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Sample records for glial glutamate uptake

  1. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  2. Neuronal vs glial glutamate uptake: Resolving the conundrum.

    PubMed

    Danbolt, N C; Furness, D N; Zhou, Y

    2016-09-01

    Neither normal brain function nor the pathological processes involved in neurological diseases can be adequately understood without knowledge of the release, uptake and metabolism of glutamate. The reason for this is that glutamate (a) is the most abundant amino acid in the brain, (b) is at the cross-roads between several metabolic pathways, and (c) serves as the major excitatory neurotransmitter. In fact most brain cells express glutamate receptors and are thereby influenced by extracellular glutamate. In agreement, brain cells have powerful uptake systems that constantly remove glutamate from the extracellular fluid and thereby limit receptor activation. It has been clear since the 1970s that both astrocytes and neurons express glutamate transporters. However the relative contribution of neuronal and glial transporters to the total glutamate uptake activity, however, as well as their functional importance, has been hotly debated ever since. The present short review provides (a) an overview of what we know about neuronal glutamate uptake as well as an historical description of how we got there, and (b) a hypothesis reconciling apparently contradicting observations thereby possibly resolving the paradox. PMID:27235987

  3. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  4. Electrogenic glutamate uptake in glial cells is activated by intracellular potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Boris; Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1988-09-01

    Uptake of glutamate into glial cells in the CNS maintains the extracellular glutamate concentration below neurotoxic levels and helps terminate its action as a neurotransmitter 1. The co-transport of two sodium ions on the glutamate carrier is thought to provide the energy needed to transport glutamate into cells2,3. We have shown recently that glutamate uptake can be detected electrically because the excess of Na+ ions transported with each glutamate anion results in a net current flow into the cell4. We took advantage of the control of the environment, both inside and outside the cell, provided by whole-cell patch-clamping and now report that glutamate uptake is activated by intracellular potassium and inhibited by extracellular potassium. Our results indicate that one K+ ion is transported out of the cell each time a glutamate anion and three Na+ ions are transported in. A carrier with this stoichiometry can accumulate glutamate against a much greater concentration gradient than a carrier co-transporting one glutamate anion and two Na+ ions. Pathological rises in extracellular potassium concentration will inhibit glutamate uptake by depolarizing glial cells and by preventing the loss of K+ from the glutamate carrier. This will facilitate a rise in the extracellular glutamate concentration to neurotoxic levels and contribute to the neuronal death occurring in brain anoxia and ischaemia.

  5. Coupling of glutamate and glucose uptake in cultured Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Suárez-Pozos, Edna; Najimi, Mustapha; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of sodium-dependent, glutamate uptake transporters mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing neuronal death. The sustained sodium influx associated to glutamate removal in glial cells, activates the sodium/potassium ATPase restoring the ionic balance, additionally, glutamate entrance activates glutamine synthetase, both events are energy demanding, therefore glia cells increase their ATP expenditure favouring glucose uptake, and triggering several signal transduction pathways linked to proper neuronal glutamate availability, via the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. To further characterize these complex transporters interactions, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity, plasma membrane localization and protein levels of glucose transporters was detected upon d-aspartate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of a protein kinase C-dependent signaling cascade. Furthermore, a glutamate-dependent glucose and glutamate transporters co-immunoprecipitation was detected. These results favour the notion that glial cells are involved in glutamatergic neuronal physiology. PMID:27184733

  6. Decreased glial and synaptic glutamate uptake in the striatum of HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Roberto I; Roman, Cristina; Capo-Velez, Coral M; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms leading to the neurocognitive deficits in humans with immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not well resolved. A number of cell culture models have demonstrated that the HIV-envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) decreases the reuptake of glutamate, which is necessary for learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. However, the impact of brain HIV-1 gp120 on glutamate uptake systems in vivo remains unknown. Notably, alterations in brain glutamate uptake systems are implicated in a number of neurodegenerative and neurocognitive disorders. We characterized the kinetic properties of system XAG (sodium-dependent) and systems xc- (sodium-independent) [3H]-L-glutamate uptake in the striatum and hippocampus of HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mice, an established model of HIV neuropathology. We determined the kinetic constant Vmax (maximal velocity) and Km (affinity) of both systems XAG and xc- using subcellular preparations derived from neurons and glial cells. We show significant (30-35 %) reductions in the Vmax of systems XAG and xc- in both neuronal and glial preparations derived from the striatum, but not from the hippocampus of gp120 mice relative to wild-type (WT) controls. Moreover, immunoblot analysis showed that the protein expression of glutamate transporter subtype-1 (GLT-1), the predominant brain glutamate transporter, was significantly reduced in the striatum but not in the hippocampus of gp120 mice. These extensive and region-specific deficits of glutamate uptake likely contribute to the development and/or severity of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Understanding the role of striatal glutamate uptake systems in HIV-1 gp120 may advance the development of new therapeutic strategies to prevent neuronal damage and improve cognitive function in HIV patients. PMID:26567011

  7. Hyperglycemia reduces functional expression of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels and glial glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Aponte, D E; Méndez-González, M P; Rivera-Pagán, A F; Kucheryavykh, Y V; Kucheryavykh, L Y; Skatchkov, S N; Eaton, M J

    2015-12-01

    Diabetics are at risk for a number of serious health complications including an increased incidence of epilepsy and poorer recovery after ischemic stroke. Astrocytes play a critical role in protecting neurons by maintaining extracellular homeostasis and preventing neurotoxicity through glutamate uptake and potassium buffering. These functions are aided by the presence of potassium channels, such as Kir4.1 inwardly rectifying potassium channels, in the membranes of astrocytic glial cells. The purpose of the present study was to determine if hyperglycemia alters Kir4.1 potassium channel expression and homeostatic functions of astrocytes. We used q-PCR, Western blot, patch-clamp electrophysiology studying voltage and potassium step responses and a colorimetric glutamate clearance assay to assess Kir4.1 channel levels and homeostatic functions of rat astrocytes grown in normal and high glucose conditions. We found that astrocytes grown in high glucose (25 mM) had an approximately 50% reduction in Kir4.1 mRNA and protein expression as compared with those grown in normal glucose (5mM). These reductions occurred within 4-7 days of exposure to hyperglycemia, whereas reversal occurred between 7 and 14 days after return to normal glucose. The decrease in functional Kir channels in the astrocytic membrane was confirmed using barium to block Kir channels. In the presence of 100-μM barium, the currents recorded from astrocytes in response to voltage steps were reduced by 45%. Furthermore, inward currents induced by stepping extracellular [K(+)]o from 3 to 10mM (reflecting potassium uptake) were 50% reduced in astrocytes grown in high glucose. In addition, glutamate clearance by astrocytes grown in high glucose was significantly impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that down-regulation of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels by elevated glucose may contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of diabetes-induced CNS disorders and contribute to the poor prognosis after stroke

  8. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way.

  9. Glial glutamate transporters: new actors in brain signaling.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-10-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate brain, is critically involved in most of the physiological functions of the central nervous system. It has traditionally been assumed that glutamate triggers a wide array of signaling cascades through the activation of specific membrane receptors. The extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent neurotoxic insults. Electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glial glutamate transporters remove the bulk of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. An exquisitely ordered coupling between glutamatergic neurons and surrounding glia cells is fundamental for excitatory transmission. The glutamate/glutamine and astrocyte/neuron lactate shuttles provide the biochemical framework of this compulsory association. In this context, recent advances show that glial glutamate transporters act as signal transducers that regulate the expression of proteins involved in their compartmentalization with neurons in the so-called tripartite synapse.

  10. Mechanisms underlying the protective effects of myricetin and quercetin following oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake in glial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C6 glial cells were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in cell culture for 5 hr and cell swelling was determined 90 min after the end of OGD. The OGD-induced increase in swelling was significantly blocked by the two flavonoids studied, quercetin and myricetin. The OGD-induced increase in ...

  11. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. PMID:27017513

  12. Effect of insulin on muscle glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T. T.; Brennan, M. F.; Müller, W. A.; Moore, F. D.; Cahill, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    For decades, investigators concerned with protein metabolism in man have performed detailed amino acid analyses of human plasma obtained under a wide range of experimental situations. A large body of information has been used to calculated rates of protein synthesis and proteolysis. During the course of an investigation of the effect of intrabrachial artery infusion of insulin (70 μU/min per kg body weight) on glutamate uptake by human forearm muscle, it was discovered that plasma arterio-deep venous glutamate difference analysis failed to document any increase in the uptake of this amino acid, suggesting that insulin had little influence on glutamate uptake by muscle. However, whole blood glutamate analyses, performed on the same blood samples, revealed that (a) the resting muscle uptake of glutamate is smaller than previously reported and (b) insulin is capable of markedly increasing glutamate uptake by muscle from whole blood. Since the hematocrit was obtained on all samples, detailed analyses of the various compartments in which glutamate could be found were performed. It was determined that circulating blood cells have a dynamic role in glutamate transport. These data underscore the need for both whole blood and plasma amino acid analysis in investigations concerned with protein synthesis and/or amino acid flux, for analysis of plasma samples alone could be misleading as illustrated in the present study. Images PMID:5080414

  13. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  14. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  15. Transplantation of Glial Progenitors That Overexpress Glutamate Transporter GLT1 Preserves Diaphragm Function Following Cervical SCI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Hala, Tamara J; Sannie, Daniel; Regan, Kathleen A; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Wright, Megan C; Poulsen, David J; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) cases affect cervical regions, resulting in chronic respiratory compromise. The majority of these injuries affect midcervical levels, the location of phrenic motor neurons (PMNs) that innervate the diaphragm. A valuable opportunity exists following SCI for preventing PMN loss that occurs during secondary degeneration. One of the primary causes of secondary injury is excitotoxicity due to dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis. Astrocytes express glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1), which is responsible for the majority of CNS glutamate clearance. Given our observations of GLT1 dysfunction post-SCI, we evaluated intraspinal transplantation of Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs)—a class of lineage-restricted astrocyte progenitors—into ventral horn following cervical hemicontusion as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 function, preventing excitotoxicity and protecting PMNs in the acutely injured spinal cord. We find that unmodified transplants express low levels of GLT1 in the injured spinal cord. To enhance their therapeutic properties, we engineered GRPs with AAV8 to overexpress GLT1 only in astrocytes using the GFA2 promoter, resulting in significantly increased GLT1 protein expression and functional glutamate uptake following astrocyte differentiation in vitro and after transplantation into C4 hemicontusion. Compared to medium-only control and unmodified GRPs, GLT1-overexpressing transplants reduced lesion size, diaphragm denervation and diaphragm dysfunction. Our findings demonstrate transplantation-based replacement of astrocyte GLT1 is a promising approach for SCI. PMID:25492561

  16. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  17. Changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence and membrane current produced by glutamate uptake into salamander Müller cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, B; Magnus, C; Szatkowski, M; Gray, P T; Attwell, D

    1993-01-01

    1. Glutamate uptake into isolated, whole-cell patch-clamped glial cells was studied by monitoring the increase of cell fluorescence generated as glutamate and NAD(P) were converted into alpha-ketoglutarate and NAD(P)H by glutamate dehydrogenase. The current generated by the glutamate uptake carrier was recorded simultaneously. 2. L-Glutamate evoked an increase of cell fluorescence and an inward uptake current. L- and D-aspartate generated an uptake current but no fluorescence response, consistent with the amino acid specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase. 3. In the absence of external sodium the glutamate-evoked fluorescence response and uptake current were abolished, showing that there is no sodium-independent glutamate uptake across the cell membrane. 4. Varying the glutamate concentration altered both the fluorescence response and the uptake current. The fluorescence response saturated at a lower glutamate concentration than the uptake current, and depended in a Michaelis-Menten fashion on the uptake current. 5. The fluorescence response and the uptake current were reduced by membrane depolarization, and also by removal of intracellular potassium. 6. The dependence of the fluorescence response on uptake current when membrane potential was altered or intracellular potassium was removed was the same as that seen when the external glutamate concentration was altered. 7. These fluorescence studies show that glutamate uptake is inhibited by depolarization and by removal of intracellular potassium, consistent with the conclusion of earlier work in which uptake was monitored solely as a membrane current. The data are consistent with high-affinity electrogenic sodium- and potassium-dependent glutamate uptake with fixed stoichiometry being the only significant influx route for glutamate. Other possible interpretations of the data are also discussed. PMID:8105078

  18. Adenosine A2A receptors modulate glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes and gliosomes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre Dos; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, where its toxic build-up leads to synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxic cell death that underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, efforts have been made to understand the regulation of glutamate transporters, which are responsible for the clearance of extracellular glutamate. We now report that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) R) control the uptake of D-aspartate in primary cultured astrocytes as well as in an ex vivo preparation enriched in glial plasmalemmal vesicles (gliosomes) from adult rats, whereas A(1) R and A(3) R were devoid of effects. Thus, the acute exposure to the A(2A) R agonist, CGS 21680, inhibited glutamate uptake, an effect prevented by the A(2A) R antagonist, SCH 58261, and abbrogated in cultured astrocytes from A(2A) R knockout mice. Furthermore, the prolonged activation of A(2A) R lead to a cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent reduction of GLT-I and GLAST mRNA and protein levels, which leads to a sustained decrease of glutamate uptake. This dual mechanism of inhibition of glutamate transporters by astrocytic A(2A) R provides a novel candidate mechanism to understand the ability of A(2) (A) R to control synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, two conditions tightly associated with the control of extracellular glutamate levels by glutamate transporters.

  19. Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. II. Uptake of glutamic acid and other amino acids by fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Goetz, I E; Holden, J; Holtz, J

    1981-03-01

    Injection of kainic acid, a rigid analog of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (glu), into the neostriatum of rats produces a condition that mimics Huntington disease (HD) in at least 12 different morphological and biochemical parameters. These results suggested that one of the possible basic mechanisms in HD is a defect in the presynaptic of glial uptake of glu, resulting in chronic hyperstimulation and death of a specific set of neurons. To test this hypothesis, the uptake of glu was studied in 12 carefully matched sets of control-HD pairs and two lines of Tourette syndrome fibroblasts. Although the first six sets suggested a glutamate transport defect in HD cells, examination of 12 sets indicated that there were no significant differences between control and HD cells. The fibroblasts showed both a high and low affinity uptake of glutamic acid. Sodium dependent uptake of L-glutamate (L-glu) minus D-glutamate (D-glu) at 100, 1,000, and 10,000 Micrometers glutamate was normal in HD and Tourette syndrome cells.

  20. Gq-DREADD Selectively Initiates Glial Glutamate Release and Inhibits Cue-induced Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Scofield Michael, D.; Boger Heather, A.; Smith Rachel, J.; Li, Hao; Haydon Philip, G.; Kalivas Peter, W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glial cells of the central nervous system directly influence neuronal activity by releasing neuroactive small molecules, including glutamate. Long-lasting cocaine-induced reductions in extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) affect synaptic plasticity responsible for relapse vulnerability. Methods We transduced NAcore astrocytes with an AAV viral vector expressing hM3Dq (Gq) DREADD under control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter in 62 male Sprague Dawley rats, 4 dnSNARE mice and 4 wild type littermates. Using glutamate biosensors we measured NAcore glutamate levels following intracranial or systemic administration of clozapine-N-oxide (CNO), and tested the ability of systemic CNO to inhibit reinstated cocaine or sucrose seeking following self-administration (SA) and extinction training. Results Administration of CNO in GFAP-Gq-DREADD transfected animals increased NAcore extracellular glutamate levels in vivo. The glial origin of released glutamate was validated by an absence of CNO-mediated release in mice expressing a dominant-negative SNARE variant in glia. Also, CNO-mediated release was relatively insensitive to N-type calcium channel blockade. Systemic administration of CNO inhibited cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats extinguished from cocaine, but not sucrose SA. The capacity to inhibit reinstated cocaine-seeking was prevented by systemic administration of the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) antagonist LY341495. Conclusions DREADD-mediated glutamate gliotransmission inhibited cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking by stimulating release-regulating mGluR2/3 autoreceptors to inhibit cue-induced synaptic glutamate spillover. PMID:25861696

  1. Glutamate regulates eEF1A phosphorylation and ribosomal transit time in Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Iliana; Flores-Méndez, Marco; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Cid, Luis; Huerta, Miriam; Zinker, Samuel; López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguilera, José; Ortega, Arturo

    2010-12-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, is involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Glutamatergic stimulation leads to differential gene expression patterns in neuronal and glial cells. A glutamate-dependent transcriptional control has been established for several genes. However, much less is known about the molecular events that modify the translational machinery upon exposure to this neurotransmitter. In a glial model of cerebellar cultured Bergmann cells, glutamate induces a biphasic effect on [(35)S]-methionine incorporation into proteins that suggests that the elongation phase of protein biosynthesis is the target for regulation. Indeed, after a 15 min exposure to glutamate a transient increase in elongation factor 2 phosphorylation has been reported, an effect mediated through the activation of the elongation factor 2 kinase. In this contribution, we sought to characterize the phosphorylation status of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and the ribosomal transit time under glutamate exposure. A dose-dependent increase in eEF1A phosphorylation was found after a 60 min glutamate treatment; this phenomenon is Ca(2+)/CaM dependent, blocked with Src and phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase inhibitors and with rapamicyn. Concomitantly, the ribosomal transit time was increased with a 15 min glutamate exposure. After 60 more minutes, the average time used by the ribosomes to complete a polypeptide chain had almost returned to its initial level. These results strongly suggest that glutamate exerts an exquisite time-dependent translational control in glial cells, a process that might be critical for glia-neuron interactions.

  2. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  3. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  4. Neuron-glial trafficking of NH4+ and K+: separate routes of uptake into glial cells of bee retina.

    PubMed

    Marcaggi, Païkan; Jeanne, Marion; Coles, Jonathan A

    2004-02-01

    Ammonium (NH4+ and/or NH3) and K+ are released from active neurons and taken up by glial cells, and can modify glial cell behaviour. Study of these fluxes is most advanced in the retina of the honeybee drone, which consists essentially of identical neurons (photoreceptors) and identical glial cells (outer pigment cells). In isolated bee retinal glial cells, ammonium crosses the membrane as NH4+ on a Cl- cotransporter. We have now investigated, in the more physiological conditions of a retinal slice, whether the NH4+-Cl- cotransporter can transport K+ and whether the major K+ conductance can transport NH4+. We increased [NH4+] or [K+] in the superfusate and monitored uptake by recording from the glial cell syncytium or from interstitial space with microelectrodes selective for H+ or K+. In normal superfusate solution, ammonium acidified the glial cells but, after 6 min superfusion in low [Cl-] solution, ammonium alkalinized them. In the same low [Cl-] conditions, the rise in intraglial [K+] induced by an increase in superfusate [K+] was unchanged, i.e. no K+ flux on the Cl- cotransporter was detected. Ba2+ (5 mm) abolished the glial depolarization induced by K+ released from photoreceptors but did not reduce NH4+uptake. We estimate that when extracellular [NH4+] is increased, 62-100% is taken up by the NH4+-Cl- cotransporter and that when K+ is increased, 77-100% is taken up by routes selective for K+. This separation makes it possible that the glial uptake of NH4+ and of K+, and hence their signalling roles, might be regulated separately.

  5. Glutamate down-regulates GLAST expression through AMPA receptors in Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Espinoza-Rojo, Mónica; Ortega, Arturo

    2003-07-01

    The Na(+)-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the mechanisms of long-term modulation are less understood. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors mediate a substantial reduction in GLAST mRNA levels, suggesting a transcriptional level of regulation. Moreover, when the 5' proximal region of the GLAST gene was cloned and transfected into Bergmann glia cells, a decrease in promoter activity was induced by glutamate exposure. The use of specific pharmacological tools established the involvement of Ca(2+)-permeable alpha-amino 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoaxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors via protein kinase C and c-Jun. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under transcriptional control through glutamate receptors activation, and further supports the participation of Bergmann glia cells in the modulation of glutamatergic transmission.

  6. A CDC42EP4/septin-based perisynaptic glial scaffold facilitates glutamate clearance.

    PubMed

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamazaki, Maya; Konno, Kohtarou; Nakayama, Hisako; Abe, Manabu; Hashimoto, Kenji; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Huda, Fathul; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase-effector proteins CDC42EP1-5/BORG1-5 interact reciprocally with CDC42 or the septin cytoskeleton. Here we show that, in the cerebellum, CDC42EP4 is exclusively expressed in Bergmann glia and localizes beneath specific membrane domains enwrapping dendritic spines of Purkinje cells. CDC42EP4 forms complexes with septin hetero-oligomers, which interact with a subset of glutamate transporter GLAST/EAAT1. In Cdc42ep4(-/-) mice, GLAST is dissociated from septins and is delocalized away from the parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. The excitatory postsynaptic current exhibits a protracted decay time constant, reduced sensitivity to a competitive inhibitor of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors (γDGG) and excessive baseline inward current in response to a subthreshold dose of a nonselective inhibitor of the glutamate transporters/EAAT1-5 (DL-TBOA). Insufficient glutamate-buffering/clearance capacity in these mice manifests as motor coordination/learning defects, which are aggravated with subthreshold DL-TBOA. We propose that the CDC42EP4/septin-based glial scaffold facilitates perisynaptic localization of GLAST and optimizes the efficiency of glutamate-buffering and clearance. PMID:26657011

  7. A CDC42EP4/septin-based perisynaptic glial scaffold facilitates glutamate clearance

    PubMed Central

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamazaki, Maya; Konno, Kohtarou; Nakayama, Hisako; Abe, Manabu; Hashimoto, Kenji; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Huda, Fathul; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase-effector proteins CDC42EP1-5/BORG1–5 interact reciprocally with CDC42 or the septin cytoskeleton. Here we show that, in the cerebellum, CDC42EP4 is exclusively expressed in Bergmann glia and localizes beneath specific membrane domains enwrapping dendritic spines of Purkinje cells. CDC42EP4 forms complexes with septin hetero-oligomers, which interact with a subset of glutamate transporter GLAST/EAAT1. In Cdc42ep4−/− mice, GLAST is dissociated from septins and is delocalized away from the parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. The excitatory postsynaptic current exhibits a protracted decay time constant, reduced sensitivity to a competitive inhibitor of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors (γDGG) and excessive baseline inward current in response to a subthreshold dose of a nonselective inhibitor of the glutamate transporters/EAAT1–5 (DL-TBOA). Insufficient glutamate-buffering/clearance capacity in these mice manifests as motor coordination/learning defects, which are aggravated with subthreshold DL-TBOA. We propose that the CDC42EP4/septin-based glial scaffold facilitates perisynaptic localization of GLAST and optimizes the efficiency of glutamate-buffering and clearance. PMID:26657011

  8. Effects of Ceftriaxone on Glial Glutamate Transporters in Wistar Rats Administered Sequential Ethanol and Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Alshehri, Fahad S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the psychostimulants that is co-abused with ethanol. Repeated exposure to high dose of METH has been shown to cause increases in extracellular glutamate concentration. We have recently reported that ethanol exposure can also increase the extracellular glutamate concentration and downregulate the expression of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). GLT-1 is a glial transporter that regulates the majority of extracellular glutamate. A Wistar rat model of METH and ethanol co-abuse was used to examine the expression of GLT-1 as well as other glutamate transporters such as cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). We also examined the body temperature in rats administered METH, ethanol or both drugs. We further investigated the effects of ceftriaxone (CEF), a β-lactam antibiotic known to upregulate GLT-1, in this METH/ethanol co-abuse rat model. After 7 days of either ethanol (6 g/kg) or water oral gavage, Wistar rats received either saline or METH (10 mg/kg i.p. every 2 h × 4), followed by either saline or CEF (200 mg/kg) posttreatment. METH administered alone decreased GLT-1 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and increased body temperature, but did not reduce either xCT or GLAST expression in ethanol and water-pretreated rats. Interestingly, ethanol and METH were found to have an additive effect on the downregulation of GLT-1 expression in the NAc but not in the PFC. Moreover, ethanol alone caused GLT-1 downregulation in the NAc and elevated body temperature compared to control. Finally, CEF posttreatment significantly reversed METH-induced hyperthermia, restored GLT-1 expression, and increased xCT expression. These findings suggest the potential therapeutic role of CEF against METH- or ethanol/METH-induced hyperglutamatergic state and hyperthermia. PMID:27713684

  9. Experimentally induced diabetes causes glial activation, glutamate toxicity and cellular damage leading to changes in motor function

    PubMed Central

    Nagayach, Aarti; Patro, Nisha; Patro, Ishan

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral impairments are the most empirical consequence of diabetes mellitus documented in both humans and animal models, but the underlying causes are still poorly understood. As the cerebellum plays a major role in coordination and execution of the motor functions, we investigated the possible involvement of glial activation, cellular degeneration and glutamate transportation in the cerebellum of rats, rendered diabetic by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg body weight; intraperitoneally). Motor function alterations were studied using Rotarod test (motor coordination) and grip strength (muscle activity) at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th week post-diabetic confirmation. Scenario of glial (astroglia and microglia) activation, cell death and glutamate transportation was gaged using immunohistochemistry, histological study and image analysis. Cellular degeneration was clearly demarcated in the diabetic cerebellum. Glial cells were showing sequential and marked activation following diabetes in terms of both morphology and cell number. Bergmann glial cells were hypertrophied and distorted. Active caspase-3 positive apoptotic cells were profoundly present in all three cerebellar layers. Reduced co-labeling of GLT-1 and GFAP revealed the altered glutamate transportation in cerebellum following diabetes. These results, exclusively derived from histology, immunohistochemistry and cellular quantification, provide first insight over the associative reciprocity between the glial activation, cellular degeneration and reduced glutamate transportation, which presumably lead to the behavioral alterations following STZ-induced diabetes. PMID:25400546

  10. In vivo quantification of neuro-glial metabolism and glial glutamate concentration using 1H-[13C] MRS at 14.1T.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Bernard; Xin, Lijing; Millet, Philippe; Gruetter, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes have recently become a major center of interest in neurochemistry with the discoveries on their major role in brain energy metabolism. An interesting way to probe this glial contribution is given by in vivo (13) C NMR spectroscopy coupled with the infusion labeled glial-specific substrate, such as acetate. In this study, we infused alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats with [2-(13) C]acetate and followed the dynamics of the fractional enrichment (FE) in the positions C4 and C3 of glutamate and glutamine with high sensitivity, using (1) H-[(13) C] magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 14.1T. Applying a two-compartment mathematical model to the measured time courses yielded a glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate (Vg ) of 0.27 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min and a glutamatergic neurotransmission rate (VNT ) of 0.15 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. Glial oxidative ATP metabolism thus accounts for 38% of total oxidative metabolism measured by NMR. Pyruvate carboxylase (VPC ) was 0.09 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, corresponding to 37% of the glial glutamine synthesis rate. The glial and neuronal transmitochondrial fluxes (Vx (g) and Vx (n) ) were of the same order of magnitude as the respective TCA cycle fluxes. In addition, we estimated a glial glutamate pool size of 0.6 ± 0.1 μmol/g. The effect of spectral data quality on the fluxes estimates was analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations. In this (13) C-acetate labeling study, we propose a refined two-compartment analysis of brain energy metabolism based on (13) C turnover curves of acetate, glutamate and glutamine measured with state of the art in vivo dynamic MRS at high magnetic field in rats, enabling a deeper understanding of the specific role of glial cells in brain oxidative metabolism. In addition, the robustness of the metabolic fluxes determination relative to MRS data quality was carefully studied. PMID:24117599

  11. Effects of inhibiting glutamine synthetase and blocking glutamate uptake on b-wave generation in the isolated rat retina

    PubMed Central

    WINKLER, BARRY S.; KAPOUSTA-BRUNEAU, NATALIA; ARNOLD, MATTHEW J.; GREEN, DANIEL G.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiments was to evaluate the contribution of the glutamate-glutamine cycle in retinal glial (Müller) cells to photoreceptor cell synaptic transmission. Dark-adapted isolated rat retinas were superfused with oxygenated bicarbonate-buffered media. Recordings were made of the b-wave of the electroretinogram as a measure of light-induced photoreceptor to ON-bipolar neuron transmission. L-methionine sulfoximine (1–10 mM) was added to superfusion media to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a Müller cell specific enzyme, by more than 99% within 5–10 min, thereby disrupting the conversion of glutamate to glutamine in the Müller cells. Threo-hydroxyaspartic acid and D-aspartate were used to block glutamate transporters. The amplitude of the b-wave was well maintained for 1–2 h provided 0.25 mM glutamate or 0.25 mM glutamine was included in the media. Without exogenous glutamate or glutamine the amplitude of the b-wave declined by about 70% within 1 h. Inhibition of glutamate transporters led to a rapid (2–5 min) reversible loss of the b-wave in the presence and absence of the amino acids. In contrast, inhibition of glutamine synthetase did not alter significantly either the amplitude of the b-wave in the presence of glutamate or glutamine or the rate of decline of the b-wave found in the absence of these amino acids. Excellent recovery of the b-wave was found when 0.25 mM glutamate was resupplied to L-methionine sulfoximine–treated retinas. The results suggest that in the isolated rat retina uptake of released glutamate into photoreceptors plays a more important role in transmitter recycling than does uptake of glutamate into Müller cells and its subsequent conversion to glutamine. PMID:10367968

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Glutamate Receptors in Glial Cells from the Cortex of GFAP/EGFP Mice Following Ischemic Injury: Focus on NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dzamba, David; Honsa, Pavel; Valny, Martin; Kriska, Jan; Valihrach, Lukas; Novosadova, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael; Anderova, Miroslava

    2015-11-01

    Cortical glial cells contain both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Despite several efforts, a comprehensive analysis of the entire family of glutamate receptors and their subunits present in glial cells is still missing. Here, we provide an overall picture of the gene expression of ionotropic (AMPA, kainate, NMDA) and the main metabotropic glutamate receptors in cortical glial cells isolated from GFAP/EGFP mice before and after focal cerebral ischemia. Employing single-cell RT-qPCR, we detected the expression of genes encoding subunits of glutamate receptors in GFAP/EGFP-positive (GFAP/EGFP(+)) glial cells in the cortex of young adult mice. Most of the analyzed cells expressed mRNA for glutamate receptor subunits, the expression of which, in most cases, even increased after ischemic injury. Data analyses disclosed several classes of GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells with respect to glutamate receptors and revealed in what manner their expression correlates with the expression of glial markers prior to and after ischemia. Furthermore, we also examined the protein expression and functional significance of NMDA receptors in glial cells. Immunohistochemical analyses of all seven NMDA receptor subunits provided direct evidence that the GluN3A subunit is present in GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells and that its expression is increased after ischemia. In situ and in vitro Ca(2+) imaging revealed that Ca(2+) elevations evoked by the application of NMDA were diminished in GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells following ischemia. Our results provide a comprehensive description of glutamate receptors in cortical GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells and may serve as a basis for further research on glial cell physiology and pathophysiology.

  13. Cellular senescence induced by prolonged subculture adversely affects glutamate uptake in C6 lineage.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mery Stéfani Leivas; Zenki, Kamila; Cavalheiro, Marcela Mendonça; Thomé, Chairini Cássia; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Lenz, Guido; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch

    2014-05-01

    Several researchers have recently used C6 cells to evaluate functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters. However, it has been demonstrated that this lineage suffers several morphological and biochemical alterations according to the number of passages in culture. Currently, there are no reports showing whether functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters comply with these sub culturing-dependent modifications. The present study aimed to compare the functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters expressed in early (EPC6) and late (LPC6) passage C6 cells through a detailed pharmacological and biochemical characterization. Between 60-180 min of L-[(3)H]glu incubation, LPC6 presented an intracellular [(3)H] 55% lower than EPC6. Both cultures showed a time-dependent increase of intracellular [(3)H] reaching maximal levels at 120 min. Cultures incubated with D-[(3)H]asp showed a time-dependent increase of [(3)H] until 180 min. Moreover, LPC6 have a D-[(3)H]asp-derived intracellular [(3)H] 30-45% lower than EPC6 until 120 min. Only EAAT3 was immunodetected in cultures and its total content was equal between them. PMA-stimulated EAAT3 trafficking to membrane increased 50% of L-[(3)H]glu-derived intracellular [(3)H] in EPC6 and had no effect in LPC6. LPC6 displayed characteristics that resemble senescence, such as high β-Gal staining, cell enlargement and increase of large and regular nuclei. Our results demonstrated that LPC6 exhibited glutamate uptake impairment, which may have occurred due to its inability to mobilize EAAT3 to cell membrane. This profile might be related to senescent process observed in this culture. Our results suggest that LPC6 cells are an inappropriate glial cellular model to investigate the functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters.

  14. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  15. Role of glutamate receptors and glial cells in the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Na, Kyoung-Sae

    2016-10-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) causes substantial socioeconomic burden. Although a consensus on the definition of TRD has not yet been reached, it is certain that classic monoaminergic antidepressants are ineffective for TRD. One decade ago, many researchers found ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, to be an alternative to classic monoaminergic antidepressants. The major mechanisms of action of ketamine rapidly induce synaptogenesis in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway. Although excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission and consequent excitotoxicity were considered a major cause of TRD, recent evidence suggests that the extrasynaptic glutamatergic receptor signal pathway mainly contributes to the detrimental effects of TRD. Glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes, early life adversity, and glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction participate in complex cross-talk. An appropriate reuptake of glutamate at the astrocyte is crucial for preventing 'spill-over' of synaptic glutamate and binding to the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor. Excessive microglial activation and the inflammatory process cause astrocyte glutamatergic dysfunction, which in turn activates microglial function. Early life adversity and glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction result in vulnerability to stress in adulthood. A maladaptive response to stress leads to increased glutamatergic release and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which then activate microglia. However, since the role of inflammatory mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines is not specific for depression, more disease-specific mechanisms should be identified. Last, although much research has focused on ketamine as an alternative antidepressant for TRD, its long-lasting effectiveness and adverse events have not been rigorously demonstrated. Additionally, evidence suggests that substantial brain abnormalities develop in ketamine abusers. Thus, more investigations for ketamine and other novel

  16. Restored glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 function as a potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kou; Kong, Qiongman; Lin, Yuchen; Stouffer, Nathan; Schulte, Delanie A; Lai, Liching; Liu, Qibing; Chang, Ling-Chu; Dominguez, Sky; Xing, Xuechao; Cuny, Gregory D; Hodgetts, Kevin J; Glicksman, Marcie A; Lin, Chien-Liang Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Glutamatergic systems play a critical role in cognitive functions and are known to be defective in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Previous literature has indicated that glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 plays an essential role in cognitive functions and that loss of EAAT2 protein is a common phenomenon observed in AD patients and animal models. In the current study, we investigated whether restored EAAT2 protein and function could benefit cognitive functions and pathology in APPSw,Ind mice, an animal model of AD. A transgenic mouse approach via crossing EAAT2 transgenic mice with APPSw,Ind. mice and a pharmacological approach using a novel EAAT2 translational activator, LDN/OSU-0212320, were conducted. Findings from both approaches demonstrated that restored EAAT2 protein function significantly improved cognitive functions, restored synaptic integrity, and reduced amyloid plaques. Importantly, the observed benefits were sustained one month after compound treatment cessation, suggesting that EAAT2 is a potential disease modifier with therapeutic potential for AD. PMID:25711212

  17. Glutamate-dependent phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Rossana C; Barrera, Iliana; Castelán, Francisco; Suárez-Pozos, Edna; Melgarejo, Yaaziel; González-Mejia, Elba; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguilera, José; Ortega, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, plays an important role in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. It activates a variety of signaling pathways that regulate gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Within glial cells, besides transcription, glutamate also regulates translation initiation and elongation. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key participant in the translation process, represents an important regulatory locus for translational control. Therefore, in the present communication we sought to characterize the mTOR phosphorylation pattern after glutamate treatment in chick cerebellar Bergmann glia primary cultures. A time- and dose-dependent increase in mTOR Ser 2448 phosphorylation was found. Pharmacological tools established that the glutamate effect is mediated through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors and interestingly, the glutamate transporter system is also involved. The signaling cascade triggered by glutamate includes an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels, and the activation of the p60(Src)/PI-3K/PKB pathway. These results suggest that glia cells participate in the activity-dependent change in the brain protein repertoire.

  18. Modification of potassium movement through the retina of the drone (Apis mellifera male) by glial uptake.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Orkand, R K

    1983-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in photoreceptors and glial cells (outer pigment cells) of the superfused cut head of the honey-bee drone (Apis mellifera male). When the [K+] in the superfusate was abruptly increased from 3.2 mM to 17.9 mM both photoreceptors and glial cells depolarized. The time course of the depolarization of the photoreceptors was slower with increasing depth from the surface. Half time of depolarization was plotted against depth: this graph was compatible with the arrival of K+ being exclusively by diffusion through the extracellular clefts. However, as we then showed, this interpretation is inadequate. The time course of depolarization of the glial cells was almost the same at all depths. This indicates that they are electrically coupled. Consequently, current-mediated K+ flux (spatial buffering) through glial cells will contribute to the transport of K+ through the tissue: K+ ions enter the glial syncytium in the region of high external potassium concentration, [K+]0, and an equivalent quantity of K+ ions leave in regions of low [K+]0. Intracellular K+ activity (aiK) was measured with double-barrelled K+-sensitive micro-electrodes in slices of retina superfused on both faces. When [K+] in the superfusate was increased from 7.5 mM to 17.9 mM an increase in aiK was observed in glial cells at all depths in the slice (initial rate 1.7 mM min-1, S.E. of the mean = 0.2 mM min-1), but there was little increase in the photoreceptors (0.3 +/- 0.2 mM min-1). The increase in aiK in glial cells near the centre of the slice could not have been caused by spatial buffering; it presumably resulted from net uptake. We conclude that when [K+] is increased at the surface of this tissue, the build up of K+ in the extracellular clefts depends on extracellular diffusion, spatial buffering and net uptake. The latter two processes, which have opposing effects, involve about 10 times as much K+ as the first. This is in rough agreement with less direct experiments

  19. Electrogenic uptake of sulphur-containing analogues of glutamate and aspartate by Müller cells from the salamander retina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Miller, B A; Szatkowski, M; Attwell, D

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of sulphur-containing analogues of glutamate and aspartate on the membrane current of glial cells was studied by whole-cell clamping Müller cells isolated from the salamander retina. 2. L-Cysteic acid (CA), L-cysteinesulphinic acid (CSA), L-homocysteic acid (HCA), L-homocysteinesulphinic acid (HCSA) and S-sulpho-L-cysteine (SC) all evoked an inward membrane current that was large at negative potentials, and was smaller (but did not reverse) at more positive potentials up to +30 mV. 3. Removal of external sodium ions abolished the amino acid-evoked currents. Whole-cell clamping with pipettes containing no potassium led to a rapid suppression of the currents, that did not occur when potassium was included in the pipette. 4. The dependence of the currents on sulphur-containing amino acid concentration obeyed first-order Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The current evoked by co-application of L-glutamate and a sulphur-containing analogue was smaller than the sum of the currents produced by glutamate alone and by the sulphur analogue alone. 5. These data are consistent with the sulphur amino acid-evoked current being caused by uptake on the electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which co-transports an excess of Na+ ions into the cell, and counter-transports one K+ ion out of the cell. 6. The apparent Km (Michaelis-Menten constant) values for activation of uptake by CA (6 microM) and by CSA (60 microM) are low enough for uptake on the glutamate uptake carrier to be a plausible mechanism for terminating the postulated neurotransmitter action of these agents. However, the apparent Km values for uptake of HCA (2.95 mM), HCSA (1.65 mM) and SC (greater than 1 mM) are much higher than the EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) concentrations for these agents' activation of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) channels. 7. Comparing the concentrations of sulphur amino acids needed to activate NMDA channels with their rate of uptake suggests that their potency for causing

  20. Glutamate and tumor-associated epilepsy: glial cell dysfunction in the peritumoral environment

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Robel, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Seizures are a serious and debilitating co-morbidity of primary brain tumors that affect most patients, yet their etiology is poorly understood. In many CNS pathologies, including epilepsy and brain injury, high levels of extracellular glutamate have been implicated in seizure generation. It has been shown that gliomas release neurotoxic levels of glutamate through their high expression of system xc-. More recently it was shown that the surrounding peritumoral cortex is spontaneously hyperexcitable. In this review, we discuss how gliomas induce changes in the surrounding environment that may further contribute to elevated extracellular glutamate and tumor-associated seizures. Peritumoral astrocytes become reactive and lose their ability to remove glutamate, while microglia, in response to signals from glioma cells, may release glutamate. In addition, gliomas increase blood brain barrier permeability, allowing seizure-inducing serum components, including glutamate, into the peritumoral region. These factors, working together or alone, may influence the frequency and severity of tumor-associated epilepsy. PMID:23385090

  1. Glial Expression of the Caenorhabditis elegans Gene swip-10 Supports Glutamate Dependent Control of Extrasynaptic Dopamine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hardaway, J. Andrew; Sturgeon, Sarah M.; Snarrenberg, Chelsea L.; Li, Zhaoyu; Xu, X.Z. Shawn; Bermingham, Daniel P.; Odiase, Peace; Spencer, W. Clay; Miller, David M.; Carvelli, Lucia; Hardie, Shannon L.

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells play a critical role in shaping neuronal development, structure, and function. In a screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that display dopamine (DA)-dependent, Swimming-Induced Paralysis (Swip), we identified a novel gene, swip-10, the expression of which in glia is required to support normal swimming behavior. swip-10 mutants display reduced locomotion rates on plates, consistent with our findings of elevated rates of presynaptic DA vesicle fusion using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. In addition, swip-10 mutants exhibit elevated DA neuron excitability upon contact with food, as detected by in vivo Ca2+ monitoring, that can be rescued by glial expression of swip-10. Mammalian glia exert powerful control of neuronal excitability via transporter-dependent buffering of extracellular glutamate (Glu). Consistent with this idea, swip-10 paralysis was blunted in mutants deficient in either vesicular Glu release or Glu receptor expression and could be phenocopied by mutations that disrupt the function of plasma membrane Glu transporters, most noticeably glt-1, the ortholog of mammalian astrocytic GLT1 (EAAT2). swip-10 encodes a protein containing a highly conserved metallo-β-lactamase domain, within which our swip-10 mutations are located and where engineered mutations disrupt Swip rescue. Sequence alignments identify the CNS-expressed gene MBLAC1 as a putative mammalian ortholog. Together, our studies provide evidence of a novel pathway in glial cells regulated by swip-10 that limits DA neuron excitability, DA secretion, and DA-dependent behaviors through modulation of Glu signaling. PMID:26109664

  2. Protein kinase C -dependent regulation of synaptosomal glutamate uptake under conditions of hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Borisov, Arseniy; Sivko, Roman

    Glutamate is not only the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, but also a potent neurotoxin. Excessive concentration of ambient glutamate over activates glutamate receptors and causes neurotoxicity. Uptake of glutamate from the extracellular space into nerve cells was mediated by sodium-dependent glutamate transporters located in the plasma membrane. It was shown that the activity of glutamate transporters in rat brain nerve terminals was decreased after hypergravity (centrifugation of rats in special containers at 10 G for 1 hour). This decrease may result from the reduction in the number of glutamate transporters expressed in the plasma membrane of nerve terminals after hypergravity that was regulated by protein kinase C. The possibility of the involvement of protein kinase C in the regulation of the activity of glutamate transporters was assessed under conditions of hypergravity. The effect of protein kinase C inhibitor GF 109 203X on synaptosomal L-[14C]glutamate uptake was analysed. It was shown that the inhibitor decreased L-[14C]glutamate uptake by 15 % in control but did not influence it after hypergravity. In control, the initial velocity of L-[14C]glutamate uptake in the presence of the inhibitor decreased from 2.5 ± 0.2 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.17 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins, whereas after hypergravity this value lowered from 2.05 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.04 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins. Thus, protein kinase C -dependent alteration in the cell surface expression of glutamate transporters may be one of the causes of a decrease in the activity of glutamate transporters after hypergravity.

  3. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Matthew P.; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Woodard, Cameron L.; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H.; Raymond, Lynn A.

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  4. Determination of glutamate uptake by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in preparations of retinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Edinaldo Rogério da Silva; Grisolia, Alan Barroso Araújo; Oliveira, Karen Renata Matos; Picanço-Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Maximino, Caio; Batista, Evander de Jesus Oliveira; Herculano, Anderson Manoel

    2012-10-15

    The present study describes a simple and efficient method utilizing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to fluorescence detection for the determination of kinetic parameters of glutamate uptake in nervous tissue. Retinal tissue obtained from 7-day-old chicks was incubated with known concentrations of glutamate (50-2000 μM) for 10 min, and the levels of the o-phtaldehyde (OPA)-derivatized neurotransmitter in the incubation medium were measured. By assessing the difference between initial and final concentrations of glutamate in the medium, a saturable uptake mechanism was characterized (K(m)=8.2 and V(max)=9.8 nmol/mg protein/min). This measure was largely sodium- and temperature-dependent, strongly supporting that the mechanism for concentration decrements is indeed uptake by high-affinity transporters. Added to this, our results also demonstrated that zinc chloride (an inhibitor of glutamate/aspartate transporters) evoked a concentration-dependent decrease in glutamate uptake, demonstrating the specificity of our methodology. Overall, the present work characterizes an alternative methodology to evaluate glutamate uptake in nervous tissue using HPLC. This approach could be an important tool for studies associated to the characterization of minute alterations in glutamate transport related with central nervous system injury.

  5. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew P; Vanni, Matthieu P; Woodard, Cameron L; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H; Raymond, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  6. Effect of carnitine on muscular glutamate uptake and intramuscular glutathione in malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, R; Babylon, A; Hack, V; Schuster, K; Tokus, M; Böhles, H; Hagmüller, E; Edler, L; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    2000-01-01

    Abnormally low intramuscular glutamate and glutathione (GSH) levels and/or a decreased muscular uptake of glutamate by the skeletal muscle tissue have previously been found in malignant diseases and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and may contribute to the development of cachexia. We tested the hypothesis that an impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism may compromise the Na+-dependent glutamate transport. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was designed to study the effects of L-carnitine, i.e. an agent known to enhance mitochondrial integrity and function, on the glutamate transport and plasma glutamate level of cancer patients. The effect of carnitine on the intramuscular glutamate and GSH levels was examined in complementary experiments with tumour-bearing mice. In the mice, L-carnitine treatment ameliorated indeed the tumour-induced decrease in muscular glutamate and GSH levels and the increase in plasma glutamate levels. The carnitine-treated group in the randomized clinical study showed also a significant decrease in the plasma glutamate levels but only a moderate and statistically not significant increase in the relative glutamate uptake in the lower extremities. Further studies may be warranted to determine the effect of L-carnitine on the intramuscular GSH levels in cancer patients.

  7. Effect of carnitine on muscular glutamate uptake and intramuscular glutathione in malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Breitkreutz, R; Babylon, A; Hack, V; Schuster, K; Tokus, M; Böhles, H; Hagmüller, E; Edler, L; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    2000-01-01

    Abnormally low intramuscular glutamate and glutathione (GSH) levels and/or a decreased muscular uptake of glutamate by the skeletal muscle tissue have previously been found in malignant diseases and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and may contribute to the development of cachexia. We tested the hypothesis that an impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism may compromise the Na+-dependent glutamate transport. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was designed to study the effects of L -carnitine, i.e. an agent known to enhance mitochondrial integrity and function, on the glutamate transport and plasma glutamate level of cancer patients. The effect of carnitine on the intramuscular glutamate and GSH levels was examined in complementary experiments with tumour-bearing mice. In the mice, L -carnitine treatment ameliorated indeed the tumour-induced decrease in muscular glutamate and GSH levels and the increase in plasma glutamate levels. The carnitine-treated group in the randomized clinical study showed also a significant decrease in the plasma glutamate levels but only a moderate and statistically not significant increase in the relative glutamate uptake in the lower extremities. Further studies may be warranted to determine the effect of L -carnitine on the intramuscular GSH levels in cancer patients. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646895

  8. Sodium-Dependent Glutamate Uptake by an Alkaliphilic, Thermophilic Bacillus Strain, TA2.A1

    PubMed Central

    Peddie, Catherine J.; Cook, Gregory M.; Morgan, Hugh W.

    1999-01-01

    A strain of Bacillus designated TA2.A1, isolated from a thermal spring in Te Aroha, New Zealand, grew optimally at pH 9.2 and 70°C. Bacillus strain TA2.A1 utilized glutamate as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, and sodium chloride (>5 mM) was an obligate requirement for growth. Growth on glutamate was inhibited by monensin and amiloride, both inhibitors that collapse the sodium gradient (ΔpNa) across the cell membrane. N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide inhibited the growth of Bacillus strain TA2.A1, suggesting that an F1F0-ATPase (H type) was being used to generate cellular ATP needed for anabolic reactions. Vanadate, an inhibitor of V-type ATPases, did not affect the growth of Bacillus strain TA2.A1. Glutamate transport by Bacillus strain TA2.A1 could be driven by an artificial membrane potential (ΔΨ), but only when sodium was present. In the absence of sodium, the rate of ΔΨ-driven glutamate uptake was fourfold lower. No glutamate transport was observed in the presence of ΔpNa alone (i.e., no ΔΨ). Glutamate uptake was specifically inhibited by monensin, and the Km for sodium was 5.6 mM. The Hill plot had a slope of approximately 1, suggesting that sodium binding was noncooperative and that the glutamate transporter had a single binding site for sodium. Glutamate transport was not affected by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, suggesting that the transmembrane pH gradient was not required for glutamate transport. The rate of glutamate transport increased with increasing glutamate concentration; the Km for glutamate was 2.90 μM, and the Vmax was 0.7 nmol · min−1 mg of protein. Glutamate transport was specifically inhibited by glutamate analogues. PMID:10322019

  9. Behavioral History of Withdrawal Influences Regulation of Cocaine Seeking by Glutamate Re-Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Luyi; Andersen, Haley; Arreola, Adrian C.; Turner, Jill R.; Ortinski, Pavel I.

    2016-01-01

    Withdrawal from cocaine regulates expression of distinct glutamate re-uptake transporters in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In this study, we examined the cumulative effect of glutamate re-uptake by multiple excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) on drug-seeking at two different stages of withdrawal from self-administered cocaine. Rats were trained on fixed ratio 1 (FR1), progressing to FR5 schedule of reinforcement. After one day of withdrawal, microinfusion of a broad non-transportable EAAT antagonist, DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA), into the NAc shell dose-dependently attenuated self-administration of cocaine. Sucrose self-administration was not affected by DL-TBOA, indicating an effect specific to reinforcing properties of cocaine. The attenuating effect on cocaine seeking was not due to suppression of locomotor response, as DL-TBOA was found to transiently increase spontaneous locomotor activity. Previous studies have established a role for EAAT2-mediated re-uptake on reinstatement of cocaine seeking following extended withdrawal and extinction training. We found that blockade of NAc shell EAATs did not affect cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking. These results indicate that behavioral history of withdrawal influences the effect of re-uptake mediated glutamate clearance on cocaine seeking. Dynamic regulation of glutamate availability by re-uptake mechanisms may impact other glutamate signaling pathways to account for such differences. PMID:27685834

  10. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  11. Glutamate receptor subunit expression in primary neuronal and secondary glial cultures.

    PubMed

    Janssens, N; Lesage, A S

    2001-06-01

    We report on the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in primary neuronal cultures from rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum and of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes in these neuronal cultures as well as in cortical astroglial cultures. We found that the NMDA receptor (NR) subunits NR1, NR2A and NR2B were expressed in all three cultures. Each of the three cultures showed also expression of the four AMPA receptor subunits. Although RT-PCR detected mRNA of all kainate (KA) subunits in the three cultures, western blot showed only expression of Glu6 and KA2 receptor subunits. The expression analysis of mGlu receptors indicated the presence of all mGlu receptor subtype mRNAs in the three neuronal cultures, except for mGlu2 receptor mRNA, which was not detected in the cortical and cerebellar culture. mGlu1a/alpha, -2/3 and -5 receptor proteins were present in all three cultures, whereas mGlu4a and mGlu8a receptor proteins were not detected. Astroglial cultures were grown in either serum-containing or chemically defined medium. Only mGlu5 receptor protein was found in astroglial cultures grown in serum-containing medium. When astrocytes were cultured in chemically defined medium, mGlu3, -5 and -8 receptor mRNAs were detected, but at the protein level, still only mGlu5 receptor was found. PMID:11413230

  12. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A.; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  13. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  14. Targeting glutamate uptake to treat alcohol use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P.S.S.; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a serious public health concern that is characterized by the development of tolerance to alcohol's effects, increased consumption, loss of control over drinking and the development of physical dependence. This cycle is often times punctuated by periods of abstinence, craving and relapse. The development of tolerance and the expression of withdrawal effects, which manifest as dependence, have been to a great extent attributed to neuroadaptations within the mesocorticolimbic and extended amygdala systems. Alcohol affects various neurotransmitter systems in the brain including the adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, peptidergic, and serotonergic systems. Due to the myriad of neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems affected by alcohol, the efficacies of current pharmacotherapies targeting alcohol dependence are limited. Importantly, research findings of changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission induced by alcohol self- or experimenter-administration have resulted in a focus on therapies targeting glutamatergic receptors and normalization of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Glutamatergic receptors implicated in the effects of ethanol include the ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, Kainate, and NMDA) and some metabotropic glutamate receptors. Regarding glutamatergic homeostasis, ceftriaxone, MS-153, and GPI-1046, which upregulate glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) expression in mesocorticolimbic brain regions, reduce alcohol intake in genetic animal models of alcoholism. Given the hyperglutamatergic/hyperexcitable state of the central nervous system induced by chronic alcohol abuse and withdrawal, the evidence thus far indicates that a restoration of glutamatergic concentrations and activity within the mesocorticolimbic system and extended amygdala as well as multiple memory systems holds great promise for the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:25954150

  15. Conditional deletion of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 reveals that astrocytic GLT-1 protects against fatal epilepsy while neuronal GLT-1 contributes significantly to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Petr, Geraldine T; Sun, Yan; Frederick, Natalie M; Zhou, Yun; Dhamne, Sameer C; Hameed, Mustafa Q; Miranda, Clive; Bedoya, Edward A; Fischer, Kathryn D; Armsen, Wencke; Wang, Jianlin; Danbolt, Niels C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Aoki, Chiye J; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain, and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, but at lower levels also in excitatory terminals. We generated a conditional GLT-1 knock-out mouse to uncover cell-type-specific functional roles of GLT-1. Inactivation of the GLT-1 gene was achieved in either neurons or astrocytes by expression of synapsin-Cre or inducible human GFAP-CreERT2. Elimination of GLT-1 from astrocytes resulted in loss of ∼80% of GLT-1 protein and of glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes. This loss was accompanied by excess mortality, lower body weight, and seizures suggesting that astrocytic GLT-1 is of major importance. However, there was only a small (15%) reduction that did not reach significance of glutamate uptake into crude forebrain synaptosomes. In contrast, when GLT-1 was deleted in neurons, both the GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes were virtually unaffected. These mice showed normal survival, weight gain, and no seizures. However, the synaptosomal glutamate uptake capacity (Vmax) was reduced significantly (40%). In conclusion, astrocytic GLT-1 performs critical functions required for normal weight gain, resistance to epilepsy, and survival. However, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes is less than expected, and the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal glutamate uptake is greater than expected based on their relative protein expression. These results have important implications for the interpretation of the many previous studies assessing glutamate uptake capacity by measuring synaptosomal uptake. PMID:25834045

  16. Conditional Deletion of the Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Reveals That Astrocytic GLT-1 Protects against Fatal Epilepsy While Neuronal GLT-1 Contributes Significantly to Glutamate Uptake into Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Geraldine T.; Sun, Yan; Frederick, Natalie M.; Zhou, Yun; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Hameed, Mustafa Q.; Miranda, Clive; Bedoya, Edward A.; Fischer, Kathryn D.; Armsen, Wencke; Wang, Jianlin; Danbolt, Niels C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Aoki, Chiye J.

    2015-01-01

    GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain, and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, but at lower levels also in excitatory terminals. We generated a conditional GLT-1 knock-out mouse to uncover cell-type-specific functional roles of GLT-1. Inactivation of the GLT-1 gene was achieved in either neurons or astrocytes by expression of synapsin-Cre or inducible human GFAP-CreERT2. Elimination of GLT-1 from astrocytes resulted in loss of ∼80% of GLT-1 protein and of glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes. This loss was accompanied by excess mortality, lower body weight, and seizures suggesting that astrocytic GLT-1 is of major importance. However, there was only a small (15%) reduction that did not reach significance of glutamate uptake into crude forebrain synaptosomes. In contrast, when GLT-1 was deleted in neurons, both the GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes were virtually unaffected. These mice showed normal survival, weight gain, and no seizures. However, the synaptosomal glutamate uptake capacity (Vmax) was reduced significantly (40%). In conclusion, astrocytic GLT-1 performs critical functions required for normal weight gain, resistance to epilepsy, and survival. However, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes is less than expected, and the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal glutamate uptake is greater than expected based on their relative protein expression. These results have important implications for the interpretation of the many previous studies assessing glutamate uptake capacity by measuring synaptosomal uptake. PMID:25834045

  17. Neuroprotection by glial metabotropic glutamate receptors is mediated by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Battaglia, G; Casabona, G; Copani, A; Caciagli, F; Nicoletti, F

    1998-12-01

    The medium collected from cultured astrocytes transiently exposed to the group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists (2S,1'R, 2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) or (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (4C3HPG) is neuroprotective when transferred to mixed cortical cultures challenged with NMDA (). The following data indicate that this particular form of neuroprotection is mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta). (1) TGFbeta1 and -beta2 were highly neuroprotective against NMDA toxicity, and their action was less than additive with that produced by the medium collected from astrocytes treated with DCG-IV or 4C3HPG (GM/DCG-IV or GM/4C3HPG); (2) antibodies that specifically neutralized the actions of TGFbeta1 or -beta2 prevented the neuroprotective activity of DCG-IV or 4C3HPG, as well as the activity of GM/DCG-IV or GM/4C3HPG; and (3) a transient exposure of cultured astrocytes to either DCG-IV or 4C3HPG led to a delayed increase in both intracellular and extracellular levels of TGFbeta. We therefore conclude that a transient activation of group-II mGlu receptors (presumably mGlu3 receptors) in astrocytes leads to an increased formation and release of TGFbeta, which in turn protects neighbor neurons against excitotoxic death. These results offer a new strategy for increasing the local production of neuroprotective factors in the CNS. PMID:9822720

  18. Antagonistic interaction between adenosine A2A receptors and Na+/K+-ATPase-α2 controlling glutamate uptake in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2013-11-20

    Astrocytic glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-I) is critical to control the bulk of glutamate uptake and, thus, to regulate synaptic plasticity and excitotoxicity. GLT-I glutamate uptake is driven by the sodium gradient implemented by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases (NKAs) and the α2 subunit of NKA (NKA-α2) is actually linked to GLT-I to regulate astrocytic glutamate transport. We recently found that adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs), which control synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, regulate glutamate uptake through unknown mechanisms. Here we report that A2AR activation decreases NKA activity selectively in astrocytes to inhibit glutamate uptake. Furthermore, we found a physical association of A2ARs with NKA-α2s in astrocytes, as gauged by coimmunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assays, in the cerebral cortex and striatum, two brain regions where A2ARs inhibit the astrocytic glutamate uptake. Moreover, the selective deletion of A2ARs in astrocytes (using Gfa2-A2AR-KO mice) leads to a concurrent increase of both astrocytic glutamate uptake and NKA-α2 levels and activity in the striatum and cortex. This coupling of astrocytic A2ARs to the regulation of glutamate transport through modulation of NKA-α2 activity provides a novel mechanism linking neuronal activity to ion homeostasis controlling glutamatergic activity, all of which are processes intricately associated with the etiology of several brain diseases.

  19. [Effect of cholinomimetics on L-glutamic acid release and uptake in the neostriatum of rats].

    PubMed

    Godukhin, O V; Budantsev, A Iu; Selifonova, O V; Agapova, V N

    1983-12-01

    The effects of cholinomimetics on release and uptake of exogenic glutamic acid in the rat brain neostriatum in vivo and in vitro were studied. Carbocholine and nicotin were shown to inhibit the release, carbocholine acting directly on the presynaptic receptors whereas nicotin acting indirectly through the interneurons of neostriatum. PMID:6141074

  20. Ferrous-iron-dependent uptake of L-glutamate by a mesophilic, mixotrophic iron-oxidizing bacterium strain OKM-9.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takao; Kamimura, Kazuo; Sugio, Tsuyoshi

    2002-10-01

    Strain OKM-9 is a mesophilic, mixotrophic iron-oxidizing bacterium that absolutely requires ferrous iron as its energy source and L-amino acids (including L-glutamate) as carbon sources for growth. The properties of the L-glutamate transport system were studied with OKM-9 resting cells, plasma membranes, and actively reconstituted proteoliposomes. L-Glutamate uptake into resting cells was totally dependent on ferrous iron that was added to the reaction mixture. Potassium cyanide, an iron oxidase inhibitor, completely inhibited the activity at 1 mM. The optimum pH for Fe2+-dependent uptake activity of L-glutamate was 3.5-4.0. Uptake activity was dependent on the concentration of the L-glutamate. The Km and Vmax for L-glutamate were 0.4 mM and 11.3 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1), respectively. L-Aspartate, D-aspartate, D-glutamate, and L-cysteine strongly inhibited L-glutamate uptake. L-Aspartate competitively inhibited the activity, and the apparent Ki for this amino acid was 75.9 microM. 2,4-Dinitrophenol, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, gramicidin D, valinomycin, and monensin did not inhibit Fe2+-dependent L-glutamate uptake. The OKM-9 plasma membranes had approximately 40% of the iron-oxidizing activity of the resting cells and approximately 85% of the Fe2+-dependent uptake activity. The glutamate transport system was solubilized from the membranes with 1% n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside and reconstituted into a lecithin liposome. The L-glutamate transport activity of the reconstituted proteoliposomes was 8-fold than that of the resting cells. The Fe2+-dependent L-glutamate uptake observed here seems to explain the mixotrophic nature of this strain, which absolutely requires Fe2+ oxidation when using amino acids as carbon sources. PMID:12450111

  1. Glial metabotropic glutamate receptor-4 increases maturation and survival of oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, Simona Federica; Merlo, Sara; Chisari, Mariangela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Sortino, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mediate important neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Stimulation of mGlu4 receptor reduces neuroinflammation in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) whereas mGlu4 knockout mice display exacerbated EAE clinical scores. We now show that mGlu4 receptors are expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia in culture. Oligodendrocytes express mGlu4 receptors only at early stages of maturation (O4 positive), but not when more differentiated (myelin basic protein, MBP positive). Treatment of immature oligodendrocytes with the mGlu4 receptor agonist L-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4; 50 μM for 48 h) accelerates differentiation with enhanced branching and earlier appearance of MBP staining. Oligodendrocyte death induced by exposure to 1 mM kainic acid for 24 h is significantly reduced by a 30-min pretreatment with L-AP4 (50 μM), an effect observed only in the presence of astrocytes, mimicked by the specific mGlu4 receptor positive allosteric modulator N-Phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC) (30 μM) and prevented by pretreatment with the mGlu4 receptor antagonist, cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG) (100 μM). In astrocytes, mGlu4 receptor is the most expressed among group III mGlu receptors, as by Quantitative real time PCR (QRT-PCR), and its silencing prevents protective effects. Protection is also observed when conditioned medium (CM) from L-AP4-pretreated astrocytes is transferred to oligodendrocytes challenged with kainic acid. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) mediates the increased oligodendrocyte survival as the effect of L-AP4 is mimicked by addition of 10 ng/ml TGF-β and prevented by incubation with a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. In contrast, despite the expression of mGlu4 receptor in resting and activated microglia, CM from L-AP4-stimulated microglia does not modify kainate-induced oligodendrocyte toxicity. Our

  2. Investigating the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in trigeminal ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells: implications for craniofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Boye Larsen, Dennis; Ingemann Kristensen, Gunda; Panchalingam, Vinodenee; Laursen, Jens Christian; Nørgaard Poulsen, Jeppe; Skallerup Andersen, Maria; Kandiah, Aginsha

    2014-01-01

    Context/objective Previous studies have demonstrated that various subtypes of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), implicating that glutamate potentially contributes to sensory transmission through these receptors. While mGluR expression has been investigated largely in the DRG, the present study focused on mGluR expression on neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the trigeminal ganglion (TG). Materials and methods: To address the presence of mGluRs in rat TG neurons and their corresponding SGCs, the trigeminal ganglia from six adult male Wistar rats were isolated and immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were performed. The expression of mGluR1α-, mGluR2/3- and mGluR8 on TG neurons and SGCs was investigated in tissue slices and isolated cells. Results: 35.1 ± 6.0% of the TG neurons were positive for mGluR1α, whereas 39.9 ± 7.7% and 55.5 ± 6.3% were positive for mGluR2/3 and mGluR8, respectively. Immunoreactive neurons expressing mGluRs were mainly medium- to large sized, with a smaller population of small-sized neurons showing immunoreactivity. The SGCs showed immunoreactivity toward mGluR1α and mGluR8, but not mGluR2/3, both in the tissue and in isolated cells. Conclusions: Findings from the present study showed that trigeminal neurons express mGluR1α, mGluR2/3 and mGluR8, while SGCs only express mGluR1α and mGluR8. This novel evidence may advance investigations on a possible role of mGluRs in relation to trigeminal pain transmission within the craniofacial region. PMID:24495291

  3. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P. . E-mail: Bressler@kennedykrieger.org

    2007-05-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin.

  4. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  5. Atorvastatin Prevents Glutamate Uptake Reduction Induced by Quinolinic Acid Via MAPKs Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vandresen-Filho, S; Martins, W C; Bertoldo, D B; Rieger, D K; Maestri, M; Leal, R B; Tasca, C I

    2016-08-01

    Statins have been shown to promote neuroprotection in a wide range of neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms involved in such effects of statins are not fully understood. Quinolinic acid (QA) is a neurotoxin that induces seizures when infused in vivo and promotes glutamatergic excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the putative glutamatergic mechanisms and the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the atorvastatin neuroprotective effects against QA toxicity. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment for 7 days prevented the QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake, but had no effect on increased glutamate release induced by QA. Moreover, atorvastatin treatment increased the phosphorylation of ERK1 and prevented the decrease in Akt phosphorylation induced by QA. Neither atorvastatin treatment nor QA infusion altered glutamine synthetase activity or the levels of phosphorylation of p38(MAPK) or JNK1/2 during the evaluation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, but not PI3K/Akt signaling, abolished the neuroprotective effect of atorvastatin against QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. Our data suggest that atorvastatin protective effects against QA toxicity are related to modulation of glutamate transporters via MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

  6. Enhanced GLT-1 mediated glutamate uptake and migration of primary astrocytes directed by fibronectin-coated electrospun poly-L-lactic acid fibers

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Jonathan M.; Hyzinski-García, María C.; Vlasselaer, Kristien Van; Zaccor, Nicholas; Plopper, George E.; Mongin, Alexander A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioengineered fiber substrates are increasingly studied as a means to promote regeneration and remodeling in the injured central nervous system (CNS). Previous reports largely focused on the ability of oriented scaffolds to bridge injured regions and direct outgrowth of axonal projections. In the present work, we explored the effects of electrospun microfibers on the migration and physiological properties of brain astroglial cells. Primary rat astrocytes were cultured on either fibronectin-coated poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) films, fibronectin-coated randomly oriented PLLA electrospun fibers, or fibronectin-coated aligned PLLA electrospun fibers. Aligned PLLA fibers strongly altered astrocytic morphology, orienting cell processes, actin microfilaments, and microtubules along the length of the fibers. On aligned fibers, astrocytes also significantly increased their migration rates in the direction of fiber orientation. We further investigated if fiber topography modifies astrocytic neuroprotective properties, namely glutamate and glutamine transport and metabolism. This was done by quantifying changes in mRNA expression (qRT-PCR) and protein levels (Western blotting) for a battery of relevant biomolecules. Interestingly, we found that cells grown on random and/or aligned fibers increased the expression levels of two glutamate transporters, GLAST and GLT-1, and an important metabolic enzyme, glutamine synthetase, as compared to the fibronectin-coated films. Functional assays revealed increases in glutamate transport rates due to GLT-1 mediated uptake, which was largely determined by the dihydrokainate-sensitive GLT-1. Overall, this study suggests that aligned PLLA fibers can promote directed astrocytic migration, and, of most importance, our in vitro results indicate for the first time that electrospun PLLA fibers can positively modify neuroprotective properties of glial cells by increasing rates of glutamate uptake. PMID:24246642

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta regulates glial glutamate transporter protein expression in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Han-Rong; Gao, Mei; Maixner, Dylan W.

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional glial glutamate transporters and over production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1β, IL-1β) are two prominent mechanisms by which glial cells enhance neuronal activities in the spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain conditions. Endogenous molecules regulating production of IL-1β and glial glutamate functions remain poorly understood. In this study, we revealed a dynamic alteration of GSK3β activities and its role in regulating glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) protein expression in the spinal dorsal horn and nociceptive behaviors following the nerve injury. Specifically, GSK3β was expressed in both neurons and astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. GSK3β activities were suppressed on day 3 but increased on day 10 following the nerve injury. In parallel, protein expression of GLT-1 in the spinal dorsal horn was enhanced on day 3 but reduced on day 10. In contrast to these time-dependent changes, the activation of astrocytes and over-production of IL-1β were found on both day 3 and day 10. Meanwhile, thermal hyperalgesia was observed from day 2 through day 10 and mechanical allodynia from day 4 through day 10. Pre-emptive pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β activities significantly ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia at the late stage but did not have effects at the early stage. These were accompanied with the suppression of GSK3β activities, prevention of decreased GLT-1 protein expression, inhibition of astrocytic activation, and reduction of IL-1β in the spinal dorsal horn on day 10. These data indicate that the increased GSK3β activity in the spinal dorsal horn is attributable to the downregulation of GLT-1 protein expression in neuropathic rats at the late stage. Further, we also demonstrated that the nerve-injury-induced thermal hyperalgesia on day 10 was transiently suppressed by pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β. Our study suggests that GSK3β may be a potential target for the

  8. Effect of SCH442416 on glutamate uptake in retinal Müller cells at increased hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Huang, Shouyue; Huang, Ping; Zhong, Yisheng

    2015-09-01

    The A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist has been considered as an attractive option to improve the treatment of neurological disorders, and the function of A2AR antagonist may inhibit the release of glutamate and prevent neuron damage. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether SCH442416 can modulate the glutamate uptake in retinal Müller cells under increased hydrostatic pressure. The levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) were assessed in retinal Müller cells under 40 mmHg pressure for 24 h using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and a glutamate uptake assay was performed using a scintillation counting method. Following treatment of the Müller cells with 100 nM SCH442416 under 40 mmHg pressure for 24 h, the mRNA and protein expression levels of GS and GLAST, and glutamate uptake activity were investigated. Under 40 mmHg pressure, the expression levels of GS and GLAST in the Müller cells, and glutamate uptake activity were significantly reduced. Treatment with SCH442416 significantly ameliorated the decreased expression levels of GS and GLAST, and improved the glutamate uptake activity in the retinal Müller cells exposed to 40 mmHg pressure, resulting in increased expression levels of GS and GLAST, and increased glutamate uptake activity in the Müller cells under pressure. These results suggested that SCH442416 may be a potential candidate as a beneficial neuroprotective agent for the treatment of glaucoma by accelerating the clearance of extracellular glutamate. PMID:26045066

  9. ALUMINUM STIMULATES UPTAKE OF NON-TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON AND TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON IN HUMAN GLIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer’s Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in the brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin. PMID:17376497

  10. Synaptic vesicle-bound pyruvate kinase can support vesicular glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Atsuhiko; Noda, Yasuko; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    2008-01-01

    Glucose metabolism is essential for normal brain function and plays a vital role in synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that ATP synthesized locally by glycolysis, particularly via glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase/3-phosphoglycerate kinase, is critical for synaptic transmission. We present evidence that ATP generated by synaptic vesicle-associated pyruvate kinase is harnessed to transport glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Isolated synaptic vesicles incorporated [3H]glutamate in the presence of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. Pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors stimulated and reduced PEP/ADP-dependent glutamate uptake, respectively. Membrane potential was also formed in the presence of pyruvate kinase activators. “ATP-trapping” experiments using hexokinase and glucose suggest that ATP produced by vesicle-associated pyruvate kinase is more readily used than exogenously added ATP. Other neurotransmitters such as GABA, dopamine, and serotonin were also taken up into crude synaptic vesicles in a PEP/ADP-dependent manner. The possibility that ATP locally generated by glycolysis supports vesicular accumulation of neurotransmitters is discussed. PMID:18751889

  11. Inhibition of glutamate uptake by a polypeptide toxin (phoneutriatoxin 3-4) from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer.

    PubMed

    Reis, H J; Prado, M A; Kalapothakis, E; Cordeiro, M N; Diniz, C R; De Marco, L A; Gomez, M V; Romano-Silva, M A

    1999-10-15

    Glutamate concentration increases significantly in the extracellular compartment during brain ischaemia and anoxia. This increase has an important Ca(2+)-independent component, which is due in part to the reversal of glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane of neurons and glia. The toxin phoneutriatoxin 3-4 (Tx3-4) from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer has been reported to decrease the evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes by inhibiting Ca(2+) entry via voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. However, we report here that Tx3-4 is also able to inhibit the uptake of glutamate by synaptosomes in a time-dependent manner and that this inhibition in turn leads to a decrease in the Ca(2+)-independent release of glutamate. No other polypeptide toxin so far described has this effect. Our results suggest that Tx3-4 can be a valuable tool in the investigation of function and dysfunction of glutamatergic neurotransmission in diseases such as ischaemia.

  12. Diphenyl ditelluride induces anxiogenic-like behavior in rats by reducing glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Eluza Curte; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2014-06-01

    Anxiety-related disorders are a common public health issue. Several lines of evidence suggest that altered glutamatergic neurotransmission underlies anxiety. The present study evaluated the effect of diphenyl ditelluride [(PhTe)2] exposure on the behavioral performance of rats and examined whether the behavioral effects could be attributed to changes in the modulation of glutamatergic function. Rats were exposed to (PhTe)2 (subcutaneously) during 8 weeks-final dose one third LD50 (124 μg/kg). The testing schedule included elevated plus-maze, open-field, T-maze, rotorod, and Morris water maze tests. Synaptosomal basal [(3)H] glutamate release and uptake were also evaluated. The time spent in the open arm and the ratio of time spent in the open arm/total were decreased in the (PhTe)2 group. Furthermore, the [(3)H] glutamate uptake was decreased in this experimental group. The results suggest that exposure to (PhTe)2 did not change motor abilities whereas it may result in anxiogenic-like behavior, induced by changes in the glutamatergic system at the pre-synaptic level.

  13. Acrolein, a product of lipid peroxidation, inhibits glucose and glutamate uptake in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Lovell, M A; Xie, C; Markesbery, W R

    2000-10-15

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased lipid peroxidation, decreased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, and increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), F(2)-isoprostanes, and F(4)-neuroprostanes are present in the brain in patients with AD. Acrolein, an alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation has been demonstrated to be approximately 100 times more reactive than HNE and is present in neurofibrillary tangles in the brain in AD. We recently demonstrated statistically significant elevated concentrations of extractable acrolein in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala in AD compared with age-matched control subjects. Concentrations of acrolein were two to five times those of HNE in the same samples. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with acrolein led to a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in cell survival as well as a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular calcium. In cortical neuron cultures, we now report that acrolein causes a concentration-dependent impairment of glutamate uptake and glucose transport in cortical neuron cultures. Treatment of cortical astrocyte cultures with acrolein led to the same pattern of impairment of glutamate uptake as observed in cortical neuron cultures. Collectively, these data demonstrate neurotoxicity mechanisms of arolein that might be important in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration in AD.

  14. Astrocytic adenosine A2A receptors control the amyloid-β peptide-induced decrease of glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Machado, Nuno J; dos Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive impairment tightly correlated with the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (mainly Aβ(1-42)). There is a precocious disruption of glutamatergic synapses in AD, in line with an ability of Aβ to decrease astrocytic glutamate uptake. Accumulating evidence indicates that caffeine prevents the burden of AD, likely through the antagonism of A(2A) receptors (A(2A)R) which attenuates Aβ-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity. Since A(2A)R also modulate astrocytic glutamate uptake, we now tested if A(2A)R blockade could prevent the decrease of astrocytic glutamate uptake caused by Aβ. In cultured astrocytes, Aβ(1-42). (1 μM for 24 hours) triggered an astrogliosis typified by an increased density of GFAP, which was mimicked by the A(2A)R agonist, CGS 26180 (30 nM), and prevented by the A(2A)R antagonist, SCH 58261 (100 nM). Aβ1-42 also decreased D-aspartate uptake by 28 ± 4%, an effect abrogated upon genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of A(2A)R. In accordance with the long term control of glutamate transporter expression by A(2A)R, Aβ(1-42). enhanced the expression and density of astrocytic A(2A)R and decreased GLAST and GLT-I expression in astrocytes from wild type, but not from A(2A)R knockout mice. This impact of Aβ(1-42). on glutamate transporters and uptake, dependent on A(2A)R function, was also confirmed in an ex vivo astrocyte preparation (gliosomes) from rats intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected with Aβ(1-42). . These results provide the first demonstration for a direct key role of astrocytic A(2A)R in the ability of Aβ-induced impairment of glutamate uptake, which may underlie glutamatergic synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxicity in AD.

  15. Insulin-dependent regulation of GLAST/EAAT1 in Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Poblete-Naredo, Irais; Angulo, Carla; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa; López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguilera, José; Ortega, Arturo

    2009-02-20

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors are present in neurons and glial cells and are involved in gene expression regulation. A family of sodium-dependent glutamate transporters carries out the removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. In the cerebellum, the bulk of glutamate transport is mediated through the excitatory amino acids transporter 1 (EAAT1/GLAST) expressed in Bergmann glial cells. Proper transporter function is critical for glutamate cycling and glucose turnover, as well as prevention of excitotoxic insult to Purkinje cells. In order to gain insight into the regulatory signals that modify this uptake activity, we investigated the effects of insulin exposure. Using the well-defined chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cell culture model, we observed a time and dose-dependent decrease in [(3)H]-d-aspartate uptake. As expected, this effect is mimicked by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate, suggesting a receptor-mediated effect. Equilibrium [(3)H]-d-aspartate binding experiments as well as a reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction strategy demonstrated that the decrease in the uptake activity is related to reduced numbers of transporter molecules in the plasma membrane. Accordingly, the transcriptional activity of the chick glast promoter diminished upon insulin treatment. The present findings suggest the involvement of insulin in neuronal/glial coupling in the cerebellum.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christina L.; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 +/- 10.56 ppm, 136.0 +/- 31.73 ppm and 62.37 +/- 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.Titanium dioxide (Ti

  17. Glutamate uptake determines pathway specificity of long-term potentiation in the neural circuitry of fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Evgeny; Shin, Ryong Moon; Bolshakov, Vadim Y

    2004-01-01

    Long-term synaptic modifications in afferent inputs to the amygdala underlie fear conditioning in animals. Fear conditioning to a single sensory modality does not generalize to other cues, implying that synaptic modifications in fear conditioning pathways are input specific. The mechanisms of pathway specificity of long-term potentiation (LTP) are poorly understood. Here we show that inhibition of glutamate transporters leads to the loss of input specificity of LTP in the amygdala slices, as assessed by monitoring synaptic responses at two independent inputs converging on a single postsynaptic neuron. Diffusion of glutamate ("spillover") from stimulated synapses, paired with postsynaptic depolarization, is sufficient to induce LTP in the heterosynaptic pathway, whereas an enzymatic glutamate scavenger abolishes this effect. These results establish active glutamate uptake as a crucial mechanism maintaining the pathway specificity of LTP in the neural circuitry of fear conditioning.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christina L; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-28

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 ± 10.56 ppm, 136.0 ± 31.73 ppm and 62.37 ± 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.

  19. 4-hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation product, rapidly accumulates following traumatic spinal cord injury and inhibits glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Springer, J E; Azbill, R D; Mark, R J; Begley, J G; Waeg, G; Mattson, M P

    1997-06-01

    Traumatic injury to the spinal cord initiates a host of pathophysiological events that are secondary to the initial insult. One such event is the accumulation of free radicals that damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. A major reactive product formed following lipid peroxidation is the aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), which cross-links to side chain amino acids and inhibits the function of several key metabolic enzymes. In the present study, we used immunocytochemical and immunoblotting techniques to examine the accumulation of protein-bound HNE, and synaptosomal preparations to study the effects of spinal cord injury and HNE formation on glutamate uptake. Protein-bound HNE increased in content in the damaged spinal cord at early times following injury (1-24 h) and was found to accumulate in myelinated fibers distant to the site of injury. Immunoblots revealed that protein-bound HNE levels increased dramatically over the same postinjury interval. Glutamate uptake in synaptosomal preparations from injured spinal cords was decreased by 65% at 24 h following injury. Treatment of control spinal cord synaptosomes with HNE was found to decrease significantly, in a dose-dependent fashion, glutamate uptake, an effect that was mimicked by inducers of lipid peroxidation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the lipid peroxidation product HNE rapidly accumulates in the spinal cord following injury and that a major consequence of HNE accumulation is a decrease in glutamate uptake, which may potentiate neuronal cell dysfunction and death through excitotoxic mechanisms. PMID:9166741

  20. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  1. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  2. Differential Regulation of Two Isoforms of the Glial Glutamate Transporter EAAT2 by DLG1 and CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    The gene for EAAT2, the major astrocytic glutamate transporter, generates two carrier isoforms (EAAT2a and EAAT2b) that vary at their C termini as a consequence of alternative RNA splicing. The EAAT2b cytoplasmic C terminus contains a postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1 (PDZ) ligand, which is absent in EAAT2a. To understand how the distinct C termini might affect transporter trafficking and surface localization, we generated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that stably express EGFP-EAAT2a or EGFP-EAAT2b and found robust basolateral membrane expression of the EAAT2b isoform. In contrast, EAAT2a displayed a predominant distribution within intracellular vesicle compartments, constitutively cycling to and from the membrane. Addition of the PDZ ligand to EAAT2a as well as its deletion from EAAT2b confirmed the importance of the motif for cell-surface localization. Using EAAT2 constructs with an extracellular biotin acceptor tag to directly assess surface proteins, we observed significant PDZ ligand-dependent EAAT2b surface expression in cultured astrocytes, consistent with observations in cell lines. Discs large homolog 1 (DLG1; SAP97), a PDZ protein prominent in both astrocytes and MDCK cells, colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with EAAT2b. shRNA knockdown of DLG1 expression decreased surface EAAT2b in both MDCK cells and cultured astrocytes, suggesting that the DLG scaffolding protein stabilizes EAAT2b at the surface. DLG1 can be phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), resulting in disruption of its PDZ-mediated interaction. In murine astrocytes and acute brain slices, activation of CaMKII decreases EAAT2b surface expression but does not alter the distribution of EAAT2a. These data indicate that the surface expression and function of EAAT2b can be rapidly modulated through the disruption of its interaction with DLG1 by CaMKII activation. PMID:25834051

  3. Genomic organization, promoter analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for the mouse glial high-affinity glutamate transporter Slc1a3

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kohichi; Maeno-Hikichi, Yuka

    1996-05-01

    The mouse gene encoding glial high-affinity, Na -dependent glutamate transporter Slcla3 (GluT-1/GLAST) was isolated, and its structural organization was characterized. The gene appeared to exist as a single copy in the mouse genome and comprised 10 exons spanning more than 56 kilobases. The transcription initiation sites were mapped to positions 503, which is the first transcriptional point (defined as +1), 128 (+376), and 64 (+440) basepairs upstream of the 3{prime}-end of exon 1 by primer extension. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the mouse GluT-1 gene had a typical CCAAT box and a GC box but lacked at TATA box. These features of the promoter region were characteristic of housekeeping genes. The fusion plasmids containing approximately 4 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region (-3830 to +450) and the firefly luciferase gene induced a significant luciferase activity when transfected into COS-1 cells. Distal deletion of the 5{prime}-flanking region, leaving 619 bp (-169 to +450), resulted in a marked decrease in luciferase activity in COS-1 cells, suggesting that a CCAAT box, which was positioned at -200, is necessary for the expression of this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene to mouse chromosome 15A2. These structural features will lead to a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the expression of the GluT-1 gene by ischemia and will also provide a basis for future evolutionary comparisons with other neurotransmitter transporters. 40 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Peripheral nerve injury produces a sustained shift in the balance between glutamate release and uptake in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Inquimbert, Perrine; Bartels, Karsten; Babaniyi, Olusegun B.; Barrett, Lee B.; Tegeder, Irmgard; Scholz, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury provokes heightened excitability of primary sensory afferents including nociceptors, and elicits ectopic activity in lesioned and neighboring intact nerve fibers. The major transmitter released by sensory afferents in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord is glutamate. Glutamate is critically involved in nociceptive signaling and the development of neuropathic pain. We recorded miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) from neurons in lamina II of the rat dorsal horn to assess spontaneous synaptic activity after spared nerve injury (SNI), a model of chronic neuropathic pain. Following SNI, the frequency of mEPSCs doubled, indicating heightened glutamate release from primary afferents or spinal interneurons. Consistent with this finding, glutamate concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were elevated at one and four weeks after SNI. Transmitter uptake was insufficient to prevent the rise in extracellular glutamate as the expression of glutamate transporters remained unchanged or decreased. 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), an antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), reduced the frequency of mEPSCs to its preinjury level, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism that involves facilitation of transmitter release by mGluR5 activation in the presence of high extracellular glutamate. Treatment with the β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone increased the expression of glutamate transporter 1 (Glt1) in the dorsal horn after SNI, raised transmitter uptake and lowered extracellular glutamate. Improving glutamate clearance prevented the facilitation of transmitter release by mGluR5 and attenuated neuropathic pain-like behavior. Balancing glutamate release and uptake after nerve injury should be an important target in the management of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:23021150

  5. Gas1 Knockdown Increases the Neuroprotective Effect of Glial Cell-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Against Glutamate-Induced Cell Injury in Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Growth arrest-specific 1 (Gas1) protein acts as an inhibitor of cell growth and a mediator of cell death in nervous system during development and is also re-expressed in adult neurons during excitotoxic insult. Due to its structural similarity to the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptors α (GFRα), Gas1 is likely to interfere with the neuroprotective effect of GDNF. In the present study, we investigated the expression profile of Gas1 during glutamate insults in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as well as the influence of Gas1 inhibition on the protective effect of GDNF against glutamate-induced cell injury. Our data showed that Gas1 expression was significantly increased with the treatment of glutamate in SH-SY5Y cells. The silencing of Gas1 by small interfering RNA promoted the protective effect of GDNF against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity as well as cell apoptosis, which effect was likely mediated through activating Akt/PI3 K-dependent cell survival signaling pathway and inhibiting mitochondrial-dependent cell apoptosis signaling pathway via Bad dephosphorylation blockade. In summary, this study showed the synergistic effect of Gas1 inhibition and GDNF against glutamate-induced cell injury in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which information might significantly contribute to better understanding the function of Gas1 in neuronal cells and form the basis of the therapeutic development of GDNF in treating human neurodegenerative diseases in the future.

  6. Linkage between postabsorptive amino acid release and glutamate uptake in skeletal muscle tissue of healthy young subjects, cancer patients, and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Holm, E; Hack, V; Tokus, M; Breitkreutz, R; Babylon, A; Dröge, W

    1997-06-01

    Several diseases of varying etiology that are commonly associated with the loss of skeletal muscle mass were found to be associated with a decrease in muscular glutamate and glutathione levels and in glutamate uptake in the postabsorptive state. In view of the Na+ dependency and insulin responsiveness of glutamate transport we studied the postabsorptive glutamate exchange in more detail. Our study demonstrates a linkage between glutamate uptake and the export of other amino acids, suggesting that protein catabolism and the resulting coexport of amino acids plus Na+ substitute for insulin as a driving force for the Na+ gradient in the postabsorptive state. The regression function of the correlation between relative glutamate exchange and cumulative amino acid exchange in cancer patients was lower than that in non-tumor-bearing subjects, suggesting that cancer patients must release more amino acids to achieve the same glutamate uptake. In addition, cancer patients had a lower average cumulative amino acid exchange rate than non-tumor-bearing subjects, suggesting that the abnormally low relative glutamate exchange capacity of cancer patients results mainly from inadequate postabsorptive protein catabolism in the skeletal muscle tissue. Both cancer patients and non-tumor-bearing elderly subjects had higher arterial glutamate levels and alanine release than young subjects, indicative of a substantial glycolytic activity in the skeletal muscle. However, elderly non-tumor-bearing subjects showed, in contrast to cancer patients, in the postabsorptive state a stronger cumulative amino acid release and postabsorptive glutamate uptake than healthy young subjects. These changes are discussed in view of the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass.

  7. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  8. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Salińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs), the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST). Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release) by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  9. Strategies for metabolic exchange between glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Deitmer, J W

    2001-12-01

    The brain is a major energy consumer and dependent on carbohydrate and oxygen supply. Electrical and synaptic activity of neurons can only be sustained given sufficient availability of ATP. Glial cells, which have long been assigned trophic functions, seem to play a pivotal role in meeting the energy requirements of active neurons. Under conditions of high neuronal activity, a number of glial functions, such as the maintenance of ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter clearance from synaptic domains, the supply of energetic compounds and calcium signalling, are challenged. In the vertebrate brain, astrocytes may increase glucose utilization and release lactate, which is taken up and consumed by neurons to generate ATP by oxidative metabolism. The CO(2) produced is processed primarily in astrocytes, which display the major activity of carboanhydrase in the brain. Protons and bicarbonate in turn may contribute to drive acid/base-coupled transporters. In the present article a scenario is discussed which couples the transfer of energy and the conversion of CO(2) with the high-affinity glutamate uptake and other transport processes at glial and neuronal cell membranes. The transporters can be linked to glial signalling and may cooperate with each other at the cellular level. This could save energy, and would render energy exchange processes between glial cells and neurons more effective. Functions implications and physiological responses, in particular in chemosensitive brain areas, are discussed.

  10. Strategies for metabolic exchange between glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Deitmer, J W

    2001-12-01

    The brain is a major energy consumer and dependent on carbohydrate and oxygen supply. Electrical and synaptic activity of neurons can only be sustained given sufficient availability of ATP. Glial cells, which have long been assigned trophic functions, seem to play a pivotal role in meeting the energy requirements of active neurons. Under conditions of high neuronal activity, a number of glial functions, such as the maintenance of ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter clearance from synaptic domains, the supply of energetic compounds and calcium signalling, are challenged. In the vertebrate brain, astrocytes may increase glucose utilization and release lactate, which is taken up and consumed by neurons to generate ATP by oxidative metabolism. The CO(2) produced is processed primarily in astrocytes, which display the major activity of carboanhydrase in the brain. Protons and bicarbonate in turn may contribute to drive acid/base-coupled transporters. In the present article a scenario is discussed which couples the transfer of energy and the conversion of CO(2) with the high-affinity glutamate uptake and other transport processes at glial and neuronal cell membranes. The transporters can be linked to glial signalling and may cooperate with each other at the cellular level. This could save energy, and would render energy exchange processes between glial cells and neurons more effective. Functions implications and physiological responses, in particular in chemosensitive brain areas, are discussed. PMID:11738647

  11. Improving solubility, stability, and cellular uptake of resveratrol by nanoencapsulation with chitosan and γ-poly (glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Ok; Lee, Ji-Soo; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a polyphenolic compound found in grape skins, is a potent antioxidant with broad health benefits. However, its utilization in food has been limited by its poor water solubility, instability, and low bioavailability. The purpose of this study is to improve the solubility, stability, and cellular uptake of RES by nanoencapsulation using chitosan (CS) and γ-poly (glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). The size of nanoparticles significantly decreases with a decrease in the CS/γ-PGA ratio (p<0.05). The nanoparticle size with CS/γ-PGA ratio of 5 was 100-150nm. The entrapment efficiency and UV-light protection effect significantly increases (p<0.05), with an increase in the CS and γ-PGA concentration. The solubility of RES increases 3.2 and 4.2 times before and after lyophilization by nanoencapsulation, respectively. Compared with non-nanoencapsulated RES, the nanoencapsulated RES tends to maintain its solubility and antioxidant activity during storage. CS/γ-PGA nanoencapsulation was able to significantly enhance the transport of RES across a Caco-2 cell monolayer (p<0.05). The highest cellular uptake was found for nanoparticles prepared with 0.5mg/mL CS and 0.1mg/mL γ-PGA, which showed the highest solubility and antioxidant activity during storage. Therefore, CS/γ-PGA nanoencapsulation is found to be a potentially valuable technique for improving the solubility, stability, and cellular uptake of RES. PMID:27518454

  12. Effect of poly-glutamate on uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity of cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Shirani, Ali; Mohammadi, Samaneh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Shahbazi Mojarrad, Javid; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2016-04-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were developed as vehicles for efficient delivery of various molecules. An ideal CPP-peptide should not display any toxicity against cancer cells as well as healthy cells and efficiently enter into the cell. Because of the cationic nature and the intrinsic vector capabilities, these peptides can cause cytotoxicity. One of the possible reasons for toxicity of CPPs is direct translocation and consequently, pore formation on the plasma membrane. In this study it was demonstrated that interaction of poly-glutamate with CPP considerably reduced their cytotoxicity in A549 cell. This strategy could be useful for efficient drug delivery mediated by CPP. PMID:27074859

  13. Effects of volatile and intravenous anesthetics on the uptake of GABA, glutamate and dopamine by their transporters heterologously expressed in COS cells and in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, M; Kitayama, S; Morita, K; Irifune, M; Takarada, T; Kawahara, M; Dohi, T

    2001-08-01

    Although the neurotransmitter uptake system is considered a possible target for the presynaptic action of anesthetic agents, observations are inconsistent concerning effects on the transporter and their clinical relevance. The present study examined the effects of volatile and intravenous anesthetics on the uptake of GABA, glutamate and dopamine in COS cells heterologously expressing the transporters for these neurotransmitters and in the rat brain synaptosomes. Halothane and isoflurane, but not thiamylal or thiopental, significantly inhibited uptake by COS cell systems of GABA, dopamine and glutamic acid in a concentration-dependent manner within clinically relevant ranges for anesthesia induced by these agents. Similarly, in synaptosomes halothane and isoflurane but not thiopental significantly suppressed the uptake of GABA and glutamic acid, respectively. These results do not support the hypothesis that volatile and intravenous anesthetics exert their action via specific inhibition of GABA uptake to enhance inhibitory GABAergic neuronal activity. Rather, they suggest that presynaptic uptake systems for various neurotransmitters including GABA may be the molecular targets for volatile anesthetic agents.

  14. Disruptions in the Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Neurons and Glia in the Rat Striatum Two Days after Diffuse Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hinzman, Jason M.; Thomas, Theresa Currier; Quintero, Jorge E.; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Disrupted regulation of extracellular glutamate in the central nervous system contributes to and can exacerbate the acute pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previously, we reported increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum of anesthetized rats 2 days after diffuse brain injury. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for increased extracellular glutamate, we used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) coupled with specific pharmacological agents targeted at in vivo neuronal and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate. After TBI, extracellular glutamate was significantly increased in the striatum by (∼90%) averaging 4.1±0.6 μM compared with sham 2.2±0.4 μM. Calcium-dependent neuronal glutamate release, investigated by local application of an N-type calcium channel blocker, was no longer a significant source of extracellular glutamate after TBI, compared with sham. In brain-injured animals, inhibition of glutamate uptake with local application of an excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor produced significantly greater increase in glutamate spillover (∼ 65%) from the synapses compared with sham. Furthermore, glutamate clearance measured by locally applying glutamate into the extracellular space revealed significant reductions in glutamate clearance parameters in brain-injured animals compared with sham. Taken together, these data indicate that disruptions in calcium-mediated glutamate release and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate contribute to increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum 2 days after diffuse brain injury. Overall, these data suggest that therapeutic strategies used to regulate glutamate release and uptake may improve excitatory circuit function and, possibly, outcomes following TBI. PMID:22233432

  15. Methylglyoxal and carboxyethyllysine reduce glutamate uptake and S100B secretion in the hippocampus independently of RAGE activation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Battú, Cíntia Eickhoff; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Galland, Fabiana; Lirio, Franciane; Broetto, Núbia; Nardin, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by high fasting-glucose levels. Diabetic complications have been associated with hyperglycemia and high levels of reactive compounds, such as methylglyoxal (MG) and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation derived from glucose. Diabetic patients have a higher risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. Herein, we examined the effect of high glucose, MG and carboxyethyllysine (CEL), a MG-derived AGE of lysine, on oxidative, metabolic and astrocyte-specific parameters in acute hippocampal slices, and investigated some of the mechanisms that could mediate these effects. Glucose, MG and CEL did not alter reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, glucose uptake or glutamine synthetase activity. However, glutamate uptake and S100B secretion were decreased after MG and CEL exposure. RAGE activation and glycation reactions, examined by aminoguanidine and L-lysine co-incubation, did not mediate these changes. Acute MG and CEL exposure, but not glucose, were able to induce similar effects on hippocampal slices, suggesting that conditions of high glucose concentrations are primarily toxic by elevating the rates of these glycation compounds, such as MG, and by generation of protein cross-links. Alterations in the secretion of S100B and the glutamatergic activity mediated by MG and AGEs can contribute to the brain dysfunction observed in diabetic patients.

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and 13C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Portais, J C; Pianet, I; Allard, M; Merle, M; Raffard, G; Kien, P; Biran, M; Labouesse, J; Caille, J M; Canioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR [1-13C] glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm3. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the contralateral unaffected side. PMID:1674432

  17. Sigma 1 receptor regulates the oxidative stress response in primary retinal Müller glial cells via NRF2 signaling and system xc(-), the Na(+)-independent glutamate-cystine exchanger.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Shanmugam, Arul; Markand, Shanu; Zorrilla, Eric; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress figures prominently in retinal diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Ligands for σ1R, a unique transmembrane protein localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and nuclear and plasma membranes, have profound retinal neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Studies to determine the mechanism of σ1R-mediated retinal neuroprotection have focused mainly on neurons. Little is known about the effects of σ1R on Müller cell function, yet these radial glial cells are essential for homeostatic support of the retina. Here we investigated whether σ1R mediates the oxidative stress response of Müller cells using wild-type (WT) and σ1R-knockout (σ1RKO) mice. We observed increased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in σ1RKO Müller cells compared to WT, which was accompanied by decreased expression of Sod1, catalase, Nqo1, Hmox1, Gstm6, and Gpx1. The protein levels of SOD1, CAT, NQO1, and GPX1 were also significantly decreased. The genes encoding these antioxidants contain an antioxidant response element (ARE), which under stress is activated by NRF2, a transcription factor that typically resides in the cytoplasm bound by KEAP1. In the σ1RKO Müller cells Nrf2 expression was decreased significantly at the gene (and protein) level, whereas Keap1 gene (and protein) levels were markedly increased. NRF2-ARE binding affinity was decreased markedly in σ1RKO Müller cells. We investigated system xc(-), the cystine-glutamate exchanger important for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), and observed decreased function in σ1RKO Müller cells compared to WT as well as decreased GSH and GSH/GSSG ratios. This was accompanied by decreased gene and protein levels of xCT, the unique component of system xc(-). We conclude that Müller glial cells lacking σ1R manifest elevated ROS, perturbation of antioxidant balance, suppression of NRF2 signaling, and impaired function of system xc(-). The data suggest that the oxidative

  18. DJ-1 deficiency impairs glutamate uptake into astrocytes via the regulation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Mo; Cha, Seon-Heui; Choi, Yu Ree; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Although the cause of PD is still poorly understood, mutations in many genes including SNCA, parkin, PINK1, LRRK2, and DJ-1 have been identified in the familial forms of PD. It was recently proposed that alterations in lipid rafts may cause the neurodegeneration shown in PD. Here, we observe that DJ-1 deficiency decreased the expression of flotillin-1 (flot-1) and caveolin-1 (cav-1), the main protein components of lipid rafts, in primary astrocytes and MEF cells. As a mechanism, DJ-1 regulated flot-1 stability by direct interaction, however, decreased cav-1 expression may not be a direct effect of DJ-1, but rather as a result of decreased flot-1 expression. Dysregulation of flot-1 and cav-1 by DJ-1 deficiency caused an alteration in the cellular cholesterol level, membrane fluidity, and alteration in lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis. Moreover, DJ-1 deficiency impaired glutamate uptake into astrocytes, a major function of astrocytes in the maintenance of CNS homeostasis, by altering EAAT2 expression. This study will be helpful to understand the role of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of PD, and the modulation of lipid rafts through the regulation of flot-1 or cav-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for PD. PMID:27346864

  19. GLAST/EAAT1-induced glutamine release via SNAT3 in Bergmann glial cells: evidence of a functional and physical coupling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Guillem, Alain M; Flores-Méndez, Marco; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Vela, Carmelita; Meza, Enrique; Zepeda, Rossana C; Caba, Mario; Rodríguez, Angelina; Ortega, Arturo

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, is removed from the synaptic cleft by a family of sodium-dependent glutamate transporters profusely expressed in glial cells. Once internalized, it is metabolized by glutamine synthetase to glutamine and released to the synaptic space through sodium-dependent neutral amino acid carriers of the N System (SNAT3/slc38a3/SN1, SNAT5/slc38a5/SN2). Glutamine is then taken up by neurons completing the so-called glutamate/glutamine shuttle. Despite of the fact that this coupling was described decades ago, it is only recently that the biochemical framework of this shuttle has begun to be elucidated. Using the established model of cultured cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, we sought to characterize the functional and physical coupling of glutamate uptake and glutamine release. A time-dependent Na⁺-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter/EAAT1-induced System N-mediated glutamine release could be demonstrated. Furthermore, D-aspartate, a specific glutamate transporter ligand, was capable of enhancing the co-immunoprecipitation of Na⁺-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter and Na⁺-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 3, whereas glutamine tended to reduce this association. Our results suggest that glial cells surrounding glutamatergic synapses may act as sensors of neuron-derived glutamate through their contribution to the neurotransmitter turnover.

  20. Evidence for Glutamate as a Neuroglial Transmitter within Sensory Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Gong, Kerui; Adedoyin, Mary; Ng, Johnson; Bhargava, Aditi; Ohara, Peter T.; Jasmin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study examines key elements of glutamatergic transmission within sensory ganglia of the rat. We show that the soma of primary sensory neurons release glutamate when depolarized. Using acute dissociated mixed neuronal/glia cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia and a colorimetric assay, we show that when glutamate uptake by satellite glial cells (SGCs) is inhibited, KCl stimulation leads to simultaneous increase of glutamate in the culture medium. With calcium imaging we see that the soma of primary sensory neurons and SGCs respond to AMPA, NMDA, kainate and mGluR agonists, and selective antagonists block this response. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique, inward currents were recorded from small diameter (<30 µm) DRG neurons from intact DRGs (ex-vivo whole ganglion preparation) in response to local application of the above glutamate receptor agonists. Following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either the inferior orbital nerve or the sciatic nerve, glutamate expression increases in the trigeminal ganglia and DRG respectively. This increase occurs in neurons of all diameters and is present in the somata of neurons with injured axons as well as in somata of neighboring uninjured neurons. These data provides additional evidence that glutamate can be released within the sensory ganglion, and that the somata of primary sensory neurons as well as SGCs express functional glutamate receptors at their surface. These findings, together with our previous gene knockdown data, suggest that glutamatergic transmission within the ganglion could impact nociceptive threshold. PMID:23844184

  1. Uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-glutamic acid by synaptosomes from postmortem human cerebral cortex: multiple sites, sodium dependence and effect of tissue preparation.

    PubMed

    Dodd, P R; Watson, W E; Morrison, M M; Johnston, G A; Bird, E D; Cowburn, R F; Hardy, J A

    1989-06-26

    The uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamic acid by synaptosomes prepared from frozen postmortem human brain was shown to be effected via distinct high and low affinity sites. At approximately 17 h postmortem delay, the kinetic parameters for GABA uptake were: high affinity site, Km 7.1 +/- 2.5 microM, Vmax 18.7 +/- 4.8 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein; low affinity site, Km 2 +/- 1 mM, Vmax 425 +/- 250 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein (means +/- S.E.M., n = 13). Kinetic parameters for L-glutamate uptake were: high affinity site, Km 7.5 +/- 1.0 microM, Vmax 85 +/- 8 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein; low affinity site, Km 1.8 +/- 1.2 mM. Vmax 780 +/- 175 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein (n = 11). A detailed kinetic analysis of high affinity GABA uptake was performed over a range of sodium ion concentrations. The results were consistent with a coupling ratio of one Na+ ion to one GABA molecule; a similar result was found with rat brain synaptosomes. However, rat and human synaptosomes differed in the degree to which the substrate affinity of the high affinity GABA uptake site varied with decreasing Na+ ion concentration. High affinity GABA uptake was markedly affected by the method used to freeze and divide the tissue, but did not vary greatly in different cortical regions. There was some decline of high affinity GABA uptake activity with postmortem delay, apparently due to a loss of sites rather than a change in site affinity.

  2. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity: [ 3H]GABA and L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake, exocytosis and efflux mediated by high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Himmelreich, N. H.

    The effects of centrifuge-induced hypergravity on the presynaptic events have been investigated in order to provide further insight into regulation of glutamate and GABA neurotransmission and correlation between excitatory and inhibitory responses under artificial gravity conditions. Exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10 G for 1 h) has been found to cause changes in the synaptic processes of brain, in particular neurotransmitter release and uptake in rat brain synaptosomes. Hypergravity loading resulted in more than two-fold enhancement of GABA transporter activity ( Vmax increased from 1.4 ± 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for the animals exposed to hypergravity ( P ⩽ 0.05)). The maximal velocity of L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein under artificial gravity conditions. Depolarization-evoked exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters has also changed in response to hypergravity. It increased for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11.74 ± 1.2% of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively ( P ⩽ 0.05)), but reduced for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%, for control and hypergravity, respectively). Thus, comparative analysis of the neurotransmitter uptake and release has demonstrated that short-term centrifuge-induced 10 G hypergravity loading intensified inhibitory and attenuated excitatory processes in nerve terminals. The activation or reduction of neurotransmitter uptake appeared to be coupled with similarly directed alterations of the neurotransmitter release.

  3. The neuroprotective activity of group-II metabotropic glutamate receptors requires new protein synthesis and involves a glial-neuronal signaling.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Sureda, F X; Storto, M; Casabona, G; Caruso, A; Knopfel, T; Kuhn, R; Nicoletti, F

    1997-03-15

    The group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists (2S,1'R, 2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV), S-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (4C3HPG), and (2S,1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) protected mouse cortical neurons grown in mixed cultures against excitotoxic degeneration induced by a 10 min pulse with NMDA. Protection was observed not only when agonists were added in combination with NMDA but also when they were transiently applied to cultures 6-20 hr before the NMDA pulse. In both cases, neuroprotection was reduced by the group-II mGlu receptor antagonist (2S,1'S,2'S,3'R)-2-(2'-carboxy-3'-phenylcyclopropyl)glycine (PCCG-IV), as well as by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX). Both neurons and astrocytes in mixed cultures were immunostained with an antibody that recognized mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors in recombinant cells. To determine whether astrocytes played any role in the neuroprotection mediated by group-II mGlu receptors, we exposed pure cultures of cortical astrocytes to DCG-IV, 4C3HPG, or L-CCG-I for 10 min. The astrocyte medium collected 2-20 hr after the exposure to any of these drugs was highly neuroprotective when transferred to mixed cultures treated with NMDA. This protective activity was reduced when CHX was applied to astrocyte cultures immediately after the transient exposure to group-II mGlu receptor agonists. We conclude that neuroprotection mediated by group-II mGlu receptors in cultured cortical cells requires new protein synthesis and involves an interaction between neurons and astrocytes. PMID:9045718

  4. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  5. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  6. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia. PMID:26994581

  7. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia.

  8. p-Chloro-diphenyl diselenide reverses memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone and modulates hippocampal [(3)H]glutamate uptake in mice.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Vanessa A; Sari, Marcel H M; Heck, Suélen O; Stangherlin, Eluza C; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress or chronically high levels of glucocorticoids can result in memory impairment. This study aimed to investigate if 4,4'-dichloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2 reverses memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone administration in mice and its possible mechanism of action. Swiss mice received corticosterone (20μg/ml) in their drinking water during four weeks. In the last week, the animals were treated with (p-ClPhSe)2 (1 or 5mg/kg) by the intragastric route (i.g.) once a day for 7days. The cognitive performance of mice was assessed through the object recognition test (ORT), the object location test (OLT) and the step-down passive avoidance test (SDPA), some of predictive tests of memory. Biochemical parameters were determined and locomotor activity of mouse was performed to gain insight in (p-ClPhSe)2 toxicity. The findings demonstrated that treatment with (p-ClPhSe)2 in both doses was effective in reversing memory deficits in the ORT, the OLT and the SDPA caused by corticosterone exposure in mice. Treatment with (p-ClPhSe)2 at both doses reversed the increase in the [(3)H] glutamate uptake by hippocampal slices of mice treated with corticosterone. By contrast, [(3)H] glutamate uptake by brain cortical slices was not altered in mice exposed to corticosterone. The Na(+)K(+)ATPase activity was not altered in hippocampus and cerebral cortices of mice treated with corticosterone. There was no sign of toxicity in mice treated with (p-ClPhSe)2. This organoselenium compound reversed memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone and modulated hippocampal [(3)H]glutamate uptake in mice.

  9. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde in zebrafish brain structures: an in vitro approach on glutamate uptake and on toxicity-related parameters.

    PubMed

    Zenki, Kamila Cagliari; Mussulini, Ben Hur Marins; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Lösch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock

    2014-08-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) and its metabolite, acetaldehyde (ALD), induce deleterious effects on central nervous system (CNS). Here we investigate the in vitro toxicity of EtOH and ALD (concentrations of 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1%) in zebrafish brain structures [telencephalon (TE), opticum tectum (OT), and cerebellum (CE)] by measuring the functionality of glutamate transporters, MTT reduction, and extracellular LDH activity. Both molecules decreased the activity of the Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters in all brain structures. The strongest glutamate uptake inhibition after EtOH exposure was 58% (TE-1%), and after ALD, 91% (CE-1%). The results of MTT assay and LDH released demonstrated that the actions of EtOH and its metabolite are concentration and structure-dependent, in which ALD was more toxic than EtOH. In summary, our findings demonstrate a differential toxicity in vitro of EtOH and ALD in zebrafish brain structures, which can involve changes on glutamatergic parameters. We suggest that this species may be an interesting model for assessing the toxicological actions of alcohol and its metabolite in CNS.

  10. Physical and Functional Interaction of NCX1 and EAAC1 Transporters Leading to Glutamate-Enhanced ATP Production in Brain Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, Sara; Nasti, Annamaria Assunta; Giordano, Antonio; Amoroso, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is emerging as a major factor stimulating energy production in CNS. Brain mitochondria can utilize this neurotransmitter as respiratory substrate and specific transporters are required to mediate the glutamate entry into the mitochondrial matrix. Glutamate transporters of the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) family have been previously well characterized on the cell surface of neuronal and glial cells, representing the primary players for glutamate uptake in mammalian brain. Here, by using western blot, confocal microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy, we report for the first time that the Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1), an EAATs member, is expressed in neuronal and glial mitochondria where it participates in glutamate-stimulated ATP production, evaluated by a luciferase-luciferin system. Mitochondrial metabolic response is counteracted when different EAATs pharmacological blockers or selective EAAC1 antisense oligonucleotides were used. Since EAATs are Na+-dependent proteins, this raised the possibility that other transporters regulating ion gradients across mitochondrial membrane were required for glutamate response. We describe colocalization, mutual activity dependency, physical interaction between EAAC1 and the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1) both in neuronal and glial mitochondria, and that NCX1 is an essential modulator of this glutamate transporter. Only NCX1 activity is crucial for such glutamate-stimulated ATP synthesis, as demonstrated by pharmacological blockade and selective knock-down with antisense oligonucleotides. The EAAC1/NCX1-dependent mitochondrial response to glutamate may be a general and alternative mechanism whereby this neurotransmitter sustains ATP production, since we have documented such metabolic response also in mitochondria isolated from heart. The data reported here disclose a new physiological role for mitochondrial NCX1 as the key player in glutamate-induced energy production. PMID:22479505

  11. Chronic postnatal stress induces voluntary alcohol intake and modifies glutamate transporters in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Odeon, María Mercedes; Andreu, Marcela; Yamauchi, Laura; Grosman, Mauricio; Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal stress alters stress responses for life, with serious consequences on the central nervous system (CNS), involving glutamatergic neurotransmission and development of voluntary alcohol intake. Several drugs of abuse, including alcohol and cocaine, alter glutamate transport (GluT). Here, we evaluated effects of chronic postnatal stress (CPS) on alcohol intake and brain glutamate uptake and transporters in male adolescent Wistar rats. For CPS from postnatal day (PD) 7, pups were separated from their mothers and exposed to cold stress (4 °C) for 1 h daily for 20 days; controls remained with their mothers. Then they were exposed to either voluntary ethanol (6%) or dextrose (1%) intake for 7 days (5-7 rats per group), then killed. CPS: (1) increased voluntary ethanol intake, (2) did not affect body weight gain or produce signs of toxicity with alcohol exposure, (3) increased glutamate uptake by hippocampal synaptosomes in vitro and (4) reduced protein levels (Western measurements) in hippocampus and frontal cortex of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and excitatory amino-acid transporter-3 (EAAT-3) but increased glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) levels. We propose that CPS-induced decrements in GLT-1 and EAAT-3 expression levels are opposed by activation of a compensatory mechanism to prevent excitotoxicity. A greater role for GLAST in total glutamate uptake to prevent enlarged extracellular glutamate levels is inferred. Although CPS strongly increased intake of ethanol, this had little impact on effects of CPS on brain glutamate uptake or transporters. However, the impact of early life adverse events on glutamatergic neurotransmission may underlie increased alcohol consumption in adulthood.

  12. Effect of duration of osmotic downshock and coexisting glutamate on survival and uptake of ectoine in halotolerant Brevibacterium sp. JCM 6894.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Shinichi; Wang, Chenxiang

    2006-01-01

    Halotolerant Brevibacterium sp. JCM 6894 that was subjected to an osmotic downshock (0.7 M NaCl to 0 M) was examined for its survival and uptake of ectoine in the presence of ectoine and/or carbon sources. In the presence of ectoine alone, the rates of ectoine uptake by the 1 h-downshocked cells were low and high in the absence and presence of 0.7 M NaCl, respectively, which were in parallel with the rates of cell growth. The presence of glutamate or amino acids together with ectoine exerted a stimulative effect on the survival of downshocked cells. The incubation time of the cells subjected to osmotic downshock strongly affected ectoine uptake as well as the cell growth of this strain, suggesting that the transporter of ectoine in the strain JCM 6894 was stimulated during the osmotic downshock for about 1 h. Different downshock strengths had marked effects on the rate of ectoine uptake when the downshocked cells were incubated in the presence of NaCl.

  13. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  14. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemic injury in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury including cell swelling, increased free radical production, ...

  15. Morphological changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive astrocytes in the hippocampus of dietary-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Cano, Victoria; Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Hernández-Nuño, Francisco; Merino, Beatriz; Del Olmo, Nuria; Chowen, Julie A; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    Long-term consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) has been shown to trigger both metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the effect of this type of dietary regime on the central nervous system, particularly outside the hypothalamus, has been investigated poorly. Astrocytes, the most abundant population of glial cells in the brain, are pivotal in regulating glutamatergic transmission as they are responsible for most of the glutamate uptake and metabolism. Mice on an HFD show deficits in learning and memory, together with neurochemical and electrophysiological changes compatible with the impairment in hippocampal glutamatergic activity. Because astrocyte function and morphology have been shown to be interdependent, we speculated whether HFD would trigger changes in astrocyte morphology. For this purpose, we have used a model of diet-induced obesity in mice. We have analyzed astrocyte morphology and density by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemistry, as well as the expression of the glutamate transporters, GLT-1 (glutamate transporter type-1), and GLAST (astrocyte glutamate transporter), in the CA3 area of the hippocampus. We found that astrocytes from HFD mice showed longer and less abundant projections. These changes were accompanied by the upregulation of both GLT-1 and GLAST. Our data show that the functional impairment detected previously in HFD mice is concomitant with morphological changes within the hippocampus.

  16. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST/EAAT1: a role for YY1.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Sandra; Vargas, Miguel A; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2007-05-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain and its extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent excitotoxic effects. The Na(+)-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST/EAAT1 is regulated in the short and in the long term by glutamate. A receptors-independent change in its membrane translocation rate, accounts for an acute modulation in GLAST/EAAT1 transport. In contrast, activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate subtype of glutamate receptors represses the transcription of the chick glast gene. A glutamate responsive element has been mapped to the promoter region of this gene containing a bonafide binding site for the transcription factor Ying-Yang 1. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, glutamate elicited a time and dose-dependent increase in Ying-Yang 1 DNA binding consistent with the negative response generated in a reporter gene construct controlled for Ying-Yang 1. Over-expression of this transcription factor leads to a substantial reduction in GLAST/EAAT1 transporter uptake and an important decrease in mRNA levels, all associated with the transcriptional repression of the chick glast promoter activity. These results provide evidence for an involvement of Ying-Yang 1 in the transcriptional response to glutamate in glial cells and favor the notion of a relevant role of this factor in GLAST/EAAT1 transcriptional control.

  17. Brain metabolite abnormalities in the white matter of elderly schizophrenic subjects: implication for glial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Friedman, Joseph; Ernst, Thomas; Zhong, Kai; Tsopelas, Nicholas D.; Davis, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the white matter of the brain may occur in individuals with schizophrenia as well as with normal aging. Therefore, elderly schizophrenic patients may suffer further cognitive decline as they age. This study determined whether elderly schizophrenia participants, especially those with declined cognitive function (CDR>1), show white matter metabolite abnormalities on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS), and whether there are group differences in age-dependent changes in these brain metabolites. Method 23 elderly schizophrenic and 22 comparison participants fulfilling study criteria were enrolled. Localized, short echo-time 1H MRS at 4 Tesla was used to assess neurometabolite concentrations in several white matter regions. Results Compared to healthy subjects, schizophrenic participants had lower N-acetyl compounds (NA, −12.6%, p=0.0008), lower myoinositol (MI, −16.4%, p=0.026) and higher glutamate+glutamine (GLX, +28.7%, p=0.0016) concentrations across brain regions. Schizophrenic participants with CDR≥1 showed the lowest NA in the frontal and temporal regions compared to controls. Interactions between age and schizophrenia status on total creatine (CR) and choline-containing compounds (CHO) were observed; only schizophrenic participants showed age-related decreases of these two metabolites in the right frontal region. Conclusion Decreased NA in these white matter brain regions likely reflects reduced neuronal content associated with decreased synapses and neuronal cell volumes. The elevated GLX, if reflecting elevated glutamate, could result from excess neuronal glutamate release or glial dysfunction in glutamate re-uptake. The decreased MI in participants with schizophrenia suggests decreased glial content or dysfunctional glia, which might result from glutamate-mediated toxicity. PMID:17693392

  18. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of membrane lipid peroxidation, impairs glutamate transport and mitochondrial function in synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Bruce, A J; Blanc, E; Rothstein, J D; Uchida, K; Waeg, G; Mattson, M P

    1997-10-01

    Removal of extracellular glutamate at synapses, by specific high-affinity glutamate transporters, is critical to prevent excitotoxic injury to neurons. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of an array of prominent neurodegenerative conditions that involve degeneration of synapses and neurons in glutamatergic pathways including stroke, and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Although cell culture data indicate that oxidative insults can impair key membrane regulatory systems including ion-motive ATPases and amino acid transport systems, the effects of oxidative stress on synapses, and the mechanisms that mediate such effects, are largely unknown. This study provides evidence that 4-hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, mediates oxidation-induced impairment of glutamate transport and mitochondrial function in synapses. Exposure of rat cortical synaptosomes to 4-hydroxynonenal resulted in concentration- and time-dependent decreases in [3H]glutamate uptake, and mitochondrial function [assessed with the dye 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)]. Other related aldehydes including malondialdehyde and hexanal had little or no effect on glutamate uptake or mitochondrial function. Exposure of synaptosomes to insults known to induce lipid peroxidation (FeSO4 and amyloid beta-peptide) also impaired glutamate uptake and mitochondrial function. The antioxidants propyl gallate and glutathione prevented impairment of glutamate uptake and MTT reduction induced by FeSO4 and amyloid beta-peptide, but not that induced by 4-hydroxynonenal. Western blot analyses using an antibody to 4-hydroxynonenal-conjugated proteins showed that 4-hydroxynonenal bound to multiple cell proteins including GLT-1, a glial glutamate transporter present at high levels in synaptosomes. 4-Hydroxynonenal itself induced lipid peroxidation suggesting that, in addition to binding directly to membrane regulatory proteins, 4

  19. Alpha-lipoic acid effects on brain glial functions accompanying double-stranded RNA antiviral and inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Scumpia, Philip O; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Stevens, Bruce R

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) serve as viral ligands that trigger innate immunity in astrocytes and microglial, as mediated through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). Beneficial transient TLR3 and PKR anti-viral signaling can become deleterious when events devolve into inflammation and cytotoxicity. Viral products in the brain cause glial cell dysfunction, and are a putative etiologic factor in neuropsychiatric disorders, notably schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson's, and autism spectrum. Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) has been proposed as a possible therapeutic neuroprotectant. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that LA can control untoward antiviral mechanisms associated with neural dysfunction. Utilizing rat brain glial cultures (91% astrocytes:9% microglia) treated with PKR- and TLR3-ligand/viral mimetic dsRNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), we report in vitro glial antiviral signaling and LA reduction of the effects of this signaling. LA blunted the dsRNA-stimulated expression of IFNα/β-inducible genes Mx1, PKR, and TLR3. And in polyI:C treated cells, LA promoted gene expression of rate-limiting steps that benefit healthy neural redox status in glutamateric systems. To this end, LA decreased dsRNA-induced inflammatory signaling by downregulating IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, iNOS, and CAT2 transcripts. In the presence of polyI:C, LA prevented cultured glial cytotoxicity which was correlated with increased expression of factors known to cooperatively control glutamate/cystine/glutathione redox cycling, namely glutamate uptake transporter GLAST/EAAT1, γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits, and IL-10. Glutamate exporting transporter subunits 4F2hc and xCT were downregulated by LA in dsRNA-stimulated glia. l-Glutamate net uptake was inhibited by dsRNA, and this was relieved by LA. Glutathione synthetase mRNA levels were unchanged by dsRNA or LA. This study demonstrates the protective

  20. Diphenyl diselenide elicits antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to monosodium glutamate: A contribution of serotonin uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Velasquez, Daniela; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-03-15

    Depression is a disorder with symptoms manifested at the psychological, behavioral and physiological levels. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects induced by this additive have been demonstrated in experimental animals and humans, including functional and behavioral alterations. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, in the depressive-like behavior induced by MSG in rats. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided in control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. At 60th day of life, animals received (PhSe)2 (10mg/kg, intragastrically) 25min before spontaneous locomotor and forced swimming tests (FST). The cerebral cortices of rats were removed to determine [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. A single administration of (PhSe)2 was effective against locomotor hyperactivity caused by MSG in rats. (PhSe)2 treatment protected against the increase in the immobility time and a decrease in the latency for the first episode of immobility in the FST induced by MSG. Furthermore, (PhSe)2 reduced the [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and restored Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity altered by MSG. In the present study a single administration of (PhSe)2 elicited an antidepressant-like effect and decrease the synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and an increase in the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in MSG-treated rats.

  1. Neutralizing Aspartate 83 Modifies Substrate Translocation of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 3 (EAAT3) Glutamate Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Hotzy, Jasmin; Machtens, Jan-Philipp; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft into neuronal and glial cells. EAATs are not only secondary active glutamate transporters but also function as anion channels. Gating of EAAT anion channels is tightly coupled to transitions within the glutamate uptake cycle, resulting in Na+- and glutamate-dependent anion currents. A point mutation neutralizing a conserved aspartic acid within the intracellular loop close to the end of transmembrane domain 2 was recently shown to modify the substrate dependence of EAAT anion currents. To distinguish whether this mutation affects transitions within the uptake cycle or directly modifies the opening/closing of the anion channel, we used voltage clamp fluorometry. Using three different sites for fluorophore attachment, V120C, M205C, and A430C, we observed time-, voltage-, and substrate-dependent alterations of EAAT3 fluorescence intensities. The voltage and substrate dependence of fluorescence intensities can be described by a 15-state model of the transport cycle in which several states are connected to branching anion channel states. D83A-mediated changes of fluorescence intensities, anion currents, and secondary active transport can be explained by exclusive modifications of substrate translocation rates. In contrast, sole modification of anion channel opening and closing is insufficient to account for all experimental data. We conclude that D83A has direct effects on the glutamate transport cycle and that these effects result in changed anion channel function. PMID:22532568

  2. Physiology of transformed glial cells.

    PubMed

    Brismar, T

    1995-11-01

    Much of our present knowledge of glial cell function stems from studies of glioma cell lines, both rodent (C6, C6 polyploid, and TR33B) and human (1321N1, 138MG, D384, R-111, T67, Tp-276MG, Tp-301MG, Tp-483MG, Tp-387MG, U-118MG, U-251MG, U-373MG, U-787MG, U-1242MG, and UC-11MG). New methods such as patch clamp and Ca2+ imaging have lead to rapid progress the last few years in our knowledge about glial cells, where an unexpected presence and diversity of receptors and ion channels have emerged. Basic mechanisms related to membrane potential and K+ transport and the presence of voltage gated ion channels (Na+, inwardly rectifying K+, Ca(2+)-activated K+, Ca2+, and Cl- channels) have been identified. Receptor function and intracellular signaling for glutamate, acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, cathecolamines, and a large number of neuropeptides (bradykinin, cholecystokinin, endothelin, opioids, and tachykinins) have been characterized. Such studies are facilitated in cell lines which offer a more homogenous material than primary cultures. Although the expression of ion channels and receptors vary considerably between different cell lines and comparative studies are rare, a few differences (compared to astrocytes in primary culture) have been identified which may turn out to be characteristic for glioma cells. Future identification of specific markers for receptors on glial and glioma cells related to cell type and growth properties may have great potential in clinical diagnosis and therapy. PMID:8586460

  3. Anxious phenotypes plus environmental stressors are related to brain DNA damage and changes in NMDA receptor subunits and glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abaleira, Helena M; Michels, Monique; Tomaz, Débora B; dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Carlessi, Anelise S; Matias, Beatriz I; Leffa, Daniela D; Damiani, Adriani P; Gomes, Vitor de C; Andrade, Vanessa M; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Landeira-Fernadez, Jesus; Quevedo, João

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of chronic mild stress on DNA damage, NMDA receptor subunits and glutamate transport levels in the brains of rats with an anxious phenotype, which were selected to represent both the high-freezing (CHF) and low-freezing (CLF) lines. The anxious phenotype induced DNA damage in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAc). CHF rats subjected to chronic stress presented a more pronounced DNA damage in the hippocampus and NAc. NMDAR1 were increased in the prefrontal cortex (PC), hippocampus and amygdala of CHF, and decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and NAc of CHF stressed. NMDAR2A were decreased in the amygdala of the CHF and stressed; and increased in CHF stressed. NMDRA2A in the NAc was increased after stress, and decreased in the CLF. NMDAR2B were increased in the hippocampus of CLF and CHF. In the amygdala, there was a decrease in the NMDAR2B for stress in the CLF and CHF. NMDAR2B in the NAc were decreased for stress and increased in the CHF; in the PC NMDAR2B increased in the CHF. EAAT1 increased in the PC of CLF+stress. In the hippocampus, EAAT1 decreased in all groups. In the amygdala, EAAT1 decreased in the CLF+stress and CHF. EAAT2 were decreased in the PC for stress, and increased in CHF+control. In the hippocampus, the EAAT2 were increased for the CLF and decreased in the CLF+stress. In the amygdala, there was a decrease in the EATT2 in the CLF+stress and CHF. These findings suggest that an anxious phenotype plus stress may induce a more pronounced DNA damage, and promote more alterations in the glutamatergic system. These findings may help to explain, at least in part, the common point of the mechanisms involved with the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety. PMID:25772108

  4. WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid): a novel, EAAT2-preferring, nonsubstrate inhibitor of high-affinity glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, John; Eliasof, Scott; Stack, Gary; McIlvain, H Beal; Greenfield, Alexander; Kowal, Dianne; Petroski, Robert; Carrick, Tikva

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of a novel glutamate transport inhibitor, WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid), on the activity of the human forebrain glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 expressed in stable mammalian cell lines and in Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. WAY-855 inhibited glutamate uptake mediated by all three subtypes in a concentration-dependent manner, with preferential inhibition of the CNS-predominant EAAT2 subtype in both cells and oocytes. IC50 values for EAAT2 and EAAT3 inhibition in cells were 2.2 and 24.5 μM, respectively, while EAAT1 activity was inhibited by 50% at 100 μM (IC50 values determined in oocytes were 1.3 μM (EAAT2), 52.5 μM (EAAT3) and 125.9 μM (EAAT1)). Application of WAY-855 to EAAT-expressing oocytes failed to induce a transporter current, and the compound failed to exchange with accumulated [3H]D-aspartate in synaptosomes consistent with a nonsubstrate inhibitor. WAY-855 inhibited D-aspartate uptake into cortical synaptosomes by a competitive mechanism, and with similar potency to that observed for the cloned EAAT2. WAY-855 failed to agonise or antagonise ionotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurones, or the human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 expressed in a stable cell line. WAY-855 represents a novel structure in glutamate transporter pharmacology, and exploration of this structure might provide insights into the discrimination between EAAT2 and other EAAT subtypes. PMID:14517179

  5. Ability of retinal Müller glial cells to protect neurons against excitotoxicity in vitro depends upon maturation and neuron-glial interactions.

    PubMed

    Heidinger, V; Hicks, D; Sahel, J; Dreyfus, H

    1999-02-01

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory amino acid in the central nervous system. It has also been described as a potent toxin when present in high concentrations because excessive stimulation of its receptors leads to neuronal death. Glial influence on neuronal survival has already been shown in the central nervous system, but the mechanisms underlying glial neuroprotection are only partly known. When cells isolated from newborn rat retina were maintained in culture as enriched neuronal populations, 80% of the cells were destroyed by application of excitotoxic concentrations of glutamate. Massive neuronal death was also observed in newborn retinal cultures containing large numbers of glia, or when neurons were seeded onto feeder layers of purified cells prepared from immature (postnatal 8 day) rat retina. When newborn retinal neurons were seeded onto feeder layers of purified glial cells prepared from adult retinas, application of excitotoxic amino acids no longer led to neuronal death. Furthermore, neuronal death was not observed in mixed neuron/glial cultures prepared from adult retina. However, in all cases (newborn and adult) application of kainate led to amacrine cell-specific death. Activity of glutamine synthetase, a key glial enzyme involved in glutamate detoxification, was assayed in these cultures in the presence or absence of exogenous glutamate. Whereas pure glial cultures alone (from young or adult retina) showed low activity that was not stimulated by glutamate addition, mixed or co-cultured neurons and adult glia exhibited up to threefold higher levels of activity following glutamate treatment. These data indicate that two conditions must be satisfied to observe glial neuroprotection: maturation of glutamine synthetase expression, and neuron-glial signalling through glutamate-elicited responses. PMID:9932869

  6. The Hydroxyl Side Chain of a Highly Conserved Serine Residue Is Required for Cation Selectivity and Substrate Transport in the Glial Glutamate Transporter GLT-1/SLC1A2.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Alexandre; Montalbetti, Nicolas; Gyimesi, Gergely; Pujol-Giménez, Jonai; Hediger, Matthias A

    2015-12-18

    Glutamate transporters maintain synaptic concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter below neurotoxic levels. Their transport cycle consists of cotransport of glutamate with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of potassium. Structural studies proposed that a highly conserved serine located in the binding pocket of the homologous GltPh coordinates L-aspartate as well as the sodium ion Na1. To experimentally validate these findings, we generated and characterized several mutants of the corresponding serine residue, Ser-364, of human glutamate transporter SLC1A2 (solute carrier family 1 member 2), also known as glutamate transporter GLT-1 and excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT2. S364T, S364A, S364C, S364N, and S364D were expressed in HEK cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes to measure radioactive substrate transport and transport currents, respectively. All mutants exhibited similar plasma membrane expression when compared with WT SLC1A2, but substitutions of serine by aspartate or asparagine completely abolished substrate transport. On the other hand, the threonine mutant, which is a more conservative mutation, exhibited similar substrate selectivity, substrate and sodium affinities as WT but a lower selectivity for Na(+) over Li(+). S364A and S364C exhibited drastically reduced affinities for each substrate and enhanced selectivity for L-aspartate over D-aspartate and L-glutamate, and lost their selectivity for Na(+) over Li(+). Furthermore, we extended the analysis of our experimental observations using molecular dynamics simulations. Altogether, our findings confirm a pivotal role of the serine 364, and more precisely its hydroxyl group, in coupling sodium and substrate fluxes.

  7. Animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproate: altered glutamate metabolism in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bristot Silvestrin, Roberta; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Galland, Fabiana; Daniele Bobermim, Larissa; Quincozes-Santos, André; Torres Abib, Renata; Zanotto, Caroline; Batassini, Cristiane; Brolese, Giovana; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Riesgo, Rudimar; Gottfried, Carmem

    2013-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by deficits in social interaction, language and communication impairments and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors, with involvement of several areas of the central nervous system (CNS), including hippocampus. Although neurons have been the target of most studies reported in the literature, recently, considerable attention has been centered upon the functionality and plasticity of glial cells, particularly astrocytes. These cells participate in normal brain development and also in neuropathological processes. The present work investigated hippocampi from 15 (P15) and 120 (P120) days old male rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA) as an animal model of autism. Herein, we analyzed astrocytic parameters such as glutamate transporters and glutamate uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutathione (GSH) content. In the VPA group glutamate uptake was unchanged at P15 and increased 160% at P120; the protein expression of GLAST did not change neither in P15 nor in P120, while GLT1 decreased 40% at P15 and increased 92% at P120; GS activity increased 43% at P15 and decreased 28% at P120; GSH content was unaltered at P15 and had a 27% increase at P120. These data highlight that the astrocytic clearance and destination of glutamate in the synaptic cleft might be altered in autism, pointing out important aspects to be considered from both pathophysiologic and pharmacological approaches in ASD.

  8. Arundic acid attenuates retinal ganglion cell death by increasing glutamate/aspartate transporter expression in a model of normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, M; Aida, T; Takeda, T; Namekata, K; Harada, T; Shinagawa, R; Tanaka, K

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and is characterized by gradual visual impairment owing to progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been implicated as a mechanism of RGC death in glaucoma. Consistent with this claim, we previously reported that glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST)-deficient mice show optic nerve degeneration that is similar to that observed in glaucoma. Therefore, drugs that upregulate GLAST may be useful for neuroprotection in glaucoma. Although many compounds are known to increase the expression of another glial glutamate transporter, EAAT2/GLT1, few compounds are shown to increase GLAST expression. Arundic acid is a glial modulating agent that ameliorates delayed ischemic brain damage by attenuating increases in extracellular glutamate. We hypothesized that arundic acid neuroprotection involves upregulation of GLAST. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of arundic acid on GLAST expression and glutamate uptake. We found that arundic acid induces GLAST expression in vitro and in vivo. In addition, arundic acid treatment prevented RGC death by upregulating GLAST in heterozygous (GLAST+/−) mice. Furthermore, arundic acid stimulates the human GLAST ortholog, EAAT1, expression in human neuroglioblastoma cells. Thus, discovering compounds that can enhance EAAT1 expression and activity may be a novel strategy for therapeutic treatment of glaucoma. PMID:25789968

  9. Mechanisms of a Glial Modulating Agent, Propentofylline: Potential New Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Valerie

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor with a very poor prognosis despite multi-modalities of treatment. As a result, there is a critical need to develop alternative therapies. Propentofylline (PPF) is a methyl xanthine with glial modulating properties. Based on known mechanisms of PPF and the important role of glial cells in glioma growth, we hypothesized that PPF can target glial cells in the tumor microenvironment, decreasing tumor growth. More specifically, PPF can target microglia and astrocytes. In Chapter 3 we demonstrate that PPF decreases microglia migration towards CNS-1 cells, decreases CNS-1 cells invasion when cultured with microglia and decreases MMP-9 expression in microglia. In Chapter 4 we showed that PPF decreases TROY expression in microglia. In Chapter 5 we showed PPF causes astrocytes to increase glutamate uptake through the GLT-1 transporter, leading to less glutamate available for CNS-1 cells, ultimately resulting in increased CNS-1 cell apoptosis. Finally, in Chapter 6 we present supportive data that PPF uniquely targets resident microglia in the CNS due to pharmacological differences between species and cell types. This thesis describes the following major contributions to the field of glioma research: 1) identification of propentofylline as a possible new drug for GBM treatment that targets microglia and astrocytes, decreasing brain tumor growth in vivo, and further supporting a different functional role of microglia and infiltrating macrophages in the tumor microenvironment, 2) identification of TROY as a novel signaling molecule expressed in microglia in response to CNS-1 cells and involved in microglia migration, and 3) identification of differential responses between species and cell types with propentofylline treatment.

  10. Neuronal glutamate transporters regulate synaptic transmission in single synapses on CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kondratskaya, Elena; Shin, Min-Chul; Akaike, Norio

    2010-01-15

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in CNS although it causes severe brain damage by pathologic excitotoxicity. Efficient neurotransmission is controlled by powerful protection and support afforded by specific high-affinity glutamate transporters in neurons and glia, clearing synaptic glutamate. While the role of glial cells in glutamate uptake is well defined, the role of neuronal transporters remains poorly understood. The evaluation of impact of neuronal transporters on spontaneous and evoked EPSC in hippocampal CA1 neurons within a model 'single bouton preparation' by pre- and postsynaptic uptake was addressed. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments the influence of blocking, pre- or both pre- and postsynaptic glutamate transporters (GluT) on spontaneous and evoked postsynaptic currents (sEPSC and eEPSC), was examined by manipulating the content of intracellular solution. Suppressing GluT by non-transportable inhibitor TBOA (10 microM) led to remarkable alteration of glutamate uptake process and was reflected in measurable changes of general properties of synaptic currents. Elimination of intracellular K(+) concentration required for glutamate transporter operation by using Cs(+)-based internal solution (postsynaptic GluTs are non-functional apriori), causes the deficient of presynaptic glutamate transporters. Applied in such conditions glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA (10 microM) affected the occurrence of synaptic event and thus unregulated the transmitter release. eEPSCs were generally suppressed both in amplitude (to 48.73+/-7.03% vs. control) and in success rate (R(suc)) by TBOA (from 91.1+/-7.5% in control to 79.57+/-13.2%). In contrast, with K(+)-based solution in patch pipette (pre- and postsynaptic GluT are intact), amplitude of eEPSC was substantially potentiated by pre-treatment with TBOA (152.1+/-11%), whereas (R(suc)) was reduced to 79.8+/-8.3% in average. The identical reduction of event success rate as well as increased pair

  11. Dynamic transition of neuronal firing induced by abnormal astrocytic glutamate oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiajia; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Du, Mengmeng; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The gliotransmitter glutamate released from astrocytes can modulate neuronal firing by activating neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. This enables astrocytic glutamate(AG) to be involved in neuronal physiological and pathological functions. Based on empirical results and classical neuron-glial “tripartite synapse” model, we propose a practical model to describe extracellular AG oscillation, in which the fluctuation of AG depends on the threshold of calcium concentration, and the effect of AG degradation is considered as well. We predict the seizure-like discharges under the dysfunction of AG degradation duration. Consistent with our prediction, the suppression of AG uptake by astrocytic transporters, which operates by modulating the AG degradation process, can account for the emergence of epilepsy. PMID:27573570

  12. Dynamic transition of neuronal firing induced by abnormal astrocytic glutamate oscillation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Du, Mengmeng; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The gliotransmitter glutamate released from astrocytes can modulate neuronal firing by activating neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. This enables astrocytic glutamate(AG) to be involved in neuronal physiological and pathological functions. Based on empirical results and classical neuron-glial "tripartite synapse" model, we propose a practical model to describe extracellular AG oscillation, in which the fluctuation of AG depends on the threshold of calcium concentration, and the effect of AG degradation is considered as well. We predict the seizure-like discharges under the dysfunction of AG degradation duration. Consistent with our prediction, the suppression of AG uptake by astrocytic transporters, which operates by modulating the AG degradation process, can account for the emergence of epilepsy. PMID:27573570

  13. Dynamic transition of neuronal firing induced by abnormal astrocytic glutamate oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiajia; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Du, Mengmeng; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    The gliotransmitter glutamate released from astrocytes can modulate neuronal firing by activating neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. This enables astrocytic glutamate(AG) to be involved in neuronal physiological and pathological functions. Based on empirical results and classical neuron-glial “tripartite synapse” model, we propose a practical model to describe extracellular AG oscillation, in which the fluctuation of AG depends on the threshold of calcium concentration, and the effect of AG degradation is considered as well. We predict the seizure-like discharges under the dysfunction of AG degradation duration. Consistent with our prediction, the suppression of AG uptake by astrocytic transporters, which operates by modulating the AG degradation process, can account for the emergence of epilepsy.

  14. Glial dysfunction in the mouse habenula causes depressive-like behaviors and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanpeng; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Michiko; Aida, Tomomi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Keiya; Tanaka, Kohichi; Aizawa, Hidenori

    2014-12-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) regulates the activity of monoaminergic neurons in the brainstem. This area has recently attracted a surge of interest in psychiatry because studies have reported the pathological activation of the habenula in patients with major depression and in animal models. The LHb plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of depression; however, how habenular neurons are activated to cause various depression symptoms, such as reduced motivation and sleep disturbance, remain unclear. We hypothesized that dysfunctional astrocytes may cause LHb hyperactivity due to the defective uptake activity of extracellular glutamate, which induces depressive-like behaviors. We examined the activity of neurons in habenular pathways and performed behavioral and sleep analyses in mice with pharmacological and genetic inhibition of the activity of the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1 in the LHb. The habenula-specific inhibition of GLT-1 increased the neuronal firing rate and the level of c-Fos expression in the LHb. Mice with reduced GLT-1 activity in the habenula exhibited a depressive-like phenotype in the tail suspension and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. These animals also displayed increased susceptibility to chronic stress, displaying more frequent avoidant behavior without affecting locomotor activity in the open-field test. Intriguingly, the mice showed disinhibition of rapid eye movement sleep, which is a characteristic sleep pattern in patients with depression. These results provide evidence that disrupting glutamate clearance in habenular astrocytes increases neuronal excitability and depressive-like phenotypes in behaviors and sleep. PMID:25471567

  15. Fine Astrocyte Processes Contain Very Small Mitochondria: Glial Oxidative Capability May Fuel Transmitter Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Amin; Haseleu, Julia; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The peripheral astrocyte process (PAP) is the glial compartment largely handling inactivation of transmitter glutamate, and supplying glutamate to the axon terminal. It is not clear how these energy demanding processes are fueled, and whether the PAP exhibits oxidative capability. Whereas the GFAP-positive perinuclear cytoplasm and stem process are rich in mitochondria, the PAP is often considered too narrow to contain mitochondria and might thus not rely on oxidative metabolism. Applying high resolution light microscopy, we investigate here the presence of mitochondria in the PAPs of freshly dissociated, isolated astrocytes. We provide an overview of the subcellular distribution and the approximate size of astrocytic mitochondria. A substantial proportion of the astrocyte's mitochondria are contained in the PAPs and, on the average, they are smaller there than in the stem processes. The majority of mitochondria in the stem and peripheral processes are surprisingly small (0.2-0.4 µm), spherical and not elongate, or tubular, which is supported by electron microscopy. The density of mitochondria is two to several times lower in the PAPs than in the stem processes. Thus, PAPs do not constitute a mitochondria free glial compartment but contain mitochondria in large numbers. No juxtaposition of mitochondria-containing PAPs and glutamatergic synapses has been reported. However, the issue of sufficient ATP concentrations in perisynaptic PAPs can be seen in the light of (1) the rapid, activity dependent PAP motility, and (2) the recently reported activity-dependent mitochondrial transport and immobilization leading to spatial, subcellular organisation of glutamate uptake and oxidative metabolism.

  16. Relationship between increase in astrocytic GLT-1 glutamate transport and late-LTP

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na+-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) and late long-term potentiation (L-LTP). Four issues were addressed in this research: Which glutamate transporter is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP? In what cell type in the hippocampus does the increase in glutamate uptake occur? Does a single type of cell contain all the mechanisms to respond to an induction stimulus with a change in glutamate uptake? What role does the increase in glutamate uptake play during L-LTP? We have confirmed that GLT-1 is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP. Also, we found that astrocytes were responsible for much, if not all, of the increase in glutamate uptake in hippocampal slices during L-LTP. Additionally, we found that cultured astrocytes alone were able to respond to an induction stimulus with an increase in glutamate uptake. Inhibition of basal glutamate uptake did not affect the induction of L-LTP, but inhibition of the increase in glutamate uptake did inhibit both the expression of L-LTP and induction of additional LTP. It seems likely that heightened glutamate transport plays an ongoing role in the ability of hippocampal circuitry to code and store information. PMID:23166293

  17. Glutamate-based antidepressants: preclinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M; Skolnick, Phil

    2013-06-15

    Over the past 20 years, converging lines of evidence have both linked glutamatergic dysfunction to the pathophysiology of depression and demonstrated that the glutamatergic synapse presents multiple targets for developing novel antidepressants. The robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists ketamine and traxoprodil provide target validation for this family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This article reviews the preclinical evidence that it may be possible to develop glutamate-based antidepressants by not only modulating ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, including mGlu2/3, mGLu5 and mGlu7 receptors, but also by altering synaptic concentrations of glutamate via specialized transporters such as glial glutamate transporter 1 (excitatory amino-acid transporter 2).

  18. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  19. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Astroglial Potassium and Glutamate Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Giselle; Sibille, Jérémie; Zapata, Jonathan; Rouach, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that astrocytes play essential roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Nevertheless, how neuronal activity alters astroglial functional properties and whether such properties also display specific forms of plasticity still remain elusive. Here, we review research findings supporting this aspect of astrocytes, focusing on their roles in the clearance of extracellular potassium and glutamate, two neuroactive substances promptly released during excitatory synaptic transmission. Their subsequent removal, which is primarily carried out by glial potassium channels and glutamate transporters, is essential for proper functioning of the brain. Similar to neurons, different forms of short- and long-term plasticity in astroglial uptake have been reported. In addition, we also present novel findings showing robust potentiation of astrocytic inward currents in response to repetitive stimulations at mild frequencies, as low as 0.75 Hz, in acute hippocampal slices. Interestingly, neurotransmission was hardly affected at this frequency range, suggesting that astrocytes may be more sensitive to low frequency stimulation and may exhibit stronger plasticity than neurons to prevent hyperexcitability. Taken together, these important findings strongly indicate that astrocytes display both short- and long-term plasticity in their clearance of excess neuroactive substances from the extracellular space, thereby regulating neuronal activity and brain homeostasis. PMID:26346563

  20. Pharmacological inhibitions of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 compromise glutamate transport in photoreceptor to ON- bipolar cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Chung, Inyoung; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    To maintain reliable signal transmission across a synapse, free synaptic neurotransmitters must be removed from the cleft in a timely manner. In the first visual synapse, this critical task is mainly undertaken by glutamate transporters (EAATs). Here we study the differential roles of the EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT5 subtypes in glutamate (GLU) uptake at the photoreceptor-to-depolarizing bipolar cell synapse in intact dark-adapted retina. Various doses of EAAT blockers and/or GLU were injected into the eye before the electroretinogram (ERG) was measured. Their effectiveness and potency in inhibiting the ERG b-wave were studied to determine their relative contributions to the GLU clearing activity at the synapse. The results showed that EAAT1 and EAAT2 plays different roles. Selectively blocking glial EAAT1 alone using UCPH101 inhibited the b-wave 2–24 hours following injection, suggesting a dominating role of EAAT1 in the overall GLU clearing capacity in the synaptic cleft. Selectively blocking EAAT2 on photoreceptor terminals had no significant effect on the b-wave, but increased the potency of exogenous GLU in inhibiting the b-wave. These suggest that EAAT2 play a secondary yet significant role in the GLU reuptake activity at the rod and the cone output synapses. Additionally, we have verified our electrophysiological findings with double-label immunohistochemistry, and extend the literature on the spatial distribution of EAAT2 splice variants in the mouse retina. PMID:25152321

  1. Arsenite exposure downregulates EAAT1/GLAST transporter expression in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Del Razo, Luz María; Huerta, Miriam; Hernandez-Lopez, Angeles; Ortega, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther

    2011-08-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic severely damages the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate (GLU) is the major excitatory amino acid and is highly neurotoxic when levels in the synaptic cleft are not properly regulated by a family of Na⁺-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters. Within the cerebellum, the activity of the Bergmann glia Na⁺-dependent GLU/aspartate transporter (GLAST) excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1/GLAST) accounts for more than 90% of GLU uptake. Because exposure to the metalloid arsenite results in CNS toxicity, we examined whether EAAT1/GLAST constitutes a molecular target. To this end, primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells were exposed to sodium arsenite for 24 h, and EAAT1/GLAST activity was evaluated via ³H-D-aspartate uptake. A sharp decrease in GLU transport was observed, and kinetic studies revealed protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent decreases in K(M) and V(max) concomitant with diminished chglast transcription. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena, we investigated the generation of reactive oxidative species and the lipid peroxidative damage caused by arsenite exposure. None of these responses were found, although we did observe an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 DNA-binding activity correlated with a rise in total glutathione levels. Our results clearly suggest that EAAT1/GLAST is a molecular target of arsenite and support the critical involvement of glial cells in brain function and dysfunction.

  2. In vivo expression of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin by mouse striatal astrocytes impairs glutamate transport: a correlation with Huntington's disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Faideau, Mathilde; Kim, Jinho; Cormier, Kerry; Gilmore, Richard; Welch, Mackenzie; Auregan, Gwennaelle; Dufour, Noelle; Guillermier, Martine; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Hantraye, Philippe; Déglon, Nicole; Ferrante, Robert J; Bonvento, Gilles

    2010-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder previously thought to be of primary neuronal origin, despite ubiquitous expression of mutant huntingtin (mHtt). We tested the hypothesis that mHtt expressed in astrocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of HD. To better understand the contribution of astrocytes in HD in vivo, we developed a novel mouse model using lentiviral vectors that results in selective expression of mHtt into striatal astrocytes. Astrocytes expressing mHtt developed a progressive phenotype of reactive astrocytes that was characterized by a marked decreased expression of both glutamate transporters, GLAST and GLT-1, and of glutamate uptake. These effects were associated with neuronal dysfunction, as observed by a reduction in DARPP-32 and NR2B expression. Parallel studies in brain samples from HD subjects revealed early glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in striatal astrocytes from Grade 0 HD cases. Astrogliosis was associated with morphological changes that increased with severity of disease, from Grades 0 through 4 and was more prominent in the putamen. Combined immunofluorescence showed co-localization of mHtt in astrocytes in all striatal HD specimens, inclusive of Grade 0 HD. Consistent with the findings from experimental mice, there was a significant grade-dependent decrease in striatal GLT-1 expression from HD subjects. These findings suggest that the presence of mHtt in astrocytes alters glial glutamate transport capacity early in the disease process and may contribute to HD pathogenesis. PMID:20494921

  3. Multifactorial Gene Therapy Enhancing the Glutamate Uptake System and Reducing Oxidative Stress Delays Symptom Onset and Prolongs Survival in the SOD1-G93A ALS Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Benkler, Chen; Barhum, Yael; Ben-Zur, Tali; Offen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The 150-year-long search for treatments of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is still fueled by frustration over the shortcomings of available therapeutics. Contributing to the therapeutic limitations might be the targeting of a single aspect of this multifactorial-multisystemic disease. In an attempt to overcome this, we devised a novel multifactorial-cocktail treatment, using lentiviruses encoding: EAAT2, GDH2, and NRF2, that act synergistically to address the band and width of the effected excito-oxidative axis, reducing extracellular-glutamate and glutamate availability while improving the metabolic state and the anti-oxidant response. This strategy yielded particularly impressive results, as all three genes together but not separately prolonged survival in ALS mice by an average of 19-22 days. This was accompanied by improvement in every parameter evaluated, including body-weight loss, reflex score, neurologic score, and motor performance. We hope to provide a novel strategy to slow down disease progression and alleviate symptoms of patients suffering from ALS.

  4. Vesicular release of glutamate from unmyelinated axons in white matter

    PubMed Central

    Ziskin, Jennifer L; Nishiyama, Akiko; Rubio, Maria; Fukaya, Masahiro; Bergles, Dwight E

    2007-01-01

    Directed fusion of transmitter-laden vesicles enables rapid intercellular signaling in the central nervous system and occurs at synapses within gray matter. Here we show that action potentials also induce the release of glutamate from axons in the corpus callosum, a white matter region responsible for interhemispheric communication. Callosal axons release glutamate by vesicular fusion, which induces quantal AMPA receptor–mediated currents in NG2+ glial progenitors at anatomically distinct axo–glial synaptic junctions. Glutamate release from axons was facilitated by repetitive stimulation and could be inhibited through activation of metabotropic autoreceptors. Although NG2+ cells form associations with nodes of Ranvier in white matter, measurements of conduction velocity indicated that unmyelinated fibers are responsible for glutamatergic signaling with NG2+ glia. This activity-dependent secretion of glutamate was prevalent in the developing and mature mouse corpus callosum, indicating that axons within white matter both conduct action potentials and engage in rapid neuron-glia communication. PMID:17293857

  5. Pharmacological evaluation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mediated neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajkumar; Mishra, Vikas; Sasmal, Dinakar; Raghubir, Ram

    2010-07-25

    Recently glutamate transporters have emerged as a potential therapeutic target in a wide range of acute and chronic neurological disorders, owing to their novel mode of action. The modulation of GLT-1, a major glutamate transporter has been shown to exert neuroprotection in various models of ischemic injury and motoneuron degeneration. Therefore, an attempt was made to explore its neuroprotective potential in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using ceftriaxone, a GLT-1 modulator. Pre-treatment with ceftriaxone (100mg/kg. i.v) for five days resulted in a significant reduction (P<0.01) in neurological deficit as well as cerebral infarct volume after 1h of ischemia followed by 24h of reperfusion injury. It also caused a significant (P<0.05) upregulation of GLT-1 mRNA, protein and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. Furthermore, inhibition of ceftriaxone-mediated increased glutamine synthetase activity by dihydrokainate (DHK), a GLT-1 specific inhibitor, confirms the specific effect of ceftriaxone on GLT-1 activity. In addition, ceftriaxone also induced a significant (P<0.01) increase in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake, mediated by GLT-1 in glial enriched preparation, as evidenced by use of DHK and DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA). Thus, the present study provides overwhelming evidence that modulation of GLT-1 protein expression and activity confers neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  6. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation in bergmann glia cells: involvement of p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Rossana C; Barrera, Iliana; Castelán, Francisco; Soto-Cid, Abraham; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2008-07-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are present in neurons and glial cells and are involved in gene expression regulation. Mitogen-activated proteins kinases (MAPK) are critical for all the membrane to nuclei signaling pathways described so far. In cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation is partially dependent on p42/44 MAPK activity. Another member of this kinase family, p38 MAPK is activated by non-mitogenic stimuli through its Thr180/Tyr182 phosphorylation and phosphorylates cytoplasmic and nuclear protein targets involved in translational and transcriptional events. Taking into consideration that the role of p38MAPK in glial cells is not well understood, we demonstrate here that glutamate increases p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a time and dose dependent manner in cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells (BGC). Moreover, p38 MAPK is involved in the glutamate-induced transcriptional activation in these cells. Ionotropic as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors participate in p38 MAPK activation. The present findings demonstrate the involvement of p38 MAPK in glutamate-dependent gene expression regulation in glial cells.

  7. Protein misfolding and oxidative stress promote glial-mediated neurodegeneration in an Alexander disease model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Colodner, Kenneth J.; Feany, Mel B.

    2011-01-01

    Although alterations in glial structure and function commonly accompany death of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, the role glia play in modulating neuronal loss is poorly understood. We have created a model of Alexander disease in Drosophila by expressing disease-linked mutant versions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in fly glia. We find aggregation of mutant human GFAP into inclusions bearing the hallmarks of authentic Rosenthal fibers. We also observe significant toxicity of mutant human GFAP to glia, which is mediated by protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Both protein aggregation and oxidative stress contribute to activation of a robust autophagic response in glia. Toxicity of mutant GFAP to glial cells induces a non-cell autonomous stress response and subsequent apoptosis in neurons, which is dependent on glial glutamate transport. Our findings thus establish a simple genetic model of Alexander disease and further identify cellular pathways critical for glial-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21414908

  8. [The effect of glial cells in the function and development of the nervous system in Caenorhabditis elegans].

    PubMed

    Yulan, X U; Yadan, Xue; Lijun, Kang

    2016-05-25

    There are three types of glial cells in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans for short): sheath glia, socket glia and glutamate receptor glia. They are mainly located in four sensory organs including the amphid, the cephalic organ, the outer labial sensilla and the inner labial sensilla. C. elegans glial cells play key roles in dendrite extension, neurite guidance and extension, and are essential for synaptogenesis and maintain the normal morphology and the function of sensory nerve endings as well. A recent study shown that some nematode neurons are derived from the glial cells. Moreover, nematodes glial cells can directly modulate the function of sensory neurons. Some glial cells can also respond to certain external stimuli, such as mechanical stimulation, and adjust the accompanying neuronal activities.The article summarizes the progress on effects of nematodes glial cells on the nervous system development and function. PMID:27651199

  9. Effects of therapeutic hypothermia on the glial proteome and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a useful intervention against brain injury in experimental models and patients, but its therapeutic applications are limited due to its ill-defined mode of action. Glia cells maintain homeostasis and protect the central nervous system from environmental change, but after brain injury, glia are activated and induce glial scar formation and secondary injury. On the other hand, therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to modulate glial hyperactivation under various brain injury conditions. We considered that knowledge of the effect of hypothermia on the molecular profiles of glia and on their phenotypes would improve our understanding of the neuroprotective mechanism of hypothermia. Here, we review the findings of recent studies that examined the effect of hypothermia on proteome changes in reactive glial cells in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic effects of hypothermia are associated with the inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, the maintenance of ion homeostasis, and the protection of neurovascular units in cultured glial cells. In an animal model, a distinct pattern of protein alterations was detected in glia following hypothermia under ischemic/reperfusion conditions. In particular, hypothermia was found to exert a neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury by regulating specific glial signaling pathways, such as, glutamate signaling, cell death, and stress response, and by influencing neural dysfunction, neurogenesis, neural plasticity, cell differentiation, and neurotrophic activity. Furthermore, the proteins that were differentially expressed belonged to various pathways and could mediate diverse phenotypic changes of glia in vitro or in vivo. Therefore, hypothermia-modulated glial proteins and subsequent phenotypic changes may form the basis of the therapeutic effects of hypothermia. PMID:23441897

  10. Astrocytic dysfunction in epileptogenesis: consequence of altered potassium and glutamate homeostasis?

    PubMed

    David, Yaron; Cacheaux, Luisa P; Ivens, Sebastian; Lapilover, Ezequiel; Heinemann, Uwe; Kaufer, Daniela; Friedman, Alon

    2009-08-26

    Focal epilepsy often develops following traumatic, ischemic, or infectious brain injury. While the electrical activity of the epileptic brain is well characterized, the mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis are poorly understood. We have recently shown that in the rat neocortex, long-lasting breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or direct exposure of the neocortex to serum-derived albumin leads to rapid upregulation of the astrocytic marker GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), followed by delayed (within 4-7 d) development of an epileptic focus. We investigated the role of astrocytes in epileptogenesis in the BBB-breakdown and albumin models of epileptogenesis. We found similar, robust changes in astrocytic gene expression in the neocortex within hours following treatment with deoxycholic acid (BBB breakdown) or albumin. These changes predict reduced clearance capacity for both extracellular glutamate and potassium. Electrophysiological recordings in vitro confirmed the reduced clearance of activity-dependent accumulation of both potassium and glutamate 24 h following exposure to albumin. We used a NEURON model to simulate the consequences of reduced astrocytic uptake of potassium and glutamate on EPSPs. The model predicted that the accumulation of glutamate is associated with frequency-dependent (>100 Hz) decreased facilitation of EPSPs, while potassium accumulation leads to frequency-dependent (10-50 Hz) and NMDA-dependent synaptic facilitation. In vitro electrophysiological recordings during epileptogenesis confirmed frequency-dependent synaptic facilitation leading to seizure-like activity. Our data indicate a transcription-mediated astrocytic transformation early during epileptogenesis. We suggest that the resulting reduction in the clearance of extracellular potassium underlies frequency-dependent neuronal hyperexcitability and network synchronization.

  11. The glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family: physiological and pharmacological implications.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-10-31

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) is composed of five high affinity glutamate transporters, which exhibit the properties of the previously described system XAG-, as well as two Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporters with characteristics of the so-called "ASC" (alanine, serine and cysteine). The SLC1 family members are structurally similar, with almost identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane topologies. The transporters have eight transmembrane domains and a structure reminiscent of a pore loop between the seventh and eighth domains [Neuron 21 (1998) 623]. However, each of these transporters exhibits distinct functional properties. Glutamate transporters mediate transport of L-Glu, L-Asp and D-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na+ and one 1 H+, and the countertransport of 1 K+, whereas ASC transporters mediate Na+-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. Given the high concentrating capacity provided by the unique ion coupling pattern of glutamate transporters, they play crucial roles in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). The regulation and manipulation of their function is a critical issue in the pathogenesis and treatment of CNS disorders involving glutamate excitotoxicity. Loss of function of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), resulting in damage of adjacent motor neurons. The importance of glial glutamate transporters in protecting neurons from extracellular glutamate was further demonstrated in studies of the slc1A2 glutamate transporter knockout mouse. The findings suggest that therapeutic upregulation of GLT1 may be beneficial in a variety of pathological conditions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) but not the glial glutamate transporters may be of therapeutic interest, allowing blockage of glutamate exit from

  12. The purinergic system and glial cells: emerging costars in nociception.

    PubMed

    Magni, Giulia; Ceruti, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    It is now well established that glial cells not only provide mechanical and trophic support to neurons but can directly contribute to neurotransmission, for example, by release and uptake of neurotransmitters and by secreting pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. This has greatly changed our attitude towards acute and chronic disorders, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches targeting activated glial cells to indirectly modulate and/or restore neuronal functions. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in neuron-to-glia and glia-to-glia communication that can be pharmacologically targeted is therefore a mandatory step toward the success of this new healing strategy. This holds true also in the field of pain transmission, where the key involvement of astrocytes and microglia in the central nervous system and satellite glial cells in peripheral ganglia has been clearly demonstrated, and literally hundreds of signaling molecules have been identified. Here, we shall focus on one emerging signaling system involved in the cross talk between neurons and glial cells, the purinergic system, consisting of extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their membrane receptors. Specifically, we shall summarize existing evidence of novel "druggable" glial purinergic targets, which could help in the development of innovative analgesic approaches to chronic pain states. PMID:25276794

  13. Sodium channels in axons and glial cells of the optic nerve of Necturus maculosa

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Experiments investigating both the binding of radioactively labelled saxitoxin (STX) and the electrophysiological response to drugs that increase the sodium permeability of excitable membranes were conducted in an effort to detect sodium channels in glial cells of the optic nerve of Necturus maculosa, the mudpuppy. Glial cells in nerves from chronically enucleated animals, which lack optic nerve axons, show no saturable uptake of STX whereas a saturable uptake is clearly present in normal optic nerves. The normal nerve is depolarized by aconitine, batrachotoxin, and veratridine (10(-6)-10(-5) M), whereas the all-glial preparation is only depolarized by veratridine and at concentrations greater than 10(-3) M. Unlike the depolarization caused by veratridine in normal nerves, the response in the all-glial tissue is not blocked by tetrodotoxin nor enhanced by scorpion venom (Leiurus quinquestriatus). In glial cells of the normal nerve, where axons are also present, the addition of 10(-5) M veratridine does lead to a transient depolarization; however, it is much briefer than the axonal response to veratridine in this same tissue. This glial response to veratridine could be caused by the efflux of K+ from the drug- depolarized axons, and is similar to the glial response to extracellular K+ accumulation resulting from action potentials in the axon. PMID:512633

  14. Glial control of neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Lemke, G

    2001-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between differentiating glial cells and neurons define the course of nervous system development even before the point at which these two cell types become definitively recognizable. Glial cells control the survival of associated neurons in both Drosophila and mammals, but this control is dependent on the prior neuronal triggering of glial cell fate commitment and trophic factor expression. In mammals, the growth factor neuregulin-1 and its receptors of the ErbB family play crucial roles in both events. Similarly, early differentiating neurons and their associated glia rely on reciprocal signaling to establish the basic axon scaffolds from which neuronal connections evolve. The importance of this interactive signaling is illustrated by the action of glial transcription factors and of glial axon guidance cues such as netrin and slit, which together regulate the commissural crossing of pioneer axons at the neural midline. In these and related events, the defining principle is one of mutually reinforced and mutually dependent signaling that occurs in a network of developing neurons and glia.

  15. Glutamate-induced octamer DNA binding and transcriptional control in cultured radial glia cells.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Cruz-Solís, Irma; Corona, Matilde; López-Colomé, Ana María; Ortega, Arturo

    2006-08-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, is critically involved in gene expression regulation in neurons and in glia cells. Neuron-glia interactions provide the framework for synaptic plasticity. Retinal and cerebellar radial glia cells surround glutamatergic excitatory synapses and sense synaptic activity through glutamate receptors expressed in their membranes. Several glutamate-dependent membrane to nuclei signaling cascades have been described in these cells. Octamer DNA binding factors, namely Oct-1 and Oct-2 recognize similar DNA sequences on regulatory regions, but their final transcriptional effect depends on several factors. By these means, different responses can be achieved in different cell types. Here, we describe a comparison between the glutamate-induced DNA binding of octamer factors and their functional activities in two important types of radial glia, retinal Müller and cerebellar Bergmann glial cells. While Oct-1 is expressed in both cell types and in both glutamate treatments results in an increase in Oct-1 DNA binding, this complex is capable of transactivating a reporter gene only in Müller glia cells. In contrast, Oct-2 expression is restricted to Bergmann glia cells in which glutamate treatment results in an augmentation of Oct-2 DNA binding complexes and the repression of kainate binding protein gene transcription. Our present findings demonstrate a differential role for Oct-1 and Oct-2 transcription factors in glial glutamate signaling, and further strengthen the notion of an important role for glial cells in glutamatergic transactions in the central nervous system.

  16. Astroglial glutamate transporters coordinate excitatory signaling and brain energetics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael B; Jackson, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian brain, a family of sodium-dependent transporters maintains low extracellular glutamate and shapes excitatory signaling. The bulk of this activity is mediated by the astroglial glutamate transporters GLT-1 and GLAST (also called EAAT2 and EAAT1). In this review, we will discuss evidence that these transporters co-localize with, form physical (co-immunoprecipitable) interactions with, and functionally couple to various 'energy-generating' systems, including the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, glycogen metabolizing enzymes, glycolytic enzymes, and mitochondria/mitochondrial proteins. This functional coupling is bi-directional with many of these systems both being regulated by glutamate transport and providing the 'fuel' to support glutamate uptake. Given the importance of glutamate uptake to maintaining synaptic signaling and preventing excitotoxicity, it should not be surprising that some of these systems appear to 'redundantly' support the energetic costs of glutamate uptake. Although the glutamate-glutamine cycle contributes to recycling of neurotransmitter pools of glutamate, this is an over-simplification. The ramifications of co-compartmentalization of glutamate transporters with mitochondria for glutamate metabolism are discussed. Energy consumption in the brain accounts for ∼20% of the basal metabolic rate and relies almost exclusively on glucose for the production of ATP. However, the brain does not possess substantial reserves of glucose or other fuels. To ensure adequate energetic supply, increases in neuronal activity are matched by increases in cerebral blood flow via a process known as 'neurovascular coupling'. While the mechanisms for this coupling are not completely resolved, it is generally agreed that astrocytes, with processes that extend to synapses and endfeet that surround blood vessels, mediate at least some of the signal that causes vasodilation. Several studies have shown that either genetic deletion or

  17. Understanding safety of glutamate in food and brain.

    PubMed

    Mallick, H N

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is ubiquitous in nature and is present in all living organisms. It is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system. Glutamate is being used as food additive for enhancing flavour for over last 1200 years imparting a unique taste known as "umami" in Japanese. It is being marketed for about last 100 years. The taste of umami is now recognized as the fifth basic taste. Many of the foods used in cooking for enhancing flavour contain high amount of glutamate. Breast milk has the highest concentration of glutamate amongst all amino acids. Glutamate in high doses as gavage or parenteral injection have been reported to produce neurodegeneration in infant rodents. The neurodegeneration was not produced when gluamate was given with food. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, based on enumerable scientific evidence, has declared that, "glutamate as an additive in food" is not an health hazard to human being. Glutamate is used as signaling molecule not only in neuronal but also in non-neuronal tissues. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the synaptic cleft has been associated with excitotoxicty and glutamate is implicated in number of neurological disorders. Excessive accumulation could be attributed to increase release, failure of transport system for uptake mechanism, neuronal injury due to hypoxia-ischemia, trauma and associated metabolic failures. The role blood brain barrier, vesicular glutamate and sodium dependent excitatory amino acid transporters in glutamate homeostasis are emphasized in the review.

  18. HIV-1, Methamphetamine and Astrocyte Glutamate Regulation: Combined Excitotoxic Implications for Neuro-AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Irma E; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory transmitter in the brain can lead to neurotoxicity when not properly regulated. Excitotoxicity is a direct result of abnormal regulation of glutamate concentrations in the synapse, and is a common neurotoxic mediator associated with neurodegenerative disorders. It is well accepted that methamphetamine (METH), a potent central nervous stimulant with high abuse potential, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are implicated in the progression of neurocognitive malfunction. Both have been shown to induce common neurodegenerative effects such as astrogliosis, compromised blood brain barrier integrity, and excitotoxicity in the brain. Reduced glutamate uptake from neuronal synapses likely leads to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular spaces. Astrocytes express the glutamate transporters responsible for majority of the glutamate uptake from the synapse, as well as for vesicular glutamate release. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity in the context of METH and HIV-1 are undefined. Topics reviewed include dysregulation of the glutamate transporters, specifically excitatory amino acid transporter-2, metabotropic glutamate receptor(s) expression and the release of glutamate by vesicular exocytosis. We also discuss glutamate concentration dysregulation through astrocytic expression of enzymes for glutamate synthesis and metabolism. Lastly, we discuss recent evidence of various astrocyte and neuron crosstalk mechanisms implicated in glutamate regulation. Astrocytes play an essential role in the neuropathologies associated with METH/HIV-1-induced excitotoxicity. We hope to shed light on common cellular and molecular pathways astrocytes share in glutamate regulation during drug abuse and HIV-1 infection. PMID:22591363

  19. HIV-1, methamphetamine and astrocyte glutamate regulation: combined excitotoxic implications for neuro-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Irma E; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory transmitter in the brain can lead to neurotoxicity when not properly regulated. Excitotoxicity is a direct result of abnormal regulation of glutamate concentrations in the synapse, and is a common neurotoxic mediator associated with neurodegenerative disorders. It is well accepted that methamphetamine (METH), a potent central nervous stimulant with high abuse potential, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are implicated in the progression of neurocognitive malfunction. Both have been shown to induce common neurodegenerative effects such as astrogliosis, compromised blood brain barrier integrity, and excitotoxicity in the brain. Reduced glutamate uptake from neuronal synapses likely leads to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular spaces. Astrocytes express the glutamate transporters responsible for majority of the glutamate uptake from the synapse, as well as for vesicular glutamate release. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity in the context of METH and HIV-1 are undefined. Topics reviewed include dysregulation of the glutamate transporters, specifically excitatory amino acid transporter-2, metabotropic glutamate receptor(s) expression and the release of glutamate by vesicular exocytosis. We also discuss glutamate concentration dysregulation through astrocytic expression of enzymes for glutamate synthesis and metabolism. Lastly, we discuss recent evidence of various astrocyte and neuron crosstalk mechanisms implicated in glutamate regulation. Astrocytes play an essential role in the neuropathologies associated with METH/HIV-1-induced excitotoxicity. We hope to shed light on common cellular and molecular pathways astrocytes share in glutamate regulation during drug abuse and HIV-1 infection.

  20. Elevated venous glutamate levels in (pre)catabolic conditions result at least partly from a decreased glutamate transport activity.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Stütz, O; Kinscherf, R; Schykowski, M; Kellerer, M; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    1996-06-01

    Abnormally high postabsorptive venous plasma glutamate levels have been reported for several diseases that are associated with a loss of body cell mass including cancer, human/simian immunodeficiency virus infection, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Studies on exchange rates in well-nourished cancer patients now show that high venous plasma glutamate levels may serve as a bona fide indicator for a decreased uptake of glutamate by the peripheral muscle tissue in the postabsorptive period and may be indicative for a precachectic state. High glutamate levels are also moderately correlated with a decreased uptake of glucose and ketone bodies. Relatively high venous glutamate levels have also been found in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and to some extent also in the cubital vein of normal elderly subjects, i.e., in conditions commonly associated with a decreased glucose tolerance and progressive loss of body cell mass.

  1. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST: role of PKC.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-term, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules present at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate of the transporter molecules accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the long-term modulation apparently involves transcriptional regulation. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors activation mediate a substantial reduction in the transcriptional activity of the chglast promoter through the Ca2+/diacylglicerol-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling cascade. Overexpression of constitutive active PKC isoforms of mimic the glutamate effect. Accordingly, increased levels of c-Jun or c-Fos, but not Jun-B, Jun-D or Fos-B, lower the chglast promoter activity. Serial deletions and electrophorectic mobility shift assays were used to define a specific region within the 5' proximal region of the chglast promoter, associated with transcriptional repression. A putative glutamate response element could be defined in the proximal promoter stretch more likely between nts -40 and -78. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under glutamate-dependent transcriptional control through PKC, and support the notion of a pivotal role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of its own removal from the synaptic cleft, thereby modulating, mainly in the long term, glutamatergic transmission.

  2. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  3. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  4. Rapid Microelectrode Measurements and the Origin and Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, E.R.; Hascup, K.N.; Stephens, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Huettl, P.; Gratton, A.; Gerhardt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a significant role in several mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, addiction and anxiety. Previous studies on PFC glutamate-mediated function have used techniques that raise questions on the neuronal vs. astrocytic origin of glutamate. The present studies used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to monitor second-by-second resting glutamate levels in the PFC of awake rats. Locally-applied drugs were employed in an attempt to discriminate between the neuronal or glial components of the resting glutamate signal. Local application of tetrodotoxin (TTX; sodium channel blocker), produced a significant (~40%) decline in resting glutamate levels. In addition significant reductions in extracellular glutamate were seen with locally-applied ω-conotoxin (MVIIC; ~50%; calcium channel blocker), and the mGluR⅔ agonist, LY379268 (~20%), and a significant increase with the mGluR⅔ antagonist LY341495 (~40%), effects all consistent with a large neuronal contribution to the resting glutamate levels. Local administration of D,L-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; glutamate transporter inhibitor) produced an ~120% increase in extracellular glutamate levels, supporting that excitatory amino acid transporters, which are largely located on glia, modulate clearance of extracellular glutamate. Interestingly, local application of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG; cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitor), produced small, non-significant bi-phasic changes in extracellular glutamate versus vehicle control. Finally, pre-administration of TTX completely blocked the glutamate response to tail pinch stress. Taken together, these results support that PFC resting glutamate levels in rats as measured by the MEA technology are at least 40-50% derived from neurons. Furthermore, these data support that the impulse flow-dependent glutamate release from a physiologically-evoked event is entirely neuronally derived. PMID:20969570

  5. Transcriptional regulation of glial cell specification.

    PubMed

    Ragone, Gianluca; Van De Bor, Véronique; Sorrentino, Sandro; Kammerer, Martial; Galy, Anne; Schenck, Annette; Bernardoni, Roberto; Miller, Alita A; Roy, Nivedita; Giangrande, Angela

    2003-03-01

    Neuronal differentiation relies on proneural factors that also integrate positional information and contribute to the specification of the neuronal type. The molecular pathway triggering glial specification is not understood yet. In Drosophila, all lateral glial precursors and glial-promoting activity have been identified, which provides us with a unique opportunity to dissect the regulatory pathways controlling glial differentiation and specification. Although glial lineages are very heterogeneous with respect to position, time of differentiation, and lineage tree, they all express and require two homologous genes, glial cell deficient/glial cell missing (glide/gcm) and glide2, that act in concert, with glide/gcm constituting the major glial-promoting factor. Here, we show that glial specification resides in glide/gcm transcriptional regulation. The glide/gcm promoter contains lineage-specific elements as well as quantitative and turmoil elements scattered throughout several kilobases. Interestingly, there is no correlation between a specific regulatory element and the type of glial lineage. Thus, the glial-promoting factor acts as a naive switch-on button that triggers gliogenesis in response to multiple pathways converging onto its promoter. Both negative and positive regulation are required to control glide/gcm expression, indicating that gliogenesis is actively repressed in some neural lineages. PMID:12618139

  6. Functional role for redox in the epileptogenesis: molecular regulation of glutamate in the hippocampus of FeCl3-induced limbic epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yuto; Doi, Taku; Nagatomo, Keiko; Willmore, L James; Nakajima, Akira

    2007-08-01

    We used western blotting to measure the quantity of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters proteins within hippocampal tissue obtained from rats who had undergone epileptogenesis. Chronic seizures were induced by amygdalar injection of FeCl(3). We found that the glial glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1 were down-regulated at 60 days after initiation of chronic and recurrent seizures. However, the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC-1 and the GABA transporter GAT-3 were increased. We performed in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals to estimate in vivo redox state. We found that the hippocampal tissues were oxidized, resulting in even further impairment of glutamate transport. Our data show that epileptogenesis in rats resulting in chronic and recurrent seizures is associated with collapse of glutamate regulation caused by both the molecular down-regulation of glial glutamate transporters combined with the functional failure due to oxidation.

  7. Modulation of intestinal L-glutamate transport by luminal leptin.

    PubMed

    Fanjul, Carmen; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Lostao, María Pilar; Ducroc, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Leptin is secreted into the digestive tract and contributes to the absorption of dietary molecules by regulating transporters activity. Here, we studied the effect of luminal leptin on the intestinal transport of L-glutamate, an important component of human diet. We examined the effect of leptin on L-glutamate uptake in rat intestine in vitro measuring glutamate-induced short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chambers and L-[(3)H (U)]-glutamate uptake in jejunal everted rings. Glutamate-induced Isc was only observed in Na(+)-free conditions. This Isc was concentration (1-60 mmol L(-1)) and pH dependent. Luminal leptin increased glutamate Isc (∼100 %). Dose-response curve showed a biphasic pattern, with maximal stimulations observed at 10(-13) and 10(-10) mmol L(-1), that were sensitive to leptin receptor antagonist. In everted rings, two glutamate transport mechanisms were distinguished: a Na(+)-dependent, H(+)-independent, that was inhibited by leptin (∼20 %), and a Na(+)-independent but H(+)-dependent, that was enhanced by leptin (∼20 %), in line with data obtained in Ussing chambers. Altogether, these data reveal original non-monotonic effect of luminal leptin in the intestine and demonstrate a new role for this hormone in the modulation of L-glutamate transport, showing that luminal active gut peptides can influence absorption of amino acids.

  8. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chendan; Ren, Jianbo; Guo, Xiangjie; Yun, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS). Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca2+ release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca2+ release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca2+ overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca2+ release and ER stress. PMID:27783050

  9. Targeting Glia with N-Acetylcysteine Modulates Brain Glutamate and Behaviors Relevant to Neurodevelopmental Disorders in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Durieux, Alice M S; Fernandes, Cathy; Murphy, Declan; Labouesse, Marie Anais; Giovanoli, Sandra; Meyer, Urs; Li, Qi; So, Po-Wah; McAlonan, Grainne

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between excitatory (E) glutamate and inhibitory (I) GABA transmission may underlie neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. This may be direct, through alterations in synaptic genes, but there is increasing evidence for the importance of indirect modulation of E/I balance through glial mechanisms. Here, we used C57BL/6J mice to test the hypothesis that striatal glutamate levels can be shifted by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which acts at the cystine-glutamate antiporter of glial cells. Striatal glutamate was quantified in vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of NAC on behaviors relevant to ASD was examined in a separate cohort. NAC induced a time-dependent decrease in striatal glutamate, which recapitulated findings of lower striatal glutamate reported in ASD. NAC-treated animals were significantly less active and more anxious in the open field test; and NAC-treated females had significantly impaired prepulse inhibition of startle response. This at least partly mimics greater anxiety and impaired sensorimotor gating reported in neurodevelopmental disorders. Thus glial mechanisms regulate glutamate acutely and have functional consequences even in adulthood. Glial cells may be a potential drug target for the development of new therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders across the life-span. PMID:26696857

  10. Novel di-aryl-substituted isoxazoles act as noncompetitive inhibitors of the system Xc(-) cystine/glutamate exchanger.

    PubMed

    Newell, J L; Keyari, C M; McDaniel, S W; Diaz, P J; Natale, N R; Patel, S A; Bridges, R J

    2014-07-01

    The system xc(-) antiporter is a plasma membrane transporter that mediates the exchange of extracellular l-cystine with intracellular l-glutamate. This exchange is significant within the context of the CNS because the import of l-cystine is required for the synthesis of the antioxidant glutathione, while the efflux of l-glutamate has the potential to contribute to either excitatory signaling or excitotoxic pathology. Changes in the activity of the transport system have been linked to the underlying pathological mechanisms of a variety of CNS disorders, one of the most prominent of which is its highly enriched expression in glial brain tumors. In an effort to produce more potent system xc(-) blockers, we have been using amino-3-carboxy-5-methylisoxazole propionic acid (ACPA) as a scaffold for inhibitor development. We previously demonstrated that the addition of lipophilic aryl groups to either the #4 or #5 position on the isoxazole ring markedly increased the inhibitory activity at system xc(-). In the present work a novel series of analogues has been prepared in which aryl groups have been introduced at both the #4 and #5 positions. In contrast to the competitive action of the mono-substituted analogues, kinetic analyses indicate that the di-substituted isoxazoles block system xc(-)-mediated uptake of (3)H-l-glutamate into SNB-19 cells by a noncompetitive mechanism. These new analogues appear to be the first noncompetitive inhibitors identified for this transport system, as well as being among the most potent blockers identified to date. These diaryl-isoxazoles should be of value in assessing the physiological roles and molecular pharmacology of system xc(-).

  11. Structural Features of the Glutamate Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Konings, Wil N.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus prevent neurotoxicity. The proteins belong to a large and widespread family of secondary transporters, including bacterial glutamate, serine, and C4-dicarboxylate transporters; mammalian neutral-amino-acid transporters; and an increasing number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic proteins that have not yet been functionally characterized. Sixty members of the glutamate transporter family were found in the databases on the basis of sequence homology. The amino acid sequences of the carriers have diverged enormously. Homology between the members of the family is most apparent in a stretch of approximately 150 residues in the C-terminal part of the proteins. This region contains four reasonably well-conserved sequence motifs, all of which have been suggested to be part of the translocation pore or substrate binding site. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal stretch revealed the presence of five subfamilies with characterized members: (i) the eukaryotic glutamate transporters, (ii) the bacterial glutamate transporters, (iii) the eukaryotic neutral-amino-acid transporters, (iv) the bacterial C4-dicarboxylate transporters, and (v) the bacterial serine transporters. A number of other subfamilies that do not contain characterized members have been defined. In contrast to their amino acid sequences, the hydropathy profiles of the members of the family are extremely well conserved. Analysis of the hydropathy profiles has suggested that the glutamate transporters have a global structure that is unique among secondary transporters. Experimentally, the unique structure of the transporters was recently confirmed by membrane topology studies. Although there is still controversy about part of the topology, the most likely model predicts the presence of eight membrane-spanning α-helices and a loop-pore structure which is unique among secondary

  12. Nerve impulses increase glial intercellular permeability.

    PubMed

    Marrero, H; Orkand, R K

    1996-03-01

    Coordinating the activity of neurons and their satellite glial cells requires mechanisms by which glial cells detect neuronal activity and change their properties as a result. This study monitors the intercellular diffusion of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow (LY), following its injection into glial cells of the frog optic nerve, and demonstrates that nerve impulses increase the permeability of interglial gap junctions. Consequently, the spatial buffer capacity of the neuroglial cell syncytium for potassium, other ions, and small molecules will be enhanced; this may facilitate glial function in maintaining homeostasis of the neuronal microenvironment. PMID:8833199

  13. Transport Mechanism of a Bacterial Homologue of Glutamate Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, N.; Ginter, C; Boudker, O

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are integral membrane proteins that catalyse a thermodynamically uphill uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft into the cytoplasm of glia and neuronal cells by harnessing the energy of pre-existing electrochemical gradients of ions. Crucial to the reaction is the conformational transition of the transporters between outward and inward facing states, in which the substrate binding sites are accessible from the extracellular space and the cytoplasm, respectively. Here we describe the crystal structure of a double cysteine mutant of a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii, GltPh, which is trapped in the inward facing state by cysteine crosslinking. Together with the previously determined crystal structures of Glt{sub Ph} in the outward facing state, the structure of the crosslinked mutant allows us to propose a molecular mechanism by which Glt{sub Ph} and, by analogy, mammalian glutamate transporters mediate sodium-coupled substrate uptake.

  14. Transport mechanism of a glutamate transporter homologue GltPh

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Postis, Vincent L.G.; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate in mammalian central nervous systems. Their archaeal homologue GltPh, an aspartate transporter isolated from Pyrococcus horikoshii, has been the focus of extensive studies through crystallography, MD simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Here, we summarize the recent research progress on GltPh, in the hope of gaining some insights into the transport mechanism of this aspartate transporter. PMID:27284058

  15. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Glutamate involvement in calcium–dependent migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. Methods The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. Results We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca2+ transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca2+ oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca2+ oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca2+]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  17. Conceptual convergence: increased inflammation is associated with increased basal ganglia glutamate in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Haroon, E; Fleischer, C C; Felger, J C; Chen, X; Woolwine, B J; Patel, T; Hu, X P; Miller, A H

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation and altered glutamate metabolism are two pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Interestingly, these pathways may be linked given that administration of inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-α to otherwise non-depressed controls increased glutamate in the basal ganglia and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Whether increased inflammation is associated with increased glutamate among patients with major depression is unknown. Accordingly, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 50 medication-free, depressed outpatients using single-voxel MRS, to measure absolute glutamate concentrations in basal ganglia and dACC. Multivoxel chemical shift imaging (CSI) was used to explore creatine-normalized measures of other metabolites in basal ganglia. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory markers were assessed along with anhedonia and psychomotor speed. Increased log plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) was significantly associated with increased log left basal ganglia glutamate controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking status and depression severity. In turn, log left basal ganglia glutamate was associated with anhedonia and psychomotor slowing measured by the finger-tapping test, simple reaction time task and the Digit Symbol Substitution Task. Plasma CRP was not associated with dACC glutamate. Plasma and CSF CRP were also associated with CSI measures of basal ganglia glutamate and the glial marker myoinositol. These data indicate that increased inflammation in major depression may lead to increased glutamate in the basal ganglia in association with glial dysfunction and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting glutamate may be preferentially effective in depressed patients with increased inflammation as measured by CRP. PMID:26754953

  18. Conceptual convergence: increased inflammation is associated with increased basal ganglia glutamate in patients with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, E; Fleischer, C C; Felger, J C; Chen, X; Woolwine, B J; Patel, T; Hu, X P; Miller, A H

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and altered glutamate metabolism are two pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Interestingly, these pathways may be linked given that administration of inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-α to otherwise non-depressed controls increased glutamate in the basal ganglia and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Whether increased inflammation is associated with increased glutamate among patients with major depression is unknown. Accordingly, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 50 medication-free, depressed outpatients using single-voxel MRS, to measure absolute glutamate concentrations in basal ganglia and dACC. Multivoxel chemical shift imaging (CSI) was used to explore creatine-normalized measures of other metabolites in basal ganglia. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory markers were assessed along with anhedonia and psychomotor speed. Increased log plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) was significantly associated with increased log left basal ganglia glutamate controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking status and depression severity. In turn, log left basal ganglia glutamate was associated with anhedonia and psychomotor slowing measured by the finger-tapping test, simple reaction time task and the Digit Symbol Substitution Task. Plasma CRP was not associated with dACC glutamate. Plasma and CSF CRP were also associated with CSI measures of basal ganglia glutamate and the glial marker myoinositol. These data indicate that increased inflammation in major depression may lead to increased glutamate in the basal ganglia in association with glial dysfunction and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting glutamate may be preferentially effective in depressed patients with increased inflammation as measured by CRP. PMID:26754953

  19. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, M; Teng, C; Wilkening, R B; Fennessey, P; Battaglia, F C; Meschia, G

    2000-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying mechanisms, hepatic amino acid uptake and conversion of L-[1-(13)C]glutamine to L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and (13)CO(2) were measured in six sheep fetuses before and in the last 2 h of a 26-h Dex infusion. Dex decreased hepatic glutamine and alanine uptakes (P < 0.01) and hepatic glutamate output (P < 0.001). Hepatic outputs of the glutamate (R(Glu,Gln)) and CO(2) formed from plasma glutamine decreased to 21 (P < 0.001) and 53% (P = 0.009) of control, respectively. R(Glu,Gln), expressed as a fraction of both outputs, decreased (P < 0.001) from 0.36 +/- 0.02 to 0.18 +/- 0.04. Hepatic glucose output remained virtually zero throughout the experiment. We conclude that Dex decreases fetal hepatic glutamate output by increasing the routing of glutamate carbon into the citric acid cycle and by decreasing the hepatic uptake of glucogenic amino acids. PMID:10780940

  20. Electrogenic Steps Associated with Substrate Binding to the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter EAAC1.

    PubMed

    Tanui, Rose; Tao, Zhen; Silverstein, Nechama; Kanner, Baruch; Grewer, Christof

    2016-05-27

    Glutamate transporters actively take up glutamate into the cell, driven by the co-transport of sodium ions down their transmembrane concentration gradient. It was proposed that glutamate binds to its binding site and is subsequently transported across the membrane in the negatively charged form. With the glutamate binding site being located partially within the membrane domain, the possibility has to be considered that glutamate binding is dependent on the transmembrane potential and, thus, is electrogenic. Experiments presented in this report test this possibility. Rapid application of glutamate to the wild-type glutamate transporter subtype EAAC1 (excitatory amino acid carrier 1) through photo-release from caged glutamate generated a transient inward current, as expected for the electrogenic inward movement of co-transported Na(+) In contrast, glutamate application to a transporter with the mutation A334E induced transient outward current, consistent with movement of negatively charged glutamate into its binding site within the dielectric of the membrane. These results are in agreement with electrostatic calculations, predicting a valence for glutamate binding of -0.27. Control experiments further validate and rule out other possible explanations for the transient outward current. Electrogenic glutamate binding can be isolated in the mutant glutamate transporter because reactions, such as glutamate translocation and/or Na(+) binding to the glutamate-bound state, are inhibited by the A334E substitution. Electrogenic glutamate binding has to be considered together with other voltage-dependent partial reactions to cooperatively determine the voltage dependence of steady-state glutamate uptake and glutamate buffering at the synapse. PMID:27044739

  1. Implications of glial nitric oxide in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jose Enrique; Tarragon, Ernesto; Campuzano, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26347610

  2. Implications of glial nitric oxide in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Jose Enrique; Tarragon, Ernesto; Campuzano, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26347610

  3. Glial abnormalities in substance use disorders and depression: Does shared glutamatergic dysfunction contribute to comorbidity?

    PubMed Central

    Niciu, Mark J.; Henter, Ioline D.; Sanacora, Gerard; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Preclinical and clinical research in neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly mood and substance use disorders, have historically focused on neurons; however, glial cells – astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes – also play key roles in these disorders. Methods Peer-reviewed PubMed/Medline articles published through December 2012 were identified using the following keyword combinations: glia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes/glia, microglia, substance use, substance abuse, substance dependence, alcohol, opiate, opioid, cocaine, psychostimulants, stimulants, and glutamate. Results Depressive and substance use disorders are highly comorbid, suggesting a common or overlapping aetiology and pathophysiology. Reduced astrocyte cell number occurs in both disorders. Altered glutamate neurotransmission and metabolism – specifically changes in the levels/activity of transporters, receptors, and synaptic proteins potentially related to synaptic physiology – appear to be salient features of both disorders. Glial cell pathology may also underlie the pathophysiology of both disorders via impaired astrocytic production of neurotrophic factors. Microglial/neuroinflammatory pathology is also evident in both depressive and substance use disorders. Finally, oligodendrocyte impairment decreases myelination and impairs expression of myelin-related genes in both substance use and depressive disorders. Conclusions Glial-mediated glutamatergic dysfunction is a common neuropathological pathway in both substance use and depression. Therefore, glutamatergic neuromodulation is a rational drug target in this comorbidity. PMID:24024876

  4. Repeated exposure to moderate doses of ethanol augments hippocampal glutamate neurotransmission by increasing release

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir; Meis, Jennifer; Wang, Grace; Kuzmin, Alexander; Bakalkin, Georgy; Shippenberg, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The present study used conventional and quantitative microdialysis to assess glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the hippocampal CA3 area of the rat following a moderate-dose ethanol treatment regimen. Male Wistar rats received 3.4 g/kg of ethanol or water for 6 days via gastric gavage. Microdialysis experiments commenced 2 days later. Basal and depolarization-induced glutamate overflow were significantly elevated in ethanol-treated animals. Basal and depolarization-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) overflow were unaltered. Quantitative no-net-flux microdialysis was used to determine if changes in dialysate glutamate levels following ethanol administration are due to an increase in release or a decrease in uptake.To confirm the validity of this method for quantifying basal glutamate dynamics, extracellular concentrations of glutamate and the extraction fraction, which reflects changes in analyte clearance, were quantified in response to retro-dialysis of the glutamate uptake blocker trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC). tPDC significantly decreased the extraction fraction for glutamate, resulting in augmented extracellular glutamate concentrations. Repeated ethanol administration did not alter the glutamate extraction fraction. However, extracellular glutamate concentrations were significantly elevated, indicating that glutamate release is increased as a consequence of repeated ethanol administration. These data demonstrate that repeated bouts of moderate ethanol consumption alter basal glutamate dynamics in the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Basal glutamate release is augmented, whereas glutamate uptake is unchanged. Furthermore, they suggest that dysregulation of glutamate transmission in this region may contribute to the previously documented deficits in cognitive function associated with moderate dose ethanol use. PMID:21182572

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells protect CNS neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity by inhibiting glutamate receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Voulgari-Kokota, A; Fairless, R; Karamita, M; Kyrargyri, V; Tseveleki, V; Evangelidou, M; Delorme, B; Charbord, P; Diem, R; Probert, L

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) promote functional recovery in experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) pathology and are currently being tested in clinical trials for stroke, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Their beneficial effects are attributed to the activation of endogenous CNS protection and repair processes as well as immune regulation but their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here we investigated the neuroprotective effects of mouse MSC in rodent MSC-neuron co-cultures and mice using models of glutamate excitotoxicity. A 24h pre-culture of mouse primary cortical neurons with MSC protected them against glutamate (NMDA) receptor-induced death and conditioned medium from MSC (MSC CM) was sufficient for this effect. Protection by MSC CM was associated with reduced mRNA levels of genes encoding NMDA receptor subunits, and increased levels for genes associated with non-neuronal and stem cell types, as shown by RT-PCR and cDNA microarray analyses. Changes in gene expression were not associated with alterations in cell lineage representation within the cultures. Further, MSC CM-mediated neuroprotection in rat retinal ganglion cells was associated with reduced glutamate-induced calcium influx. The adoptive transfer of EGFP(+)MSC in a mouse kainic acid epilepsy model also provided neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity in vivo, as shown by reduced neuron damage and glial cell activation in the hippocampus. These results show that MSC mediate direct neuroprotection by reducing neuronal sensitivity to glutamate receptor ligands and altering gene expression, and suggest a link between the therapeutic effects of MSC and the activation of cell plasticity in the damaged CNS. PMID:22561409

  6. Glutamate Receptor Agonists and Glutamate Transporter Antagonists Regulate Differentiation of Osteoblast Lineage Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjie; Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Hofstetter, Willy

    2016-08-01

    Development and function of osteoblast lineage cells are regulated by a complex microenvironment consisting of the bone extracellular matrix, cells, systemic hormones and cytokines, autocrine and paracrine factors, and mechanical load. Apart from receptors that transduce extracellular signals into the cell, molecular transporters play a crucial role in the cellular response to the microenvironment. Transporter molecules are responsible for cellular uptake of nutritional components, elimination of metabolites, ion transport, and cell-cell communication. In this report, the expression of molecular transporters in osteoblast lineage cells was investigated to assess their roles in cell development and activity. Low-density arrays, covering membrane and vesicular transport molecules, were used to assess gene expression in osteoblasts representing early and late differentiation states. Receptors and transporters for the amino acid glutamate were found to be differentially expressed during osteoblast development. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and the mechanisms of its release, signal transduction, and cellular reabsorption in the synaptic cleft are well understood. Less clear, however, is the control of equivalent processes in peripheral tissues. In primary osteoblasts, inhibition of glutamate transporters with nonselective inhibitors leads to an increase in the concentration of extracellular glutamate. This change was accompanied by a decrease in osteoblast proliferation, stimulation of alkaline phosphatase, and the expression of transcripts encoding osteocalcin. Enzymatic removal of extracellular glutamate abolished these pro-differentiation effects, as did the inhibition of PKC- and Erk1/2-signaling pathways. These findings demonstrate that glutamate signaling promotes differentiation and activation of osteoblast lineage cells. Consequently, the glutamate system may represent a putative therapeutic target to induce an anabolic response

  7. 4-Hydroxyhexenal (HHE) impairs glutamate transport in astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Mark A; Bradley, Melissa A; Fister, Shuling X

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies show elevations of α,β-unsaturated aldehydic by-products of lipid peroxidation including 4-hydroxynonenal and acrolein in vulnerable brain regions of subjects throughout the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). More recently 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE), a diffusible α,β-unsaturated aldehyde resulting from peroxidation of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, was shown to be elevated in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus (HPG) of subjects with preclinical AD (PCAD) and in late stage AD (LAD). HHE treatment of primary rat cortical neuron cultures led to a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in survival and glucose uptake. To determine if HHE also impairs glutamate uptake, primary rat astrocyte cultures were exposed to HHE for 4 hours and glutamate transport measured. Results show subtoxic (2.5 μM) HHE concentrations significantly (p < 0.05) impair glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation of excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT-2), the primary glutamate transporter in brain, from normal control, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), PCAD, and LAD HPG followed by quantification of HHE immunolabeling showed a significant increase in HHE positive EAAT-2 in MCI and LAD HPG. Together these data suggest HHE can significantly impair glutamate uptake and may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22766736

  8. Glial Cells are Involved in Itch Processing.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2016-08-23

    Recent discoveries in itch neurophysiology include itch-selective neuronal pathways, the clinically relevant non-histaminergic pathway, and elucidation of the notable similarities and differences between itch and pain. Potential involvement of glial cells in itch processing and the possibility of glial modulation of chronic itch have recently been identified, similarly to the established glial modulation of pain processing. This review outlines the similarities and differences between itch and pain, and how different types of central and peripheral glial cells may be differentially involved in the development of chronic itch akin to their more investigated role in chronic pain. Improvements are needed in the management of chronic itch, and future basic and interventional studies on glial activity modulation would both enhance our understanding of mechanisms underlying the chronification of itch and provide novel opportunities for the prevention or treatment of this debilitating and common condition.

  9. Glutamate signalling in roots.

    PubMed

    Forde, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    As a signalling molecule, glutamate is best known for its role as a fast excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian nervous system, a role that requires the activity of a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). The unexpected discovery in 1998 that Arabidopsis thaliana L. possesses a family of iGluR-related (GLR) genes laid the foundations for an assessment of glutamate's potential role as a signalling molecule in plants that is still in progress. Recent advances in elucidating the function of Arabidopsis GLR receptors has revealed similarities with iGluRs in their channel properties, but marked differences in their ligand specificities. The ability of plant GLR receptors to act as amino-acid-gated Ca(2+) channels with a broad agonist profile, combined with their expression throughout the plant, makes them strong candidates for a multiplicity of amino acid signalling roles. Although root growth is inhibited in the presence of a number of amino acids, only glutamate elicits a specific sequence of changes in growth, root tip morphology, and root branching. The recent finding that the MEKK1 gene is a positive regulator of glutamate sensitivity at the root tip has provided genetic evidence for the existence in plants of a glutamate signalling pathway analogous to those found in animals. This short review will discuss the most recent advances in understanding glutamate signalling in roots, considering them in the context of previous work in plants and animals.

  10. Quantification of immunogold labelling reveals enrichment of glutamate in mossy and parallel fibre terminals in cat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, P; Halasy, K; Somogyi, J; Storm-Mathisen, J; Ottersen, O P

    1986-12-01

    The glutamate immunoreactivity of different cell populations was compared quantitatively in the cerebellar cortex of cat, using an antiserum raised against glutamate coupled to bovine serum albumin by glutaraldehyde. Neuronal and glial processes were identified on serial electron microscopic sections which were processed by a postembedding immunogold procedure. The surface density of colloidal gold particles was used for statistical comparison of the relative levels of glutamate in cell populations, or in different parts of the same population. The terminals of mossy and parallel fibres had significantly higher levels of glutamate immunoreactivity than Golgi cell terminals, granule cell dendritic digits, Purkinje cell dendrites or dendritic spines. Golgi cell terminals were identified by their position and GABA immunoreactivity as revealed by immunogold in serial sections. The dendritic digits of the putative glutamatergic granule cells had significantly higher glutamate immunoreactivity than did Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines. Glial cell processes in the molecular layer had lower level of glutamate immunoreactivity than any of the neuronal processes. The results demonstrate that the highest levels of glutamate immunoreactivity occur in mossy and parallel fibre presynaptic terminals that are known to have an excitatory effect. This supports previous suggestions that glutamate may be a transmitter at these synapses. The measurement of the levels of putative amino acid transmitters in identified neuronal populations, or in different parts of the same population, could have wide applications in studies on the chemical neuroanatomy of the nervous system.

  11. II. Glutamine and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Tapiero, H; Mathé, G; Couvreur, P; Tew, K D

    2002-11-01

    Glutamine and glutamate with proline, histidine, arginine and ornithine, comprise 25% of the dietary amino acid intake and constitute the "glutamate family" of amino acids, which are disposed of through conversion to glutamate. Although glutamine has been classified as a nonessential amino acid, in major trauma, major surgery, sepsis, bone marrow transplantation, intense chemotherapy and radiotherapy, when its consumption exceeds its synthesis, it becomes a conditionally essential amino acid. In mammals the physiological levels of glutamine is 650 micromol/l and it is one of the most important substrate for ammoniagenesis in the gut and in the kidney due to its important role in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. In cells, glutamine is a key link between carbon metabolism of carbohydrates and proteins and plays an important role in the growth of fibroblasts, lymphocytes and enterocytes. It improves nitrogen balance and preserves the concentration of glutamine in skeletal muscle. Deamidation of glutamine via glutaminase produces glutamate a precursor of gamma-amino butyric acid, a neurotransmission inhibitor. L-Glutamic acid is a ubiquitous amino acid present in many foods either in free form or in peptides and proteins. Animal protein may contain from 11 to 22% and plants protein as much as 40% glutamate by weight. The sodium salt of glutamic acid is added to several foods to enhance flavor. L-Glutamate is the most abundant free amino acid in brain and it is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the vertebrate central nervous system. Most free L-glutamic acid in brain is derived from local synthesis from L-glutamine and Kreb's cycle intermediates. It clearly plays an important role in neuronal differentiation, migration and survival in the developing brain via facilitated Ca++ transport. Glutamate also plays a critical role in synaptic maintenance and plasticity. It contributes to learning and memory through use-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy and

  12. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  13. The role of mitochondrial function in glutamate-dependent metabolism in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Smaili, S S; Ureshino, R P; Rodrigues, L; Rocha, K K; Carvalho, J T; Oseki, K T; Bincoletto, C; Lopes, G S; Hirata, H

    2011-12-01

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in neurons and glial cells and it is one of the keys to the neuron-glial interaction in the brain. Glutamate transmission is strongly dependent on calcium homeostasis and on mitochondrial function. In the present work we presented several aspects related to the role of mitochondria in glutamate signaling and in brain diseases. We focused on glutamateinduced calcium signaling and its relation to the organelle dysfunction with cell death processes. In addition, we have discussed how alterations in this pathway may lead or aggravate a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. We compiled information on how mitochondria can influence cell fate during glutamate stimulation and calcium signaling. These organelles play a pivotal role in neuron and glial exchange, in synaptic plasticity and several pathological conditions related to Aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. We have also presented autophagy as a mechanism activated during mitochondrial dysfunction which may function as a protective mechanism during injury. Furthermore, some new perspectives and approaches to treat these neurodegenerative diseases are offered and evaluated.

  14. Localization of a GABA transporter to glial cells in the developing and adult olfactory pathway of the moth Manduca sexta1

    PubMed Central

    Oland, Lynne A; Gibson, Nicholas J; Tolbert, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Glial cells have several critical roles in the developing and adult olfactory (antennal) lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. Early in development, glial cells occupy discrete regions of the developing olfactory pathway and processes of GABAergic neurons extend into some of these regions. Because GABA is known to have developmental effects in a variety of systems, we explored the possibility that the glial cells express a GABA transporter that could regulate GABA levels to which olfactory neurons and glial cells are exposed. Using an antibody raised against a characterized high-affinity M. sexta GABA transporter with high sequence homology to known mammalian GABA transporters (Mbungu et al., 1995; Umesh and Gill, 2002), we found that the GABA transporter is localized to subsets of centrally derived glial cells during metamorphic adult development. The transporter persists into adulthood in a subset of the neuropil-associated glial cells, but its distribution pattern as determined by light- and electron-microscopic-level immunocytochemistry indicates that it could not serve to regulate GABA concentration in the synaptic cleft. Rather its role is more likely to regulate extracellular GABA levels within the glomerular neuropil. Expression in the sorting zone glial cells disappears after the period of olfactory receptor axon ingrowth, but may be important during ingrowth if GABA regulates axon growth. Glial cells take up GABA, and that uptake can be blocked by DABA. This is the first molecular evidence that the central glial cell population in this pathway is heterogeneous. PMID:20058309

  15. Glial choristoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Shemanski, Karen A; Voth, Spencer E; Patitucci, Lana B; Ma, Yuxiang; Popnikolov, Nikolay; Katsetos, Christos D; Sataloff, Robert T

    2013-12-01

    Glial choristomas are isolated masses of mature brain tissue that are found outside the spinal cord or cranial cavity. These masses are rare, especially in the middle ear. We describe the case of an 81-year-old man who presented with left-sided chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. He was found to have a glial choristoma of the middle ear on the left. Otologic surgeons should be aware of the possibility of finding such a mass in the middle ear and be familiar with the differences in treatment between glial choristomas and the more common encephaloceles.

  16. Physiology of neuronal-glial networking.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2010-11-01

    Neuronal-glial networks are the substrate for the brain function. Evolution of the nervous system resulted in the appearance of highly specialized neuronal web optimized for rapid information transfer. This neuronal web is embedded into glial syncytium, thereby creating sophisticated neuronal-glial circuitry were both types of neural cells are working in concert, ensuring amplification of brain computational power. In addition neuroglial cells are fundamental for control of brain homeostasis and they represent the intrinsic brain defence system, being thus intimately involved in pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  17. Glutamate cycling may drive organic anion transport on the basal membrane of human placental syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Lofthouse, Emma M; Brooks, Suzanne; Cleal, Jane K; Hanson, Mark A; Poore, Kirsten R; O'Kelly, Ita M; Lewis, Rohan M

    2015-10-15

    The organic anion transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) and organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP2B1 (SLCO2B1) are expressed in the basal membrane of the placental syncytiotrophoblast. These transporters mediate exchange whereby uptake of one organic anion is coupled to efflux of a counter-ion. In placenta, these exchangers mediate placental uptake of substrates for oestrogen synthesis as well as clearing waste products and xenobiotics from the fetal circulation. However, the identity of the counter-ion driving this transport in the placenta, and in other tissues, is unclear. While glutamate is not a known OAT4 or OATP2B1 substrate, we propose that its high intracellular concentration has the potential to drive accumulation of substrates from the fetal circulation. In the isolated perfused placenta, glutamate exchange was observed between the placenta and the fetal circulation. This exchange could not be explained by known glutamate exchangers. However, glutamate efflux was trans-stimulated by an OAT4 and OATP2B1 substrate (bromosulphothalein). Exchange of glutamate for bromosulphothalein was only observed when glutamate reuptake was inhibited (by addition of aspartate). To determine if OAT4 and/or OATP2B1 mediate glutamate exchange, uptake and efflux of glutamate were investigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our data demonstrate that in Xenopus oocytes expressing either OAT4 or OATP2B1 efflux of intracellular [(14)C]glutamate could be stimulated by conditions including extracellular glutamate (OAT4), estrone-sulphate and bromosulphothalein (both OAT4 and OATP2B1) or pravastatin (OATP2B1). Cycling of glutamate across the placenta involving efflux via OAT4 and OATP2B1 and subsequent reuptake will drive placental uptake of organic anions from the fetal circulation.

  18. The role of glial-specific Kir4.1 in normal and pathological states of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Nwaobi, Sinifunanya E; Cuddapah, Vishnu A; Patterson, Kelsey C; Randolph, Anita C; Olsen, Michelle L

    2016-07-01

    Kir4.1 is an inwardly rectifying K(+) channel expressed exclusively in glial cells in the central nervous system. In glia, Kir4.1 is implicated in several functions including extracellular K(+) homeostasis, maintenance of astrocyte resting membrane potential, cell volume regulation, and facilitation of glutamate uptake. Knockout of Kir4.1 in rodent models leads to severe neurological deficits, including ataxia, seizures, sensorineural deafness, and early postnatal death. Accumulating evidence indicates that Kir4.1 plays an integral role in the central nervous system, prompting many laboratories to study the potential role that Kir4.1 plays in human disease. In this article, we review the growing evidence implicating Kir4.1 in a wide array of neurological disease. Recent literature suggests Kir4.1 dysfunction facilitates neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to epilepsy. Genetic screens demonstrate that mutations of KCNJ10, the gene encoding Kir4.1, causes SeSAME/EAST syndrome, which is characterized by early onset seizures, compromised verbal and motor skills, profound cognitive deficits, and salt-wasting. KCNJ10 has also been linked to developmental disorders including autism. Cerebral trauma, ischemia, and inflammation are all associated with decreased astrocytic Kir4.1 current amplitude and astrocytic dysfunction. Additionally, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrate loss of Kir4.1. This is particularly exciting in the context of Huntington disease, another neurodegenerative disorder in which restoration of Kir4.1 ameliorated motor deficits, decreased medium spiny neuron hyperexcitability, and extended survival in mouse models. Understanding the expression and regulation of Kir4.1 will be critical in determining if this channel can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26961251

  19. The role of glial-specific Kir4.1 in normal and pathological states of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Nwaobi, Sinifunanya E; Cuddapah, Vishnu A; Patterson, Kelsey C; Randolph, Anita C; Olsen, Michelle L

    2016-07-01

    Kir4.1 is an inwardly rectifying K(+) channel expressed exclusively in glial cells in the central nervous system. In glia, Kir4.1 is implicated in several functions including extracellular K(+) homeostasis, maintenance of astrocyte resting membrane potential, cell volume regulation, and facilitation of glutamate uptake. Knockout of Kir4.1 in rodent models leads to severe neurological deficits, including ataxia, seizures, sensorineural deafness, and early postnatal death. Accumulating evidence indicates that Kir4.1 plays an integral role in the central nervous system, prompting many laboratories to study the potential role that Kir4.1 plays in human disease. In this article, we review the growing evidence implicating Kir4.1 in a wide array of neurological disease. Recent literature suggests Kir4.1 dysfunction facilitates neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to epilepsy. Genetic screens demonstrate that mutations of KCNJ10, the gene encoding Kir4.1, causes SeSAME/EAST syndrome, which is characterized by early onset seizures, compromised verbal and motor skills, profound cognitive deficits, and salt-wasting. KCNJ10 has also been linked to developmental disorders including autism. Cerebral trauma, ischemia, and inflammation are all associated with decreased astrocytic Kir4.1 current amplitude and astrocytic dysfunction. Additionally, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrate loss of Kir4.1. This is particularly exciting in the context of Huntington disease, another neurodegenerative disorder in which restoration of Kir4.1 ameliorated motor deficits, decreased medium spiny neuron hyperexcitability, and extended survival in mouse models. Understanding the expression and regulation of Kir4.1 will be critical in determining if this channel can be exploited for therapeutic benefit.

  20. Impairment of glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle in manganese toxicity in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, M

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining the proper function and regulation of many biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the central nervous system. The overdose accumulation of Mn in specific brain areas, such as the substantia nigra, the globus pallidus and the striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, referred to as manganism. Manganese toxicity is associated with the disruption of glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu) GABA cycle (GGC). The GGC represents a complex process, since Gln efflux from astrocytes must be met by its influx in neurons. Mn toxicity is associated with the disruption of both of these critical points in the cycle. In cultured astrocytes, pre-treatment with Mn inhibits the initial net uptake of Gln in a concentration-dependent manner. Manganese added directly to astrocytes induces deregulation in the expression of SNAT3, SNAT2, ASCT2 and LAT2 transporters and significantly decreases in Gln uptake mediated by the transporting Systems N and ASC, and a decrease in Gln efflux mediated by Systems N, ASC and L. Further, Mn disrupts Glu transporting systems leading to both a reduction in Glu uptake and elevation in extracellular Glu levels. Interestingly, there appear to be common signaling targets of Mn in GGC cycling in glial cells. Namely, the PKC signaling is affected by Mn in Gln and Glu transporters expression and function. Additionally, Mn was identified to deregulate glutamine synthetase (GS) expression and activity. Those evidences could triggers depletion of Gln synthesis/metabolism in glia cells and consequently diminish astrocytic-derived glutamine, while disruption of Glu removal/transport can mediate dyshomeostasis in neurotransmission of functioning neurons. Overdose and excessive Mn accumulations in astrocytes not only culminate in pathology, but also affect astrocytic protective properties and defect or

  1. Impairment of glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle in manganese toxicity in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, M

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining the proper function and regulation of many biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the central nervous system. The overdose accumulation of Mn in specific brain areas, such as the substantia nigra, the globus pallidus and the striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, referred to as manganism. Manganese toxicity is associated with the disruption of glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu) GABA cycle (GGC). The GGC represents a complex process, since Gln efflux from astrocytes must be met by its influx in neurons. Mn toxicity is associated with the disruption of both of these critical points in the cycle. In cultured astrocytes, pre-treatment with Mn inhibits the initial net uptake of Gln in a concentration-dependent manner. Manganese added directly to astrocytes induces deregulation in the expression of SNAT3, SNAT2, ASCT2 and LAT2 transporters and significantly decreases in Gln uptake mediated by the transporting Systems N and ASC, and a decrease in Gln efflux mediated by Systems N, ASC and L. Further, Mn disrupts Glu transporting systems leading to both a reduction in Glu uptake and elevation in extracellular Glu levels. Interestingly, there appear to be common signaling targets of Mn in GGC cycling in glial cells. Namely, the PKC signaling is affected by Mn in Gln and Glu transporters expression and function. Additionally, Mn was identified to deregulate glutamine synthetase (GS) expression and activity. Those evidences could triggers depletion of Gln synthesis/metabolism in glia cells and consequently diminish astrocytic-derived glutamine, while disruption of Glu removal/transport can mediate dyshomeostasis in neurotransmission of functioning neurons. Overdose and excessive Mn accumulations in astrocytes not only culminate in pathology, but also affect astrocytic protective properties and defect or

  2. Astrocytic energetics during excitatory neurotransmission: What are contributions of glutamate oxidation and glycolysis?

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2013-10-01

    Astrocytic energetics of excitatory neurotransmission is controversial due to discrepant findings in different experimental systems in vitro and in vivo. The energy requirements of glutamate uptake are believed by some researchers to be satisfied by glycolysis coupled with shuttling of lactate to neurons for oxidation. However, astrocytes increase glycogenolysis and oxidative metabolism during sensory stimulation in vivo, indicating that other sources of energy are used by astrocytes during brain activation. Furthermore, glutamate uptake into cultured astrocytes stimulates glutamate oxidation and oxygen consumption, and glutamate maintains respiration as well as glucose. The neurotransmitter pool of glutamate is associated with the faster component of total glutamate turnover in vivo, and use of neurotransmitter glutamate to fuel its own uptake by oxidation-competent perisynaptic processes has two advantages, substrate is supplied concomitant with demand, and glutamate spares glucose for use by neurons and astrocytes. Some, but not all, perisynaptic processes of astrocytes in adult rodent brain contain mitochondria, and oxidation of only a small fraction of the neurotransmitter glutamate taken up into these structures would be sufficient to supply the ATP required for sodium extrusion and conversion of glutamate to glutamine. Glycolysis would, however, be required in perisynaptic processes lacking oxidative capacity. Three lines of evidence indicate that critical cornerstones of the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model are not established and normal brain does not need lactate as supplemental fuel: (i) rapid onset of hemodynamic responses to activation delivers oxygen and glucose in excess of demand, (ii) total glucose utilization greatly exceeds glucose oxidation in awake rodents during activation, indicating that the lactate generated is released, not locally oxidized, and (iii) glutamate-induced glycolysis is not a robust phenotype of all astrocyte cultures

  3. Production of D-Glutamate from L-Glutamate with Glutamate Racemase and L-Glutamate Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, T; Watanabe, M; Makiura, H; Kusakabe, H; Yamade, K; Soda, K

    1999-01-01

    We studied production of D-glutamate from L-glutamate using a bioreactor consisting of two columns of sequentially connected immobilized glutamate racemase (EC 5.1.1.3, from Bacillus subtilis IFO 3336) and L-glutamate oxidase (EC 1.4.3.11, from Streptomyces sp. X119-6): L-glutamate was racemized by the glutamate racemase column, and then L-glutamate was oxidized by the L-glutamate oxidase column. Consequently only D-glutamate remained, and was easily separated from the α-ketoglutarate formed by anion-exchange chromatography. Both enzymes were highly stabilized by immobilization. The pH and temperature optima of immobilized glutamate racemase (pH 8, 40°C) were similar to those of immobilized L-glutamate oxidase (pH 7, 50°C). Accordingly, we connected the two columns tandemly to do both enzyme reactions under the same conditions. Actually 4.5 μmol of D-glutamate was produced and isolated from 10 μmol of L-glutamate, about 90% of the theoretical yield. PMID:27373918

  4. Hypoxia regulates glutamate metabolism and membrane transport in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effect of hypoxia on glutamate metabolism and uptake in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Various key enzymes relevant to glutamate production, metabolism and transport were coordinately regulated by hypoxia. PC12 cells express two glutamate-metabolizing enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as the glutamate-producing enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Exposure to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 6 h or longer increased expression of GS mRNA and protein and enhanced GS enzymatic activity. In contrast, hypoxia caused a significant decrease in expression of PAG mRNA and protein, and also decreased PAG activity. In addition, hypoxia led to an increase in GAD65 and GAD67 protein levels and GAD enzymatic activity. PC12 cells express three Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters; EAAC1, GLT-1 and GLAST. Hypoxia increased EAAC1 and GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on GLAST. Chronic hypoxia significantly enhanced the Na(+)-dependent component of glutamate transport. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased cellular content of glutamate, but increased that of glutamine. Taken together, the hypoxia-induced changes in enzymes related to glutamate metabolism and transport are consistent with a decrease in the extracellular concentration of glutamate. This may have a role in protecting PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate during chronic hypoxia. PMID:11259512

  5. Cellular and subcellular localization of hexokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase in the honeybee drone retina.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, A L; Tsacopoulos, M; Millan de Ruiz, L; Perrottet, P

    1994-05-01

    Subcellular localization of hexokinase in the honeybee drone retina was examined following fractionation of cell homogenate using differential centrifugation. Nearly all hexokinase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction, following a similar distribution as the cytosolic enzymatic marker, phosphoglycerate kinase. The distribution of enzymatic markers of mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, rotenone-insensitive cytochrome c reductase, and adenylate kinase) indicated that the outer mitochondrial membrane was partly damaged, but their distributions were different from that of hexokinase. The activity of hexokinase in purified suspensions of cells was fivefold higher in glial cells than in photoreceptors. This result is consistent with the hypothesis based on quantitative 2-deoxy[3H]glucose autoradiography that only glial cells phosphorylate significant amounts of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. The activities of alanine aminotransferase and to a lesser extent of glutamate dehydrogenase were higher in the cytosolic than in the mitochondrial fraction. This important cytosolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was consistent with the higher activity found in mitochondria-poor glial cells. In conclusion, this distribution of enzymes is consistent with the model of metabolic interactions between glial and photoreceptor cells in the intact bee retina. PMID:8158142

  6. Cellular and subcellular localization of hexokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase in the honeybee drone retina.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, A L; Tsacopoulos, M; Millan de Ruiz, L; Perrottet, P

    1994-05-01

    Subcellular localization of hexokinase in the honeybee drone retina was examined following fractionation of cell homogenate using differential centrifugation. Nearly all hexokinase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction, following a similar distribution as the cytosolic enzymatic marker, phosphoglycerate kinase. The distribution of enzymatic markers of mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, rotenone-insensitive cytochrome c reductase, and adenylate kinase) indicated that the outer mitochondrial membrane was partly damaged, but their distributions were different from that of hexokinase. The activity of hexokinase in purified suspensions of cells was fivefold higher in glial cells than in photoreceptors. This result is consistent with the hypothesis based on quantitative 2-deoxy[3H]glucose autoradiography that only glial cells phosphorylate significant amounts of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. The activities of alanine aminotransferase and to a lesser extent of glutamate dehydrogenase were higher in the cytosolic than in the mitochondrial fraction. This important cytosolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was consistent with the higher activity found in mitochondria-poor glial cells. In conclusion, this distribution of enzymes is consistent with the model of metabolic interactions between glial and photoreceptor cells in the intact bee retina.

  7. Effects of dextromethorphan on glial cell function: proliferation, maturation, and protection from cytotoxic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Robert P; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Benjamins, Joyce A

    2014-05-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM), a sigma receptor agonist and NMDA receptor antagonist, protects neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity, hypoxia and ischemia, and inhibits microglial activation, but its effects on differentiation and protection of cells in the oligodendroglial lineage are unknown. It is important to protect oligodendroglia (OL) to prevent demyelination and preserve axons, and to protect oligodendroglial progenitors (OPC) to optimize myelination during development and remyelination following damage. Enriched glial cultures from newborn rat brain were used 1-2 days or 6-8 days after shakeoff for OPC or mature OL. DM had large effects on glial proliferation in less mature cultures in contrast to small variable effects in mature cultures; 1 μM DM stimulated proliferation of OPC by 4-fold, microglia (MG) by 2.5-fold and astroglia (AS) by 2-fold. In agreement with increased OPC proliferation, treatment of OPC with DM for 3 days increased the % of OPC relative to OL, with a smaller difference by 5 days, suggesting that maturation of OPC to OL was "catching up" by 5 days. DM at 2 and 20 μM protected both OL and OPC from killing by glutamate as well as NMDA, AMPA, quinolinic acid, staurosporine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). DM did not protect against kynurenic acid, and only modestly against NO. These agents and DM were not toxic to AS or MG at the concentrations used. Thus, DM stimulates proliferation of OPC, and protects both OL and OPC against excitotoxic and inflammatory insults. PMID:24526455

  8. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  9. Glial Cell Regulation of Rhythmic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, F. Rob; Ng, Fanny S.; Sengupta, Sukanya; You, Samantha; Huang, Yanmei

    2015-01-01

    Brain glial cells, in particular astrocytes and microglia, secrete signaling molecules that regulate glia–glia or glia–neuron communication and synaptic activity. While much is known about roles of glial cells in nervous system development, we are only beginning to understand the physiological functions of such cells in the adult brain. Studies in vertebrate and invertebrate models, in particular mice and Drosophila, have revealed roles of glia–neuron communication in the modulation of complex behavior. This chapter emphasizes recent evidence from studies of rodents and Drosophila that highlight the importance of glial cells and similarities or differences in the neural circuits regulating circadian rhythms and sleep in the two models. The chapter discusses cellular, molecular, and genetic approaches that have been useful in these models for understanding how glia–neuron communication contributes to the regulation of rhythmic behavior. PMID:25707272

  10. Glial cells transform glucose to alanine, which fuels the neurons in the honeybee retina.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Veuthey, A L; Saravelos, S G; Perrottet, P; Tsoupras, G

    1994-03-01

    The retina of honeybee drone is a nervous tissue with a crystal-like structure in which glial cells and photoreceptor neurons constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. The phosphorylation of glucose and its subsequent incorporation into glycogen occur in glia, whereas O2 consumption (QO2) occurs in the photoreceptors. Experimental evidence showed that glia phosphorylate glucose and supply the photoreceptors with metabolic substrates. We aimed to identify these transferred substrates. Using ion-exchange and reversed-phase HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that more than 50% of 14C(U)-glucose entering the glia is transformed to alanine by transamination of pyruvate with glutamate. In the absence of extracellular glucose, glycogen is used to make alanine; thus, its pool size in isolated retinas is maintained stable or even increased. Our model proposes that the formation of alanine occurs in the glia, thereby maintaining the redox potential of this cell and contributing to NH3 homeostasis. Alanine is released into the extracellular space and is then transported into photoreceptors using an Na(+)-dependent transport system. Purified suspensions of photoreceptors have similar alanine aminotransferase activity as glial cells and transform 14C-alanine to glutamate, aspartate, and CO2. Therefore, the alanine entering photoreceptors is transaminated to pyruvate, which in turn enters the Krebs cycle. Proline also supplies the Krebs cycle by making glutamate and, in turn, the intermediate alpha-ketoglutarate. Light stimulation caused a 200% increase of QO2 and a 50% decrease of proline and of glutamate. Also, the production of 14CO2 from 14C-proline was increased. The use of these amino acids would sustain about half of the light-induced delta QO2, the other half being sustained by glycogen via alanine formation. The use of proline meets a necessary anaplerotic function in the Krebs cycle, but implies high NH3 production. The results showed

  11. Regulation of serotonin transporter gene expression in human glial cells by growth factors.

    PubMed

    Kubota, N; Kiuchi, Y; Nemoto, M; Oyamada, H; Ohno, M; Funahashi, H; Shioda, S; Oguchi, K

    2001-04-01

    The aims of this study were to identify monoamine transporters expressed in human glial cells, and to examine the regulation of their expression by stress-related growth factors. The expression of serotonin transporter mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in normal human astrocytes, whereas the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the norepinephrine transporter (NET) were not detected. The cDNA sequence of the "glial" serotonin transporter in astrocytes was consistent with that reported for the "neuronal" serotonin transporter (SERT). Moreover, we also demonstrated SERT expression in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells by immunocytochemical staining in normal human astrocytes. Serotonin transporter gene expression was also detected in glioma-derived cell lines (A172, KG-1-C and KGK). Addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) for 2 days increased serotonin transporter gene expression in astrocytes and JAR (human choriocarcinoma cell line). Basic fibroblast growth factor, but not epidermal growth factor, increased specific [3H]serotonin uptake in astrocytes in a time (1-4 days)- and concentration (20-100 ng/ml)-dependent manner. The expression of genes for basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptors was detected in astrocytes. These findings suggest that the expression of the serotonin transporter in human glial cells is positively regulated by basic fibroblast growth factor. PMID:11301061

  12. Evidence for synergistic control of glutamate biosynthesis by glutamate dehydrogenases and glutamate in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Stannek, Lorena; Thiele, Martin J; Ischebeck, Till; Gunka, Katrin; Hammer, Elke; Völker, Uwe; Commichau, Fabian M

    2015-09-01

    In the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis glutamate is synthesized by the glutamine synthetase and the glutamate synthase (GOGAT). During growth with carbon sources that exert carbon catabolite repression, the rocG glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene is repressed and the transcription factor GltC activates the expression of the GOGAT encoding gltAB genes. In the presence of amino acids of the glutamate family, the GDH RocG is synthesized and the enzyme prevents GltC from binding to DNA. The dual control of glutamate biosynthesis allows the efficient utilization of the available nutrients. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that, like RocG, also the paralogous GDH GudB can inhibit the transcription factor GltC, thereby controlling glutamate biosynthesis. Contradictory previous observations show that high level of GDH activity does not result in permanent inhibition of GltC. By controlling the intracellular levels of glutamate through feeding with exogenous arginine, we observed that the GDH-dependent control of GltC and thus expression of the gltAB genes inversely correlates with the glutamate pool. These results suggest that the B. subtilis GDHs RocG and GudB in fact act as glutamate sensors. In conclusion, the GDH-mediated control of glutamate biosynthesis seems to depend on the intracellular glutamate concentration. PMID:25711804

  13. Extrasynaptic Neurotransmission in the Modulation of Brain Function. Focus on the Striatal Neuronal–Glial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Rivera, Alicia; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Garriga, Pere; Narváez, José Angel; Ciruela, Francisco; Guescini, Michele; Agnati, Luigi F.

    2012-01-01

    Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT) and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT) and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons, and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal cellular networks

  14. Evidence for brain glial activation in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Loggia, Marco L; Chonde, Daniel B; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Edwards, Robert R; Hill, Elena; Hsu, Shirley; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ji, Ru-Rong; Riley, Misha; Wasan, Ajay D; Zürcher, Nicole R; Albrecht, Daniel S; Vangel, Mark G; Rosen, Bruce R; Napadow, Vitaly; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    Although substantial evidence has established that microglia and astrocytes play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of persistent pain in animal models, the role of glial cells in human pain disorders remains unknown. Here, using the novel technology of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and the recently developed radioligand (11)C-PBR28, we show increased brain levels of the translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of glial activation, in patients with chronic low back pain. As the Ala147Thr polymorphism in the TSPO gene affects binding affinity for (11)C-PBR28, nine patient-control pairs were identified from a larger sample of subjects screened and genotyped, and compared in a matched-pairs design, in which each patient was matched to a TSPO polymorphism-, age- and sex-matched control subject (seven Ala/Ala and two Ala/Thr, five males and four females in each group; median age difference: 1 year; age range: 29-63 for patients and 28-65 for controls). Standardized uptake values normalized to whole brain were significantly higher in patients than controls in multiple brain regions, including thalamus and the putative somatosensory representations of the lumbar spine and leg. The thalamic levels of TSPO were negatively correlated with clinical pain and circulating levels of the proinflammatory citokine interleukin-6, suggesting that TSPO expression exerts pain-protective/anti-inflammatory effects in humans, as predicted by animal studies. Given the putative role of activated glia in the establishment and or maintenance of persistent pain, the present findings offer clinical implications that may serve to guide future studies of the pathophysiology and management of a variety of persistent pain conditions.

  15. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  16. Effect of pleiotrophin on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hitomi; Morita, Shoko; Miyata, Seiji

    2011-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted heparin-binding cytokine that signals diverse functions, including lineage-specific differentiation of glial progenitor cells, axonal outgrowth and angiogenesis. Neurotoxicity mediated by glutamate receptor is thought to play a role in various neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we examined the effect of PTN on the neuronal viability of hippocampal neurons in vitro by using the immunostaining of MAP2 and permeability of propidium iodide. PTN significantly prevented glutamate-induced neurotoxicity when hippocampal neurons were treated with PTN after the glutamate stimulation. PTN significantly promoted glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, when cells were incubated with PTN before and after the glutamate stimulation. Thus, the effect of PTN on the neuronal viability of hippocampal neurons largely depends on the timing of the treatment of PTN. The treatment of PTN promoted dendrite-specific expression of MAP2, indicating that PTN stabilizes microtubule system at dendrites. The data suggest that PTN may be relevant to be concerned with glutamate-induced neurotoxicity of hippocampal neurons.

  17. Emerging role of glial cells in the control of body weight

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glia are the most abundant cell type in the brain and are indispensible for the normal execution of neuronal actions. They protect neurons from noxious insults and modulate synaptic transmission through affectation of synaptic inputs, release of glial transmitters and uptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft. They also transport nutrients and other circulating factors into the brain thus controlling the energy sources and signals reaching neurons. Moreover, glia express receptors for metabolic hormones, such as leptin and insulin, and can be activated in response to increased weight gain and dietary challenges. However, chronic glial activation can be detrimental to neurons, with hypothalamic astrocyte activation or gliosis suggested to be involved in the perpetuation of obesity and the onset of secondary complications. It is now accepted that glia may be a very important participant in metabolic control and a possible therapeutical target. Here we briefly review this rapidly advancing field. PMID:24024117

  18. Glial regulation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated excitation of supraoptic nucleus neurones during dehydration.

    PubMed

    Joe, N; Scott, V; Brown, C H

    2014-01-01

    Magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) project to the posterior pituitary gland where they release the hormones, vasopressin and oxytocin into the circulation to maintain plasma osmolality. Hormone release is proportionate to SON MNC action potential (spike) firing rate. When activated by ambient extracellular glutamate, extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (eNMDARs) mediate a tonic (persistent) depolarisation to increase the probability of action potential firing. In the present study, in vivo single-unit electrophysiological recordings were made from urethane-anaesthetised female Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the impact of tonic eNMDAR activation on MNC activity. Water deprivation (for up to 48 h) caused an increase in the firing rate of SON MNCs that was associated with a general increase in post-spike excitability. To determine whether eNMDAR activation contributes to the increased MNC excitability during water deprivation, memantine, which preferentially blocks eNMDARs, was administered locally into the SON by microdialysis. Memantine significantly decreased the firing rate of MNCs recorded from 48-h water-deprived rats but had no effect on MNCs recorded from euhydrated rats. In the presence of the glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) blocker, dihydrokainate, memantine also reduced the MNC firing rate in euhydrated rats. Taken together, these observations suggest that GLT-1 clears extracellular glutamate to prevent the activation of eNDMARs under basal conditions and that, during dehydration, eNMDAR activation contributes to the increased firing rate of MNCs.

  19. Ionic and possible metabolic interactions between sensory neurones and glial cells in the retina of the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Tsacopoulos, M

    1981-12-01

    This is a review paper that includes original calculations and figures. The drone retina is composed of two essentially uniform populations of cells, the photoreceptors and the glial cells. The photoreceptors contain many mitochondria but no glycogen has been detected; the glial cells contain much glycogen and very few mitochondria. The oxygen consumption of the photoreceptors in the dark is 20 microliters min-1 per g of retinal tissue and in response to a single flash of light there is an extra consumption that reaches a maximum of 40 microliters min-1 per g. In addition, light stimulation of the photoreceptors leads to changes in the glycogen metabolism of the glial cells, and to movements of K+. Measurements with intracellular K+-sensitive micro-electrodes showed that during light stimulation with a series of flashes the K+ activity (alpha K) in the photoreceptors fell by an average of 27% while in the glial cells alpha K rose by an amount that is estimated to correspond to most of the quantity of K+ lost by the photoreceptors. The relative contributions to the clearance of extracellular K+ of extracellular diffusion, spatial buffering and possible net K+ uptake by glial cells are discussed.

  20. Conformationally-restricted amino acid analogues bearing a distal sulfonic acid show selective inhibition of system x(c)(-) over the vesicular glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Etoga, Jean-Louis G; Ahmed, S Kaleem; Patel, Sarjubhai; Bridges, Richard J; Thompson, Charles M

    2010-04-15

    A panel of amino acid analogs and conformationally-restricted amino acids bearing a sulfonic acid were synthesized and tested for their ability to preferentially inhibit the obligate cysteine-glutamate transporter system x(c)(-) versus the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Several promising candidate molecules were identified: R/S-4-[4'-carboxyphenyl]-phenylglycine, a biphenyl substituted analog of 4-carboxyphenylglycine and 2-thiopheneglycine-5-sulfonic acid both of which reduced glutamate uptake at system x(c)(-) by 70-75% while having modest to no effect on glutamate uptake at VGLUT.

  1. Spatial and temporal activation of spinal glial cells: role of gliopathy in central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Young S; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-04-01

    In the spinal cord, neuron and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to 1 month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not simple events, rather they are the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinflammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neuron and glial cells via their own receptors

  2. Detection of glutamate release from neurons by genetically encoded surface-displayed FRET nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Looger, Loren L.; Micheva, Kristina D.; Reimer, Richard J.; Smith, Stephen J.; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2005-06-01

    Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. Once released, its rapid removal from the synaptic cleft is critical for preventing excitotoxicity and spillover to neighboring synapses. Despite consensus on the role of glutamate in normal and disease physiology, technical issues limit our understanding of its metabolism in intact cells. To monitor glutamate levels inside and at the surface of living cells, genetically encoded nanosensors were developed. The fluorescent indicator protein for glutamate (FLIPE) consists of the glutamate/aspartate binding protein ybeJ from Escherichia coli fused to two variants of the green fluorescent protein. Three sensors with lower affinities for glutamate were created by mutation of residues peristeric to the ybeJ binding pocket. In the presence of ligands, FLIPEs show a concentration-dependent decrease in FRET efficiency. When expressed on the surface of rat hippocampal neurons or PC12 cells, the sensors respond to extracellular glutamate with a reversible concentration-dependent decrease in FRET efficiency. Depolarization of neurons leads to a reduction in FRET efficiency corresponding to 300 nM glutamate at the cell surface. No change in FRET was observed when cells expressing sensors in the cytosol were superfused with up to 20 mM glutamate, consistent with a minimal contribution of glutamate uptake to cytosolic glutamate levels. The results demonstrate that FLIPE sensors can be used for real-time monitoring of glutamate metabolism in living cells, in tissues, or in intact organisms, providing tools for studying metabolism or for drug discovery. aspartate | hippocampal neuron | neurotransmitter | secretion | transport

  3. Glial Cell Contributions to Auditory Brainstem Development

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits.

  4. Glial involvement in diffuse Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Terada, Seishi; Ishizu, Hideki; Yokota, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Nakashima, Hanae; Ishihara, Takeshi; Fujita, Daisuke; Uéda, Kenji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kuroda, Shigetoshi

    2003-02-01

    Diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the neurons and neurites of cortical, subcortical, and brain stem structures. Recently, alpha-synuclein (alphaS) has been found to be a central constituent of LB. In DLBD, abnormal accumulation of alphaS has been reported in both neurons and glia, but studies on glial lesions in DLBD have been limited. We examined in detail the constituents and distribution of glial lesions in eight patients with DLBD and report the pathogenesis of the glial lesions. alphaS-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NI), neuropil threads (NT), and coiled bodies (CB) showed similar immunostaining profiles. Without pretreatment, NI, NT, and CB were detected by all antibodies against alphaS. The immunostaining profile of star-like astrocytes (SLA) was quite different from those of NI, NT, and CB. A few SLA were stained by an antibody against the non-Abeta component portion of alphaS without pretreatment, but formic acid pretreatment dramatically enhanced SLA immunoreactivity. SLA and CB were found in all eight brains with DLBD. SLA were scarce in the brain stem, but there were hundreds of SLA per visual field at x100 magnification in the temporal cortex of most cases, while CB were found diffusely in both the cerebral cortex and brain stem, similar to NI. This suggests that the pathogenesis of SLA is different from those of NI and CB.

  5. Maternal inflammation leads to impaired glutamate homeostasis and up-regulation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in activated microglia in the fetal/newborn rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Bassam, Bassam; Thomas, Ajit G; Williams, Monica; Liu, Jinhuan; Nance, Elizabeth; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S; Kannan, Sujatha

    2016-10-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction and excessive activation of glutamatergic systems have been implicated in a number of neurologic disorders, including periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). However, the role of chorioamnionitis on glutamate homeostasis in the fetal and neonatal brains is not clearly understood. We have previously shown that intrauterine endotoxin administration results in intense microglial 'activation' and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periventricular region (PVR) of the neonatal rabbit brain. In this study, we assessed the effect of maternal inflammation on key components of the glutamate pathway and its relationship to astrocyte and microglial activation in the fetal and neonatal New Zealand white rabbit brain. We found that intrauterine endotoxin exposure at gestational day 28 (G28) induced acute and prolonged glutamate elevation in the PVR of fetal (G29, 1day post-injury) and postnatal day 1 (PND1, 3days post-injury) brains along with prominent morphological changes in the astrocytes (soma hypertrophy and retracted processes) in the white matter tracts. There was a significant increase in glutaminase and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) NR2 subunit expression along with decreased glial L-glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in the PVR at G29, that would promote acute dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis. This was accompanied with significantly decreased TGF-β1 at PND1 in CP kits indicating ongoing neuroinflammation. We also show for the first time that glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) was significantly increased in the activated microglia at the periventricular white matter area in both G29 and PND1 CP kits. This was confirmed by in vitro studies demonstrating that LPS activated primary microglia markedly upregulate GCPII enzymatic activity. These results suggest that maternal intrauterine endotoxin exposure results in early onset and long-lasting dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis, which may be mediated by

  6. Distribution of glutamate transporter 1 mRNA in the central nervous system of the pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul

    2009-07-01

    Glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) in glial cells removes glutamate that diffuses from the synaptic cleft into the extracellular space. Previously, we have shown the distribution of glutamatergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of the pigeon. In the present study, we identified cDNA sequence of the pigeon GLT1, and mapped the distribution of the mRNA-expressing cells in CNS to examine whether GLT1 is associated with glutamatergic terminal areas. The cDNA sequence of the pigeon GLT1 consisted of 1889bp nucleotides and the amino acids showed 97% and 87% identity to the chicken and human GLT1, respectively. In situ hybridization autoradiograms revealed GLT1 mRNA expression in glial cells and produced regional differences of GLT1 mRNA distribution in CNS. GLT1 mRNA was expressed preferentially in the pallium than the subpallium. Moderate expression was seen in the hyperpallium, Field L, mesopallium, and hippocampal formation. In the thalamus, moderate expression was found in the ovoidal nucleus, rotundal nucleus, triangular nucleus, and lateral spiriform nucleus, while the dorsal thalamic nuclei were weak. In the brainstem, the isthmic nuclei, optic tectum, vestibular nuclei, and cochlear nuclei expressed moderately, but the cerebellar cortex showed strong expression. Bergmann glial cells expressed GLT1 mRNA very strongly. The results indicate that cDNA sequence of the pigeon GLT1 is comparable with that of the mammalian GLT1, and a large number of GLT1 mRNA-expressing areas correspond with areas where AMPA-type glutamate receptors are located. Avian GLT1 in glial cells probably maintain microenvironment of glutamate concentration around synapses as in mammalian GLT1.

  7. Molecular Insights into Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Allosteric Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are a group of eight family C G protein–coupled receptors that are expressed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery. Within the CNS the different subtypes are found in neurons, both pre- and/or postsynaptically, where they mediate modulatory roles and in glial cells. The mGlu receptor family provides attractive targets for numerous psychiatric and neurologic disorders, with the majority of discovery programs focused on targeting allosteric sites, with allosteric ligands now available for all mGlu receptor subtypes. However, the development of allosteric ligands remains challenging. Biased modulation, probe dependence, and molecular switches all contribute to the complex molecular pharmacology exhibited by mGlu receptor allosteric ligands. In recent years we have made significant progress in our understanding of this molecular complexity coupled with an increased understanding of the structural basis of mGlu allosteric modulation. PMID:25808929

  8. Primary culture of glial cells from mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion: a valuable tool for studying glial cell biology.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2010-12-15

    Central nervous system glial cells as astrocytes and microglia have been investigated in vitro and many intracellular pathways have been clarified upon various stimuli. Peripheral glial cells, however, are not as deeply investigated in vitro despite its importance role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Based on our previous experience of culturing neuronal cells, our objective was to standardize and morphologically characterize a primary culture of mouse superior cervical ganglion glial cells in order to obtain a useful tool to study peripheral glial cell biology. Superior cervical ganglia from neonatal C57BL6 mice were enzymatically and mechanically dissociated and cells were plated on diluted Matrigel coated wells in a final concentration of 10,000cells/well. Five to 8 days post plating, glial cell cultures were fixed for morphological and immunocytochemical characterization. Glial cells showed a flat and irregular shape, two or three long cytoplasm processes, and round, oval or long shaped nuclei, with regular outline. Cell proliferation and mitosis were detected both qualitative and quantitatively. Glial cells were able to maintain their phenotype in our culture model including immunoreactivity against glial cell marker GFAP. This is the first description of immunocytochemical characterization of mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion glial cells in primary culture. This work discusses the uses and limitations of our model as a tool to study many aspects of peripheral glial cell biology.

  9. Glial enriched gene expression profiling identifies novel factors regulating the proliferation of specific glial subtypes in the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Rochex, Amélie; Maierbrugger, Katja T.; Bateman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells constitute a large proportion of the central nervous system (CNS) and are critical for the correct development and function of the adult CNS. Recent studies have shown that specific subtypes of glia are generated through the proliferation of differentiated glial cells in both the developing invertebrate and vertebrate nervous systems. However, the factors that regulate glial proliferation in specific glial subtypes are poorly understood. To address this we have performed global gene expression analysis of Drosophila post-embryonic CNS tissue enriched in glial cells, through glial specific overexpression of either the FGF or insulin receptor. Analysis of the differentially regulated genes in these tissues shows that the expression of known glial genes is significantly increased in both cases. Conversely, the expression of neuronal genes is significantly decreased. FGF and insulin signalling drive the expression of overlapping sets of genes in glial cells that then activate proliferation. We then used these data to identify novel transcription factors that are expressed in glia in the brain. We show that two of the transcription factors identified in the glial enriched gene expression profiles, foxO and tramtrack69, have novel roles in regulating the proliferation of cortex and perineurial glia. These studies provide new insight into the genes and molecular pathways that regulate the proliferation of specific glial subtypes in the Drosophila post-embryonic brain. PMID:25217886

  10. Functions of glial cells in the retina of the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A

    1989-01-01

    In the retina of the honey bee drone, Apis mellifera male, physiological interactions between glial cells and neurons (the photoreceptors) are exceptionally clear-cut and amenable to investigation. The principal glia (outer pigment cells) contribute to the homeostasis of extracellular [K+] and [Na+] by 1) spatial buffering of K+ and 2) net uptake of K+ and Cl-. The glia supply carbohydrate metabolic substrate to the neurons; only the glia take up and phosphorylate glucose. Neuronal activity 1) modifies glycogen metabolism in the glia, and 2) can be signalled to the glia in the absence of elevated extracellular [K+].

  11. Myelinating satellite oligodendrocytes are integrated in a glial syncytium constraining neuronal high-frequency activity

    PubMed Central

    Battefeld, Arne; Klooster, Jan; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite oligodendrocytes (s-OLs) are closely apposed to the soma of neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons but their properties and functional roles remain unresolved. Here we show that s-OLs form compact myelin and action potentials of the host neuron evoke precisely timed Ba2+-sensitive K+ inward rectifying (Kir) currents in the s-OL. Unexpectedly, the glial K+ inward current does not require oligodendrocytic Kir4.1. Action potential-evoked Kir currents are in part mediated by gap–junction coupling with neighbouring OLs and astrocytes that form a syncytium around the pyramidal cell body. Computational modelling predicts that glial Kir constrains the perisomatic [K+]o increase most importantly during high-frequency action potentials. Consistent with these predictions neurons with s-OLs showed a reduced probability for action potential burst firing during [K+]o elevations. These data suggest that s-OLs are integrated into a glial syncytium for the millisecond rapid K+ uptake limiting activity-dependent [K+]o increase in the perisomatic neuron domain. PMID:27161034

  12. Characterization of the venom from the spider, Araneus gemma: search for a glutamate antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Early, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Venom from three spiders, Argiope aurantia, Neoscona arabesca, and Araneus gemma have been shown to inhibit the binding of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate to both GBP and synaptic membranes. The venom from Araneus gemma was shown to be the most potent of the three venoms in inhibiting the binding of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate to GBP. Therefore, Araneus gemma venom was selected for further characterization. Venom from Araneus gemma appeared to contain two factors which inhibit the binding of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate to GBP and at least one factor that inhibits L-glutamate-stimulated /sup 35/SCN flux. Factor I is thought to be L-glutamic acid, based on: (1) its similar mobility to glutamic acid in thin-layer chromatography and amino acid analysis, (2) the presence of fingerprint molecular ion peaks for glutamate in the mass spectrum for the methanol:water (17:1) extract and for the fraction from the HPLC-purification of the crude venom, and (3) its L-glutamate-like interaction with the sodium-dependent uptake system. Factor II appears to be a polypeptide, possibly 21 amino acids in length, and does not appear to contain any free amino groups or tryptophan. While the venom does not appear to contain any indoleamines, three catecholamines (epinephrine, epinine, dopamine) and one catecholamine metabolite (DOPAC) were detected.

  13. Peripherally restricted viral challenge elevates extracellular glutamate and enhances synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Holly C; Wang, Desheng; Petrisko, Tiffany J; Alhowail, Ahmad; Setti, Sharay E; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Konat, Gregory W; Reed, Miranda N

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral infections increase the propensity and severity of seizures in susceptible populations. We have previously shown that intraperitoneal injection of a viral mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC), elicits hypersusceptibility of mice to kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. This study was undertaken to determine whether this seizure hypersusceptibility entails alterations in glutamate signaling. Female C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with PIC, and after 24 h, glutamate homeostasis in the hippocampus was monitored using the enzyme-based microelectrode arrays. PIC challenge robustly increased the level of resting extracellular glutamate. While pre-synaptic potassium-evoked glutamate release was not affected, glutamate uptake was profoundly impaired and non-vesicular glutamate release was augmented, indicating functional alterations of astrocytes. Electrophysiological examination of hippocampal slices from PIC-challenged mice revealed a several fold increase in the basal synaptic transmission as compared to control slices. PIC challenge also increased the probability of pre-synaptic glutamate release as seen from a reduction of paired-pulse facilitation and synaptic plasticity as seen from an enhancement of long-term potentiation. Altogether, our results implicate a dysregulation of astrocytic glutamate metabolism and an alteration of excitatory synaptic transmission as the underlying mechanism for the development of hippocampal hyperexcitability, and consequently seizure hypersusceptibility following peripheral PIC challenge. Peripheral infections/inflammations enhance seizure susceptibility. Here, we explored the effect of peritoneal inflammation induced by a viral mimic on glutamate homeostasis and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the mouse hippocampus. We found that peritoneal inflammation elevated extracellular glutamate concentration and enhanced the probability of pre-synaptic glutamate release resulting in hyperexcitability of

  14. Researching glutamate – induced cytotoxicity in different cell lines: a comparative/collective analysis/study

    PubMed Central

    Kritis, Aristeidis A.; Stamoula, Eleni G.; Paniskaki, Krystallenia A.; Vavilis, Theofanis D.

    2015-01-01

    Although glutamate is one of the most important excitatory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system, its excessive extracellular concentration leads to uncontrolled continuous depolarization of neurons, a toxic process called, excitotoxicity. In excitotoxicity glutamate triggers the rise of intracellular Ca2+ levels, followed by up regulation of nNOS, dysfunction of mitochondria, ROS production, ER stress, and release of lysosomal enzymes. Excessive calcium concentration is the key mediator of glutamate toxicity through over activation of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. In addition, glutamate accumulation can also inhibit cystine (CySS) uptake by reversing the action of the CySS/glutamate antiporter. Reversal of the antiporter action reinforces the aforementioned events by depleting neurons of cysteine and eventually glutathione’s reducing potential. Various cell lines have been employed in the pursuit to understand the mechanism(s) by which excitotoxicity affects the cells leading them ultimately to their demise. In some cell lines glutamate toxicity is exerted mainly through over activation of NMDA, AMPA, or kainate receptors whereas in other cell lines lacking such receptors, the toxicity is due to glutamate induced oxidative stress. However, in the greatest majority of the cell lines ionotropic glutamate receptors are present, co-existing to CySS/glutamate antiporters and metabotropic glutamate receptors, supporting the assumption that excitotoxicity effect in these cells is accumulative. Different cell lines differ in their responses when exposed to glutamate. In this review article the responses of PC12, SH-SY5Y, HT-22, NT-2, OLCs, C6, primary rat cortical neurons, RGC-5, and SCN2.2 cell systems are systematically collected and analyzed. PMID:25852482

  15. [Studies on potassium transport through glial cell membranes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Gardner-Medwin, A R; Tsacopoulos, M

    1980-04-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is used as a model for the study of ion movements across the membranes of the glial cells caused by changes in the extracellular potassium concentration. The values found for changes in extracellular potential suggest that at least some of the potassium that enters glial cells in an active region of tissue is associated with an efflux of potassium from parts of the glial syncytium not affected by an increase in extracellular potassium concentration. In addition, it appears that ions other than K+ cross the glial membrane.

  16. Effects of Flavonoids from Food and Dietary Supplements on Glial and Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Marko; Rozman, Damjana; Komel, Radovan

    2015-10-23

    Quercetin, catechins and proanthocyanidins are flavonoids that are prominently featured in foodstuffs and dietary supplements, and may possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most dangerous form of glioma, a malignancy of the brain connective tissue. This review assesses molecular structures of these flavonoids, their importance as components of diet and dietary supplements, their bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, their reported beneficial health effects, and their effects on non-malignant glial as well as glioblastoma tumor cells. The reviewed flavonoids appear to protect glial cells via reduction of oxidative stress, while some also attenuate glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and reduce neuroinflammation. Most of the reviewed flavonoids inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induce their death. Moreover, some of them inhibit pro-oncogene signaling pathways and intensify the effect of conventional anti-cancer therapies. However, most of these anti-glioblastoma effects have only been observed in vitro or in animal models. Due to limited ability of the reviewed flavonoids to access the brain, their normal dietary intake is likely insufficient to produce significant anti-cancer effects in this organ, and supplementation is needed.

  17. Glial cells as key players in schizophrenia pathology: recent insights and concepts of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Guest, Paul C; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of knowledge on the impact of glia for the neurobiological foundation of schizophrenia. A plethora of studies have shown structural and functional abnormalities in all three types of glial cells. There is convincing evidence of reduced numbers of oligodendrocytes, impaired cell maturation and altered gene expression of myelin/oligodendrocyte-related genes that may in part explain white matter abnormalities and disturbed inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity, which are characteristic signs of schizophrenia. Earlier reports of astrogliosis could not be confirmed by later studies, although the expression of a variety of astrocyte-related genes is abnormal in psychosis. Since astrocytes play a key role in the synaptic metabolism of glutamate, GABA, monoamines and purines, astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to certain aspects of disturbed neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Finally, increased densities of microglial cells and aberrant expression of microglia-related surface markers in schizophrenia suggest that immunological/inflammatory factors are of considerable relevance for the pathophysiology of psychosis. This review describes current evidence for the multifaceted role of glial cells in schizophrenia and discusses efforts to develop glia-directed therapies for the treatment of the disease.

  18. Enteric glial cells have specific immunosuppressive properties.

    PubMed

    Kermarrec, Laetitia; Durand, Tony; Neunlist, Michel; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neveu, Isabelle

    2016-06-15

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) have trophic and neuroregulatory functions in the enteric nervous system, but whether they exert a direct effect on immune cells is unknown. Here, we used co-cultures to show that human EGC can inhibit the proliferation of activated T lymphocytes. Interestingly, EGC from Crohn's patients were effective at one EGC for two T cells whereas EGC from control patients required a ratio of 1:1. These data suggest that EGC contribute to local immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal wall. They also raise the possibility that EGC have particular immunosuppressive properties in inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. PMID:27235353

  19. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  20. Computational Studies of Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Setiadi, Jeffry; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain whose binding to receptors on neurons excites them while excess glutamate are removed from synapses via transporter proteins. Determination of the crystal structures of bacterial aspartate transporters has paved the way for computational investigation of their function and dynamics at the molecular level. Here, we review molecular dynamics and free energy calculation methods used in these computational studies and discuss the recent applications to glutamate transporters. The focus of the review is on the insights gained on the transport mechanism through computational methods, which otherwise is not directly accessible by experimental probes. Recent efforts to model the mammalian glutamate and other amino acid transporters, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, are included in the review. PMID:26569328

  1. Glutamate regulates Oct-2 DNA-binding activity through alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptors in cultured chick Bergmann glia cells.

    PubMed

    Méndez, J Alfredo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Rojas, Fausto; Hernández, María Elena; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-02-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors in cerebellar Bergmann glial cells are linked to transcriptional regulation and, by these means, are thought to play an important role in plasticity, learning and memory and in several neuropathologies. Within the CNS, the transcription factors of the POU family bind their target DNA sequences after a growth factor-dependent phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade. Exposure of cultured Bergmann glial cells to glutamate leads to a time- and dose-dependent increase in Oct-2 DNA-binding activity. The use of specific pharmacological tools established the involvement of Ca2+-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptors. Furthermore, the signaling cascade includes phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase as well as protein kinase C activation. Interestingly, transcriptional as well as translational inhibitors abolish the glutamate effect, suggesting a transcriptional up-regulation of the oct-2 gene. These data demonstrate that Oct-2 expression is not restricted to neurons and further strengthen the notion that the glial glutamate receptors participate in the modulation of glutamatergic cerebellar neurotransmission.

  2. Bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Weckert, Edgar; Frahm, August Wilhelm

    2006-05-15

    For the second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, the cyanide addition as the key stereodifferentiating step produces mixtures of diastereomeric alpha-amino nitrile esters the composition of which is independent of the reaction temperature and the type of the solvent, respectively. The subsequent hydrolysis is exclusively achieved with concentrated H(2)SO(4) yielding diastereomeric mixtures of three secondary alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters and two diastereomeric cis-fused angular alpha-carbamoyl gamma-lactams as bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives, gained from in situ stereomer differentiating cyclisation of the secondary cis-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters. Separation was achieved by CC. The pure secondary trans-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters cyclise on heating and treatment with concentrated H(2)SO(4), respectively, to diastereomeric cis-fused angular secondary alpha-amino imides. Their hydrogenolysis led to the enantiomeric cis-fused angular primary alpha-amino imides. The configuration of all compounds was completely established by NMR methods, CD-spectra, and by X-ray analyses of the (alphaR,1R,5R)-1-carbamoyl-2-(1-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one and of the trans-alphaS,1S,2R-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1-(1-phenylethylamino)cyclopentanecarboxamide. PMID:16596563

  3. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  4. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  5. Glial cells: Old cells with new twists

    PubMed Central

    Ndubaku, Ugo; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Summary Based on their characteristics and function – migration, neural protection, proliferation, axonal guidance and trophic effects – glial cells may be regarded as probably the most versatile cells in our body. For many years, these cells were considered as simply support cells for neurons. Recently, it has been shown that they are more versatile than previously believed – as true stem cells in the nervous system – and are important players in neural function and development. There are several glial cell types in the nervous system: the two most abundant are oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Although both of these cells are responsible for myelination, their developmental origins are quite different. Oligodendrocytes originate from small niche populations from different regions of the central nervous system, while Schwann cells develop from a stem cell population (the neural crest) that gives rise to many cell derivatives besides glia and which is a highly migratory group of cells. PMID:18068219

  6. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  7. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  8. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    PubMed

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754.

  9. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    PubMed

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. PMID:27121701

  10. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: Putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1. Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1.Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25128239

  12. Glial heterotopia of the lip: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Bayram, Fazli Cengiz; Ince, Bilsev; Bilgen, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Glial heterotopia represents collections of normal glial tissue in an abnormal location distant to the central nervous system or spinal canal with no intracranial connectivity. Nasal gliomas are non-neoplastic midline tumours, with limited growth potential and no similarity to the central nervous system gliomas. The nose and the nasopharynx are the most common sites of location. Existence of glial heterotopia in the lip region is a rare developmental disorder. We report a case of large glial heterotopia in the upper lip region in a full-term female newborn which had intracranial extension with a fibrotic band. After the surgery, there was no recurrence in the follow-up period of 3 years. When glial heterotopia, which is a rare midline anomaly, is suspected, possible intracranial connection and properties of the mass should be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. By this way, lower complication rate and better aesthetic results can be achieved with early diagnosis and proper surgery. PMID:27274134

  13. Molecular Determinants of Substrate Specificity in Sodium-coupled Glutamate Transporters.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Nechama; Ewers, David; Forrest, Lucy R; Fahlke, Christoph; Kanner, Baruch I

    2015-11-27

    Crystal structures of the archaeal homologue GltPh have provided important insights into the molecular mechanism of transport of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. Whereas mammalian glutamate transporters can translocate both glutamate and aspartate, GltPh is only one capable of aspartate transport. Most of the amino acid residues that surround the aspartate substrate in the binding pocket of GltPh are highly conserved. However, in the brain transporters, Thr-352 and Met-362 of the reentrant hairpin loop 2 are replaced by the smaller Ala and Thr, respectively. Therefore, we have studied the effects of T352A and M362T on binding and transport of aspartate and glutamate by GltPh. Substrate-dependent intrinsic fluorescence changes were monitored in transporter constructs containing the L130W mutation. GltPh-L130W/T352A exhibited an ~15-fold higher apparent affinity for l-glutamate than the wild type transporter, and the M362T mutation resulted in an increased affinity of ~40-fold. An even larger increase of the apparent affinity for l-glutamate, around 130-fold higher than that of wild type, was observed with the T352A/M362T double mutant. Radioactive uptake experiments show that GltPh-T352A not only transports aspartate but also l-glutamate. Remarkably, GltPh-M362T exhibited l-aspartate but not l-glutamate transport. The double mutant retained the ability to transport l-glutamate, but its kinetic parameters were very similar to those of GltPh-T352A alone. The differential impact of mutation on binding and transport of glutamate suggests that hairpin loop 2 not only plays a role in the selection of the substrate but also in its translocation.

  14. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  15. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  16. Glutamate activation of Oct-2 in cultured chick Bergmann glia cells: involvement of NFkappaB.

    PubMed

    Méndez, J Alfredo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2005-07-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is critically involved in gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels. Its activity through ionotropic as well as metabotropic receptors modifies the protein repertoire in neurons and glial cells. In avian cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, glutamate receptors trigger a diverse array of signaling cascades that include activity-dependent transcription factors such as the activator protein-1, the cAMP response-element binding protein, and Oct-2. We analyze the upstream regulatory elements involved in Oct-2 activation. Our results demonstrate that Ca2+ influx, protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Src, and nuclear factor (NF)kappaB are involved in this signaling pathway. Our findings link alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor activation to a negative phase of chkbp gene regulation, controlled by NFkappaB.

  17. Structure and bonding of Cu(II)-glutamate complexes at the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Fitts, J.P.; Persson, P.; Brown, G.E. Jr.; Parks, G.A.

    1999-12-01

    The composition and mode of attachment of Cu(II) complexes at the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-water interface in suspensions containing a simple amino acid (glutamate) were characterized with EXAFS and FTIR spectroscopies. The spectroscopic results indicate that two types of Cu(II)-glutamate-alumina interactions are primarily responsible for Cu(II) and glutamate uptake between pH 4 and 9. In acidic suspensions of alumina, glutamate forms a bridge between Cu(II) ions and the (hydr)oxide surface (Type B complex). In this Type B surface complex, Cu(II) is bonded to amino acid headgroups (i.e., {sup +}H{sub 3}NCHRCOO{sup {minus}}) of two glutamate molecules. Spectroscopic and ionic strength dependent uptake results are combined to propose that the nonbonded side chain carboxylate groups of this complex are attracted to the oxide surface through long-range forces, leading to enhanced Cu(II) uptake relative to the glutamate-free system. In alkaline suspensions the relative amount of surface-bound Cu(II) complexed by glutamate decreases, and a direct Cu(II)-surface bond becomes the dominant mode of attachment (Type A complex). These surface complexes differ markedly from the species found in the alumina-free Cu(II)-glutamate aqueous system under similar solution conditions, where Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+} and Cu(glutamate){sub 2}{sup 2{minus}} are the dominant species in acidic and alkaline solutions, respectively. Based on these spectroscopic results, surface complexation reactions are proposed for the Cu(II) and glutamate ternary interactions with the alumina surface in this system. Similarities between the results of this study and Cu(II) uptake behavior and complexation in the presence of natural organic material (NOM) indicate that Cu(II)-glutamate interactions mimic those in more complex Cu(II)-NON-mineral-water systems.

  18. A role for preoptic glutamate in the regulation of male reproductive behavior.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Juan M

    2009-02-01

    Although much progress has been made toward understanding the role of the medial preoptic area (MPOA) in the regulation of male reproductive behaviors, the precise mechanisms responsible for its activation during mating are largely unclear. Several studies implicate glutamate in this response. However, not until recently was there direct evidence supporting this hypothesis. Results obtained using in vivo microdialysis showed that levels of glutamate increased in the MPOA during mating, particularly with ejaculation. Levels then decreased rapidly following ejaculation, during a period of sexual quiescence. The magnitude of this decrease correlated with time spent in quiescence. Additionally, central administration of glutamate uptake inhibitors increased levels of glutamate and facilitated behavior. Glutamate activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the MPOA is at least partly responsible for behavioral effects evoked by increase glutamate. This is evidenced by histological analysis of the MPOA, which shows that nearly all cells containing mating-induced Fos also contained NMDA receptors. Mating also increased phosphorylation of NMDA receptors, indicating receptor activation. Finally, bilateral microinjections of NMDA receptor antagonists inhibited copulation. This neurochemical, anatomical, and behavioral evidence points to a key role of preoptic glutamate in the regulation of sexual behavior in males. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Co-release of glutamate and GABA from single vesicles in GABAergic neurons exogenously expressing VGLUT3

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Johannes; Herman, Melissa A.; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The identity of the vesicle neurotransmitter transporter expressed by a neuron largely corresponds with the primary neurotransmitter that cell releases. However, the vesicular glutamate transporter subtype 3 (VGLUT3) is mainly expressed in non-glutamatergic neurons, including cholinergic, serotonergic, or GABAergic neurons. Though a functional role for glutamate release from these non-glutamatergic neurons has been demonstrated, the interplay between VGLUT3 and the neuron’s characteristic neurotransmitter transporter, particularly in the case of GABAergic neurons, at the synaptic and vesicular level is less clear. In this study, we explore how exogenous expression of VGLUT3 in striatal GABAergic neurons affects the packaging and release of glutamate and GABA in synaptic vesicles (SVs). We found that VGLUT3 expression in isolated, autaptic GABAergic neurons leads to action potential evoked release of glutamate. Under these conditions, glutamate and GABA could be packaged together in single vesicles release either spontaneously or asynchronously. However, the presence of glutamate in GABAergic vesicles did not affect uptake of GABA itself, suggesting a lack of synergy in vesicle filling for these transmitters. Finally, we found postsynaptic detection of glutamate released from GABAergic terminals difficult when bona fide glutamatergic synapses were present, suggesting that co-released glutamate cannot induce postsynaptic glutamate receptor clustering. PMID:26441632

  20. Glial repair in an insect central nervous system: effects of selective glial disruption.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Leech, C A; Treherne, J E

    1984-11-01

    In vivo application of ethidium bromide to cockroach central nervous connectives caused extensive disruption of the neuroglia within 24 hr. Axonal conduction persisted following treatment with the glial toxin. A consistent feature of glial damage and repair was the prominent involvement of granule-containing cells. These cells (which were never seen in control cords) shared a number of cytological features with hemocytes that were seen adhering to and penetrating the neural lamella, in the early stages of glial damage. The granule-containing cells appear to serve dual functions: phagocytosis and structural repair. After 48 hr, granule-containing cells, or their processes, formed layers at the periphery of the connectives. By 4 to 6 days after treatment, the peripheral cells had assumed the morphological characteristics of normal perineurial cells and by 28 days were indistinguishable, ultrastructurally, from those of the perineurium of normal, untreated animals. These structural changes paralleled the re-establishment of the normal permeability properties of the blood-brain interface revealed by the exclusion of an extracellular tracer, ionic lanthanum, and electrophysiological observations.

  1. Landmarks in the application of 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to studies of neuronal/glial relationships.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H

    1998-01-01

    The development of the use of carbon isotopes as metabolic tracers is briefly described. 13C-labelled precursors (13CO2, 13CH4) first became available in 1940 and were studied in microorganisms, but their use was limited by very low enrichments and lack of suitable analytical equipment. More success was achieved with 11C and especially 14C, as these radioactive tracers did not need to be highly enriched. Although the stable 13C isotope can be used at a low percentage enrichment in mass spectrometry, its application to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) requires very highly enriched precursors, due to its low natural abundance and low sensitivity. Despite such limitations, however, the great advantage of 13C-MRS lies in its exquisite chemical specificity, in that labelling of different carbon atoms can be distinguished within the same molecule. Effective exploitation became feasible in the early 1970s with the advent of stable instruments, Fourier transform 13C-MRS, and the availability of highly enriched precursors. Reports of its use in brain research began to appear in the mid-1980s. The applications of 13C isotopomer analysis to research on neuronal/glial relationships are reviewed. The presence of neighbouring 13C-labelled atoms affects the appearance of the resonances (splitting due to C-C coupling), and so allows for unique quantification of rates through different and possibly competing pathways. Isotopomer patterns in resonances labelled from a combination of [1-13C]glucose and [1, 2-13C2]acetate have revealed aspects of neuronal/glial metabolic trafficking on depolarization and under hypoxic conditions in vitro. This approach has now been applied to in vivo studies on inhibition of glial metabolism using fluoroacetate. The results confirm the glial specificity of the toxin and demonstrate that it does not affect entry of acetate. When the glial TCA cycle is inhibited, the ability of the glia to participate in the glutamate/glutamine cycle remains

  2. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  4. Effects of diabetes mellitus on astrocyte GFAP and glutamate transporters in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Elaine; Judd, Robert; Hoe, Lori; Dennis, John; Posner, Philip

    2004-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as stroke, seizures, dementia, and cognitive impairment. The cellular mechanisms responsible for the increased risk of these disorders are incompletely understood. Astrocytes are proving critical for normal CNS function, and alterations in their activity could contribute to diabetes-related disturbances in the brain. We examined the effects of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats on the level of the astrocyte intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), number of astrocytes, and levels of the astrocyte glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum by Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IH). Studies were carried out at 4 and 8 weeks of diabetes duration. Diabetes resulted in a significant decrease in GFAP protein levels (WB) in the hippocampus and cerebellum at 4 weeks and in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum by 8 weeks. Attenuated GFAP immunoreactivity (IH) was evident in the hippocampus, cerebellum and white matter regions such as the corpus callosum and external capsule at both 4 and 8 weeks of diabetes. Astrocyte cell counts of adjacent sections immunoreactive for S-100B were not different between control and diabetic animals. No significant differences were noted in astrocyte glutamate transporter levels in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, or cerebellum at either time period (WB, IH). With the expanding list of astrocyte functions in the CNS, the role of astrocytes in diabetes-induced CNS disorders clearly warrants further investigation.

  5. Chronic social isolation decreases glutamate and glutamine levels and induces oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuan; Yan, Gen; Xuan, Yinghua; Peng, Hui; Huang, Qing-Jun; Wu, Renhua; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-04-01

    Social isolation (SI) rearing of rodents is a developmental manipulation, which is commonly compared with the psychological stressors in humans as it produces several behavioral outcomes similar to those observed in humans with early life stress. To explain the SI-induced behavioral outcomes, animal studies have been performed to examine the dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems in the brain. In this study, we measured possible changes in levels of glutamate and glutamine of SI-rats using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We also assessed the oxidative stress parameters in certain brain regions to see if glutamate and/or glutamine changes, if any, are associated with oxidative stress. SI rearing for 8 weeks decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and the total antioxidant capacity, but increased levels of hydrogen peroxide, in certain brain regions, of which prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were most vulnerable. It also decreased levels of glutamate, glutamine, N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA), and phosphocreatine in the dorsal hippocampus, but not in the cerebral cortex. Decreased phosphocreatine and NAA indicate energy metabolism deficit in brain cells; the latter also suggests the neuronal viability was inhibited. Decreased glutamate and glutamine may suggest the neuron-glial integrity was implicated by chronic SI. These neurochemical and biochemical changes may contribute to the SI-induced behavioral abnormalities including a high level of anxiety, social interaction deficit, and impaired spatial working memory shown in this study.

  6. Kinetic properties of a phosphate-bond-driven glutamate-glutamine transport system in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris.

    PubMed

    Poolman, B; Smid, E J; Konings, W N

    1987-06-01

    In Streptococcus lactis ML3 and Streptococcus cremoris Wg2 the uptake of glutamate and glutamine is mediated by the same transport system, which has a 30-fold higher affinity for glutamine than for glutamate at pH 6.0. The apparent affinity constant for transport (KT) of glutamine is 2.5 +/- 0.3 microM, independent of the extracellular pH. The KTS for glutamate uptake are 3.5, 11.2, 77, and 1200 microM at pH 4.0, 5.1, 6.0, and 7.0, respectively. Recalculation of the affinity constants based on the concentration of glutamic acid in the solution yield KTS of 1.8 +/- 0.5 microM independent of the external pH, indicating that the protonated form of glutamate, i.e., glutamic acid, and glutamine are the transported species. The maximal rates of glutamate and glutamine uptake are independent of the extracellular pH as long as the intracellular pH is kept constant, despite large differences in the magnitude and composition of the components of the proton motive force. Uptake of glutamate and glutamine requires the synthesis of ATP either from glycolysis or from arginine metabolism and appears to be essentially unidirectional. Cells are able to maintain glutamate concentration gradients exceeding 4 X 10(3) for several hours even in the absence of metabolic energy. The t1/2s of glutamate efflux are 2, 12, and greater than 30 h at pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0, respectively. After the addition of lactose as energy source, the rate of glutamine uptake and the level of ATP are both very sensitive to arsenate. When the intracellular pH is kept constant, both parameters decrease approximately in parallel (between 0.2 and 1.0 mM ATP) with increasing concentrations of the inhibitor. These results suggest that the accumulation of glutamate and glutamine is energized by ATP or an equivalent energy-rich phosphorylated intermediate and not by the the proton motive force.

  7. Lack of involvement of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in MPP+ toxicity in striatal dopaminergic terminals: possible involvement of ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Matarredona, Esperanza R; Santiago, Marti; Machado, Alberto; Cano, Josefina

    1997-01-01

    The present study concerns the possible relationship between glutamate excitotoxicity and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPTP/MPP+) neurotoxicity on striatal dopaminergic terminals. MPP+ neurotoxicity has been studied by means of two MPP+ perfusions separated by 24 h. After the second MPP+ 1 mM perfusion, dopamine extracellular output, measured by microdialysis, was considered to be an index of the dopaminergic neurone damage produced by the first MPP+ 1 mM perfusion. High concentration (10 mM) of glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) stimulated basal release of dopamine and protected against the neurotoxic effect of MPP+. PDC 10 mM perfusion produced an increase in the extracellular output of glutamate and aspartate, and a decrease in that of ascorbate. The protective effect against MPP+ toxicity observed with PDC 10 mM was completely abolished when this glutamate uptake inhibitor was co-perfused with ascorbate 0.5 mM. These results suggest that glutamate-induced neurotoxicity is not involved in MPP+ toxicity. The protective effect found with the glutamate uptake inhibitor could be due to a decrease in extracellular ascorbate levels. PMID:9222565

  8. Disrupting MLC1 and GlialCAM and ClC-2 interactions in leukodystrophy entails glial chloride channel dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegg-Beiler, Maja B.; Sirisi, Sònia; Orozco, Ian J.; Ferrer, Isidre; Hohensee, Svea; Auberson, Muriel; Gödde, Kathrin; Vilches, Clara; de Heredia, Miguel López; Nunes, Virginia; Estévez, Raúl; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2014-03-01

    Defects in the astrocytic membrane protein MLC1, the adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the chloride channel ClC-2 underlie human leukoencephalopathies. Whereas GlialCAM binds ClC-2 and MLC1, and modifies ClC-2 currents in vitro, no functional connections between MLC1 and ClC-2 are known. Here we investigate this by generating loss-of-function Glialcam and Mlc1 mouse models manifesting myelin vacuolization. We find that ClC-2 is unnecessary for MLC1 and GlialCAM localization in brain, whereas GlialCAM is important for targeting MLC1 and ClC-2 to specialized glial domains in vivo and for modifying ClC-2’s biophysical properties specifically in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the cells chiefly affected by vacuolization. Unexpectedly, MLC1 is crucial for proper localization of GlialCAM and ClC-2, and for changing ClC-2 currents. Our data unmask an unforeseen functional relationship between MLC1 and ClC-2 in vivo, which is probably mediated by GlialCAM, and suggest that ClC-2 participates in the pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts.

  9. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  10. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  13. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  14. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  14. Brain neuroprotection by scavenging blood glutamate.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Gurevich, Boris; Tkachov, Sergei; Maoz, Ilana; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I

    2007-01-01

    Excess glutamate in brain fluids characterizes acute brain insults such as traumatic brain injury and stroke. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As blood glutamate scavenging has been demonstrated to increase the efflux of excess glutamate from brain into blood, we tested the prediction that oxaloacetate-mediated blood glutamate scavenging causes neuroprotection in a pathological situation such as closed head injury (CHI), in which there is a well established deleterious increase of glutamate in brain fluids. We observed highly significant improvements of the neurological status of rats submitted to CHI following an intravenous treatment with 1 mmol oxaloacetate/100 g rat weight which decreases blood glutamate levels by 40%. No detectable therapeutic effect was obtained when rats were treated IV with 1 mmol oxaloacetate together with 1 mmol glutamate/100 g rat. The treatment with 0.005 mmol/100 g rat oxaloacetate was no more effective than saline but when it was combined with the intravenous administration of 0.14 nmol/100 g of recombinant glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, recovery was almost complete. Oxaloacetate provided neuroprotection when administered before CHI or at 60 min post CHI but not at 120 min post CHI. Since neurological recovery from CHI was highly correlated with the decrease of blood glutamate levels (r=0.89, P=0.001), we conclude that blood glutamate scavenging affords brain neuroprotection Blood glutamate scavenging may open now new therapeutic options.

  15. Novel metabotropic glutamate receptor negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Toms, Nick J; Roberts, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    Several excitatory amino acid ligands were found potently to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in rat cultured cerebellar astrocytes: L-cysteine sulfinic acid (L-CSA) = L-aspartate > L-glutamate >/= the glutamate uptake inhibitor, L-PDC. This property did not reflect activation of conventional glutamate receptors, since the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists NMDA, AMPA, and kainate, as well as several mGlu receptor agonists [(1S,3R)-ACPD, (S)-DHPG, DCG-IV, L-AP4, L-quisqualate, and L-CCG-I], were without activity. In addition, the mGlu receptor antagonists, L-AP3, (S)-4CPG, Eglu, LY341495, (RS)-CPPG, and (S)-MCPG failed to reverse 30 microM glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. L-PDC-mediated inhibition was abolished by the addition of the enzyme glutamate-pyruvate transaminase. This finding suggests that the effect of L-PDC is indirect and that it is mediated through endogenously released L-glutamate. Interestingly, L-glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses were resistant to pertussis toxin, suggesting that G(i)/G(o) type G proteins were not involved. However, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC, either via the selective PKC inhibitor GF109203X or chronic PMA treatment) augmented glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. Although mGlu3 receptors (which are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase) are expressed in astrocyte populations, in our study Western blot analysis indicated that this receptor type was not expressed in cerebellar astrocytes. We therefore suggest that cerebellar astrocytes express a novel mGlu receptor, which is negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and possesses an atypical pharmacological profile. PMID:14999808

  16. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  17. Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Eileen H.; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ferrer, Isidro; Ghetti, Bernardino; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Holton, Janice L.; Josephs, Keith A.; Powers, James; Spina, Salvatore; Takahashi, Hitoshi; White, Charles L.; Revesz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Rrecent studies have highlighted a group of 4-repeat (4R) tauopathies that are characterised neuropathologically by widespread, globular glial inclusions (GGIs). Tau immunohistochemistry reveals 4R immunore-active globular oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions and the latter are predominantly negative for Gallyas silver staining. These cases are associated with a range of clinical presentations, which correlate with the severity and distribution of underlying tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Their heterogeneous clinicopathological features combined with their rarity and under-recognition have led to cases characterised by GGIs being described in the literature using various and redundant terminologies. In this report, a group of neuropathologists form a consensus on the terminology and classification of cases with GGIs. After studying microscopic images from previously reported cases with suspected GGIs (n = 22), this panel of neuropathologists with extensive experience in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and a documented record of previous experience with at least one case with GGIs, agreed that (1) GGIs were present in all the cases reviewed; (2) the morphology of globular astrocytic inclusions was different to tufted astrocytes and finally that (3) the cases represented a number of different neuropathological subtypes. They also agreed that the different morphological subtypes are likely to be part of a spectrum of a distinct disease entity, for which they recommend that the overarching term globular glial tauopathy (GGT) should be used. Type I cases typically present with frontotemporal dementia, which correlates with the fronto-temporal distribution of pathology. Type II cases are characterised by pyramidal features reflecting motor cortex involvement and corticospinal tract degeneration. Type III cases can present with a combination of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease with fronto-temporal cortex, motor cortex and

  18. Water Extract from the Leaves of Withania somnifera Protect RA Differentiated C6 and IMR-32 Cells against Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Hardeep; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C.; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate neurotoxicity has been implicated in stroke, head trauma, multiple sclerosis and neurodegenerative disorders. Search for herbal remedies that may possibly act as therapeutic agents is an active area of research to combat these diseases. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective role of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), also known as Indian ginseng, against glutamate induced toxicity in the retinoic acid differentiated rat glioma (C6) and human neuroblastoma (IMR-32) cells. The neuroprotective activity of the Ashwagandha leaves derived water extract (ASH-WEX) was evaluated. Cell viability and the expression of glial and neuronal cell differentiation markers was examined in glutamate challenged differentiated cells with and without the presence of ASH-WEX. We demonstrate that RA-differentiated C6 and IMR-32 cells, when exposed to glutamate, undergo loss of neural network and cell death that was accompanied by increase in the stress protein HSP70. ASH-WEX pre-treatment inhibited glutamate-induced cell death and was able to revert glutamate-induced changes in HSP70 to a large extent. Furthermore, the analysis on the neuronal plasticity marker NCAM (Neural cell adhesion molecule) and its polysialylated form, PSA-NCAM revealed that ASH-WEX has therapeutic potential for prevention of neurodegeneration associated with glutamate-induced excitotoxicty. PMID:22606332

  19. Dynamic positron tomographic imaging with nitrogen-13 glutamate in patients with coronary artery disease: Comparison with nitrogen-13 ammonia and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Krivokapich, J.; Barrio, J.R.; Huang, S.C.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1990-11-01

    This study was designed to test the usefulness of nitrogen-13 (N-13) glutamate imaging with positron emission tomography in defining myocardial ischemia in humans. Seventeen patients who had undergone coronary arteriography were studied with N-13 glutamate at peak supine exercise using a bicycle ergometer, as well as with the flow tracer N-13 ammonia at peak exercise during a second similar exercise test. Six of the patients also underwent imaging with N-13 glutamate at rest before exercise testing; in the remaining 11 patients imaging with fluorine-18 (F-18) fluorodeoxyglucose was performed to assess glucose metabolism after the second exercise test. Seven patients had classic metabolism-flow mismatches consistent with ischemia (that is, decreased N-13 ammonia uptake in a region with relatively increased F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose uptake). There was no evidence of increased N-13 glutamate uptake in the ischemic mismatched regions in any of these patients. In all 17 patients, the uptake of N-13 glutamate during exercise paralleled the uptake of N-13 ammonia during exercise, suggesting that N-13 glutamate behaves as a flow tracer rather than as a metabolic marker of ischemia in humans.

  20. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration.

  1. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B.

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  2. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration. PMID:27029404

  3. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  4. Astrocyte VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent cycling and modulate glutamate transporter trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Zylbersztejn, Kathleen; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Guillon, Marc; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Key points Mouse cortical astrocytes express VAMP3 but not VAMP2. VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo- and endocytotic cycling at the plasma membrane. VAMP3 vesicle traffic regulates the recycling of plasma membrane glutamate transporters. cAMP modulates VAMP3 vesicle cycling and glutamate uptake. Abstract Previous studies suggest that small synaptic-like vesicles in astrocytes carry vesicle-associated vSNARE proteins, VAMP3 (cellubrevin) and VAMP2 (synaptobrevin 2), both contributing to the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis of gliotransmitters, thereby modulating brain information processing. Here, using cortical astrocytes taken from VAMP2 and VAMP3 knock-out mice, we find that astrocytes express only VAMP3. The morphology and function of VAMP3 vesicles were studied in cultured astrocytes at single vesicle level with stimulated emission depletion (STED) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopies. We show that VAMP3 antibodies label small diameter (∼80 nm) vesicles and that VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo-endocytosis. We also show that this pathway modulates the surface expression of plasma membrane glutamate transporters and the glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Finally, using pharmacological and optogenetic tools, we provide evidence suggesting that the cytosolic cAMP level influences astrocytic VAMP3 vesicle trafficking and glutamate transport. Our results suggest a new role for VAMP3 vesicles in astrocytes. PMID:25864578

  5. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-12-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to {mu}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time ({approx}30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from {mu}M to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  6. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S

    2015-08-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our ability to construct human glial chimeras with the production of patient-specific hGPCs derived from pluripotential stem cells, we may now establish mice in which a substantial proportion of resident glia are both human and disease-derived. These mice in particular may provide us new opportunities for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human neurological and neuropsychiatric disease.

  7. Sensing the neuronal glycocalyx by glial sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectins.

    PubMed

    Linnartz-Gerlach, B; Mathews, M; Neumann, H

    2014-09-01

    Sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are cell surface receptors of microglia and oligodendrocytes that recognize the sialic acid cap of healthy neurons and neighboring glial cells. Upon ligand binding, Siglecs typically signal through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) to keep the cell in a homeostatic status and support healthy neighboring cells. Siglecs can be divided into two groups; the first, being conserved among different species. The conserved Siglec-4/myelin-associated glycoprotein is expressed on oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. Siglec-4 protects neurons from acute toxicity via interaction with sialic acids bound to neuronal gangliosides. The second group of Siglecs, named CD33-related Siglecs, is almost exclusively expressed on immune cells and is highly variable among different species. Microglial expression of Siglec-11 is human lineage-specific and prevents neurotoxicity via interaction with α2.8-linked sialic acid oligomers exposed on the neuronal glycocalyx. Microglial Siglec-E is a mouse CD33-related Siglec member that prevents microglial phagocytosis and the associated oxidative burst. Mouse Siglec-E of microglia binds to α2.8- and α2.3-linked sialic acid residues of the healthy glycocalyx of neuronal and glial cells. Recently, polymorphisms of the human Siglec-3/CD33 were linked to late onset Alzheimer's disease by genome-wide association studies. Human Siglec-3 is expressed on microglia and produces inhibitory signaling that decreases uptake of particular molecules such as amyloid-β aggregates. Thus, glial ITIM-signaling Siglecs recognize the intact glycocalyx of neurons and are involved in the modulation of neuron-glia interaction in healthy and diseased brain.

  8. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  9. Glutamate transporters alterations in the reorganizing dentate gyrus are associated with progressive seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan A; Van Vliet, Erwin A; Proper, Evelien A; De Graan, Pierre N E; Ghijsen, Wim E J M; Lopes Da Silva, Fernando H; Aronica, Eleonora

    2002-01-21

    The expression of glial and neuronal glutamate transporter proteins was investigated in the hippocampal region at different time points after electrically induced status epilepticus (SE) in the rat. This experimental rat model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by cell loss, gliosis, synaptic reorganization, and chronic seizures after a latent period. Despite extensive gliosis, immunocytochemistry revealed only an up-regulation of both glial transporters localized at the outer aspect of the inner molecular layer (iml) in chronic epileptic rats. The neuronal EAAC1 transporter was increased in many somata of individual CA1-3 neurons and granule cells that had survived after SE; this up-regulation was still present in the chronic epileptic phase. In contrast, a permanent decrease of EAAC1 immunoreactivity was observed in the iml of the dentate gyrus. This permanent decrease in EAAC1 expression, which was only observed in rats that experienced progressive spontaneous seizure activity, could lead to abnormal glutamate levels in the iml once new abnormal glutamatergic synaptic contacts are formed by means of sprouted mossy fibers. Considering the steady growth of reorganizing mossy fibers in the iml, the absence of a glutamate reuptake mechanism in this region could contribute to progression of spontaneous seizure activity, which occurs with a similar time course.

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of hippocampal CA1 region astrocytes in 10-day-old rats after monosodium glutamate treatment.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, A; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Rycerz, K

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of glutamate (Glu) is excitotoxic for nervous system structures. This may lead to glial reactivity ie. increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100β protein, and also to hypertrophy and proliferation of cells which are determined by the presence of Ki-67 antigen. The aim of the study was to analyse the immunoreactivity of the GFAP, S100β and Ki-67 proteins in astrocytes of hippocampal CA1 region in young rats after administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG) at two doses: 2 g/kg b.w. (I group) and 4 g/kg b.w. (II group). In rats from I and II group morphologically altered astrocytes with the GFAP expression were observed in the SLM of the hippocampal CA1 region. The cells had eccentrically located nuclei and on the opposite site of the nuclei there were single or double, long and weakly branched processes. Moreover, in the SLM the increase of the number of GFAP and S100β immunopositive astrocytes and nuclei with Ki-67 expression, in contrary to control individuals, was observed. These results suggest the increased expression of the proteins in early reactions or hyperplasia which, together with cell hypertrophy, indicate late reactivity of astroglia in response to glutamate noxious effect. PMID:26812818

  11. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of the relationship between the glutamate-glutamine neurotransmitter cycle and functional neuroenergetics.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, D L; Sibson, N R; Hyder, F; Shen, J; Behar, K L; Shulman, R G

    1999-01-01

    In this article we review recent studies, primarily from our laboratory, using 13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) to non-invasively measure the rate of the glutamate-glutamine neurotransmitter cycle in the cortex of rats and humans. In the glutamate-glutamine cycle, glutamate released from nerve terminals is taken up by surrounding glial cells and returned to the nerve terminals as glutamine. 13C NMR studies have shown that the rate of the glutamate-glutamine cycle is extremely high in both the rat and human cortex, and that it increases with brain activity in an approximately 1:1 molar ratio with oxidative glucose metabolism. The measured ratio, in combination with proposals based on isolated cell studies by P. J. Magistretti and co-workers, has led to the development of a model in which the majority of brain glucose oxidation is mechanistically coupled to the glutamate-glutamine cycle. This model provides the first testable mechanistic relationship between cortical glucose metabolism and a specific neuronal activity. We review here the experimental evidence for this model as well as implications for blood oxygenation level dependent magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography functional imaging studies of brain function. PMID:10466144

  12. Neuronal and glial differentiation during lizard (Gallotia galloti) visual system ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Romero-Alemán, M M; Monzón-Mayor, M; Santos, E; Lang, D M; Yanes, C

    2012-07-01

    We studied the histogenesis of the lizard visual system (E30 to adulthood) by using a selection of immunohistochemical markers that had proved relevant for other vertebrates. By E30, the Pax6(+) pseudostratified retinal epithelium shows few newborn retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the centrodorsal region expressing neuron- and synaptic-specific markers such as betaIII-tubulin (Tuj1), synaptic vesicle protein-2 (SV2), and vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1). Concurrently, pioneer RGC axons run among the Pax2(+) astroglia in the optic nerve and reach the superficial optic tectum. Between E30 and E35, the optic chiasm and optic tract remain acellular, but the latter contains radial processes with subpial endfeet expressing vimentin (Vim). From E35, neuron- and synaptic-specific stainings spread in the retina and optic tectum, whereas retinal Pax6, and Tuj1/SV2 in RGC axons decrease. Müller glia and abundant optic nerve glia express a variety of glia-specific markers until adulthood. Subpopulations of optic nerve glia are also VGLUT1(+) and cluster differentiation-44 (CD44)-positive but cytokeratin-negative, unlike the case in other regeneration-competent species. Specifically, coexpression of CD44/Vim and glutamine synthetase (GS)/VGLUT1 reflects glial specialization, insofar as most CD44(+) glia are GS(-). In the adult optic tract and tectum, radial glia and free astroglia coexist. The latter show different immunocharacterization (Pax2(-)/CD44(-) /Vim(-)) compared with that in the optic nerve. We conclude that upregulation of Tuj1 and SV2 is required for axonal outgrowth and search for appropriate targets, whereas Pax2(+) optic nerve astroglia and Vim(+) radial glia may aid in early axonal guidance. Spontaneous axonal regrowth seems to succeed despite the heterogeneous mammalian-like glial environment in the lizard optic nerve.

  13. Radioiodinated benzodiazepines: agents for mapping glial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.; Ciliax, B.J.; Gildersleeve, D.L.; Sherman, P.S.; Rosenspire, K.C.; Young, A.B.; Junck, L.; Wieland, D.M.

    1988-11-01

    Two isomeric iodinated analogues of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) ligand Ro5-4864 have been synthesized and labeled in high specific activity with iodine-125. Competitive binding assays conducted with the unlabeled analogues indicate high affinity for PBS. Tissue biodistribution studies in rats with these /sup 125/I-labeled ligands indicate high uptake of radioactivity in the adrenals, heart, and kidney--tissues known to have high concentrations of PBS. Preadministration of the potent PBS antagonist PK 11195 blocked in vivo uptake in adrenal tissue by over 75%, but to a lesser degree in other normal tissues. In vivo binding autoradiography in brain conducted in C6 glioma bearing rats showed dense, PBS-mediated accumulation of radioactivity in the tumor. Ligand 6 labeled with /sup 123/I may have potential for scintigraphic localization of intracranial glioma.

  14. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  15. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  16. Activation of glutamate transport evokes rapid glutamine release from perisynaptic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Uwechue, Nneka M; Marx, Mari-Carmen; Chevy, Quentin; Billups, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of astrocytes by neuronal activity and the subsequent release of neuromodulators is thought to be an important regulator of synaptic communication. In this study we show that astrocytes juxtaposed to the glutamatergic calyx of Held synapse in the rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are stimulated by the activation of glutamate transporters and consequently release glutamine on a very rapid timescale. MNTB principal neurones express electrogenic system A glutamine transporters, and were exploited as glutamine sensors in this study. By simultaneous whole-cell voltage clamping astrocytes and neighbouring MNTB neurones in brainstem slices, we show that application of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) substrate d-aspartate stimulates astrocytes to rapidly release glutamine, which is detected by nearby MNTB neurones. This release is significantly reduced by the toxins l-methionine sulfoximine and fluoroacetate, which reduce glutamine concentrations specifically in glial cells. Similarly, glutamine release was also inhibited by localised inactivation of EAATs in individual astrocytes, using internal dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or dissipating the driving force by modifying the patch-pipette solution. These results demonstrate that astrocytes adjacent to glutamatergic synapses can release glutamine in a temporally precise, controlled manner in response to glial glutamate transporter activation. Since glutamine can be used by neurones as a precursor for glutamate and GABA synthesis, this represents a potential feedback mechanism by which astrocytes can respond to synaptic activation and react in a way that sustains or enhances further communication. This would therefore represent an additional manifestation of the tripartite relationship between synapses and astrocytes. PMID:22411007

  17. Glutamate-glutamine cycle and exchange in the placenta-fetus unit during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Xie, Chunyan; Zhang, Yuzhe; Fan, Zhiyong; Yin, Yulong; Blachier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    The present review focuses on the physiological functions of glutamate-glutamine exchange involving placental amino acid transport and umbilical amino acid uptake in mammals (particularly in sows), with special emphasis on the associated regulating mechanisms. Glutamate plus glutamine are among the most abundant and the most utilized amino acids in fetus during late gestation. During pregnancy, amino acids, notably as precursors of macromolecules including proteins and nucleotides are involved in fetal development and growth. Amino acid concentrations in fetus are generally higher than in the mother. Among amino acids, the transport and metabolism of glutamate and glutamine during fetal development exhibit characteristics that clearly emphasize the importance of the interaction between the placenta and the fetal liver. Glutamate is quite remarkable among amino acids, which originate from the placenta, and is cleared from fetal plasma. In addition, the flux of glutamate through the placenta from the fetal plasma is highly correlated with the umbilical glutamate delivery rate. Glutamine plays a central role in fetal carbon and nitrogen metabolism and exhibits one of the highest fetal/maternal plasma ratio among all amino acids in human and other mammals. Glutamate is taken up by placenta from the fetal circulation and then converted to glutamine before being released back into the fetal circulation. Works are required on the glutamate-glutamine metabolism during late pregnancy in physiological and pathophysiological situations since such works may help to improve fetal growth and development both in humans and other mammals. Indeed, glutamine supplementation appears to ameliorate fetal growth retardation in sows and reduces preweaning mortality of piglets.

  18. Glutamate racemization and catabolism in Fusobacterium varium.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Resmer, Kelly L; White, Robert L

    2011-07-01

    The pathways of glutamate catabolism in the anaerobic bacterium Fusobacterium varium, grown on complex, undefined medium and chemically defined, minimal medium, were investigated using specifically labelled (13)C-glutamate. The metabolic end-products acetate and butyrate were isolated from culture fluids and derivatized for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. On complex medium, labels from L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and L-[4-(13)C]glutamate were incorporated into C1 of acetate and equally into C1/C3 of butyrate, while label derived from L-[5-(13)C]glutamate was not incorporated. The isotopic incorporation results and the detection of glutamate mutase and 3-methylaspartate ammonia lyase in cell extracts are most consistent with the methylaspartate pathway, the best known route of glutamate catabolism in Clostridium species. When F. varium was grown on defined medium, label from L-[4-(13)C]glutamate was incorporated mainly into C4 of butyrate, demonstrating a major role for the hydroxyglutarate pathway. Upon addition of coenzyme B(12) or cobalt ion to the defined medium in replicate experiments, isotope was located equally at C1/C3 of butyrate in accord with the methylaspartate pathway. Racemization of D-glutamate and subsequent degradation of L-glutamate via the methylaspartate pathway are supported by incorporation of label into C2 of acetate and equally into C2/C4 of butyrate from D-[3-(13)C]glutamate and the detection of a cofactor-independent glutamate racemase in cell extracts. Together the results demonstrate a major role for the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate catabolism in F. varium and substantial participation of the hydroxyglutarate pathway when coenzyme B(12) is not available.

  19. Regulation of the mouse Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST: putative role of an AP-1 DNA binding site.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; López-Bayghen, Esther; Hernández-Kelly, L Clara R; Arias-Montaño, J Antonio; Bernabé, Alfonso; Ortega, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Appropriate removal of L: -glutamate from the synaptic cleft is important for prevention of the excitotoxic effects of this neurotransmitter. The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST is regulated in the short term, by a transporter-dependent decrease in uptake activity while in the long term, a receptor's-dependent decrease in GLAST protein levels leads to a severe reduction in glutamate uptake. The promoter region of the mouse glast gene harbors an Activator Protein-1 site (AP-1). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms triggered by Glu-receptors activation involved in GLAST regulation, we took advantage of the neonatal mouse cerebellar prisms model. We characterized the glutamate uptake activity; the glutamate-dependent effect on GLAST protein levels and over the interaction of nuclear proteins with a mouse glast promoter AP-1 probe. A time and dose dependent decrease in transporter activity matching with a decrease in GLAST levels was recorded upon glutamate treatment. Moreover, a significant increase in glast AP-1 DNA binding was found. Pharmacological experiments established that both effects are mediated through alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors, favoring the notion of the critical involvement of glutamate in the regulation of its binding partners: receptors and transporters.

  20. Increase in glial intracellular K+ in drone retina caused by photostimulation but not mediated by an increase in extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Schneider-Picard, G

    1989-01-01

    The predominant glial cells of the drone retina (outer pigment cells) respond to an increase in extracellular [K+] (Ko) by a net uptake of K+; thus, they contribute to bringing Ko back toward its baseline value. The authors report herein that there is also a different mechanism by which light stimulation of the retina causes an increase in intracellular free [K+] in the glial cells. In superfused retinal slices, after 5-10 minutes of continuous illumination at physiological intensities, extracellular [K+] often fell back to below its original level in the dark. This fall can be explained by increased activity of the Na/K pump in the photoreceptors and diffusion of K+ down their axons. Despite the absence of raised Ko, K+-selective microelectrodes in glial cells recorded a small increase in intracellular [K+] that was maintained for the duration of the illumination; i.e. a change occurred in the glia that was not mediated by an increase in Ko. The increase in intracellular [K+] is not mediated by illumination of the screening pigment in the glia. Unless the increase is caused by illumination of some other, unknown, pigment in the glia, the results show that some unidentified signal (that is not K+) passes from the photoreceptors to the glia.

  1. The effect of glial glutamine synthetase inhibition on recognition and temporal memories in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kant, Deepika; Tripathi, Shweta; Qureshi, Munazah F; Tripathi, Shweta; Pandey, Swati; Singh, Gunjan; Kumar, Tankesh; Mir, Fayaz A; Jha, Sushil K

    2014-02-01

    The glutamate neurotransmitter is intrinsically involved in learning and memory. Glial glutamine synthetase enzyme synthesizes glutamine, which helps maintain the optimal neuronal glutamate level. However, the role of glutamine synthetase in learning and memory remains unclear. Using associative trace learning task, we investigated the effects of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (glutamine synthetase inhibitor) on recognition and temporal memories. MSO and vehicle were injected (i.p.) three hours before training in separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=11). Animals were trained to obtain fruit juice after following a set of sequential events. Initially, house-light was presented for 15s followed by 5s trace interval. Thereafter, juice was given for 20s followed by 20s inter-presentation interval. A total of 75 presentations were made over five sessions during the training and testing periods. The average number of head entries to obtain juice per session and during individual phases at different time intervals was accounted as an outcome measure of recognition and temporal memories. The total head entries in MSO and vehicle treated animals were comparable on training and testing days. However, it was 174.90% (p=0.08), 270.61% (p<0.05), 143.20% (p<0.05) more on training day and 270.33% (p<0.05), 157.94% (p<0.05), 170.42% (p<0.05) more on testing day, during the house-light, trace-interval and inter-presentation interval phases in MSO animals. Glutamine synthetase inhibition did not induce recognition memory deficit, while temporal memory was altered, suggesting that glutamine synthetase modulates some aspects of mnemonic processes.

  2. Different functional roles of arginine residues 39 and 61 and tyrosine residue 98 in transport and channel mode of the glutamate transporter EAAC1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yani; Vasilets, Larisa A; Fei, Jian; Guo, Lihe; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2004-10-11

    The excitatory amino acid transporter EAAC1 is an electrogenic Na+ - and K+ -gradient-driven transporter. In addition, the transporter mediates in the presence of Na+ and glutamate an anion conductance uncoupled from the transport of the glutamate. The first two N-terminal domains, important for forming the conductance mode, are extracellularly bordered by positively charged arginine residues, R39 and R61, being completely conserved throughout the transporter family. Also the conserved tyrosine residue Y98 could be important for Cl- conductance. We have investigated, by measurements of glutamate uptake and glutamate-induced currents, the effects of mutation of the arginines and the tyrosine to alanine. The mutation R39A hardly affects transport and channel mode. The mutation R61A, on the other hand, reduces the activity of transport but stimulates the channel conductance. In addition, the apparent Km values for glutamate uptake and for the glutamate-activated current are reduced. Glutamate stimulation of current seems to be associated with a voltage-dependent step, and the apparent valence of charge moved during binding is reduced in the R61A mutant. The mutation Y98A leads to reduced function with reduced apparent Km value for glutamate, and with strong reduction of the selectivity ration between NO3- and Cl- of the conductance mode.

  3. Epidemiology of glial and non-glial brain tumours in Europe.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Trama, Annalisa; Stiller, Charles; Caldarella, Adele; Soffietti, Riccardo; Jaal, Jana; Weber, Damien C; Ricardi, Umberto; Slowinski, Jerzy; Brandes, Alba

    2012-07-01

    To the central nervous system (CNS) belong a heterogeneous group of glial and non glial rare cancers. The aim of the present study was to estimate the burden (incidence, prevalence, survival and proportion of cured) for the principal CNS cancers in Europe (EU27) and in European regions using population-based data from cancer registries participating in the RARECARE project. We analysed 44,947 rare CNS cancers diagnosed from 1995 to 2002 (with follow up at 31st December 2003): 86.0% astrocytic (24% low grade, 63% high grade and 13% glioma NOS), 6.4% oligodendroglial (74% low grade), 3.6% ependymal (85% low grade), 4.1% Embryonal tumours and 0.1% choroid plexus carcinoma. Incidence rates vary widely across European regions especially for astrocytic tumours ranging from 3/100,000 in Eastern Europe to 5/100,000 in United Kingdom and Ireland. Overall, about 27,700 new rare CNS cancers were estimated every year in EU27, for an annual incidence rate of 4.8 per 100,000 for astrocytic, 0.4 for oligodendroglial, 0.2 for ependymal and embryonal tumours and less than 0.1 for choroid plexus carcinoma. More than 154,000 persons with rare CNS were estimated alive (prevalent cases) in the EU at the beginning of 2008. Five-year relative survival was 14.5% for astrocytic tumours (42.6% for low grade, 4.9% for high grade and 17.5% for glioma NOS), 54.5% for oligodendroglial (64.9% high grade and 29.6% low grade), 74.2% for ependymal (80.4% low grade and 36.6% high grade), 62.8% for choroid plexus carcinomas and 56.8% for embryonal tumours. Survival rates for astrocytic tumours were relatively higher in Northern and Central Europe than in Eastern Europe and in UK and Ireland. The different availability of diagnostic imaging techniques and/or radiation therapy equipment across Europe may contribute to explain the reported survival differences. The estimated proportion of cured patients was 7.9% for the 'glial' group to which belong astrocytic tumours. Overall results are strongly

  4. Glutamate neurons within the midbrain dopamine regions.

    PubMed

    Morales, M; Root, D H

    2014-12-12

    Midbrain dopamine systems play important roles in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. The participation of midbrain dopamine systems in diverse clinical contexts suggests these systems are highly complex. Midbrain dopamine regions contain at least three neuronal phenotypes: dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic. Here, we review the locations, subtypes, and functions of glutamatergic neurons within midbrain dopamine regions. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2) mRNA-expressing neurons are observed within each midbrain dopamine system. Within rat retrorubral field (RRF), large populations of VGluT2 neurons are observed throughout its anteroposterior extent. Within rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), VGluT2 neurons are observed centrally and caudally, and are most dense within the laterodorsal subdivision. RRF and SNC rat VGluT2 neurons lack tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), making them an entirely distinct population of neurons from dopaminergic neurons. The rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) contains the most heterogeneous populations of VGluT2 neurons. VGluT2 neurons are found in each VTA subnucleus but are most dense within the anterior midline subnuclei. Some subpopulations of rat VGluT2 neurons co-express TH or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), but most of the VGluT2 neurons lack TH or GAD. Different subsets of rat VGluT2-TH neurons exist based on the presence or absence of vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter, or D2 dopamine receptor. Thus, the capacity by which VGluT2-TH neurons may release dopamine will differ based on their capacity to accumulate vesicular dopamine, uptake extracellular dopamine, or be autoregulated by dopamine. Rat VTA VGluT2 neurons exhibit intrinsic VTA projections and extrinsic projections to the accumbens and to the prefrontal cortex. Mouse VTA VGluT2 neurons project to accumbens shell, prefrontal cortex, ventral pallidum, amygdala, and lateral habenula. Given their molecular

  5. The effects of acidosis and alkalosis on the metabolism of glutamine and glutamate in renal cortex slices

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Donald E.; Strope, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Studies of the metabolism of glutamine and glutamate by renal cortex slices from acidotic, alkalotic, and control rats were performed. 88-95% of the glutamine and 104-115% of the glutamate taken up from the medium could be accounted for by the products found. Acidosis increased glutamine uptake and conversion to ammonia, CO2, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, lipid, and protein. The increase in glutamine conversion to ammonia after acidosis could be completely accounted for by the associated increase in its conversion to glucose, glutamate, lactate, and pyruvate. When glutamate metabolism was examined, acidosis did not affect substrate uptake but did increase its conversion to ammonia, glucose, lactate, CO2, and lipid. The increase in 14CO2 from U-14C-glutamine and U-14C-glutamate found with cortex slices from acidotic animals could be explained by the CO2 production calculated to be associated with the enhanced conversion of these substrates to other products during acidosis. 14CO2 production from 1.2-14C-acetate was found to be significantly increased in alkalosis rather than acidosis. These studies suggest that in the rat, the rate at which glutamine is completely oxidized in the Krebs cycle is not a factor regulating renal ammonia production. A comparison of the effects of acidbase status on glutamine and glutamate metabolism suggests that either glutamine transport or glutamine transaminase activity are significantly increased by acidosis. Images PMID:5057130

  6. Modification of glial response in hibernation: a patch-clamp study on glial cells acutely isolated from hibernating land snail.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ljiljana; Bataveljic, Danijela; Andjus, Pavle R; Moldovan, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Petkovic, Branka

    2014-12-01

    Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservation of brain function in the hibernating state implies accompanying modification of glial activity. A supportive role of glia in regulating neuronal activity is reflected through the activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kir). Therefore, we examined electrophysiological response, particularly Kir current response, of glial cells in mixture with neurons acutely isolated from active and hibernating land snail Helix pomatia. Our data show that hibernated glia have significantly lower inward current density, specific membrane conductance, and conductance density compared with active glia. The observed reduction could be attributed to the Kir currents, since the Ba2+-sensitive Kir current density was significantly lower in hibernated glia. Accordingly, a significant positive shift of the current reversal potential indicated a more depolarized state of hibernated glia. Data obtained show that modification of glial current response could be regulated by serotonin (5-HT) through an increase of cGMP as a secondary messenger, since extracellular addition of 5-HT or intracellular administration of cGMP to active glia induced a significant reduction of inward current density and thus mimicked the reduced response of hibernated glia. Lower Kir current density of hibernated glia accompanied the lower electrical activity of hibernated neurons, as revealed by a decrease in neuronal fast inward Na+ current density. Our findings reveal that glial response is reduced in the hibernating state and suggest seasonal modulation of glial activity. Maintenance of low glial activity in hibernation could be important for preservation of brain

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of the high-affinity glutamate transporter, EAAC1, in the retina of representative vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Schultz, K; Stell, W K

    1996-06-28

    The glutamate transporter, EAAC1, was localized immunocytochemically in goldfish, salamander, turtle, chicken, and rat retinas, using affinity-purified oligopeptide antibodies. Immunoreactive (IR) EAAC1 was present in the inner plexiform layer of all species, and in cell bodies of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells of most species, but absent from photoreceptors and Müller's glial cells. Western blots revealed an IR-EAAC1 band at 70 kDa. Staining was abolished by preabsorption with EAAC1 peptide. PMID:8817573

  8. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  9. Glial regulation of neuronal function: from synapse to systems physiology.

    PubMed

    Tasker, J G; Oliet, S H R; Bains, J S; Brown, C H; Stern, J E

    2012-04-01

    Classically, glia have been regarded as non-excitable cells that provide nourishment and physical scaffolding for neurones. However, it is now generally accepted that glia are active participants in brain function that can modulate neuronal communication via several mechanisms. Investigations of anatomical plasticity in the magnocellular neuroendocrine system of the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei led the way in the development of much of our understanding of glial regulation of neuronal activity. In this review, we provide an overview of glial regulation of magnocellular neurone activity from a historical perspective of the development of our knowledge of the morphological changes that are evident in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. We also focus on recent data from the authors' laboratories presented at the 9th World Congress on Neurohypophysial Hormones that have contributed to our understanding of the multiple mechanisms by which glia modulate the activity of neurones, including: gliotransmitter modulation of synaptic transmission; trans-synaptic modulation by glial neurotransmitter transporter regulation of neurotransmitter spillover; and glial neurotransmitter transporter modulation of excitability by regulation of ambient neurotransmitter levels and their action on extrasynaptic receptors. The magnocellular neuroendocrine system secretes oxytocin and vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland to control birth, lactation and body fluid balance, and we finally speculate as to whether glial regulation of individual magnocellular neurones might co-ordinate population activity to respond appropriately to altered physiological circumstances.

  10. Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fain, J S; Tomlinson, F H; Scheithauer, B W; Parisi, J E; Fletcher, G P; Kelly, P J; Miller, G M

    1994-03-01

    Small asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland represent a common incidental finding in adults undergoing computerized tomography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or at postmortem examination. In contrast, large symptomatic pineal cysts are rare, being limited to individual case reports or small series. The authors have reviewed 24 cases of large pineal cysts. The mean patient age at presentation was 28.7 years (range 15 to 46 years); 18 were female and six male. Presenting features in 20 symptomatic cases included: headache in 19; nausea and/or vomiting in seven; papilledema in five; visual disturbances in five (diplopia in three, "blurred vision" in two, and unilateral partial oculomotor nerve palsy in one); Parinaud's syndrome in two; hemiparesis in one; hemisensory aberration in one; and seizures in one. Four lesions were discovered incidentally. Magnetic resonance imaging typically demonstrated a 0.8- to 3.0-cm diameter mass (mean 1.7 cm) with homogeneous decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and a distinct margin. Hydrocephalus was present in eight cases. The cysts were surgically excised via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach (23 cases) or stereotactically biopsied (one case). Histological examination revealed a cyst wall 0.5 to 2.0 mm thick comprised of three layers: an outer fibrous layer, a middle layer of pineal parenchymal cells with variable calcification, and an inner layer of hypocellular glial tissue often exhibiting Rosenthal fibers and/or granular bodies. Evidence of prior hemorrhage, mild astrocytic degenerative atypia, and disorganization of pineal parenchyma were often present. Postoperative follow-up review in all 24 cases (range 3 months to 10 years) revealed no complications in 21, mild ocular movement deficit in one, gradually resolving Parinaud's syndrome in one, and radiographic evidence of a postoperative venous infarct of the superior cerebellum with ataxia of 1 week

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in the tripartite synapse as a target for new psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Wierońska, Joanna M; Pilc, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Mental disorders, such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia, has become a large medical and social problem recently. Studies performed in animal tests and early clinical investigations brought a new insight in the pharmacotherapy of these disorders. Latest investigations are focused mainly on the glutamatergic system, a main excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the brain. Evidence indicates that metabotropic glutamate receptors ligands have excellent antidepressant, anxiolytic and antipsychotic effects. Metabotopic glutamate receptors (mGlu) divaded into three groups (group I, II and III) are localized on nerve terminals, postsynaptic sites and glial cells and thus they can influence and modulate the action of glutamate on different levels in the synapse. Recent advances in the identification of selective and specific compounds (both ortho- and allosteric ligands), and the generation of transgenic animals enabled to have new insight into the pathophysiology and therapy of mood disorders. At present, the most potent seem to be negative allosteric modulators of the first group (mGlu1 and mGlu5), and positive allosteric modulators of the second (mGlu2 and mGlu3) and third (mGlu4/7/8) group of mGlu receptors. PMID:19428811

  12. Neuroprotection mediated by glutamate carboxypeptidase II (NAALADase) inhibition requires TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A G; Liu, W; Olkowski, J L; Tang, Z; Lin, Q; Lu, X C; Slusher, B S

    2001-10-26

    Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase (GCP) II (EC 3.4.17.21), also termed N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), has been shown to protect against ischemic injury presumably via decreasing glutamate and increasing N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG). NAAG is a potent and selective mGlu3 receptor agonist. Activation of glial mGlu3 receptors has been shown to protect against NMDA toxicity by releasing transforming growth factors, TGF-betas. We hypothesized that GCP II inhibition could be neuroprotective also via TGF-betas, due to increased NAAG. To verify this, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) were performed on media from both control and ischemic cultures treated with the GCP II inhibitor, 2-(phosphonomethyl)-pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA). We found that 2-PMPA attenuated ischemia-induced declines in TGF-beta. To further assess the role of TGF-betas in 2-PMPA-mediated neuroprotection, a neutralizing antibody to TGF-beta (TGF-beta Ab) was used. In both in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia, TGF-beta Ab reversed the neuroprotection by 2-PMPA. Antibodies to other growth factors had no effect. Data suggests that neuroprotection by GCP II inhibition may be partially mediated by promoting TGF-beta release. PMID:11698060

  13. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  14. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells.

    PubMed

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M; Matarredona, Esperanza R; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain.

  15. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the uptake and respiration of amino acids by a facultatively psychrophilic marine bacterium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, K. L.; Morita, R. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Studies of pressure and temperature effects on glutamic acid transport and utilization indicated that hydrostatic pressure and low temperature inhibit glutamate transport more than glutamate respiration. The effects of pressure on transport were reduced at temperatures near the optimum. Similar results were obtained for glycine, phenylalanine, and proline. Pressure effects on the transport systems of all four amino acids were reversible to some degree. Both proline and glutamic acid were able to protect their transport proteins against pressure damage. The data presented indicate that the uptake of amino acids by cells under pressure is inhibited, which is the cause of their inability to grow under pressure.

  16. The glutamate homeostasis hypothesis of addiction.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-08-01

    Addiction is associated with neuroplasticity in the corticostriatal brain circuitry that is important for guiding adaptive behaviour. The hierarchy of corticostriatal information processing that normally permits the prefrontal cortex to regulate reinforcement-seeking behaviours is impaired by chronic drug use. A failure of the prefrontal cortex to control drug-seeking behaviours can be linked to an enduring imbalance between synaptic and non-synaptic glutamate, termed glutamate homeostasis. The imbalance in glutamate homeostasis engenders changes in neuroplasticity that impair communication between the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens. Some of these pathological changes are amenable to new glutamate- and neuroplasticity-based pharmacotherapies for treating addiction. PMID:19571793

  17. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Natalie; Bihari, Ofer; Kanner, Sivan; Barzilai, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a "hostile" environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit. PMID:27245308

  18. Implanted neural progenitor cells regulate glial reaction to brain injury and establish gap junctions with host glial cells.

    PubMed

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Macías, David; Gálvez, Victoria; Pastor, Angel M

    2014-04-01

    Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) in the lesioned brain is able to restore morphological and physiological alterations induced by different injuries. The local microenvironment created at the site of grafting and the communication between grafted and host cells are crucial in the beneficial effects attributed to the NPC implants. We have previously described that NPC transplantation in an animal model of central axotomy restores firing properties and synaptic coverage of lesioned neurons and modulates their trophic factor content. In this study, we aim to explore anatomical relationships between implanted NPCs and host glia that might account for the implant-induced neuroprotective effects. Postnatal rat subventricular zone NPCs were isolated and grafted in adult rats after transection of the medial longitudinal fascicle. Brains were removed and analyzed eight weeks later. Immunohistochemistry for different glial markers revealed that NPC-grafted animals displayed significantly greater microglial activation than animals that received only vehicle injections. Implanted NPCs were located in close apposition to activated microglia and reactive astrocytes. The gap junction protein connexin43 was present in NPCs and glial cells at the lesion site and was often found interposed within adjacent implanted and glial cells. Gap junctions were identified between implanted NPCs and host astrocytes and less frequently between NPCs and microglia. Our results show that implanted NPCs modulate the glial reaction to lesion and establish the possibility of communication through gap junctions between grafted and host glial cells which might be involved in the restorative effects of NPC implants.

  19. Scavenging of blood glutamate for enhancing brain-to-blood glutamate efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Qi, Qi; Wang, Le; Luo, Lan; Yang, Shaoqi; Zhang, Yumei; Miao, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Weidong; Wang, Zhenhai; Shen, Ying; Wang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of excess glutamate in the brain interstitial fluid characterizes several acute pathological conditions of the brain, including traumatic brain injury and stroke. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to eliminate excess glutamate in the brain by decreasing blood glutamate levels and, accordingly, accelerating the brain-to-blood glutamate efflux. It is feasible to accomplish this process by activating blood resident enzymes in the presence of the respective glutamate cosubstrates. In the present study, several glutamate cosubstrates and cofactors were studied in an attempt to identify the optimal conditions to reduce blood glutamate levels. The administration of a mixture of 1 mM pyruvate and oxaloacetate (Pyr/Oxa) for 1 h decreased blood glutamate levels by ≤50%. The addition of lipoamide to this mixture resulted in a further reduction in blood glutamate levels of >80%. In addition, in vivo experiments showed that lipoamide together with Pyr/Oxa is able to decrease blood glutamate levels to a greater extent than Pyr/Oxa alone, and accordingly, this enhances the glutamate efflux from the brain to the blood. These results may outline a novel neuroprotective strategy with increased effectiveness for the removal of excess brain glutamate in various neurodegenerative conditions.

  20. Bilateral macrostomia associated with aqueductal stenosis and glial heterotopias.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Ernesto; Petricig, Paola; Peretta, Paola; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2007-09-01

    We report on an Italian boy, born to normal and nonconsanguineous parents with a prenatal diagnosis of ventriculomegaly and subependymal glial heterotopias. At birth bilateral macrostomia was diagnosed without other evident facial anomalies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed triventricular hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis and confirmed the nodules of glial heterotopia. The bilateral macrostomia was surgically corrected with the vermilion square flap method and W-plasty technique and follow up MRI at 6 months showed mild increase of ventricular dilatation without signs of active hydrocephalus. The association between macrostomia and hydrocephalus has been reported only in rare cases of complex malformative syndromes but never with isolated macrostomia.

  1. Metabolism of Proline, Glutamate, and Ornithine in Proline Mutant Root Tips of Zea mays (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dierks-Ventling, Christa; Tonelli, Chiara

    1982-01-01

    In excised pro1-1 mutant and corresponding normal type roots of Zea mays L. the uptake and interconversion of [14C]proline, [14C]glutamic acid, [14C]glutamine, and [14C]ornithine and their utilization for protein synthesis was measured with the intention of finding an explanation for the proline requirement of the mutant. Uptake of these four amino acids, with the exception of proline, was the same in mutant and normal roots, but utilization differed. Higher than normal utilization rates for proline and glutamic acid were noted in mutant roots leading to increased CO2 production, free amino acid interconversion, and protein synthesis. Proline was synthesized from either glutamic acid (or glutamine) or ornithine in both mutant and normal roots; it did not accumulate but rather was used for protein synthesis. Ornithine was not a good precursor for proline in either system, but was preferentially converted to arginine and glutamine, particularly in mutant roots. The pro1-1 mutant was thus not deficient in its ability to make proline. Based on these findings, and on the fact that ornithine, arginine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid are elevated as free amino acids in mutant roots, it is suggested that in the pro1-1 mutant proline catabolism prevails over proline synthesis. PMID:16662144

  2. NEUROINFLAMMATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH CHANGES IN GLIAL MGLUR5 EXPRESSION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEONATAL EXCITOTOXIC LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Janelle, Drouin-Ouellet; Anna-Liisa, Brownell; Martine, Saint-Pierre; Caroline, Fasano; Vincent, Emond; Louis-Eric, Trudeau; Daniel, Lévesque; Francesca, Cicchetti

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that neuroinflammation triggered during brain development can alter brain functions later in life. We investigated the contribution of inflammation to the alteration of normal brain circuitries in the context of neuroexcitotoxicity following neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions with ibotenic acid, a NMDA glutamate receptor agonist, in rats. Excitotoxic ibotenic acid lesions led to a significant and persistent astrogliosis and microglial activation, associated with the production of inflammatory mediators. This response was accompanied by a significant increase in metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) expression within two distinct neuroinflammatory cell types; astrocytes and microglia. The participation of inflammation to the neurotoxin-induced lesion was further supported by the prevention of hippocampal neuronal loss, glial mGluR5 expression and some of the behavioral perturbations associated to the excitotoxic lesion by concurrent anti-inflammatory treatment with minocycline. These results indicate that neuroinflammation significantly contributes to long-lasting excitotoxic effects of the neurotoxin and to some behavioral phenotypes associated with this model. Thus, the control of the inflammatory response may prevent the deleterious effects of excitotoxic processes that are triggered during brain development, limiting the risk to develop some of the behavioral manifestations related to these processes in adulthood. PMID:21125661

  3. Muscle and splanchnic glutamine and glutamate metabolism in postabsorptive and starved man

    PubMed Central

    Marliss, E. B.; Aoki, T. T.; Pozefsky, T.; Most, A. S.; Cahill, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Arterio-venous differences across forearm muscle in man in both prolonged starvation and in the postabsorptive state, show an uptake of glutamate and a relatively greater production of glutamine. Splanchnic arteriovenous differences in the postabsorptive state show a net uptake of glutamine and lesser rate of glutamate production. These data suggest that muscle is a major site of glutamine synthesis in man, and that the splanchnic bed is a site of its removal. The relative roles of liver and other tissues in the splanchnic circuit were not directly assessed, only the net balance. These data in man are in conflict with most previous studies in other species attributing the major proportion of glutamine production to the liver and, pari passu, to the splanchnic bed. PMID:5547277

  4. Astroglial Contribution to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Revealed by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Elucidation of the Dominant Pathway for Neurotransmitter Glutamate Repletion and Measurement of Astrocytic Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lebon, Vincent; Petersen, Kitt F.; Cline, Gary W.; Shen, Jun; Mason, Graeme F.; Dufour, Sylvie; Behar, Kevin L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in eight volunteers during an intravenous infusion of [2-13C] acetate, which has been shown in animal models to be metabolized specifically in astroglia. Mathematical modeling of the three established pathways for neurotransmitter glutamate repletion indicates that the glutamate/glutamine neurotransmitter cycle between astroglia and neurons (0.32 ± 0.07 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) is the major pathway for neuronal glutamate repletion and that the astroglial TCA cycle flux (0.14 ± 0.06 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) accounts for ~14% of brain oxygen consumption. Up to 30% of the glutamine transferred to the neurons by the cycle may derive from replacement of oxidized glutamate by anaplerosis. The further application of this approach could potentially enlighten the role of astroglia in supporting brain glutamatergic activity and in neurological and psychiatric disease. PMID:11880482

  5. Remarkable increase in 14C-acetate uptake in an epilepsy model rat brain induced by lithium-pilocarpine.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Rie; Kitano, Daisuke; Momosaki, Sotaro; Kuse, Kenji; Gee, Antony; Inoue, Osamu

    2010-01-22

    The present study demonstrates changes in rat brain glial metabolism during the acute phase of epilepsy. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced using the lithium-pilocarpine model. Glial metabolism was measured with (14)C-acetate. Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism were also measured using (14)C-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) and (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG), respectively. At the initiation of the seizure, (14)C-acetate uptake did not change significantly. However, a marked increase was observed 2 h after the pilocarpine injection in all brain regions studied. The increase of brain uptake was transient, and the maximum enhancement was seen at 2 h after the pilocarpine injection. The increase of (14)C-acetate uptake was almost to the same degree in all regions, whereas (14)C-IMP and (14)C-2DG uptakes showed a heterogeneous increase. In the case of (14)C-IMP, the highest increase was observed in the thalamus (280%), and a moderate increase (120 to 150%) was seen in the orbital cortex, cingulate cortex and pyriform cortex. (14)C-2DG uptake increased by 130 to 240% in most regions of the brain, however, an increase of only 40 and 20% was observed in the cerebellum and pons-medulla, respectively. These results demonstrated that glial energy metabolism was markedly enhanced during a prolonged seizure. To our knowledge, this study is the first observation showing large and widespread glial metabolic increases in the rat brain during status epilepticus.

  6. Astrocytes and glutamate homoeostasis in Alzheimer's disease: a decrease in glutamine synthetase, but not in glutamate transporter-1, in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Syková, Eva; Chvátal, Alexander; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J

    2013-10-07

    Astrocytes control tissue equilibrium and hence define the homoeostasis and function of the CNS (central nervous system). Being principal homoeostatic cells, astroglia are fundamental for various forms of neuropathology, including AD (Alzheimer's disease). AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions due to specific lesions in mnesic-associated regions, including the mPFC (medial prefrontal cortex). Here, we analyzed the expression of GS (glutamine synthetase) and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1) in astrocytes in the mPFC during the progression of AD in a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD). GS is an astrocyte-specific enzyme, responsible for the intracellular conversion of glutamate into glutamine, whereas the removal of glutamate from the extracellular space is accomplished mainly by astroglia-specific GLT-1. We found a significant decrease in the numerical density (Nv, cells/mm3) of GS-positive astrocytes from early to middle ages (1-9 months; at the age of 1 month by 17%, 6 months by 27% and 9 months by 27% when compared with control animals) in parallel with a reduced expression of GS (determined by Western blots), which started at the age of 6 months and was sustained up to 12 months of age. We did not, however, find any changes in the expression of GLT-1, which implies an intact glutamate uptake mechanism. Our results indicate that the decrease in GS expression may underlie a gradual decline in the vital astrocyte-dependent glutamate-glutamine conversion pathway, which in turn may compromise glutamate homoeostasis, leading towards failures in synaptic connectivity with deficient cognition and memory.

  7. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  8. Reduced plasma membrane surface expression of GLAST mediates decreased glutamate regulation in the aged striatum.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin; Salvatore, Michael F; Pomerleau, Francois; Apparsundaram, Subbu; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2007-11-01

    Extracellular L-glutamate poses a severe excitotoxic threat to neurons and glia when unregulated, therefore low synaptic levels of this neurotransmitter must be maintained via a rapid and robust transport system. A recent study from our laboratory showed a reduced glutamate uptake rate in the striatum of the aged Fischer 344 (F344) rat, yet the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. The current study utilized in vivo electrochemical recordings, immunoblotting and biotinylation in young (6 months), late-middle aged (18 months) and aged (24 months) F344 rats to elucidate the potential role that glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST, and EAAC1) may play in this mechanism. Here we show that the time necessary to clear glutamate from the late-middle aged and aged striatum is significantly prolonged in comparison to the young striatum. In addition, an analysis of various sub-regions of the striatum revealed a marked dorsoventral gradient in terms of glutamate clearance times in the aged striatum, a phenomenon which was not present in the striatum of the animals of the remaining age groups. We also found that the decreased glutamate clearance time observed in the late-middle aged and aged rats is not due to a decrease in the production of total transporter protein among these three transporters. Rather, a significant reduction in the amount of GLAST expressed on the plasma membrane surface in the aged animals (approximately 55% when compared to young rats) may contribute to this phenomenon. These age-related alterations in extracellular l-glutamate regulation may be key contributors to the increased susceptibility of the aged brain to excitotoxic insults such as stroke and hypoxia.

  9. Methylmalonate impairs mitochondrial respiration supported by NADH-linked substrates: involvement of mitochondrial glutamate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Melo, Daniela R; Mirandola, Sandra R; Assunção, Nilson A; Castilho, Roger F

    2012-06-01

    The neurodegeneration that occurs in methylmalonic acidemia is proposed to be associated with impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism resulting from methylmalonate (MMA) accumulation. The present study evaluated the effects of MMA on oxygen consumption by isolated rat brain mitochondria in the presence of NADH-linked substrates (α-ketoglutarate, citrate, isocitrate, glutamate, malate, and pyruvate). Respiration supported either by glutamate or glutamate plus malate was significantly inhibited by MMA (1-10 mM), whereas no inhibition was observed when a cocktail of NADH-linked substrates was used. Measurements of glutamate transport revealed that the inhibitory effect of MMA on respiration maintained by this substrate is not due to inhibition of its mitochondrial uptake. In light of this result, the effect of MMA on the activity of relevant enzymes involved in mitochondrial glutamate metabolism was investigated. MMA had minor inhibitory effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase, whereas α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was significantly inhibited by this metabolite (K(i) = 3.65 mM). Moreover, measurements of α-ketoglutarate transport and mitochondrial MMA accumulation indicated that MMA/α-ketoglutarate exchange depletes mitochondria from this substrate, which may further contribute to the inhibition of glutamate-sustained respiration. To study the effect of chronic in vivo MMA treatment on mitochondrial function, young rats were intraperitoneally injected with MMA. No significant difference was observed in respiration between isolated brain mitochondria from control and MMA-treated rats, indicating that in vivo MMA treatment did not lead to permanent mitochondrial respiratory defects. Taken together, these findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of MMA on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be ascribed to concurrent inhibition of specific enzymes and lower availability of respiratory substrates. PMID:22488725

  10. Regulation of brain glutamate metabolism by nitric oxide and S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Karthik; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Evans, Perry; Krizman, Elizabeth N.; Jackson, Joshua G.; Horyn, Oksana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Nissim, Ilana; Yudkoff, Marc; Nissim, Itzhak; Sharp, Kim A.; Robinson, Michael B.; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling intermediate during glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS). NO signaling is in part accomplished through cysteine S-nitrosylation, a posttranslational modification by which NO regulates protein function and signaling. In our investigation of the protein targets and functional impact of S-nitrosylation in the CNS under physiological conditions, we identified 269 S-nitrosocysteine residues in 136 proteins in the wild-type mouse brain. The number of sites was significantly reduced in the brains of mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS−/−) or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS−/−). In particular, nNOS−/− animals showed decreased S-nitrosylation of proteins that participate in the glutamate/glutamine cycle, a metabolic process by which synaptic glutamate is recycled or oxidized to provide energy. 15N-glutamine–based metabolomic profiling and enzymatic activity assays indicated that brain extracts from nNOS−/− mice converted less glutamate to glutamine and oxidized more glutamate than those from mice of the other genotypes. GLT1 [also known as EAAT2 (excitatory amino acid transporter 2)], a glutamate transporter in astrocytes, was S-nitrosylated at Cys373 and Cys561 in wild-type and eNOS−/− mice, but not in nNOS−/− mice. A form of rat GLT1 that could not be S-nitrosylated at the equivalent sites had increased glutamate uptake compared to wild-type GLT1 in cells exposed to an S-nitrosylating agent. Thus, NO modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission through the selective, nNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of proteins that govern glutamate transport and metabolism. PMID:26152695

  11. TM4 of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 experiences substrate-induced motion during the transport cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xiuliang; Tan, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Xiuping; Lu, Lingli; Zou, Xiaoming; Qu, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), also known as glial glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1), plays an important role in maintaining the extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. The highly conserved TM2 transmembrane domain of GLT-1 maintains a stable position during the transport cycle; however, the effect of the transport cycle on the topology of TM4 in not well established. To further reveal the function of TM4, two cysteine pairs between TM2 and TM4 were introduced using site-directed mutagenesis. A significant decrease of transport activity was observed in the I93C/V241C and I97C/V241C mutants upon application of the oxidative cross-linking reagent, copper (II) (1,10-phenanthroline)3 (CuPh), which suggests that a conformational shift is essential for transporter activity. Furthermore, the decrease in activity by CuPh crosslinking was enhanced in external media with glutamate or potassium, which suggests that TM2 and TM4 assume closer proximity in the inward-facing conformation of the transporter. Our results suggest that the TM4 domain of GLT-1, and potentially other glutamate transporters, undergoes a complex conformational shift during substrate translocation, which involves an increase in the proximity of the TM2 and TM4 domains in the inward-facing conformation. PMID:27698371

  12. Effect of MS-153, a glutamate transporter activator, on the conditioned rewarding effects of morphine, methamphetamine and cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takayuki; Fujio, Mayumi; Ozawa, Tohru; Minami, Masabumi; Satoh, Masamichi

    2005-01-30

    There is a body of evidence implying the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the conditioned rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. It is recognized that the release of extracellular glutamate from nerve terminals is counterbalanced by the functions of neuronal and glial glutamate transporters. In the present study, we investigated the effects of (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), a glutamate transporter activator, on the induction of the conditioned place preference to morphine, methamphetamine and cocaine in mice. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mice were conditioned with repeated subcutaneous injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), methamphetamine (2 mg/kg) or cocaine (8 mg/kg) in combination with or without MS-153 (3 and 10 mg/kg). Co-administration of MS-153 at a dose of 10 mg/kg, but not 3 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the induction of conditioned place preference to morphine, methamphetamine and cocaine. However, MS-153 itself produced neither conditioned place preference nor aversion. On the other hand, co-administration of MS-153 (10 mg/kg) did not alter the acute locomotor activation elicited by a single injection of morphine, methamphetamine and cocaine. These results suggest that MS-153, a glutamate transporter activator, has an inhibitory effect on the conditioned rewarding effects of morphine, methamphetamine and cocaine without affecting their acute locomotor responses.

  13. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. PMID:27422519

  14. Analogies between respiration and a light-driven proton pump as sources of energy for active glutamate transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belliveau, J. W.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Halobacterium halobium is known to contain sheets of bacteriorhodopsin, a pigment which upon exposure to light undergoes cyclic protonation and deprotonation, resulting in net H(+) translocation. In this paper, experiments were conducted to test H. halobium cell envelope vesicles for respiration-induced glutamate uptake. It is shown that glutamate transport in H. halobium cell envelope vesicles can occur as a result of respiration, as well as light acting on bacteriorhodopsin. Glutamate transport can be energized by the oxidation of dimethyl phenylenediamine, and the properties of the transport system are entirely analogous to those observed with illumination as the source of energy. In the case of respiration-dependent glutamate transport, the transportation is also driven by a Na(+) gradient, thereby confirming the existence of a single glutamate transport system independent of the source of energy. The analogy observed is indirect evidence that the cytochrome oxidase of H. halobium functions as a H(+) pump.

  15. L-glutamate and glutamine improve haemodynamic function and restore myocardial glycogen content during postischaemic reperfusion: A radioactive tracer study in the rat isolated heart.

    PubMed

    Støttrup, Nicolaj B; Kristiansen, Steen B; Løfgren, Bo; Hansen, Bo Falck; Kimose, Hans-Henrik; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Nielsen, Torsten Toftegaard

    2006-11-01

    1. L-Glutamate and glutamine have been suggested to have cardioprotective effects. However, the issue is controversial and the metabolic mechanisms underlying a beneficial effect are not well understood. 2. In the present study we investigated the effects of L-glutamate and glutamine on haemodynamic recovery, the rate of de novo glycogen synthesis and myocardial glucose uptake during postischaemic reperfusion. 3. Hearts from male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided into three groups as follows: (i) control (n = 12); (ii) L-glutamate (n = 12); and (iii) glutamine (n = 12). Hearts were mounted in a Langendorff preparation and perfused with oxygenated Krebs'-Henseleit solution at 80 mmHg and 37C. Global ischaemia for 20 min was followed by 15 min reperfusion, during which L-glutamate (50 mmol/L) or glutamine (20 mmol/L) were administered. Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), de novo synthesis of glycogen using [14C]-glucose and myocardial glucose uptake using D-[2-3H]-glucose were measured. 4. L-Glutamate and glutamine increased postischaemic LVDP (P < 0.01 vs control hearts for both). L-Glutamate and glutamine increased de novo glycogen synthesis by 78% (P < 0.001) and 55% (P < 0.01), respectively. At the end of reperfusion, total myocardial glycogen content was increased by both L-glutamate and glutamine (5.7 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.7 micromol/g wet weight, respectively; P < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively) compared with that in control hearts (3.6 +/- 0.4 micromol/g wet weight). Neither L-glutamate nor glutamine affected myocardial glucose uptake during reperfusion. 5. Improved postischaemic haemodynamic recovery after L-glutamate and glutamine supplementation during reperfusion is associated with increased de novo glycogen synthesis, suggesting a favourable modulation of intracellular myocardial carbohydrate metabolism.

  16. Thinking outside the cleft to understand synaptic activity: contribution of the cystine-glutamate antiporter (System xc-) to normal and pathological glutamatergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Richard; Lutgen, Victoria; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2012-07-01

    System x(c)(-) represents an intriguing target in attempts to understand the pathological states of the central nervous system. Also called a cystine-glutamate antiporter, system x(c)(-) typically functions by exchanging one molecule of extracellular cystine for one molecule of intracellular glutamate. Nonvesicular glutamate released during cystine-glutamate exchange activates extrasynaptic glutamate receptors in a manner that shapes synaptic activity and plasticity. These findings contribute to the intriguing possibility that extracellular glutamate is regulated by a complex network of release and reuptake mechanisms, many of which are unique to glutamate and rarely depicted in models of excitatory signaling. Because system x(c)(-) is often expressed on non-neuronal cells, the study of cystine-glutamate exchange may advance the emerging viewpoint that glia are active contributors to information processing in the brain. It is noteworthy that system x(c)(-) is at the interface between excitatory signaling and oxidative stress, because the uptake of cystine that results from cystine-glutamate exchange is critical in maintaining the levels of glutathione, a critical antioxidant. As a result of these dual functions, system x(c)(-) has been implicated in a wide array of central nervous system diseases ranging from addiction to neurodegenerative disorders to schizophrenia. In the current review, we briefly discuss the major cellular components that regulate glutamate homeostasis, including glutamate release by system x(c)(-). This is followed by an in-depth discussion of system x(c)(-) as it relates to glutamate release, cystine transport, and glutathione synthesis. Finally, the role of system x(c)(-) is surveyed across a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Glutamate Transporter-Mediated Glutamate Secretion in the Mammalian Pineal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Uehara, Shunsuke; Muroyama, Akiko; Hille, Bertil; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Koh, Duk-Su

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are expressed throughout the central nervous system where their major role is to clear released glutamate from presynaptic terminals. Here we report a novel function of the transporter in rat pinealocytes. This electrogenic transporter conducted inward current in response to L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate and depolarized the membrane in patch clamp experiments. Ca2+ imaging demonstrated that the transporter-mediated depolarization induced a significant Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ rise finally evoked glutamate exocytosis as detected by carbon-fiber amperometry and by high-performance liquid chromatography. In pineal slices with densely packed pinealocytes, glutamate released from the cells effectively activated glutamate transporters in neighboring cells. The Ca2+ signal generated by KCl depolarization or acetylcholine propagated through several cell layers by virtue of the regenerative ‘glutamate-induced glutamate release’. Therefore we suggest that glutamate transporters mediate synchronized elevation of L-glutamate and thereby efficiently down-regulate melatonin secretion via previously identified inhibitory metabotropic glutamate receptors in the pineal gland. PMID:18945893

  18. Glial cell development and function in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    CHOTARD, CAROLE; SALECKER, IRIS

    2008-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, building a functional neuronal network relies on coordinating the formation, specification and survival to diverse neuronal and glial cell subtypes. The establishment of neuronal connections further depends on sequential neuron–neuron and neuron–glia interactions that regulate cell-migration patterns and axon guidance. The visual system of Drosophila has a highly regular, retinotopic organization into reiterated interconnected synaptic circuits. It is therefore an excellent invertebrate model to investigate basic cellular strategies and molecular determinants regulating the different developmental processes that lead to network formation. Studies in the visual system have provided important insights into the mechanisms by which photoreceptor axons connect with their synaptic partners within the optic lobe. In this review, we highlight that this system is also well suited for uncovering general principles that underlie glial cell biology. We describe the glial cell subtypes in the visual system and discuss recent findings about their development and migration. Finally, we outline the pivotal roles of glial cells in mediating neural circuit assembly, boundary formation, neural proliferation and survival, as well as synaptic function. PMID:18333286

  19. Mechanisms of Aβ Clearance and Degradation by Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Miriam; Sastre, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells have a variety of functions in the brain, ranging from immune defense against external and endogenous hazardous stimuli, regulation of synaptic formation, calcium homeostasis, and metabolic support for neurons. Their dysregulation can contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One of the most important functions of glial cells in AD is the regulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in the brain. Microglia and astrocytes have been reported to play a central role as moderators of Aβ clearance and degradation. The mechanisms of Aβ degradation by glial cells include the production of proteases, including neprilysin, the insulin degrading enzyme, and the endothelin-converting enzymes, able to hydrolyse Aβ at different cleavage sites. Besides these enzymes, other proteases have been described to have some role in Aβ elimination, such as plasminogen activators, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and matrix metalloproteinases. Other relevant mediators that are released by glial cells are extracellular chaperones, involved in the clearance of Aβ alone or in association with receptors/transporters that facilitate their exit to the blood circulation. These include apolipoproteins, α2macroglobulin, and α1-antichymotrypsin. Finally, astrocytes and microglia have an essential role in phagocytosing Aβ, in many cases via a number of receptors that are expressed on their surface. In this review, we examine all of these mechanisms, providing an update on the latest research in this field. PMID:27458370

  20. Mechanisms of Aβ Clearance and Degradation by Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ries, Miriam; Sastre, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells have a variety of functions in the brain, ranging from immune defense against external and endogenous hazardous stimuli, regulation of synaptic formation, calcium homeostasis, and metabolic support for neurons. Their dysregulation can contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the most important functions of glial cells in AD is the regulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in the brain. Microglia and astrocytes have been reported to play a central role as moderators of Aβ clearance and degradation. The mechanisms of Aβ degradation by glial cells include the production of proteases, including neprilysin, the insulin degrading enzyme, and the endothelin-converting enzymes, able to hydrolyse Aβ at different cleavage sites. Besides these enzymes, other proteases have been described to have some role in Aβ elimination, such as plasminogen activators, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and matrix metalloproteinases. Other relevant mediators that are released by glial cells are extracellular chaperones, involved in the clearance of Aβ alone or in association with receptors/transporters that facilitate their exit to the blood circulation. These include apolipoproteins, α2macroglobulin, and α1-antichymotrypsin. Finally, astrocytes and microglia have an essential role in phagocytosing Aβ, in many cases via a number of receptors that are expressed on their surface. In this review, we examine all of these mechanisms, providing an update on the latest research in this field. PMID:27458370

  1. Glutamate transporter dysfunction associated with nerve injury-induced pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Napier, Ian A; Mohammadi, Sarasa A; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction at glutamatergic synapses has been proposed as a mechanism in the development of neuropathic pain. Here we sought to determine whether peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain results in functional changes to primary afferent synapses. Signs of neuropathic pain as well as an induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein in immunostained spinal cord sections 4 days after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve indicated the induction of neuropathic pain. We found that following nerve injury, no discernable change to kinetics of dl-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) could be observed in dorsal horn (lamina I/II) neurons compared with those of naïve mice. However, we did find that nerve injury was accompanied by slowed decay of the early phase of eEPSCs in the presence of glutamate transporter inhibition by the competitive nontransportable inhibitor dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA). Concomitantly, expression patterns for the two major glutamate transporters in the spinal cord, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) 1 and EAAT2, were found to be reduced at this time (4 days postinjury). We then sought to directly determine whether nerve injury results in glutamate spillover to NMDARs at dorsal horn synapses. By employing the use-dependent NMDAR blocker (±)MK-801 to block subsynaptic receptors, we found that although TBOA-induced spillover to extrasynaptic receptors trended to increased activation of these receptors after nerve injury, this was not significant compared with naïve mice. Together, these results suggest the development of neuropathic pain involves subtle changes to glutamate transporter expression and function that could contribute to neuropathic pain during excessive synaptic activity. PMID:22072505

  2. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    PubMed

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  3. Glial fibrillary acidic protein is a body fluid biomarker for glial pathology in human disease.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2015-03-10

    This review on the role of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as a biomarker for astroglial pathology in neurological diseases provides background to protein synthesis, assembly, function and degeneration. Qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques for the investigation of human tissue and biological fluid samples are discussed including partial lack of parallelism and multiplexing capabilities. Pathological implications are reviewed in view of immunocytochemical, cell-culture and genetic findings. Particular emphasis is given to neurodegeneration related to autoimmune astrocytopathies and to genetic gain of function mutations. The current literature on body fluid levels of GFAP in human disease is summarised and illustrated by disease specific meta-analyses. In addition to the role of GFAP as a diagnostic biomarker for chronic disease, there are important data on the prognostic value for acute conditions. The published evidence permits to classify the dominant GFAP signatures in biological fluids. This classification may serve as a template for supporting diagnostic criteria of autoimmune astrocytopathies, monitoring disease progression in toxic gain of function mutations, clinical treatment trials (secondary outcome and toxicity biomarker) and provide prognostic information in neurocritical care if used within well defined time-frames.

  4. Treatment with UDP-glucose, GDNF, and memantine promotes SVZ and white matter self-repair by endogenous glial progenitor cells in neonatal rats with ischemic PVL.

    PubMed

    Li, W-J; Mao, F-X; Chen, H-J; Qian, L-H; Buzby, J S

    2015-01-22

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is one of the foremost neurological conditions leading to long-term abnormalities in premature infants. Since it is difficult to prevent initiation of this damage in utero, promoting the innate regenerative potential of the brain after birth may provide a more feasible, prospective therapy for PVL. Treatment with UDP-glucose (UDPG), an endogenous agonist of G protein-coupled receptor 17 (GPR17) that may enhance endogenous self-repair potentiality, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a neurotrophic factor associated with the growth and survival of nerve cells, and memantine, a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that block ischemia-induced glutamate signal transduction, has been reported to achieve functional, neurological improvement in neonatal rats with PVL. The aim of the present study was to further explore whether UDPG, GDNF and/or memantine could promote corresponding self-repair of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and white matter (WM) in neonatal rats with ischemia-induced PVL. SVZ or WM tissue samples and cultured glial progenitor cells derived from a 5 day-old neonatal rat model of PVL were utilized for studying response to UDPG, GDNF and memantine in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Labeling with 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and immunofluorescent cell lineage markers after hypoxia-ischemia or oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) revealed that UDPG, GDNF and memantine each significantly increased glial progenitor cells and preoligodendrocytes (preOLs), as well as more differentiated immature and mature oligodendrocyte (OL), in both the SVZ and WM in vivo or in vitro. SVZ and WM glial cell apoptosis was also significantly reduced by UDPG, GDNF or memantine, both in vivo and in vitro. These results indicated that UDPG, GDNF or memantine may promote endogenous self-repair by stimulating proliferation of glial progenitor cells derived from both the SVZ and WM, activating their

  5. Presynaptic Na+-dependent transport and exocytose of GABA and glutamate in brain in hypergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Pozdnyakova, N.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate are the most widespread neurotransmitter amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is now widely recognized as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. L-glutamate mediates the most of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the brain. They involved in the main aspects of normal brain function. The nerve terminals (synaptosomes) offer several advantages as a model system for the study of general mechanisms of neurosecretion. Our data allowed to conclude that exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10G for 1 hour) had a profound effect on synaptic processes in brain. Comparative analysis of uptake and release of GABA and glutamate have demonstrated that hypergravity loading evokes oppositely directed alterations in inhibitory and excitatory signal transmission. We studied the maximal velocities of [^3H]GABA reuptake and revealed more than twofold enhancement of GABA transporter activity (Vmax rises from 1.4 |pm 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for animals exposed to hypergravity (P ≤ 0.05)). Recently we have also demonstrated the significant lowering of glutamate transporter activity (Vmax of glutamate reuptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein in the group of animals, exposed to the hypergravity stress (P ≤ 0.05)). Significant changes occurred in release of neurotransmitters induced by stimulating exocytosis with the agents, which depolarized nerve terminal plasma membrane. Depolarization-evoked Ca2+-stimulated release was more abundant for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11,74 ±1,2 % of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively (P≤0.05)) and was essentially less for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%) after exposure of animals to centrifuge induced artificial gravity. Changes observed in depolarization-evoked exocytotic release

  6. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory–inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster

  7. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway.

  8. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  9. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Camandola, Simonetta

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  10. Connexin and pannexin hemichannels in brain glial cells: properties, pharmacology, and roles

    PubMed Central

    Giaume, Christian; Leybaert, Luc; C. Naus, Christian; C. Sáez, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Functional interaction between neurons and glia is an exciting field that has expanded tremendously during the past decade. Such partnership has multiple impacts on neuronal activity and survival. Indeed, numerous findings indicate that glial cells interact tightly with neurons in physiological as well as pathological situations. One typical feature of glial cells is their high expression level of gap junction protein subunits, named connexins (Cxs), thus the membrane channels they form may contribute to neuroglial interaction that impacts neuronal activity and survival. While the participation of gap junction channels in neuroglial interactions has been regularly reviewed in the past, the other channel function of Cxs, i.e., hemichannels located at the cell surface, has only recently received attention. Gap junction channels provide the basis for a unique direct cell-to-cell communication, whereas Cx hemichannels allow the exchange of ions and signaling molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular medium, thus supporting autocrine and paracrine communication through a process referred to as “gliotransmission,” as well as uptake and release of metabolites. More recently, another family of proteins, termed pannexins (Panxs), has been identified. These proteins share similar membrane topology but no sequence homology with Cxs. They form multimeric membrane channels with pharmacology somewhat overlapping with that of Cx hemichannels. Such duality has led to several controversies in the literature concerning the identification of the molecular channel constituents (Cxs versus Panxs) in glia. In the present review, we update and discuss the knowledge of Cx hemichannels and Panx channels in glia, their properties and pharmacology, as well as the understanding of their contribution to neuroglial interactions in brain health and disease. PMID:23882216

  11. Effect of environmental enrichment on dopamine and serotonin transporters and glutamate neurotransmission in medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Darna, Mahesh; Beckmann, Joshua S; Gipson, Cassandra D; Bardo, Michael T; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have reported that rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) have decreased dopamine transporter (DAT) function and expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as well as increased d-amphetamine-induced glutamate release in nucleus accumbens compared to rats raised in an isolated condition (IC). In these previous studies, DAT function and expression were evaluated using mPFC pooled from four rats for each condition to obtain kinetic parameters due to sparse DAT expression in mPFC. In contrast, accumbal glutamate release was determined using individual rats. The current study extends the previous work and reports on the optimization of DAT and serotonin transporter (SERT) functional assays, as well as cell surface expression assays using both mPFC and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) from individual EC or IC rats. In addition, the effect of d-amphetamine on glutamate release in mPFC and OFC of EC and IC rats was determined using in vivo microdialysis. Results show that environmental enrichment decreased maximal transport velocity (Vmax) for [(3)H]dopamine uptake in mPFC, but increased Vmax for [(3)H]dopamine uptake in OFC. Corresponding changes in DAT cell surface expression were not found. In contrast, Vmax for [(3)H]serotonin uptake and cellular localization of SERT in mPFC and OFC were not different between EC and IC rats. Further, acute d-amphetamine (2mg/kg, s.c.) increased extracellular glutamate concentrations in mPFC of EC rats only and in OFC of IC rats only. Overall, these results suggest that enrichment produces long-lasting alterations in mPFC and OFC DAT function via a trafficking-independent mechanism, as well as differential glutamate release in mPFC and OFC. Rearing-induced modulation of DAT function and glutamate release in prefrontal cortical subregions may contribute to the known protective effects of enrichment on drug abuse vulnerability.

  12. Excess cerebral TNF causing glutamate excitotoxicity rationalizes treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurogenic pain by anti-TNF agents.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ian A; Vissel, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    The basic mechanism of the major neurodegenerative diseases, including neurogenic pain, needs to be agreed upon before rational treatments can be determined, but this knowledge is still in a state of flux. Most have agreed for decades that these disease states, both infectious and non-infectious, share arguments incriminating excitotoxicity induced by excessive extracellular cerebral glutamate. Excess cerebral levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are also documented in the same group of disease states. However, no agreement exists on overarching mechanism for the harmful effects of excess TNF, nor, indeed how extracellular cerebral glutamate reaches toxic levels in these conditions. Here, we link the two, collecting and arguing the evidence that, across the range of neurodegenerative diseases, excessive TNF harms the central nervous system largely through causing extracellular glutamate to accumulate to levels high enough to inhibit synaptic activity or kill neurons and therefore their associated synapses as well. TNF can be predicted from the broader literature to cause this glutamate accumulation not only by increasing glutamate production by enhancing glutaminase, but in addition simultaneously reducing glutamate clearance by inhibiting re-uptake proteins. We also discuss the effects of a TNF receptor biological fusion protein (etanercept) and the indirect anti-TNF agents dithio-thalidomides, nilotinab, and cannabinoids on these neurological conditions. The therapeutic effects of 6-diazo-5-oxo-norleucine, ceptriaxone, and riluzole, agents unrelated to TNF but which either inhibit glutaminase or enhance re-uptake proteins, but do not do both, as would anti-TNF agents, are also discussed in this context. By pointing to excess extracellular glutamate as the target, these arguments greatly strengthen the case, put now for many years, to test appropriately delivered ant-TNF agents to treat neurodegenerative diseases in randomly controlled trials. PMID:27596607

  13. Telmisartan Modulates Glial Activation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Torika, Nofar; Asraf, Keren; Danon, Abraham; Apte, Ron N.; Fleisher-Berkovich, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    The circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including the biologically active angiotensin II, is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of blood pressure conserved through evolution. Angiotensin II components of the RAS have also been identified in the brain. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuromodulators, such as angiotensin II can induce (through angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R)) some of the inflammatory actions of brain glial cells and influence brain inflammation. Moreover, in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) models, where neuroinflammation occurs, increased levels of cortical AT1Rs have been shown. Still, the precise role of RAS in neuroinflammation is not completely clear. The overall aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of RAS in the modulation of glial functions and AD pathology. To reach this goal, the specific aims of the present study were a. to investigate the long term effect of telmisartan (AT1R blocker) on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1-β (IL1-β) and nitric oxide (NO) release from glial cells. b. to examine the effect of intranasally administered telmisartan on amyloid burden and microglial activation in 5X familial AD (5XFAD) mice. Telmisartan effects in vivo were compared to those of perindopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor). Long-term-exposure of BV2 microglia to telmisartan significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced NO, inducible NO synthase, TNF-α and IL1-β synthesis. The effect of Telmisartan on NO production in BV2 cells was confirmed also in primary neonatal rat glial cells. Intranasal administration of telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day) for up to two months significantly reduced amyloid burden and CD11b expression (a marker for microglia) both in the cortex and hipoccampus of 5XFAD. Based on the current view of RAS and our data, showing reduced amyloid burden and glial activation in the brains of 5XFAD transgenic mice, one may envision potential intervention with the progression

  14. Telmisartan Modulates Glial Activation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Torika, Nofar; Asraf, Keren; Danon, Abraham; Apte, Ron N; Fleisher-Berkovich, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    The circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including the biologically active angiotensin II, is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of blood pressure conserved through evolution. Angiotensin II components of the RAS have also been identified in the brain. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuromodulators, such as angiotensin II can induce (through angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R)) some of the inflammatory actions of brain glial cells and influence brain inflammation. Moreover, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) models, where neuroinflammation occurs, increased levels of cortical AT1Rs have been shown. Still, the precise role of RAS in neuroinflammation is not completely clear. The overall aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of RAS in the modulation of glial functions and AD pathology. To reach this goal, the specific aims of the present study were a. to investigate the long term effect of telmisartan (AT1R blocker) on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1-β (IL1-β) and nitric oxide (NO) release from glial cells. b. to examine the effect of intranasally administered telmisartan on amyloid burden and microglial activation in 5X familial AD (5XFAD) mice. Telmisartan effects in vivo were compared to those of perindopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor). Long-term-exposure of BV2 microglia to telmisartan significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced NO, inducible NO synthase, TNF-α and IL1-β synthesis. The effect of Telmisartan on NO production in BV2 cells was confirmed also in primary neonatal rat glial cells. Intranasal administration of telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day) for up to two months significantly reduced amyloid burden and CD11b expression (a marker for microglia) both in the cortex and hipoccampus of 5XFAD. Based on the current view of RAS and our data, showing reduced amyloid burden and glial activation in the brains of 5XFAD transgenic mice, one may envision potential intervention with the progression of

  15. Emerging aspects of dietary glutamate metabolism in the developing gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as a flavour additive in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is exten...

  16. Scanning with L-(/sup 13/N) glutamate: Assessment of the response to chemotherapy of a patient with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sordillo, P.P.; Reiman, R.E.; Gelbard, A.S.; Benua, R.S.; Magill, G.B.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    The use of /sup 13/N-labeled L-glutamate as an imaging agent in a patient with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is described. Localization of /sup 13/N in a large, poorly defined tumor of the left pectoral region was seen, and clinically occult right axilliary metastases were also detected. A marked reduction in uptake in these areas occurred after chemotherapy, paralleling the clinical disappearance of tumor. These changes were verified on gallium scan. /sup 13/N-labeled glutamate may be useful as an imaging agent, especially in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas.

  17. Augmented cystine-glutamate exchange by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide signaling via the VPAC1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Resch, Jon M; Albano, Rebecca; Liu, XiaoQian; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A; Choi, SuJean

    2014-07-28

    In the central nervous system, cystine import in exchange for glutamate through system xc(-) is critical for the production of the antioxidant glutathione by astrocytes, as well as the maintenance of extracellular glutamate. Therefore, regulation of system xc(-) activity affects multiple aspects of cellular physiology and may contribute to disease states. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuronally-derived peptide that has already been demonstrated to modulate multiple aspects of glutamate signaling suggesting PACAP may also target activity of cystine-glutamate exchange via system xc(-) . In the current study, 24-hour treatment of primary cortical cultures containing neurons and glia with PACAP concentration-dependently increased system xc(-) function as measured by radiolabeled cystine uptake. Furthermore, the increase in cystine uptake was completely abolished by the system xc(-) inhibitor, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG), attributing increases in cystine uptake specifically to system xc(-) activity. Time course and quantitative PCR results indicate that PACAP signaling may increase cystine-glutamate exchange by increasing expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system xc(-) . Furthermore, the potentiation of system xc(-) activity by PACAP occurs via a PKA-dependent pathway that is not mediated by the PAC1R, but rather the shared vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor VPAC1R. Finally, assessment of neuronal, astrocytic, and microglial-enriched cultures demonstrated that only astrocyte-enriched cultures exhibit enhanced cystine uptake following both PACAP and VIP treatment. These data introduce a novel mechanism by which both PACAP and VIP regulate system xc(-) activity. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    FEATHERSTONE, DAVID E.; SHIPPY, SCOTT A.

    2008-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μM of glutamate is high enough to cause constitutive desensitization of most glutamate receptors. Therefore, most glutamate receptors in vivo may be constitutively desensitized, and ambient extracellular glutamate and receptor desensitization may be potent but generally unrecognized regulators of synaptic transmission. Unfortunately, the mechanisms regulating ambient extracellular glutamate and glutamate receptor desensitization remain poorly understood and understudied. PMID:17947494

  19. Construction of a potentiometric glutamate biosensor for determination of glutamate in some real samples.

    PubMed

    Y Lmaz, Demet; Karaku, Emine

    2011-12-01

    The potentiometric glutamate biosensor based on ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode was constructed by chemically immobilizing glutamate oxidase. Ammonium ions produced after an enzymatic reaction were determined potentiometrically. We determined the optimum working conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, lifetime, response time, linear working range, kinetic constants (K(m) and V(max)) of glutamate oxidase enzyme used for biosensor construction values, and other response characteristics. Additionally, glutamate assay in some real samples such as chicken bullion, healthy human serum, and commercial multipower amino acid mixture were also successfully carried out. The results showed good agreement with previously reported values.

  20. Brain glutamate decarboxylase and pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Choi, S Y; Khemlani, L S; Churchich, J E

    1992-01-01

    Porcine brain glutamate decarboxylase was examined for the presence of covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). HPLC analysis of pure glutamate decarboxylase subjected to the hexanol extraction procedure gave negative results when monitored at 320 nm, the maximum of absorbance of 4-hydroxy-5-hexoxy-PQQ. Resolved glutamate decarboxylase exhibits a structureless absorption band at wavelengths longer than 300 nm which cannot be attributed to PQQ. The holoenzyme is not a pyridoxal-quinoprotein; its catalytic mechanism involves the participation of only one cofactor, i.e. pyridoxal-5-P. Free PQQ is a strong inhibitor of the decarboxylase (Ki = 13 microM) and the reaction with the protein results in spectral changes resembling those of polylysine treated with PQQ. If the concentration of free PQQ in some regions of the brain reaches the micromolar level, then PQQ might play a role in the regulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity.

  1. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  2. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  3. [Glutamate transporter dysfunction and major mental illnesses].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohichi

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and plays an important role in most aspects of normal brain function. In spite of its importance as a neurotransmitter, excess glutamate is toxic to neurons. Clearance of extracellular glutamate is critical for maintenance of low extracellular glutamate concentration, and occurs in large part through the activity of GLT1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1), which are primarily expressed by astrocytes. Rare variants and down-regulation of GLT1 and GLAST, in psychiatric disorders have been reported. In this review, we demonstrate that various kinds of GLT1 and/or GLAST knockout mice replicate many aspects of the behavioral abnormalities seen in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, obsessive -compulsive disorders, autism, epilepsy and addiction. PMID:26793898

  4. Glial β-Oxidation regulates Drosophila Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Joachim G.; Laranjeira, Antonio; Van Huffel, Leen; Gärtner, Annette; Vilain, Sven; Bastianen, Jarl; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    The brain's impotence to utilize long-chain fatty acids as fuel, one of the dogmas in neuroscience, is surprising, since the nervous system is the tissue most energy consuming and most vulnerable to a lack of energy. Challenging this view, we here show in vivo that loss of the Drosophila carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), an enzyme required for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids as substrates for energy production, results in the accumulation of triacylglyceride-filled lipid droplets in adult Drosophila brain but not in obesity. CPT2 rescue in glial cells alone is sufficient to restore triacylglyceride homeostasis, and we suggest that this is mediated by the release of ketone bodies from the rescued glial cells. These results demonstrate that the adult brain is able to catabolize fatty acids for cellular energy production. PMID:25588812

  5. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylation in Chlorella12

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. R.; Stiller, Mary

    1970-01-01

    The decarboxylation of endogenous free glutamic acid by Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Marburg strain, was induced by a variety of metabolic poisons, by anaerobic conditions, and by freezing and thawing the cells. The rate of decarboxylation was proportional to the concentration of inhibitor present. Possible mechanisms which relate the effects of the various conditions on glutamate decarboxylation and oxygen consumption by Chlorella are discussed. Images PMID:5429350

  6. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44

  7. In vivo long-term synaptic plasticity of glial cells.

    PubMed

    Bélair, Eve-Lyne; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Evidence showing the ability of glial cells to detect, respond to and modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity has contributed to the notion of glial cells as active synaptic partners. However, synaptically induced plasticity of glia themselves remains ill defined. Here we used the amphibian neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to study plasticity of perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), glial cells at this synapse, following long-term in vivo modifications of synaptic activity. We used two models that altered synaptic activity in different manners. First, chronic blockade of postsynaptic nicotinic receptors using alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) decreased facilitation, increased synaptic depression and decreased post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). Second, chronic nerve stimulation increased facilitation and resistance to synaptic depression, while leaving PTP unaltered. Our results indicate that there is no direct relationship between transmitter release and PSC calcium responses. Indeed, despite changes in transmitter release and plasticity in stimulated NMJs, nerve-evoked PSC calcium responses were similar to control. Similarly, PSC calcium responses in alpha-BTx treated NMJs were delayed and smaller in amplitude, even though basal level of transmitter release was increased. Also, when isolating purinergic and muscarinic components of PSC calcium responses, we found an increased sensitivity to ATP and a decreased sensitivity to muscarine in chronically stimulated NMJs. Conversely, in alpha-BTx treated NMJs, PSC sensitivity remained unaffected, but ATP- and muscarine-induced calcium responses were prolonged. Thus, our results reveal complex modifications of PSC properties, with differential modulation of signalling pathways that might underlie receptor regulation or changes in Ca(2+) handling. Importantly, similar to neurons, perisynaptic glial cells undergo plastic changes induced by altered synaptic activity.

  8. Redefining the classification of AMPA-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Derek

    2012-01-01

    AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) represent the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the developing and adult vertebrate CNS. They are crucial for the normal hardwiring of glutamatergic circuits but also fine tune synaptic strength by cycling into and out of synapses during periods of sustained patterned activity or altered homeostasis. AMPARs are grouped into two functionally distinct tetrameric assemblies based on the inclusion or exclusion of the GluA2 receptor subunit. GluA2-containing receptors are thought to be the most abundant AMPAR in the CNS, typified by their small unitary events, Ca(2+) impermeability and insensitivity to polyamine block. In contrast, GluA2-lacking AMPARs exhibit large unitary conductance, marked divalent permeability and nano- to micromolar polyamine affinity. Here, I review evidence for the existence of a third class of AMPAR which, though similarly Ca(2+) permeable, is characterized by its near-insensitivity to internal and external channel block by polyamines. This novel class of AMPAR is most notably found at multivesicular release synapses found in the avian auditory brainstem and mammalian retina. Curiously, these synapses lack NMDA-type iGluRs, which are conventionally associated with controlling AMPAR insertion. The lack of NMDARs suggests that a different set of rules may govern AMPAR cycling at these synapses. AMPARs with similar functional profiles are also found on some glial cells suggesting they may have a more widespread distribution in the mammalian CNS. I conclude by noting that modest changes to the ion-permeation pathway might be sufficient to retain divalent permeability whilst eliminating polyamine sensitivity. Consequently, this emerging AMPAR subclass need not be assembled from novel subunits, yet to be cloned, but could simply occur by varying the stoichiometry of existing proteins.

  9. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  10. Medroxyprogesterone acetate exacerbates glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon; Morales, Alison; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2006-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone functions as a neuroprotective agent whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; Provera) does not. Moreover, MPA antagonized the neuroprotective and neurotrophic outcomes induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). Towards developing effective hormone therapies for protection against neurodegeneration, we sought to determine whether formulation, chemical features or prevention versus treatment mode of exposure affected the outcome of MPA treatment in survival of primary hippocampal neurons. Results of these analyses indicated that both crystalline MPA and a pharmaceutical formulation (Depo-Provera) lacked neuroprotective efficacy, indicating that the effects were not dependent upon MPA formulation. Likewise, MPA in the prevention and treatment paradigms were equally ineffective at promoting neuronal survival, indicating that timing of MPA administration was not a factor. Further, the detrimental effects of MPA were not due to the presence of the acetate group, as medroxyprogesterone was as ineffective as MPA in promoting neuronal survival. Moreover, MPA pretreatment exacerbated neuron death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity as indicated by a 40% increase in neuron death determined by direct live/dead cell count and a commensurate increase in the number of positive cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling. Collectively these results predict that the progestin formulation of hormone therapy will affect the vulnerability of the central nervous system to degenerative insults.

  11. Activated Scavenger Receptor A Promotes Glial Internalization of Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei-wei; Wang, Shao-wei; Xu, Peng-xin; Yu, Xiao-lin; Liu, Rui-tian

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates have a pivotal role in pathological processing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The clearance of Aβ monomer or aggregates is a causal strategy for AD treatment. Microglia and astrocytes are the main macrophages that exert critical neuroprotective roles in the brain. They may effectively clear the toxic accumulation of Aβ at the initial stage of AD, however, their functions are attenuated because of glial overactivation. In this study, we first showed that heptapeptide XD4 activates the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) on the glia by increasing the binding of Aβ to SR-A, thereby promoting glial phagocytosis of Aβ oligomer in microglia and astrocytes and triggering intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Moreover, XD4 enhances the internalization of Aβ monomers to microglia and astrocytes through macropinocytosis or SR-A-mediated phagocytosis. Furthermore, XD4 significantly inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytotoxicity to glial cells and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may provide a novel strategy for AD treatment by activating SR-A. PMID:24718459

  12. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771.

  13. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  14. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771. PMID:27228454

  15. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-01

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities.

  16. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain

  17. Oxidation of Proline and Glutamate by Mitochondria of the Inflorescence of Voodoo Lily (Sauromatum guttatum) 1

    PubMed Central

    Skubatz, Hanna; Meeuse, Bastiaan J. D.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    1989-01-01

    In appendices of Sauromatum guttatum that are developing thermogenicity, mitochondria isolated from successive developmental stages of the inflorescence show an increase in the oxidation rates of proline and glutamate. A similar rise in the oxidation rates of these compounds is observed in mitochondria obtained from the spathe, a nonthermogenic organ of the inflorescence. Changes in oxidative metabolism were also observed in mitochondria isolated from sections of immature appendix treated with salicylic acid (SA) at 0.69 microgram per gram fresh weight indicating that they are induced by SA. At that concentration, however, SA has no effect on oxygen consumption by mitochondria in the presence of glutamate, proline, or malate. Furthermore, oxygen uptake by mitochondria in the presence of proline or glutamate is partially sensitive to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) at concentrations greater than 2 millimolar when in the presence of 1 millimolar KCN. For NADH, succinate, and malate a high capacity of the alternative (cyanide-resistant) pathway is found that is completely sensitive to SHAM at 1.5 to 4 millimolar. The increase in the mitochondrial capacity to oxidize either amino acid is also found in four other Araceae species including both thermogenic and nonthermogenic ones. After anthesis, the rates of proline and glutamate oxidation decline. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667065

  18. Mutant Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 in astrocytes: focus on glutamate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Abazyan, Sofya; Yang, Eun Ju; Abazyan, Bagrat; Xia, Meng; Yang, Chunxia; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara; Sattler, Rita; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a genetic risk factor that has been implicated in major mental disorders. DISC1 binds to and stabilizes serine racemase (SR) to regulate production of D-serine by astrocytes, contributing to glutamate (GLU) neurotransmission. However, the possible involvement of astrocytic DISC1 in synthesis, metabolism, re-uptake or secretion of GLU remains unexplored. Thus, we studied the effects of dominant-negative mutant DISC1 on various aspects of GLU metabolism using primary astrocyte cultures and the hippocampal tissue from transgenic mice with astrocyte-restricted expression of mutant DISC1. While mutant DISC1 had no significant effects on astrocyte proliferation, GLU re-uptake, Glutaminase or Glutamate carboxypeptidase II activity, expression of mutant DISC1 was associated with increased levels of alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 2, vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 3 in primary astrocytes and in the hippocampus as well as elevated expression of the NR1 subunit and diminished expression of the NR2A subunit of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus at postnatal day 21. Our findings indicate that decreased D-serine production by astrocytic mutant DISC1 may lead to compensatory changes in levels of the amino acid transporters and NMDA receptors in the context of tripartite synapse. PMID:25131692

  19. Neuronal release and successful astrocyte uptake of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters after spinal cord injury in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Valle-Maroto, Silvia María; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to mammals, the spinal cord of lampreys spontaneously recovers from a complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Understanding the differences between lampreys and mammals in their response to SCI could provide valuable information to propose new therapies. Unique properties of the astrocytes of lampreys probably contribute to the success of spinal cord regeneration. The main aim of our study was to investigate, in the sea lamprey, the release of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters and the subsequent astrocyte uptake of these neurotransmitters during the first week following a complete SCI by detecting glutamate, GABA, glycine, Hu and cytokeratin immunoreactivities. This is the first time that aminoacidergic neurotransmitter release from neurons and the subsequent astrocytic response after SCI are analysed by immunocytochemistry in any vertebrate. Spinal injury caused the immediate loss of glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivities in neurons close to the lesion site (except for the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting GABA cells). Only after SCI, astrocytes showed glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivity. Treatment with an inhibitor of glutamate transporters (DL-TBOA) showed that neuronal glutamate was actively transported into astrocytes after SCI. Moreover, after SCI, a massive accumulation of inhibitory neurotransmitters around some reticulospinal axons was observed. Presence of GABA accumulation significantly correlated with a higher survival ability of these neurons. Our data show that, in contrast to mammals, astrocytes of lampreys have a high capacity to actively uptake glutamate after SCI. GABA may play a protective role that could explain the higher regenerative and survival ability of specific descending neurons of lampreys.

  20. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  1. Spinal astrocyte gap junction and glutamate transporter expression contributes to a rat model of bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Caleb R.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence implicating astrocytes in multiple forms of chronic pain, as well as in the specific context of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). However, it is still unclear what the exact role of astrocytes may be in the context of CIPN. Findings in oxaliplatin and paclitaxel models have displayed altered expression of astrocytic gap junctions and glutamate transporters as means by which astrocytes may contribute to observed behavioral changes. The current study investigated whether these changes were also generalizable to the bortezomib CIPN. Changes in mechanical sensitivity were verified in bortezomib-treated animals, and these changes were prevented by co-treatment with a glial activation inhibitor (minocycline), a gap junction decoupler (carbenoxolone), and by a glutamate transporter upregulator (ceftriaxone). Immunohistochemistry data at day 30 in bortezomib-treated animals showed increases in expression of GFAP and connexin 43 but decrease in GLAST expression. These changes were prevented by co-treatment with minocycline. Follow-up Western blotting data showed a shift in connexin 43 from a non-phosphorylated state to a phosphorylated state, indicating increased trafficking of expressed connexin 43 to the cell membrane. These data suggest that increases in behavioral sensitivity to cutaneous stimuli may be tied to persistent synaptic glutamate resulting from increased calcium flow between spinal astrocytes. PMID:25446343

  2. Proteome Analysis and Conditional Deletion of the EAAT2 Glutamate Transporter Provide Evidence against a Role of EAAT2 in Pancreatic Insulin Secretion in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Waanders, Leonie F.; Holmseth, Silvia; Guo, Caiying; Berger, Urs V.; Li, Yuchuan; Lehre, Anne-Catherine; Lehre, Knut P.; Danbolt, Niels C.

    2014-01-01

    Islet function is incompletely understood in part because key steps in glutamate handling remain undetermined. The glutamate (excitatory amino acid) transporter 2 (EAAT2; Slc1a2) has been hypothesized to (a) provide islet cells with glutamate, (b) protect islet cells against high extracellular glutamate concentrations, (c) mediate glutamate release, or (d) control the pH inside insulin secretory granules. Here we floxed the EAAT2 gene to produce the first conditional EAAT2 knock-out mice. Crossing with Nestin-cyclization recombinase (Cre) eliminated EAAT2 from the brain, resulting in epilepsy and premature death, confirming the importance of EAAT2 for brain function and validating the genetic construction. Crossing with insulin-Cre lines (RIP-Cre and IPF1-Cre) to obtain pancreas-selective deletion did not appear to affect survival, growth, glucose tolerance, or β-cell number. We found (using TaqMan RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and proteome analysis) that the EAAT2 levels were too low to support any of the four hypothesized functions. The proteome analysis detected more than 7,000 islet proteins of which more than 100 were transporters. Although mitochondrial glutamate transporters and transporters for neutral amino acids were present at high levels, all other transporters with known ability to transport glutamate were strikingly absent. Glutamate-metabolizing enzymes were abundant. The level of glutamine synthetase was 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of glutaminase. Taken together this suggests that the uptake of glutamate by islets from the extracellular fluid is insignificant and that glutamate is intracellularly produced. Glutamine synthetase may be more important for islets than assumed previously. PMID:24280215

  3. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity in Relation to Carbon Limitation and Protein Catabolism in Carrot Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sharon A.; Stewart, George R.; Phillips, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity and function have been studied in cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L. cv Chantenay) in response to carbon and nitrogen supply in the culture medium. The specific activity of GDH was derepressed in sucrose-starved cells concomitant with protein catabolism, ammonium excretion, and the accumulation of metabolically active amino acids. The addition of sucrose led to a rapid decrease in GDH specific activity, an uptake of ammonium from the medium, and a decrease in amino acid levels. The extent of GDH derepression was correlated positively with cellular glutamate concentration. These findings strengthen the view that the function of GDH is the catabolism of glutamate, which under conditions of carbon stress provides carbon skeletons for tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. PMID:16668745

  4. Chloride enters glial cells and photoreceptors in response to light stimulation in the retina of the honey bee drone.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Orkand, R K; Yamate, C L

    1989-01-01

    Double-barrelled ion-selective microelectrodes were used to measure free [Cl-] in photoreceptors, extracellular space, and glial cells in superfused slices of drone retina. Tests indicated that with normal superfusate the intracellular electrode signal was due essentially to Cl- and not to some other interfering anion. The results indicate that Cl- is more concentrated in both photoreceptors and glial cells than would be predicted for a passive electrochemical distribution. When the photoreceptors were stimulated by a standard train of 20 ms flashes, 1/s for 90 s, their intracellular free [Cl-] (Cli) rose by 8 +/- 1 mM. At the end of stimulation Cli usually continued to rise for up to a further 2 min and then returned toward the baseline over about 10 min. During light stimulation Cli in the glia rose. The magnitude of the increase was 5.1 +/- 0.4 mM, about half the increase in Ki. In some extracellular recording sites, light stimulation caused [Cl-] to increase and in others to decrease. The mean change was -0.7 mM, SD 6.5 mM. The Cl- that entered the photoreceptors and the glia was presumably made available by the shrinking of the extracellular space. When the cells were depolarized by increasing [K+] in the superfusate from 7.5 mM to 18 mM, Cli increased. The half-time of the change in Cli was longer than the half-time of the depolarization by 10-30 s in the glia and 50-250s in the photoreceptors. During superfusion with 0 Cl- Ringer's solution, the light-induced rise in extracellular [K+] was greater by a factor of 1.4-2.7, and the clearance after the end of the stimulation was slower. The rate of increase in glial Ki during light stimulation fell; the rate of increase of glial Ki caused by superfusion with raised [K+] (in the absence of Cl-) fell more. We conclude that when extracellular [K+] is increased, entry of Cl- into the glia is necessary for part, but not all, of the net uptake of K+. During light stimulation, the observed movement of CL- into glia

  5. Astrocytes from adult Wistar rats aged in vitro show changes in glial functions.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Raupp, Gustavo Santos; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytes, the most versatile cells of the central nervous system, play an important role in the regulation of neurotransmitter homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses and the anti-inflammatory response. Recently, our group characterized cortical astrocyte cultures from adult Wistar rats. In line with that work, we studied glial function using an experimental in vitro model of aging astrocytes (30 days in vitro after reaching confluence) from newborn (NB), adult (AD) and aged (AG) Wistar rats. We evaluated metabolic parameters, such as the glucose uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and glutathione (GSH) content, as well as the GFAP, GLUT-1 and xCT expression. AD and AG astrocytes take up less glucose than NB astrocytes and had decreased GLUT1 expression levels. Furthermore, AD and AG astrocytes exhibited decreased GS activity compared to NB cells. Simultaneously, AD and AG astrocytes showed an increase in GSH levels, along with an increase in xCT expression. NB, AD and AG astrocytes presented similar morphology; however, differences in GFAP levels were observed. Taken together, these results improve the knowledge of cerebral senescence and represent an innovative tool for brain studies of aging. PMID:26210720

  6. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Chadi G.; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M.; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Mason, Graeme F.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in MDD we used in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with MDD relative to non-depressed subjects. Method 1H MRS and 13C MRS data were collected on 23 medication-free MDD and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]-glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (VTCAN) for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling, from voxels placed in the occipital cortex. Results Our main finding was that mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was reduced by 26% in MDD subjects (t = 2.57, p = 0.01). Paradoxically we found no difference in the rate of glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). We also found a significant correlation between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle considering the total sample. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities. PMID:25073688

  7. Flavor Preferences Conditioned by Dietary Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Our understanding of the molecular basis of umami taste and its appetitive qualities has been greatly aided by studies in laboratory rodents. This review describes methods for testing responses to the prototypical umami substance monosodium glutamate (MSG) in rodents. Two techniques, forced exposure to MSG and 2-bottle choice tests with ascending concentrations, were used to evaluate the responses to the taste of umami itself, and 2 other methods used oral or postoral MSG to modify the responses to other flavors. Intake and preference for MSG are enhanced in mice by experience with MSG and with other nutrients with positive postoral effects. In addition, flavor preferences are enhanced in mice and rats by gastric or intestinal MSG infusions via an associative learning process. Even mice with an impaired or absent ability to taste MSG can learn to prefer a flavor added to an MSG solution, supporting the notion that glutamate acts postorally. The more complex flavor of dashi seasoning, which includes umami substances (inosinate, glutamate), is attractive to rodents, but dashi does not condition flavor preferences. Details of the postoral glutamate detection process and the nature of the signal involved in learned preferences are still uncertain but probably involve gastric or intestinal sensors or both and vagal transmission. Some findings suggest that postoral glutamate effects may enhance food preferences in humans, but this requires further study. PMID:27422522

  8. Rheology, oxygen transfer, and molecular weight characteristics of poly(glutamic acid) fermentation by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Andrew; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2003-05-01

    Poly(glutamic acid) (PGA) is a water-soluble, biodegradable biopolymer that is produced by microbial fermentation. Recent research has shown that PGA can be used in drug delivery applications for the controlled release of paclitaxel (Taxol) in cancer treatment. A fundamental understanding of the key fermentation parameters is necessary to optimize the production and molecular weight characteristics of poly(glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis for paclitaxel and other applications of pharmaceuticals for controlled release. Because of its high molecular weight, PGA fermentation broths exhibit non-Newtonian rheology. In this article we present experimental results on the batch fermentation kinetics of PGA production, mass transfer of oxygen, specific oxygen uptake rate, broth rheology, and molecular weight characterization of the PGA biopolymer.

  9. Mechanisms underlying presynaptic Ca2+ transient and vesicular glutamate release at a CNS nerve terminal during in vitro ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Yi; Kim, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Key points Here we demonstrate presynaptic responses and mechanisms of increased vesicular glutamate release during in vitro ischaemia in the calyx of Held terminal, an experimentally accessible presynaptic terminal in the CNS. The ischaemia-induced increase in presynaptic Ca2+ was mediated by both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The reverse operation of the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) plays a key role in Ca2+ influx for triggering Ca2+ release from intracellular stores at presynaptic terminals during in vitro ischaemia. Ca2+ uptake via NCX underlies the ischaemia-induced Ca2+ rise and the consequent increase in vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in the early phase of brain ischaemia. Abstract An early consequence of brain ischaemia is an increase in vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals. However, the mechanisms of this increased glutamate release are not fully understood. Here we studied presynaptic responses and mechanisms of increased glutamate release during in vitro ischaemia, using pre- and postsynaptic whole-cell recordings and presynaptic Ca2+ imaging at the calyx of Held synapse in rat brainstem slices. Consistent with results from other brain regions, in vitro ischaemia significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) without affecting their amplitude, suggesting that ischaemia enhances vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals. We found that ischaemia-induced vesicular glutamate release was dependent on a rise in basal Ca2+ at presynaptic terminals, which resulted from extracellular Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. During early ischaemia, increased Ca2+ influx into presynaptic terminals was due to reverse operation of the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) rather than presynaptic depolarization or voltage-activated Ca2+ currents. KB-R7943, an inhibitor of NCX, prevented the

  10. Mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by glyphosate-based herbicide in immature rat hippocampus: involvement of glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Daiane; de Liz Oliveira Cavalli, Vera Lúcia; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Domingues, Juliana Tonietto; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Tasca, Carla Inês; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxic effects needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Roundup(®) (a glyphosate-based herbicide) leads to neurotoxicity in hippocampus of immature rats following acute (30min) and chronic (pregnancy and lactation) pesticide exposure. Maternal exposure to pesticide was undertaken by treating dams orally with 1% Roundup(®) (0.38% glyphosate) during pregnancy and lactation (till 15-day-old). Hippocampal slices from 15 day old rats were acutely exposed to Roundup(®) (0.00005-0.1%) during 30min and experiments were carried out to determine whether glyphosate affects (45)Ca(2+) influx and cell viability. Moreover, we investigated the pesticide effects on oxidative stress parameters, (14)C-α-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid ((14)C-MeAIB) accumulation, as well as glutamate uptake, release and metabolism. Results showed that acute exposure to Roundup(®) (30min) increases (45)Ca(2+) influx by activating NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, leading to oxidative stress and neural cell death. The mechanisms underlying Roundup(®)-induced neurotoxicity also involve the activation of CaMKII and ERK. Moreover, acute exposure to Roundup(®) increased (3)H-glutamate released into the synaptic cleft, decreased GSH content and increased the lipoperoxidation, characterizing excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. We also observed that both acute and chronic exposure to Roundup(®) decreased (3)H-glutamate uptake and metabolism, while induced (45)Ca(2+) uptake and (14)C-MeAIB accumulation in immature rat hippocampus. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Roundup(®) might lead to excessive extracellular glutamate levels and consequently to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat hippocampus.

  11. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. (/sup 3/H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate ((/sup 3/H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of (/sup 3/H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells.

  12. Distribution and Development of Peripheral Glial Cells in the Human Fetal Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Locher, Heiko; de Groot, John C. M. J.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Huisman, Margriet A.; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2014-01-01

    The adult human cochlea contains various types of peripheral glial cells that envelop or myelinate the three different domains of the spiral ganglion neurons: the central processes in the cochlear nerve, the cell bodies in the spiral ganglia, and the peripheral processes in the osseous spiral lamina. Little is known about the distribution, lineage separation and maturation of these peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea. In the current study, we observed peripheral glial cells expressing SOX10, SOX9 and S100B as early as 9 weeks of gestation (W9) in all three neuronal domains. We propose that these cells are the common precursor to both mature Schwann cells and satellite glial cells. Additionally, the peripheral glial cells located along the peripheral processes expressed NGFR, indicating a phenotype distinct from the peripheral glial cells located along the central processes. From W12, the spiral ganglion was gradually populated by satellite glial cells in a spatiotemporal gradient. In the cochlear nerve, radial sorting was accomplished by W22 and myelination started prior to myelination of the peripheral processes. The developmental dynamics of the peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea is in support of a neural crest origin. Our study provides the first overview of the distribution and maturation of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea from W9 to W22. PMID:24498246

  13. Sigma-1 receptor activation inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) cells by transactivation of glutamatergic and purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Winters, Helge; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Sigma (σ) receptor activation is known to have neuroprotective effects in the retina. Here, we show that the nonselective σ receptor agonist ditolylguanidine, and the selective σ1 receptor agonist PRE-084, inhibit the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. In contrast, PRE-084 did not inhibit the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. The effects of σ receptor agonists on the Müller cell swelling were abrogated in the presence of blockers of metabotropic glutamate and purinergic P2Y1 receptors, respectively, suggesting that σ receptor activation triggers activation of a glutamatergic-purinergic signaling cascade which is known to prevent the osmotic Müller cell swelling. The swelling-inhibitory effect of 17β-estradiol was prevented by the σ1 receptor antagonist BD1047, suggesting that the effect is mediated by σ1 receptor activation. The data may suggest that the neuroprotective effect of σ receptor activation in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial cells. PMID:26499958

  14. Effect of exposure to 1,800 MHz electromagnetic fields on heat shock proteins and glial cells in the brain of developing rats.

    PubMed

    Watilliaux, Aurélie; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Lévêque, Philippe; Jay, Thérèse M; Mallat, Michel

    2011-08-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones by children raise issues about the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the immature Central Nervous System (CNS). In the present study, we quantified cell stress and glial responses in the brain of developing rats one day after a single exposure of 2 h to a GSM 1,800 MHz signal at a brain average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the range of 1.7 to 2.5 W/kg. Young rats, exposed to EMF on postnatal days (P) 5 (n = 6), 15 (n = 5) or 35 (n = 6), were compared to pseudo-exposed littermate rats (n = 6 at all ages). We used western blotting to detect heat shock proteins (HSPs) and cytoskeleton- or neurotransmission-related proteins in the developing astroglia. The GSM signal had no significant effect on the abundance of HSP60, HSC70 or HSP90, of serine racemase, glutamate transporters including GLT1 and GLAST, or of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) in either total or soluble tissue extracts. Imunohistochemical detection of CD68 antigen in brain sections from pseudo-exposed and exposed animals did not reveal any differences in the morphology or distribution of microglial cells. These results provide no evidence for acute cell stress or glial reactions indicative of early neural cell damage, in developing brains exposed to 1,800 MHz signals in the range of SAR used in our study.

  15. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  16. 18F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    von Leden, Ramona E.; Selwyn, Reed G.; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M.; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel bio-marker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24 hours and 15 days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6 hours post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24 hours and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target. PMID:27084688

  17. A glial palisade delineates the ipsilateral optic projection in Monodelphis.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    1998-01-01

    In developing marsupials, the path taken through the optic chiasm by ipsilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cells is complicated. Just prior to entry into the chiasm, ganglion cells destined for the ipsilateral optic tract separate from the remainder of axons by turning abruptly downwards to take a position in the ventral part of the optic nerve. In this report, it is shown that a discrete population of about 10-15 large glial cells transiently form a linear array across the prechiasmatic part of the optic nerve, precisely at this axon turning point. The distinct morphology of these cells and their novel location may reflect a specialized role in axon guidance.

  18. Mood disorders: regulation by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nowak, Gabriel; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2008-03-01

    Medicinal therapies for mood disorders neither fully serve the efficacy needs of patients nor are they free of side-effect issues. Although monoamine-based therapies are the primary current treatment approaches, both preclinical and clinical findings have implicated the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders. The present commentary focuses on the metabotropic glutamate receptors and their relationship to mood disorders. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors regulate glutamate transmission by altering the release of neurotransmitter and/or modulating the post-synaptic responses to glutamate. Convergent biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, and clinical data will be reviewed that establish glutamatergic neurotransmission via mGlu receptors as a biologically relevant process in the regulation of mood and that these receptors may serve as novel targets for the discovery of small molecule modulators with unique antidepressant properties. Specifically, compounds that antagonize mGlu2, mGlu3, and/or mGlu5 receptors (e.g. LY341495, MGS0039, MPEP, MTEP) exhibit biochemical effects indicative of antidepressant effects as well as in vivo activity in animal models predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Both preclinical and clinical data have previously been presented to define NMDA and AMPA receptors as important targets for the modulation of major depression. In the present review, we present a model suggesting how the interplay of glutamate at the mGlu and at the ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors might account for the antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic- and monoaminergic-based drugs affecting mood in patients. The current data lead to the hypothesis that mGlu-based compounds and conventional antidepressants impact a network of interactive effects that converge upon a down regulation of NMDA receptor function and an enhancement in AMPA receptor signaling. PMID:18164691

  19. 13N as a tracer for studying glutamate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2010-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes studies my associates and I carried out that are relevant to the topic of the present volume [i.e. glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)] using radioactive 13N (t½ 9.96 min) as a biological tracer. These studies revealed the previously unrecognized rapidity with which nitrogen is exchanged among certain metabolites in vivo. For example, our work demonstrated that a) the t½ for conversion of portal vein ammonia to urea in the rat liver is ~10–11 sec, despite the need for five enzyme-catalyzed steps and two mitochondrial transport steps, b) the residence time for ammonia in the blood of anesthetized rats is ≤7–8 sec, c) the t½ for incorporation of blood-borne ammonia into glutamine in the normal rat brain is <3 sec, and d) equilibration between glutamate and aspartate nitrogen in rat liver is extremely rapid (seconds), a reflection of the fact that the components of the hepatic aspartate aminotransferase reaction are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Our work emphasizes the importance of the GDH reaction in rat liver as a conduit for dissimilating or assimilating ammonia as needed. In contrast, our work shows that the GDH reaction in rat brain appears to operate mostly in the direction of ammonia production (dissimilation). The importance of the GDH reaction as an endogenous source of ammonia in the brain and the relation of GDH to the brain glutamine cycle is discussed. Finally, our work integrates with the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study brain ammonia uptake and brain glutamine, respectively, in normal individuals and in patients with liver disease or other diseases associated with hyperammonemia. PMID:21108979

  20. Energy metabolism and glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain: a stoichiometric modeling perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The energetics of cerebral activity critically relies on the functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Important open questions include the relation between neuronal versus astrocytic energy demand, glucose uptake and intercellular lactate transfer, as well as their dependence on the level of activity. Results We have developed a large-scale, constraint-based network model of the metabolic partnership between astrocytes and glutamatergic neurons that allows for a quantitative appraisal of the extent to which stoichiometry alone drives the energetics of the system. We find that the velocity of the glutamate-glutamine cycle (Vcyc) explains part of the uncoupling between glucose and oxygen utilization at increasing Vcyc levels. Thus, we are able to characterize different activation states in terms of the tissue oxygen-glucose index (OGI). Calculations show that glucose is taken up and metabolized according to cellular energy requirements, and that partitioning of the sugar between different cell types is not significantly affected by Vcyc. Furthermore, both the direction and magnitude of the lactate shuttle between neurons and astrocytes turn out to depend on the relative cell glucose uptake while being roughly independent of Vcyc. Conclusions These findings suggest that, in absence of ad hoc activity-related constraints on neuronal and astrocytic metabolism, the glutamate-glutamine cycle does not control the relative energy demand of neurons and astrocytes, and hence their glucose uptake and lactate exchange. PMID:24112710

  1. Glutamate metabolism in HIV-1 infected macrophages: Role of HIV-1 Vpr.

    PubMed

    Datta, Prasun K; Deshmane, Satish; Khalili, Kamel; Merali, Salim; Gordon, John C; Fecchio, Chiara; Barrero, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 infected macrophages play a significant role in the neuropathogenesis of AIDS. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) not only facilitates HIV-1 infection but also contribute to long-lived persistence in macrophages. Our previous studies using SILAC-based proteomic analysis showed that the expression of critical metabolic enzymes in the glycolytic pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were altered in response to Vpr expression in macrophages. We hypothesized that Vpr-induced modulation of glycolysis and TCA cycle regulates glutamate metabolism and release in HIV-1 infected macrophages. We assessed the amount of specific metabolites induced by Vpr and HIV-1 in macrophages at the intracellular and extracellular level in a time-dependent manner utilizing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) targeted metabolomics. In addition, stable isotope-labeled glucose and an MRM targeted metabolomics assay were used to evaluate the de novo synthesis and release of glutamate in Vpr overexpressing macrophages and HIV-1 infected macrophages, throughout the metabolic flux of glycolytic pathway and TCA cycle activation. The metabolic flux studies demonstrated an increase in glucose uptake, glutamate release and accumulation of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and glutamine in the extracellular milieu in Vpr expressing and HIV-1 infected macrophages. Interestingly, glutamate pools and other intracellular intermediates (glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), citrate, malate, α-KG, and glutamine) showed a decreased trend except for fumarate, in contrast to the glutamine accumulation observed in the extracellular space in Vpr overexpressing macrophages. Our studies demonstrate that dysregulation of mitochondrial glutamate metabolism induced by Vpr in HIV-1 infected macrophages commonly seen, may contribute to neurodegeneration via excitotoxic mechanisms in the context of NeuroAIDS. PMID:27245560

  2. Cell-specific abnormalities of glutamate transporters in schizophrenia: sick astrocytes and compensating relay neurons?

    PubMed

    McCullumsmith, R E; O'Donovan, S M; Drummond, J B; Benesh, F S; Simmons, M; Roberts, R; Lauriat, T; Haroutunian, V; Meador-Woodruff, J H

    2016-06-01

    Excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) bind and transport glutamate, limiting spillover from synapses due to their dense perisynaptic expression primarily on astroglia. Converging evidence suggests that abnormalities in the astroglial glutamate transporter localization and function may underlie a disease mechanism with pathological glutamate spillover as well as alterations in the kinetics of perisynaptic glutamate buffering and uptake contributing to dysfunction of thalamo-cortical circuits in schizophrenia. We explored this hypothesis by performing cell- and region-level studies of EAAT1 and EAAT2 expression in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in an elderly cohort of subjects with schizophrenia. We found decreased protein expression for the typically astroglial-localized glutamate transporters in the mediodorsal and ventral tier nuclei. We next used laser-capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to assess cell-level expression of the transporters and their splice variants. In the mediodorsal nucleus, we found lower expression of transporter transcripts in a population of cells enriched for astrocytes, and higher expression of transporter transcripts in a population of cells enriched for relay neurons. We confirmed expression of transporter protein in neurons in schizophrenia using dual-label immunofluorescence. Finally, the pattern of transporter mRNA and protein expression in rodents treated for 9 months with antipsychotic medication suggests that our findings are not due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment. We found a compensatory increase in transporter expression in neurons that might be secondary to a loss of transporter expression in astrocytes. These changes suggest a profound abnormality in astrocyte functions that support, nourish and maintain neuronal fidelity and synaptic activity.

  3. Luminal l-glutamate enhances duodenal mucosal defense mechanisms via multiple glutamate receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chikako; Mizumori, Misa; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Presence of taste receptor families in the gastrointestinal mucosa suggests a physiological basis for local and early detection of a meal. We hypothesized that luminal l-glutamate, which is the primary nutrient conferring fundamental umami or proteinaceous taste, influences mucosal defense mechanisms in rat duodenum. We perfused the duodenal mucosa of anesthetized rats with l-glutamate (0.1–10 mM). Intracellular pH (pHi) of the epithelial cells, blood flow, and mucus gel thickness (MGT) were simultaneously and continuously measured in vivo. Some rats were pretreated with indomethacin or capsaicin. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) was measured with flow-through pH and CO2 electrodes. We tested the effects of agonists or antagonists for metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 or 4 or calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on defense factors. Luminal l-glutamate dose dependently increased pHi and MGT but had no effect on blood flow in the duodenum. l-glutamate (10 mM)-induced cellular alkalinization and mucus secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with indomethacin or capsaicin. l-glutamate effects on pHi and MGT were mimicked by mGluR4 agonists and inhibited by an mGluR4 antagonist. CaSR agonists acidified cells with increased MGT and DBS, unlike l-glutamate. Perfusion of l-glutamate with inosinate (inosine 5′-monophosphate, 0.1 mM) enhanced DBS only in combination, suggesting synergistic activation of the l-glutamate receptor, typical of taste receptor type 1. l-leucine or l-aspartate had similar effects on DBS without any effect on pHi and MGT. Preperfusion of l-glutamate prevented acid-induced cellular injury, suggesting that l-glutamate protects the mucosa by enhancing mucosal defenses. Luminal l-glutamate may activate multiple receptors and afferent nerves and locally enhance mucosal defenses to prevent subsequent injury attributable to acid exposure in the duodenum. PMID:19643955

  4. Extracorporeal methods of blood glutamate scavenging: a novel therapeutic modality.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Agzam; Boyko, Matthew; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Brotfain, Evgeny; Bilotta, Federico; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Pathologically elevated glutamate concentrations in the brain's extracellular fluid are associated with several acute and chronic brain insults. Studies have demonstrated that by decreasing the concentration of glutamate in the blood, thereby increasing the concentration gradient between the brain and the blood, the rate of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux can be increased. Blood glutamate scavengers, pyruvate and oxaloacetate have shown great promise in providing neuroprotection in many animal models of acute brain insults. However, glutamate scavengers' potential systemic toxicity, side effects and pharmacokinetic properties may limit their use in clinical practice. In contrast, extracorporeal methods of blood glutamate reduction, in which glutamate is filtered from the blood and eliminated, may be an advantageous adjunct in treating acute brain insults. Here, we review the current evidence for the glutamate-lowering effects of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and hemofiltration. The evidence reviewed here highlights the need for clinical trials.

  5. Glutamate availability is important in intramuscular amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle intermediates but does not affect peak oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mourtzakis, M; Graham, T E; González-Alonso, J; Saltin, B

    2008-08-01

    Muscle glutamate is central to reactions producing 2-oxoglutarate, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate that essentially expands the TCA cycle intermediate pool during exercise. Paradoxically, muscle glutamate drops approximately 40-80% with the onset of exercise and 2-oxoglutarate declines in early exercise. To investigate the physiological relationship between glutamate, oxidative metabolism, and TCA cycle intermediates (i.e., fumarate, malate, 2-oxoglutarate), healthy subjects trained (T) the quadriceps of one thigh on the single-legged knee extensor ergometer (1 h/day at 70% maximum workload for 5 days/wk), while their contralateral quadriceps remained untrained (UT). After 5 wk of training, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in the T thigh was greater than that in the UT thigh (P<0.05); VO2peak was not different between the T and UT thighs with glutamate infusion. Peak exercise under control conditions revealed a greater glutamate uptake in the T thigh compared with rest (7.3+/-3.7 vs. 1.0+/-0.1 micromol.min(-1).kg wet wt(-1), P<0.05) without increase in TCA cycle intermediates. In the UT thigh, peak exercise (vs. rest) induced an increase in fumarate (0.33+/-0.07 vs. 0.02+/-0.01 mmol/kg dry wt (dw), P<0.05) and malate (2.2+/-0.4 vs. 0.5+/-0.03 mmol/kg dw, P<0.05) and a decrease in 2-oxoglutarate (12.2+/-1.6 vs. 32.4+/-6.8 micromol/kg dw, P<0.05). Overall, glutamate infusion increased arterial glutamate (P<0.05) and maintained this increase. Glutamate infusion coincided with elevated fumarate and malate (P<0.05) and decreased 2-oxoglutarate (P<0.05) at peak exercise relative to rest in the T thigh; there were no further changes in the UT thigh. Although glutamate may have a role in the expansion of the TCA cycle, glutamate and TCA cycle intermediates do not directly affect VO2peak in either trained or untrained muscle.

  6. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  7. Glial-Restricted Precursors Protect Neonatal Brain Slices from Hypoxic-Ischemic Cell Death Without Direct Tissue Contact.

    PubMed

    Sweda, Romy; Phillips, Andre W; Marx, Joel; Johnston, Michael V; Wilson, Mary Ann; Fatemi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs) are tripotential progenitors that have been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in several preclinical models of neurological disorders, including neonatal brain injury. The mechanisms of action of these cells, however, require further study, as do clinically relevant questions such as timing and route of cell administration. Here, we explored the effects of GRPs on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia during acute and subacute stages, using an in vitro transwell co-culture system with organotypic brain slices exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). OGD-exposed slices that were then co-cultured with GRPs without direct cell contact had decreased tissue injury and cortical cell death, as evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. This effect was more pronounced when cells were added during the subacute phase of the injury. Furthermore, GRPs reduced the amount of glutamate in the slice supernatant and changed the proliferation pattern of endogenous progenitor cells in brain slices. In summary, we show that GRPs exert a neuroprotective effect on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia without the need for direct cell-cell contact, thus confirming the rising view that beneficial actions of stem cells are more likely attributable to trophic or immunomodulatory support rather than to long-term integration. PMID:27149035

  8. TRPV1-Dependent and -Independent Alterations in the Limbic Cortex of Neuropathic Mice: Impact on Glial Caspases and Pain Perception

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Catia; Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Siniscalco, Dario; Petrosino, Stefania; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Marabese, Ida; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; Imperatore, Roberta; Palazzo, Enza; de Novellis, Vito; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    During neuropathic pain, caspases are activated in the limbic cortex. We investigated the role of TRPV1 channels and glial caspases in the mouse prelimbic and infralimbic (PL-IL) cortex after spared nerve injury (SNI). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blots, and immunfluorescence showed overexpression of several caspases in the PL-IL cortex 7 days postinjury. Caspase-3 release and upregulation of AMPA receptors in microglia, caspase-1 and IL-1β release in astrocytes, and upregulation of Il-1 receptor-1, TRPV1, and VGluT1 in glutamatergic neurons, were also observed. Of these alterations, only those in astrocytes persisted in SNI Trpv1−/− mice. A pan-caspase inhibitor, injected into the PL-IL cortex, reduced mechanical allodynia, this effect being reduced but not abolished in Trpv1−/− mice. Single-unit extracellular recordings in vivo following electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala or application of pressure on the hind paw, showed increased excitatory pyramidal neuron activity in the SNI PL-IL cortex, which also contained higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Intra-PL-IL cortex injection of mGluR5 and NMDA receptor antagonists and AMPA exacerbated, whereas TRPV1 and AMPA receptor antagonists and a CB1 agonist inhibited, allodynia. We suggest that SNI triggers both TRPV1-dependent and independent glutamate- and caspase-mediated cross-talk among IL-PL cortex neurons and glia, which either participates or counteracts pain. PMID:22139792

  9. TRPV1-dependent and -independent alterations in the limbic cortex of neuropathic mice: impact on glial caspases and pain perception.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Catia; Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Siniscalco, Dario; Petrosino, Stefania; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Marabese, Ida; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; Imperatore, Roberta; Palazzo, Enza; de Novellis, Vito; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2012-11-01

    During neuropathic pain, caspases are activated in the limbic cortex. We investigated the role of TRPV1 channels and glial caspases in the mouse prelimbic and infralimbic (PL-IL) cortex after spared nerve injury (SNI). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blots, and immunfluorescence showed overexpression of several caspases in the PL-IL cortex 7 days postinjury. Caspase-3 release and upregulation of AMPA receptors in microglia, caspase-1 and IL-1β release in astrocytes, and upregulation of Il-1 receptor-1, TRPV1, and VGluT1 in glutamatergic neurons, were also observed. Of these alterations, only those in astrocytes persisted in SNI Trpv1(-/-) mice. A pan-caspase inhibitor, injected into the PL-IL cortex, reduced mechanical allodynia, this effect being reduced but not abolished in Trpv1(-/-) mice. Single-unit extracellular recordings in vivo following electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala or application of pressure on the hind paw, showed increased excitatory pyramidal neuron activity in the SNI PL-IL cortex, which also contained higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Intra-PL-IL cortex injection of mGluR5 and NMDA receptor antagonists and AMPA exacerbated, whereas TRPV1 and AMPA receptor antagonists and a CB(1) agonist inhibited, allodynia. We suggest that SNI triggers both TRPV1-dependent and independent glutamate- and caspase-mediated cross-talk among IL-PL cortex neurons and glia, which either participates or counteracts pain.

  10. Biomechanical properties of retinal glial cells: comparative and developmental data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Pannicke, Thomas; Wei, Er-Qing; Bringmann, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Habermann, Gunnar; Buse, Eberhard; Käs, Josef A; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The biomechanical properties of Müller glial cells may have importance in understanding the retinal tissue alterations after retinal surgery with removal of the inner limiting membrane and during the ontogenetic development, respectively. Here, we compared the viscoelastic properties of Müller cells from man and monkey as well as from different postnatal developmental stages of the rat. We determined the complex Young's modulus E = E' + iE″ in a defined range of deforming frequencies (30, 100, and 200 Hz) using a scanning force microscope, where the real part E' reflects the elastic property (energy storage or elastic stiffness) and the imaginary part E″ reflects the viscous property (energy dissipation) of the cells. The viscoelastic properties were similar in Müller cells from man, monkey, and rat. In general, the elastic behavior dominated over the viscous behavior (E' > E″). The inner process of the Müller cell was the softest region, the soma the stiffest (Einnerprocess(')glial cells (Eneuron(')>Eglia(')). These relations were also observed during the postnatal development of the rat. It is concluded that, generally, retinal cells display mechanics of elastic solids. In addition, the data indicate that the rodent retina is a reliable model to investigate retinal mechanics and tissue alterations after retinal surgery. During retinal development, neuronal branching and synaptogenesis might be particularly stimulated by the viscoelastic properties of Müller cell processes in the inner plexiform layer.

  11. Neuronal and glial properties of a murine transgenic retinoblastoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T.; Virtanen, I.; Marcus, D. M.; O'Brien, J. M.; Carpenter, J. L.; Brauner, E.; Tarkkanen, A.; Albert, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Antigenic properties of a murine transgenic model for hereditary retinoblastoma, induced by a chimeric gene coding for Simian virus 40 large T antigen, an oncogene that inactivates the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product, were studied by immunohistochemistry. All transgenic mice develop bilateral intraocular retinal tumors in the inner nuclear layer with Homer Wright-like rosettes, and one quarter develop midbrain tumors resembling trilateral retinoblastoma. Cell lines TE-1 and TM-1 were established from intraocular and metastatic tumors, respectively. Intraocular tumors reacted with antibodies to neuron-specific enolase and synaptophysin, while vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic, and S-100 proteins were detected only in reactive glia derived from adjacent retina. The midbrain tumors showed weak reactivity to synaptophysin, and they blended with reactive astrocytes positive for glial markers. The tumors were negative for cytokeratins. Finally both derived cell lines expressed synaptophysin and individual neurofilament triplet proteins in immunofluorescence and Western blotting, supporting their essentially neuronal nature. The antigenic profile resembles human retinoblastoma, but differences in morphology and antigen distribution suggest a more close relationship to neurons of the inner nuclear layer than to photoreceptor cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1708946

  12. Dual polarization of microglia isolated from mixed glial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lili; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Yun; Wu, Yanhong; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Qunyuan

    2015-09-01

    Microglia are versatile immune effector cells of the CNS and are sensitive to various stimuli. The different methods used to isolate microglia may affect some of their characteristics, such as their polarization state. The influence of cell sorting methods on the polarization state of microglia has never been studied. Mixed glial culture system (MGCS) and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) are two methods that are commonly used to purify microglia. This study compares the immunological states between microglia isolated by MGCS and microglia isolated by MACS. We show that microglia isolated by MGCS exhibit a stronger immune-activated state than microglia isolated by MACS. They present an elevated phagocytic ability and high levels of markers associated with classical activation (M1) and alternative activation (M2). In addition, high levels of M1-type and M2-type chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 and transforming growth factor-β1 were detected in the culture medium of mixed glial cells. Our results show that microglia isolated by MGCS are in an immune-activated state, whereas microglia isolated by MACS appear to be closer to their primary in vivo state. Therefore, the immune status of microglia, depending on the protocol used to purify them, should be carefully considered in neuropathology research.

  13. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  14. Regulation of astrocyte glutamate transporter-1 (GLT1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression in a model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Jacqueline A; Szu, Jenny I; Yonan, Jennifer M; Binder, Devin K

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes regulate extracellular glutamate and water homeostasis through the astrocyte-specific membrane proteins glutamate transporter-1 (GLT1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4), respectively. The role of astrocytes and the regulation of GLT1 and AQP4 in epilepsy are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the expression of GLT1 and AQP4 in the intrahippocampal kainic acid (IHKA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis at 1, 4, 7, and 30days after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE) to determine hippocampal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker for reactive astrocytes), GLT1, and AQP4 expression changes during the development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis). Following IHKA, all mice had SE and progressive increases in GFAP immunoreactivity and GFAP protein expression out to 30days post-SE. A significant initial increase in dorsal hippocampal GLT1 immunoreactivity and protein levels were observed 1day post SE and followed by a marked downregulation at 4 and 7days post SE with a return to near control levels by 30days post SE. AQP4 dorsal hippocampal protein expression was significantly downregulated at 1day post SE and was followed by a gradual return to baseline levels with a significant increase in ipsilateral protein levels by 30days post SE. Transient increases in GFAP and AQP4 mRNA were also observed. Our findings suggest that specific molecular changes in astrocyte glutamate transporters and water channels occur during epileptogenesis in this model, and suggest the novel therapeutic strategy of restoring glutamate and water homeostasis. PMID:27155358

  15. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  16. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  17. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  18. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  19. Localization of L-glutamate and glutamate-like receptors at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Di Cosmo, A; Nardi, G; Di Cristo, C; De Santis, A; Messenger, J B

    1999-08-28

    HPLC analysis of the amino acid contents of the second- and third-order giant fibres at the giant synapse in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo vulgaris shows that there are significantly higher amounts of L-glutamate and L-aspartate in the second-order (presynaptic) fibre than in the third-order (postsynaptic) fibre. Immunocytochemical staining of sections of the ganglion with an antibody raised against L-glutamate produces specific positive staining in the synaptic region of the second-order fibre. In contrast, staining with antibodies raised against glutamate-receptors (mammalian GluR1 with GluR2/3) produces positive staining in the third-order fibre at the postsynaptic region. These data provide further evidence for the hypothesis that L-glutamate is an excitatory transmitter at the giant synapse.

  20. Circuit mapping by ultraviolet uncaging of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Gordon M G

    2012-09-01

    In laser photostimulation, small clusters of neurons in brain slices are induced to fire action potentials by focal glutamate uncaging, and synaptic connectivity between photoexcited presynaptic neurons and individual postsynaptic neurons is assessed by intracellular recording of synaptic events. With a scanner, this process can be repeated sequentially across a patterned array of stimulus locations, generating maps of neurons' local sources of synaptic inputs. Laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) based on patterned glutamate uncaging offers an efficient, quantitative, optical-electrophysiological way to map synaptic circuits in brain slices. The efficacy of glutamate-based photostimulation for circuit mapping (in contrast to electrical stimulation) derives from the ability to stimulate neurons with high precision and speed, and without stimulating axons of passage. This protocol describes the components, assembly, and operation of a laser scanning microscope for ultraviolet (UV) uncaging, along with experimental methods for circuit mapping in brain slices. It presents a general approach and a set of guidelines for quantitative circuit mapping using "standard" LSPS methods based on single-photon glutamate uncaging using a UV laser, a pair of scanning mirror galvanometers, a patch-clamp setup, and open-source data acquisition software. PMID:22949715

  1. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  2. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  3. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  4. Ultrastructure of the subpial glial limitans in the cerebellum of the lizard (Lacerta lepida).

    PubMed

    Bodega, G; Suarez, I; Oteruelo, F; Fernandez, B; Gianonatti, C

    1990-01-01

    The subpial glial limitans in the cerebellum of the lizard (Lacerta lepida) is a single layer formed by the extensions of the fibers of Bergmann's glia. These subpial extensions present a prismatic aspect, few organelles and abundant whorls of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. These whorls of endoplasmic reticulum appear as concentric and tubular membranous formations. The glial limitans is not continuous at times.

  5. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection. PMID:25075784

  6. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection.

  7. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  8. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  9. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. PMID:26073813

  10. Glial cells generate neurons: the role of the transcription factor Pax6.

    PubMed

    Heins, Nico; Malatesta, Paolo; Cecconi, Francesco; Nakafuku, Masato; Tucker, Kerry Lee; Hack, Michael A; Chapouton, Prisca; Barde, Yves-Alain; Götz, Magdalena

    2002-04-01

    Radial glial cells, ubiquitous throughout the developing CNS, guide radially migrating neurons and are the precursors of astrocytes. Recent evidence indicates that radial glial cells also generate neurons in the developing cerebral cortex. Here we investigated the role of the transcription factor Pax6 expressed in cortical radial glia. We showed that radial glial cells isolated from the cortex of Pax6 mutant mice have a reduced neurogenic potential, whereas the neurogenic potential of non-radial glial precursors is not affected. Consistent with defects in only one neurogenic lineage, the number of neurons in the Pax6 mutant cortex in vivo is reduced by half. Conversely, retrovirally mediated Pax6 expression instructs neurogenesis even in astrocytes from postnatal cortex in vitro. These results demonstrated an important role of Pax6 as intrinsic fate determinant of the neurogenic potential of glial cells.

  11. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O/sub 2/ and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  12. Honeybee Retinal Glial Cells Transform Glucose and Supply the Neurons with Metabolic Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy[3H]glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy[3H]glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O2 and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  13. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Evêquoz-Mercier, V; Perrottet, P; Buchner, E

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy[3H]glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy[3H]glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O2 and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  14. Impaired Purinergic Regulation of the Glial (Müller) Cell Volume in the Retina of Transgenic Rats Expressing Defective Polycystin-2.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Pannicke, Thomas; Hollborn, Margrit; Kolibabka, Matthias; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Retinal glial (Müller) cells possess an endogenous purinergic signal transduction cascade which normally prevents cellular swelling in osmotic stress. The cascade can be activated by osmotic or glutamate receptor-dependent ATP release. We determined whether activation of this cascade is altered in Müller cells of transgenic rats that suffer from a slow photoreceptor degeneration due to the expression of a truncated human cilia gene polycystin-2 (CMV-PKD21/703 HA). Age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats served as control. Retinal slices were superfused with a hypoosmotic solution (60 % osmolarity). Müller cells in retinas of PKD21/703 rats swelled immediately in hypoosmotic stress; this was not observed in control retinas. Pharmacological blockade of P2Y1 or adenosine A1 receptors induced osmotic swelling of Müller cells from control rats. The swelling induced by the P2Y1 receptor antagonist was mediated by induction of oxidative-nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, production of inflammatory lipid mediators, and a sodium influx from the extracellular space. Exogenous VEGF or glutamate prevented the hypoosmotic swelling of Müller cells from PKD21/703 rats; this effect was mediated by activation of the purinergic signaling cascade. In neuroretinas of PKD21/703 rats, the gene expression levels of P2Y1 and A1 receptors, pannexin-1, connexin 45, NTPDases 1 and 2, and various subtypes of nucleoside transporters are elevated compared to control. The data may suggest that the osmotic swelling of Müller cells from PKD21/703 rats is caused by an abrogation of the osmotic ATP release while the glutamate-induced ATP release is functional. In the normal retina, ATP release and autocrine P2Y1 receptor activation serve to inhibit the induction of oxidative-nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and production of inflammatory lipid mediators, which otherwise will induce a sodium influx and cytotoxic Müller cell swelling under anisoosmotic conditions. Purinergic

  15. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Taro Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  16. Involvement of nucleotides in glial growth following scratch injury in avian retinal cell monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thayane Martins; França, Guilherme Rapozeiro; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Loiola, Erick Correia; Ulrich, Henning; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2015-06-01

    When retinal cell cultures were mechanically scratched, cell growth over the empty area was observed. Only dividing and migrating, 2 M6-positive glial cells were detected. Incubation of cultures with apyrase (APY), suramin, or Reactive Blue 2 (RB-2), but not MRS 2179, significantly attenuated the growth of glial cells, suggesting that nucleotide receptors other than P2Y1 are involved in the growth of glial cells. UTPγS but not ADPβS antagonized apyrase-induced growth inhibition in scratched cultures, suggesting the participation of UTP-sensitive receptors. No decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA(+)) cells was observed at the border of the scratch in apyrase-treated cultures, suggesting that glial proliferation was not affected. In apyrase-treated cultures, glial cytoplasm protrusions were smaller and unstable. Actin filaments were less organized and alfa-tubulin-labeled microtubules were mainly parallel to scratch. In contrast to control cultures, very few vinculin-labeled adhesion sites could be noticed in these cultures. Increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation was observed in UTP-treated cultures, effect that was inhibited by SRC inhibitor 1 and PI3K blocker LY294002. These inhibitors and the FAK inhibitor PF573228 also decreased glial growth over the scratch, suggesting participation of SRC, PI3K, and FAK in UTP-induced growth of glial cells in scratched cultures. RB-2 decreased dissociated glial cell attachment to fibronectin-coated dishes and migration through transwell membranes, suggesting that nucleotides regulated adhesion and migration of glial cells. In conclusion, mechanical scratch of retinal cell cultures induces growth of glial cells over the empty area through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of UTP-sensitive receptors, SRC, PI3K, and FAK.

  17. 3-Aminoglutarate is a "silent" false transmitter for glutamate neurons.

    PubMed

    Foster, Alan C; Chen, June; Runyan, Stephen; Dinh, Tim; Venadas, Steven; Ehring, George R; Li, Yong-Xin; Staubli, Ursula

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the storage and release of the excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate by synaptic vesicles has lagged behind receptor characterizations due to a lack of pharmacological agents. We report that the glutamate analog, 3-aminoglutarate (3-AG) is a "silent" false transmitter for glutamate neurons that may be a useful tool to study stora