the attenuation of glial support of neurons, leading to their loss and impairment of auditory functions. Thus, FGF/FGF receptor signaling provides a potentially novel mechanism of maintaining reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia in adult and aging animals. Dysfunction of glial cells and FGF receptor signaling may therefore be implicated in neurodegenerative hearing loss associated with normal aging.

  13. Early effects of iodine deficiency on radial glial cells of the hippocampus of the rat fetus. A model of neurological cretinism.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Galán, J R; Pedraza, P; Santacana, M; Escobar del Ray, F; Morreale de Escobar, G; Ruiz-Marcos, A

    1997-01-01

    The most severe brain damage associated with thyroid dysfunction during development is observed in neurological cretins from areas with marked iodine deficiency. The damage is irreversible by birth and related to maternal hypothyroxinemia before mid gestation. However, direct evidence of this etiopathogenic mechanism is lacking. Rats were fed diets with a very low iodine content (LID), or LID supplemented with KI. Other rats were fed the breeding diet with a normal iodine content plus a goitrogen, methimazole (MMI). The concentrations of -thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'triiodo--thyronine (T3) were determined in the brain of 21-d-old fetuses. The proportion of radial glial cell fibers expressing nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was determined in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. T4 and T3 were decreased in the brain of the LID and MMI fetuses, as compared to their respective controls. The number of immature glial cell fibers, expressing nestin, was not affected, but the proportion of mature glial cell fibers, expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein, was significantly decreased by both LID and MMI treatment of the dams. These results show impaired maturation of cells involved in neuronal migration in the hippocampus, a region known to be affected in cretinism, at a stage of development equivalent to mid gestation in humans. The impairment is related to fetal cerebral thyroid hormone deficiency during a period of development when maternal thyroxinemia is believed to play an important role. PMID:9169500

  14. [The role of the glial cells in the maintenance of the ionic environment of the photoreceptors of the retina of the drone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Coles, J A

    1978-04-01

    A double-barrelled potassium sensitive microelectrode was used to record electrical potentials and K+ activities in the retina of the drone Apis Mellifera during stimulation with trains of flashes, 1 per sec, intense enough to produce receptor potentials of near maximal amplitude. During the stimulation photoreceptors lose about 25% of their intracellular potassium concentration. During stimulation the potassium activity in the extracellular space increased transitorily up to 20 mM and then fell to a plateau. By this time the potassium concentration increased by about 20% in the glial cells. These results suggest that the glial cells may participate in the regulation of K+ activity in the extracellular space. The increase of potassium activity in the glial cells may be a stimulus for activation of cellular metabolism.

  15. Radiosensitisation by pharmacological ascorbate in glioblastoma multiforme cells, human glial cells, and HUVECs depends on their antioxidant and DNA repair capabilities and is not cancer specific.

    PubMed

    Castro, M Leticia; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that 5 mM ascorbate radiosensitized early passage radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells derived from one patient tumor. Here we investigate the sensitivity of a panel of cell lines to 5 mM ascorbate and 6 Gy ionizing radiation, made up of three primary human GBM cells, three GBM cell lines, a human glial cell line, and primary human vascular endothelial cells. The response of different cells lines to ascorbate and/or radiation was determined by measuring viability, colony-forming ability, generation and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs), cell cycle progression, antioxidant capacity and generation of reactive oxygen species. Individually, radiation and ascorbate both decreased viability and clonogenicity by inducing DNA damage, but had differential effects on cell cycle progression. Radiation led to G2/M arrest in most cells whereas ascorbate caused accumulation in S phase, which was moderately associated with poor DSB repair. While high dose ascorbate radiosensitized all cell lines in clonogenic assays, the sensitivity to radiation, high dose ascorbate, and combined treatment varied between cell lines. Normal glial cells were similar to GBM cells with respect to free radical scavenging potential and effect of treatment on DNA damage and repair, viability, and clonogenicity. Both GBM cells and normal cells coped equally poorly with oxidative stress caused by radiation and/or high dose ascorbate, dependent primarily on their antioxidant and DSB repair capacity.

  16. PDGF stimulation of Mueller cell proliferation: Contributions of c-JNK and the PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sang Woong; Chung, Eun Jee; Jung, Sun-Ah; Lee, Joon H.

    2009-10-09

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has a critical role in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) as a chemoattractant and mitogen for retinal pigment epithelial cells and retinal glial cells. Here, we investigated the potential effects of PDGF on the proliferation of Mueller cells and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. PDGF induced Mueller cell proliferation and increased phosphorylation of the PDGF receptor (PDGFR), as shown by an MTT assay and immunoprecipitation analyses. Both effects were blocked by JNJ, a PDGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PDGF also stimulated phosphorylation of c-JNK and Akt. PDGF-induced Mueller cell proliferation was significantly reduced by pre-treatment with SP600125 and LY294002, inhibitors of c-JNK and Akt phosphorylation, respectively. Our findings collectively indicate that PDGF-stimulated Mueller cell proliferation occurs via activation of the c-JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These data provide useful information in establishing the role of Mueller cells in the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  17. Increased expression of BDNF and proliferation of dentate granule cells after bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Stadelmann, Christine; Spreer, Annette; Brück, Wolfgang; Nau, Roland; Gerber, Joachim

    2005-09-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells is increased after bacterial meningitis. To identify endogenous factors involved in neurogenesis, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, nerve growth factor (NGF), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was investigated. C57BL/6 mice were infected by intracerebral injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mice were killed 30 hours later or treated with ceftriaxone and killed 4 days after infection. Hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels were increased 2.4-fold 4 days after infection (p = 0.026). Similarly, BDNF protein levels in the hippocampal formation were higher in infected mice than in control animals (p = 0.0003). This was accompanied by an elevated proliferation of dentate granule cells (p = 0.0002). BDNF protein was located predominantly in the hippocampal CA3/4 area and the hilus of the dentate gyrus. The density of dentate granule cells expressing the BDNF receptor TrkB as well as mRNA levels of TrkB in the hippocampal formation were increased 4 days after infection (p = 0.027 and 0.0048, respectively). Conversely, NGF mRNA levels at 30 hours after infection were reduced by approximately 50% (p = 0.004). No significant changes in GDNF expression were observed. In conclusion, increased synthesis of BDNF and TrkB suggests a contribution of this neurotrophic factor to neurogenesis after bacterial meningitis.

  18. Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation from Smartphones on Learning Ability and Hippocampal Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu-Jin; Choi, Yun-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Nonionizing radiation is emitted from electronic devices, such as smartphones. In this study, we intended to elucidate the effect of electromagnetic radiation from smartphones on spatial working memory and progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Methods Both male and female mice were randomly separated into two groups (radiated and control) and the radiated group was exposed to electromagnetic radiation for 9 weeks and 11 weeks for male and female mice, respectively. Spatial working memory was examined with a Y maze, and proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells were examined by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine administration and immunohistochemical detection. Results When spatial working memory on a Y maze was examined in the 9th week, there was no significant difference in the spontaneous alternation score on the Y maze between the two groups. In addition, there was no significant difference in hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation. However, immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased in exposed animals. Next, to test the effect of recovery following chronic radiation exposure, the remaining female mice were further exposed to electromagnetic radiation for 2 more weeks (total 11 weeks), and spontaneous alternation was tested 4 weeks later. In this experiment, although there was no significant difference in the spontaneous alternation scores, the number of arm entry was significantly increased. Conclusion These data indicate that although chronic electromagnetic radiation does not affect spatial working memory and hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation it can mediate astrocyte activation in the hippocampus and delayed hyperactivity-like behavior. PMID:26981337

  19. Short Term Morphine Exposure In Vitro Alters Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells and Promotes Apoptosis via Mu Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Dafna; Cohen-Yeshurun, Ayelet; Avidan, Alexander; Ozersky, Vladislav; Shohami, Esther; Leker, Ronen R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic morphine treatment inhibits neural progenitor cell (NPC) progression and negatively effects hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the effect of acute opioid treatment on cell development and its influence on NPC differentiation and proliferation in vitro is unknown. We aim to investigate the effect of a single, short term exposure of morphine on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of NPCs and the mechanism involved. Methods Cell cultures from 14-day mouse embryos were exposed to different concentrations of morphine and its antagonist naloxone for 24 hours and proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis were studied. Proliferating cells were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and cell fate was studied with immunocytochemistry. Results Cells treated with morphine demonstrated decreased BrdU expression with increased morphine concentrations. Analysis of double-labeled cells showed a decrease in cells co-stained for BrdU with nestin and an increase in cells co-stained with BrdU and neuron-specific class III β-tubuline (TUJ1) in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, a significant increase in caspase-3 activity was observed in the nestin- positive cells. Addition of naloxone to morphine-treated NPCs reversed the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of morphine. Conclusions Short term morphine exposure induced inhibition of NPC proliferation and increased active caspase-3 expression in a dose dependent manner. Morphine induces neuronal and glial differentiation and decreases the expression of nestin- positive cells. These effects were reversed with the addition of the opioid antagonist naloxone. Our results demonstrate the effects of short term morphine administration on the proliferation and differentiation of NPCs and imply a mu-receptor mechanism in the regulation of NPC survival. PMID:25072277

  20. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  1. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-03-03

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis.

  2. Comparative study of Pax2 expression in glial cells in the retina and optic nerve of birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Stanke, Jennifer; Moose, Holly E; El-Hodiri, Heithem M; Fischer, Andy J

    2010-06-15

    Little is known about the expression of Pax2 in mature retina or optic nerve. Here we probed for the expression of Pax2 in late stages of embryonic development and in mature chick retina. We find two distinct Pax2 isoforms expressed by cells within the retina and optic nerve. Surprisingly, Müller glia in central regions of the retina express Pax2, and levels of expression are decreased with increasing distance from the nerve head. In Müller glia, the expression levels of Pax2 are increased by acute retinal damage or treatment with growth factors. At the optic nerve, Pax2 is expressed by peripapillary glia, at the junction of the neural retina and optic nerve head and by glia within the optic nerve. In addition, we assayed for Pax2 expression in glial cells in mammalian retinas. In mammalian retinas, unlike the case in chick retina, the Müller glia do not express Pax2. Pax2-expressing cells are found in the optic nerve and astrocytes within the mouse retina. By comparison, Pax2-positive cells are not found within the guinea pig retina; Pax2-expressing glia are confined to the optic nerve. In dog and monkey (Macaca fascicularis), Pax2 is expressed by astrocytes that are scattered across inner retinal layers and by numerous glia within the optic nerve. Interestingly, Pax2-positive glial cells are found at the peripheral edge of the dog retina, but only in older animals. We conclude that the expression of Pax2 in the vertebrate eye is restricted to retinal astrocytes, peripapillary glia, and glia within the optic nerve.

  3. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and prevent certain cancers. Here, we show that simvastatin decreases the SASP of senescent human fibroblasts by inhibiting protein prenylation, without affecting the senescent growth arrest. The Rho family GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 were activated in senescent cells, and simvastatin reduced both activities. Further, geranylgeranyl transferase, Rac1 or Cdc42 depletion reduced IL-6 secretion by senescent cells. We also show that simvastatin mitigates the effects of senescent conditioned media on breast cancer cell proliferation and endocrine resistance. Our findings identify a novel activity of simvastatin and mechanism of SASP regulation. They also suggest that senescent cells, which accumulate after radio/chemo therapy, promote endocrine resistance in breast cancer and that simvastatin might suppress this resistance. PMID:26658759

  4. Non-neuronal Cells in ALS: Role of Glial, Immune cells and Blood-CNS Barriers.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Fabiola; Malaspina, Andrea; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Neurological dysfunction and motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is strongly associated with neuroinflammation reflected by activated microglia and astrocytes in the CNS. In ALS endogenous triggers in the CNS such as aggregated protein and misfolded proteins activate a pathogenic response by innate immune cells. However, there is also strong evidence for a neuroprotective immune response in ALS. Emerging evidence also reveals changes in the peripheral adaptive immune responses as well as alterations in the blood brain barrier that may aid traffic of lymphocytes and antibodies into the CNS. Understanding the triggers of neuroinflammation is key to controlling neuronal loss. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the roles of non-neuronal cells as well as the innate and adaptive immune responses in ALS. Existing ALS animal models, in particular genetic rodent models, are very useful to study the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. We also discuss the approaches used to target the pathogenic immune responses and boost the neuroprotective immune pathways as novel immunotherapies for ALS.

  5. The gut microbiota keeps enteric glial cells on the move; prospective roles of the gut epithelium and immune system.

    PubMed

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S; Lasrado, Reena; McCallum, Sarah; Chng, Song Hui; Snippert, Hugo J; Clevers, Hans; Pettersson, Sven; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) coordinates the major functions of the gastrointestinal tract. Its development takes place within a constantly changing environment which, after birth, culminates in the establishment of a complex gut microbiota. How such changes affect ENS development and its subsequent function throughout life is an emerging field of study that holds great interest but which is inadequately explored thus far. In this addendum, we discuss our recent findings showing that a component of the ENS, the enteric glial cell network that resides in the gut lamina propria, develops after birth and parallels the evolution of the gut microbiota. Importantly, this network was found to be malleable throughout life by incorporating new cells that arrive from the area of the gut wall in a process of directional movement which was controlled by the lumen gut microbiota. Finally, we postulate on the roles of the intestinal epithelium and the immune system as potential intermediaries between gut microbiota and ENS responses.

  6. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P. . E-mail: Bressler@kennedykrieger.org

    2007-05-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin.

  7. The Touch and Zap Method for In Vivo Whole-Cell Patch Recording of Intrinsic and Visual Responses of Cortical Neurons and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Adrien E.; Marinazzo, Daniele; Gener, Thomas; Graham, Lyle J.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-cell patch recording is an essential tool for quantitatively establishing the biophysics of brain function, particularly in vivo. This method is of particular interest for studying the functional roles of cortical glial cells in the intact brain, which cannot be assessed with extracellular recordings. Nevertheless, a reasonable success rate remains a challenge because of stability, recording duration and electrical quality constraints, particularly for voltage clamp, dynamic clamp or conductance measurements. To address this, we describe “Touch and Zap”, an alternative method for whole-cell patch clamp recordings, with the goal of being simpler, quicker and more gentle to brain tissue than previous approaches. Under current clamp mode with a continuous train of hyperpolarizing current pulses, seal formation is initiated immediately upon cell contact, thus the “Touch”. By maintaining the current injection, whole-cell access is spontaneously achieved within seconds from the cell-attached configuration by a self-limited membrane electroporation, or “Zap”, as seal resistance increases. We present examples of intrinsic and visual responses of neurons and putative glial cells obtained with the revised method from cat and rat cortices in vivo. Recording parameters and biophysical properties obtained with the Touch and Zap method compare favourably with those obtained with the traditional blind patch approach, demonstrating that the revised approach does not compromise the recorded cell. We find that the method is particularly well-suited for whole-cell patch recordings of cortical glial cells in vivo, targeting a wider population of this cell type than the standard method, with better access resistance. Overall, the gentler Touch and Zap method is promising for studying quantitative functional properties in the intact brain with minimal perturbation of the cell's intrinsic properties and local network. Because the Touch and Zap method is performed semi

  8. Ethanol alters proliferation and differentiation of normal and chromosomally abnormal human embryonic stem cell-derived neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Malini; Gerwe, Brian A; Scharer, Christopher D; Sahasranaman, Vanita; Eilertson, Carmen D; Nash, Rachel J; Usta, Sümeyra Naz; Kelly, Shasmine; Rose, Matthew; Peraza, Rene; Arumugham, Jagan; Stewart, Bethany; Stice, Steven L; Nash, Rodney J

    2013-06-01

    Ethanol is a powerful substance and, when consumed during pregnancy, has significant psychoactive and developmental effects on the developing fetus. These abnormalities include growth retardation, neurological deficits, and behavioral and cognitive deficiencies, commonly referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. The effect of ethanol has been reported to affect cellular development on the embryonic level, however, not much is known about mutations contributing to the influence of ethanol. The purpose of our study was to determine if mutation contribute to changes in differentiation patterning, cell-cycle regulatory gene expression, and DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells after ethanol exposure. We exposed human embryonic stem cells (with and without know DNA mutations) to a low concentration (20 mM) of ethanol and measured neurosphere proliferation and differentiation, glial protein levels, expression of various cell-cycle genes, and DNA methylation. Ethanol altered cell-cycle gene expression between the two cell lines; however, gene methylation was not affected in ether lines.

  9. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: Differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-11-15

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegeneration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

  10. beta-Chemokine production by neural and glial progenitor cells is enhanced by HIV-1 Tat: effects on microglial migration.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Vo, Phu; Fitting, Sylvia; Block, Michelle L; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 neuropathology results from collective effects of viral proteins and inflammatory mediators on several cell types. Significant damage is mediated indirectly through inflammatory conditions promulgated by glial cells, including microglia that are productively infected by HIV-1, and astroglia. Neural and glial progenitors exist in both developing and adult brains. To determine whether progenitors are targets of HIV-1, a multi-plex assay was performed to assess chemokine/cytokine expression after treatment with viral proteins transactivator of transcription (Tat) or glycoprotein 120 (gp120). In the initial screen, ten analytes were basally released by murine striatal progenitors. The beta-chemokines CCL5/regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted, CCL3/macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and CCL4/macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta were increased by 12-h exposure to HIV-1 Tat. Secreted factors from Tat-treated progenitors were chemoattractive towards microglia, an effect blocked by 2D7 anti-CCR5 antibody pre-treatment. Tat and opiates have interactive effects on astroglial chemokine secretion, but this interaction did not occur in progenitors. gp120 did not affect chemokine/cytokine release, although both CCR5 and CXCR4, which serve as gp120 co-receptors, were detected in progenitors. We postulate that chemokine production by progenitors may be a normal, adaptive process that encourages immune inspection of newly generated cells. Pathogens such as HIV might usurp this function to create a maladaptive state, especially during development or regeneration, when progenitors are numerous.

  11. Global cellular responses to β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) by olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Welch, Jeffrey H; Gehringer, Michelle M; Guillemin, Gilles J; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-06-01

    This study utilised a proteomics approach to identify any differential protein expression in a glial cell line, rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), treated with the cyanotoxin β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA). Five proteins of interest were identified, namely Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDP1), Nck-associated protein 1 (NCKAP1), voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1), 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type-2 (3hCoAdh2), and ubiquilin-4 (UBQLN4). Four of these candidates, nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (Nur77), cyclophilin A (CyPA), RhoGDP1 and VDAC1, have been reported to be involved in cell growth. A microarray identified UBQLN4, palladin and CyPA, which have been implicated to have roles in excitotoxicity. Moreover, the NCKAP1, UBQLN4, CyPA and 3hCoAdh2 genes have been associated with abnormal protein aggregation. Differential expression of genes involved in mitochondrial activity, Nur77, 3hCoAdh2, VDAC1 and UBQLN4, were also identified. Confirmatory reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of transcripts generated from the genes of interest corroborated the differential expression trends identified in the global protein analysis. BMAA induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of OEC and apoptosis after 48 h at concentrations of 250 μM and 500 μM. Collectively, this work advances our understanding of the mechanism of BMAA-mediated glial-toxicity in vitro.

  12. Sciatic nerve injury induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion satellite glial cells and selectively modifies neurosteroidogenesis in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Véronique; Meyer, Laurence; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Eckert, Anne; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2010-01-15

    Neurosteroids are synthesized either by glial cells, by neurons, or within the context of neuron-glia cross-talk. Various studies suggested neurosteroid involvement in the control of neurodegeneration but there is no evidence showing that the natural protection of nerve cells against apoptosis directly depends on their own capacity to produce neuroprotective neurosteroids. Here, we investigated the interactions between neurosteroidogenesis and apoptosis occurring in sensory structures of rats subjected to neuropathic pain generated by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), we observed no apoptotic cells in the spinal cord up to 30 days after CCI although pain symptoms such as mechano-allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were evidenced with the Hargreaves's behavioral and von Frey filament tests. In contrast, double-labeling experiments combining TUNEL and immunostaining with antibodies against glutamine synthetase or neuronal nuclei protein revealed apoptosis occurrence in satellite glial cells (SGC) (not in neurons) of CCI rat ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at day 30 after injury. Pulse-chase experiments coupled with high performance liquid chromatography and flow scintillation detection showed that, among numerous biosynthetic pathways converting [(3)H]pregnenolone into various [(3)H]neurosteroids, only [(3)H]estradiol formation was selectively modified and upregulated in DRG of CCI rats. Consistently, immunohistochemical investigations localized aromatase (estradiol-synthesizing enzyme) in DRG neurons but not in SGC. Pharmacological inhibition of aromatase caused apoptosis of CCI rat DRG neurons. Altogether, our results suggest that endogenously produced neurosteroids such as estradiol may be pivotal for the protection of DRG sensory neurons against sciatic nerve CCI-induced apoptosis.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in the nuclear compartment of neurons and glial cells in aging and stroke.

    PubMed

    Pirici, Daniel; Pirici, Ionica; Mogoanta, Laurentiu; Margaritescu, Otilia; Tudorica, Valerica; Margaritescu, Claudiu; Ion, Daniela A; Simionescu, Cristiana; Coconu, Marieta

    2012-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are well-recognized denominators for extracellular matrix remodeling in the pathology of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Recent data on non-nervous system tissue showed intracellular and even intranuclear localizations for different MMPs, and together with this, a plethora of new functions have been proposed for these intracellular active enzymes, but are mostly related to apoptosis induction and malign transformation. In neurons and glial cells, on human tissue, animal models and cell cultures, different active MMPs have been also proven to be located in the intra-cytoplasmic or intra-nuclear compartments, with no clear-cut function. In the present study we show for the first time on human tissue the nuclear expression of MMP-9, mainly in neurons and to a lesser extent in astrocytes. We have studied ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients, as well as aged control patients. Age and ischemic suffering seemed to be the best predictors for an elevated MMP-9 nuclear expression, and there was no evidence of a clear-cut extracellular proteolytic activity for this compartment, as revealed by intact vascular basement membranes and assessment of vascular densities. More, the majority of the cells expressing MMP-9 in the nuclear compartment also co-expressed activated-caspase 3, indicating a possible link between nuclear MMP-9 localization and apoptosis in neuronal and glial cells following an ischemic or hemorrhagic event. These results, besides showing for the first time the nuclear localization of MMP-9 on a large series of human stroke and aged brain tissues, raise new questions regarding the unknown spectrum of the functions MMPs in human CNS pathology.

  14. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Li, Jijun; Johnson, Cameron W.; Rassoulian, Cyrus; Olumi, Aria F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and regulating cell cycle. Methods BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA. Results Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h) significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h) stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells) and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM) abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the

  15. Purinergic modulation of norepinephrine release and uptake in rat brain cortex: contribution of glial cells.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Diana; Quintas, Clara; Sardo, Filipa; Cardoso, Teresa Magalhães; Queiroz, Glória

    2013-12-01

    The pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases is often associated with a deregulation of noradrenergic transmission. Considering the potential involvement of purinergic signaling in the modulation of noradrenergic transmission in the brain cortex, this study aimed to identify the P2Y receptor subtypes involved in the modulation of neuronal release and neuronal/glial uptake of norepinephrine. Electrical stimulation (100 pulses at 5 Hz) of rat cortical slices induced norepinephrine release that was inhibited by ATP and ADP (0.01-1 mM), adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (ADPβS, 0.03-0.3 mM), and UDP (0.1-1 mM). The effect of ADPβS was mediated by P2Y1 receptors and possibly by A1/P2Y1 heterodimers since it was attenuated by the A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX and by the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS 2500 but was resistant to the effect of adenosine deaminase (ADA). UDP inhibited norepinephrine release through activation of P2Y6 receptors, an effect that was abolished by the P2Y6 receptor antagonist MRS 2578 and by DPCPX, indicating that it depends on the formation and/or release of adenosine and activation of A1 receptors. Supporting this hypothesis, the inhibitory effect of UDP was also prevented by inhibition of ectonucleotidases, by ADA and was attenuated by the inhibitor of nucleoside transporter 6-[(4-nitrobenzyl)thio]-9-β-d-ribofuranosylpurine (NBTI). Additionally, the inhibitory effect of UDP was attenuated when norepinephrine uptake 1 or 2 was inhibited. In astroglial cultures, ADPβS and UDP increased norepinephrine uptake mainly by activation of P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors, respectively. The results indicate that neuronal and glial P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors may represent new targets of intervention to regulate noradrenergic transmission in CNS diseases.

  16. A Neural Network Based Workstation for Automated Cell Proliferation Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    proliferation analysis, of cytological microscope images. The software of the system assists the expert biotechnologist during cell proliferation and...work was supported by the Programa de Apoyo a Proyectos de Desarrollo e Investigacíon en Informática REDII 2000. We thank Blanca Itzel Taboada for

  17. P2Y1 Receptor Activation of the TRPV4 Ion Channel Enhances Purinergic Signaling in Satellite Glial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, Pradeep; Poole, Daniel P.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Veldhuis, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of peripheral sensory pathways are important mediators of pain, itch, and neurogenic inflammation. They are expressed by primary sensory neurons and by glial cells in the central nervous system, but their expression and function in satellite glial cells (SGCs) of sensory ganglia have not been explored. SGCs tightly ensheath neurons of sensory ganglia and can regulate neuronal excitability in pain and inflammatory states. Using a modified dissociation protocol, we isolated neurons with attached SGCs from dorsal root ganglia of mice. SGCs, which were identified by expression of immunoreactive Kir4.1 and glutamine synthetase, were closely associated with neurons, identified using the pan-neuronal marker NeuN. A subpopulation of SGCs expressed immunoreactive TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and responded to the TRPV4-selective agonist GSK1016790A by an influx of Ca2+ ions. SGCs did not express functional TRPV1, TRPV3, or TRP ankyrin 1 channels. Responses to GSK1016790A were abolished by the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 and were absent in SGCs from Trpv4−/− mice. The P2Y1-selective agonist 2-methylthio-ADP increased [Ca2+]i in SGCs, and responses were prevented by the P2Y1-selective antagonist MRS2500. P2Y1 receptor-mediated responses were enhanced in TRPV4-expressing SGCs and HEK293 cells, suggesting that P2Y1 couples to and activates TRPV4. PKC inhibitors prevented P2Y1 receptor activation of TRPV4. Our results provide the first evidence for expression of TRPV4 in SGCs and demonstrate that TRPV4 is a purinergic receptor-operated channel in SGCs of sensory ganglia. PMID:26475857

  18. Acute morphine activates satellite glial cells and up-regulates IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia in mice via matrix metalloprotease-9

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of spinal cord glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes has been shown to regulate chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and hyperalgesia, due to spinal up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) has been implicated in IL-1β activation in neuropathic pain. However, it is unclear whether acute opioid treatment can activate glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. We examined acute morphine-induced activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) and up-regulation of IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), and further investigated the involvement of MMP-9 in these opioid-induced peripheral changes. Results Subcutaneous morphine injection (10 mg/kg) induced robust peripheral glial responses, as evidenced by increased GFAP expression in DRGs but not in spinal cords. The acute morphine-induced GFAP expression is transient, peaking at 2 h and declining after 3 h. Acute morphine treatment also increased IL-1β immunoreactivity in SGCs and IL-1β activation in DRGs. MMP-9 and GFAP are expressed in DRG neurons and SGCs, respectively. Confocal analysis revealed a close proximity of MMP-9 and GFAP immunostaining. Importantly, morphine-induced DRG up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation was abolished after Mmp9 deletion or naloxone pre-treatment. Finally, intrathecal injections of IL-1β-selective siRNA not only reduced DRG IL-1β expression but also prolonged acute morphine-induced analgesia. Conclusions Acute morphine induces opioid receptors- and MMP-9-dependent up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation in SGCs of DRGs. MMP-9 could mask and shorten morphine analgesia via peripheral neuron-glial interactions. Targeting peripheral glial activation might prolong acute opioid analgesia. PMID:22439811

  19. Pharmacological WNT Inhibition Reduces Proliferation, Survival and Clonogenicity of Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kahlert, Ulf D.; Suwala, Abigail K.; Koch, Katharina; Natsumeda, Manabu; Orr, Brent A.; Hayashi, Masanori; Maciaczyk, Jarek; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Wingless (WNT) signaling has been shown to be an important pathway in gliomagenesis and in the growth of stem-like glioma cells. Using immunohistochemistry to assess translocation of β-catenin protein, we identified intranuclear staining, which suggest WNT pathway activation, in 8 of 43 (19%) adult and 9 of 30 (30%) pediatric glioblastoma patient surgical samples. WNT activity, evidenced by nuclear β-catenin in our cohort and high expression of its target AXIN2 in published glioma datasets, was associated with shorter patient survival, although this was not statistically significant. We determined the effects of the porcupine inhibitor LGK974 in 3 glioblastoma cell lines with elevated AXIN2 and found that it reduced WNT pathway activity by 50% or more as assessed by T cell factor-luciferase reporters. WNT inhibition led to suppression of growth and proliferation in the cultures and a modest induction of cell death. LGK974 reduced NANOG mRNA levels and the fraction of cells expressing the stem cell marker CD133 in neurosphere cultures, induced glial differentiation, and suppressed clonogenicity. These data indicate that LGK974 represents a promising new agent that can inhibit the canonical WNT pathway in vitro, slow tumor growth and deplete stem-like clonogenic cells, thereby providing further support for targeting WNT in patients with glioblastoma. PMID:26222502

  20. Nanovesicles engineered from ES cells for enhanced cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dayeong; Jo, Wonju; Yoon, Jaewoong; Kim, Junho; Gianchandani, Sachi; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (Exosomes and microvesicles) have drawn wide attentions in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, since they are considered to shuttle biological signals intercellularly. However, further research on exosomes is limited by their rarity and heterogeneity even after lengthy isolation processes. In particular, these limitations are challenging in therapeutic applications. To meet these demands, cell-derived nanovesicles that mimic exosomes were generated by extruding living embryonic stem cells through micro-filters. These nanovesicles have an enclosed lipid bilayer and contain cellular contents. The present study investigated the ability of these nanovesicles to improve proliferation by treating primary murine skin fibroblasts with the nanovesicles. The treated skin fibroblasts showed higher expression levels of mRNA, VEGF-α, protein levels of TGF-β collagen I, PCNA, and Ki-67, as well as enhanced cell proliferation rate and number, compared to non-treated cells. The results indicate that treatment with the nanovesicles could potentially contribute to recovery or wound healing process of tissues.

  1. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-09-15

    of the glial K+ channels does not appear to play a role in siphoning the excess K+ released by active neurones. It is hypothesized that the cAMP-gated glial K+ channels may be involved in the control of glial cell proliferation.

  2. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed Central

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-01-01

    of the glial K+ channels does not appear to play a role in siphoning the excess K+ released by active neurones. It is hypothesized that the cAMP-gated glial K+ channels may be involved in the control of glial cell proliferation. PMID:8887773

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Autism-Specific Maternal Autoantibodies Alters Proliferation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells, Enlarges Brain, and Increases Neuronal Size in Adult Animals

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Camacho, Jasmin; Fox, Elizabeth; Miller, Elaine; Ariza, Jeanelle; Kienzle, Devon; Plank, Kaela; Noctor, Stephen C.; Van de Water, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect up to 1 in 68 children. Autism-specific autoantibodies directed against fetal brain proteins have been found exclusively in a subpopulation of mothers whose children were diagnosed with ASD or maternal autoantibody-related autism. We tested the impact of autoantibodies on brain development in mice by transferring human antigen-specific IgG directly into the cerebral ventricles of embryonic mice during cortical neurogenesis. We show that autoantibodies recognize radial glial cells during development. We also show that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies increased stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the embryonic neocortex, increased adult brain size and weight, and increased the size of adult cortical neurons. We propose that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies directly affects radial glial cell development and presents a viable pathologic mechanism for the maternal autoantibody-related prenatal ASD risk factor. PMID:25535268

  4. Quantitative assessment of glial cells in the human and guinea pig enteric nervous system with an anti-Sox8/9/10 antibody.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Sebastian; Zeller, Florian; von Weyhern, Claus Werner Hann; Wegner, Michael; Schemann, Michael; Michel, Klaus; Rühl, Anne

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative changes of enteric glia (EGC) have been implicated in gastrointestinal disorders. To facilitate future studies of EGC in human pathology, we aimed to characterize thoroughly glial markers in the human enteric nervous system (ENS) and to compare EGC in man and guinea pig. Whole-mount preparations of the enteric nerve plexuses from human and guinea pig ileum and colon were labeled with antibodies against S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and p75NGFR and the transcription factors Sox8/9/10 and neuronally counterstained. Abundant immunoreactivity (IR) for S100b, GFAP, p75NGFR, and Sox8/9/10 was detected in EGC of all studied regions. Although the cytoplasmatic staining pattern of most markers did not permit glial quantification, the nuclear localization of Sox8/9/10-IR allowed to identify and count all EGC individually. In both man and guinea pig, myenteric ganglia were larger and contained more EGC and neurons than submucous ganglia. Furthermore, there were more EGC in the human than in the guinea pig myenteric plexus (MP), glial density was consistently higher in the human ENS, and the glia index (glia:neuron ratio) ranged from 1.3 to 1.9 and from 5.9 to 7.0 in the human submucous plexus (SMP) and MP, respectively, whereas, in guinea pig, the glia index was 0.8-1.0 in the SMP and 1.7 in the MP. The glia index was the most robust quantitative descriptor within one species. This is a comprehensive set of quantitative EGC measures in man and guinea pig that provides a basis for pathological assessment of glial proliferation and/or degeneration in the diseased gut.

  5. Cell death and proliferation in acute slices and organotypic cultures of mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Alasia, Silvia; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the interplay between cell proliferation and death has been greatly advantaged by the development of CNS slice preparations. In slices, interactions between neurons and neurons and the glial cells are fundamentally preserved in a fashion close to the in vivo situation. In parallel, these preparations offer the possibility of an easy experimental manipulation. Two main types of slices are currently in use: the acute slices, which are short living preparations where the major functions of the intact brain (including neurogenesis) are maintained, and the organotypic cultures, where the maturation and plasticity of neuronal circuitries in relation to naturally occurring neuronal death and/or experimental insults can be followed over several weeks in vitro. We will discuss here the main advantages/disadvantages linked to the use of CNS slices for histological analysis of neuronal proliferation and death, as well as the main findings obtained in the most popular types of preparations, i.e. the cortical, hippocampal, cerebellar and retinal slices.

  6. Peripheral inflammation upregulates P2X receptor expression in satellite glial cells of mouse trigeminal ganglia: a calcium imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Raya; Cherkas, Pavel S; Hanani, Menachem

    2011-09-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia are altered structurally and biochemically as a result of nerve injury. Whereas there is ample evidence that P2 purinergic receptors in central glial cells are altered after injury, there is very little information on similar changes in SGCs, although it is well established that SGCs are endowed with P2 receptors. Using calcium imaging, we characterized changes in P2 receptors in SGCs from mouse trigeminal ganglia in short-term cultures. Seven days after the induction of submandibular inflammation with complete Freund's adjuvant, there was a marked increase in the sensitivity of SGCs to ATP, with the threshold of activation decreasing from 5 μM to 10 nM. A similar observation was made in the intact trigeminal ganglion after infra-orbital nerve axotomy. Using pharmacological tools, we investigated the receptor mechanisms underlying these changes in cultured SGCs. We found that in control tissues response to ATP was mediated by P2Y (metabotropic) receptors, whereas after inflammation the response was mediated predominantly by P2X (ionotropic) receptors. As the contribution of P2X1,3,6 receptors was excluded, and the sensitivity to a P2X7 agonist did not change after inflammation, it appears that after inflammation the responses to ATP are largely due to P2X2 and/or 5 receptors, with a possible contribution of P2X4 receptors. We conclude that inflammation induced a large increase in the sensitivity of SGCs to ATP, which involved a switch from P2Y to P2X receptors. We propose that the over 100-fold augmented sensitivity of SGCs to ATP after injury may contribute to chronic pain states.

  7. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  8. Glioblastoma expression of vitronectin and the alpha v beta 3 integrin. Adhesion mechanism for transformed glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gladson, C L; Cheresh, D A

    1991-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most malignant astroglial-derived tumor, grows as an adherent mass and locally invades normal brain. An examination of adult cerebral glioblastoma biopsy material for the expression of adhesive proteins that might potentiate adhesion and invasion demonstrated tumor cell-associated vitronectin (5/5). In contrast, vitronectin was not detected associated with glial cells in low grade astroglial tumors (0/4), reactive astrogliosis (0/4), or in normal adult cortex and cerebral white matter (0/5). Also, a wide variety of other adhesive ligands were absent from the glioblastoma tumor parenchyma. The alpha v beta 3 integrin was the only vitronectin receptor identified in glioblastoma tumors in situ, and was also not expressed on low grade astroglial-derived tumors, reactive astrogliosis, or on glia or neurons in normal adult cortex and cerebral white matter. In a cell attachment assay, cultured glioblastoma cells attached to the parenchyma of glioblastoma tumor cryostat sections at the sites of vitronectin expression, but failed to attach to normal brain. This adhesion was inhibited by antibodies directed against vitronectin, the alpha v beta 3 integrin, and with an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide. These data provide evidence for a cell adhesion mechanism in glioblastoma tumors that might potentiate glioblastoma cell invasion of normal brain. Images PMID:1721625

  9. Nitric oxide-proton stimulation of trigeminal ganglion neurons increases mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatase expression in neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Freeman, S E; Patil, V V; Durham, P L

    2008-12-02

    Elevated nitric oxide (NO) and proton levels in synovial fluid are implicated in joint pathology. However, signaling pathways stimulated by these molecules that mediate inflammation and pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have not been investigated. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of NO-proton stimulation of rat trigeminal neurons on the in vivo expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatases (MKPs) in trigeminal ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells. Low levels of the active MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 were localized in the cytosol of neurons and satellite glial cells in unstimulated animals. However, increased levels of active ERK and p38, but not JNK, were detected in the cytosol and nucleus of V3 neurons and satellite glial cells 15 min and 2 h following bilateral TMJ injections of an NO donor diluted in pH 5.5 medium. While ERK levels returned to near basal levels 24 h after stimulation, p38 levels remained significantly elevated. In contrast to MKP-2 and MKP-3 levels that were barely detectable in neurons or satellite glial cells, MKP-1 staining was readily observed in satellite glial cells in ganglia from unstimulated animals. However, neuronal and satellite glial cell staining for MKP-1, MKP-2, and MKP-3 was significantly increased in response to NO-protons. Increased active ERK and p38 levels as well as elevated MKP levels were also detected in neurons and satellite glial cells located in V2 and V1 regions of the ganglion. Our data provide evidence that NO-proton stimulation of V3 neurons results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of active ERK and p38 and MKPs in all regions of the ganglion. We propose that in trigeminal ganglia these cellular events, which are involved in peripheral sensitization as well as control of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, may play a role in TMJ pathology.

  10. Cdc42 Promotes Schwann Cell Proliferation and Migration Through Wnt/β-Catenin and p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway After Sciatic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Zhao, Jun-Ying; Wang, Wu-Tao; Li, Zheng-Wei; He, Ai-Ping; Song, Xiao-Yang

    2017-01-17

    Schwann cells (SCs) are unique glial cells in the peripheral nerve and may secrete multiple neurotrophic factors, adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix molecules to form the microenvironment of peripheral nerve regeneration, guiding and supporting nerve proliferation and migration. Cdc42 plays an important regulatory role in dynamic changes of the cytoskeleton. However, there is a little study referred to regulation and mechanism of Cdc42 on glial cells after peripheral nerve injury. The present study investigated the role of Cdc42 in the proliferation and migration of SCs after sciatic nerve injury. Cdc42 expression was tested, showing that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Cdc42 were significantly up-regulated after sciatic nerve injury. Then, we isolated and purified SCs from injuried sciatic nerve at day 7. The purified SCs were transfected with Cdc42 siRNA and pcDNA3.1-Cdc42, and the cell proliferation, cell cycle and migration were assessed. The results implied that Cdc42 siRNA remarkably inhibited Schwann cell proliferation and migration, and resulted in S phase arrest. While pcDNA3.1-Cdc42 showed a contrary effect. Besides, we also observed that Cdc42 siRNA down-regulated the protein expression of β-catenin, Cyclin D1, c-myc and p-p38, which were up-regulated by pcDNA3.1-Cdc42. Meanwhile, the inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin and p38 MAPK signaling pathway IWP-2 and SB203580 significantly inhibited the effect of pcDNA3.1-Cdc42 on cell proliferation and migration. Overall, our data indicate that Cdc42 regulates Schwann cell proliferation and migration through Wnt/β-catenin and p38 MAPK signaling pathway after sciatic nerve injury, which provides further insights into the therapy of the sciatic nerve injury.

  11. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  12. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  13. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  14. EDA-Containing Fibronectin Increases Proliferation of Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Losino, Noelia; Waisman, Ariel; Solari, Claudia; Luzzani, Carlos; Espinosa, Darío Fernández; Sassone, Alina; Muro, Andrés F.; Miriuka, Santiago; Sevlever, Gustavo; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) need a set of specific factors to be propagated. They can also grow in conditioned medium (CM) derived from a bovine granulosa cell line BGC (BGC-CM), a medium that not only preserves their main features but also increases ESC´s proliferation rate. The mitogenic properties of this medium were previously reported, ascribing this effect to an alternative spliced generated fibronectin isoform that contains the extra domain A (FN EDA+). Here, we investigated if the FN EDA+ isoform increased proliferation of mouse and human ES cells. We analyzed cell proliferation using conditioned media produced by different mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) lines genetically engineered to express FN constitutively including or excluding the EDA domain (FN EDA-), and in media supplemented with recombinant peptides containing or not the EDA. We found that the presence of EDA in the medium increased mouse and human ESC’s proliferation rate. Here we showed for the first time that this FN isoform enhances ESC’s proliferation. These findings suggest a possible conserved behavior for regulation of ES cells proliferation by this FN isoform and could contribute to improve their culturing conditions both for research and cell therapy. PMID:24244705

  15. EDA-containing fibronectin increases proliferation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Losino, Noelia; Waisman, Ariel; Solari, Claudia; Luzzani, Carlos; Espinosa, Darío Fernández; Sassone, Alina; Muro, Andrés F; Miriuka, Santiago; Sevlever, Gustavo; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) need a set of specific factors to be propagated. They can also grow in conditioned medium (CM) derived from a bovine granulosa cell line BGC (BGC-CM), a medium that not only preserves their main features but also increases ESC´s proliferation rate. The mitogenic properties of this medium were previously reported, ascribing this effect to an alternative spliced generated fibronectin isoform that contains the extra domain A (FN EDA(+)). Here, we investigated if the FN EDA(+) isoform increased proliferation of mouse and human ES cells. We analyzed cell proliferation using conditioned media produced by different mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) lines genetically engineered to express FN constitutively including or excluding the EDA domain (FN EDA(-)), and in media supplemented with recombinant peptides containing or not the EDA. We found that the presence of EDA in the medium increased mouse and human ESC's proliferation rate. Here we showed for the first time that this FN isoform enhances ESC's proliferation. These findings suggest a possible conserved behavior for regulation of ES cells proliferation by this FN isoform and could contribute to improve their culturing conditions both for research and cell therapy.

  16. Precursor N-cadherin mediates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-promoted human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ye; Liu, Liyun; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Baole; Qin, Yuxia; Yao, Ruiqin; Zhou, Hao; Gao, Dian Shuai

    2017-02-12

    As the most prevalent primary brain tumor, gliomas are highly metastatic, invasive and are characteristic of high levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF is an important factor for invasive glioma cell growth; however, the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, we affirm a significantly higher expression of the precursor of N-cadherin (proN-cadherin) in most gliomas compared with normal brain tissues. Our findings reveal that GDNF interacts with the extracellular domain of proN-cadherin, which suggests that proN-cadherin mediates GDNF-induced glioma cell migration and invasion. We hypothesize that proN-cadherin might cause homotypic adhesion loss within neighboring cells and at the same time promote heterotypic adhesion within the extracellular matrix (ECM) through a certain mechanism. This study also demonstrates that the interaction between GDNF and proN-cadherin activates specific intracellular signaling pathways; furthermore, GDNF promoted the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the ECM via proN-cadherin. To reach the future goal of developing novel therapies of glioma, this study, reveals a unique mechanism of glioma cell migration and invasion.

  17. Insulin involved Akt/ERK and Bcl-2/Bax pathways against oxidative damages in C6 glial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, a hypoglycemic hormone, has multiple functions in the brain. The aim of this study to identify the mechanisms of insulin in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity in the C6 glial cells. Cytotoxicity, lactate dehydrogenase, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and calcium ion, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and glutathione levels were determined. Signaling pathway molecules were assessed by western blotting and RT-PCR. The results showed that treatment with insulin reduced the cell death and cell membrane damages against H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity. Furthermore, insulin interfered H(2)O(2)-induced intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species and calcium-ion transport, apoptosis, including lipid and protein oxidation products. Cells treated with insulin reverted H(2)O(2)-induced suppression of reduced glutathione levels by blocking oxidized glutathione. Moreover, insulin treatment activates Akt, restores ERK1/2 and Bcl-2 by preventing Bax and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Our results suggest that treatment of insulin exerts potential role against 24 h of H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity in C6 cells.

  18. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. ); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  19. Single low-dose lipopolysaccharide preconditioning: neuroprotective against axonal injury and modulates glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; Naser, Zachary J.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Vangilder, Reyna L.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Over 7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are reported each year in the United States. However, treatments and neuroprotection following TBI are limited because secondary injury cascades are poorly understood. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration before controlled cortical impact can contribute to neuroprotection. However, the underlying mechanisms and whether LPS preconditioning confers neuroprotection against closed-head injuries remains unclear. Methods The authors hypothesized that preconditioning with a low dose of LPS (0.2 mg/kg) would regulate glial reactivity and protect against diffuse axonal injury induced by weight drop. LPS was administered 7 days prior to TBI. LPS administration reduced locomotion, which recovered completely by time of injury. Results LPS preconditioning significantly reduced the post-injury gliosis response near the corpus callosum, possibly by downregulating the oncostatin M receptor. These novel findings demonstrate a protective role of LPS preconditioning against diffuse axonal injury. LPS preconditioning successfully prevented neurodegeneration near the corpus callosum, as measured by fluorojade B. Conclusion Further work is required to elucidate whether LPS preconditioning confers long-term protection against behavioral deficits and to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms responsible for LPS-induced neuroprotective effects. PMID:28164149

  20. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (P<0.05). In contrast, the application of TENS at 1 week (TENS-1w) or 2 weeks (TENS-2w) after injury was ineffective in reducing hyperalgesia (mechanical and thermal) or activation of microglia and astrocytes. Early TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (P<0.05), the expression levels of protein kinase C (PKC-γ), and phosphorylated anti-phospho-cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons (P<0.05), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased the expression levels of opioid receptors (P<0.05). The results suggested that the application of early TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible.

  1. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  2. Electrophysiological properties of rat retinal Müller (glial) cells in postnatally developing and in pathologically altered retinae.

    PubMed

    Felmy, F; Pannicke, T; Richt, J A; Reichenbach, A; Guenther, E

    2001-05-01

    Retinal glial Müller cells are characterized by dominant K(+) conductances. The cells may undergo changes of their membrane currents during ontogeny and gliosis as described in rabbit and man. Although the rat retina is often used in physiological experiments, the electrophysiology of rat Müller cells is less well studied. The aim of the present study was to characterize their membrane currents in postnatal development and in two models of retinal degeneration. Freshly isolated cells were subjected to whole-cell patch clamp recordings. During the first 4 weeks after birth of rats, their Müller cells displayed an increase in all membrane currents, particularly in the inward currents elicited at hyperpolarizing potentials. The decrease of the membrane resistance from more than 760 MOmega to less than 50 MOmega was accompanied by a shift of the zero current potential from about -20 mV to -80 mV, similar as earlier observed in developing rabbit Müller cells. These developmental changes were found in pigmented Brown Norway rats as well as in rats with inherited retinal dystrophy (RCS rats). Moreover, an infection of Lewis rats with the Borna disease virus caused substantial neuroretinal degeneration but did not result in a strong reduction of inward currents and of the zero current potential of the Müller cells. Thus, rat Müller cells fail to change their basic membrane properties in two different models of retinal pathology. This is in contrast to human and rabbit Müller cells, which have been shown to undergo dramatic changes of their membrane physiology in response to retinal diseases and injuries.

  3. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  4. RNAi for contactin 2 inhibits proliferation of U87-glioma stem cells by downregulating AICD, EGFR, and HES1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yang; Zhang, Peidong; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common form of malignant brain tumors and has a poor prognosis. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are thought to be responsible for the aberrant proliferation and invasion. Targeting the signaling pathways that promote proliferation in GSCs is one of the strategies for glioma treatment. In this study, we found increased expression of contactin 2 (CNTN2) and amyloid β precursor protein (APP) in U87-derived GSCs (U87-GSCs). RNA interference (RNAi) for CNTN2 downregulated the expression of APP intracellular domain (AICD), which is the proteolytic product of APP. Treatment with CNTN2 RNAi inhibited the proliferation of U87-GSCs. CNTN2 RNAi decreased the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and HES1, which are potential targets of AICD. In summary, inhibition of the CNTN2/APP signaling pathway may repress the proliferation in U87-GSCs via downregulating the expression of HES1 and epidermal growth factor receptor. CNTN2/APP/AICD signaling pathway plays an important role in U87 glial tumorigenesis. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the role of these signaling pathways in other sources of GSCs. Depending on their role in proliferation in other sources of GSCs, members of the CNTN2/APP/AICD signaling pathway may provide novel targets for the development of therapy for glioblastomas. PMID:28243115

  5. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

  6. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A.; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Pin, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.—Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. PMID:27811059

  7. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2016-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, non-motile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  8. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem.

  9. Oxidative Glial Cell Damage Associated with White Matter Lesions in the Aging Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Mashhadi, Sufana; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Dickman, Mark; Forster, Gillian; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B

    2015-09-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are common in brain aging and are associated with dementia. We aimed to investigate whether oxidative DNA damage and occur in WML and in apparently normal white matter in cases with lesions. Tissue from WML and control white matter from brains with lesions (controls lesional) and without lesions (controls non-lesional) were obtained, using post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging-guided sampling, from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Oxidative damage was assessed by immunohistochemistry to 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxoguanosine (8-OHdG) and Western blotting for malondialdehyde. DNA response was assessed by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), p53, senescence markers and by quantitative Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) panel for candidate DNA damage-associated genes. 8-OHdG was expressed in glia and endothelium, with increased expression in both WML and controls lesional compared with controls non-lesional (P < 0.001). γH2Ax showed a similar, although attenuated difference among groups (P = 0.03). Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16 suggested induction of senescence mechanisms in glia. Oxidative DNA damage and a DNA damage response are features of WML pathogenesis and suggest candidate mechanisms for glial dysfunction. Their expression in apparently normal white matter in cases with WML suggests that white matter dysfunction is not restricted to lesions. The role of this field-effect lesion pathogenesis and cognitive impairment are areas to be defined.

  10. Learning, memory, and glial cell changes following recovery from chronic unpredictable stress.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yanqing; Pan, Zhuo; Hou, Ziyuan; Huang, Cui; Li, Wei; Zhao, Baohua

    2012-08-01

    Previous research has indicated that chronic stress induces inflammatory responses, cognitive impairments, and changes in microglia and astrocytes. However, whether stress-induced changes following recovery are reversible is unclear. The present study examined the effects of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) following recovery on spatial learning and memory impairments, changes in microglia and astrocytes, and interleukine-1β (IL-1β) and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels. Mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and recovery groups, and CUS was applied to mice in the stress and recovery groups for 40 days. Following the application of CUS, the recovery group was allowed 40 days without stress. The results of the Morris water maze illustrated that CUS-induced spatial learning and memory impairments could be reversed or even improved by a period of recovery. Immunohistochemical tests revealed that CUS-induced alterations in microglia could dissipate with time in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and prelimbic areas. However, CUS-induced activation of astrocytes was sustained in the CA3 area following recovery. Western blot analyses revealed that CUS induced a significant increase of GDNF and a significant decrease in IL-1β. Additionally, increased GDNF levels were sustained in the hippocampus during recovery. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that CUS-induced learning and memory impairments could be reversible following recovery. However, activated astrocytes and increased GDNF levels in the hippocampus remained elevated after recovery, suggesting that activated astrocytes and increased GDNF play important roles in the adaptation of the brain to CUS and in repairing CUS-induced impairments during recovery.

  11. NTE/PNPLA6 is expressed in mature Schwann cells and is required for glial ensheathment of Remak fibers.

    PubMed

    McFerrin, Janis; Patton, Bruce L; Sunderhaus, Elizabeth R; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2017-02-16

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) or patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 6 (PNPLA6) was first linked with a neuropathy occurring after organophosphate poisoning and was later also found to cause complex syndromes when mutated, which can include mental retardation, spastic paraplegia, ataxia, and blindness. NTE/PNPLA6 is widely expressed in neurons but experiments with its Drosophila orthologue Swiss-cheese (SWS) suggested that it may also have glial functions. Investigating whether NTE/PNPLA6 is expressed in glia, we found that NTE/PNPLA6 is expressed by Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve of adult mice with the most prominent expression in nonmyelinating Schwann cells. Within Schwann cells, NTE/PNPLA6 is enriched at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and around the nucleus. When analyzing postnatal expression patterns, we did not detect NTE/PNPLA6 in promyelinating Schwann cells, while weak expression was detectable at postnatal day 5 in Schwann cells and increased with their maturation. Interestingly, NTE/PNPLA6 levels were upregulated after nerve crush and localized to ovoids forming along the nerve fibers. Using a GFAP-based knock-out of NTE/PNPLA6, we detected an incomplete ensheathment of Remak fibers whereas myelination did not appear to be affected. These results suggest that NTE/PNPLA6 is involved in the maturation of nonmyelinating Schwann cells during development and de-/remyelination after neuronal injury. Since Schwann cells play an important role in maintaining axonal viability and function, it is therefore likely that changes in Schwann cells contribute to the locomotory deficits and neuropathy observed in patients carrying mutations in NTE.

  12. Inflammation and Proliferation Act Together to Mediate Intestinal Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Swain, John R.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:19657387

  13. Cholesterol induces proliferation of chicken primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Chen, Meijuan; Lu, Zhenping; Yang, Mengmeng; Xie, Long; Zhang, Wenxin; Xu, Huiyan; Lu, Kehuan; Lu, Yangqing

    2016-08-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the precursors of sperm and eggs and may serve as suitable cells for use in research in developmental biology and transgenic animals. However, the long-term propagation of PGCs in vitro has so far been plagued by the loss of their germ cell characteristics. This is largely because of the scarcity of knowledge concerning cell division and proliferation in these cells and the poor optimization of the culture medium. The sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is involved in proliferation of many types of cells, but little is known about its role in chicken PGCs. The results of the current study indicate that the proliferation of chicken PGCs increases significantly when cholesterol, a molecule that facilitates the trafficking of HH ligands, is supplemented in the culture medium. This effect was attenuated when an SHH antagonist, cyclopamine was added, suggesting the involvement of SHH signaling in this process. The characterization of PGCs treated with cholesterol has shown that these cells express germ-cell-related markers and retain their capability to colonize the embryonic gonad after re-introduction to vasculature of stage-15 HH embryos, indicating that proliferation of PGCs induced by cholesterol does not alter the germ cell characteristics of these cells.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid possesses dual action in cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Tigyi, G; Dyer, D L; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) induces mitogenic responses in cultured fibroblasts through a pertussis toxin-sensitive signaling pathway. In contrast, we have shown that LPA inhibits the proliferation of Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cells. To resolve this apparent controversy, LPA-elicited responses in cell proliferation and the underlying second messenger mechanisms were compared in Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. The antimitogenic response was not elicited by micromolar concentrations of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, or diacylglycerol. In NIH 3T3 and Sp2 cells, LPA elicited an increase in inositol trisphosphate and a subsequent transient increase in free cytoplasmic Ca2+. Unlike the mitogenic response in NIH 3T3 cells, the antimitogenic effect was not affected by pertussis toxin; on the contrary, it was accompanied by an increase in cAMP. In Sp2 cells, cAMP analogs, forskolin, and isobutylmethylxanthine inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced LPA action in an additive manner, suggesting that an LPA-elicited increase in cAMP-mediated signaling was responsible for the antimitogenic response. In addition to the mitogenic response in fibroblasts and the antimitogenic response in tumor cell lines, there are some cell types (Jurkat T-cell lymphoma and primary astrocytes) in which LPA is ineffective in altering cell proliferation. The cell-type-specific dual action of LPA suggests that this endogenous lipid mediator when released from activated cells might play an important role as a regulator, rather than a ubiquitous inducer, of cell proliferation. Images PMID:8127904

  15. Enhanced IL-1beta production in response to the activation of hippocampal glial cells impairs neurogenesis in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, Naoko; Ikegami, Daigo; Imai, Satoshi; Narita, Michiko; Tamura, Rie; Yajima, Marie; Suzuki, Atsuo; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Niikura, Keiichi; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Ando, Takayuki; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2010-09-01

    A variety of mechanisms that contribute to the accumulation of age-related damage and the resulting brain dysfunction have been identified. Recently, decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been recognized as one of the mechanisms of age-related brain dysfunction. However, the molecular mechanism of decreased neurogenesis with aging is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether aging decreases neurogenesis accompanied by the activation of microglia and astrocytes, which increases the expression of IL-1beta in the hippocampus, and whether in vitro treatment with IL-1beta in neural stem cells directly impairs neurogenesis. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1)-positive microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes were increased in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of 28-month-old mice. Furthermore, the mRNA level of IL-1beta was significantly increased without related histone modifications. Moreover, a significant increase in lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9) trimethylation at the promoter of NeuroD (a neural progenitor cell marker) was observed in the hippocampus of aged mice. In vitro treatment with IL-1beta in neural stem cells prepared from whole brain of E14.5 mice significantly increased H3K9 trimethylation at the NeuroD promoter. These findings suggest that aging may decrease hippocampal neurogenesis via epigenetic modifications accompanied by the activation of microglia and astrocytes with the increased expression of IL-1beta in the hippocampus.

  16. Migratory capacity of the cell line RN33B and the host glial cell response after subretinal transplantation to normal adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Anita Blixt; Englund, Ulrica; Lundberg, Cecilia; Warfvinge, Karin

    2004-07-01

    As previously reported, the brain-derived precursor cell line RN33B has a great capacity to migrate when transplanted to adult brain or retina. This cell line is immortalized with the SV40 large T-antigen and carries the reporter gene LacZ and the green fluorescent protein GFP. In the present study, the precursor cells were transplanted to the subretinal space of adult rats and investigated early after grafting. The purpose was to demonstrate the migration of the grafted cells from the subretinal space into the retina and the glial cell response of the host retina. Detachment caused by the transplantation method was persistent up to 4 days after transplantation, and then reattachment occurred. The grafted cells were shown to migrate in between the photoreceptor cells before entering into the plexiform layers. Molecules involved in migration of immature neuronal cells as the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and the collapsing response-mediated protein 4 (TUC-4) was found in the plexiform layers of the host retina, but not in the grafted cells. The expression of the intermediate filaments GFAP, vimentin, and nestin was intensely upregulated immediately after transplantation. A less pronounced upregulation was observed on sham-operated animals. In summary, the RN33B cell line migrated promptly posttransplantation and settled preferably into the plexiform layers of the retina, the same layers where the migration cues PSA-NCAM and TUC-4 were established. In addition, both the transplantation method per se and the implanted cells caused an intense glial cell response by the host retina.

  17. Increased proliferation of late-born retinal progenitor cells by gestational lead exposure delays rod and bipolar cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Shawnta Y.; Rueda, Elda M.; Johnson, Jerry E.; Fox, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Studies of neuronal development in the retina often examine the stages of proliferation, differentiation, and synaptic development, albeit independently. Our goal was to determine if a known neurotoxicant insult to a population of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) would affect their eventual differentiation and synaptic development. To that end, we used our previously published human equivalent murine model of low-level gestational lead exposure (GLE). Children and animals with GLE exhibit increased scotopic electroretinogram a- and b-waves. Adult mice with GLE exhibit an increased number of late-born RPCs, a prolonged period of RPC proliferation, and an increased number of late-born rod photoreceptors and rod and cone bipolar cells (BCs), with no change in the number of late-born Müller glial cells or early-born neurons. The specific aims of this study were to determine whether increased and prolonged RPC proliferation alters the spatiotemporal differentiation and synaptic development of rods and BCs in early postnatal GLE retinas compared to control retinas. Methods C57BL/6N mouse pups were exposed to lead acetate via drinking water throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10, which is equivalent to the human gestation period for retinal neurogenesis. RT-qPCR, immunohistochemical analysis, and western blots of well-characterized, cell-specific genes and proteins were performed at embryonic and early postnatal ages to assess rod and cone photoreceptor differentiation, rod and BC differentiation and synaptic development, and Müller glial cell differentiation. Results Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) with the rod-specific transcription factors Nrl, Nr2e3, and Crx and the rod-specific functional gene Rho, along with central retinal confocal studies with anti-recoverin and anti-rhodopsin antibodies, revealed a two-day delay in the differentiation of rod photoreceptors in GLE retinas. Rhodopsin immunoblots supported this conclusion. No changes in

  18. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a