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Sample records for glial precursors clear

  1. Glial-restricted precursors as potential candidates for ALS cell-replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kruminis-Kaszkiel, Ewa; Wojtkiewicz, Joanna; Maksymowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multifactorial progressive neurodegenerative disorder leading to severe disability and death within 3-5 years after diagnosis. The main mechanisms underlying the disease progression are poorly known but according to the current knowledge, neuroinflammation is a key player in motor neurons damage. Astrocytes constitute an important cell population involved in neuroinflammatory reaction. Many studies confirmed their striking connection with motor neuron pathology and therefore they might be a target for the treatment of ALS. Cell-based therapy appears to be a promising strategy. Since direct replacement or restoring of motor neurons using various stem cells is challenging, enrichment of healthy donor-derived astrocytes appears to be a more realistic and beneficial approach. The effects of astrocytes have been examined using transplantation of glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) that represent one of the earliest precursors within the oligodendrocytic and astrocytic cell lineage. In this review, we focused on evidence-based data on astrocyte replacement transplantation therapy using GRPs in animal models of motor neuron diseases. The efficacy of GRPs engrafting is very encouraging. Furthermore, the lesson learned from application of lineage-restricted precursors in spinal cord injury (SCI) indicates that differentiation of GRPs into astrocytes before transplantation might be more advantageous in the context of axon regeneration. To sum up, the studies of glial-restricted precursors have made a step forward to ALS research and might bring breakthroughs to the field of ALS therapy in the future.

  2. Gradient isolation of glial cells: evidence that flat epithelial cells are astroglial cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Meller, K

    1987-07-01

    Discontinuous gradients of metrizamide were used to separate the cell components of monolayers of primary cultures of embryonic rat brains. These primary cell cultures were of two types: long-term cultures (more than a year) of embryonic rat brain, which contained several glial cell types, and monolayers of cell cultures (several weeks old), which contained a complex population of cells, including neuronal elements. The gradient separation produces fractions of pure flat epithelial cells that are able to survive and proliferate. After a few days, all flat epithelial cells become confluent and show a positive reaction to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); this indicates that these cells astroglial precursor cells. Following their maintenance in vitro for several months, all cultures give rise to a pure population of astrocytes identified not only by their characteristic morphology, but also by their content of GFAP. It is proposed that the differentiation controls are dependent on cell interactions that are influenced by the composition of the cell population and/or the molecular growth and differentiation factors released by these cells into the medium.

  3. Reversal of developmental restrictions in neural crest lineages: Transition from Schwann cells to glial-melanocytic precursors in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dupin, Elisabeth; Real, Carla; Glavieux-Pardanaud, Corinne; Vaigot, Pierre; Le Douarin, Nicole M.

    2003-01-01

    In vertebrate embryos, diversification of the lineages arising from the neural crest (NC) is controlled to a large extent by environmental factors. In previous work, we showed that endothelin 3 (ET3) peptide favors the development of glial and melanocytic NC precursors in vitro. This factor is also capable of inducing proliferation of cultured epidermal pigment cells and their conversion to glia. ET3 therefore strongly promotes the emergence of melanocytic and glial phenotypes from precursors and acts on the maintenance of these phenotypes. In the present work, we explored the capacity of ET3 to reprogram glial cells into melanocytes. Schwann cells expressing glial-specific markers [such as the Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP)] were isolated from sciatic nerves of quail embryos and cultured in vitro. We found that ET3 promotes cell growth and sequential expression of melanocyte differentiation markers in cultures of purified SMP-expressing cells, whereas it had no significant effect on SMP-negative cells from the same nerves. Moreover, we provide evidence for the transition of differentiated Schwann cells to melanocytes in clonal cultures. This transition involves the production of a mixed progeny of melanoblasts/melanocytes, glia, and cells bearing differentiation markers of both phenotypes. Therefore, Schwann cells exposed to ET3 transdifferentiate to melanocytes through reversion to the stage of bipotent glial-melanocytic NC precursors. These findings show that NC-derived pigment and glial cells are phenotypically unstable in vitro and may undergo reversal of precursor hierarchy to function as bipotent stem cells. PMID:12702775

  4. Examining the properties and therapeutic potential of glial restricted precursors in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Haas, Christopher; Fischer, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    In the aftermath of spinal cord injury, glial restricted precursors (GRPs) and immature astrocytes offer the potential to modulate the inflammatory environment of the injured spinal cord and promote host axon regeneration. Nevertheless clinical application of cellular therapy for the repair of spinal cord injury requires strict quality-assured protocols for large-scale production and preservation that necessitates long-term in vitro expansion. Importantly, such processes have the potential to alter the phenotypic and functional properties and thus therapeutic potential of these cells. Furthermore, clinical use of cellular therapies may be limited by the inflammatory microenvironment of the injured spinal cord, altering the phenotypic and functional properties of grafted cells. This report simulates the process of large-scale GRP production and demonstrates the permissive properties of GRP following long-term in vitro culture. Furthermore, we defined the phenotypic and functional properties of GRP in the presence of inflammatory factors, and call attention to the importance of the microenvironment of grafted cells, underscoring the importance of modulating the environment of the injured spinal cord. PMID:27212899

  5. Glial commitment of mesencephalic neural precursor cells expanded as neurospheres precludes their engagement in niche-dependent dopaminergic neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baizabal, José-Manuel; Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Valencia, Concepción; Santa-Olalla, Jesús; Young, Kaylene M; Rietze, Rodney L; Bartlett, Perry F; Covarrubias, Luis

    2012-05-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) with high proliferative potential are commonly expanded in vitro as neurospheres. As a population, neurosphere cells show long-term self-renewal capacity and multipotentiality in vitro. These features have led to the assumption that neurosphere cells represent an expansion of the endogenous NPCs residing within the embryonic and adult brain. If this is the case, in principle, bona-fide expansion of endogenous NPCs should not significantly affect their capacity to respond to their original niche of differentiation. To address this issue, we generated primary neurospheres from the dopaminergic niche of the ventral mesencephalon and then transplanted these cells to their original niche within mesencephalic explant cultures. Primary neurosphere cells showed poor capacity to generate dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalic niche of dopaminergic neurogenesis. Instead, most primary neurosphere cells showed glial commitment as they differentiated into astrocytes in an exclusively neurogenic niche. Subculture of primary cells demonstrated that the neurosphere assay does not amplify niche-responsive dopaminergic progenitors. Further, neurospheres cells were largely unable to acquire the endogenous positional identity within the Nkx6.1(+), Nkx2.2(+), and Pax7(+) domains of mesencephalic explants. Finally, we demonstrate that our observations are not specific for embryonic mesencephalic cells, as NPCs in the adult subventricular zone also showed an intrinsic fate switch from neuronal to glial potential upon neurosphere amplification. Our data suggest that neurosphere formation does not expand the endogenous neurogenic NPCs but rather promotes amplification of gliogenic precursors that do not respond to niche-derived signals of cellular specification and differentiation.

  6. Glial versus melanocyte cell fate choice: Schwann cell precursors as a cellular origin of melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Adameyko, Igor; Lallemend, Francois

    2010-09-01

    Melanocytes and Schwann cells are derived from the multipotent population of neural crest cells. Although both cell types were thought to be generated through completely distinct pathways and molecular processes, a recent study has revealed that these different cell types are intimately interconnected far beyond previously postulated limits in that they share a common post-neural crest progenitor, i.e. the Schwann cell precursor. This finding raises interesting questions about the lineage relationships of hitherto unrelated cell types such as melanocytes and Schwann cells, and may provide clinical insights into mechanisms of pigmentation disorders and for cancer involving Schwann cells and melanocytes.

  7. Glial-Restricted Precursors Protect Neonatal Brain Slices from Hypoxic-Ischemic Cell Death Without Direct Tissue Contact.

    PubMed

    Sweda, Romy; Phillips, Andre W; Marx, Joel; Johnston, Michael V; Wilson, Mary Ann; Fatemi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs) are tripotential progenitors that have been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in several preclinical models of neurological disorders, including neonatal brain injury. The mechanisms of action of these cells, however, require further study, as do clinically relevant questions such as timing and route of cell administration. Here, we explored the effects of GRPs on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia during acute and subacute stages, using an in vitro transwell co-culture system with organotypic brain slices exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). OGD-exposed slices that were then co-cultured with GRPs without direct cell contact had decreased tissue injury and cortical cell death, as evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. This effect was more pronounced when cells were added during the subacute phase of the injury. Furthermore, GRPs reduced the amount of glutamate in the slice supernatant and changed the proliferation pattern of endogenous progenitor cells in brain slices. In summary, we show that GRPs exert a neuroprotective effect on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia without the need for direct cell-cell contact, thus confirming the rising view that beneficial actions of stem cells are more likely attributable to trophic or immunomodulatory support rather than to long-term integration.

  8. Precursor N-cadherin mediates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-promoted human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Baole; Qin, Yuxia; Yao, Ruiqin; Zhou, Hao; Gao, Dian Shuai

    2017-01-01

    As the most prevalent primary brain tumor, gliomas are highly metastatic, invasive and are characteristic of high levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF is an important factor for invasive glioma cell growth; however, the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, we affirm a significantly higher expression of the precursor of N-cadherin (proN-cadherin) in most gliomas compared with normal brain tissues. Our findings reveal that GDNF interacts with the extracellular domain of proN-cadherin, which suggests that proN-cadherin mediates GDNF-induced glioma cell migration and invasion. We hypothesize that proN-cadherin might cause homotypic adhesion loss within neighboring cells and at the same time promote heterotypic adhesion within the extracellular matrix (ECM) through a certain mechanism. This study also demonstrates that the interaction between GDNF and proN-cadherin activates specific intracellular signaling pathways; furthermore, GDNF promoted the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the ECM via proN-cadherin. To reach the future goal of developing novel therapies of glioma, this study, reveals a unique mechanism of glioma cell migration and invasion. PMID:28212546

  9. Precursor N-cadherin mediates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-promoted human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ye; Liu, Liyun; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Baole; Qin, Yuxia; Yao, Ruiqin; Zhou, Hao; Gao, Dian Shuai

    2017-02-12

    As the most prevalent primary brain tumor, gliomas are highly metastatic, invasive and are characteristic of high levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF is an important factor for invasive glioma cell growth; however, the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, we affirm a significantly higher expression of the precursor of N-cadherin (proN-cadherin) in most gliomas compared with normal brain tissues. Our findings reveal that GDNF interacts with the extracellular domain of proN-cadherin, which suggests that proN-cadherin mediates GDNF-induced glioma cell migration and invasion. We hypothesize that proN-cadherin might cause homotypic adhesion loss within neighboring cells and at the same time promote heterotypic adhesion within the extracellular matrix (ECM) through a certain mechanism. This study also demonstrates that the interaction between GDNF and proN-cadherin activates specific intracellular signaling pathways; furthermore, GDNF promoted the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the ECM via proN-cadherin. To reach the future goal of developing novel therapies of glioma, this study, reveals a unique mechanism of glioma cell migration and invasion.

  10. Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Modulate the Neuronal Network by Activity-Dependent Ectodomain Cleavage of Glial NG2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jeet; Frischknecht, Renato; Marongiu, Daniele; Binamé, Fabien; Perera, Sumudhu S.; Endres, Kristina; Lutz, Beat; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Trotter, Jacqueline; Mittmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The role of glia in modulating neuronal network activity is an important question. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) characteristically express the transmembrane proteoglycan nerve-glia antigen 2 (NG2) and are unique glial cells receiving synaptic input from neurons. The development of NG2+ OPC into myelinating oligodendrocytes has been well studied, yet the retention of a large population of synapse-bearing OPC in the adult brain poses the question as to additional functional roles of OPC in the neuronal network. Here we report that activity-dependent processing of NG2 by OPC-expressed secretases functionally regulates the neuronal network. NG2 cleavage by the α-secretase ADAM10 yields an ectodomain present in the extracellular matrix and a C-terminal fragment that is subsequently further processed by the γ-secretase to release an intracellular domain. ADAM10-dependent NG2 ectodomain cleavage and release (shedding) in acute brain slices or isolated OPC is increased by distinct activity-increasing stimuli. Lack of NG2 expression in OPC (NG2-knockout mice), or pharmacological inhibition of NG2 ectodomain shedding in wild-type OPC, results in a striking reduction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) in pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and alterations in the subunit composition of their α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepr opionicacid (AMPA) receptors. In NG2-knockout mice these neurons exhibit diminished AMPA and NMDA receptor-dependent current amplitudes; strikingly AMPA receptor currents can be rescued by application of conserved LNS protein domains of the NG2 ectodomain. Furthermore, NG2-knockout mice exhibit altered behavior in tests measuring sensorimotor function. These results demonstrate for the first time a bidirectional cross-talk between OPC and the surrounding neuronal network and demonstrate a novel physiological role for OPC in regulating information processing at neuronal synapses. PMID

  11. ICV-transplanted human glial precursor cells are short-lived yet exert immunomodulatory effects in mice with EAE.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heechul; Walczak, Piotr; Muja, Naser; Campanelli, James T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2012-07-01

    Human glial precursor cells (hGPs) have potential for remyelinating lesions and are an attractive cell source for cell therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate whether transplanted hGPs can affect the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of transplanted hGPs together with the in vivo fate of these cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI). At 14 days post-EAE induction, mice (n = 19) were intracerebroventricularly (ICV) injected with 5 × 10(5) hGPs that were magnetically labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles as MR contrast agent and transduced with firefly luciferase for BLI of cell survival. Control mice (n = 18) received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) vehicle only. The severity of EAE clinical disability in the hGP-transplanted group was significantly suppressed (P < 0.05) with concomitant inhibition of ConA and MOG-specific T cell proliferation in the spleen. Astrogliosis was reduced and a lower activity of macrophages and/or microglia was observed in the spinal cord (P < 0.05). On MRI, SPIO signal was detected within the lateral ventricle from 1 day post-transplantation and remained there for up to 34 days. BLI indicated that most cells did not survive beyond 5-10 days, consistent with the lack of detectable migration into the brain parenchyma and the histological presence of an abundance of apoptotic cells. Transplanted hGPs could not be detected in the spleen. We conclude that ICV transplantation of short-lived hGPs can have a remote therapeutic effect through immunomodulation from within the ventricle, without cells directly participating in remyelination.

  12. A highly enriched niche of precursor cells with neuronal and glial potential within the hair follicle dermal papilla of adult skin.

    PubMed

    Hunt, David P J; Morris, Paul N; Sterling, Jane; Anderson, Jane A; Joannides, Alexis; Jahoda, Colin; Compston, Alastair; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2008-01-01

    Skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) are multipotent neural crest-related stem cells that grow as self-renewing spheres and are capable of generating neurons and myelinating glial cells. SKPs are of clinical interest because they are accessible and potentially autologous. However, although spheres can be readily isolated from embryonic and neonatal skin, SKP frequency falls away sharply in adulthood, and primary sphere generation from adult human skin is more problematic. In addition, the culture-initiating cell population is undefined and heterogeneous, limiting experimental studies addressing important aspects of these cells such as the behavior of endogenous precursors in vivo and the molecular mechanisms of neural generation. Using a combined fate-mapping and microdissection approach, we identified and characterized a highly enriched niche of neural crest-derived sphere-forming cells within the dermal papilla of the hair follicle of adult skin. We demonstrated that the dermal papilla of the rodent vibrissal follicle is 1,000-fold enriched for sphere-forming neural crest-derived cells compared with whole facial skin. These "papillaspheres" share a phenotypic and developmental profile similar to that of SKPs, can be readily expanded in vitro, and are able to generate both neuronal and glial cells in response to appropriate cues. We demonstrate that papillaspheres can be efficiently generated and expanded from adult human facial skin by microdissection of a single hair follicle. This strategy of targeting a highly enriched niche of sphere-forming cells provides a novel and efficient method for generating neuronal and glial cells from an accessible adult somatic source that is both defined and minimally invasive.

  13. Glial Restricted Precursor Cell Transplant with Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Improved Some Autonomic Functions but Resulted in a Reduced Graft Size after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nout, Yvette S.; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H.; Tovar, C. Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, 1)uninjured control, 2)SCI+vehicle, and 3)SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] were increased 14 days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: 1)SCI+vehicle, 2)SCI+GRP, 3)SCI+cAMP, 4)SCI+GRP+cAMP, and 5)uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2 weeks after SCI. At 9 days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24 hrs when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24 hrs compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive effects were seen

  14. Glial restricted precursor cell transplant with cyclic adenosine monophosphate improved some autonomic functions but resulted in a reduced graft size after spinal cord contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Nout, Yvette S; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H; Tovar, C Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, (1) uninjured control, (2) SCI+vehicle, and (3) SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] was increased 14days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: (1) SCI+vehicle, (2) SCI+GRP, (3) SCI+cAMP, (4) SCI+GRP+cAMP, and (5) uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2weeks after SCI. At 9days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24hours when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24hours compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive

  15. Role of the postnatal radial glial scaffold for the development of the dentate gyrus as revealed by Reelin signaling mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Brunne, Bianka; Franco, Santos; Bouché, Elisabeth; Herz, Joachim; Howell, Brian W.; Pahle, Jasmine; Müller, Ulrich; May, Petra; Frotscher, Michael; Bock, Hans H.

    2014-01-01

    During dentate gyrus development the early embryonic radial glial scaffold is replaced by a secondary glial scaffold around birth. In contrast to neocortical and early dentate gyrus radial glial cells these postnatal glial cells are severely altered with regard to position and morphology in reeler mice lacking the secreted protein Reelin. In this study we focus on the functional impact of these defects. Most radial glial cells throughout the nervous system serve as scaffolds for migrating neurons and precursor cells for both neurogenesis and gliogenesis. Precursor cell function has been demonstrated for secondary radial glial cells but the exact function of these late glial cells in granule cell migration and positioning is not clear. No data exist concerning the interplay between granule neurons and late radial glial cells during dentate gyrus development. Here we show that despite the severe morphological defects in the reeler dentate gyrus the precursor function of secondary radial glial cells is not impaired during development in reeler mice. In addition, selective ablation of Disabled-1, an intracellular adaptor protein essential for Reelin signaling, in neurons but not in glial cells allowed us to distinguish effects of Reelin signaling on radial glial cells from possible secondary effects based on defective granule cells positioning. PMID:23828756

  16. Transplanted glial restricted precursor cells improve neurobehavioral and neuropathological outcomes in a mouse model of neonatal white matter injury despite limited cell survival.

    PubMed

    Porambo, Michael; Phillips, Andre W; Marx, Joel; Ternes, Kylie; Arauz, Edwin; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Wilson, Mary Ann; Rothstein, Jeffery D; Johnston, Michael V; Fatemi, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal white matter injury (NWMI) is the leading cause of cerebral palsy and other neurocognitive deficits in prematurely-born children, and no restorative therapies exist. Our objective was to determine the fate and effect of glial restricted precursor cell (GRP) transplantation in an ischemic mouse model of NWMI. Neonatal CD-1 mice underwent unilateral carotid artery ligation on postnatal-Day 5 (P5). At P22, intracallosal injections of either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) + GRPs or saline were performed in control and ligated mice. Neurobehavioral and postmortem studies were performed at 4 and 8 weeks post-transplantation. GRP survival was comparable at 1 month but significantly lower at 2 months post-transplantation in NWMI mice compared with unligated controls. Surviving cells showed better migration capability in controls; however, the differentiation capacity of transplanted cells was similar in control and NWMI. Saline-treated NWMI mice showed significantly altered response in startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition (PPI) paradigms compared with unligated controls, while these behavioral tests were completely normal in GRP-transplanted animals. Similarly, there was significant increase in hemispheric myelin basic protein density, along with significant decrease in pathologic axonal staining in cell-treated NWMI mice compared with saline-treated NWMI animals. The reduced long-term survival and migration of transplanted GRPs in an ischemia-induced NWMI model suggests that neonatal ischemia leads to long-lasting detrimental effects on oligodendroglia even months after the initial insult. Despite limited GRP-survival, behavioral, and neuropathological outcomes were improved after GRP-transplantation. Our results suggest that exogenous GRPs improve myelination through trophic effects in addition to differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transplanted Glial Restricted Precursor Cells Improve Neurobehavioral and Neuropathological Outcomes in a Mouse Model of Neonatal White Matter Injury Despite Limited Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Porambo, Michael; Phillips, Andre W.; Marx, Joel; Ternes, Kylie; Arauz, Edwin; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Wilson, Mary Ann; Rothstein, Jeffery D.; Johnston, Michael V.; Fatemi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neonatal White Matter Injury (NWMI) is the leading cause of cerebral palsy and other neurocognitive deficits in prematurely-born children, and no restorative therapies exist. Our objective was to determine the fate and effect of glial restricted precursor cell (GRP) transplantation in an ischemic mouse model of NWMI. Methods Neonatal CD-1 mice underwent unilateral carotid artery ligation on postnatal-day 5 (P5). At P22, intracallosal injections of either eGFP+ GRPs or saline were performed in control and ligated mice. Neurobehavioral and postmortem studies were performed at four and eight weeks post-transplantation. Results GRP survival was comparable at one month but significantly lower at two months post-transplantation in NWMI mice compared to unligated controls. Surviving cells showed better migration capability in controls; however, the differentiation capacity of transplanted cells was similar in control and NWMI. Saline-treated NWMI mice showed significantly altered response in startle amplitude and pre-pulse inhibition paradigms compared to unligated controls, while these behavioral tests were completely normal in GRP-transplanted animals. Similarly, there was significant increase in hemispheric myelin basic protein density, along with significant decrease in pathologic axonal staining in cell-treated NWMI mice compared to saline-treated NWMI animals. Interpretation The Reduced long-term survival and migration of transplanted GRPs in an ischemia-induced NWMI model suggests that neonatal ischemia leads to long-lasting detrimental effects on oligodendroglia even months after the initial insult. Despite limited GRP-survival, behavioral and neuropathological outcomes were improved after GRP-transplantation. Our results suggest that exogenous GRPs improve myelination through trophic effects in addition to differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes. PMID:25377280

  18. Targeting glial physiology and glutamate cycling in the treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Gerald W.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that dysfunction in amino acid neurotransmission contributes to the pathophysiology of depression. Consequently, the modulation of amino acid neurotransmission represents a new strategy for antidepressant development. While glutamate receptor ligands are known to have antidepressant effects, mechanisms regulating glutamate cycling and metabolism may be viable drug targets as well. In particular, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) that are embedded in glial processes constitute the primary means of clearing extrasynaptic glutamate. Therefore, the decreased glial number observed in preclinical stress models, and in postmortem tissue from depressed patients provides intriguing, yet indirect evidence for a role of disrupted glutamate homeostasis in the pathophysiology of depression. More direct evidence for this hypothesis comes from studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a technique that non-invasively measures in vivo concentrations of glutamate and other amino acids under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, when combined with the infusion of 13C-labeled metabolic precursors, MRS can measure flux through discrete metabolic pathways. This approach has recently shown that glial amino acid metabolism is reduced by chronic stress, an effect that provides a link between environmental stress and the decreased EAAT activity observed under conditions of increased oxidative stress in the brain. Furthermore, administration of riluzole, a drug that enhances glutamate uptake through EAATs, reversed this stress-induced change in glial metabolism. Because riluzole has antidepressant effects in both animal models and human subjects, it may represent the prototype for a novel class of antidepressants with the modulation of glial physiology as a primary mechanism of action. PMID:19376090

  19. Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Jared M.; DePaul, Marc A.; Filous, Angela R.; Lang, Brad T.; Tran, Amanda; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes react to CNS injury by building a dense wall of filamentous processes around the lesion. Stromal cells quickly take up residence in the lesion core and synthesize connective tissue elements that contribute to fibrosis. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferate within the lesion and help to entrap dystrophic axon tips. Here we review evidence that this aggregate scar acts as the major barrier to regeneration of axons after injury. We also consider several exciting new interventions that allow axons to regenerate beyond the glial scar, and discuss the implications of this work for the future of regeneration biology. PMID:24424280

  20. Glial cell dysregulation: a new perspective on Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major cause of dementia. Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain its pathogenesis, beta-amyloid (A beta toxicity, cholinergic dysfunction, Tau hyper-phosphorylation, oxidative damage, synaptic dysfunction and inflammation secondary to senile plaques, among others. Glial cells are the major producers of inflammatory mediators, and cytotoxic activation of glial cells is linked to several neurodegenerative diseases; however, whether inflammation is a consequence or the cause of neurodegeneration is still unclear. I propose that inflammation and cellular stress associated with aging are key events in the development of AD through the induction of glial dysfunction. Dysregulated inflammatory response can elicit glial cell activation by compounds which are normally poorly reactive. Inflammation can also be the major cause of defective handling of A beta and the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Here I review evidence that support the proposal that dysfunctional glia and the resulting neuroinflammation can explain many features of AD. Evidence supports the notion that damage caused by inflammation is not only a primary cause of neurodegeneration but also an inducer for the accumulation of A beta in AD. Dysfunctional glia can result in impaired neuronal function in AD, as well as in many progressive neurodegenerative disorders. We show that microglial cell activation is enhanced under pro-inflammatory conditions, indicating that glial cell responses to A beta related proteins can be critically dependent on the priming of glial cells by pro-inflammatory factors.

  1. EGF Enhances Oligodendrogenesis from Glial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junlin; Cheng, Xuejun; Qi, Jiajun; Xie, Binghua; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Kang; Zhang, Zunyi; Qiu, Mengsheng

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling plays a positive role in myelin development and repair, but little is known about its biological effects on the early generation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells. In this study, we investigated the role of EGF in early OL development with isolated glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells. It was found that EGF collaborated with Platelet Derived Growth Factor-AA (PDGFaa) to promote the survival and self-renewal of GRP cells, but predisposed GRP cells to develop into O4− early-stage oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in the absence of or PDGFaa. In OPCs, EGF synergized with PDGFaa to maintain their O4 negative antigenic phenotype. Upon PDGFaa withdrawal, EGF promoted the terminal differentiation of OPCs by reducing apoptosis and increasing the number of mature OLs. Together, these data revealed that EGF is an important mitogen to enhance oligodendroglial development. PMID:28442994

  2. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S

    2015-08-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our ability to construct human glial chimeras with the production of patient-specific hGPCs derived from pluripotential stem cells, we may now establish mice in which a substantial proportion of resident glia are both human and disease-derived. These mice in particular may provide us new opportunities for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human neurological and neuropsychiatric disease.

  3. The scoop on the fly brain: glial engulfment functions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Logan, Mary A; Freeman, Marc R

    2007-02-01

    Glial cells provide support and protection for neurons in the embryonic and adult brain, mediated in part through the phagocytic activity of glia. Glial cells engulf apoptotic cells and pruned neurites from the developing nervous system, and also clear degenerating neuronal debris from the adult brain after neural trauma. Studies indicate that Drosophila melanogaster is an ideal model system to elucidate the mechanisms of engulfment by glia. The recent studies reviewed here show that many features of glial engulfment are conserved across species and argue that work in Drosophila will provide valuable cellular and molecular insight into glial engulfment activity in mammals.

  4. Central neuron-glial and glial-glial interactions following axon injury.

    PubMed

    Aldskogius, H; Kozlova, E N

    1998-05-01

    Axon injury rapidly activates microglial and astroglial cells close to the axotomized neurons. Following motor axon injury, astrocytes upregulate within hour(s) the gap junction protein connexin-43, and within one day glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Concomitantly, microglial cells proliferate and migrate towards the axotomized neuron perikarya. Analogous responses occur in central termination territories of peripherally injured sensory ganglion cells. The activated microglia express a number of inflammatory and immune mediators. When neuron degeneration occurs, microglia act as phagocytes. This is uncommon after peripheral nerve injury in the adult mammal, however, and the functional implications of the glial cell responses in this situation are unclear. When central axons are injured, the glial cell responses around the affected neuron perikarya appears to be minimal or absent, unless neuron degeneration occurs. Microglia proliferate, and astrocytes upregulate GFAP along central axons undergoing anterograde, Wallerian, degeneration. Although microglia develop into phagocytes, they eliminate the disintegrating myelin very slowly, presumably because they fail to release molecules which facilitate phagocytosis. During later stages of Wallerian degeneration, oligodendrocytes express clusterin, a glycoprotein implicated in several conditions of cell degeneration. A hypothetical scheme for glial cell activation following axon injury is discussed, implying the injured neurons initially interact with adjacent astrocytes. Subsequently, neighbouring resting microglia are activated. These glial reactions are amplified by paracrine and autocrine mechanisms, in which cytokines appear to be important mediators. The specific functional properties of the activated glial cells will determine their influence on neuronal survival, axon regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. The control of the induction and progression of these responses are therefore likely to be critical

  5. [Glial activation and brain aging].

    PubMed

    Sugaya, K

    2001-10-01

    While basal forebrain cholinergic neurons degenerate in aging and Alzheimer's disease, the cholinergic groups of the upper brainstem are preserved. Since the brainstem reticular-like cholinergic neurons differ from the rostral cholinergic phenotype by their high expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA, we hypothesized that they contain biochemical mechanisms to protect themselves against self-induced damage by nitric oxide (NO). Our initial question was a source of the NO during the aging process. We found a significant correlation between cognitive function and markers for glial activation and oxidative stress using aged rats. This result indicates that oxidative stress accompanied by glial activation may be occurred in the cognitively impaired animals. We also found mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) was significantly damaged in these animals, while accumulation of oxidative damage was not evident in other molecules. Therefore, oxidative damage to the mDNA by glial activation may occur in the cells having poor protection against oxidative stress during aging. Then the dysfunction of mitochondria, induced by the mDNA damage, may induce cell death as well as produce another oxidative stress to cause neuronal damage. The damaged neurons induce further glial activation and such self-accelerated immune-like response results in progressive neurodegeneration.

  6. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O/sub 2/ and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  7. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Tsacopoulos, M; Evêquoz-Mercier, V; Perrottet, P; Buchner, E

    1988-01-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy[3H]glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy[3H]glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O2 and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system. Images PMID:3186756

  8. GLIAL RESPONSES AFTER CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Dianna L.

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT) nerve innervates lingual taste buds and is susceptible to damage during dental and inner ear procedures. Interruption of the CT results in a disappearance of taste buds, which can be accompanied by taste disturbances. Because the CT usually regenerates to reinnervate taste buds successfully in a few weeks, a persistence of taste disturbances may indicate alterations in central nervous function. Peripheral injury to other sensory nerves leads to glial responses at central terminals, which actively contribute to abnormal sensations arising from nerve damage. Therefore, the current study examined microglial and astrocytic responses in the first central gustatory relay -the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS)- after transection of the CT. Damage to the CT resulted in significant microglial responses in terms of morphological reactivity and an increased density of microglial cells from 2-20 days after injury. This increased microglial population primarily resulted from microglial proliferation from 1.5-3 days, which was supplemented by microglial migration within sub-divisions of the nTS between days 2-3. Unlike other nerve injuries, CT injury did not result in recruitment of bone marrow-derived precursors. Astrocytes also reacted in the nTS with increased levels of GFAP by 3 days, although none showed evidence of cell division. GFAP levels remained increased at 30 days by which time microglial responses had resolved. These results show that nerve damage to the CT results in central glial responses, which may participate in long lasting taste alterations following CT lesion. PMID:22315167

  9. Glial cells and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Guerra-Cantera, Santiago; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2017-01-01

    The search for new strategies and drugs to abate the current obesity epidemic has led to the intensification of research aimed at understanding the neuroendocrine control of appetite and energy expenditure. This intensified investigation of metabolic control has also included the study of how glial cells participate in this process. Glia, the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, perform a wide spectrum of functions and are vital for the correct functioning of neurons and neuronal circuits. Current evidence indicates that hypothalamic glia, in particular astrocytes, tanycytes and microglia, are involved in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of appetite and metabolic control, at least in part by regulating the signals reaching metabolic neuronal circuits. Glia transport nutrients, hormones and neurotransmitters; they secrete growth factors, hormones, cytokines and gliotransmitters and are a source of neuroprogenitor cells. These functions are regulated, as glia also respond to numerous hormones and nutrients, with the lack of specific hormonal signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes disrupting metabolic homeostasis. Here, we review some of the more recent advances in the role of glial cells in metabolic control, with a special emphasis on the differences between glial cell responses in males and females.

  10. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  11. Populations of Radial Glial Cells Respond Differently to Reelin and Neuregulin1 in a Ferret Model of Cortical Dysplasia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-28

    Populations of Radial Glial Cells Respond Differently to Reelin and Neuregulin1 in a Ferret Model of Cortical Dysplasia Sylvie Poluch1,2, Sharon L...their function as neural precursors and guides of neuronal migration. Both reelin and neuregulin1 (NRG1) maintain the radial glial scaffold; they also...with the strongly disrupted vimentin expressing radial glia. When E24 MAM-treated organotypic slices are exposed to reelin or NRG1, the severely

  12. Review: Glial lineages and myelination in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    COMPSTON, ALASTAIR; ZAJICEK, JOHN; SUSSMAN, JON; WEBB, ANNA; HALL, GILLIAN; MUIR, DAVID; SHAW, CHRISTOPHER; WOOD, ANDREW; SCOLDING, NEIL

    1997-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, derived from stem cell precursors which arise in subventricular zones of the developing central nervous system, have as their specialist role the synthesis and maintenance of myelin. Astrocytes contribute to the cellular architecture of the central nervous system and act as a source of growth factors and cytokines; microglia are bone-marrow derived macrophages which function as primary immunocompetent cells in the central nervous system. Myelination depends on the establishment of stable relationships between each differentiated oligodendrocyte and short segments of several neighbouring axons. There is growing evidence, especially from studies of glial cell implantation, that oligodendrocyte precursors persist in the adult nervous system and provide a limited capacity for the restoration of structure and function in myelinated pathways damaged by injury or disease. PMID:9061442

  13. Glial dysfunction in abstinent methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Abulseoud, Osama; Harris, Kent C; Ross, Brian D

    2010-05-01

    Persistent neurochemical abnormalities in frontal brain structures are believed to result from methamphetamine use. We developed a localized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) assay on a conventional MR scanner, to quantify selectively glial metabolic flux rate in frontal brain of normal subjects and a cohort of recovering abstinent methamphetamine abusers. Steady-state bicarbonate concentrations were similar, between 11 and 15 mmol/L in mixed gray-white matter of frontal brain of normal volunteers and recovering methamphetamine-abusing subjects (P>0.1). However, glial (13)C-bicarbonate production rate from [1-(13)C]acetate, equating with glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate, was significantly reduced in frontal brain of abstinent methamphetamine-addicted women (methamphetamine 0.04 micromol/g per min (N=5) versus controls 0.11 micromol/g per min (N=5), P=0.001). This is equivalent to 36% of the normal glial TCA cycle rate. Severe reduction in glial TCA cycle rate that normally comprises 10% of total cerebral metabolic rate may impact operation of the neuronal glial glutamate cycle and result in accumulation of frontal brain glutamate, as observed in these recovering methamphetamine abusers. Although these are the first studies to define directly an abnormality in glial metabolism in human methamphetamine abuse, sequential studies using analogous (13)C MRS methods may determine 'cause and effect' between glial failure and neuronal injury.

  14. Telmisartan Modulates Glial Activation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Torika, Nofar; Asraf, Keren; Danon, Abraham; Apte, Ron N; Fleisher-Berkovich, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    The circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including the biologically active angiotensin II, is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of blood pressure conserved through evolution. Angiotensin II components of the RAS have also been identified in the brain. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuromodulators, such as angiotensin II can induce (through angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R)) some of the inflammatory actions of brain glial cells and influence brain inflammation. Moreover, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) models, where neuroinflammation occurs, increased levels of cortical AT1Rs have been shown. Still, the precise role of RAS in neuroinflammation is not completely clear. The overall aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of RAS in the modulation of glial functions and AD pathology. To reach this goal, the specific aims of the present study were a. to investigate the long term effect of telmisartan (AT1R blocker) on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1-β (IL1-β) and nitric oxide (NO) release from glial cells. b. to examine the effect of intranasally administered telmisartan on amyloid burden and microglial activation in 5X familial AD (5XFAD) mice. Telmisartan effects in vivo were compared to those of perindopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor). Long-term-exposure of BV2 microglia to telmisartan significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced NO, inducible NO synthase, TNF-α and IL1-β synthesis. The effect of Telmisartan on NO production in BV2 cells was confirmed also in primary neonatal rat glial cells. Intranasal administration of telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day) for up to two months significantly reduced amyloid burden and CD11b expression (a marker for microglia) both in the cortex and hipoccampus of 5XFAD. Based on the current view of RAS and our data, showing reduced amyloid burden and glial activation in the brains of 5XFAD transgenic mice, one may envision potential intervention with the progression of

  15. Phenotypic changes in satellite glial cells in cultured trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Vitali; Shraer, Nathanael; Hanani, Menachem

    2010-11-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are specialized cells that form a tight sheath around neurons in sensory ganglia. In recent years, there is increasing interest in SGCs and they have been studied in both intact ganglia and in tissue culture. Here we studied phenotypic changes in SGCs in cultured trigeminal ganglia from adult mice, containing both neurons and SGCs, using phase optics, immunohistochemistry and time-lapse photography. Cultures were followed for up to 14 days. After isolation virtually every sensory neuron is ensheathed by SGCs, as in the intact ganglia. After one day in culture, SGCs begin to migrate away from their parent neurons, but in most cases the neurons still retain an intact glial cover. At later times in culture, there is a massive migration of SGCs away from the neurons and they undergo clear morphological changes, and at 7 days they become spindle-shaped. At one day in culture SGCs express the glial marker glutamine synthetase, and also the purinergic receptor P2X7. From day 2 in culture the glutamine synthetase expression is greatly diminished, whereas that of P2X7 is largely unchanged. We conclude that SGCs retain most of their characteristics for about 24 h after culturing, but undergo major phenotypic changes at later times.

  16. A Phenotypic Change But Not Proliferation Underlies Glial Responses in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2014-01-01

    Classical immunohistochemical studies in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain reveal prominent glial reactions, but whether this pathological feature is due primarily to cell proliferation or to a phenotypic change of existing resting cells remains controversial. We performed double-fluorescence immunohistochemical studies of astrocytes and microglia, followed by unbiased stereology-based quantitation in temporal cortex of 40 AD patients and 32 age-matched nondemented subjects. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC2) were used as markers of astrocytic and microglial activation, respectively. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 L1 and glutamine synthetase were used as constitutive astrocytic markers, and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1) as a constitutive microglial marker. As expected, AD patients had higher numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes and MHC2+ microglia than the nondemented subjects. However, both groups had similar numbers of total astrocytes and microglia and, in the AD group, these total numbers remained essentially constant over the clinical course of the disease. The GFAP immunoreactivity of astrocytes, but not the MHC2 immunoreactivity of microglia, increased in parallel with the duration of the clinical illness in the AD group. Cortical atrophy contributed to the perception of increased glia density. We conclude that a phenotypic change of existing glial cells, rather than a marked proliferation of glial precursors, accounts for the majority of the glial responses observed in the AD brain. PMID:23602650

  17. A phenotypic change but not proliferation underlies glial responses in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T

    2013-06-01

    Classical immunohistochemical studies in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain reveal prominent glial reactions, but whether this pathological feature is due primarily to cell proliferation or to a phenotypic change of existing resting cells remains controversial. We performed double-fluorescence immunohistochemical studies of astrocytes and microglia, followed by unbiased stereology-based quantitation in temporal cortex of 40 AD patients and 32 age-matched nondemented subjects. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC2) were used as markers of astrocytic and microglial activation, respectively. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 L1 and glutamine synthetase were used as constitutive astrocytic markers, and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1) as a constitutive microglial marker. As expected, AD patients had higher numbers of GFAP(+) astrocytes and MHC2(+) microglia than the nondemented subjects. However, both groups had similar numbers of total astrocytes and microglia and, in the AD group, these total numbers remained essentially constant over the clinical course of the disease. The GFAP immunoreactivity of astrocytes, but not the MHC2 immunoreactivity of microglia, increased in parallel with the duration of the clinical illness in the AD group. Cortical atrophy contributed to the perception of increased glia density. We conclude that a phenotypic change of existing glial cells, rather than a marked proliferation of glial precursors, accounts for the majority of the glial responses observed in the AD brain. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tramtrack controls glial number and identity in the Drosophila embryonic CNS.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, P

    2001-10-01

    Neurons and glia are often derived from common multipotent stem cells. In Drosophila, neural identity appears to be the default fate of these precursors. Stem cells that generate either neurons or glia transiently express neural stem cell-specific markers. Further development as glia requires the activation of glial-specific regulators. However, this must be accompanied by simultaneous repression of the alternate neural fate. I show that the Drosophila transcriptional repressor Tramtrack is a key repressor of neuronal fates. It is expressed at high levels in all mature glia of the embryonic central nervous system. Analysis of the temporal profile of Tramtrack expression in glia shows that it follows that of existing glial markers. When expressed ectopically before neural stem cell formation, Tramtrack represses the neural stem cell-specific genes asense and deadpan. Surprisingly, Tramtrack protein levels oscillate in a cell cycle-dependent manner in proliferating glia, with expression dropping before replication, but re-initiating after S phase. Overexpression of Tramtrack blocks glial development by inhibiting S-phase and repressing expression of the S-phase cyclin, cyclin E. Conversely, in tramtrack mutant embryos, glia are disrupted and undergo additional rounds of replication. I propose that Tramtrack ensures stable mature glial identity by both repressing neuroblast-specific genes and controlling glial cell proliferation.

  19. MCP-1 involvement in glial differentiation of neuroprogenitor cells through APP signaling.

    PubMed

    Vrotsos, Emmanuel George; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2009-04-29

    Previously it has been reported that neural stem cells undergoing apoptotic stress have increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and increased APP expression results in glial differentiation. APP activity was also shown to be required for staurosporine-induced glial differentiation of neuroprogenitor cells. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a chemokine that is expressed early during inflammation. The binding of MCP-1 to its chemokine receptor induces expression of novel transcription factor MCP-1-induced protein (MCPIP). MCPIP expression subsequently leads to cell death. Previous studies have shown that pro-apoptotic factors have the ability to induce neural differentiation. Therefore, we investigated if MCPIP expression leads to differentiation of NT2 neuroprogenitor cells. Results showed that MCPIP expression increased glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression and also caused distinct morphological changes, both indicative of glial differentiation. Similar results were observed with MCP-1 treatment. Interestingly, APP expression decreased in response to MCPIP. Instead, we found APP activity regulates expression of both MCP-1 and MCPIP. Furthermore, inhibition of either p38 MAPK or JAK signaling pathways significantly reduced APP's effect on MCP-1 and MCPIP. These data demonstrates the role APP has in glial differentiation of NT2 cells through MCP-1/MCPIP signaling. It is possible that increased APP expression after CNS injury could play a role in MCP-1 production, possibly promoting astrocyte activation at injured site.

  20. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-06

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  1. Do glial cells control pain?

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Marc R; Wen, Yeong-Ray; Decosterd, Isabelle; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Management of chronic pain is a real challenge, and current treatments focusing on blocking neurotransmission in the pain pathway have only resulted in limited success. Activation of glia cells has been widely implicated in neuroinflammation in the central nervous system, leading to neruodegeneration in many disease conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis. The inflammatory mediators released by activated glial cells, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β can not only cause neurodegeneration in these disease conditions, but also cause abnormal pain by acting on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons in injury conditions. Pain can also be potentiated by growth factors such as BDNF and bFGF that are produced by glia to protect neurons. Thus, glia cells can powerfully control pain when they are activated to produce various pain mediators. We will review accumulating evidence supporting an important role of microglia cells in the spinal cord for pain control under injury conditions (e.g. nerve injury). We will also discuss possible signaling mechanisms in particular MAP kinase pathways that are critical for glia control of pain. Investigating signaling mechanisms in microglia may lead to more effective management of devastating chronic pain. PMID:18504511

  2. The interface between glial progenitors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain and spinal cord contain heterogeneous populations of cycling, immature cells. These include cells with stem cell-like properties as well as progenitors in various stages of early glial differentiation. This latter population is distributed widely throughout gray and white matter and numerically represents an extremely large cell pool. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glial progenitors that populate the adult CNS are one source of gliomas. Indeed, the marker phenotypes, morphologies, and migratory properties of cells in gliomas strongly resemble glial progenitors in many ways. We review briefly some salient features of normal glial development and then examine the similarities and differences between normal progenitors and cells in gliomas, focusing on the phenotypic plasticity of glial progenitors and the responses to growth factors in promoting proliferation and migration of normal and glioma cells, and discussing known mutational changes in gliomas in the context of how these might affect the proliferative and migratory behaviors of progenitors. Finally, we will discuss the “cancer stem cell” hypothesis in light of the possibility that glial progenitors can generate gliomas. PMID:18784926

  3. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  4. Application of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent labels for diagnosis of brain glial cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Patrícia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando J. M., Jr.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Romão, Luciana; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Amaral, Jane C. O. F.; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    In this work we present the preparation, characterization and conjugation of colloidal core shell CdS-Cd(OH) II quantum dots to health and cancer glial rats living cells in culture media. The particles were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium, with final pH=7.3-7.4. Laser Scan Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) and Fluorescence Microscopy were used to evaluate fluorescence intensities and patterns of health and cancer (glioblastoma) glial cells labeled with the quantum dots in different time intervals. Health and cancer glial cells clearly differ in their fluorescence intensities and patterns. These different fluorescence intensities and patterns may be associated to differences concerning cellular membrane and metabolic features of health and cancer cells. The results obtained indicate the potential of the methodology for fast and precise cancer diagnostics.

  5. Glial chain migration requires pioneer cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoît; Lepelletier, Léa; Giangrande, Angela

    2008-11-05

    The migration of glial chains along the nerve entails directional and coordinated movement. Despite its importance in the formation of the nervous system, this process remains poorly understood, because of the difficulty of manipulating identified cells. Using confocal time-lapse and cell ablation in the whole animal, we provide direct evidence for a discrete number of Drosophila peripheral glial cells acting as pioneers and guiding the rest of the migratory chain. These cells are in direct contact with several follower cells through a very long and stable cytoplasmic extension. The presence of pioneer cells and homotypic interactions at the tip of the chain allows coordinated movement and the formation of a continuous sheath around the nerve. These in vivo data open novel perspectives for understanding the cellular bases of vertebrate glial migration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  6. Investigations on contribution of glial inwardly-rectifying K(+) current to membrane potential and ion flux: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Yan-Ming; Kao, Ching-An; Chen, Bing-Shuo; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The inwardly rectifying K(+) current [IK(IR)] allows large inward K(+) currents at potentials negative to K(+) equilibrium potential (EK) and it becomes small outward K(+) currents at those positive to EK. How changes of such currents enriched in glial cells can influence the functions of glial cell, neurons, or both is not clearly defined, although mutations of Kir4.1 channels have been demonstrated to cause serious neurological disorders. In this study, we identified the presence of IK(IR) in human glioma cells (U373 and U87 cells). The amplitude of IK(IR) in U373 cells was subject to inhibition by amitriptyline, arecoline, or BaCl2. The activity of inwardly rectifying K(+) channels was also clearly detected, and single-channel conductance of these channels was calculated to be around 23 pS. Moreover, based on a simulation model derived from neuron-glial interaction mediated by ion flux, we further found out that incorporation of glial IK(IR) conductance into the model can significantly contribute to regulation of extracellular K(+) concentrations and glial resting potential, particularly during high-frequency stimulation. Glial cells and neurons can mutually modulate their expression of ion channels through K(+) ions released into the extracellular space. It is thus anticipated that glial IK(IR) may be a potential target utilized to influence the activity of neuronal and glial cells as well as their interaction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  7. dMyc is required in retinal progenitors to prevent JNK-mediated retinal glial activation.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Lígia; Correia, Andreia; Santos, Marília A; Relvas, João B; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-03-01

    In the nervous system, glial cells provide crucial insulation and trophic support to neurons and are important for neuronal survival. In reaction to a wide variety of insults, glial cells respond with changes in cell morphology and metabolism to allow repair. Additionally, these cells can acquire migratory and proliferative potential. In particular, after axonal damage or pruning the clearance of axonal debris by glial cells is key for a healthy nervous system. Thus, bidirectional neuron-glial interactions are crucial in development, but little is known about the cellular sensors and signalling pathways involved. In here, we show that decreased cellular fitness in retinal progenitors caused by reduced Drosophila Myc expression triggers non cell-autonomous activation of retinal glia proliferation and overmigration. Glia migration occurs beyond its normal limit near the boundary between differentiated photoreceptors and precursor cells, extending into the progenitor domain. This overmigration is stimulated by JNK activation (and the function of its target Mmp1), while proliferative responses are mediated by Dpp/TGF-β signalling activation.

  8. The hypoparathyroidism-associated mutation in Drosophila Gcm compromises protein stability and glial cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao; Lu, Lu; Zhuge, Chun-Chun; Chen, Xuebing; Zhai, Yuanfen; Cheng, Jingjing; Mao, Haian; Yang, Chang-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lee, Yi-Nan; Chien, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Margaret S.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated neurons and glia are acquired from immature precursors via transcriptional controls exerted by factors such as proteins in the family of Glial Cells Missing (Gcm). Mammalian Gcm proteins mediate neural stem cell induction, placenta and parathyroid development, whereas Drosophila Gcm proteins act as a key switch to determine neuronal and glial cell fates and regulate hemocyte development. The present study reports a hypoparathyroidism-associated mutation R59L that alters Drosophila Gcm (Gcm) protein stability, rendering it unstable, and hyperubiquitinated via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). GcmR59L interacts with the Slimb-based SCF complex and Protein Kinase C (PKC), which possibly plays a role in its phosphorylation, hence altering ubiquitination. Additionally, R59L causes reduced Gcm protein levels in a manner independent of the PEST domain signaling protein turnover. GcmR59L proteins bind DNA, functionally activate transcription, and induce glial cells, yet at a less efficient level. Finally, overexpression of either wild-type human Gcmb (hGcmb) or hGcmb carrying the conserved hypoparathyroidism mutation only slightly affects gliogenesis, indicating differential regulatory mechanisms in human and flies. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the significance of this disease-associated mutation in controlling Gcm protein stability via UPS, hence advance our understanding on how glial formation is regulated. PMID:28051179

  9. dMyc is required in retinal progenitors to prevent JNK-mediated retinal glial activation

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Andreia; Santos, Marília A.; Relvas, João B.; Pereira, Paulo S.

    2017-01-01

    In the nervous system, glial cells provide crucial insulation and trophic support to neurons and are important for neuronal survival. In reaction to a wide variety of insults, glial cells respond with changes in cell morphology and metabolism to allow repair. Additionally, these cells can acquire migratory and proliferative potential. In particular, after axonal damage or pruning the clearance of axonal debris by glial cells is key for a healthy nervous system. Thus, bidirectional neuron-glial interactions are crucial in development, but little is known about the cellular sensors and signalling pathways involved. In here, we show that decreased cellular fitness in retinal progenitors caused by reduced Drosophila Myc expression triggers non cell-autonomous activation of retinal glia proliferation and overmigration. Glia migration occurs beyond its normal limit near the boundary between differentiated photoreceptors and precursor cells, extending into the progenitor domain. This overmigration is stimulated by JNK activation (and the function of its target Mmp1), while proliferative responses are mediated by Dpp/TGF-β signalling activation. PMID:28267791

  10. Calcineurin and glial signaling: neuroinflammation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Furman, Jennifer L; Norris, Christopher M

    2014-09-10

    Similar to peripheral immune/inflammatory cells, neuroglial cells appear to rely on calcineurin (CN) signaling pathways to regulate cytokine production and cellular activation. Several studies suggest that harmful immune/inflammatory responses may be the most impactful consequence of aberrant CN activity in glial cells. However, newly identified roles for CN in glutamate uptake, gap junction regulation, Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, and amyloid production suggest that CN's influence in glia may extend well beyond neuroinflammation. The following review will discuss the various actions of CN in glial cells, with particular emphasis on astrocytes, and consider the implications for neurologic dysfunction arising with aging, injury, and/or neurodegenerative disease.

  11. DNA damage, neuronal and glial cell death and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key factor in the maintenance of genome stability. As such, it is a central axis in sustaining cellular homeostasis in a variety of contexts: development, growth, differentiation, and maintenance of the normal life cycle of the cell. It is now clear that diverse mechanisms encompassing cell cycle regulation, repair pathways, many aspects of cellular metabolism, and cell death are inter-linked and act in concert in response to DNA damage. Defects in the DDR in proliferating cells can lead to cancer, while DDR defects in neurons may result in neurodegeneration. Mature neurons are highly differentiated, post-mitotic cells that cannot be replenished after disease or trauma. Their high metabolic activity generates large amounts of reactive oxygen species with DNA damaging capacity. Moreover, their intense transcriptional activity increases the potential for genomic DNA damage. Respectively, neurons have elaborate mechanisms to defend the integrity of their genome, thus ensuring their longevity and functionality in the face of these threats. Over the course of the past two decades, there has been a substantial increase in our understanding of the role of glial cells in supporting the neuronal cell DDR and longevity. This review article focuses on the potential role of the DDR in the etiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and in addition, it describes various aspects of glial cell functionality in two genomic instability disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

  12. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    von Hilchen, Christian M; Bustos, Alvaro E; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo.

  13. Negative regulation of glial engulfment activity by Draper terminates glial responses to axon injury

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Mary A.; Hackett, Rachel; Doherty, Johnna; Sheehan, Amy; Speese, Sean D.; Freeman, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury elicits potent cellular responses from glia, but molecular pathways modulating glial activation, phagocytic function, and termination of reactive responses remain poorly defined. Here we show that positive or negative regulation of glial reponses to axon injury are molecularly encoded by unique isoforms of the Drosophila engulfment receptor Draper. Draper-I promotes engulfment of axonal debris through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). In contrast, Draper-II, an alternative splice variant, potently inhibits glial engulfment function. Draper-II suppresses Draper-I signaling through a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-like domain and the tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Intriguingly, loss of Draper-II/Csw signaling prolongs expression of glial engulfment genes after axotomy and reduces the ability of glia to respond to secondary axotomy. Our work highlights a novel role for Draper-II in inhibiting glial responses to neurodegeneration, and indicates a balance of opposing Draper-I/-II signaling events is essential to maintain glial sensitivity to brain injury. PMID:22426252

  14. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is viewed with confocal microscopy and laser speckle flowmetry to monitor glial cell responses and retinal blood flow. Retinal glial cells are labeled with the Ca2+ indicator dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and the caged Ca2+ compound NP-EGTA by injection of the compounds into the vitreous humor. Glial cells are stimulated by photolysis of caged Ca2+ and the activation state of the cells assessed by monitoring Ca2+ indicator dye fluorescence. We find that, as in the ex vivo retina, retinal glial cells in vivo generate both spontaneous and evoked intercellular Ca2+ waves. We also find that stimulation of glial cells leads to the dilation of neighboring retinal arterioles, supporting the hypothesis that glial cells regulate blood flow in the retina. This in vivo preparation holds great promise for assessing glial cell function in the healthy and pathological retina. PMID:22144328

  15. Intrathoracic glial implants in a child with gliomatosis peritonei.

    PubMed

    Lipskar, Aaron M; Rothstein, David H; Soffer, Samuel Z; Edelman, Morris; Glick, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    Glial peritoneal implants, commonly referred to as gliomatosis peritonei, are an occasional feature of ovarian teratomas. They are benign nodules of mature glial tissue and usually do not adversely affect outcome. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl who underwent excision of an immature ovarian teratoma, along with biopsies of multiple glial peritoneal implants. She also had a 2-cm right-sided pleural mass, which turned out to be normal glial tissue that was histologically indistinguishable from the peritoneal glial tissue. Pleural gliomatosis has not been described in the literature. The pathophysiology of gliomatosis peritonei was originally thought to be the direct extrusion or lymphatic spread of glial cells from the associated teratoma, although it has been postulated that the glial implants may instead be the result of pluripotent Mullerian stem cells that undergo metaplasia. This report provides evidence to bolster the metaplastic theory.

  16. Glial Cell Development and Function in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, David A.; Talbot, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a premier vertebrate model system that offers many experimental advantages for in vivo imaging and genetic studies. This review provides an overview of glial cell types in the central and peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We highlight some recent work that exploited the strengths of the zebrafish system to increase the understanding of the role of Gpr126 in Schwann cell myelination and illuminate the mechanisms controlling oligodendrocyte development and myelination. We also summarize similarities and differences between zebrafish radial glia and mammalian astrocytes and consider the possibility that their distinct characteristics may represent extremes in a continuum of cell identity. Finally, we focus on the emergence of zebrafish as a model for elucidating the development and function of microglia. These recent studies have highlighted the power of the zebrafish system for analyzing important aspects of glial development and function. PMID:25395296

  17. Human brain glial cells synthesize thrombospondin.

    PubMed Central

    Asch, A S; Leung, L L; Shapiro, J; Nachman, R L

    1986-01-01

    Thrombospondin, a 450-kDa multinodular glycoprotein with lectin-type activity, is found in human platelets, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, monocytes, and granular pneumocytes. Thrombospondin interacts with heparin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen, histidine-rich glycoprotein, and plasminogen. Recently, thrombospondin synthesis by smooth muscle cells has been reported to be augmented by platelet-derived growth factor. We present evidence that thrombospondin is present within and synthesized by astrocytic neuroglial cells. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of material derived from a human brain homogenate yielded a protein that, when reduced, had an apparent size of 180 kDa and comigrated with reduced platelet thrombospondin on NaDodSO4/PAGE. Immunoblot analysis with monospecific anti-thrombospondin confirmed the presence of immunoreactive thrombospondin. Indirect immunofluorescence of cultured human glial cells indicated the presence of thrombospondin. Metabolic labeling of glial cell cultures with [35S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with monospecific anti-thrombospondin revealed synthesis of a 180-kDa polypeptide that comigrated with platelet thrombospondin on NaDodSO4/PAGE. Cultured human glial cells were incubated for 48 hr in serum-free medium with purified platelet-derived growth factor at concentrations up to 50 ng/ml. Aliquots taken at intervals were analyzed by a quantitative double-antibody ELISA. The growth factor stimulated the release of thrombospondin into the culture medium by as much as 10-fold over control cultures. The presence of thrombospondin within glial cells of the central nervous system and the augmentation of its synthesis by platelet-derived growth factor suggest that thrombospondin may play an important role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during periods of cell division and growth. Images PMID:2939460

  18. Glial Cell Contributions to Auditory Brainstem Development

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits. PMID:27818624

  19. Physiological Functions of Glial Cell Hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    The brain performs exceptionally complex and dynamic tasks that depend on the coordinated interaction of neurons, glial cells, endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, ependymal cells, and circulating blood cells. Among these cells, glial cells have emerged as crucial protagonists in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neural function. Indeed, these cells express a wide range of receptors that enable them to sense changes in neuronal activity and the microenvironment by responding locally via the release of bioactive molecules known as gliotransmitters. In the central nervous system (CNS), a novel mechanism that allows gliotransmission via the opening of hemichannels has been proposed. These channels are composed of six protein subunits consisting of connexins or pannexins, which are two highly conserved protein families that are encoded by 21 and 3 genes, respectively, in humans. Typically, glial cell hemichannels exhibit low levels of activity, but this activity is sufficient to ensure the release of a broad spectrum of gliotransmitters, including ATP, D-serine, glutamate, adenosine, and glutathione. Here, we briefly review the current findings regarding the effects of the hemichannel-dependent release of gliotransmitters on the physiology of the CNS.

  20. Clear cell unicystic ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, MB; Thambiah, Lalita J; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell differentiation in unicystic ameloblastoma with inclusion of many other histologic variants in the same tumor is a very rare occurrence. Here, we report a case of a well-circumscribed large mandibular swelling in a 22 - year old female. The lesion was histopathologically diagnosed as unicystic ameloblastoma which showed multiple histologic patterns and clear cell differentiation. The tumor was treated with surgical enucleation and chemical cauterization. A follow up of 20 months has shown no recurrence after initial surgery. PMID:21731291

  1. Effect of treatment with choline alphoscerate on hippocampus microanatomy and glial reaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Amenta, Francesco

    2006-11-20

    The influence of long term treatment with choline alphoscerate on microanatomy of hippocampus and glial reaction was assessed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) used as an animal model of cerebrovascular disease. Choline alphoscerate is a cholinergic precursor, which has shown to be effective in countering cognitive symptoms in forms of dementia disorders of degenerative, vascular or combined origin. Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) aged 6 months and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated for 8 weeks with an oral daily dose of 100 mg/kg of choline alphoscerate, 285 mg/kg of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) or vehicle. On the hippocampus of different animal groups, nerve cell number and GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes were assessed by neuroanatomical, immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques associated with quantitative analysis. Treatment with choline alphoscerate countered nerve cell loss and glial reaction primarily in the CA1 subfields and in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of SHR. Phosphatidylcholine did not affect hypertension-dependent changes in hippocampal microanatomy. Both compounds did not affect blood pressure values in SHR. These data suggest that choline alphoscerate may play a role in the countering hippocampal changes induced by cerebrovascular involvement. The observation that treatment with choline alphoscerate attenuates the extent of glial reaction in the hippocampus of SHR suggests also that the compound may afford neuroprotection in this animal model of vascular brain damage.

  2. Primary culture of glial cells from mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion: a valuable tool for studying glial cell biology.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2010-12-15

    Central nervous system glial cells as astrocytes and microglia have been investigated in vitro and many intracellular pathways have been clarified upon various stimuli. Peripheral glial cells, however, are not as deeply investigated in vitro despite its importance role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Based on our previous experience of culturing neuronal cells, our objective was to standardize and morphologically characterize a primary culture of mouse superior cervical ganglion glial cells in order to obtain a useful tool to study peripheral glial cell biology. Superior cervical ganglia from neonatal C57BL6 mice were enzymatically and mechanically dissociated and cells were plated on diluted Matrigel coated wells in a final concentration of 10,000cells/well. Five to 8 days post plating, glial cell cultures were fixed for morphological and immunocytochemical characterization. Glial cells showed a flat and irregular shape, two or three long cytoplasm processes, and round, oval or long shaped nuclei, with regular outline. Cell proliferation and mitosis were detected both qualitative and quantitatively. Glial cells were able to maintain their phenotype in our culture model including immunoreactivity against glial cell marker GFAP. This is the first description of immunocytochemical characterization of mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion glial cells in primary culture. This work discusses the uses and limitations of our model as a tool to study many aspects of peripheral glial cell biology.

  3. Clarifying Tissue Clearing

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Douglas S.; Lichtman, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Biological specimens are intrinsically three dimensional; however because of the obscuring effects of light scatter, imaging deep into a tissue volume is problematic. Although efforts to eliminate the scatter by “clearing” the tissue have been ongoing for over a century, there have been a large number of recent innovations. This review introduces the physical basis for light-scatter in tissue, describes the mechanisms underlying various clearing techniques, and discusses several of the major advances in light microscopy for imaging cleared tissue. PMID:26186186

  4. Sex steroids inhibit osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Florian; Wurm, Antje; Linnertz, Regina; Pannicke, Thomas; Iandiev, Ianors; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. We investigated whether sex steroids inhibit the swelling of glial somata in acutely isolated retinal slices and glial cells of the rat. Superfusion of retinal slices or cells from control animals with a hypoosmolar solution did not induce glial swelling, whereas glial swelling was observed in slices of postischemic and diabetic retinas. Progesterone, testosterone, estriol, and 17beta-estradiol prevented glial swelling with half-maximal effects at approximately 0.3, 0.6, 6, and 20 microM, respectively. The effect of progesterone was apparently mediated by transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, P2Y1, and adenosine A1 receptors. The data suggest that sex steroids may inhibit cytotoxic edema in the retina.

  5. A-3 Cleared Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-18

    Work to clear the site for the A-3 Test Stand progresses quickly, as seen in this photo taken June 18 from atop the A-1 Test Stand. The next step in construction at 19-acre site will be the arrival of fill dirt in mid-July, followed by pilings and piling caps.

  6. A-3 Cleared Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Work to clear the site for the A-3 Test Stand progresses quickly, as seen in this photo taken June 18 from atop the A-1 Test Stand. The next step in construction at 19-acre site will be the arrival of fill dirt in mid-July, followed by pilings and piling caps.

  7. The use of glial data in human health assessments of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Andrew D

    2015-07-03

    Central nervous system (CNS) glia (i.e., astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes) are essential for maintaining neuronal homeostasis, and they orchestrate an organized cellular response to CNS injury. In addition to their beneficial roles, studies have demonstrated that disrupted glial function can have disastrous consequences on neuronal health. While effects on neuron-supportive glia are important to consider when evaluating neurotoxicity risk, interpreting glial changes is not always straightforward, particularly when attempting to discern pro-neurotoxic phenotypes from homeostatic processes or adaptive responses. To better understand how glia have been characterized and used in human health assessments of environmental contaminants (e.g., chemicals), an evaluation of all finalized assessments conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's influential Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) program between 1987 and 2013 was performed. Human health assessments to date have placed a clear emphasis on the neuronal cell response to potential toxicants, although more recent assessments increasingly include descriptions of glial changes. However, these descriptions are generally brief and non-specific, and they primarily consist of documenting gliosis following overt neuronal injury. As research interest in this topic continues to increase, methods for evaluating changes in glia continue to be expanded and refined, and assessors' confidence in the reliability of these data is likely to rise. Thus, glial data are anticipated to have an increasingly influential impact on the interpretation of neurotoxicity risk and underlying mechanisms. As our understanding of the complex roles these cells play grows, this knowledge is expected to support the inclusion of more extensive and specific descriptions of glial changes, including informed interpretations of the potential impact on CNS health, in future human health assessments.

  8. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout.

  9. Diverse neurotoxicants target the differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells into neuronal and glial phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2016-11-30

    The large number of compounds that needs to be tested for developmental neurotoxicity drives the need to establish in vitro models to evaluate specific neurotoxic endpoints. We used neural stem cells derived from rat neuroepithelium on embryonic day 14 to evaluate the impact of diverse toxicants on their ability to differentiate into glia and neurons: a glucocorticoid (dexamethasone), organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, parathion), insecticides targeting the GABAA receptor (dieldrin, fipronil), heavy metals (Ni(2+), Ag(+)), nicotine and tobacco smoke extract. We found three broad groupings of effects. One diverse set of compounds, dexamethasone, the organophosphate pesticides, Ni(2+) and nicotine, suppressed expression of the glial phenotype while having little or no effect on the neuronal phenotype. The second pattern was restricted to the pesticides acting on GABAA receptors. These compounds promoted the glial phenotype and suppressed the neuronal phenotype. Notably, the actions of compounds eliciting either of these differentiation patterns were clearly unrelated to deficits in cell numbers: dexamethasone, dieldrin and fipronil all reduced cell numbers, whereas organophosphates and Ni(2+) had no effect. The third pattern, shared by Ag(+) and tobacco smoke extract, clearly delineated cytotoxicity, characterized by major cell loss with suppression of differentiation into both glial and neuronal phenotypes; but here again, there was some selectivity in that glia were suppressed more than neurons. Our results, from this survey with diverse compounds, point to convergence of neurotoxicant effects on a specific "decision node" that controls the emergence of neurons and glia from neural stem cells.

  10. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation. © FASEB.

  11. Glial cells: Old cells with new twists

    PubMed Central

    Ndubaku, Ugo; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Summary Based on their characteristics and function – migration, neural protection, proliferation, axonal guidance and trophic effects – glial cells may be regarded as probably the most versatile cells in our body. For many years, these cells were considered as simply support cells for neurons. Recently, it has been shown that they are more versatile than previously believed – as true stem cells in the nervous system – and are important players in neural function and development. There are several glial cell types in the nervous system: the two most abundant are oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Although both of these cells are responsible for myelination, their developmental origins are quite different. Oligodendrocytes originate from small niche populations from different regions of the central nervous system, while Schwann cells develop from a stem cell population (the neural crest) that gives rise to many cell derivatives besides glia and which is a highly migratory group of cells. PMID:18068219

  12. Glial cyst of the pineal gland: case report and considerations about surgical management.

    PubMed

    Tartara, F; Regolo, P; Terreni, M R; Giovanelli, M

    2000-06-01

    Symptomatic glial cyst of the pineal gland are rare lesions. Origin, natural history and factors leading to cyst enlargement are not completely clear; thus management remain uncertain in some cases. We report a case of symptomatic glial cyst and analyze the implication for surgery. Surgical management is indicated in patients presenting hydrocephalus, mass effect or symptoms related to mesencephalic dysfunction. The infratentorial supracerebellar approach represent the first choice for this condition allowing easy orientation with wide exposure of the tumor and good visibility of deep venous systems that may be preserved. Size of the tumor is a key element in evaluation of the treatment and the appropriate course for asymptomatic cyst less than 1 cm in size consist of conservative management. Periodic follow up is always indicated.

  13. Fine Surface Images That Reflect Cytoskeletal Structures in Cultured Glial Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Yukako; Hatakeyama, Dai; Tojima, Takuro; Kawabata, Kazushige; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Ogura, Shigeaki; Abe, Kazuhiro; Ito, Etsuro

    1998-06-01

    The morphology of cultured glial cells was examined using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and immunofluorescence staining for cytoskeletons. The meshwork of type-1 astrocytes consisted of thick longitudinal and thin lateral lines on the cell surfaces observed by AFM; the former lines were confirmed to be reflections of actin filaments. The astrocytic processes of type-2 astrocytes were observed to be rugged on AFM. These structures were mainly affected by microtubules. Immunofluorescence imaging of microglia revealed that actin filaments and microtubules were arranged radially and wavily along the cell edge, respectively. AFM could detect these radial and wavy structures clearly. These results show that AFM can provide information on the cytoskeletons of glial cells, indicating that AFM is a useful tool for the morphological characterization of cells.

  14. 77 FR 37803 - Customer Clearing Documentation, Timing of Acceptance for Clearing, and Clearing Member Risk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... Clearing, and Clearing Member Risk Management; Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated... Clearing Member Risk Management, and Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contract...

  15. Glial heterotopia in an adult: A rare orbital mass

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresh, Divya Dabir; Mangala Gouri, S R

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic glial tissue is very rare in the orbit. Our case was an adult, which is unique since most cases reported in literature involve children. We describe a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with an orbital mass, which histopathologically revealed heterotopic glial tissue. PMID:27958209

  16. Glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in pathophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Francesca; Begum, Gulnaz; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Sirabella, Rossana; Cuomo, Ornella; Casamassa, Antonella; Sun, Dandan; Annunziato, Lucio

    2016-10-01

    Sodium dynamics are essential for regulating functional processes in glial cells. Indeed, glial Na(+) signaling influences and regulates important glial activities, and plays a role in neuron-glia interaction under physiological conditions or in response to injury of the central nervous system (CNS). Emerging studies indicate that Na(+) pumps and Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes regulate Na(+) homeostasis and play a fundamental role in modulating glial activities in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduced the emerging roles of each glial cell type in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and myelin diseases. Then, we discussed the current knowledge on the main roles played by the different glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters, including Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchangers, Na(+) /H(+) exchangers, Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporters, and Na(+) - HCO3- cotransporter in the pathophysiology of the diverse CNS diseases. We highlighted their contributions in cell survival, synaptic pathology, gliotransmission, pH homeostasis, and their role in glial activation, migration, gliosis, inflammation, and tissue repair processes. Therefore, this review summarizes the foundation work for targeting Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in glia as a novel strategy to control important glial activities associated with Na(+) dynamics in different neurological disorders. GLIA 2016;64:1677-1697. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Long-term fate of neural precursor cells following transplantation into developing and adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Lepore, A C; Neuhuber, B; Connors, T M; Han, S S W; Liu, Y; Daniels, M P; Rao, M S; Fischer, I

    2006-05-12

    Successful strategies for transplantation of neural precursor cells for replacement of lost or dysfunctional CNS cells require long-term survival of grafted cells and integration with the host system, potentially for the life of the recipient. It is also important to demonstrate that transplants do not result in adverse outcomes. Few studies have examined the long-term properties of transplanted neural precursor cells in the CNS, particularly in non-neurogenic regions of the adult. The aim of the present study was to extensively characterize the fate of defined populations of neural precursor cells following transplantation into the developing and adult CNS (brain and spinal cord) for up to 15 months, including integration of graft-derived neurons with the host. Specifically, we employed neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors, which represent neural precursor cells with lineage restrictions for neuronal and glial fate, respectively. Transplanted cells were prepared from embryonic day-13.5 fetal spinal cord of transgenic donor rats that express the marker gene human placental alkaline phosphatase to achieve stable and reliable graft tracking. We found that in both developing and adult CNS grafted cells showed long-term survival, morphological maturation, extensive distribution and differentiation into all mature CNS cell types (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). Graft-derived neurons also formed synapses, as identified by electron microscopy, suggesting that transplanted neural precursor cells integrated with adult CNS. Furthermore, grafts did not result in any apparent deleterious outcomes. We did not detect tumor formation, cells did not localize to unwanted locations and no pronounced immune response was present at the graft sites. The long-term stability of neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors and the lack of adverse effects suggest that transplantation of lineage-restricted neural precursor cells can

  18. Glial heterotopia of the lip: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Bayram, Fazli Cengiz; Ince, Bilsev; Bilgen, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Glial heterotopia represents collections of normal glial tissue in an abnormal location distant to the central nervous system or spinal canal with no intracranial connectivity. Nasal gliomas are non-neoplastic midline tumours, with limited growth potential and no similarity to the central nervous system gliomas. The nose and the nasopharynx are the most common sites of location. Existence of glial heterotopia in the lip region is a rare developmental disorder. We report a case of large glial heterotopia in the upper lip region in a full-term female newborn which had intracranial extension with a fibrotic band. After the surgery, there was no recurrence in the follow-up period of 3 years. When glial heterotopia, which is a rare midline anomaly, is suspected, possible intracranial connection and properties of the mass should be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. By this way, lower complication rate and better aesthetic results can be achieved with early diagnosis and proper surgery. PMID:27274134

  19. Neuron-Glial Interactions in Blood-Brain Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Swati; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2010-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) evolved to preserve the microenvironment of the highly excitable neuronal cells to allow for action potential generation and propagation. Intricate molecular interactions between two main cell types, the neurons and the glial cells, form the underlying basis of the critical functioning of the nervous system across species. In invertebrates, interactions between neurons and glial cells are central in establishing a functional BBB. However, in vertebrates, the BBB formation and function is coordinated by interactions between neurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells. Here we review the neuron-glial interaction–based blood barriers in invertebrates and vertebrates and provide an evolutionary perspective as to how a glial-barrier system in invertebrates evolved into an endothelial barrier system. We also summarize the clinical relevance of the BBB as this protective barrier becomes disadvantageous in the pharmacological treatment of various neurological disorders. PMID:17506642

  20. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  1. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  2. Glial influence on the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Jorge Ivan; Katayama, Takahiro; Prat, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) is a specialized vascular structure tightly regulating central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis. Endothelial cells are the central component of the BBB and control of their barrier phenotype resides on astrocytes and pericytes. Interactions between these cells and the endothelium promote and maintain many of the physiological and metabolic characteristics that are unique to the BBB. In this review we describe recent findings related to the involvement of astroglial cells, including radial glial cells, in the induction of barrier properties during embryogenesis and adulthood. In addition, we describe changes that occur in astrocytes and endothelial cells during injury and inflammation with a particular emphasis on alterations of the BBB phenotype. GLIA 2013;61:1939–1958 PMID:24123158

  3. Culturing conditions determine neuronal and glial excitability.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2010-12-15

    The cultivation of pure neuronal cultures is considered advantageous for the investigation of cell-type specific responses (such as transmitter release and also pharmacological agents), however, divergent results are a likely consequence of media modifications and culture composition. Using Fura-2 based imaging techniques, we here set out to compare calcium responses of rat hippocampal neurones and glia to excitatory stimulation with l-glutamate in different culture types and media. Neurones in neurone-enriched cultures had increased responses to 10 μM and 100 μM l-glutamate (+43 and 45%, respectively; p's< 0.001) and a slower recovery compared to mixed cultures, indicating heightened excitability. In matured (15-20 days in vitro) mixed cultures, neuronal responder rates were suppressed in a neurone-supportive medium (Neurobasal-A, NB: 65%) compared to a general-purpose medium (supplemented minimal essential medium, MEM: 96%). Glial response size in contrast did not differ greatly in isolated or mixed cultures maintained in MEM, but responder rates were suppressed in both culture types in NB (e.g. 10 μM l-glutamate responders in mixed cultures: 29% in NB, 71% in MEM). This indicates that medium composition is more important for glial excitability than the presence of neurones, whereas the presence of glia has an important impact on neuronal excitability. Therefore, careful consideration of culturing conditions is crucial for interpretation and comparison of experimental results. Especially for investigations of toxicity and neuroprotection mixed cultures may be more physiologically relevant over isolated cultures as they comprise aspects of mutual influences between glia and neurones.

  4. [Death of neurons and glial cells, induced by a photodynamic injury: signaling processes and neurone-glial interactions].

    PubMed

    Uzdenskiĭ, A B; Kolosov, M S; Lobanov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of photodynamic (PD) injury of neurons and glial cells are reviewed. Neuron responses: firing stimulation at high photosensitizer concentrations and inhibition at low concentrations (< 10(-7) M) that were followed by necrosis, are described. Glial cells died from both necrosis and apoptosis. Local laser inactivation of a neuron enhanced PD-induced apoptosis of glial cells, thus indicating that neuron maintained the survival of glia. Inter- and intracellular signaling mediated photodamage of these cells. Using inhibitors or activators of signaling proteins, the involvement of Ca(2+)-, adenylate cyclase- and tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways in responses of neurons and glial cells to photosensitization was shown. Their pharmacological modulation can change selectivity of PD injury of neuronal and glial cells and efficiency of PD therapy.

  5. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype. PMID:28400715

  6. Impaired glial buffering hampers antidromic conduction of CA1 neurons during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Kwan; Kim, Seok-Joon

    2009-07-14

    Increased potassium conductance during hypoxia causes membrane hyperpolarization and a resultant increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)](o)). In addition, glial buffering of [K(+)](o) is the key mechanism for clearing excess K(+) and is important for neuronal function and survival. Here, we studied the effect of glial buffering of [K(+)](o) on neural impulse conduction during hypoxia using a potassium-selective electrode and evoked potential recording in rat hippocampal slices. The increase in [K(+)](o) during hypoxia was modest and there were no significant differences between the layers. The [K(+)](o) during hypoxia was significantly elevated by addition of barium (1 mM), especially in the stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens. Although synaptic transmission was depressed during hypoxia, the presynaptic volley and antidromic population spike mostly remained unchanged. With the addition of barium, antidromic conduction was more profoundly affected than the presynaptic volley. When presynaptic inhibition was precluded by including a selective A1 adenosine receptor blocker to restore synaptic transmission, blockade of the antidromic conduction became more evident compared with the blockade of other recorded field potentials. These findings are compatible with regional differences in the increase of [K(+)](o) and suggest that glial buffering of high [K(+)](o) is important in antidromic conduction during hypoxia.

  7. How Does Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Influence Glial Cells in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Carlie L.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely used in the clinic, and while it has a direct effect on neuronal excitability, the beneficial effects experienced by patients are likely to include the indirect activation of other cell types. Research conducted over the past two decades has made it increasingly clear that a population of non-neuronal cells, collectively known as glia, respond to and facilitate neuronal signaling. Each glial cell type has the ability to respond to electrical activity directly or indirectly, making them likely cellular effectors of TMS. TMS has been shown to enhance adult neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation, but the effect on cell survival and differentiation is less certain. Furthermore there is limited information regarding the response of astrocytes and microglia to TMS, and a complete paucity of data relating to the response of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to this treatment. However, due to the critical and yet multifaceted role of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), the influence that TMS has on glial cells is certainly an area that warrants careful examination. PMID:27092058

  8. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Ana; Wandosell, Francisco; Garrido, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Brain development requires the interaction of complex signaling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of central nervous system development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic program that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron–glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  9. ErbB2 activation contributes to de-differentiation of astrocytes into radial glial cells following induction of scratch-insulted astrocyte conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Ling, Weng; Vitale, Angela; Olivera, Cathy; Min, Yan; You, Siwei

    2011-12-01

    Radial glial cells play a significant role in the repair of spinal cord injuries as they exert critical role in the neurogenesis and act as a scaffold for neuronal migration. Our previous study showed that mature astrocytes of spinal cord can undergo a de-differentiation process and further transform into pluripotential neural precursors; the occurrence of these complex events arise directly from the induction of diffusible factors released from scratch-insulted astrocytes. However, it is unclear whether astrocytes can also undergo rejuvenation to revert to a radial glial progenitor phenotype after the induction of scratch-insulted astrocytes conditioned medium (ACM). Furthermore, the mechanism of astrocyte de-differentiation to the progenitor cells is still unclear. Here we demonstrate that upon treating mature astrocytes with ACM for 10 days, the astrocytes exhibit progressive morphological and functional conversion to radial glial cells. These changes include the appearance of radial glial progenitor cells, changes in the immunophenotypical profiles, characterized by the co-expression of nestin, paired homeobox protein (Pax6) and RC2 as well as enhanced capability of multipotential differentiation. Concomitantly, ErbB2 protein level was progressively up-regulated. Thereby these results provide a potential mechanism by which ACM could induce mature astrocytes to regain the profile of radial glial progenitors due to activating the ErbB2 signaling pathways.

  10. Disrupting MLC1 and GlialCAM and ClC-2 interactions in leukodystrophy entails glial chloride channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hoegg-Beiler, Maja B; Sirisi, Sònia; Orozco, Ian J; Ferrer, Isidre; Hohensee, Svea; Auberson, Muriel; Gödde, Kathrin; Vilches, Clara; de Heredia, Miguel López; Nunes, Virginia; Estévez, Raúl; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2014-03-19

    Defects in the astrocytic membrane protein MLC1, the adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the chloride channel ClC-2 underlie human leukoencephalopathies. Whereas GlialCAM binds ClC-2 and MLC1, and modifies ClC-2 currents in vitro, no functional connections between MLC1 and ClC-2 are known. Here we investigate this by generating loss-of-function Glialcam and Mlc1 mouse models manifesting myelin vacuolization. We find that ClC-2 is unnecessary for MLC1 and GlialCAM localization in brain, whereas GlialCAM is important for targeting MLC1 and ClC-2 to specialized glial domains in vivo and for modifying ClC-2's biophysical properties specifically in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the cells chiefly affected by vacuolization. Unexpectedly, MLC1 is crucial for proper localization of GlialCAM and ClC-2, and for changing ClC-2 currents. Our data unmask an unforeseen functional relationship between MLC1 and ClC-2 in vivo, which is probably mediated by GlialCAM, and suggest that ClC-2 participates in the pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts.

  11. Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Eileen H.; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ferrer, Isidro; Ghetti, Bernardino; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Holton, Janice L.; Josephs, Keith A.; Powers, James; Spina, Salvatore; Takahashi, Hitoshi; White, Charles L.; Revesz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Rrecent studies have highlighted a group of 4-repeat (4R) tauopathies that are characterised neuropathologically by widespread, globular glial inclusions (GGIs). Tau immunohistochemistry reveals 4R immunore-active globular oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions and the latter are predominantly negative for Gallyas silver staining. These cases are associated with a range of clinical presentations, which correlate with the severity and distribution of underlying tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Their heterogeneous clinicopathological features combined with their rarity and under-recognition have led to cases characterised by GGIs being described in the literature using various and redundant terminologies. In this report, a group of neuropathologists form a consensus on the terminology and classification of cases with GGIs. After studying microscopic images from previously reported cases with suspected GGIs (n = 22), this panel of neuropathologists with extensive experience in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and a documented record of previous experience with at least one case with GGIs, agreed that (1) GGIs were present in all the cases reviewed; (2) the morphology of globular astrocytic inclusions was different to tufted astrocytes and finally that (3) the cases represented a number of different neuropathological subtypes. They also agreed that the different morphological subtypes are likely to be part of a spectrum of a distinct disease entity, for which they recommend that the overarching term globular glial tauopathy (GGT) should be used. Type I cases typically present with frontotemporal dementia, which correlates with the fronto-temporal distribution of pathology. Type II cases are characterised by pyramidal features reflecting motor cortex involvement and corticospinal tract degeneration. Type III cases can present with a combination of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease with fronto-temporal cortex, motor cortex and

  12. Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeshan; Bigio, Eileen H; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W; Ferrer, Isidro; Ghetti, Bernardino; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Holton, Janice L; Josephs, Keith A; Powers, James; Spina, Salvatore; Takahashi, Hitoshi; White, Charles L; Revesz, Tamas; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a group of 4-repeat (4R) tauopathies that are characterised neuropathologically by widespread, globular glial inclusions (GGIs). Tau immunohistochemistry reveals 4R immunoreactive globular oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions and the latter are predominantly negative for Gallyas silver staining. These cases are associated with a range of clinical presentations, which correlate with the severity and distribution of underlying tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Their heterogeneous clinicopathological features combined with their rarity and under-recognition have led to cases characterised by GGIs being described in the literature using various and redundant terminologies. In this report, a group of neuropathologists form a consensus on the terminology and classification of cases with GGIs. After studying microscopic images from previously reported cases with suspected GGIs (n = 22), this panel of neuropathologists with extensive experience in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and a documented record of previous experience with at least one case with GGIs, agreed that (1) GGIs were present in all the cases reviewed; (2) the morphology of globular astrocytic inclusions was different to tufted astrocytes and finally that (3) the cases represented a number of different neuropathological subtypes. They also agreed that the different morphological subtypes are likely to be part of a spectrum of a distinct disease entity, for which they recommend that the overarching term globular glial tauopathy (GGT) should be used. Type I cases typically present with frontotemporal dementia, which correlates with the fronto-temporal distribution of pathology. Type II cases are characterised by pyramidal features reflecting motor cortex involvement and corticospinal tract degeneration. Type III cases can present with a combination of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease with fronto-temporal cortex, motor cortex and

  13. Functions of glial cells in the retina of the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A

    1989-01-01

    In the retina of the honey bee drone, Apis mellifera male, physiological interactions between glial cells and neurons (the photoreceptors) are exceptionally clear-cut and amenable to investigation. The principal glia (outer pigment cells) contribute to the homeostasis of extracellular [K+] and [Na+] by 1) spatial buffering of K+ and 2) net uptake of K+ and Cl-. The glia supply carbohydrate metabolic substrate to the neurons; only the glia take up and phosphorylate glucose. Neuronal activity 1) modifies glycogen metabolism in the glia, and 2) can be signalled to the glia in the absence of elevated extracellular [K+].

  14. Synthetic carbon precursor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Synthetic carbon precursor systems offer advantages over natural petroleum and coal-tar pitch precursors in that they can reproducibly provide a material with a known and uniform composition. They also permit controlled modifications of the derived carbon's properties through variations in the precursor's properties and processing conditions. Extensive research efforts at Oak Ridge have been directed toward the production and characterization of synthetic carbon precursors and the correlations that exist between carbon precursor properties and the properties of the ultimate carbon. This report describes how synthetic carbon precursors can be used to tailor and develop reproducible carbon structures for advanced materials applications. The potential and capability for performing carbon material development at Oak Ridge is also described.

  15. Glial cells in (patho)physiology

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Heneka, Michael T.; Montana, Vedrana; Oliet, Stéphane H.R.; Schousboe, Arne; Haydon, Philip. G.; Stout, Randy F.; Spray, David C.; Reichenbach, Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas; Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Zorec, Robert; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglial cells define brain homeostasis and mount defense against pathological insults. Astroglia regulate neurogenesis and development of brain circuits. In the adult brain, astrocytes enter into intimate dynamic relationship with neurons, especially at synaptic sites where they functionally form the tripartite synapse. At these sites astrocytes regulate ion and neurotransmitter homeostasis, metabolically support neurons and monitor synaptic activity; one of the readouts of the latter manifests in astrocytic intracellular Ca2+ signals. This form of astrocytic excitability can lead to release of chemical transmitters via Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Once in the extracellular space, gliotransmitters can modulate synaptic plasticity and cause changes in behavior. Besides these physiological tasks, astrocytes are fundamental for progression and outcome of neurological diseases. In Alzheimer’s disease, for example, astrocytes may contribute to the etiology of this disorder. Highly lethal glial-derived tumors use signaling trickery to coerce normal brain cells to assist tumor invasiveness. This review sheds new light on the brain operation in health and disease, but also points to many unknowns. PMID:22251135

  16. Corticobasal syndrome with novel argyrophilic glial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Rippon, Gregory A; Staugaitis, S M; Chin, Steven S M; Goldman, James E; Marder, K

    2005-05-01

    A 42-year-old, left-handed woman first noted impaired dexterity of the dominant hand, soon followed by dysarthria and cognitive decline. Over a 4-year period, she developed severe left-sided apraxia with eventual neglect of the left arm and progressive extrapyramidal signs. Cognitive testing showed progressive executive, visuospatial, fluency, and naming impairment with relative preservation of memory. Single-photon emission computed tomography demonstrated asymmetric right posterior frontal and superior parietal hypoperfusion. The clinical impression was corticobasal degeneration. At autopsy, severe atrophy was seen in the perirolandic and frontal regions. There was marked neuronal loss and gliosis in the posterior frontal and precentral regions and less severe pathology in prefrontal, temporal, and parietal areas. Mild to moderate gliosis and neuronal loss were also seen in the putamen, globus pallidus, subthalamic, and dentate nuclei. Gallyas silver stain revealed numerous inclusions adjacent to oligodendrocyte nuclei in white and gray matter of affected cortical and subcortical regions. The gracile inclusions were wavy, slender, and stained positively with antibodies to ubiquitin and alphaB-crystallin but not to microtubule-associated proteins (tau, MAP1B, MAP2), tubulin, neurofilaments, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or alpha-synuclein. The argyrophilic inclusions identified in this case are distinct from those previously described in neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. The early life of a fly glial cell.

    PubMed

    Altenhein, Benjamin; Cattenoz, Pierre B; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Throughout evolution, glia have key regulatory roles in neural development and function. Typically, they control the response to developmental and/or pathological signals, thereby affecting neural proliferation, remodeling, survival, and regeneration. Such complex biology depends on the plastic features of glial cells, but also on the presence of different classes of glial cells, hence the importance of understanding the cellular and the molecular mechanisms underlying their development. The fly community has made major breakthroughs by characterizing the bases of gliogenesis and here we describe the glial lineages as well as the glial promoting factor active in the embryo of Drosophila melanogaster. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:67-84. doi: 10.1002/wdev.200 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  19. Complex and differential glial responses in Alzheimer's disease and ageing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José J; Butt, Arthur M; Gardenal, Emanuela; Parpura, Vladimir; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells and their association with neurones are fundamental for brain function. The emergence of complex neurone-glial networks assures rapid information transfer, creating a sophisticated circuitry where both types of neural cells work in concert, serving different activities. All glial cells, represented by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia and NG2-glia, are essential for brain homeostasis and defence. Thus, glia are key not only for normal central nervous system (CNS) function, but also to its dysfunction, being directly associated with all forms of neuropathological processes. Therefore, the progression and outcome of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases depend on glial reactions. In this review, we provide a concise account of recent data obtained from both human material and animal models demonstrating the pathological involvement of glia in neurodegenerative processes, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as physiological ageing.

  20. Serum albumin induces osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Silvana; Wurm, Antje; Kutzera, Franziska; Pannicke, Thomas; Krügel, Katja; Linnertz, Regina; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-03-04

    Edema in the ischemic neural tissue develops by increased vascular permeability associated with extravasation of albumin, and by glial swelling. Here, we show that bovine serum albumin acutely administered to slices of the rat retina causes swelling of glial somata under hypoosmotic conditions. The effect of albumin was dose-dependent, with half-maximal and maximal effects at 10 nM and 1 microM, respectively, and was mediated by activation of transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II, oxidative stress, and the production of arachidonic acid and prostaglandins. Albumin-induced glial swelling was prevented by glutamate and purinergic receptor agonists. The data suggest that serum albumin may induce glial swelling in the presence of osmotic gradients.

  1. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-03-31

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration.

  2. Glial hemichannels and their involvement in aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; von Bernhardi, Rommy; Giaume, Christian; Sáez, Juan C

    2012-01-26

    During the last two decades, it became increasingly evident that glial cells accomplish a more important role in brain function than previously thought. Glial cells express pannexins and connexins, which are member subunits of two protein families that form membrane channels termed hemichannels. These channels communicate intra- and extracellular compartments and allow the release of autocrine/paracrine signaling molecules [e.g., adenosine triphosphate (ATP), glutamate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and prostaglandin E2] to the extracellular milieu, as well as the uptake of small molecules (e.g., glucose). An increasing body of evidence has situated glial hemichannels as potential regulators of the beginning and maintenance of homeostatic imbalances observed in diverse brain diseases. Here, we review and discuss the current evidence about the possible role of glial hemichannels on neurodegenerative diseases. A subthreshold pathological threatening condition leads to microglial activation, which keeps active defense and restores the normal function of the central nervous system. However, if the stimulus is deleterious, microglial cells and the endothelium become overactivated, both releasing bioactive molecules (e.g., glutamate, cytokines, prostaglandins, and ATP), which increase the activity of glial hemichannels, reducing the astroglial neuroprotective functions, and further reducing neuronal viability. Because ATP and glutamate are released via glial hemichannels in neurodegenerative conditions, it is expected that they contribute to neurotoxicity. More importantly, toxic molecules released via glial hemichannels could increase the Ca2+ entry in neurons also via neuronal hemichannels, leading to neuronal death. Therefore, blockade of hemichannels expressed by glial cells and/or neurons during neuroinflammation might prevent neurodegeneration.

  3. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification. PMID:26106302

  4. Neurturin and GDNF promote proliferation and survival of enteric neuron and glial progenitors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heuckeroth, R O; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; Milbrandt, J

    1998-08-01

    Signaling through the c-Ret tyrosine kinase and the endothelin B receptor pathways is known to be critical for development of the enteric nervous system. To clarify the role of these receptors in enteric nervous system development, the effect of ligands for these receptors was examined on rat enteric neuron precursors in fully defined medium in primary culture. In this culture system, dividing Ret-positive cells differentiate, cluster into ganglia containing neurons and enteric glia, and create extensive networks reminiscent of the enteric plexus established in vivo. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurturin both potently support survival and proliferation of enteric neuron precursors in this system. Addition of either neurturin or GDNF to these cultures increased the number of both neurons and enteric glia. Persephin, a third GDNF family member, shares many properties with neurturin and GDNF in the central nervous system and in kidney development. By contrast, persephin does not promote enteric neuron precursor proliferation or survival in these cultures. Endothelin-3 also does not increase the number of enteric neurons or glia in these cultures. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  5. Delayed glial clearance of degenerating axons in aged Drosophila is due to reduced PI3K/Draper activity

    PubMed Central

    Purice, Maria D.; Speese, Sean D.; Logan, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, but the mechanisms that render the senescent brain vulnerable to disease are unclear. Glial immune responses provide neuroprotection in a variety of contexts. Thus, we explored how glial responses to neurodegeneration are altered with age. Here we show that glia–axon phagocytic interactions change dramatically in the aged Drosophila brain. Aged glia clear degenerating axons slowly due to low phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signalling and, subsequently, reduced expression of the conserved phagocytic receptor Draper/MEGF10. Importantly, boosting PI3K/Draper activity in aged glia significantly reverses slow phagocytic responses. Moreover, several hours post axotomy, early hallmarks of Wallerian degeneration (WD) are delayed in aged flies. We propose that slow clearance of degenerating axons is mechanistically twofold, resulting from deferred initiation of axonal WD and reduced PI3K/Draper-dependent glial phagocytic function. Interventions that boost glial engulfment activity, however, can substantially reverse delayed clearance of damaged neuronal debris. PMID:27647497

  6. Spatial constraints dictate glial territories at murine neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Monika S.; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs), the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, cover synaptic terminals, allowing them to monitor and modulate neurotransmission. Disruption of glial coverage leads to axon degeneration and synapse loss. The cellular mechanisms that establish and maintain this coverage remain largely unknown. To address this, we labeled single SCs and performed time-lapse imaging experiments. Adult terminal SCs are arranged in static tile patterns, whereas young SCs dynamically intermingle. The mechanism of developmental glial segregation appears to be spatial competition, in which glial–glial and axonal–glial contacts constrain the territory of single SCs, as shown by four types of experiments: (1) laser ablation of single SCs, which led to immediate territory expansion of neighboring SCs; (2) axon removal by transection, resulting in adult SCs intermingling dynamically; (3) axotomy in mutant mice with blocked axon fragmentation in which intermingling was delayed; and (4) activity blockade, which had no immediate effects. In summary, we conclude that glial cells partition synapses by competing for perisynaptic space. PMID:22006952

  7. Asymptomatic and symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Taraszewska, Anna; Matyja, Ewa; Koszewski, Waldemar; Zaczyński, Artur; Bardadin, Krzysztof; Czernicki, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Glial cysts of the pineal gland are benign and mostly asymptomatic incidental lesions found in the brain MRI or at autopsy examinations. In rare cases pineal cysts become symptomatic and require surgical intervention. Symptomatic glial cysts may be clinically and radiologically indistinguishable from cystic neoplasms of the pineal region; therefore, histopathological diagnosis is critical for further prognosis and therapy in operated patients. In this paper we present detailed histopathological characteristics of symptomatic glial cysts in 2 surgical cases and of asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland found at random in 3 autopsy cases. Both surgical patients, a 19-year-old girl and a 17-year-old boy, presented with severe headaches, associated with syncope in one case and insomnia in the second one. Preoperative MR imaging suggested tumour of the pineal gland in case no. 2. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of the specimens from both surgical and all autopsy cases revealed a characteristic pattern of cystic structures within the pineal gland, surrounded by layers of a dense fibrillar glial tissue and pineal parenchyma, consistent with non-neoplastic glial cysts. Although histopathological findings in asymptomatic and symptomatic cysts are essentially the same, the cyst in surgical case 1 was unilocular and partly lined with ependymal cells, whereas the cysts in other cases were multilocular, comprising cavities of various size, formed in the central part of gliotic tissue or directly within the pineal parenchyma, and lacked ependymal lining. Possible pathophysiological and clinicopathological significance of some morphological variants of pineal glial cysts is discussed.

  8. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  9. Precursors and BRST symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Freivogel, Ben; Kabir, Laurens; Lokhande, Sagar F.

    2017-07-01

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence, bulk information appears to be encoded in the CFT in a redundant way. A local bulk field corresponds to many different non-local CFT operators (precursors). We recast this ambiguity in the language of BRST symmetry, and propose that in the large N limit, the difference between two precursors is a BRST exact and ghost-free term. This definition of precursor ambiguities has the advantage that it generalizes to any gauge theory. Using the BRST formalism and working in a simple model with global symmetries, we re-derive a precursor ambiguity appearing in earlier work. Finally, we show within this model that the obtained ambiguity has the right number of parameters to explain the freedom to localize precursors within different spatial regions of the boundary order by order in the large N expansion.

  10. Clear Thinking about Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... industry, with corporations both large and small vigorously marketing their products. 5 | Clear Thinking about Alternative Therapies ... Once the FDA has cleared the product for marketing, people are protected by disclosure requirements such as ...

  11. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for glial and neural-related molecules in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures: neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lisak, Robert P; Benjamins, Joyce A; Bealmear, Beverly; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Yao, Bin; Land, Susan; Studzinski, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis, inflammatory cells are found in both active and chronic lesions, and it is increasingly clear that cytokines are involved directly and indirectly in both formation and inhibition of lesions. We propose that cytokine mixtures typical of Th1 or Th2 lymphocytes, or monocyte/macrophages each induce unique molecular changes in glial cells. Methods To examine changes in gene expression that might occur in glial cells exposed to the secreted products of immune cells, we have used gene array analysis to assess the early effects of different cytokine mixtures on mixed CNS glia in culture. We compared the effects of cytokines typical of Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M) on CNS glia after 6 hours of treatment. Results In this paper we focus on changes with potential relevance for neuroprotection and axon/glial interactions. Each mixture of cytokines induced a unique pattern of changes in genes for neurotrophins, growth and maturation factors and related receptors; most notably an alternatively spliced form of trkC was markedly downregulated by Th1 and M/M cytokines, while Th2 cytokines upregulated BDNF. Genes for molecules of potential importance in axon/glial interactions, including cell adhesion molecules, connexins, and some molecules traditionally associated with neurons showed significant changes, while no genes for myelin-associated genes were regulated at this early time point. Unexpectedly, changes occurred in several genes for proteins initially associated with retina, cancer or bone development, and not previously reported in glial cells. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures induced specific changes in gene expression that could be altered by pharmacologic strategies to promote protection of the central nervous system. PMID:18088439

  12. Late effects of radiation on the central nervous system: role of vascular endothelial damage and glial stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Coderre, Jeffrey A; Morris, Gerard M; Micca, Peggy L; Hopewell, John W; Verhagen, Ilja; Kleiboer, Bert J; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2006-09-01

    Selective irradiation of the vasculature of the rat spinal cord was used in this study, which was designed specifically to address the question as to whether it is the endothelial cell or the glial progenitor cell that is the target responsible for late white matter necrosis in the CNS. Selective irradiation of the vascular endothelium was achieved by the intraperitoneal (ip) administration of a boron compound known as BSH (Na(2)B(12)H(11)SH), followed by local irradiation with thermal neutrons. The blood-brain barrier is known to exclude BSH from the CNS parenchyma. Thirty minutes after the ip injection of BSH, the boron concentration in blood was 100 microg (10)B/ g, while that in the CNS parenchyma was below the detection limit of the boron analysis system, <1 microg (10)B/g. An ex vivo clonogenic assay of the O2A (oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte) glial progenitor cell survival was performed 1 week after irradiation and at various times during the latent period before white matter necrosis in the spinal cord resulted in myelopathy. One week after 4.5 Gy of thermal neutron irradiation alone (approximately one-third of the dose required to produce a 50% incidence of radiation myelopathy), the average glial progenitor cell surviving fraction was 0.03. The surviving fraction of glial progenitor cells after a thermal neutron irradiation with BSH for a comparable effect was 0.46. The high level of glial progenitor cell survival after irradiation in the presence of BSH clearly reflects the lower dose delivered to the parenchyma due to the complete exclusion of BSH by the blood-brain barrier. The intermediate response of glial progenitor cells after irradiation with thermal neutrons in the presence of a boron compound known as BPA (p-dihydroxyboryl-phenylalanine), again for a dose that represents one-third the ED(50) for radiation-induced myelopathy, reflects the differential partition of boron-10 between blood and CNS parenchyma for this compound, which crosses the

  13. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina

    PubMed Central

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells) in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission) can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively). Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels) and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1). These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:28562601

  14. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells generate pituicytes in vivo during neurohypophysis development.

    PubMed

    Virard, Isabelle; Coquillat, Delphine; Bancila, Mircea; Kaing, Sovann; Durbec, Pascale

    2006-02-01

    In the vertebrate brain, much remains to be understood concerning the origin of glial cell diversity and the potential lineage relationships between the various types of glia. Besides astrocytes and myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, other macroglial cell populations are found in discrete areas of the central nervous system (CNS). They share functional features with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes but also display specific characteristics. Such specialized cells, called pituicytes, are located in the neurohypophysis (NH). Our work focuses on the lineage of the pituicytes during rodent development. First, we show that cells identified with a combination of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) markers are present in the developing rat NH. In culture, neonatal NH progenitors also share major functional characteristics with OPCs, being both migratory and bipotential, i.e. able to give rise to type 2 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We then observe that, either in vitro or after transplantation into myelin-deficient Shiverer brain, pieces of NH generate myelinating oligodendrocytes, confirming the oligodendrogenic potentiality of NH cells. However, no mature oligodendrocyte can be found in the NH. This led us to hypothesize that the OPCs present in the developing NH might be generating other glial cells, especially the pituicytes. Consistent with this hypothesis, the OPCs appear during NH development before pituicytes differentiate. Finally, we establish a lineage relationship between olig1+ cells, most likely OPCs, and the pituicytes by fate-mapping experiments using genetically engineered mice. This constitutes the first demonstration that OPCs generate glial cells other than oligodendrocytes in vivo.

  15. Optical clearing of articular cartilage: a comparison of clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Alexander; Hautala, Tapio; Kinnunen, Matti; Popov, Alexey; Karhula, Sakari; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-07-01

    Optical clearing technique was applied to the problem of OCT imaging of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. We show that optical clearing significantly enhances visualization of articular cartilage and cartilage-bone interface. The effect of different clearing agents was analyzed. For the clearing, iohexol solution and propylene glycol (PG) were used. Clearing was performed in vitro at room temperature by immersion method. Cylindrical osteochondral samples (d=4.8mm) were drilled from bovine lateral femur and stored in phosphate-buffered saline at -20°C until clearing. Monitoring of clearing process was performed using high-speed spectral-domain OCT system providing axial resolution of 5.8μm at 930nm. Total duration of experiment was 90-100min to ensure saturation of clearing. We have shown that iohexol solution and PG are capable to optically clear articular cartilage enabling reliable characterization of cartilagebone interface with OCT. Being a low osmolarity agent, iohexol provides minimal changes to the thickness of cartilage sample. Clearing saturation time for the cartilage sample with the thickness of 0.9 mm measured with OCT is of 50 min. However, less than 15 min is enough to reliably detect the rear cartilage boundary. Alternatively, PG significantly (60%) reduces the cartilage thickness enabling better visualization of subchondral bone. It was observed that PG has higher clearing rate. The clearing saturation time is of 30 min, however less than 5 min is enough to detect cartilage-bone interface. We conclude that iohexol solution is superior for OCT imaging of cartilage and cartilage-bone interface, while PG suits better for subhondral bone visualization.

  16. Precursors to Lymphoproliferative Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Lynn R.; McMaster, Mary L.; Caporaso, Neil E.

    2013-01-01

    We review monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) as a precursor to chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) as a precursor to plasma cell disorders. These conditions are present in the general population and increase with age. These precursors aggregate with lymphoproliferative malignancies in families suggesting shared inheritance. MBL and MGUS may share some of the same risk factors as their related malignancies but data are limited. While these conditions are characterized by enhanced risk for the associated malignancy, the majority of individuals with these conditions do not progress to malignancy. A key focus for current work is to identify markers that predict progression to malignancy. PMID:23549397

  17. Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fain, J S; Tomlinson, F H; Scheithauer, B W; Parisi, J E; Fletcher, G P; Kelly, P J; Miller, G M

    1994-03-01

    Small asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland represent a common incidental finding in adults undergoing computerized tomography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or at postmortem examination. In contrast, large symptomatic pineal cysts are rare, being limited to individual case reports or small series. The authors have reviewed 24 cases of large pineal cysts. The mean patient age at presentation was 28.7 years (range 15 to 46 years); 18 were female and six male. Presenting features in 20 symptomatic cases included: headache in 19; nausea and/or vomiting in seven; papilledema in five; visual disturbances in five (diplopia in three, "blurred vision" in two, and unilateral partial oculomotor nerve palsy in one); Parinaud's syndrome in two; hemiparesis in one; hemisensory aberration in one; and seizures in one. Four lesions were discovered incidentally. Magnetic resonance imaging typically demonstrated a 0.8- to 3.0-cm diameter mass (mean 1.7 cm) with homogeneous decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and a distinct margin. Hydrocephalus was present in eight cases. The cysts were surgically excised via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach (23 cases) or stereotactically biopsied (one case). Histological examination revealed a cyst wall 0.5 to 2.0 mm thick comprised of three layers: an outer fibrous layer, a middle layer of pineal parenchymal cells with variable calcification, and an inner layer of hypocellular glial tissue often exhibiting Rosenthal fibers and/or granular bodies. Evidence of prior hemorrhage, mild astrocytic degenerative atypia, and disorganization of pineal parenchyma were often present. Postoperative follow-up review in all 24 cases (range 3 months to 10 years) revealed no complications in 21, mild ocular movement deficit in one, gradually resolving Parinaud's syndrome in one, and radiographic evidence of a postoperative venous infarct of the superior cerebellum with ataxia of 1 week

  18. Modification of glial response in hibernation: a patch-clamp study on glial cells acutely isolated from hibernating land snail.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ljiljana; Bataveljic, Danijela; Andjus, Pavle R; Moldovan, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Petkovic, Branka

    2014-12-01

    Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservation of brain function in the hibernating state implies accompanying modification of glial activity. A supportive role of glia in regulating neuronal activity is reflected through the activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kir). Therefore, we examined electrophysiological response, particularly Kir current response, of glial cells in mixture with neurons acutely isolated from active and hibernating land snail Helix pomatia. Our data show that hibernated glia have significantly lower inward current density, specific membrane conductance, and conductance density compared with active glia. The observed reduction could be attributed to the Kir currents, since the Ba2+-sensitive Kir current density was significantly lower in hibernated glia. Accordingly, a significant positive shift of the current reversal potential indicated a more depolarized state of hibernated glia. Data obtained show that modification of glial current response could be regulated by serotonin (5-HT) through an increase of cGMP as a secondary messenger, since extracellular addition of 5-HT or intracellular administration of cGMP to active glia induced a significant reduction of inward current density and thus mimicked the reduced response of hibernated glia. Lower Kir current density of hibernated glia accompanied the lower electrical activity of hibernated neurons, as revealed by a decrease in neuronal fast inward Na+ current density. Our findings reveal that glial response is reduced in the hibernating state and suggest seasonal modulation of glial activity. Maintenance of low glial activity in hibernation could be important for preservation of brain

  19. Distinctive Glial and Neuronal Interfacing on Nanocrystalline Diamond

    PubMed Central

    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth. PMID:24664111

  20. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  1. Strategies for metabolic exchange between glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Deitmer, J W

    2001-12-01

    The brain is a major energy consumer and dependent on carbohydrate and oxygen supply. Electrical and synaptic activity of neurons can only be sustained given sufficient availability of ATP. Glial cells, which have long been assigned trophic functions, seem to play a pivotal role in meeting the energy requirements of active neurons. Under conditions of high neuronal activity, a number of glial functions, such as the maintenance of ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter clearance from synaptic domains, the supply of energetic compounds and calcium signalling, are challenged. In the vertebrate brain, astrocytes may increase glucose utilization and release lactate, which is taken up and consumed by neurons to generate ATP by oxidative metabolism. The CO(2) produced is processed primarily in astrocytes, which display the major activity of carboanhydrase in the brain. Protons and bicarbonate in turn may contribute to drive acid/base-coupled transporters. In the present article a scenario is discussed which couples the transfer of energy and the conversion of CO(2) with the high-affinity glutamate uptake and other transport processes at glial and neuronal cell membranes. The transporters can be linked to glial signalling and may cooperate with each other at the cellular level. This could save energy, and would render energy exchange processes between glial cells and neurons more effective. Functions implications and physiological responses, in particular in chemosensitive brain areas, are discussed.

  2. Stereotypical physiological properties emerge during early neuronal and glial lineage development in the embryonic rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Maric, D; Maric, I; Chang, Y H; Barker, J L

    2000-08-01

    Surface immunolabeling was used together with membrane potential and/or Ca(2+) indicator dyes to characterize physiological properties emerging among precursors, neuroglial progenitors and differentiating neurons during neurogenesis of embryonic rat neocortex. Cells were immunoidentified with tetanus toxin (TnTx), which binds to gangliosides expressed by neurons, and anti-A2B5, which reacts with gangliosides expressed by neuroglial progenitors. Microdissection of the neocortex into ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) and cortical plate/subplate (CP/SP) regions further resolved the TnTx/A2B5-immunoidentified cells into pre- and post-migratory subpopulations. Quantitative immunocytochemistry revealed mainly proliferative (BrdU(+)) and immature (nestin(+)) elements among TnTx(-)A2B5(-) precursors and TnTx(-)A2B5(+) progenitors in the VZ/SVZ, and the appearance of neuron-specific antigens among post-mitotic TnTx(+) subpopulations of the CP/SP. Flow cytometry of acutely prepared cells in suspension and dual-imaging of cells in culture revealed that ionotropic amino acid receptors and metabotropic acetylcholine receptors closely paralleled the emergence of voltage-dependent Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange activity among TnTx(+) neuronal progenitors migrating from VZ/SVZ to CP/SP. During this period, TnTx(-)A2B5(-) precursors and TnTx(-)A2B5(+) neuroglial progenitors from VZ/SVZ predominantly exhibited Ca(2+) responses to ATP. Thus, stereotypical and contrasting physiologies emerge among embryonic cortical cells in vivo as they initially progress from proliferating precursors and progenitors along neuronal and glial cell lineages.

  3. Differential properties of dentate gyrus and CA1 neural precursors.

    PubMed

    Becq, H; Jorquera, I; Ben-Ari, Y; Weiss, S; Represa, A

    2005-02-05

    In the present article we investigated the properties of CA1 and dentate gyrus cell precursors in adult rodents both in vivo and in vitro. Cell proliferation in situ was investigated by rating the number of cells incorporating BrdU after kainate-induced seizures. CA1 precursors displayed a greater proliferation capacity than dentate gyrus precursors. The majority of BrdU-labeled cells in CA1 expressed Nestin and Mash-1, two markers of neural precursors. BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus expressed Nestin, but only a few expressed Mash-1. In animals pretreated with the antimitotic azacytidine, the capacity of kainate to enhance the proliferation was higher in CA1 than in the dentate gyrus. Differences in intrinsic progenitor cell activity could underlie these different expansion capacities. Thus, we compared the renewal- expansion and multipotency of dentate gyrus and CA1 precursors isolated in vitro. We found that the dissected CA1 region, including the periventricular zone, is enriched in neurosphere-forming cells (presumed stem cells), which respond to either EGF or FGF-2. Dentate gyrus contains fewer neurosphere-forming cells and none that respond to FGF-2 alone. Neurospheres generated from CA1 were multipotent and produced neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, while dentate gyrus neurospheres mostly produced glial cells. The analysis of the effects of EGF on organotypic cultures of hippocampal slices depicted similar features: BrdU and Nestin immunoreactivities increased after EGF treatment in CA1 but not in the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that CA1 precursors are more stem-cell-like than granule cell precursors, which may represent a more restricted precursor cell.

  4. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  5. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Natalie; Bihari, Ofer; Kanner, Sivan; Barzilai, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a "hostile" environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  6. Glial dysfunction causes age-related memory impairment in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Ueno, Kohei; Ueno, Taro; Saeki, Shinjiro; Matsuno, Motomi; Naganos, Shintaro; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Yukinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Honda, Yoshiko; Kodama, Tohru; Masuda, Tomoko; Saitoe, Minoru

    2014-11-19

    Several aging phenotypes, including age-related memory impairment (AMI), are thought to be caused by cumulative oxidative damage. In Drosophila, age-related impairments in 1 hr memory can be suppressed by reducing activity of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the mechanism for this effect has been unclear. Here we show that decreasing PKA suppresses AMI by reducing activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a glial metabolic enzyme whose amounts increase upon aging. Increased PC activity causes AMI through a mechanism independent of oxidative damage. Instead, increased PC activity is associated with decreases in D-serine, a glia-derived neuromodulator that regulates NMDA receptor activity. D-serine feeding suppresses both AMI and memory impairment caused by glial overexpression of dPC, indicating that an oxidative stress-independent dysregulation of glial modulation of neuronal activity contributes to AMI in Drosophila.

  7. Neuroprotection in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury targeting glial cells.

    PubMed

    Herrera, María Inés; Mucci, Sofia; Barreto, George E; Kolliker-Frers, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco

    2017-07-27

    Brain injury constitutes a disabling health condition of several etiologies. One of the major causes of brain injury is hypoxia-ischemia. Until recently, pharmacological treatments were solely focused on neurons. In the last decades, glial cells started to be considered as alternative targets for neuroprotection. Novel treatments for hypoxia-ischemia intend to modulate reactive forms of glial cells, and/or potentiate their recovery response. In this review, we summarize these neuroprotective strategies in hypoxia-ischemia and discuss their mechanisms of action. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-05-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus.

  9. Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels in Glial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVicar, B. A.

    1984-12-01

    The electrophysiological properties of glial cells were examined in primary culture in the presence of tetraethylammonium and Ba2+, a treatment that reduces K+ permeability of the membrane and enhances currents through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Under these conditions, glial cells showed both spontaneous action potentials and action potentials evoked by the injections of current. These responses appear to represent entry of Ba2+ through Ca2+ channels because they were resistant to tetrodotoxin but were blocked by Mn2+ or Cd2+.

  10. Glial glucokinase expression in adult and post-natal development of the hypothalamic region.

    PubMed

    Millán, Carola; Martínez, Fernando; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Lizama, Isabel; Yañez, Maria Jose; Llanos, Paula; Reinicke, Karin; Rodríguez, Federico; Peruzzo, Bruno; Nualart, Francisco; García, Maria Angeles

    2010-05-25

    It has recently been proposed that hypothalamic glial cells sense glucose levels and release lactate as a signal to activate adjacent neurons. GK (glucokinase), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic beta-cells, is also expressed in the hypothalamus. However, it has not been clearly determined if glial and/or neuronal cells express this protein. Interestingly, tanycytes, the glia that cover the ventricular walls of the hypothalamus, are in contact with CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), the capillaries of the arcuate nucleus and adjacent neurons; this would be expected for a system that can detect and communicate changes in glucose concentration. Here, we demonstrated by Western-blot analysis, QRT-PCR [quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR)] and in situ hybridization that GK is expressed in tanycytes. Confocal microscopy and immuno-ultrastructural analysis revealed that GK is localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of beta1-tanycytes. Furthermore, GK expression increased in these cells during the second week of post-natal development. Based on this evidence, we propose that tanycytes mediate, at least in part, the mechanism by which the hypothalamus detects changes in glucose concentrations.

  11. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive signals in murine enteric glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Nakahara, Jin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the possible involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in maturation of enteric glial cells (EGCs). METHODS Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical techniques were used to analyze EGC markers in myenteric plexus (MP) as well as cultured MP cells and EGCs using TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. RESULTS We detected TRPV1-immunoreactive signals in EGC in the MP of wild-type (WT) but not KO mice. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactive signals was lower at postnatal day (PD) 6 in KO mice, though the difference was not clear at PD 13 and PD 21. When MP cells were isolated and cultured from isolated longitudinal muscle-MP preparation from WT and KO mice, the yield of KO EGC was lower than that of WT EGC, while the yield of KO and WT smooth muscle cells showed no difference. Addition of BCTC, a TRPV1 antagonist, to enriched EGC culture resulted in a decrease in the protein ratio of GFAP to S100B, another EGC/astrocyte-specific marker. CONCLUSION These results address the possibility that TRPV1 may be involved in the maturation of EGC, though further studies are necessary to validate this possibility. PMID:27956799

  12. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-05

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  13. Glial and Perivascular Structures in the Subfornical Organ

    PubMed Central

    Pócsai, Károly

    2015-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with a chemosensitive function, and its vessels have no blood-brain barrier. Our study investigated the glial and vascular components in the SFO to determine whether their distributions indicate subdivisions, how to characterize the vessels and how to demarcate the SFO. To this end, we investigated glial markers (GFAP, glutamine synthetase, S100) and other markers, including vimentin and nestin (immature glia), laminin (basal lamina), β-dystroglycan (glio-vascular connections), and aquaporin 4 (glial water channels). We determined that the ‘shell’ of the SFO was marked by immunoreactivity for S100, GFAP and aquaporin 4. Nestin immunoreactivity was characteristic of the ‘core’. Vimentin was almost evenly distributed. Glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity occurred in the shell but its expression was sparse. Vessels in the core were decorated with laminin but showed a discontinuous expression of aquaporin 4. Vimentin and GFAP staining was usually in separate glial elements, which may be related to their functional differences. Similar to other vessels in the brain, β-dystroglycan was detected along the shell vessels but laminin was not. The gradual disappearance of the laminin immunopositivity was attributed to the gradual disappearance of the perivascular space. Thus, our findings suggest that the shell and core glio-vascular structures are adapted to different sensory functions: osmoperception and the perception of circulating peptides, respectively. PMID:25673286

  14. Understanding the NG2 Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Amber R.; Lee, Jae K.

    2016-01-01

    NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, are located throughout the central nervous system and serve as a pool of progenitors to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. In response to spinal cord injury (SCI), NG2 cells increase their proliferation and differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. While astrocytes are typically associated with being the major cell type in the glial scar, many NG2 cells also accumulate within the glial scar but their function remains poorly understood. Similar to astrocytes, these cells hypertrophy, upregulate expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, inhibit axon regeneration, contribute to the glial-fibrotic scar border, and some even differentiate into astrocytes. Whether NG2 cells also have a role in other astrocyte functions, such as preventing the spread of infiltrating leukocytes and expression of inflammatory cytokines, is not yet known. Thus, NG2 cells are not only important for remyelination after SCI but are also a major component of the glial scar with functions that overlap with astrocytes in this region. In this review, we describe the signaling pathways important for the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 cells, as well as the role of NG2 cells in scar formation and tissue repair. PMID:27895617

  15. Mechanisms of Aβ Clearance and Degradation by Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Miriam; Sastre, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells have a variety of functions in the brain, ranging from immune defense against external and endogenous hazardous stimuli, regulation of synaptic formation, calcium homeostasis, and metabolic support for neurons. Their dysregulation can contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One of the most important functions of glial cells in AD is the regulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in the brain. Microglia and astrocytes have been reported to play a central role as moderators of Aβ clearance and degradation. The mechanisms of Aβ degradation by glial cells include the production of proteases, including neprilysin, the insulin degrading enzyme, and the endothelin-converting enzymes, able to hydrolyse Aβ at different cleavage sites. Besides these enzymes, other proteases have been described to have some role in Aβ elimination, such as plasminogen activators, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and matrix metalloproteinases. Other relevant mediators that are released by glial cells are extracellular chaperones, involved in the clearance of Aβ alone or in association with receptors/transporters that facilitate their exit to the blood circulation. These include apolipoproteins, α2macroglobulin, and α1-antichymotrypsin. Finally, astrocytes and microglia have an essential role in phagocytosing Aβ, in many cases via a number of receptors that are expressed on their surface. In this review, we examine all of these mechanisms, providing an update on the latest research in this field. PMID:27458370

  16. [Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia: its role in pain].

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipa Alexandra Leite; Moreira Neto, Fani Lourença

    2015-01-01

    Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia are a recent subject of research in the field of pain and a possible therapeutic target in the future. Therefore, the aim of this study was to summarize some of the important physiological and morphological characteristics of these cells and gather the most relevant scientific evidence about its possible role in the development of chronic pain. In the sensory ganglia, each neuronal body is surrounded by satellite glial cells forming distinct functional units. This close relationship enables bidirectional communication via a paracrine signaling between those two cell types. There is a growing body of evidence that glial satellite cells undergo structural and biochemical changes after nerve injury, which influence neuronal excitability and consequently the development and/or maintenance of pain in different animal models of chronic pain. Satellite glial cells are important in the establishment of physiological pain, in addition to being a potential target for the development of new pain treatments. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Glial cell development and function in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    CHOTARD, CAROLE; SALECKER, IRIS

    2008-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, building a functional neuronal network relies on coordinating the formation, specification and survival to diverse neuronal and glial cell subtypes. The establishment of neuronal connections further depends on sequential neuron–neuron and neuron–glia interactions that regulate cell-migration patterns and axon guidance. The visual system of Drosophila has a highly regular, retinotopic organization into reiterated interconnected synaptic circuits. It is therefore an excellent invertebrate model to investigate basic cellular strategies and molecular determinants regulating the different developmental processes that lead to network formation. Studies in the visual system have provided important insights into the mechanisms by which photoreceptor axons connect with their synaptic partners within the optic lobe. In this review, we highlight that this system is also well suited for uncovering general principles that underlie glial cell biology. We describe the glial cell subtypes in the visual system and discuss recent findings about their development and migration. Finally, we outline the pivotal roles of glial cells in mediating neural circuit assembly, boundary formation, neural proliferation and survival, as well as synaptic function. PMID:18333286

  18. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions, designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. PMID:27170209

  19. Forest clearing and regional landsliding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, D.R.; Schmidt, K.M.; Greenberg, H.M.; Dietrich, W.E.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of forest clearing on landsliding is central to longstanding concern over the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability. Here we document a strong topographic control on shallow landsliding by combining unique ground-based landslide surveys in an intensively monitored study area with digital terrain modeling using high-resolution laser altimetry and a coarser resolution regional study of 3224 landslides. As predicted by our digital terrain-based model, landslides occur disproportionately in steep, convergent topography. In terrain predicted to be at low risk of slope failure, a random model performs equally well to our mechanism-based model. Our monitoring shows that storms with 24 hr rainfall recurrence intervals of less than 4 yr triggered landslides in the decade after forest clearing and that conventional monitoring programs can substantially underestimate the effects of forest clearing. Our regional analysis further substantiates that forest clearing dramatically accelerates shallow landsliding in steep terrain typical of the Pacific Northwest.

  20. 'The patient is medically cleared'.

    PubMed

    Beale, Chloe; Turner, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    It is standard practice for psychiatric nurses and junior doctors working in emergency departments to ask that patients be 'medically cleared' before psychiatric admission or even assessment. However, there is a lack of agreement over what this process should entail.

  1. Neuronal and glial pathological changes during epileptogenesis in the mouse pilocarpine model.

    PubMed

    Borges, Karin; Gearing, Marla; McDermott, Dayna L; Smith, Amy B; Almonte, Antoine G; Wainer, Bruce H; Dingledine, Raymond

    2003-07-01

    The rodent pilocarpine model of epilepsy exhibits hippocampal sclerosis and spontaneous seizures and thus resembles human temporal lobe epilepsy. Use of the many available mouse mutants to study this epilepsy model would benefit from a detailed neuropathology study. To identify new features of epileptogenesis, we characterized glial and neuronal pathologies after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) in CF1 and C57BL/6 mice focusing on the hippocampus. All CF1 mice showed spontaneous seizures by 17-27 days after SE. By 6 h there was virtually complete loss of hilar neurons, but the extent of pyramidal cell death varied considerably among mice. In the mossy fiber pathway, neuropeptide Y (NPY) was persistently upregulated beginning 1 day after SE; NPY immunoreactivity in the supragranular layer after 31 days indicated mossy fiber sprouting. beta2 microglobulin-positive activated microglia, normally absent in brains without SE, became abundant over 3-31 days in regions of neuronal loss, including the hippocampus and the amygdala. Astrogliosis developed after 10 days in damaged areas. Amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity in the thalamus at 10 days suggested delayed axonal degeneration. The mortality after pilocarpine injection was very high in C57BL/6 mice from Jackson Laboratories but not those from Charles River, suggesting that mutant mice in the C57BL/6(JAX) strain will be difficult to study in the pilocarpine model, although their neuropathology was similar to CF1 mice. Major neuropathological changes not previously studied in the rodent pilocarpine model include widespread microglial activation, delayed thalamic axonal death, and persistent NPY upregulation in mossy fibers, together revealing extensive and persistent glial as well as neuronal pathology.

  2. Neuronal Injury and Glial Changes Are Hallmarks of Open Field Blast Exposure in Swine Frontal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Desai, Alok; Feng, Ke; Tummala, Sharvani; Saif, Tal; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhang, Liying; Cavanaugh, John M; King, Albert I

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of blast induced traumatic brain injuries and associated neuropsychological consequences in veterans returning from the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, the need to better understand the neuropathological sequelae following exposure to an open field blast exposure is still critical. Although a large body of experimental studies have attempted to address these pathological changes using shock tube models of blast injury, studies directed at understanding changes in a gyrencephalic brain exposed to a true open field blast are limited and thus forms the focus of this study. Anesthetized, male Yucatan swine were subjected to forward facing medium blast overpressure (peak side on overpressure 224-332 kPa; n = 7) or high blast overpressure (peak side on overpressure 350-403 kPa; n = 5) by detonating 3.6 kg of composition-4 charge. Sham animals (n = 5) were subjected to all the conditions without blast exposure. After a 3-day survival period, the brain was harvested and sections from the frontal lobes were processed for histological assessment of neuronal injury and glial reactivity changes. Significant neuronal injury in the form of beta amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive zones in the gray and white matter was observed in the frontal lobe sections from both the blast exposure groups. A significant increase in the number of astrocytes and microglia was also observed in the blast exposed sections compared to sham sections. We postulate that the observed acute injury changes may progress to chronic periods after blast and may contribute to short and long-term neuronal degeneration and glial mediated inflammation.

  3. Neuronal Injury and Glial Changes Are Hallmarks of Open Field Blast Exposure in Swine Frontal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Desai, Alok; Feng, Ke; Tummala, Sharvani; Saif, Tal; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhang, Liying; Cavanaugh, John M.; King, Albert I.

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of blast induced traumatic brain injuries and associated neuropsychological consequences in veterans returning from the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, the need to better understand the neuropathological sequelae following exposure to an open field blast exposure is still critical. Although a large body of experimental studies have attempted to address these pathological changes using shock tube models of blast injury, studies directed at understanding changes in a gyrencephalic brain exposed to a true open field blast are limited and thus forms the focus of this study. Anesthetized, male Yucatan swine were subjected to forward facing medium blast overpressure (peak side on overpressure 224–332 kPa; n = 7) or high blast overpressure (peak side on overpressure 350–403 kPa; n = 5) by detonating 3.6 kg of composition-4 charge. Sham animals (n = 5) were subjected to all the conditions without blast exposure. After a 3-day survival period, the brain was harvested and sections from the frontal lobes were processed for histological assessment of neuronal injury and glial reactivity changes. Significant neuronal injury in the form of beta amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive zones in the gray and white matter was observed in the frontal lobe sections from both the blast exposure groups. A significant increase in the number of astrocytes and microglia was also observed in the blast exposed sections compared to sham sections. We postulate that the observed acute injury changes may progress to chronic periods after blast and may contribute to short and long-term neuronal degeneration and glial mediated inflammation. PMID:28107370

  4. Genetic aspects of glial cells regarding neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Julio Cesar Martinez; Gómez, Rosa Margarita; Sanabria, Andres Gabriel Zarate; Jubiz, Giovanny; Valderrama, Sonia Del Pilar Otalora

    2017-08-28

    Glial cells (also known as glia or neuroglia) are structures which are found in large numbers throughout the nervous system, fulfilling multiple functions, such as regulating the synapses, providing structure, support and nutrition, contributing towards the immune response and tissue oxygenation. Knowledge regarding glial cells has increased during the last few years, since Virchow defined them as supporting connective tissue, followed by Ramón y Cajal who described them as tissue in themselves, until today when a first order physiological role has been recognised for them and a leading role in the appearance and progression of various pathological processes, primarily in the group of neurodegenerative diseases (ND). The ND represents a group of pathologies which gradually cause the degeneration of nervous tissue, have a broad spectrum regarding their appearance and, in some cases, are the direct consequence of genetic alterations leading to physiological changes in the nervous system. The present article has thus been aimed at describing glial cells' genetic interaction with ND through a systemic review of the pertinent literature. The mechanisms through which the different classes of glial cells become involved in the appearance of ND are poorly understood; however, evidence indicates that their role could be a critical factor in these pathologies' appearance, regulation and chronicity, these being largely determined by different types of cellular interactions and interaction with the microenvironment. This review shows that ND genetics regarding glial cells' cellular, molecular and genetic functioning represents a complex and understudied process; studying these factors could be a key step for ascertaining the origin of these pathologies, thereby leading to more effective therapies being developed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Effects of Cadmium on the Glial Architecture in Lizard Brain

    PubMed Central

    Favorito, Rossana; Monaco, Antonio; Grimaldi, Maria C.; Ferrandino, Ida

    2017-01-01

    The glial cells are positioned to be the first cells of the brain parenchyma to face molecules crossing the blood-brain barrier with a relevant neuroprotective role from cytotoxic action of heavy metals on the nervous system. Cadmium is a highly toxic metal and its levels in the environment are increasing due to industrial activities. This element can pass the blood-brain barrier and have neurotoxic activity. For this reason we have studied the effects of cadmium on the glial architecture in the lizard Podarcis siculus, a significant bioindicator of chemical exposure due to its persistence in a variety of habitats. The study was performed on two groups of lizards. The first group of P. siculus was exposed to an acute treatment by a single i.p. injection (2 mg/kg-BW) of CdCl2 and sacrificed after 2, 7 and 16 days. The second one was used as control. The histology of the brain was studied by Hematoxylin/Eosin and Cresyl/Violet stains while the glial structures were analyzed by immunodetection of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the most widely accepted marker for astroglial cells. Evident morphological alterations of the brain were observed at 7 and 16 days from the injection, when we revealed also a decrease of the GFAP-immunopositive structures in particular in the rhombencephalic ventricle, telencephalon and optic tectum. These results show that in the lizards an acute exposure to cadmium provokes morphological cellular alterations in the brain but also a decrement of the expression of GFAP marker with possible consequent damage of glial cells functions. PMID:28348417

  6. Immunolocalization of membrane skeletal protein, 4.1G, in enteric glial cells in the mouse large intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaorong; Terada, Nobuo; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Saitoh, Sei; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Shinichi

    2011-01-20

    4.1 family proteins are membrane skeletal proteins that interact with spectrin-actin networks and intramembraneous proteins. We reported that one of them, 4.1G, was immunolocalized in myelinated nerve fibers of the mouse peripheral nervous system, especially along cell membranes of paranodes and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in Schwann cells. In this study, to examine 4.1G's appearance in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, we focused on the enteric nervous system in mouse large intestines. In intestinal tissues prepared by an "in vivo cryotechnique" followed by freeze-substitution fixation, 4.1G was immunolocalized in Auerbach's myenteric plexus and connecting nerve fiber networks. Its immunostaining was mostly colocalized with glial fibrillar acidic protein, a marker of enteric glial cells, but not with c-Kit, a marker of interstitial cells of Cajal. Using whole-mount preparation after splitting inner and outer muscle layers, the nerve fiber networks including the plexus were clearly detected by the 4.1G immunostaining. By conventional pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy, 4.1G was detected along cell membranes of enteric glial cells and their processes surrounding axons. These indicate that 4.1G may have some roles in adhesion and/or signal transduction in unmylinated PNS nerve fibers.

  7. Delayed transplantation of precursor cell-derived astrocytes provides multiple benefits in a rat model of Parkinsons.

    PubMed

    Proschel, Christoph; Stripay, Jennifer L; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Munger, Joshua C; Noble, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    In addition to dopaminergic neuron loss, it is clear that Parkinson disease includes other pathological changes, including loss of additional neuronal populations. As a means of addressing multiple pathological changes with a single therapeutically-relevant approach, we employed delayed transplantation of a unique class of astrocytes, GDAs(BMP), that are generated in vitro by directed differentiation of glial precursors. GDAs(BMP) produce multiple agents of interest as treatments for PD and other neurodegenerative disorders, including BDNF, GDNF, neurturin and IGF1. GDAs(BMP) also exhibit increased levels of antioxidant pathway components, including levels of NADPH and glutathione. Delayed GDA(BMP) transplantation into the 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat striatum restored tyrosine hydroxylase expression and promoted behavioral recovery. GDA(BMP) transplantation also rescued pathological changes not prevented in other studies, such as the rescue of parvalbumin(+) GABAergic interneurons. Consistent with expression of the synaptic modulatory proteins thrombospondin-1 and 2 by GDAs(BMP), increased expression of the synaptic protein synaptophysin was also observed. Thus, GDAs(BMP) offer a multimodal support cell therapy that provides multiple benefits without requiring prior genetic manipulation.

  8. Delayed transplantation of precursor cell-derived astrocytes provides multiple benefits in a rat model of Parkinsons

    PubMed Central

    Proschel, Christoph; Stripay, Jennifer L; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Munger, Joshua C; Noble, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    In addition to dopaminergic neuron loss, it is clear that Parkinson disease includes other pathological changes, including loss of additional neuronal populations. As a means of addressing multiple pathological changes with a single therapeutically-relevant approach, we employed delayed transplantation of a unique class of astrocytes, GDAsBMP, that are generated in vitro by directed differentiation of glial precursors. GDAsBMP produce multiple agents of interest as treatments for PD and other neurodegenerative disorders, including BDNF, GDNF, neurturin and IGF1. GDAsBMP also exhibit increased levels of antioxidant pathway components, including levels of NADPH and glutathione. Delayed GDABMP transplantation into the 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat striatum restored tyrosine hydroxylase expression and promoted behavioral recovery. GDABMP transplantation also rescued pathological changes not prevented in other studies, such as the rescue of parvalbumin+ GABAergic interneurons. Consistent with expression of the synaptic modulatory proteins thrombospondin-1 and 2 by GDAsBMP, increased expression of the synaptic protein synaptophysin was also observed. Thus, GDAsBMP offer a multimodal support cell therapy that provides multiple benefits without requiring prior genetic manipulation. PMID:24477866

  9. CLEAR LAKE ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Clear Lake Roadless Area, Florida was concluded to offer little or no promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The only commodity that has been mined in the area is clayey sand used in stabilizing roads and in highway construction. No peat more than a few inches thick occurs in the area. Limestone underlies all of the Clear Lake area but is under thick overburden. The region has been explored for heavy minerals and phosphate, but no resources have been found. There appears to be little promise for discovery of oil and gas in the Clear Lake area. However, the area and nearby lands have not been thoroughly tested for oil and gas, and the possibilities for discovery cannot be ruled out.

  10. Development of a glial network in the olfactory nerve: role of calcium and neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Koussa, Mounir A; Tolbert, Leslie P; Oland, Lynne A

    2010-11-01

    In adult olfactory nerves of mammals and moths, a network of glial cells ensheathes small bundles of olfactory receptor axons. In the developing antennal nerve (AN) of the moth Manduca sexta, the axons of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) migrate from the olfactory sensory epithelium toward the antennal lobe. Here we explore developmental interactions between ORN axons and AN glial cells. During early stages in AN glial-cell migration, glial cells are highly dye coupled, dividing glia are readily found in the nerve and AN glial cells label strongly for glutamine synthetase. By the end of this period, dye-coupling is rare, glial proliferation has ceased, glutamine synthetase labeling is absent, and glial processes have begun to extend to enwrap bundles of axons, a process that continues throughout the remainder of metamorphic development. Whole-cell and perforated-patch recordings in vivo from AN glia at different stages of network formation revealed two potassium currents and an R-like calcium current. Chronic in vivo exposure to the R-type channel blocker SNX-482 halted or greatly reduced AN glial migration. Chronically blocking spontaneous Na-dependent activity by injection of tetrodotoxin reduced the glial calcium current implicating an activity-dependent interaction between ORNs and glial cells in the development of glial calcium currents.

  11. RNA Methylation Clears the Way.

    PubMed

    Kontur, Cassandra; Giraldez, Antonio

    2017-03-13

    During the maternal-to-zygotic transition, maternal mRNAs are cleared by multiple distinct but interrelated pathways. A recent study in Nature by Zhao et al. (2017) finds that YTHDF2, a reader of N(6)- methylation, facilitates maternal mRNA decay, introducing an additional facet of control over transcript fate and developmental reprogramming.

  12. Technical Snobbery Versus Clear Communicating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransone, R. K.

    Jargon, when used properly, defines precisely and concisely the concepts peculiar to a profession. Within a profession, it meets the criteria for clear, brief, specific communication. When used outside that profession, however, it tries to impress rather than to express. Engineers and other professionals need to be taught when--and when not--to…

  13. Neptune Through a Clear Filter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-25

    On July 23, 1989, NASA Voyager 2 spacecraft took this picture of Neptune through a clear filter on its narrow-angle camera. The image on the right has a latitude and longitude grid added for reference. Neptune Great Dark Spot is visible on the left.

  14. Sleep and immune function: glial contributions and consequences of aging.

    PubMed

    Ingiosi, Ashley M; Opp, Mark R; Krueger, James M

    2013-10-01

    The reciprocal interactions between sleep and immune function are well-studied. Insufficient sleep induces innate immune responses as evidenced by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in the brain and periphery. Conversely, immune challenges upregulate immunomodulator expression, which alters central nervous system-mediated processes and behaviors, including sleep. Recent studies indicate that glial cells, namely microglia and astrocytes, are active contributors to sleep and immune system interactions. Evidence suggests glial regulation of these interactions is mediated, in part, by adenosine and adenosine 5'-triphosphate actions at purinergic type 1 and type 2 receptors. Furthermore, microglia and astrocytes may modulate declines in sleep-wake behavior and immunity observed in aging. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Glial β-Oxidation regulates Drosophila Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Joachim G.; Laranjeira, Antonio; Van Huffel, Leen; Gärtner, Annette; Vilain, Sven; Bastianen, Jarl; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    The brain's impotence to utilize long-chain fatty acids as fuel, one of the dogmas in neuroscience, is surprising, since the nervous system is the tissue most energy consuming and most vulnerable to a lack of energy. Challenging this view, we here show in vivo that loss of the Drosophila carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), an enzyme required for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids as substrates for energy production, results in the accumulation of triacylglyceride-filled lipid droplets in adult Drosophila brain but not in obesity. CPT2 rescue in glial cells alone is sufficient to restore triacylglyceride homeostasis, and we suggest that this is mediated by the release of ketone bodies from the rescued glial cells. These results demonstrate that the adult brain is able to catabolize fatty acids for cellular energy production. PMID:25588812

  16. Temporal Variant Frontotemporal Dementia is Associated with Globular Glial Tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Lashley, Tammaryn; Mahoney, Colin J; Warren, Jason D; Revesz, Tamas; Rohrer, Jonathan D

    2015-06-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder associated with atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. Most patients with focal temporal lobe atrophy present with either the semantic dementia subtype of FTD or the behavioral variant subtype. For patients with temporal variant FTD, the most common cause found on post-mortem examination has been a TDP-43 (transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa) proteinopathy, but tauopathies have also been described, including Pick's disease and mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. We report the clinical and imaging features of 2 patients with temporal variant FTD associated with a rare frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology known as globular glial tauopathy. The pathologic diagnosis of globular glial tauopathy should be considered in patients with temporal variant FTD, particularly those who have atypical semantic dementia or an atypical parkinsonian syndrome in association with the right temporal variant.

  17. Glial β-oxidation regulates Drosophila energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Joachim G; Laranjeira, Antonio; Van Huffel, Leen; Gärtner, Annette; Vilain, Sven; Bastianen, Jarl; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Dotti, Carlos G

    2015-01-15

    The brain's impotence to utilize long-chain fatty acids as fuel, one of the dogmas in neuroscience, is surprising, since the nervous system is the tissue most energy consuming and most vulnerable to a lack of energy. Challenging this view, we here show in vivo that loss of the Drosophila carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), an enzyme required for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids as substrates for energy production, results in the accumulation of triacylglyceride-filled lipid droplets in adult Drosophila brain but not in obesity. CPT2 rescue in glial cells alone is sufficient to restore triacylglyceride homeostasis, and we suggest that this is mediated by the release of ketone bodies from the rescued glial cells. These results demonstrate that the adult brain is able to catabolize fatty acids for cellular energy production.

  18. Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia: from form to function.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2005-06-01

    Current information indicates that glial cells participate in all the normal and pathological processes of the central nervous system. Although much less is known about satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia, it appears that these cells share many characteristics with their central counterparts. This review presents information that has been accumulated recently on the physiology and pharmacology of SGCs. It appears that SGCs carry receptors for numerous neuroactive agents (e.g., ATP, bradykinin) and can therefore receive signals from other cells and respond to changes in their environment. Activation of SGCs might in turn influence neighboring neurons. Thus SGCs are likely to participate in signal processing and transmission in sensory ganglia. Damage to the axons of sensory ganglia is known to contribute to neuropathic pain. Such damage also affects SGCs, and it can be proposed that these cells have a role in pathological changes in the ganglia.

  19. Glial activation colocalizes with structural abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alshikho, Mohamad J.; Zürcher, Nicole R.; Loggia, Marco L.; Cernasov, Paul; Chonde, Daniel B.; Izquierdo Garcia, David; Yasek, Julia E.; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate brain structural abnormalities in relation to glial activation in the same cohort of participants. Methods: Ten individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 matched healthy controls underwent brain imaging using integrated MR/PET and the radioligand [11C]-PBR28. Diagnosis history and clinical assessments including Upper Motor Neuron Burden Scale (UMNB) were obtained from patients with ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses including tract-based spatial statistics and tractography were applied. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivities (mean, axial, and radial) were measured in regions of interest. Cortical thickness was assessed using surface-based analysis. The locations of structural changes, measured by DTI and the areas of cortical thinning, were compared to regional glial activation measured by relative [11C]-PBR28 uptake. Results: In this cohort of individuals with ALS, reduced FA and cortical thinning colocalized with regions demonstrating higher radioligand binding. [11C]-PBR28 binding in the left motor cortex was correlated with FA (r = −0.68, p < 0.05) and cortical thickness (r = −0.75, p < 0.05). UMNB was correlated with glial activation (r = +0.75, p < 0.05), FA (r = −0.77, p < 0.05), and cortical thickness (r = −0.75, p < 0.05) in the motor cortex. Conclusions: Increased uptake of the glial marker [11C]-PBR28 colocalizes with changes in FA and cortical thinning. This suggests a link between disease mechanisms (gliosis and inflammation) and structural changes (cortical thinning and white and gray matter changes). In this multimodal neuroimaging work, we provide an in vivo model to investigate the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27837005

  20. The EM Earthquake Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two

  1. Glial Modulators as Potential Treatments of Psychostimulant Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Patrick M.; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2014-01-01

    Glia (including astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes), which constitute the majority of cells in the brain. have many of the same receptors as neurons, secrete neurotransmitters and neurotrophic and neuroinflammatory factors, control clearance of neurotransmitters from synaptic clefts, and are intimately involved in synaptic plasticity. Despite their prevalence and spectrum of functions, appreciation of their potential general importance has been elusive since their identification in the mid-1800s, and only relatively recently have they been gaining their due respect. This development of appreciation has been nurtured by the growing awareness that drugs of abuse, including the psychostimulants, affect glial activity, and glial activity, in turn, has been found to modulate the effects of the psychostimulants. This developing awareness has begun to illuminate novel pharmacotherapeutic targets for treating psychostimulant abuse, for which targeting more conventional neuronal targets has not yet resulted in a single, approved medication. In this chapter, we discuss the molecular pharmacology, physiology and functional relationships that the glia have especially in the light in which they present themselves as targets for pharmacotherapeutics intended to treat psychostimulant abuse disorders. We then review a cross section of preclinical studies that have manipulated glial processes whose behavioral effects have been supportive of considering the glia as drug targets for psychostimulant-abuse medications. We then close with comments regarding the current clinical evaluation of relevant compounds for treating psychostimulant abuse, as well as the likelihood of future prospects. PMID:24484974

  2. Homocysteine Induces Glial Reactivity in Adult Rat Astrocyte Cultures.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Aline; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Santos, Camila Leite; Nonose, Yasmine; Kolling, Janaina; Dos Santos, Tiago M; de Assis, Adriano M; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wyse, Angela T S

    2017-03-02

    Astrocytes are dynamic glial cells associated to neurotransmitter systems, metabolic functions, antioxidant defense, and inflammatory response, maintaining the brain homeostasis. Elevated concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) are involved in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. In line with this, our hypothesis was that Hcy could promote glial reactivity in a model of cortical primary astrocyte cultures from adult Wistar rats. Thus, cortical astrocytes were incubated with different concentrations of Hcy (10, 30, and 100 μM) during 24 h. After the treatment, we analyzed cell viability, morphological parameters, antioxidant defenses, and inflammatory response. Hcy did not induce any alteration in cell viability; however, it was able to induce cytoskeleton rearrangement. The treatment with Hcy also promoted a significant decrease in the activities of Na(+), K(+) ATPase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), as well as in the glutathione (GSH) content. Additionally, Hcy induced an increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In an attempt to elucidate the putative mechanisms involved in the Hcy-induced glial reactivity, we measured the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) transcriptional activity and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, which were activated and inhibited by Hcy, respectively. In summary, our findings provide important evidences that Hcy modulates critical astrocyte parameters from adult rats, which might be associated to the aging process.

  3. Glial modulators as potential treatments of psychostimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Patrick M; Hauser, Kurt F

    2014-01-01

    Glia (including astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes), which constitute the majority of cells in the brain, have many of the same receptors as neurons, secrete neurotransmitters and neurotrophic and neuroinflammatory factors, control clearance of neurotransmitters from synaptic clefts, and are intimately involved in synaptic plasticity. Despite their prevalence and spectrum of functions, appreciation of their potential general importance has been elusive since their identification in the mid-1800s, and only relatively recently have they been gaining their due respect. This development of appreciation has been nurtured by the growing awareness that drugs of abuse, including the psychostimulants, affect glial activity, and glial activity, in turn, has been found to modulate the effects of the psychostimulants. This developing awareness has begun to illuminate novel pharmacotherapeutic targets for treating psychostimulant abuse, for which targeting more conventional neuronal targets has not yet resulted in a single, approved medication. In this chapter, we discuss the molecular pharmacology, physiology, and functional relationships that the glia have especially in the light in which they present themselves as targets for pharmacotherapeutics intended to treat psychostimulant abuse disorders. We then review a cross section of preclinical studies that have manipulated glial processes whose behavioral effects have been supportive of considering the glia as drug targets for psychostimulant-abuse medications. We then close with comments regarding the current clinical evaluation of relevant compounds for treating psychostimulant abuse, as well as the likelihood of future prospects.

  4. Glial Biomarkers in Human Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Gwenn A.; Campbell, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. PMID:27228454

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila glial gene repo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce P; Jones, Bradley W

    2005-06-01

    reversed polarity (repo) is a putative target gene of glial cells missing (gcm), the primary regulator of glial cell fate in Drosophila. Transient expression of Gcm is followed by maintained expression of repo. Multiple Gcm binding sites are found in repo upstream DNA. However, while repo is expressed in Gcm positive glia, it is not expressed in Gcm positive hemocytes. These observations suggest factors in addition to Gcm are required for repo expression. Here we have undertaken an analysis of the cis-regulatory DNA elements of repo using lacZ reporter activity in transgenic embryos. We have found that a 4.2 kb DNA region upstream of the repo start site drives the wild-type repo expression pattern. We show that expression is dependent on multiple Gcm binding sites. By ectopically expressing Repo, we show that Repo can regulate its own enhancer. Finally, by systematically analyzing fragments of repo upstream DNA, we show that expression is dependent on multiple elements that are responsible for activity in subsets of glia, as well as repressing inappropriate expression in the epidermis. Our results suggest that Gcm acts synergistically with other factors to control repo transcription in glial cells.

  6. Ideas for clear technical writing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The three greatest obstacles to clear technical-report writing are probably (1) imprecise words, (2) wordiness, and (3) poorly constructed sentences. Examples of category 1 include abstract words, jargon, and vogue words; of category 2, sentences containing impersonal construction superfluous words; and of category 3, sentences lacking parallel construction and proper order of related words and phrases. These examples and other writing-related subjects are discussed in the report, which contains a cross-referenced index and 24 references.

  7. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  8. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain

  9. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain

  10. Relationship between glial potassium regulation and axon excitability: a role for glial Kir4.1 channels.

    PubMed

    Bay, Virginia; Butt, Arthur M

    2012-04-01

    Uptake of K(+) released by axons during action potential propagation is a major function of astrocytes. Here, we demonstrate the importance of glial inward rectifying potassium channels (Kir) in regulating extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) and axonal electrical activity in CNS white matter of the mouse optic nerve. Increasing optic nerve stimulation frequency from 1 Hz to 10-35 Hz for 120 s resulted in a rise in [K(+)](o) and consequent decay in the compound action potential (CAP), a measure of reduced axonal activity. On cessation of high frequency stimulation, rapid K(+) clearance resulted in a poststimulus [K(+)](o) undershoot, followed by a slow recovery of [K(+)](o) and the CAP, which were more protracted with increasing stimulation frequency. Blockade of Kir (100 μM BaCl(2)) slowed poststimulus recovery of [K(+)](o) and the CAP at all stimulation frequencies, indicating a primary function of glial Kir was redistributing K(+) to the extracellular space to offset active removal by Na(+)-K(+) pumps. At higher levels of axonal activity, Kir blockade also increased [K(+)](o) accumulation, exacerbating the decline in the CAP and impeding its subsequent recovery. In the Kir4.1-/- mouse, astrocytes displayed a marked reduction of inward currents and were severely depolarized, resulting in retarded [K(+)](o) regulation and reduced CAP. The results demonstrate the importance of glial Kir in K(+) spatial buffering and sustaining axonal activity in the optic nerve. Glial Kir have increasing importance in K(+) clearance at higher levels of axonal activity, helping to maintain the physiological [K(+)](o) ceiling and ensure the fidelity of signaling between the retina and brain.

  11. NG2+ CNS glial progenitors remain committed to the oligodendrocyte lineage in postnatal life and following neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin H.; Fukaya, Masahiro; Yang, Jason K.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian CNS contains a ubiquitous population of glial progenitors known as NG2+ cells that have the ability to develop into oligodendrocytes and undergo dramatic changes in response to injury and demyelination. Although it has been reported that NG2+ cells are multipotent, their fate in health and disease remains controversial. Here, we generated PDGFαR-CreER transgenic mice and followed their fate in vivo in the developing and adult CNS. These studies revealed that NG2+ cells in the postnatal CNS generate myelinating oligodendrocytes, but not astrocytes or neurons. In regions of neurodegeneration in the spinal cord of ALS mice, NG2+ cells exhibited enhanced proliferation and accelerated differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but remained committed to the oligodendrocyte lineage. These results indicate that NG2+ cells in the normal CNS are oligodendrocyte precursors with restricted lineage potential, and that cell loss and gliosis are not sufficient to alter the lineage potential of these progenitors in ALS mice. PMID:21092857

  12. Neuron-glial communication mediated by TNF-α and glial activation in dorsal root ganglia in visceral inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Song, Dan-dan; Li, Yong; Tang, Dong; Huang, Li-ya; Yuan, Yao-zong

    2014-05-01

    Communication between neurons and glia in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the central nervous system is critical for nociception. Both glial activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction underlie this communication. We investigated whether satellite glial cell (SGC) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activation in DRG participates in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat model of visceral hyperalgesia. In TNBS-treated rats, TNF-α expression increased in DRG and was colocalized to SGCs enveloping a given neuron. These SGCs were activated as visualized under electron microscopy: they had more elongated processes projecting into the connective tissue space and more gap junctions. When nerves attached to DRG (L6-S1) were stimulated with a series of electrical stimulations, TNF-α were released from DRG in TNBS-treated animals compared with controls. Using a current clamp, we noted that exogenous TNF-α (2.5 ng/ml) increased DRG neuron activity, and visceral pain behavioral responses were reversed by intrathecal administration of anti-TNF-α (10 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)). Based on our findings, TNF-α and SGC activation in neuron-glial communication are critical in inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia.

  13. Glutamate-dependent ectodomain shedding of neuregulin-1 type II precursors in rat forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Yuriko; Wang, Ran; Inamura, Naoko; Araki, Kazuaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The neurotrophic factor neuregulin 1 (NRG1) regulates neuronal development, glial differentiation, and excitatory synapse maturation. NRG1 is synthesized as a membrane-anchored precursor and is then liberated by proteolytic processing or exocytosis. Mature NRG1 then binds to its receptors expressed by neighboring neurons or glial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern this process in the nervous system are not defined in detail. Here we prepared neuron-enriched and glia-enriched cultures from embryonic rat neocortex to investigate the role of neurotransmitters that regulate the liberation/release of NRG1 from the membrane of neurons or glial cells. Using a two-site enzyme immunoassay to detect soluble NRG1, we show that, of various neurotransmitters, glutamate was the most potent inducer of NRG1 release in neuron-enriched cultures. NRG1 release in glia-enriched cultures was relatively limited. Furthermore, among glutamate receptor agonists, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and kainate (KA), but not AMPA or tACPD, mimicked the effects of glutamate. Similar findings were acquired from analysis of the hippocampus of rats with KA-induced seizures. To evaluate the contribution of members of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) families to NRG1 release, we transfected primary cultures of neurons with cDNA vectors encoding NRG1 types I, II, or III precursors, each tagged with the alkaline phosphatase reporter. Analysis of alkaline phosphatase activity revealed that the NRG1 type II precursor was subjected to tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) / a Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) -dependent ectodomain shedding in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. These results suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission positively regulates the ectodomain shedding of NRG1 type II precursors and liberates the active NRG1 domain in an activity-dependent manner. PMID:28350885

  14. Io's Sodium Cloud (Clear Filter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's moon Io and its surrounding sky is shown in false color. It was taken at 5 hours 30 minutes Universal Time on Nov. 9, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, using a clear filter whose wavelength range was approximately 400 to 1100 nanometers. This picture differs in two main ways from the green-yellow filter image of the same scene which was released yesterday.

    First, the sky around Io is brighter, partly because the wider wavelength range of the clear filter lets in more scattered light from Io's illuminated crescent and from Prometheus' sunlit plume. Nonetheless, the overall sky brightness in this frame is comparable to that seen through the green-yellow filter, indicating that even here much of the diffuse sky emission is coming from the wavelength range of the green-yellow filter (i.e., from Io's Sodium Cloud).

    The second major difference is that a quite large roundish spot has appeared in Io's southern hemisphere. This spot -- which has been colored red -- corresponds to thermal emission from the volcano Pele. The green-yellow filter image bears a much smaller trace of this emission because the clear filter is far more sensitive to those relatively long wavelengths where thermal emission is strongest.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  15. Io's Sodium Cloud (Clear Filter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's moon Io and its surrounding sky is shown in false color. It was taken at 5 hours 30 minutes Universal Time on Nov. 9, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, using a clear filter whose wavelength range was approximately 400 to 1100 nanometers. This picture differs in two main ways from the green-yellow filter image of the same scene which was released yesterday.

    First, the sky around Io is brighter, partly because the wider wavelength range of the clear filter lets in more scattered light from Io's illuminated crescent and from Prometheus' sunlit plume. Nonetheless, the overall sky brightness in this frame is comparable to that seen through the green-yellow filter, indicating that even here much of the diffuse sky emission is coming from the wavelength range of the green-yellow filter (i.e., from Io's Sodium Cloud).

    The second major difference is that a quite large roundish spot has appeared in Io's southern hemisphere. This spot -- which has been colored red -- corresponds to thermal emission from the volcano Pele. The green-yellow filter image bears a much smaller trace of this emission because the clear filter is far more sensitive to those relatively long wavelengths where thermal emission is strongest.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  16. The heme precursor delta-aminolevulinate blocks peripheral myelin formation

    PubMed Central

    Felitsyn, Natalia; McLeod, Colin; Shroads, Albert L.; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Notterpek, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA) is a heme precursor implicated in neurological complications associated with porphyria and tyrosinemia type I. Delta-ALA is also elevated in the urine of animals and patients treated with the investigational drug dichloroacetate (DCA). We postulated that δ-ALA may be responsible, in part, for the peripheral neuropathy observed in subjects receiving DCA. To test this hypothesis, myelinating cocultures of Schwann cells and sensory neurons were exposed to δ-ALA (0.1–1 mM) and analyzed for the expression of neural proteins and lipids and markers of oxidative stress. Exposure of myelinating samples to δ-ALA is associated with a pronounced reduction in the levels of myelin-associated lipids and proteins, including myelin protein zero and peripheral myelin protein 22. We also observed an increase in protein carbonylation and the formation of hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde after treatment with δ-ALA. Studies of isolated Schwann cells and neurons indicate that glial cells are more vulnerable to this pro-oxidant than neurons, based on a selective decrease in the expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins in glial, but not in neuronal, cells. These results suggest that the neuropathic effects of δ-ALA are attributable, at least in part, to its pro-oxidant properties which damage myelinating Schwann cells. PMID:18665889

  17. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  18. NG2 glial cells integrate synaptic input in global and dendritic calcium signals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjing; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Nicolas, Vicky; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic signaling to NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells (NG2 cells) could be key to rendering myelination of axons dependent on neuronal activity, but it has remained unclear whether NG2 glial cells integrate and respond to synaptic input. Here we show that NG2 cells perform linear integration of glutamatergic synaptic inputs and respond with increasing dendritic calcium elevations. Synaptic activity induces rapid Ca2+ signals mediated by low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels under strict inhibitory control of voltage-gated A-type K+ channels. Ca2+ signals can be global and originate throughout the cell. However, voltage-gated channels are also found in thin dendrites which act as compartmentalized processing units and generate local calcium transients. Taken together, the activity-dependent control of Ca2+ signals by A-type channels and the global versus local signaling domains make intracellular Ca2+ in NG2 cells a prime signaling molecule to transform neurotransmitter release into activity-dependent myelination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16262.001 PMID:27644104

  19. NG2 glial cells integrate synaptic input in global and dendritic calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Nicolas, Vicky; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2016-09-19

    Synaptic signaling to NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells (NG2 cells) could be key to rendering myelination of axons dependent on neuronal activity, but it has remained unclear whether NG2 glial cells integrate and respond to synaptic input. Here we show that NG2 cells perform linear integration of glutamatergic synaptic inputs and respond with increasing dendritic calcium elevations. Synaptic activity induces rapid Ca(2+) signals mediated by low-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels under strict inhibitory control of voltage-gated A-type K(+) channels. Ca(2+) signals can be global and originate throughout the cell. However, voltage-gated channels are also found in thin dendrites which act as compartmentalized processing units and generate local calcium transients. Taken together, the activity-dependent control of Ca(2+) signals by A-type channels and the global versus local signaling domains make intracellular Ca(2+) in NG2 cells a prime signaling molecule to transform neurotransmitter release into activity-dependent myelination.

  20. The Non-Survival Effects of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor on Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Daniel; Carballo-Molina, Oscar A; Castellanos-Montiel, María José; Velasco, Iván

    2017-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was first characterized as a survival-promoting molecule for dopaminergic neurons (DANs). Afterwards, other cells were also discovered to respond to GDNF not only as a survival factor but also as a protein supporting other cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, maturation, neurite outgrowth and other phenomena that have been less studied than survival and are now more extendedly described here in this review article. During development, GDNF favors the commitment of neural precursors towards dopaminergic, motor, enteric and adrenal neurons; in addition, it enhances the axonal growth of some of these neurons. GDNF also induces the acquisition of a dopaminergic phenotype by increasing the expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH), Nurr1 and other proteins that confer this identity and promote further dendritic and electrical maturation. In motor neurons (MNs), GDNF not only promotes proliferation and maturation but also participates in regenerating damaged axons and modulates the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) at both presynaptic and postsynaptic levels. Moreover, GDNF modulates the rate of neuroblastoma (NB) and glioblastoma cancer cell proliferation. Additionally, the presence or absence of GDNF has been correlated with conditions such as depression, pain, muscular soreness, etc. Although, the precise role of GDNF is unknown, it extends beyond a survival effect. The understanding of the complete range of properties of this trophic molecule will allow us to investigate its broad mechanisms of action to accelerate and/or improve therapies for the aforementioned pathological conditions.

  1. Transcriptional analysis of glial cell differentiation in the postnatal murine spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Lehmbecker, Annika; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2015-05-01

    Postnatal murine spinal cord represents a good model system to study mammalian central nervous system myelination in vivo as a basis for further studies in demyelinating diseases. Transcriptional changes were analyzed in SJL/J mice on postnatal day 0, 14, 49 and 231 (P0, P14, P49, P231) employing Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Arrays. Additionally, marker gene signatures for astrocyte and oligodendrocyte lineage-stages were defined to study their gene expression in more detail. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the abundance of commonly used glial cell markers. 6092 differentially regulated genes (DEGs) were identified. The up-regulated DEGs at P14, P49 and P231 compared to P0 exhibited significantly enriched associations to gene ontology terms such as myelination and lipid metabolic transport and down-regulated DEGs to neurogenesis and axonogenesis. Expression values of marker gene signatures for neural stem cells, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, and developing astrocytes were constantly decreasing, whereas myelinating oligodendrocyte and mature astrocyte markers showed a steady increase. Molecular findings were substantiated by immunohistochemical observations. The transcriptional changes observed are an important reference for future analysis of degenerative and inflammatory conditions in the spinal cord.

  2. SOX1 links the function of neural patterning and Notch signalling in the ventral spinal cord during the neuron-glial fate switch

    SciTech Connect

    Genethliou, Nicholas; Panayiotou, Elena; Panayi, Helen; Orford, Michael; Mean, Richard; Lapathitis, George; Gill, Herman; Raoof, Sahir; Gasperi, Rita De; Elder, Gregory; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Richardson, William D.; Malas, Stavros

    2009-12-25

    During neural development the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, known as the neuron-glial ({Nu}/G) fate switch, requires the coordinated function of patterning factors, pro-glial factors and Notch signalling. How this process is coordinated in the embryonic spinal cord is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that during the N/G fate switch in the ventral spinal cord (vSC) SOX1 links the function of neural patterning and Notch signalling. We show that, SOX1 expression in the vSC is regulated by PAX6, NKX2.2 and Notch signalling in a domain-specific manner. We further show that SOX1 regulates the expression of Hes1 and that loss of Sox1 leads to enhanced production of oligodendrocyte precursors from the pMN. Finally, we show that Notch signalling functions upstream of SOX1 during this fate switch and is independently required for the acquisition of the glial fate perse by regulating Nuclear Factor I A expression in a PAX6/SOX1/HES1/HES5-independent manner. These data integrate functional roles of neural patterning factors, Notch signalling and SOX1 during gliogenesis.

  3. Fine Astrocyte Processes Contain Very Small Mitochondria: Glial Oxidative Capability May Fuel Transmitter Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Amin; Haseleu, Julia; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The peripheral astrocyte process (PAP) is the glial compartment largely handling inactivation of transmitter glutamate, and supplying glutamate to the axon terminal. It is not clear how these energy demanding processes are fueled, and whether the PAP exhibits oxidative capability. Whereas the GFAP-positive perinuclear cytoplasm and stem process are rich in mitochondria, the PAP is often considered too narrow to contain mitochondria and might thus not rely on oxidative metabolism. Applying high resolution light microscopy, we investigate here the presence of mitochondria in the PAPs of freshly dissociated, isolated astrocytes. We provide an overview of the subcellular distribution and the approximate size of astrocytic mitochondria. A substantial proportion of the astrocyte's mitochondria are contained in the PAPs and, on the average, they are smaller there than in the stem processes. The majority of mitochondria in the stem and peripheral processes are surprisingly small (0.2-0.4 µm), spherical and not elongate, or tubular, which is supported by electron microscopy. The density of mitochondria is two to several times lower in the PAPs than in the stem processes. Thus, PAPs do not constitute a mitochondria free glial compartment but contain mitochondria in large numbers. No juxtaposition of mitochondria-containing PAPs and glutamatergic synapses has been reported. However, the issue of sufficient ATP concentrations in perisynaptic PAPs can be seen in the light of (1) the rapid, activity dependent PAP motility, and (2) the recently reported activity-dependent mitochondrial transport and immobilization leading to spatial, subcellular organisation of glutamate uptake and oxidative metabolism.

  4. Arsenite exposure downregulates EAAT1/GLAST transporter expression in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Del Razo, Luz María; Huerta, Miriam; Hernandez-Lopez, Angeles; Ortega, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther

    2011-08-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic severely damages the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate (GLU) is the major excitatory amino acid and is highly neurotoxic when levels in the synaptic cleft are not properly regulated by a family of Na⁺-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters. Within the cerebellum, the activity of the Bergmann glia Na⁺-dependent GLU/aspartate transporter (GLAST) excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1/GLAST) accounts for more than 90% of GLU uptake. Because exposure to the metalloid arsenite results in CNS toxicity, we examined whether EAAT1/GLAST constitutes a molecular target. To this end, primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells were exposed to sodium arsenite for 24 h, and EAAT1/GLAST activity was evaluated via ³H-D-aspartate uptake. A sharp decrease in GLU transport was observed, and kinetic studies revealed protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent decreases in K(M) and V(max) concomitant with diminished chglast transcription. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena, we investigated the generation of reactive oxidative species and the lipid peroxidative damage caused by arsenite exposure. None of these responses were found, although we did observe an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 DNA-binding activity correlated with a rise in total glutathione levels. Our results clearly suggest that EAAT1/GLAST is a molecular target of arsenite and support the critical involvement of glial cells in brain function and dysfunction.

  5. Diversity of Neural Precursor Cell Types in the Prenatal Macaque Cerebral Cortex Exists Largely within the Astroglial Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Christopher L.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Noctor, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    The germinal zones of the embryonic macaque neocortex comprise the ventricular zone (VZ) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The mammalian SVZ is subdivided into an inner SVZ and an outer SVZ, with the outer SVZ being particularly large in primates. The existence of distinct precursor cell types in the neocortical proliferative zones was inferred over 100 years ago and recent evidence supports this concept. Precursor cells exhibiting diverse morphologies, patterns of transcription factor expression, and fate potential have been identified in the neocortical proliferative zones. Neurogenic precursor cells are thought to exhibit characteristics of glial cells, but the existence of neurogenic precursor cells that do not share glial specific properties has also been proposed. Therefore, one question that remains is whether neural precursor cells in the prenatal neocortex belong within the astroglial cell class, as they do in neurogenic regions of the adult neocortex, or instead include a diverse collection of precursor cells belonging to distinct cell classes. We examined the expression of astroglial markers by mitotic precursor cells in the telencephalon of prenatal macaque and human. We show that in the dorsal neocortex all mitotic cells at the surface of the ventricle, and all Pax6+ and Tbr2+ mitotic cells in the proliferative zones, express the astroglial marker GFAP. The majority of mitotic cells undergoing division away from the ventricle express GFAP, and many of the GFAP-negative mitoses express markers of cells derived from the ventral telencephalon or extracortical sites. In contrast, a markedly lower proportion of precursor cells express GFAP in the ganglionic eminence. In conclusion, we propose that the heterogeneity of neural precursor cells in the dorsal cerebral cortex develops within the GFAP+ astroglial cell class. PMID:23724007

  6. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  7. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  8. Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0412 TITLE: Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER WX81XWH-15...15. SUBJECT TERMS Repetitive brain trauma, glial metabolism, glutamate, multinuclear spectroscopy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer’s

  9. Subretinal Glial Membranes in Eyes With Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Malia M.; McLeod, D. Scott; Bhutto, Imran A.; Grebe, Rhonda; Duffy, Maeve; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Müller cells create the external limiting membrane (ELM) by forming junctions with photoreceptor cells. This study evaluated the relationship between focal photoreceptors and RPE loss in geographic atrophy (GA) and Müller cell extension into the subretinal space. Methods Human donor eyes with no retinal disease or geographic atrophy (GA) were fixed and the eye cups imaged. The retinal posterior pole was stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; astrocytes and activated Müller cells) and vimentin (Müller cells) while the submacular choroids were labeled with Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin lectin (blood vessels). Choroids and retinas were imaged using a Zeiss 710 confocal microscope. Additional eyes were cryopreserved or processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to better visualize the Müller cells. Results Vimentin staining of aged control retinas (n = 4) revealed a panretinal cobblestone-like ELM. While this pattern was also observed in the GA retinas (n = 7), each also had a distinct area in which vimentin+ and vimentin+/GFAP+ processes created a subretinal membrane. Subretinal glial membranes closely matched areas of RPE atrophy in the gross photos. Choroidal vascular loss was also evident in these atrophic areas. Smaller glial projections were noted, which correlated with drusen in gross photos. The presence of glia in the subretinal space was confirmed by TEM and cross cross-section immunohistochemistry. Conclusions In eyes with GA, subretinal Müller cell membranes present in areas of RPE atrophy may be a Müller cell attempt to replace the ELM. These membranes could interfere with treatments such as stem cell therapy. PMID:28249091

  10. Progressing from identification and functional analysis of precursor behavior to treatment of self-injurious behavior.

    PubMed

    Dracobly, Joseph D; Smith, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    This multiple-study experiment evaluated the utility of assessing and treating severe self-injurious behavior SIB based on the outcomes of a functional analysis of precursor behavior. In Study 1, a precursor to SIB was identified using descriptive assessment and conditional probability analyses. In Study 2, a functional analysis of precursor behavior was conducted. Finally, study 3 evaluated the effects of a treatment in which precursor behavior produced the maintaining variable identified in the precursor functional analysis. Studies 1 and 3 were conducted in two settings in the participants natural environment, where data collection was ongoing throughout the course of the study. Results showed that it was possible to identify a precursor to infrequent but severe SIB, that a functional analysis of precursor behavior suggested a clear operant function, and that treatment based on the results of the precursor functional analysis reduced SIB in the natural environment.

  11. Investigation of terahertz radiation influence on rat glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Borovkova, Mariia; Serebriakova, Maria; Fedorov, Viacheslav; Sedykh, Egor; Vaks, Vladimir; Lichutin, Alexander; Salnikova, Alina; Khodzitsky, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We studied an influence of continuous terahertz (THz) radiation (0.12 – 0.18 THz, average power density of 3.2 mW/cm2) on a rat glial cell line. A dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of THz radiation is demonstrated. After 1 minute of THz radiation exposure a relative number of apoptotic cells increased in 1.5 times, after 3 minutes it doubled. This result confirms the concept of biological hazard of intense THz radiation. Diagnostic applications of THz radiation can be restricted by the radiation power density and exposure time. PMID:28101417

  12. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferda, Jirí; Kastner, Jan; Mukensnabl, Petr; Choc, Milan; Horemuzová, Jana; Ferdová, Eva; Kreuzberg, Boris

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the combination of the contrast enhancement pattern

  13. Minocycline blocks glial cell activation and ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer A; Arbogast, Tara E; Moya, Esteban A; Fu, Zhenxing; Powell, Frank L

    2017-04-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) is the time-dependent increase in ventilation, which persists upon return to normoxia and involves plasticity in both central nervous system respiratory centers and peripheral chemoreceptors. We investigated the role of glial cells in VAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats using minocycline, an antibiotic that inhibits microglia activation and has anti-inflammatory properties, and barometric pressure plethysmography to measure ventilation. Rats received either minocycline (45mg/kg ip daily) or saline beginning 1 day before and during 7 days of chronic hypoxia (CH, PiO2  = 70 Torr). Minocycline had no effect on normoxic control rats or the hypercapnic ventilatory response in CH rats, but minocycline significantly (P < 0.001) decreased ventilation during acute hypoxia in CH rats. However, minocycline administration during only the last 3 days of CH did not reverse VAH. Microglia and astrocyte activation in the nucleus tractus solitarius was quantified from 30 min to 7 days of CH. Microglia showed an active morphology (shorter and fewer branches) after 1 h of hypoxia and returned to the control state (longer filaments and extensive branching) after 4 h of CH. Astrocytes increased glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody immunofluorescent intensity, indicating activation, at both 4 and 24 h of CH. Minocycline had no effect on glia in normoxia but significantly decreased microglia activation at 1 h of CH and astrocyte activation at 24 h of CH. These results support a role for glial cells, providing an early signal for the induction but not maintenance of neural plasticity underlying ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The signals for neural plasticity in medullary respiratory centers underlying ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia are unknown. We show that chronic hypoxia activates microglia and subsequently astrocytes. Minocycline, an antibiotic that blocks microglial activation and has anti

  14. Axon-glial interactions at the Drosophila CNS midline.

    PubMed

    Crews, Stephen T

    2010-01-01

    The glia that reside at the midline of the Drosophila CNS are an important embryonic signaling center and also wrap the axons that cross the CNS. The development of the midline glia (MG) is characterized by migration, ensheathment, subdivision of axon commissures, apoptosis, and the extension of glial processes. All of these events are characterized by cell-cell contact between MG and adjacent neurons. Cell adhesion and signaling proteins that mediate different aspects of MG development and MG-neuron interactions have been identified. This provides a foundation for ultimately obtaining an integrated picture of how the MG assemble into a characteristic axonal support structure in the CNS.

  15. The glial fascicle: an ontogenic and phylogenic unit guiding, supplying and distributing mammalian cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Gressens, P; Evrard, P

    1993-12-17

    Neurons destined for the mammalian neocortex migrate along radial glial cells (RGCs). This paper describes a comparative study of RGCs in the mouse, rat, hamster, cat and human fetus, selected as representative species of mammalian evolution. The glial fascicles display constant features throughout these species: they consist of 4-10 RGCs filled with glycogen. The glial fascicle guides and probably supplies metabolites to the migrating neurons and organizes the vertical lamination of the developing neocortical plate. The neuronal-glial unit which consists of the RGCs and their affiliated migrating neurons is conserved throughout the species studied, suggesting a designation as a phylogenic unit.

  16. Induction of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in rat glial cells by acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kamendulis, L M; Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1999-08-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylonitrile (ACN) resulted in a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas). While the exact mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unresolved, non-genotoxic and possibly tumor promotion modes of action appear to be involved in the induction of glial tumors. Recent studies have shown that ACN induced oxidative stress selectively in rat brain in a dose-responsive manner. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in a rat glial cell line, a target tissue, and in cultured rat hepatocytes, a non-target tissue of ACN carcinogenicity. Glial cells and hepatocytes were treated for 1, 4 and 24 h with sublethal concentrations of ACN. ACN induced an increase in oxidative DNA damage, as evidenced by increased production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in glial cells but not in rat hepatocytes. Hydroxyl radical formation following ACN treatment was also selectively increased in glial cells. Following 1 and 4 h of ACN exposure, the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione, as well as the activities of the enzymatic antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the rat glial cells. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of glutathione peroxidase were not affected by ACN treatment in rat glial cells. No changes in any of these biomarkers of oxidative stress were observed in hepatocytes treated with ACN. These data indicate that ACN selectively induced oxidative stress in rat glial cells.

  17. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. (/sup 3/H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate ((/sup 3/H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of (/sup 3/H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells.

  18. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R. G.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L.; Weissman, P.

    1977-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, with launch about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. Candidate science instruments are suggested. Individual spacecraft systems for the mission were considered, technology requirements and problem areas noted, and a number of recommendations made for technology study and advanced development. The most critical technology needs include attainment of 50-yr spacecraft lifetime and development of a long-life NEP system.

  19. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  20. Optical clearing of vaginal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Hung; Myers, Erinn M.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2017-02-01

    Near-IR laser energy in conjunction with applied tissue cooling is being investigated for thermal remodeling of endopelvic fascia during minimally invasive treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. Previous simulations of light transport, heat transfer, and tissue thermal damage have shown that a transvaginal approach is more feasible than a transurethral approach. However, undesirable thermal insult to vaginal wall was predicted. This study explores whether an optical clearing agent (OCA) can improve optical penetration depth and completely preserve vaginal wall during subsurface treatment of endopelvic fascia. Several OCA mixtures were tested, and 100% glycerol was found to be optimal. Optical transmission studies, optical coherence tomography, reflection spectroscopy, and computer simulations of thermal damage to tissue using glycerol were performed. The OCA produced a 61% increase in optical transmission through porcine vaginal wall at 37 °C after 30 min. Monte Carlo (MC) light transport, heat transfer, and Arrhenius integral thermal damage simulations were performed. MC model showed improved energy deposition in endopelvic fascia using OCA. Without OCA, 62, 37, and 1% of energy was deposited in vaginal wall, endopelvic fascia, and urethral wall, compared with 50, 49, and 1% with OCA. Use of OCA also yielded 0.5 mm increase in treatment depth, allowing potential thermal tissue remodeling at 3 mm depth.

  1. All Clear for New Horizons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-01

    This illustration shows some of the final images used to determine that the coast is clear for New Horizons' flight through the Pluto system. These images show the difference between two sets of 48 combined 10-second exposures with New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera, taken at 8:40 UTC and 10:25 UTC on June 26, 2015, from a range of 21.5 million kilometers (approximately 13 million miles) to Pluto. The known small moons, Nix, Hydra, Kerberos and Styx, are visible as adjacent bright and dark pairs of dots, due to their motion in the 105 minutes between the two image sets. The images have been extensively processed to remove the glare and "ghosts" (i.e., lens flare) from Pluto and Charon, and also to remove background stars, though many of the brighter stars are imperfectly removed and appear as irregular bright and dark blobs. These and other similar sets of images demonstrate that there are no previously unknown moons brighter than 15 times fainter than Styx (the faintest known moon) in the region outside of Charon's orbit, or brighter than five times fainter than Styx in the region between Charon's orbit and a few thousand kilometers above Pluto's surface. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19695

  2. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required.

  3. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and SIRT4 regulate glial development.

    PubMed

    Komlos, Daniel; Mann, Kara D; Zhuo, Yue; Ricupero, Christopher L; Hart, Ronald P; Liu, Alice Y-C; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome is caused by an activation mutation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the reversible interconversion between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. The syndrome presents clinically with hyperammonemia, significant episodic hypoglycemia, seizures, and frequent incidences of developmental and learning defects. Clinical research has implicated that although some of the developmental and neurological defects may be attributed to hypoglycemia, some characteristics cannot be ascribed to low glucose and as hyperammonemia is generally mild and asymptomatic, there exists the possibility that altered GDH1 activity within the brain leads to some clinical changes. GDH1 is allosterically regulated by many factors, and has been shown to be inhibited by the ADP-ribosyltransferase sirtuin 4 (SIRT4), a mitochondrially localized sirtuin. Here we show that SIRT4 is localized to mitochondria within the brain. SIRT4 is highly expressed in glial cells, specifically astrocytes, in the postnatal brain and in radial glia during embryogenesis. Furthermore, SIRT4 protein decreases in expression during development. We show that factors known to allosterically regulate GDH1 alter gliogenesis in CTX8 cells, a novel radial glial cell line. We find that SIRT4 and GDH1 overexpression play antagonistic roles in regulating gliogenesis and that a mutant variant of GDH1 found in HI/HA patients accelerates the development of glia from cultured radial glia cells.

  4. Glial cell plasticity in sensory ganglia induced by nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Hanani, M; Huang, T Y; Cherkas, P S; Ledda, M; Pannese, E

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have been done on the effect of nerve injury on neurons of sensory ganglia but little is known about the contribution of satellite glial cells (SCs) in these ganglia to post-injury events. We investigated cell-to-cell coupling and ultrastructure of SCs in mouse dorsal root ganglia after nerve injury (axotomy). Under control conditions SCs were mutually coupled, but mainly to other SCs around a given neuron. After axotomy SCs became extensively coupled to SCs that enveloped other neurons, apparently by gap junctions. Serial section electron microscopy showed that after axotomy SC sheaths enveloping neighboring neurons formed connections with each other. Such connections were absent in control ganglia. The number of gap junctions between SCs increased 6.5-fold after axotomy. We propose that axotomy induces growth of perineuronal SC sheaths, leading to contacts between SCs enveloping adjacent neurons and to formation of new gap junctions between SCs. These changes may be an important mode of glial plasticity and can contribute to neuropathic pain.

  5. Satellite glial cell responses to neuronal firing in the nervous system of Helix pomatia.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1994-03-01

    Patch clamp experiments were conducted on satellite glial cells attached to the cell body of neurons in place within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The glial cells were studied using cell-attached and whole-cell patch clamp configurations while the underlying neurons were under current or voltage clamp control. The resting potential of the glial cells (-69 mV) was more negative than that of the underlying neurons (-53 mV), due to their high K+ selectivity. Densely packed K+ channels were present, some of which were active at the cell resting potential. Neuronal firing elicited a cumulative depolarization of the glial cells. Large K+ currents flowing from V-clamped neurons depolarized the glial layer by up to 30 mV. The glial depolarization was directly correlated with the size of the neuronal K+ current. The glial cells recovered their resting potential within 2-5 sec. The neuronal depolarization induced a delayed (20-30 sec) and persistent (3-4 min) increase in the glial K+ channel opening probability. Likewise, pulses of K+ (20-50 mM)-rich saline activated the glial channels, unless the underlying neuron was held hyperpolarized. In low Ca(2+)-high Mg2+ saline, neuron depolarization and K(+)-rich saline did not activate the glial K+ channels. These data indicate that a calcium-dependent signal released from the neuronal cell body was involved in glial channel regulation. Neuron-induced channel opening may help eliminate the K+ ions flowing from active neurons.

  6. A Novel Bidirectional Interaction between endothelin-3 and Retinoic Acid in Rat Enteric Nervous System Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Gisser, Jonathan M.; Cohen, Ariella R.; Yin, Han; Gariepy, Cheryl E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Signaling through the endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) is critical for the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS) and mutations in endothelin system genes cause Hirschsprung’s aganglionosis in humans. Penetrance of the disease is modulated by other genetic factors. Mutations affecting retinoic acid (RA) signaling also produce aganglionosis in mice. Thus, we hypothesized that RA and endothelin signaling pathways may interact in controlling development of the ENS. Methods Rat immunoselected ENS precursor cells were cultured with the EDNRB ligand endothelin-3, an EDNRB-selective antagonist (BQ-788), and/or RA for 3 or 14 days. mRNA levels of genes related to ENS development, RA- and EDNRB-signaling were measured at 3 days. Proliferating cells and cells expressing neuronal, glial, and myofibroblast markers were quantified. Results Culture of isolated ENS precursors for 3 days with RA decreases expression of the endothelin-3 gene and that of its activation enzyme. These changes are associated with glial proliferation, a higher percentage of glia, and a lower percentage of neurons compared to cultures without RA. These changes are independent of EDNRB signaling. Conversely, EDNRB activation in these cultures decreases expression of RA receptors β and γ mRNA and affects the expression of the RA synthetic and degradative enzymes. These gene expression changes are associated with reduced glial proliferation and a lower percentage of glia in the culture. Over 14 days in the absence of EDNRB signaling, RA induces the formation of a heterocellular plexus replete with ganglia, glia and myofibroblasts. Conclusions A complex endothelin-RA interaction exists that coordinately regulates the development of rat ENS precursors in vitro. These results suggest that environmental RA may modulate the expression of aganglionosis in individuals with endothelin mutations. PMID:24040226

  7. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L. D.; Weissman, P.

    1980-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, launched about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low-energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and the mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. The mission should extend to 400-1000 AU from the sun. A heliocentric hyperbolic escape velocity of 50-100 km/sec or more is needed to attain this distance within a reasonable mission duration (20-50 years). The trajectory should be toward the incoming interstellar gas. For a year 2000 launch, a Pluto encounter and orbiter can be included. A second mission targeted parallel to the solar axis would also be worthwhile. The mission duration is 20 years, with an extended mission to a total of 50 years. A system using one or two stages of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) was selected as a possible baseline. The most promising alternatives are ultralight solar sails or laser sailing, with the lasers in earth orbit, for example. The NEP baseline design allows the option of carrying a Pluto orbiter as a daughter spacecraft.

  8. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  9. Diabetes alters osmotic swelling characteristics and membrane conductance of glial cells in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Pannicke, Thomas; Iandiev, Ianors; Wurm, Antje; Uckermann, Ortrud; vom Hagen, Franziska; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Bringmann, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    The development of edema in the diabetic retina may be caused by vascular leakage and glial cell swelling. To determine whether diabetic retinopathy alters the swelling characteristics of retinal glial cells and changes the properties of the glial membrane K+ conductance, isolated retinas and glial cells of rats were investigated at 4 and 6 months of chemical diabetes. After 6 months of hyperglycemia, application of a hypotonic solution to retinal slices induced swelling of glial cell bodies, a response not observed in control retinas. The osmotic glial cell swelling was blocked by inhibitors of phospholipase A2 or cyclooxygenase and by a thiol-reducing agent. Glial cells from diabetic retinas displayed a decrease of K+ currents that was associated with an altered subcellular distribution of the K+ conductance and a loss of perivascular Kir4.1 protein. The observation that swelling of cells in control retinas was inducible with K+ channel-blocking Ba2+ ions suggests a relationship between decreased K+ inward currents and osmotic cell swelling in diabetic retinas. The data show that glial cells in diabetic retinas are more sensitive to osmotic stress, which is associated with a decrease of K+ currents, than cells in control retinas. It is suggested that these alterations may be implicated in the development of diabetic retinal edema.

  10. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection. PMID:25075784

  11. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  12. Protein phosphorylation cascades associated with methamphetamine-induced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M A; O'Callaghan, J P

    2000-09-01

    Reactive gliosis is the most prominent response to diverse forms of central nervous system (CNS) injury. The signaling events that mediate this characteristic response to neural injury are under intense investigation. Several studies have demonstrated the activation of phosphoproteins within the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Janus kinase (JAK) pathways following neural insult. These signaling pathways may be involved or responsible for the glial response following injury, by virtue of their ability to phosphorylate and dynamically regulate the activity of various transcription factors. This study sought to delineate, in vivo, the relative contribution of MAPK- and JAK-signaling components to reactive gliosis as measured by induction of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), following chemical-induced neural damage. At time points (6, 24, and 48 h) following methamphetamine (METH, 10 mg/kg x 4, s.c.) administration, female C57BL/6J mice were sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation, a technique that preserves steady-state phosphorylation. Striatal (target) and nontarget (hippocampus) homogenates were assayed for METH-induced changes in markers of dopamine (DA) neuron integrity as well as differences in the levels of activated phosphoproteins. GFAP upregulation occurred as early as 6 h, reaching a threefold induction 48 h following METH exposure. Neurotoxicant-induced reductions in striatal levels of DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) paralleled the temporal profile of GFAP induction. Blots of striatal homogenates, probed with phosphorylation-state specific antibodies, demonstrated significant changes in activated forms of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2), c-jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK1/2), 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6), cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). MAPK-related phosphoproteins exhibited an

  13. Friend or foe? Resolving the impact of glial responses in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elaine C; Morrison, John C

    2009-01-01

    Glaucomatous vision loss results from the progressive degeneration of optic nerve axons and the death of retinal ganglion cells. This process is accompanied by dramatic alterations in the functional properties and distribution of glial cells in both the retina and the optic nerve head in a reaction commonly referred to as glial activation. The recent availability of rodent and cell culture glaucoma models has substantially contributed to our knowledge of glial activation under glaucomatous conditions. Conclusions drawn from these studies have led to the refinement of existing hypotheses and the generation of new ones. Because these hypotheses encompass both protective and injurious roles for glia, the impact of specific aspects of glial activation are current topics of intensive research, speculation, and debate in the field. With these unresolved issues in mind, this review will summarize recent progress in our understanding of the process of glial activation in the glaucomatous optic nerve head and retina.

  14. Protein misfolding and oxidative stress promote glial-mediated neurodegeneration in an Alexander disease model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Colodner, Kenneth J.; Feany, Mel B.

    2011-01-01

    Although alterations in glial structure and function commonly accompany death of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, the role glia play in modulating neuronal loss is poorly understood. We have created a model of Alexander disease in Drosophila by expressing disease-linked mutant versions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in fly glia. We find aggregation of mutant human GFAP into inclusions bearing the hallmarks of authentic Rosenthal fibers. We also observe significant toxicity of mutant human GFAP to glia, which is mediated by protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Both protein aggregation and oxidative stress contribute to activation of a robust autophagic response in glia. Toxicity of mutant GFAP to glial cells induces a non-cell autonomous stress response and subsequent apoptosis in neurons, which is dependent on glial glutamate transport. Our findings thus establish a simple genetic model of Alexander disease and further identify cellular pathways critical for glial-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21414908

  15. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infects and multiplies in enteric glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A; Ruehl, Anne; Ahmed, Niyaz; Usai, Donatella; Paccagnini, Daniela; Felis, Giovanna E; Zanetti, Stefania

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish the role of enteric glial cells during infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn’s disease. METHODS: In order to establish the role of enteric glial cells during infection with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn’s disease, Map adhesion experiments on enteric glial cells were performed as well as expression analysis of Map sigma factors during infection. RESULTS: In this study, for the first time, we found a high affinity of MAP to enteric glial cells and we analyzed the expression of MAP sigma factors under different conditions of growth. CONCLUSION: The fact that Map showed a high affinity to the glial cells raises concerns about the complicated etiology of the Crohn’s disease. Elucidation of the mechanisms whereby inflammation alters enteric neural control of gut functions may lead to novel treatments for Crohn’s disease. PMID:17963299

  16. Downregulation of amyloid precursor protein inhibits neurite outgrowth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein expressed in several cell types. In the nervous system, APP is expressed by glial and neuronal cells, and several lines of evidence suggest that it plays a role in normal and pathological phenomena. To address the question of the actual function of APP in normal developing neurons, we undertook a study aimed at blocking APP expression using antisense oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide internalization was achieved by linking them to a vector peptide that translocates through biological membranes. This original technique, which is very efficient and gives direct access to the cell cytosol and nucleus, allowed us to work with extracellular oligonucleotide concentrations between 40 and 200 nM. Internalization of antisense oligonucleotides overlapping the origin of translation resulted in a marked but transient decrease in APP neosynthesis that was not observed with the vector peptide alone, or with sense oligonucleotides. Although transient, the decrease in APP neosynthesis was sufficient to provoke a distinct decrease in axon and dendrite outgrowth by embryonic cortical neurons developing in vitro. The latter decrease was not accompanied by changes in the spreading of the cell bodies. A single exposure to coupled antisense oligonucleotides at the onset of the culture was sufficient to produce significant morphological effects 6, 18, and 24 h later, but by 42 h, there were no remaining significant morphologic changes. This report thus demonstrates that amyloid precursor protein plays an important function in the morphological differentiation of cortical neurons in primary culture. PMID:7876315

  17. Glial Cell Calcium Signaling Mediates Capillary Regulation of Blood Flow in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Biesecker, Kyle R.; Srienc, Anja I.; Shimoda, Angela M.; Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E.; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The brain is critically dependent on the regulation of blood flow to nourish active neurons. One widely held hypothesis of blood flow regulation holds that active neurons stimulate Ca2+ increases in glial cells, triggering glial release of vasodilating agents. This hypothesis has been challenged, as arteriole dilation can occur in the absence of glial Ca2+ signaling. We address this controversy by imaging glial Ca2+ signaling and vessel dilation in the mouse retina. We find that sensory stimulation results in Ca2+ increases in the glial endfeet contacting capillaries, but not arterioles, and that capillary dilations often follow spontaneous Ca2+ signaling. In IP3R2−/− mice, where glial Ca2+ signaling is reduced, light-evoked capillary, but not arteriole, dilation is abolished. The results show that, independent of arterioles, capillaries actively dilate and regulate blood flow. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that glial Ca2+ signaling regulates capillary but not arteriole blood flow. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show that a Ca2+-dependent glial cell signaling mechanism is responsible for regulating capillary but not arteriole diameter. This finding resolves a long-standing controversy regarding the role of glial cells in regulating blood flow, demonstrating that glial Ca2+ signaling is both necessary and sufficient to dilate capillaries. While the relative contributions of capillaries and arterioles to blood flow regulation remain unclear, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate capillary blood flow may ultimately lead to the development of therapies for treating diseases where blood flow regulation is disrupted, including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and diabetic retinopathy. This finding may also aid in revealing the underlying neuronal activity that generates BOLD fMRI signals. PMID:27605617

  18. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Taro Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  19. Involvement of nucleotides in glial growth following scratch injury in avian retinal cell monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thayane Martins; França, Guilherme Rapozeiro; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Loiola, Erick Correia; Ulrich, Henning; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2015-06-01

    When retinal cell cultures were mechanically scratched, cell growth over the empty area was observed. Only dividing and migrating, 2 M6-positive glial cells were detected. Incubation of cultures with apyrase (APY), suramin, or Reactive Blue 2 (RB-2), but not MRS 2179, significantly attenuated the growth of glial cells, suggesting that nucleotide receptors other than P2Y1 are involved in the growth of glial cells. UTPγS but not ADPβS antagonized apyrase-induced growth inhibition in scratched cultures, suggesting the participation of UTP-sensitive receptors. No decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA(+)) cells was observed at the border of the scratch in apyrase-treated cultures, suggesting that glial proliferation was not affected. In apyrase-treated cultures, glial cytoplasm protrusions were smaller and unstable. Actin filaments were less organized and alfa-tubulin-labeled microtubules were mainly parallel to scratch. In contrast to control cultures, very few vinculin-labeled adhesion sites could be noticed in these cultures. Increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation was observed in UTP-treated cultures, effect that was inhibited by SRC inhibitor 1 and PI3K blocker LY294002. These inhibitors and the FAK inhibitor PF573228 also decreased glial growth over the scratch, suggesting participation of SRC, PI3K, and FAK in UTP-induced growth of glial cells in scratched cultures. RB-2 decreased dissociated glial cell attachment to fibronectin-coated dishes and migration through transwell membranes, suggesting that nucleotides regulated adhesion and migration of glial cells. In conclusion, mechanical scratch of retinal cell cultures induces growth of glial cells over the empty area through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of UTP-sensitive receptors, SRC, PI3K, and FAK.

  20. Gliopathic Pain: When Satellite Glial Cells Go Bad

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Peter T.; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Bhargava, Aditi; Romero, Marcela; Sundberg, Christopher; Charles, Andrew C.; Jasmin, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in sensory ganglia are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs) that perform similar functions to the glia found in the CNS. When primary sensory neurons are injured, the surrounding SGCs undergo characteristic changes. There is good evidence that the SGCs are not just bystanders to the injury but play an active role in the initiation and maintenance of neuronal changes that underlie neuropathic pain. In this article the authors review the literature on the relationship between SGCs and nociception and present evidence that changes in SGC potassium ion buffering capacity and glutamate recycling can lead to neuropathic pain-like behavior in animal models. The role that SGCs play in the immune responses to injury is also considered. We propose the term gliopathic pain to describe those conditions in which central or peripheral glia are thought to be the principal generators of principal pain generators. PMID:19826169

  1. Neuronal-glial networks as substrate for CNS integration

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, A; Toescu, E C

    2006-01-01

    Astrocytes have been considered, for a long time, as the support and house-keeping cells of the nervous system. Indeed, the astrocytes play very important metabolic roles in the brain, but the catalogue of nervous system functions or activities that involve directly glial participation has extended dramatically in the last decade. In addition to the further refining of the signalling capacity of the neuroglial networks and the detailed reassessment of the interactions between glia and vascular bed in the brain, one of the important salient features of the increased glioscience activity in the last few years was the morphological and functional demonstration that protoplasmic astrocytes occupy well defined spatial territories, with only limited areas of morphological overlapping, but still able to communicate with adjacent neighbours through intercellular junctions. All these features form the basis for a possible reassessment of the nature of integration of activity in the central nervous system that could raise glia to a role of central integrator.

  2. Regulation of radial glial survival by signals from the meninges

    PubMed Central

    Radakovits, Randor; Barros, Claudia S.; Belvindrah, Richard; Patton, Bruce; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Summary Radial glial cells (RGCs) in the developing cerebral cortex are progenitors for neurons and glia and their processes serve as guideposts for migrating neurons. So far, it has remained unclear whether RGC processes also control the function of RGCs more directly. Here we show that RGC numbers and cortical size are reduced in mice lacking β1 integrins in RGCs. TUNEL stainings and time-lapse video recordings demonstrate that β1-deficient RGCs processes detach from the meningeal BM followed by apoptotic death of RGCs. Apoptosis is also induced by surgical removal of the meninges. Finally, mice lacking the BM components laminin α2 and α4 show defects in the attachment of RGC processes at the meninges, a reduction in cortical size, and enhanced apoptosis of RGC cells. Our findings demonstrate that attachment of RGC processes at the meninges is important for RGC survival and the control of cortical size. PMID:19535581

  3. Regulation of radial glial survival by signals from the meninges.

    PubMed

    Radakovits, Randor; Barros, Claudia S; Belvindrah, Richard; Patton, Bruce; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-06-17

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) in the developing cerebral cortex are progenitors for neurons and glia, and their processes serve as guideposts for migrating neurons. So far, it has remained unclear whether RGC processes also control the function of RGCs more directly. Here, we show that RGC numbers and cortical size are reduced in mice lacking beta1 integrins in RGCs. TUNEL stainings and time-lapse video recordings demonstrate that beta1-deficient RGCs processes detach from the meningeal basement membrane (BM) followed by apoptotic death of RGCs. Apoptosis is also induced by surgical removal of the meninges. Finally, mice lacking the BM components laminin alpha2 and alpha4 show defects in the attachment of RGC processes at the meninges, a reduction in cortical size, and enhanced apoptosis of RGC cells. Our findings demonstrate that attachment of RGC processes at the meninges is important for RGC survival and the control of cortical size.

  4. Gliopathic pain: when satellite glial cells go bad.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Peter T; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Bhargava, Aditi; Romero, Marcela; Sundberg, Christopher; Charles, Andrew C; Jasmin, Luc

    2009-10-01

    Neurons in sensory ganglia are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs) that perform similar functions to the glia found in the CNS. When primary sensory neurons are injured, the surrounding SGCs undergo characteristic changes. There is good evidence that the SGCs are not just bystanders to the injury but play an active role in the initiation and maintenance of neuronal changes that underlie neuropathic pain. In this article the authors review the literature on the relationship between SGCs and nociception and present evidence that changes in SGC potassium ion buffering capacity and glutamate recycling can lead to neuropathic pain-like behavior in animal models. The role that SGCs play in the immune responses to injury is also considered. We propose the term gliopathic pain to describe those conditions in which central or peripheral glia are thought to be the principal generators of principal pain generators.

  5. Glial Connexins and Gap Junctions in CNS inflammation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions facilitate direct cytoplasmic communication between neighboring cells, facilitating the transfer of small molecular weight molecules involved in cell signaling and metabolism. Gap junction channels are formed by the joining of two hemichannels from adjacent cells, each composed of six oligomeric protein subunits called connexins (Cx). Of paramount importance to CNS homeostasis are astrocyte networks formed by gap junctions, which play a critical role in maintaining the homeostatic regulation of extracellular pH, K+, and glutamate levels. Inflammation is a hallmark of several diseases afflicting the CNS. Within the past several years, the number of publications reporting effects of cytokines and pathogenic stimuli on glial gap junction communication has increased dramatically. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent observations characterizing the consequences of inflammatory stimuli on homocellular gap junction coupling in astrocytes and microglia as well as changes in connexin expression during various CNS inflammatory conditions. PMID:18410504

  6. Glial and neuronal damage markers in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Burghardt, Roland; Weiss, Deike; Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Craciun, Eugenia Maria; Goldhahn, Klaus; Klapp, Burghard F; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2008-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) commonly arises during adolescence leading to interruptions of somatic and psychological development as well as to atrophic brain changes. It remains unclear whether these brain changes are related to the loss of neurons, glia, neuropil or merely due to fluid shifts. We determined leptin levels and two brain-derived damage markers: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) of 43 acute AN patients and 50 healthy control woman (HCW). Peripheral GFAP and NSE concentrations of AN patients were not elevated and not different from HCW. Subjects with particularly low leptin concentration, indicating severe malnutrition, did not show abnormal values either. During weight recovery the marker proteins remained unchanged. Our preliminary results are in line with neuroimaging studies supporting the reversibility of brain changes in AN and do not substantiate hypotheses relying on the extensive damage of brain cells as an explanation for cerebral atrophy in AN.

  7. Glial dysfunction in parkin null mice: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rosa M; Casarejos, Maria J; Menéndez-Cuervo, Jamie; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose A; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2008-01-16

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals, and abnormal neurotransmitter release. The role of glia in parkin deficiency is little known. We cultured midbrain glia from wild-type (WT) and parkin knock-out (PK-KO) mice. After 18-20 d in vitro, PK-KO glial cultures had less astrocytes, more microglia, reduced proliferation, and increased proapoptotic protein expression. PK-KO glia had greater levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH), increased mRNA expression of the GSH-synthesizing enzyme gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and greater glutathione S-transferase and lower glutathione peroxidase activities than WT. The reverse happened in glia cultured in serum-free defined medium (EF12) or in old cultures. PK-KO glia was more susceptible than WT to transference to EF12 or neurotoxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, blockers of GSH synthesis or catalase, inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases), aging of the culture, or combination of these insults. PK-KO glia was less susceptible than WT to Fe2+ plus H2O2 and less responsive to protection by deferoxamine. Old WT glia increased the expression of heat shock protein 70, but PK-KO did not. Glia conditioned medium (GCM) from PK-KO was less neuroprotective and had lower levels of GSH than WT. GCM from WT increased the levels of dopamine markers in midbrain neuronal cultures transferred to EF12 more efficiently than GCM from PK-KO, and the difference was corrected by supplementation with GSH. PK-KO-GCM was a less powerful suppressor of apoptosis and microglia in neuronal cultures. Our data prove that abnormal glial function is critical in parkin mutations, and its role increases with aging.

  8. Depression as a Glial-Based Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rial, Daniel; Lemos, Cristina; Pinheiro, Helena; Duarte, Joana M.; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Real, Joana I.; Prediger, Rui D.; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gomes, Catarina A.; Canas, Paula M.; Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies combining pharmacological, behavioral, electrophysiological and molecular approaches indicate that depression results from maladaptive neuroplastic processes occurring in defined frontolimbic circuits responsible for emotional processing such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. However, the exact mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity that are disrupted to trigger depressive conditions have not been elucidated. Since glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) tightly and dynamically interact with synapses, engaging a bi-directional communication critical for the processing of synaptic information, we now revisit the role of glial cells in the etiology of depression focusing on a dysfunction of the “quad-partite” synapse. This interest is supported by the observations that depressive-like conditions are associated with a decreased density and hypofunction of astrocytes and with an increased microglia “activation” in frontolimbic regions, which is expected to contribute for the synaptic dysfunction present in depression. Furthermore, the traditional culprits of depression (glucocorticoids, biogenic amines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF) affect glia functioning, whereas antidepressant treatments (serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, electroshocks, deep brain stimulation) recover glia functioning. In this context of a quad-partite synapse, systems modulating glia-synapse bidirectional communication—such as the purinergic neuromodulation system operated by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine—emerge as promising candidates to “re-normalize” synaptic function by combining direct synaptic effects with an ability to also control astrocyte and microglia function. This proposed triple action of purines to control aberrant synaptic function illustrates the rationale to consider the interference with glia dysfunction as a mechanism of action driving the design of future

  9. Evidence for brain glial activation in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Loggia, Marco L; Chonde, Daniel B; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Edwards, Robert R; Hill, Elena; Hsu, Shirley; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ji, Ru-Rong; Riley, Misha; Wasan, Ajay D; Zürcher, Nicole R; Albrecht, Daniel S; Vangel, Mark G; Rosen, Bruce R; Napadow, Vitaly; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    Although substantial evidence has established that microglia and astrocytes play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of persistent pain in animal models, the role of glial cells in human pain disorders remains unknown. Here, using the novel technology of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and the recently developed radioligand (11)C-PBR28, we show increased brain levels of the translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of glial activation, in patients with chronic low back pain. As the Ala147Thr polymorphism in the TSPO gene affects binding affinity for (11)C-PBR28, nine patient-control pairs were identified from a larger sample of subjects screened and genotyped, and compared in a matched-pairs design, in which each patient was matched to a TSPO polymorphism-, age- and sex-matched control subject (seven Ala/Ala and two Ala/Thr, five males and four females in each group; median age difference: 1 year; age range: 29-63 for patients and 28-65 for controls). Standardized uptake values normalized to whole brain were significantly higher in patients than controls in multiple brain regions, including thalamus and the putative somatosensory representations of the lumbar spine and leg. The thalamic levels of TSPO were negatively correlated with clinical pain and circulating levels of the proinflammatory citokine interleukin-6, suggesting that TSPO expression exerts pain-protective/anti-inflammatory effects in humans, as predicted by animal studies. Given the putative role of activated glia in the establishment and or maintenance of persistent pain, the present findings offer clinical implications that may serve to guide future studies of the pathophysiology and management of a variety of persistent pain conditions. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Inflammation and glial responses in ischemic brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Jander, S; Schroeter, M

    1998-10-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia elicits a strong inflammatory response involving early recruitment of granulocytes and delayed infiltration of ischemic areas and the boundary zones by T cells and macrophages. Infiltration of hematogenous leukocytes is facilitated by an upregulation of the cellular adhesion molecules P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells. Blocking of the leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion process significantly reduces stroke volume after transient, but not permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. In the infarct region microglia are activated within hours and within days transform into phagocytes. Astrocytes upregulate intermediate filaments, synthesize neurotrophins and form glial scars. Local microglia and infiltrating macrophages demarcate infarcts and rapidly remove debris. Remote from the lesion no cellular infiltration occurs, but astroglia and microglia are transiently activated. Astrocytic activation is induced by spreading depression. In focal ischemia neurons die acutely by necrosis and in a delayed fashion by programmed cell death, apoptosis. Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta are upregulated within hours in ischemic brain lesions. Either directly or via induction of neurotoxic mediators such as nitric oxide, cytokines may contribute to infarct progression in the post-ischemic period. On the other hand, inflammation is tightly linked with rapid removal of debris and repair processes. At present it is unclear whether detrimental effects of inflammation outweigh neuroprotective mechanisms or vice versa. In global ischemia inflammatory responses are limited, but micro- and astroglia are also strongly activated. Glial responses significantly differ between brain regions with selective neuronal death and neighbouring areas that are more resistent to ischemic damage.

  11. Biomechanical properties of retinal glial cells: comparative and developmental data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Pannicke, Thomas; Wei, Er-Qing; Bringmann, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Habermann, Gunnar; Buse, Eberhard; Käs, Josef A; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The biomechanical properties of Müller glial cells may have importance in understanding the retinal tissue alterations after retinal surgery with removal of the inner limiting membrane and during the ontogenetic development, respectively. Here, we compared the viscoelastic properties of Müller cells from man and monkey as well as from different postnatal developmental stages of the rat. We determined the complex Young's modulus E = E' + iE″ in a defined range of deforming frequencies (30, 100, and 200 Hz) using a scanning force microscope, where the real part E' reflects the elastic property (energy storage or elastic stiffness) and the imaginary part E″ reflects the viscous property (energy dissipation) of the cells. The viscoelastic properties were similar in Müller cells from man, monkey, and rat. In general, the elastic behavior dominated over the viscous behavior (E' > E″). The inner process of the Müller cell was the softest region, the soma the stiffest (Einnerprocess(')glial cells (Eneuron(')>Eglia(')). These relations were also observed during the postnatal development of the rat. It is concluded that, generally, retinal cells display mechanics of elastic solids. In addition, the data indicate that the rodent retina is a reliable model to investigate retinal mechanics and tissue alterations after retinal surgery. During retinal development, neuronal branching and synaptogenesis might be particularly stimulated by the viscoelastic properties of Müller cell processes in the inner plexiform layer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glial regulation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated excitation of supraoptic nucleus neurones during dehydration.

    PubMed

    Joe, N; Scott, V; Brown, C H

    2014-01-01

    Magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) project to the posterior pituitary gland where they release the hormones, vasopressin and oxytocin into the circulation to maintain plasma osmolality. Hormone release is proportionate to SON MNC action potential (spike) firing rate. When activated by ambient extracellular glutamate, extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (eNMDARs) mediate a tonic (persistent) depolarisation to increase the probability of action potential firing. In the present study, in vivo single-unit electrophysiological recordings were made from urethane-anaesthetised female Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the impact of tonic eNMDAR activation on MNC activity. Water deprivation (for up to 48 h) caused an increase in the firing rate of SON MNCs that was associated with a general increase in post-spike excitability. To determine whether eNMDAR activation contributes to the increased MNC excitability during water deprivation, memantine, which preferentially blocks eNMDARs, was administered locally into the SON by microdialysis. Memantine significantly decreased the firing rate of MNCs recorded from 48-h water-deprived rats but had no effect on MNCs recorded from euhydrated rats. In the presence of the glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) blocker, dihydrokainate, memantine also reduced the MNC firing rate in euhydrated rats. Taken together, these observations suggest that GLT-1 clears extracellular glutamate to prevent the activation of eNDMARs under basal conditions and that, during dehydration, eNMDAR activation contributes to the increased firing rate of MNCs.

  13. 17 CFR 22.6 - Futures Commission Merchants and derivatives clearing organizations: Naming of Cleared Swaps...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and derivatives clearing organizations: Naming of Cleared Swaps Customer Accounts. 22.6 Section 22.6... Futures Commission Merchants and derivatives clearing organizations: Naming of Cleared Swaps Customer... derivatives clearing organization maintains with a Permitted Depository shall: (a) Clearly identify...

  14. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  15. The role of Ca 2+-related signaling in photodynamic injury of nerve and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. V.; Petin, Y. O.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) inhibited and irreversibly abolished firing, caused necrosis of neurons, necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The role in these processes of the central components of Ca 2+-mediated signaling pathway: phospholipase C, calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II, and protein kinase C was studied using their inhibitors: ET-18, fluphenazine, KN-93, or staurosporine, respectively. ET-18 reduced functional inactivation of neurons, necrosis and apoptosis of glial cells. Fluphenazine and KN-93 reduced PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells. Staurosporine enhanced PDT-induced glial apoptosis. PDTinduced gliosis was prevented by KN-93 and staurosporine. Therefore, phospholipase C participated in neuron inactivation and glial necrosis and apoptosis. Calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase II were involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but not in glial apoptosis. Protein kinase C protected glia from apoptosis and participated in PDT-induced gliosis and loss of neuronal activity. These data may be used for modulation of PDT of brain tumors.

  16. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  17. Photodynamic therapy-induced nitric oxide production in neuronal and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Vera D.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been recently demonstrated to enhance apoptosis of glial cells induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT), but to protect glial cells from PDT-induced necrosis in the crayfish stretch receptor, a simple neuroglial preparation that consists of a single mechanosensory neuron enveloped by satellite glial cells. We used the NO-sensitive fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to study the distribution and dynamics of PDT-induced NO production in the mechanosensory neuron and surrounding glial cells. The NO production in the glial envelope was higher than in the neuronal soma axon and dendrites both in control and in experimental conditions. In dark NO generator, DEA NONOate or NO synthase substrate L-arginine hydrochloride significantly increased the NO level in glial cells, whereas NO scavenger 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) or inhibitors of NO synthase L-NG-nitro arginine methyl ester and Nω-nitro-L-arginine decreased it. PDT induced the transient increase in NO production with a maximum at 4 to 7 min after the irradiation start followed by its inhibition at 10 to 40 min. We suggested that PDT stimulated neuronal rather than inducible NO synthase isoform in glial cells, and the produced NO could mediate PDT-induced apoptosis.

  18. NG2 glial cells regulate neuroimmunological responses to maintain neuronal function and survival

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masayuki; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Kume, Satoshi; Eguchi, Asami; Takata, Kumi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    NG2-expressing neural progenitor cells (i.e., NG2 glial cells) maintain their proliferative and migratory activities even in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and produce myelinating oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Although NG2 glial cells have been observed in close proximity to neuronal cell bodies in order to receive synaptic inputs, substantive non-proliferative roles of NG2 glial cells in the adult CNS remain unclear. In the present study, we generated NG2-HSVtk transgenic rats and selectively ablated NG2 glial cells in the adult CNS. Ablation of NG2 glial cells produced defects in hippocampal neurons due to excessive neuroinflammation via activation of the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) pro-inflammatory pathway, resulting in hippocampal atrophy. Furthermore, we revealed that the loss of NG2 glial cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exacerbated these abnormalities. Our findings suggest that NG2 glial cells maintain neuronal function and survival via the control of neuroimmunological function. PMID:28195192

  19. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  20. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  1. Glial choristoma in the oral and maxillofacial region: a clinicopathologic study of 6 cases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Sha; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Ma, Xu-Chen; Li, Tie-Jun

    2008-06-01

    Glial choristoma is an uncommon developmental abnormality typically presenting at birth or in early childhood. The nasal region is most frequently affected. Palate, tongue, cheek, scalp, and orbit can also be affected but these occurrences are relatively rare. To report 6 cases of glial choristoma arising in the oral and maxillofacial region and to document the clinical and pathologic features of these lesions. Histologic and immunocytochemical examinations were performed on 6 cases of glial choristoma. Biologic behavior, prognosis, and pathogenesis were discussed together with a review of the literature. The patients included 5 boys and 1 girl. They all presented with the lesions at birth or soon after birth. Four lesions occurred on the dorsal side of the tongue, near the foramen caecum. One lesion was present in the infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal space, and the other one was in the submandibular region. All patients received surgical excision, and follow-up data revealed no recurrence for a period of 10 months to 5 years after surgery. Histologically, the lesions showed mature glial cells intermixed with connective tissue. The glial tissue was strongly positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100 but negative for neurofilament. Glial choristoma should be classified as a developmental malformation that occurs in many sites of the head and neck. In oral cavity, the tongue is the most frequently affected site. Although these lesions are rare, they should be included in the differential diagnosis of congenital masses in the oral and maxillofacial region.

  2. Radial glial cells play a key role in echinoderm neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the CNS of echinoderms is capable of fast and efficient regeneration following injury and constitutes one of the most promising model systems that can provide important insights into evolution of the cellular and molecular events involved in neural repair in deuterostomes. So far, the cellular mechanisms of neural regeneration in echinoderm remained obscure. In this study we show that radial glial cells are the main source of new cells in the regenerating radial nerve cord in these animals. Results We demonstrate that radial glial cells of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima react to injury by dedifferentiation. Both glia and neurons undergo programmed cell death in the lesioned CNS, but it is the dedifferentiated glial subpopulation in the vicinity of the injury that accounts for the vast majority of cell divisions. Glial outgrowth leads to formation of a tubular scaffold at the growing tip, which is later populated by neural elements. Most importantly, radial glial cells themselves give rise to new neurons. At least some of the newly produced neurons survive for more than 4 months and express neuronal markers typical of the mature echinoderm CNS. Conclusions A hypothesis is formulated that CNS regeneration via activation of radial glial cells may represent a common capacity of the Deuterostomia, which is not invoked spontaneously in higher vertebrates, whose adult CNS does not retain radial glial cells. Potential implications for biomedical research aimed at finding the cure for human CNS injuries are discussed. PMID:23597108

  3. The glial investment of the adult and developing antennal lobe of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oland, Lynne A.; Biebelhausen, John P.; Tolbert, Leslie P.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the Drosophila olfactory system, with its unparalleled opportunities for genetic dissection of development and functional organization, has been used to study the development of central olfactory neurons and the molecular basis of olfactory coding. The results of these studies have been interpreted in the absence of a detailed understanding of the steps in maturation of glial cells in the antennal lobe. Here, we present a high-resolution study of the glia associated with olfactory glomeruli in adult and developing antennal lobes. The study provides a basis for comparison of findings in Drosophila with those in the moth Manduca sexta that indicate a critical role for glia in antennal lobe development. Using flies expressing GFP under a Nervana2 driver to visualize glia for confocal microscopy, and probing at higher resolution with the electron microscope, we find that glial development in Drosophila differs markedly from that in moths: glial cell bodies remain in a rind around the glomerular neuropil; glial processes ensheathe axon bundles in the nerve layer but likely contribute little to axonal sorting; their processes insinuate between glomeruli only very late and then form only a sparse, open network around each glomerulus; and glial processes invade the synaptic neuropil. Taking our results in the context of previous studies, we conclude that glial cells in the developing Drosophila antennal lobe are unlikely to play a strong role in either axonal sorting or glomerulus stabilization and that in the adult, glial processes do not electrically isolate glomeruli from their neighbors. PMID:18537134

  4. Mutation of a NCKX Eliminates Glial Microdomain Calcium Oscillations and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Melom, Jan E.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2013-01-01

    Glia exhibit spontaneous and activity-dependent fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+, yet it is unclear whether glial Ca2+ oscillations are required during neuronal signaling. Somatic glial Ca2+ waves are primarily mediated by the release of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and their relative importance in normal brain physiology has been disputed. Recently, near-membrane microdomain Ca2+ transients were identified in fine astrocytic processes and found to arise via an intracellular store-independent process. Here, we describe the identification of rapid, near-membrane Ca2+ oscillations in Drosophila cortex glia of the CNS. In a screen for temperature-sensitive conditional seizure mutants, we identified a glial-specific Na+/Ca2+, K+ exchanger (zydeco) that is required for microdomain Ca2+ oscillatory activity. We found that zydeco mutant animals exhibit increased susceptibility to seizures in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, and that zydeco is required acutely in cortex glia to regulate seizure susceptibility. We also found that glial expression of calmodulin is required for stress-induced seizures in zydeco mutants, suggesting a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent glial signaling pathway underlies glial–neuronal communication. These studies demonstrate that microdomain glial Ca2+ oscillations require NCKX-mediated plasma membrane Ca2+ flux, and that acute dysregulation of glial Ca2+ signaling triggers seizures. PMID:23325253

  5. DOPAL is Transmissible to and Oligomerizes Alpha-Synuclein in Human Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patricia; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) containing alpha-synuclein (AS) are a neuropathologic hallmark of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Oligomerized AS is thought to be the pathogenic form of the protein. Glial cells normally express little AS, but they can take up AS from the extracellular fluid. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), an obligate intermediate in the intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine (DA), potently oligomerizes AS. In this study we tested whether DOPAL is taken up by human glial cells and augments intracellular oligomerization of AS. Methods DOPAL (exogenous or endogenous from co-incubation with PC12 cells) and AS (native or A53T mutant form) were added to the incubation medium of glial cells (glioblastoma or MO3.13 oligodendrocytes). Glial cellular contents of DOPAL and its intracellular metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were measured at up to 180 minutes of incubation. Glial cellular AS oligomers were quantified by Western blotting. Results Neither glioblastoma nor MO3.13 cells contained endogenous catecholamines or AS. Co-incubation of the cells with DA-producing PC12 cells produced time-related increases in DOPAL and DOPAC contents. Similarly, glial cellular DOPAL and DOPAC contents increased rapidly after addition of DOPAL to the medium. After addition of native or A53T-AS, intracellular AS also increased. Incubation of glial cells with both DOPAL and AS enhanced the intracellular oligomerization of native and A53T-AS. Conclusions DOPAL is transmissible to glial cells and enhances intracellular oligomerization of AS. An interaction of DOPAL with AS might help explain the formation of CGIs in MSA. PMID:26777075

  6. Long-term maintenance of Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier depends on glial contact mediated by gliomedin and NrCAM.

    PubMed

    Amor, Veronique; Feinberg, Konstantin; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Vainshtein, Anya; Frechter, Shahar; Grumet, Martin; Rosenbluth, Jack; Peles, Elior

    2014-04-09

    Clustering of Na(+) channels at the nodes of Ranvier is coordinated by myelinating glia. In the peripheral nervous system, axoglial contact at the nodes is mediated by the binding of gliomedin and glial NrCAM to axonal neurofascin 186 (NF186). This interaction is crucial for the initial clustering of Na(+) channels at heminodes. As a result, it is not clear whether continued axon-glial contact at nodes of Ranvier is required to maintain these channels at the nodal axolemma. Here, we report that, in contrast to mice that lack either gliomedin or NrCAM, absence of both molecules (and hence the glial clustering signal) resulted in a gradual loss of Na(+) channels and other axonal components from the nodes, the formation of binary nodes, and dysregulation of nodal gap length. Therefore, these mice exhibit neurological abnormalities and slower nerve conduction. Disintegration of the nodes occurred in an orderly manner, starting with the disappearance of neurofascin 186, followed by the loss of Na(+) channels and ankyrin G, and then βIV spectrin, a sequence that reflects the assembly of nodes during development. Finally, the absence of gliomedin and NrCAM led to the invasion of the outermost layer of the Schwann cell membrane beyond the nodal area and the formation of paranodal-like junctions at the nodal gap. Our results reveal that axon-glial contact mediated by gliomedin, NrCAM, and NF186 not only plays a role in Na(+) channel clustering during development, but also contributes to the long-term maintenance of Na(+) channels at nodes of Ranvier.

  7. Long-Term Maintenance of Na+ Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Depends on Glial Contact Mediated by Gliomedin and NrCAM

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Veronique; Feinberg, Konstantin; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Vainshtein, Anya; Frechter, Shahar; Grumet, Martin; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Clustering of Na+ channels at the nodes of Ranvier is coordinated by myelinating glia. In the peripheral nervous system, axoglial contact at the nodes is mediated by the binding of gliomedin and glial NrCAM to axonal neurofascin 186 (NF186). This interaction is crucial for the initial clustering of Na+ channels at heminodes. As a result, it is not clear whether continued axon-glial contact at nodes of Ranvier is required to maintain these channels at the nodal axolemma. Here, we report that, in contrast to mice that lack either gliomedin or NrCAM, absence of both molecules (and hence the glial clustering signal) resulted in a gradual loss of Na+ channels and other axonal components from the nodes, the formation of binary nodes, and dysregulation of nodal gap length. Therefore, these mice exhibit neurological abnormalities and slower nerve conduction. Disintegration of the nodes occurred in an orderly manner, starting with the disappearance of neurofascin 186, followed by the loss of Na+ channels and ankyrin G, and then βIV spectrin, a sequence that reflects the assembly of nodes during development. Finally, the absence of gliomedin and NrCAM led to the invasion of the outermost layer of the Schwann cell membrane beyond the nodal area and the formation of paranodal-like junctions at the nodal gap. Our results reveal that axon-glial contact mediated by gliomedin, NrCAM, and NF186 not only plays a role in Na+ channel clustering during development, but also contributes to the long-term maintenance of Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:24719088

  8. 17 CFR 20.3 - Clearing organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... swaption positions. (c) End of reporting day data. For all futures equivalent months, clearing organizations shall report end of reporting day settlement prices for each cleared product and deltas for every... reporting day, with respect to paired swaps or swaptions, clearing organizations shall report to the...

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in the nuclear compartment of neurons and glial cells in aging and stroke.

    PubMed

    Pirici, Daniel; Pirici, Ionica; Mogoanta, Laurentiu; Margaritescu, Otilia; Tudorica, Valerica; Margaritescu, Claudiu; Ion, Daniela A; Simionescu, Cristiana; Coconu, Marieta

    2012-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are well-recognized denominators for extracellular matrix remodeling in the pathology of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Recent data on non-nervous system tissue showed intracellular and even intranuclear localizations for different MMPs, and together with this, a plethora of new functions have been proposed for these intracellular active enzymes, but are mostly related to apoptosis induction and malign transformation. In neurons and glial cells, on human tissue, animal models and cell cultures, different active MMPs have been also proven to be located in the intra-cytoplasmic or intra-nuclear compartments, with no clear-cut function. In the present study we show for the first time on human tissue the nuclear expression of MMP-9, mainly in neurons and to a lesser extent in astrocytes. We have studied ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients, as well as aged control patients. Age and ischemic suffering seemed to be the best predictors for an elevated MMP-9 nuclear expression, and there was no evidence of a clear-cut extracellular proteolytic activity for this compartment, as revealed by intact vascular basement membranes and assessment of vascular densities. More, the majority of the cells expressing MMP-9 in the nuclear compartment also co-expressed activated-caspase 3, indicating a possible link between nuclear MMP-9 localization and apoptosis in neuronal and glial cells following an ischemic or hemorrhagic event. These results, besides showing for the first time the nuclear localization of MMP-9 on a large series of human stroke and aged brain tissues, raise new questions regarding the unknown spectrum of the functions MMPs in human CNS pathology.

  10. [Fine structure of glial cells in the central nervous system of the tapeworm Grillotia erinaceus (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha)].

    PubMed

    Biserova, N M

    2008-01-01

    The problem of glial cells existing in parasitic and free living flatworms is correlated with organization of parenchyma in platyhelmintes. In the contrary to the widespread opinion that myelin-like envelopes and glial cells do not exist in the nervous system of parasitic flatworms, it has been shown by ultrastructural researches that Amphilina foliacea (Cestoda, Amphilinidea) has well developed glial cells and myelin-like envelopes in the ganglia and main cords, which include both glial cells and intercellular components. The aim of our research was to reveal and investigate in details structural components corresponding to the concept of the glial cell in the CNS of Grillotia erinaceus (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha). Three types of glial cells have been found. The first type is the fibroblast-like glial cells; cells locate in the cerebral ganglion, contain in cytoplasm and extract out fibrillar matrix, form desmosomes and have supporting function. The glial cells of the second type form myeline-like envelope of the giant axons and bulbar nerves in scolex and have laminar cytoplasm. These cells are numerous and exceed in number the neurons bodies into the nerve. The glial cells of the third type form multilayer envelopes in the main nerve cords; extra cellular fibers and gap-junctions take place between the layers. There are contacts between the glial cells of the third type and excretory epithelium but specialized contacts with neurons have been not found. The existing of glial cells in free living and parasitic flatworms is discussed.

  11. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  12. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  13. Clear cell carcinoma of ovary and uterus.

    PubMed

    Glasspool, Rosalind M; McNeish, Iain A

    2013-12-01

    Clear cell carcinomas of the female genital tract are rare tumours with a fearsome reputation for having poor responses to conventional platinum-based chemotherapy and poor prognosis. However, it is now clear that early-stage ovarian clear cell carcinoma has an excellent prognosis and may not require any adjuvant therapy. In addition, radiotherapy may also have a key role to play in adjuvant management of clear cell tumours. Identification of patients who truly do not need adjuvant chemotherapy is important. The past 3 years has seen a significant improvement in our understanding of clear cell carcinoma biology-in particular, the role of mutations in the chromatin remodelling gene ARID1A as key drivers that are common to clear cell carcinomas of ovarian and endometrial origin. Moreover, gynaecological clear cell carcinomas appear to share many features with renal clear cell tumours, suggesting a common pathogenesis. This raises the possibility of clinical trials that include patients with clear cell tumours from different organs of origin. Dissecting the role of disordered chromatin organisation in clear cell carcinoma pathogenesis is a key priority. Finally, the role of endometriosis and the attendant chronic inflammation are recognised. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 appears to play a key role in clear cell carcinoma biology and is an excellent potential therapeutic target.

  14. Recent progress in tissue optical clearing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Larin, Kirill V; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery V

    2013-09-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique provides a prospective solution for the application of advanced optical methods in life sciences. This paper gives a review of recent developments in tissue optical clearing techniques. The physical, molecular and physiological mechanisms of tissue optical clearing are overviewed and discussed. Various methods for enhancing penetration of optical-clearing agents into tissue, such as physical methods, chemical-penetration enhancers and combination of physical and chemical methods are introduced. Combining the tissue optical clearing technique with advanced microscopy image or labeling technique, applications for 3D microstructure of whole tissues such as brain and central nervous system with unprecedented resolution are demonstrated. Moreover, the difference in diffusion and/or clearing ability of selected agents in healthy versus pathological tissues can provide a highly sensitive indicator of the tissue health/pathology condition. Finally, recent advances in optical clearing of soft or hard tissue for in vivo imaging and phototherapy are introduced. [Formula: see text].

  15. Recent progress in tissue optical clearing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Larin, Kirill V; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery V

    2013-01-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique provides a prospective solution for the application of advanced optical methods in life sciences. This paper gives a review of recent developments in tissue optical clearing techniques. The physical, molecular and physiological mechanisms of tissue optical clearing are overviewed and discussed. Various methods for enhancing penetration of optical-clearing agents into tissue, such as physical methods, chemical-penetration enhancers and combination of physical and chemical methods are introduced. Combining the tissue optical clearing technique with advanced microscopy image or labeling technique, applications for 3D microstructure of whole tissues such as brain and central nervous system with unprecedented resolution are demonstrated. Moreover, the difference in diffusion and/or clearing ability of selected agents in healthy versus pathological tissues can provide a highly sensitive indicator of the tissue health/pathology condition. Finally, recent advances in optical clearing of soft or hard tissue for in vivo imaging and phototherapy are introduced. PMID:24348874

  16. Acoustics of clear speech: effect of instruction.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated how different instructions for eliciting clear speech affected selected acoustic measures of speech. Twelve speakers were audio-recorded reading 18 different sentences from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech ( Yorkston & Beukelman, 1984). Sentences were produced in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. A variety of acoustic measures were obtained. Relative to habitual, the clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions were associated with different magnitudes of acoustic change for measures of vowel production, speech timing, and vocal intensity. The overenunciate condition tended to yield the greatest magnitude of change in vowel spectral measures and speech timing, followed by the hearing impaired and clear conditions. SPL tended to be the greatest in the hearing impaired condition for half of the speakers studied. Different instructions for eliciting clear speech yielded acoustic adjustments of varying magnitude. Results have implications for direct comparison of studies using different instructions for eliciting clear speech. Results also have implications for optimizing clear speech training programs.

  17. 17 CFR 22.3 - Derivatives clearing organizations: Treatment of cleared swaps customer collateral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Derivatives clearing... Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION CLEARED SWAPS § 22.3 Derivatives clearing organizations: Treatment of cleared swaps customer collateral. (a) General. A derivatives clearing organization shall...

  18. 17 CFR 22.3 - Derivatives clearing organizations: Treatment of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Derivatives clearing... Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION CLEARED SWAPS (Eff. 4-9-2012) § 22.3 Derivatives clearing organizations: Treatment of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral. (a) General. A derivatives clearing...

  19. Magnesium Elevation Promotes Neuronal Differentiation While Suppressing Glial Differentiation of Primary Cultured Adult Mouse Neural Progenitor Cells through ERK/CREB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wang; Jiang, Mujun; Li, Mei; Jin, Congli; Xiao, Songhua; Fan, Shengnuo; Fang, Wenli; Zheng, Yuqiu; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the influence of magnesium elevation on fate determination of adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs) and the underlying mechanism in vitro. Adult neurogenesis, which is the generation of functional neurons from neural precursors, occurs throughout life in restricted anatomical regions in mammals. Magnesium is the fourth most abundant ion in mammals, and its elevation in the brain has been shown to enhance memory and synaptic plasticity in vivo. However, the effects of magnesium on fate determination of aNPCs, which are vital processes in neurogenesis, remain unknown. NPCs isolated from the dentate gyrus of adult C57/BL6 mice were induced to differentiate in a medium with varying magnesium concentrations (0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 mM) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD0325901. The proportion of cells that differentiated into neurons and glial cells was evaluated using immunofluorescence. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot methods were used to determine the expression of β-III tubulin (Tuj1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The activation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was examined by Western blot to reveal the underlying mechanism. Magnesium elevation increased the proportion of Tju1-positive cells and decreased the proportion of GFAP-positive cells. Also, the expression of Tuj1 was upregulated, whereas the expression of GFAP was downregulated. Moreover, magnesium elevation enhanced the activation of both ERK and CREB. Treatment with PD0325901 reversed these effects in a dose-dependent manner. Magnesium elevation promoted neural differentiation while suppressing glial cell differentiation, possibly via ERK-induced CREB activation. PMID:28280456

  20. MIO-M1 cells and similar muller glial cell lines derived from adult human retina exhibit neural stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jean M; Singhal, Shweta; Bhatia, Bhairavi; Keegan, David J; Reh, Thomas A; Luthert, Philip J; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, Gloria Astrid

    2007-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that glial cells may have a role as neural precursors in the adult central nervous system. Although it has been shown that Müller cells exhibit progenitor characteristics in the postnatal chick and rat retinae, their progenitor-like role in developed human retina is unknown. We first reported the Müller glial characteristics of the spontaneously immortalized human cell line MIO-M1, but recently we have derived similar cell lines from the neural retina of several adult eye donors. Since immortalization is one of the main properties of stem cells, we investigated whether these cells expressed stem cell markers. Cells were grown as adherent monolayers, responded to epidermal growth factor, and could be expanded indefinitely without growth factors under normal culture conditions. They could be frozen and thawed without losing their characteristics. In the presence of extracellular matrix and fibroblast growth factor-2 or retinoic acid, they acquired neural morphology, formed neurospheres, and expressed neural stem cell markers including betaIII tubulin, Sox2, Pax6, Chx10, and Notch 1. They also expressed markers of postmitotic retinal neurons, including peripherin, recoverin, calretinin, S-opsin, and Brn3. When grafted into the subretinal space of dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons rats or neonatal Lister hooded rats, immortalized cells migrated into the retina, where they expressed various markers of retinal neurons. These observations indicate that adult human neural retina harbors a population of cells that express both Müller glial and stem cell markers and suggest that these cells may have potential use for cell-based therapies to restore retinal function. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  1. Focal glial activation coincides with increased BACE1 activation and precedes amyloid plaque deposition in APP[V717I] transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Heneka, Michael T; Sastre, Magdalena; Dumitrescu-Ozimek, Lucia; Dewachter, Ilse; Walter, Jochen; Klockgether, Thomas; Van Leuven, Fred

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammation is suspected to contribute to the progression and severity of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Transgenic mice overexpressing the london mutant of amyloid precursor protein, APP [V717I], robustly recapitulate the amyloid pathology of AD. Methods Early and late, temporal and spatial characteristics of inflammation were studied in APP [V717I] mice at 3 and 16 month of age. Glial activation and expression of inflammatory markers were determined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Amyloid deposition was assessed by immunohistochemistry, thioflavine S staining and western blot experiments. BACE1 activity was detected in brain lysates and in situ using the BACE1 activity kit from R&D Systems, Wiesbaden, Germany. Results Foci of activated micro- and astroglia were already detected at age 3 months, before any amyloid deposition. Inflammation parameters comprised increased mRNA levels coding for interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, major histocompatibility complex II and macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor-receptor. Foci of CD11b-positive microglia expressed these cytokines and were neighbored by activated astrocytes. Remarkably, β-secretase (BACE1) mRNA, neuronal BACE1 protein at sites of focal inflammation and total BACE1 enzyme activity were increased in 3 month old APP transgenic mice, relative to age-matched non-transgenic mice. In aged APP transgenic mice, the mRNA of all inflammatory markers analysed was increased, accompanied by astroglial iNOS expression and NO-dependent peroxynitrite release, and with glial activation near almost all diffuse and senile Aβ deposits. Conclusion The early and focal glial activation, in conjunction with upregulated BACE1 mRNA, protein and activity in the presence of its substrate APP, is proposed to represent the earliest sites of amyloid deposition, likely evolving into amyloid plaques. PMID:16212664

  2. Glial Reactivity in Resistance to Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine (METH) result in reactive microglia and astrocytes in striatum. Prior data indicate that rats with partial dopamine (DA) loss resulting from prior exposure to METH are resistant to further decreases in striatal DA when re-exposed to METH 30 days later. Such resistant animals also do not show an activated microglia phenotype, suggesting a relation between microglial activation and METH-induced neurotoxicity. To date, the astrocyte response in such resistance has not been examined. Thus, this study examined glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD11b protein expression in striata of animals administered saline or a neurotoxic regimen of METH on postnatal days 60 and/or 90 (Saline:Saline, Saline:METH, METH:Saline, METH:METH). Consistent with previous work, animals experiencing acute toxicity (Saline:METH) showed both activated microglia and astocytes, whereas those resistant to the acute toxicity (METH:METH) did not show activated microglia. Interestingly, GFAP expression remained elevated in rats exposed to METH at PND60 (METH:Saline), and was not elevated further in resistant rats treated for the second time with METH (METH:METH). These data suggest that astrocytes remain reactive up to 30 days post-METH exposure. Additionally, these data indicate that astrocyte reactivity does not reflect acute, METH-induced DA terminal toxicity, whereas microglial reactivity does. PMID:23414433

  3. Anti-aging effects of guanosine in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-12-01

    Guanosine, a guanine-based purine, has been shown to exert beneficial roles in in vitro and in vivo injury models of neural cells. Guanosine is released from astrocytes and modulates important astroglial functions, including glutamatergic metabolism, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Astrocytes are crucial for regulating the neurotransmitter system and synaptic information processes, ionic homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and the inflammatory response. Aging is a natural process that induces numerous changes in the astrocyte functionality. Thus, the search for molecules able to reduce the glial dysfunction associated with aging may represent an approach for avoiding the onset of age-related neurological diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-aging effects of guanosine, using primary astrocyte cultures from newborn, adult, and aged Wistar rats. Concomitantly, we evaluated the role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in guanosine-mediated glioprotection. We observed age-dependent changes in glutamate uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, the glutathione (GSH) system, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β)) release, and the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor kB (NFkB), which were prevented by guanosine in an HO-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest guanosine to be a promising therapeutic agent able to provide glioprotection during the aging process. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of guanosine in the aging process.

  4. Implications of glial nitric oxide in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jose Enrique; Tarragon, Ernesto; Campuzano, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26347610

  5. Modulating the Delicate Glial-Neuronal Interactions in Neuropathic Pain: Promises and Potential Caveats

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vinod; Guan, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2014-01-01

    During neuropathic pain, glial cells (mainly astrocytes and microglia) become activated and initiate a series of signaling cascades that modulate pain processing at both spinal and supraspinal levels. It has been generally accepted that glial cell activation contributes to neuropathic pain because glia release proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and factors such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, and glutamate, which are known to facilitate pain signaling. However, recent research has shown that activation of glia also leads to some beneficial outcomes. Glia release anti-inflammatory factors that protect against neurotoxicity and restore normal pain. Accordingly, use of glial inhibitors might compromise the protective functions of glia in addition to suppressing their detrimental effects. With a better understanding of how different conditions affect glial cell activation, we may be able to promote the protective function of glia and pave the way for future development of novel, safe, and effective treatments of neuropathic pain. PMID:24820245

  6. A New Outlook on Mental Illnesses: Glial Involvement Beyond the Glue

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Maha; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Mental illnesses have long been perceived as the exclusive consequence of abnormalities in neuronal functioning. Until recently, the role of glial cells in the pathophysiology of mental diseases has largely been overlooked. However recently, multiple lines of evidence suggest more diverse and significant functions of glia with behavior-altering effects. The newly ascribed roles of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia have led to their examination in brain pathology and mental illnesses. Indeed, abnormalities in glial function, structure and density have been observed in postmortem brain studies of subjects diagnosed with mental illnesses. In this review, we discuss the newly identified functions of glia and highlight the findings of glial abnormalities in psychiatric disorders. We discuss these preclinical and clinical findings implicating the involvement of glial cells in mental illnesses with the perspective that these cells may represent a new target for treatment. PMID:26733803

  7. Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke: The Role of Leukocytes and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Park, Joohyun; Chang, Ji Young; Kim, Sa-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The immune response after stroke is known to play a major role in ischemic brain pathobiology. The inflammatory signals released by immune mediators activated by brain injury sets off a complex series of biochemical and molecular events which have been increasingly recognized as a key contributor to neuronal cell death. The primary immune mediators involved are glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocyte. After ischemic stroke, activation of glial cells and subsequent release of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals are important for modulating both neuronal cell damage and wound healing. Infiltrated leukocytes release inflammatory mediators into the site of the lesion, thereby exacerbating brain injury. This review describes how the roles of glial cells and circulating leukocytes are a double-edged sword for neuroinflammation by focusing on their detrimental and protective effects in ischemic stroke. Here, we will focus on underlying characterize of glial cells and leukocytes under inflammation after ischemic stroke. PMID:27790058

  8. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  9. Embryonic development of glial cells and myelin in the shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum

    PubMed Central

    Rotenstein, Lisa; Milanes, Anthony; Juarez, Marilyn; Reyes, Michelle; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    Glial cells are responsible for a wide range of functions in the nervous system of vertebrates. The myelinated nervous systems of extant elasmobranchs have the longest independent history of all gnathostomes. Much is known about the development of glia in other jawed vertebrates, but research in elasmobranchs is just beginning to reveal the mechanisms guiding neurodevelopment. This study examines the development of glial cells in the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum, by identifying the expression pattern of several classic glial and myelin proteins. We show for the first time that glial development in the bamboo shark (Ch. punctamum) embryo follows closely the one observed in other vertebrates and that neural development seems to proceed at a faster rate in the PNS than in the CNS. In addition, we observed more myelinated tracts in the PNS than in the CNS, and as early as stage 32, suggesting that the ontogeny of myelin in sharks is closer to osteichthyans than agnathans. PMID:19733690

  10. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, R; Yamamoto, H; Niwano, M; Hirano-Iwata, A

    2016-01-11

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  11. Differential neuronal and glial behavior on flat and micro patterned chitosan films.

    PubMed

    Mattotti, Marta; Alvarez, Zaida; Delgado, Luis; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A; Aparicio, Conrado; Planell, Josep A; Alcántara, Soledad; Engel, Elisabeth

    2017-07-19

    Chitosan is a biodegradable natural polysaccharide that has been widely studied for regenerative purposes in the central nervous system. In this study we assessed the in vitro glial and neuronal cells response to chitosan either flat or patterned with grooves in the micrometric range. Chitosan demonstrated to be a good substrate for the attachment and growth of both neurons and glial cells. Chitosan micropatterns promoted glial cell maturation, suggesting astroglial activation. Nevertheless, those mature/reactive glial cells were permissive for axonal growth. Axons aligned and organized along the patterned grooves and the size of the linear topographic patterns is also affecting neurite and cell response. Patterns with 10μm width induced fasciculation of axons, which can be useful for CNS tissue engineering substrates when precise orientation of the axonal outgrowth is desired. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed Central

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-01-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  13. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Adães, Sara; Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3-L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  14. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-09-15

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  15. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3–L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  16. Production and perception of clear speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradlow, Ann R.

    2003-04-01

    When a talker believes that the listener is likely to have speech perception difficulties due to a hearing loss, background noise, or a different native language, she or he will typically adopt a clear speaking style. Previous research has established that, with a simple set of instructions to the talker, ``clear speech'' can be produced by most talkers under laboratory recording conditions. Furthermore, there is reliable evidence that adult listeners with either impaired or normal hearing typically find clear speech more intelligible than conversational speech. Since clear speech production involves listener-oriented articulatory adjustments, a careful examination of the acoustic-phonetic and perceptual consequences of the conversational-to-clear speech transformation can serve as an effective window into talker- and listener-related forces in speech communication. Furthermore, clear speech research has considerable potential for the development of speech enhancement techniques. After reviewing previous and current work on the acoustic properties of clear versus conversational speech, this talk will present recent data from a cross-linguistic study of vowel production in clear speech and a cross-population study of clear speech perception. Findings from these studies contribute to an evolving view of clear speech production and perception as reflecting both universal, auditory and language-specific, phonological contrast enhancement features.

  17. TDP-43 causes differential pathology in neuronal versus glial cells in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sen; Wang, Chuan-En; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A.; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are associated with familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although recent studies have revealed that mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells is toxic, how mutant TDP-43 causes primarily neuronal degeneration in an age-dependent manner remains unclear. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) that expresses mutant TDP-43 (M337V) ubiquitously, we found that mutant TDP-43 accumulates preferentially in neuronal cells in the postnatal mouse brain. We then ubiquitously or selectively expressed mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells in the striatum of adult mouse brains via stereotaxic injection of AAV vectors and found that it also preferentially accumulates in neuronal cells. Expression of mutant TDP-43 in neurons in the striatum causes more severe degeneration, earlier death and more robust symptoms in mice than expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells; however, aging increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells, and expression of mutant TDP-43 in older mice caused earlier onset of phenotypes and more severe neuropathology than that in younger mice. Although expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells via stereotaxic injection does not lead to robust neurological phenotypes, systemic inhibition of the proteasome activity via MG132 in postnatal mice could exacerbate glial TDP-43-mediated toxicity and cause mice to die earlier. Consistently, this inhibition increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells in mouse brains. Thus, the differential accumulation of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal versus glial cells contributes to the preferential toxicity of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells and age-dependent pathology. PMID:24381309

  18. Crosstalk between glial and glioblastoma cells triggers the "go-or-grow" phenotype of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Isabel; Anjo, Sandra I; Vieira de Castro, Joana; Serra, Sofia C; Salgado, António J; Manadas, Bruno; Costa, Bruno M

    2017-10-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most malignant primary brain tumor, leads to poor and unpredictable clinical outcomes. Recent studies showed the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in regulating tumor growth by establishing a complex network of interactions with tumor cells. In this context, we investigated how GBM cells modulate resident glial cells, particularly their paracrine activity, and how this modulation can influence back on the malignant phenotype of GBM cells. Conditioned media (CM) of primary mouse glial cultures unexposed (unprimed) or exposed (primed) to the secretome of GL261 GBM cells were analyzed by proteomic analysis. Additionally, these CM were used in GBM cells to evaluate their impact in glioma cell viability, migration capacity and activation of tumor-related intracellular pathways. The proteomic analysis revealed that the pre-exposure of glial cells to CM from GBM cells led to the upregulation of several proteins related to inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular structure organization within the secretome of primed glial cells. At the functional levels, CM derived from unprimed glial cells favored an increase in GBM cell migration capacity, while CM from primed glial cells promoted cells viability. These effects on GBM cells were accompanied by activation of particular intracellular cancer-related pathways, mainly the MAPK/ERK pathway, which is a known regulator of cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that glial cells can impact on the pathophysiology of GBM tumors, and that the secretome of GBM cells is able to modulate the secretome of neighboring glial cells, in a way that regulates the "go-or-grow" phenotypic switch of GBM cells.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Involvement of Glial Cells in Brain Plastic Remodeling in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Khaspekov, L G; Frumkina, L E

    2017-03-01

    In this review we summarize published data on the involvement of glial cells in molecular mechanisms underlying brain plastic reorganization in epilepsy. The role of astrocytes as glial elements in pathological plasticity in epilepsy is discussed. Data on the involvement of aquaporin-4 in epileptogenic plastic changes and on participation of microglia and extracellular matrix in dysregulation of synaptic transmission and plastic remodeling in epileptic brain tissue are reviewed.

  20. TDP-43 causes differential pathology in neuronal versus glial cells in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sen; Wang, Chuan-En; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2014-05-15

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are associated with familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although recent studies have revealed that mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells is toxic, how mutant TDP-43 causes primarily neuronal degeneration in an age-dependent manner remains unclear. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) that expresses mutant TDP-43 (M337V) ubiquitously, we found that mutant TDP-43 accumulates preferentially in neuronal cells in the postnatal mouse brain. We then ubiquitously or selectively expressed mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells in the striatum of adult mouse brains via stereotaxic injection of AAV vectors and found that it also preferentially accumulates in neuronal cells. Expression of mutant TDP-43 in neurons in the striatum causes more severe degeneration, earlier death and more robust symptoms in mice than expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells; however, aging increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells, and expression of mutant TDP-43 in older mice caused earlier onset of phenotypes and more severe neuropathology than that in younger mice. Although expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells via stereotaxic injection does not lead to robust neurological phenotypes, systemic inhibition of the proteasome activity via MG132 in postnatal mice could exacerbate glial TDP-43-mediated toxicity and cause mice to die earlier. Consistently, this inhibition increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells in mouse brains. Thus, the differential accumulation of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal versus glial cells contributes to the preferential toxicity of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells and age-dependent pathology.

  1. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  2. Observations on glial inclusion bodies in a case of acute disseminated sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Field, E. J.; Miller, Henry; Russell, Dorothy S.

    1962-01-01

    An unusual rod-like structure enclosed within a vacuole is described as occurring in enlarged glial cells associated with the lesions encountered in an uncommonly acute case of multiple sclerosis apparently heralded by an attack of `viral encephalitis'. Similar bodies were not found in a variety of other enlarged glial cells. An encapsulated `grape-fruit' like structure was also seen. Images PMID:13892761

  3. 17 CFR 39.4 - Procedures for implementing derivatives clearing organization rules and clearing new products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... so approved. (b) Self-certification of rules. Proposed new or amended rules of a derivatives clearing...) Acceptance of new products for clearing. (1) A dormant derivatives clearing organization within the...

  4. 17 CFR 39.4 - Procedures for implementing derivatives clearing organization rules and clearing new products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... so approved. (b) Self-certification of rules. Proposed new or amended rules of a derivatives clearing...) Acceptance of new products for clearing. (1) A dormant derivatives clearing organization within the...

  5. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, Jakub; Marycz, Krzysztof; Szarek, Dariusz; Bednarz, Paulina; Laska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane-polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane-polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures are associated with changes in glial-neuronal interactions in the hippocampus of a mouse model of epilepsy with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Melø, Torun; Bigini, Paolo; Sonnewald, Ursula; Balosso, Silvia; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Barbera, Sara; Uboldi, Sarah; Vezzani, Annamaria; Mennini, Tiziana

    2010-12-01

    Hippocampal excitability and the metabolic glial-neuronal interactions were investigated in 22-week-old mice with motor neuron degeneration (mnd), a model of progressive epilepsy with mental retardation. Mnd mice developed spontaneous spikes in the hippocampus and were more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures compared with control mice. Neuronal hyperexcitability in their hippocampus was confirmed by the selective increase of c-Fos positive nuclei. Glial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines over-expression were observed in the hippocampus of mnd mice, even in the absence of marked hippocampal neurodegeneration, as suggested by unchanged amounts of neuroactive amino acids and N-acetyl aspartate. Concentration of other amino acids, including GABA and glutamate, was not changed as well. However, ex vivo(13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy, after simultaneous injection of [1-(13) C]glucose and [1,2-(13) C]acetate, followed by decapitation, showed decreased [1,2-(13) C]GABA formation from hippocampal astrocytic precursors and a marked reduction in [4,5-(13) C]glutamate derived from glutamine. We suggest that astrocyte dysfunction plays a primary role in the pathology and that mnd mice are of value to investigate early pathogenetic mechanism of progressive epilepsy with mental retardation. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2010 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Loss of Glial Neurofascin155 Delays Developmental Synapse Elimination at the Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Sarah L.; Sherman, Diane L.; Dissanayake, Kosala; Soucy, Geneviève; Desmazieres, Anne; Lamont, Douglas J.; Peles, Elior; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Wishart, Thomas M.; Ribchester, Richard R.; Brophy, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal synapse elimination plays a critical role in sculpting and refining neural connectivity throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, including the removal of supernumerary axonal inputs from neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here, we reveal a novel and important role for myelinating glia in regulating synapse elimination at the mouse NMJ, where loss of a single glial cell protein, the glial isoform of neurofascin (Nfasc155), was sufficient to disrupt postnatal remodeling of synaptic circuitry. Neuromuscular synapses were formed normally in mice lacking Nfasc155, including the establishment of robust neuromuscular synaptic transmission. However, loss of Nfasc155 was sufficient to cause a robust delay in postnatal synapse elimination at the NMJ across all muscle groups examined. Nfasc155 regulated neuronal remodeling independently of its canonical role in forming paranodal axo–glial junctions, as synapse elimination occurred normally in mice lacking the axonal paranodal protein Caspr. Rather, high-resolution proteomic screens revealed that loss of Nfasc155 from glial cells was sufficient to disrupt neuronal cytoskeletal organization and trafficking pathways, resulting in reduced levels of neurofilament light (NF-L) protein in distal axons and motor nerve terminals. Mice lacking NF-L recapitulated the delayed synapse elimination phenotype observed in mice lacking Nfasc155, suggesting that glial cells regulate synapse elimination, at least in part, through modulation of the axonal cytoskeleton. Together, our study reveals a glial cell-dependent pathway regulating the sculpting of neuronal connectivity and synaptic circuitry in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25232125

  8. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hui, Maria; Masiello, Kurt; Saito, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy). Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7) mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain. PMID:27537918

  9. Long-term glial reactivity in rat retinas ipsilateral and contralateral to experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Akiyasu; Nakamura, Makoto; Nakanishi, Yoriko; Yamada, Yuko; Negi, Akira

    2005-07-01

    Although glaucoma is known to alter glial reactivity, the long-term effect of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) on glial change has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to examine how chronically elevated IOP induced by episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) in unilateral eyes affect reactivities of astrocytes and Müller cells of rats in the treated as well as contralateral eyes over time. EVC in unilateral eyes of Sprague-Dawley rats were performed to produce chronically elevated IOP. Flat mounted retina preparations were made at several points until 6 months, which were subjected to immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Retinal homogenates were one- or two-dimensionally electrophoresed, followed by GFAP immunoblotting. EVC significantly increased IOPs up to 27.8 from 13.1 mmHg, which gradually decreased over time. In flat mounted retinas, astrocytes lost but Müller cells gained GFAP immunoreactivity at 3 days after cauterization. The glial changes were partially reversed over time but last even after IOP normalization. In the contralateral eyes, similar glial changes gradually appeared at 1 month after EVC and thereafter. Immunoblotting demonstrated not only molecular size shifts but also alteration of isoelectric focusing of GFAP both in treated and contralateral retina as compared with age-matched control retina. EVC led to opposite reactions in astrocytes and Müller cells in terms of GFAP immunoreactivity. Late-onset glial reactivity also occurred in the contralateral retina.

  10. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  11. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hui, Maria; Masiello, Kurt; Saito, Mitsuo

    2016-08-16

    Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy). Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7) mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  12. Glial kon/NG2 gene network for central nervous system repair.

    PubMed

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Harrison, Neale; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The glial regenerative response to central nervous system (CNS) injury, although limited, can be harnessed to promote regeneration and repair. Injury provokes the proliferation of ensheathing glial cells, which can differentiate to remyelinate axons, and partially restore function. This response is evolutionarily conserved, strongly implying an underlying genetic mechanism. In mammals, it is elicited by NG2 glia, but most often newly generated cells fail to differentiate. Thus an important goal had been to find out how to promote glial differentiation following the proliferative response. A gene network involving Notch and prospero (pros) controls the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation in flies and mice, and promotes CNS repair at least in fruit-flies. A key missing link had been how to relate the function of NG2 to this gene network. Recent findings by Losada-Perez et al., published in JCB, demonstrated that the Drosophila NG2 homologue kon-tiki (kon) is functionally linked to Notch and pros in glia. By engaging in two feedback loops with Notch and Pros, in response to injury, Kon can regulate both glial cell number and glial shape homeostasis, essential for repair. Drosophila offers powerful genetics to unravel the control of stem and progenitor cells for regeneration and repair.

  13. The glia doctrine: addressing the role of glial cells in healthy brain ageing.

    PubMed

    Nagelhus, Erlend A; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Bergersen, Linda H; Bjaalie, Jan G; Eriksson, Jens; Gundersen, Vidar; Leergaard, Trygve B; Morth, J Preben; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Torp, Reidun; Walhovd, Kristine B; Tønjum, Tone

    2013-10-01

    Glial cells in their plurality pervade the human brain and impact on brain structure and function. A principal component of the emerging glial doctrine is the hypothesis that astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells, trigger major molecular processes leading to brain ageing. Astrocyte biology has been examined using molecular, biochemical and structural methods, as well as 3D brain imaging in live animals and humans. Exosomes are extracelluar membrane vesicles that facilitate communication between glia, and have significant potential for biomarker discovery and drug delivery. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may indirectly influence the structure and function of membrane proteins expressed in glial cells and predispose specific cell subgroups to degeneration. Physical exercise may reduce or retard age-related brain deterioration by a mechanism involving neuro-glial processes. It is most likely that additional information about the distribution, structure and function of glial cells will yield novel insight into human brain ageing. Systematic studies of glia and their functions are expected to eventually lead to earlier detection of ageing-related brain dysfunction and to interventions that could delay, reduce or prevent brain dysfunction.

  14. ATM kinase inhibition in glial cells activates the innate immune response and causes neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew J; Rimkus, Stacey A; Wassarman, David A

    2012-03-13

    To investigate the mechanistic basis for central nervous system (CNS) neurodegeneration in the disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), we analyzed flies mutant for the causative gene A-T mutated (ATM). ATM encodes a protein kinase that functions to monitor the genomic integrity of cells and control cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis programs. Mutation of the C-terminal amino acid in Drosophila ATM inhibited the kinase activity and caused neuron and glial cell death in the adult brain and a reduction in mobility and longevity. These data indicate that reduced ATM kinase activity is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration in A-T. ATM kinase mutant flies also had elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells. ATM knockdown in glial cells, but not neurons, was sufficient to cause neuron and glial cell death, a reduction in mobility and longevity, and elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells, indicating that a non-cell-autonomous mechanism contributes to neurodegeneration in A-T. Taken together, these data suggest that early-onset CNS neurodegeneration in A-T is similar to late-onset CNS neurodegeneration in diseases such as Alzheimer's in which uncontrolled inflammatory response mediated by glial cells drives neurodegeneration.

  15. Evidence for glutamate-mediated activation of hippocampal neurons by glial calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Hassinger, T D; Atkinson, P B; Strecker, G J; Whalen, L R; Dudek, F E; Kossel, A H; Kater, S B

    1995-10-01

    Communication from astrocytes to neurons has recently been reported by two laboratories, but different mechanisms were though to underlie glial calcium wave activation of associated neurons. Neuronal calcium elevation by glia observed in the present report is similar to that reported previously, where an increase in neuronal calcium was demonstrated in response to glial stimulation. In the present study hippocampal neurons plated on a confluent glial monolayer displayed a transient increase in intracellular calcium following a short delay after the passage of a wave of increased calcium in underlying glia. Activated cells displayed action potentials in response to glial waves and showed antineurofilament immunoreactivity. Finally, the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione significantly reduced the responsiveness of neurons to glial calcium waves. Our results indicate that hippocampal neurons growing on hippocampal or cortical astrocytes respond to glial calcium waves with elevations in calcium and increased electrical activity. Furthermore, we show that in most cases this communication appears to be mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptor channels.

  16. Glial kon/NG2 gene network for central nervous system repair

    PubMed Central

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Harrison, Neale; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The glial regenerative response to central nervous system (CNS) injury, although limited, can be harnessed to promote regeneration and repair. Injury provokes the proliferation of ensheathing glial cells, which can differentiate to remyelinate axons, and partially restore function. This response is evolutionarily conserved, strongly implying an underlying genetic mechanism. In mammals, it is elicited by NG2 glia, but most often newly generated cells fail to differentiate. Thus an important goal had been to find out how to promote glial differentiation following the proliferative response. A gene network involving Notch and prospero (pros) controls the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation in flies and mice, and promotes CNS repair at least in fruit-flies. A key missing link had been how to relate the function of NG2 to this gene network. Recent findings by Losada-Perez et al., published in JCB, demonstrated that the Drosophila NG2 homologue kon-tiki (kon) is functionally linked to Notch and pros in glia. By engaging in two feedback loops with Notch and Pros, in response to injury, Kon can regulate both glial cell number and glial shape homeostasis, essential for repair. Drosophila offers powerful genetics to unravel the control of stem and progenitor cells for regeneration and repair. PMID:28250735

  17. Localization of endogenous biotin-containing proteins in mouse Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Takashi; Terada, Nobuo; Baba, Takeshi; Ohno, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    A peroxidase-conjugated avidin-biotin complex was used to detect endogenous biotin-containing proteins in mouse cerebellum. By this method, Bergmann glial cells were found to be strongly labelled in the adult mouse cerebellum. Developmentally, cells in the granular layer, probably astrocytes, appeared to be labelled around postnatal 10-day (P10). Their labelling decreased after P20, although the positive-labelling remained in the Bergmann glial cells up to the adult stage. The findings were confirmed by using a Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated streptavidin technique. The labelling was not affected by routine hydrogen peroxide treatment, but it was eliminated by avidin-biotin blocking. By another transblot method, the reactive proteins in the mouse cerebellum were found to be 120 kDa (the strongest one) and 75 kDa. For electron microscopy, a gold-conjugated anti-biotin antibody was immunoreacted to the mitochondria of Bergmann glial cells. These results suggest that endogenous biotin-containing proteins are abundant in the Bergmann glial cells. Therefore, the avidin-biotin complex method is useful for detecting Bergmann glial cells, probably because of the difference of biotin metabolism in the cerebellar glial cells.

  18. Anti-inflammatory role of Leptin in glial cells through p38 MAPK pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patraca, Iván; Martínez, Nohora; Busquets, Oriol; Martí, Aleix; Pedrós, Ignacio; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Marin, Miguel; Ettcheto, Miren; Sureda, Francesc; Auladell, Carme; Camins, Antoni; Folch, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, we studied the modulatory effect of Leptin (Lep) against pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin 1-beta (IL1β) and interferon-gamma (IFNγ), in primary glial cell cultures. Glial cultures were treated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, 20ng/ml; IL1β, 20ng/ml; IFNγ 20ng/ml). Cells were pre-treated with Lep 500nM, 1h prior to cytokine treatment. NO released from glial cells was determined using the Griess reaction. Cell viability was determined by the MTT method. Protein expression was determined by western blot. Pre-treatment with 500nM Lep produced an inhibitory effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production after glial cells exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Anti-inflammatory effect can be related to a decrease in P38 MAP Kinase (MAPK) pathway activity. Treatment of glial cell cultures with Lep also reduced the intrinsic apoptotic pathway (cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation). We suggest that Lep would act as an anti-inflammatory factor in glial cells exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, exerting its function on p38 MAPK pathway and reducing NO production. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Glial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of α-synucleinopathies: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Lisa; Jellinger, Kurt A.; Wenning, Gregor K.; Stefanova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are adult onset neurodegenerative disorders characterised by prominent intracellular α-synuclein aggregates (α-synucleinopathies). The glial contribution to neurodegeneration in α-synucleinopathies was largely underestimated until recently. However, brains of PD and DLB patients exhibit not only neuronal inclusions such as Lewy bodies or Lewy neurites but also glial α-synuclein aggregates. Accumulating experimental evidence in PD models suggests that astrogliosis and microgliosis act as important mediators of neurodegeneration playing a pivotal role in both disease initiation and progression. In MSA, oligodendrocytes are intriguingly affected by aberrant cytoplasmic accumulation of α-synuclein (glial cytoplasmic inclusions, Papp-Lantos bodies). Converging evidence from human postmortem studies and transgenic MSA models suggests that oligodendroglial dysfunction both triggers and exacerbates neuronal degeneration. This review summarises the wide range of responsibilities of astroglia, microglia and oligodendroglia in the healthy brain and the changes in glial function associated with ageing. We then provide a critical analysis of the role of glia in α-synucleinopathies including putative mechanisms promoting a chronically diseased glial microenvironment which can lead to detrimental neuronal changes, including cell loss. Finally, major therapeutic strategies targeting glial pathology in α-synucleinopathies as well as current pitfalls for disease-modification in clinical trials are discussed. PMID:21562886

  20. Glial hyperpolarization upon nerve root stimulation in the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Prinz, P; Deitmer, J W

    1999-07-01

    Hyperpolarizing responses in neuropil glial cells evoked by nerve root stimulation were studied in the central nervous system of the leech Hirudo medicinalis using intracellular recording and extracellular stimulation techniques. From a mean resting potential of -60.5 +/- 1.0, the glial membrane was hyperpolarized by -8.6 +/- 0.8 mV, via stimulation of the dorsal posterior nerve root in an isolated ganglion. Nerve root stimulation evoked biphasic or depolarizing responses in glial cells with resting potentials around -70 mV (Rose CR, Deitmer JW. J. Neurophysiol. 73:125-131, 1995). The hyperpolarizing response was reduced by the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist CNQX (50 microM) to 58% of its initial amplitude. In 15 mM Ca2+/15 mM Mg(2+)-saline the hyperpolarization was reduced by 44%. The hyperpolarization that persisted in high-divalent cation saline was not affected by CNQX. Bath-applied glutamate (500 microM) and kainate (2 microM) elicited glial hyperpolarizations that were sensitive to CNQX and 10 mM Mg2+/1 mM Ca(2+)-saline. The 5-HT-antagonist methysergide did not affect the hyperpolarizations evoked by nerve root stimulation. The results show that in the leech glial membrane responses to neuronal activity include not only depolarizations, as shown previously, but also hyperpolarizations, which are mediated by direct and indirect neuron-glial communication pathways. In the indirect pathway, glutamate is a transmitter between neurons.

  1. Photodynamic injury of isolated crayfish neuron and surrounding glial cells: the role of p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifulina, S. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 is involved in cell responses to injurious impacts. Using its inhibitor pifithrin- α and activators tenovin-1, RITA and WR-1065, we studied its potential participation in inactivation and death of isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron and satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In dark, p53 activation by tenovin-1 or WR-1065 shortened activity of isolated neurons. Tenovin-1 and WR-1065 induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas pifithrin-α was anti-apoptotic. Therefore, p53 mediated glial apoptosis and suppression of neuronal activity after axotomy. Tenovin-1 but not other p53 modulators induced necrosis of axotomized neurons and surrounding glia, possibly, through p53-independent pathway. Under photodynamic treatment, p53 activators tenovin-1 and RITA enhanced glial apoptosis indicating the pro-apoptotic activity of p53. Photoinduced necrosis of neurons and glia was suppressed by tenovin-1 and, paradoxically, by pifithrin-α. Modulation of photoinduced changes in the neuronal activity and necrosis of neurons and glia was possibly p53-independent. The different effects of p53 modulators on neuronal and glial responses to axotomy and photodynamic impact were apparently associated with different signaling pathways in neurons and glial cells.

  2. Precursor decay in several aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, N. H.; Bourne, N. K.; Rosenberg, Z.

    1996-05-01

    Plate impact experiments were performed on three ceramics with alumina content varying from 88 to 99.9% using a 50 mm single stage gas gun. Tiles of ceramic with thicknesses varying from 2 to 12 mm were impacted above their Hugoniot Elastic Limits (HELs) and the rate dependent strength was investigated by monitoring the variation in amplitude of the elastic precursor with propagation distance. Stress levels in the target were recorded using manganin stress transducers and a 1 GS s-1 storage oscilloscope. All grades of alumina were found to exhibit some elastic precursor decay indicating strain rate sensitivity.

  3. An overview of botanical clearing technique.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R O

    1975-03-01

    Clearing techniques are outlined with reference to their action on the chemical constituents of plant tissue. The most general technique would include pretreatment with solvents, dissolution of protoplasm, dissolution of other substances, bleaching, infiltration with a dense fluid, and staining. Extensive chemical changes go on during these steps and may prevent satisfactory clearing, an important example being the discoloration of phenolic compounds. Rational design of clearing methods for the chemically distinct cell types and tissue seems a likely future development.

  4. Major Land Clearing Fires, Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    These many and intense land clearing fires in the Kalimantan region of the island of Borneo, Indonesia (3.5S, 113.5E) are indicative of the many deforestation activities on a worldwide scale. In order to feed and house ever increasing populations, more cleared land is required for agriculture to feed ever increasing populations. More pasture lands are needed for livestock. And, more cleared lands are needed for housing.

  5. Major Land Clearing Fires, Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    These many and intense land clearing fires in the Kalimantan region of the island of Borneo, Indonesia (3.5S, 113.5E) are indicative of the many deforestation activities on a worldwide scale. In order to feed and house ever increasing populations, more cleared land is required for agriculture to feed ever increasing populations. More pasture lands are needed for livestock. And, more cleared lands are needed for housing.

  6. Laryngeal Sensation Before and After Clearing Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Gerlach, Terri Treman; Sutton, Lori Ellen; Dawson, Amy Elizabeth; Nietert, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose People frequently present to voice clinics with complaints of irritating laryngeal sensations. Clinicians attempt to reduce the irritating sensations and their common sequela, coughing and throat clearing, by advocating for techniques that remove the irritation with less harm to the vocal fold tissue. Despite the prevalence of patients with these complaints, it is not known if the less harmful techniques recommended by clinicians are effective at clearing irritating laryngeal sensations or that irritating laryngeal sensations are, in fact, more frequent in people with voice disorders than people without voice disorders. Method Assessments of participant reported laryngeal sensation, pre- and post- clearing task, were obtained from 22 people with and 24 people without a voice disorder. Six clearing tasks were used to preliminarily evaluate the differing effects of tasks believed to be deleterious and ameliorative. Results People with and without voice disorders reported pre-clear laryngeal sensation at a similar rate. Post-clear sensation was less likely to be completely or partially removed in people with voice disorders than in the non-voice disordered group. Hard throat clear and swallow with water were the most effective techniques at removing laryngeal sensation. Conclusions The findings provide initial evidence for some of the clinical practices common to treating patients with voice disorders and chronic clearing such as advocating for swallowing a sip of water as a replacement behavior instead of coughing or throat clearing. However, the findings raise questions about other practices such as associating irritating laryngeal sensation with a voice disorder. PMID:22717491

  7. The involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-κB in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-κB modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-κB during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-κB during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-κB modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-κB-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-κB is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  8. Characterization of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in the mouse cerebral cortex: a confocal microscopy approach to demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, Francesco; Strippoli, Maurizio; Errede, Mariella; Benagiano, Vincenzo; Roncali, Luisa; Ambrosi, Glauco; Virgintino, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The identification of stem cells resident in the adult central nervous system has redirected the focus of research into demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, mainly affecting the brain white matter. This immunocytochemical and morphometrical study was carried out by confocal microscopy in the adult mouse cerebral cortex, with the aim of analysing, in the brain grey matter, the characteristics of the oligodendrocyte lineage cells, whose capability to remyelinate is still controversial. The observations demonstrated the presence in all the cortex layers of glial restricted progenitors, reactive to A2B5 marker, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, expressing the NG2 proteoglycan, and pre-oligodendrocytes and pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes, reactive to the specific marker O4. NG2 expressing cells constitute the major immature population of the cortex, since not only oligodendrocyte precursor cells and pre-oligodendrocytes but also a part of the glial restrict progenitors express the NG2 proteoglycan. Together with the population of these immature cells, a larger population of mature oligodendrocytes was revealed by the classical oligodendrocyte and myelin markers, 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, myelin basic protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. The results indicate that oligodendrocyte precursors committed to differentiate into myelin forming oligodendrocytes are present through all layers of the adult cortex and that their phenotypic features exactly recall those of the oligodendroglial lineage cells during development.

  9. Enrichment of skin-derived neural precursor cells from dermal cell populations by altering culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Vahid; Gazor, Rohoullah; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Negad Dehbashi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    As stem cells play a critical role in tissue repair, their manipulation for being applied in regenerative medicine is of great importance. Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) may be good candidates for use in cell-based therapy as the only neural stem cells which can be isolated from an accessible tissue, skin. Herein, we presented a simple protocol to enrich neural SKPs by monolayer adherent cultivation to prove the efficacy of this method. To enrich neural SKPs from dermal cell populations, we have found that a monolayer adherent cultivation helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have cultured dermal cells as monolayer under serum-supplemented (control) and serum-supplemented culture, followed by serum free cultivation (test) and compared. Finally, protein markers of SKPs were assessed and compared in both experimental groups and differentiation potential was evaluated in enriched culture. The cells of enriched culture concurrently expressed fibronectin, vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors as compared to control culture. In addition, they possessed a multipotential capacity to differentiate into neurogenic, glial, adipogenic, osteogenic and skeletal myogenic cell lineages. It was concluded that serum-free adherent culture reinforced by growth factors have been shown to be effective on proliferation of skin-derived neural precursor cells (skin-NPCs) and drive their selective and rapid expansion.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Neuronal Precursors and Their Progeny From Human Fetal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Piper, David R.; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Keyoung, Hansoo; Roy, Neeta S.; Goldman, Steven A.; Rao, Mahendra S.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    We have examined primary human neuronal precursors (HNPs) from 18–22-week-old fetuses. We showed that E-NCAM/MAP2/β-III tubulin-immunoreactive neuronal precursors divide in vitro and could be induced to differentiate into mature neurons in 2 weeks. HNPs did not express nestin and differentiated slowly compared to rodent neuronal restricted precursors (NRPs, 5 days). Immunocytochemical and physiological analyses showed that HNPs could generate a heterogeneous population of neurons that expressed neurofilament-associated protein and various neurotransmitters, neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, voltage-gated ion channels, and ligand-gated neurotransmitter receptors and could fire action potentials. Undifferentiated and differentiated HNPs did not coexpress glial markers. Only a subset of cells that expressed GFP under the control of the Tα1 tubulin promoter was E-NCAM/β-III tubulin-immunoreactive, indicating nonexclusive overlap between these two HNP cell populations. Overall, HNPs resemble NRPs isolated from rodent tissue and appear to be a neuronal precursor population. PMID:11746353

  11. Three-Dimensional Regulation of Radial Glial Functions by Lis1-Nde1 and Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Pawlisz, Ashley S.; Feng, Yuanyi

    2011-01-01

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) are distinctive neural stem cells with an extraordinary slender bipolar morphology and dual functions as precursors and migration scaffolds for cortical neurons. Here we show a novel mechanism by which the Lis1-Nde1 complex maintains RGC functions through stabilizing the dystrophin/dystroglycan glycoprotein complex (DGC). A direct interaction between Nde1 and utrophin/dystrophin allows for the assembly of a multi-protein complex that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix of RGCs to stabilize their lateral membrane, cell-cell adhesion, and radial morphology. Lis1-Nde1 mutations destabilized the DGC and resulted in deformed, disjointed RGCs and disrupted basal lamina. Besides impaired RGC self-renewal and neuronal migration arrests, Lis1-Nde1 deficiencies also led to neuronal over-migration. Additional to phenotypic resemblances of Lis1-Nde1 with DGC, strong synergistic interactions were found between Nde1 and dystroglycan in RGCs. As functional insufficiencies of LIS1, NDE1, and dystroglycan all cause lissencephaly syndromes, our data demonstrated that a three-dimensional regulation of RGC's cytoarchitecture by the Lis1-Nde1-DGC complex determines the number and spatial organization of cortical neurons as well as the size and shape of the cerebral cortex. PMID:22028625

  12. Opposite patterns of age-associated changes in neurons and glial cells of the thalamus of human brain.

    PubMed

    Guidolin, D; Zunarelli, E; Genedani, S; Trentini, G P; De Gaetani, C; Fuxe, K; Benegiamo, C; Agnati, L F

    2008-06-01

    In an autopsy series of 19 individuals, age-ranged 24-94, a relatively age-spared region, the anterior-ventral thalamus, was analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques to visualize neurons (neurofilament protein), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein), microglial cells (CD68) and amyloid precursor protein. The pattern of immunoreactivity was determined by surface fractal dimension and lacunarity, the size by the field area (FA) and the spatial uniformity by the uniformity index. From the normalized FA values of immunoreactivity for the four markers studied, a global parameter was defined to give an overall characterization of the age-dependent changes in the glio-neuronal networks. A significant exponential decline of the GP was observed with increasing age. This finding suggests that early in life (age<50 years) an adaptive response might be triggered, involving the glio-neuronal networks in plastic adaptive adjustments to cope with the environmental challenges and the continuous wearing off of the neuronal structures. The slow decay of the GP observed in a later phase (age>70 years) could be due to the non-trophic reserve still available.

  13. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  14. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  15. PAGOSA Sample Problem. Elastic Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Weseloh, Wayne N.; Clancy, Sean Patrick

    2016-02-03

    A PAGOSA simulation of a flyer plate impact which produces an elastic precursor wave is examined. The simulation is compared to an analytic theory for the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and an elastic-perfectly-plastic strength model.

  16. Fractalkine mediates inflammatory pain through activation of satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Guilherme R; Talbot, Jhimmy; Lotufo, Celina M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sérgio H

    2013-07-02

    The activation of the satellite glial cells (SGCs) surrounding the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons appears to play a role in pathological pain. We tested the hypothesis that fractalkine, which is constitutively expressed by primary nociceptive neurons, is the link between peripheral inflammation and the activation of SGCs and is thus responsible for the genesis of the inflammatory pain. The injection of carrageenin into the rat hind paw induced a decrease in the mechanical nociceptive threshold (hypernociception), which was associated with an increase in mRNA and GFAP protein expression in the DRG. Both events were inhibited by anti-fractalkine antibody administered directly into the DRG (L5) [intraganglionar (i.gl.)]. The administration of fractalkine into the DRG (L5) produced mechanical hypernociception in a dose-, time-, and CX3C receptor-1 (CX3CR1)-dependent manner. Fractalkine's hypernociceptive effect appears to be indirect, as it was reduced by local treatment with anti-TNF-α antibody, IL-1-receptor antagonist, or indomethacin. Accordingly, the in vitro incubation of isolated and cultured SGC with fractalkine induced the production/release of TNF-α, IL-1β, and prostaglandin E2. Finally, treatment with i.gl. fluorocitrate blocked fractalkine (i.gl.)- and carrageenin (paw)-induced hypernociception. Overall, these results suggest that, during peripheral inflammation, fractalkine is released in the DRG and contributes to the genesis of inflammatory hypernociception. Fractalkine's effect appears to be dependent on the activation of the SGCs, leading to the production of TNFα, IL-1β, and prostanoids, which are likely responsible for the maintenance of inflammatory pain. Thus, these results indicate that the inhibition of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in SGCs may serve as a target to control inflammatory pain.

  17. Experimental investigation of HGF inhibiting glial scar in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Wu, Zu-ze; Shu, Cui-li; Li, Ding-feng; Zeng, Yan-jun; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, Wei-hao

    2011-03-01

    To study the inhibitory effect of Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on the responsive hyperplasia of damaged astrocytes in vitro. We prepared damaged model of astrocytes to simulate the responsive hyperplasia of damaged astrocytes in vivo by culturing astrocytes in vitro; After the first day of Ad-HGF transfection, astrocytes were scratched, then after the first, the third, and the fifth day of scratch, we detect the expression amount of astrocytes specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the ratio of S-phase cells with flow cytometry, both of which can reflect the proliferation status of damaged astrocytes; After HGF was added in scratched astrocytes, the activity of SPK and MAPK (P42/44) were detected by autoradiography and immunoblotting test; After adding different concentrations of HGF protein in astrocytes cultured in different serum concentrations and adding diverse concentrations of HGF protein, SPK and SPK inhibitor DMS in scratched astrocytes, we detect cell proliferation with 3H-TDR incorporation. The first day after Ad-HGF transfected astrocytes were scratched, the amount of GFAP secreted by astrocytes were decreased significantly (P < 0.05), and the cells in S phase were declined obviously. HGF has bidirectional regulation on SPK of scratched astrocytes: increases the SPK activity when HGF in low dose, while inhibits when in high dose. In addition, DMS can block the signal passage; HGF had no effects on MAPK (P42/44) of damaged astrocytes cells. In conclusion, after the transfection of Ad-HGF, it can inhibit the responsive hyperplasia of damaged astrocytes by the means of blocking SPK passage.

  18. Cytotoxic Effects of Environmental Toxins on Human Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Fiona; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Guillemin, Gilles; Rossi, Fanny; Chinian, Mirielle; Laurent, Dominique; Teo, Charles; Neilan, Brett A

    2017-02-01

    Toxins produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates have increasingly become a public health concern due to their degenerative effects on mammalian tissue and cells. In particular, emerging evidence has called attention to the neurodegenerative effects of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Other toxins such as the neurotoxins saxitoxin and ciguatoxin, as well as the hepatotoxic microcystin, have been previously shown to have a range of effects upon the nervous system. However, the capacity of these toxins to cause neurodegeneration in human cells has not, to our knowledge, been previously investigated. This study aimed to examine the cytotoxic effects of BMAA, microcystin-LR (MC-LR), saxitoxin (STX) and ciguatoxin (CTX-1B) on primary adult human astrocytes. We also demonstrated that α-lipoate attenuated MC-LR toxicity in primary astrocytes and characterised changes in gene expression which could potentially be caused by these toxins in primary astrocytes. Herein, we are the first to show that all of these toxins are capable of causing physiological changes consistent with neurodegeneration in glial cells, via oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, leading to a reduction in cell proliferation culminating in cell death. In addition, MC-LR toxicity was reduced significantly in astrocytes-treated α-lipoic acid. While there were no significant changes in gene expression, many of the probes that were altered were associated with neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. Overall, this is important in advancing our current understanding of the mechanism of toxicity of MC-LR on human brain function in vitro, particularly in the context of neurodegeneration.

  19. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5‧-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  20. Migratory capacity of the cell line RN33B and the host glial cell response after subretinal transplantation to normal adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Anita Blixt; Englund, Ulrica; Lundberg, Cecilia; Warfvinge, Karin

    2004-07-01

    As previously reported, the brain-derived precursor cell line RN33B has a great capacity to migrate when transplanted to adult brain or retina. This cell line is immortalized with the SV40 large T-antigen and carries the reporter gene LacZ and the green fluorescent protein GFP. In the present study, the precursor cells were transplanted to the subretinal space of adult rats and investigated early after grafting. The purpose was to demonstrate the migration of the grafted cells from the subretinal space into the retina and the glial cell response of the host retina. Detachment caused by the transplantation method was persistent up to 4 days after transplantation, and then reattachment occurred. The grafted cells were shown to migrate in between the photoreceptor cells before entering into the plexiform layers. Molecules involved in migration of immature neuronal cells as the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and the collapsing response-mediated protein 4 (TUC-4) was found in the plexiform layers of the host retina, but not in the grafted cells. The expression of the intermediate filaments GFAP, vimentin, and nestin was intensely upregulated immediately after transplantation. A less pronounced upregulation was observed on sham-operated animals. In summary, the RN33B cell line migrated promptly posttransplantation and settled preferably into the plexiform layers of the retina, the same layers where the migration cues PSA-NCAM and TUC-4 were established. In addition, both the transplantation method per se and the implanted cells caused an intense glial cell response by the host retina.

  1. Acoustics of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated how different instructions for eliciting clear speech affected selected acoustic measures of speech. Method: Twelve speakers were audio-recorded reading 18 different sentences from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1984). Sentences were produced in habitual, clear,…

  2. Constructing a Clear Path to Accomplished Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill Harrison

    2010-01-01

    Given the importance of quality teaching for student success, it is clear that every child needs to be able to receive instruction from a teacher who possesses the knowledge and skills for quality teaching--an accomplished teacher. It is less clear, however, how current teacher development policies and practices can ensure that all students will…

  3. Acoustics of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated how different instructions for eliciting clear speech affected selected acoustic measures of speech. Method: Twelve speakers were audio-recorded reading 18 different sentences from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1984). Sentences were produced in habitual, clear,…

  4. Intelligibility of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how clear speech instructions influence sentence intelligibility. Method: Twelve speakers produced sentences in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. Stimuli were amplitude normalized and mixed with multitalker babble for orthographic transcription by 40 listeners. The main analysis…

  5. Chemical Literature Exercises and Resources (CLEAR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostettler, John D.; And Others

    These materials were developed to make the structure and use of the chemical literature clear to chemistry students and to help them become independent and intelligent users of the library. The design of Chemical Literature Exercises and Resources (CLEAR) includes a users' note and five main parts: introduction to chemical literature, chemical…

  6. Intelligibility of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how clear speech instructions influence sentence intelligibility. Method: Twelve speakers produced sentences in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. Stimuli were amplitude normalized and mixed with multitalker babble for orthographic transcription by 40 listeners. The main analysis…

  7. Regulation of intestinal epithelial cells transcriptome by enteric glial cells: impact on intestinal epithelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Mahé, Maxime M; Teusan, Raluca; Léger, Jean; Guisle, Isabelle; Houlgatte, Rémi; Neunlist, Michel

    2009-11-02

    Emerging evidences suggest that enteric glial cells (EGC), a major constituent of the enteric nervous system (ENS), are key regulators of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) functions. Indeed EGC inhibit intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) proliferation and increase IEB paracellular permeability. However, the role of EGC on other important barrier functions and the signalling pathways involved in their effects are currently unknown. To achieve this goal, we aimed at identifying the impact of EGC upon IEC transcriptome by performing microarray studies. EGC induced significant changes in gene expression profiling of proliferating IEC after 24 hours of co-culture. 116 genes were identified as differentially expressed (70 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated) in IEC cultured with EGC compared to IEC cultured alone. By performing functional analysis of the 116 identified genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, we showed that EGC induced a significant regulation of genes favoring both cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix adhesion as well as cell differentiation. Consistently, functional studies showed that EGC induced a significant increase in cell adhesion. EGC also regulated genes involved in cell motility towards an enhancement of cell motility. In addition, EGC profoundly modulated expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and cell survival, although no clear functional trend could be identified. Finally, important genes involved in lipid and protein metabolism of epithelial cells were shown to be differentially regulated by EGC. This study reinforces the emerging concept that EGC have major protective effects upon the IEB. EGC have a profound impact upon IEC transcriptome and induce a shift in IEC phenotype towards increased cell adhesion and cell differentiation. This concept needs to be further validated under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Unusual clear cell variant of epithelioid mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Dessy, E; Falleni, M; Braidotti, P; Del Curto, B; Panigalli, T; Pietra, G G

    2001-12-01

    Clear cell mesothelioma is an extremely rare neoplasm of the pleura, which can easily be mistaken for a metastasis of clear cell carcinoma to the pleura. We report here the histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural aspects of a new case of clear cell pleural mesothelioma in a 52-year-old man with no known asbestos exposure. He was admitted to the hospital for recurrent pleural effusion, which was negative for neoplastic cells at the cytologic examination. A partial decortication of the right pleura was performed. The morphologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features reported for this case are consistent with the diagnosis of clear cell mesothelioma. The differential diagnosis and immunohistochemical features in comparison with other clear cell neoplasms are discussed.

  9. 17 CFR 39.4 - Procedures for implementing derivatives clearing organization rules and clearing new products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... clearing a new product that is not traded on a designated contract market or a registered derivatives... derivatives clearing organization rules and clearing new products. 39.4 Section 39.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DERIVATIVES CLEARING ORGANIZATIONS § 39.4 Procedures for...

  10. Myelinogenic Plasticity of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells following Spinal Cord Contusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Assinck, Peggy; Duncan, Greg J; Plemel, Jason R; Lee, Michael J; Stratton, Jo A; Manesh, Sohrab B; Liu, Jie; Ramer, Leanne M; Kang, Shin H; Bergles, Dwight E; Biernaskie, Jeff; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2017-09-06

    Spontaneous remyelination occurs after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the extent of myelin repair and identity of the cells responsible remain incompletely understood and contentious. We assessed the cellular origin of new myelin by fate mapping platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), Olig2+, and P0+ cells following contusion SCI in mice. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs; PDGFRα+) produced oligodendrocytes responsible for de novo ensheathment of ∼30% of myelinated spinal axons at injury epicenter 3 months after SCI, demonstrating that these resident cells are a major contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration. OPCs also produced the majority of myelinating Schwann cells in the injured spinal cord; invasion of peripheral myelinating (P0+) Schwann cells made only a limited contribution. These findings reveal that PDGFRα+ cells perform diverse roles in CNS repair, as multipotential progenitors that generate both classes of myelinating cells. This endogenous repair might be exploited as a therapeutic target for CNS trauma and disease.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to profound functional deficits, though substantial numbers of axons often survive. One possible explanation for these deficits is loss of myelin, creating conduction block at the site of injury. SCI leads to oligodendrocyte death and demyelination, and clinical trials have tested glial transplants to promote myelin repair. However, the degree and duration of myelin loss, and the extent and mechanisms of endogenous repair, have been contentious issues. Here, we use genetic fate mapping to demonstrate that spontaneous myelin repair by endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors is much more robust than previously recognized. These findings are relevant to many types of CNS pathology, raising the possibility that CNS precursors could be manipulated to repair myelin in lieu of glial transplantation. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/378635-20$15.00/0.

  11. CD44-positive cells are candidates for astrocyte precursor cells in developing mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Okano-Uchida, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-03-01

    Neural stem cells are generally considered to be committed to becoming precursor cells before terminally differentiating into either neurons or glial cells during neural development. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte precursor cells have been identified in several areas in the murine central nervous system. The presence of astrocyte precursor cells (APCs) is not so well understood. The present study provides several lines of evidence that CD44-positive cells are APCs in the early postnatal mouse cerebellum. In developing mouse cerebellum, CD44-positive cells, mostly located in the white matter, were positive for the markers of the astrocyte lineage, but negative for the markers of mature astrocytes. CD44-positive cells were purified from postnatal cerebellum by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and characterized in vitro. In the absence of any signaling molecule, many cells died by apoptosis. The surviving cells gradually expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for mature astrocytes, indicating that differentiation into mature astrocytes is the default program for these cells. The cells produced no neurospheres nor neurons nor oligodendrocytes under any condition examined, indicating these cells are not neural stem cells. Leukemia inhibitory factor greatly promoted astrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive cells, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) did not. Fibroblast growth factor-2 was a potent mitogen for these cells, but was insufficient for survival. BMP4 inhibited activation of caspase-3 and greatly promoted survival, suggesting a novel role for BMP4 in the control of development of astrocytes in cerebellum. We isolated and characterized only CD44 strongly positive large cells and discarded small and/or CD44 weakly positive cells in this study. Further studies are necessary to characterize these cells to help determine whether CD44 is a selective and specific marker for APCs in the developing mouse cerebellum. In conclusion, we succeeded in

  12. Case of clear cell ependymoma of medulla oblongata: clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study with literature review.

    PubMed

    Amatya, Vishwa Jeet; Takeshima, Yukio; Kaneko, Mayumi; Nakano, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru; Nakazato, Yoichi; Inai, Kouki

    2003-05-01

    Clear cell ependymoma has been included in the WHO classification of the central nervous system in 1993, after the first report by Kawano et al. Since then, only a few cases have been reported. Most clear cell ependymoma cases reported in the literature so far were located in the supra-tentorial compartment and/or cerebellum, and one case was in the cervical spinal cord. We report a case of clear cell ependymoma whose histological features were sufficient for the diagnosis and was unusually located in the fourth ventricle originating from the medulla oblongata. The tumor showed uniform tumor cells with perinuclear halo, nuclei being centrally located. Most of the tumor cells were arranged as perivascular pseudorosettes, and no ependymal canals or rosettes were evident. Mitotic figures were not frequent. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were strongly reactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin, and weak and dot-like positive for epithelial membrane antigen. Clear cell change of the tumor cells appeared to be fixation artifact because this feature was not evident in the frozen section.

  13. Glial reactivity after antipsychotic treatment. An experimental study in rats and its implications for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Blázquez Arroyo, J L; Fraile Malmierca, E; Casadiego Cubides, A; Llorca Ramón, G; Ledesma Jimeno, A

    2010-01-01

    The importance of the glial cells in the function of the nervous system and in its pathology has been the object of multiple studies in the last years. Specifically, their role in the action of the antipsychotics is debated. Our study has analyzed glial reactivity in rats treated with antipsychotics. In a first ultrastructural study of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, the animals were treated with chlorpromazine for 40 days, and were sacrificed at the end of the treatment, after 20 days of rest without treatment. In another series of studies, with the light microscope and immunohistochemistry we evaluated the immunoreactivity of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in six regions of the central nervous system of rats treated with typical and atypical antipsychotics. With the electron microscope, the animals treated with chlorpromazine showed a significant reduction of the axosomatic synapses on the neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and an increase of glial presence, as noted by the greater amount of astrocyte processes. The mentioned modifications were reversible, tending to normalize in a group of animals sacrificed 20 days after completion of the treatment. In the immunohistochemical study, the glial reaction was important in the territory of the nucleus accumbens with all the antipsychotics, moderate in the cingulate cortex, although only with atypical antipsychotics, and scarcely significant in the rest of the regions. Our results confirm that the glial cells are targets of the antipsychotic action, and this will allow us to better understand the action of these drugs and the role of the glial cells in the normal function of the nervous system and in the mental disease.

  14. Impaired dental cytodifferentiation in glial cell-line derived growth factor (GDNF) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, J C; Cabo, R; Ciriaco, E; Laurà, R; Naves, F J; Silos-Santiago, I; Vega, J A

    2002-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes the survival of multiple neuron types in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, it plays a key role in the development of the enteric nervous system and in the kidney organogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and their receptors are expressed in the developing tooth as well as in the trigeminal ganglion. However, the precise role of this growth factor in tooth morphogenesis and cell differentiation, or in the development of trigeminal ganglion cells, is still elusive. Using structural and ultrastructural techniques we analyzed in detail the first molar tooth germ of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor deficient mice as well as the neuronal density in trigeminal ganglion. The length and width of first molar tooth germ in knockout deficient animals showed no differences in the knockout animals in comparison with age-matched heterozygous or wild-type littermates. Nevertheless, in mice lacking glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, both ameloblasts and odontoblasts failed to fully develop and differentiate, and the enamel matrix and predentin layers were absent. On the other hand, the number of trigeminal sensory neurons and the structure of the nerves supplying first molar tooth germ were largely normal. Present results suggest a new non-neuronal role for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in tooth development. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor seems not to be involved in tooth initiation and morphogenesis, whereas it seems essential for cytodifferentiation. Conversely, neither development of trigeminal neuron nor nerve fibers supplying teeth are directly dependent on glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor.

  15. Purinergic receptor activation inhibits osmotic glial cell swelling in the diabetic rat retina.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Antje; Iandiev, Ianors; Hollborn, Margrit; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zimmermann, Herbert; Bringmann, Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, triamcinolone acetonide, is used clinically for the rapid resolution of diabetic macular edema. Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. Triamcinolone inhibits the swelling of retinal glial cells of diabetic rats. Here, we determined whether the effect of triamcinolone is mediated by a receptor-dependent mechanism. Hyperglycemia was induced in rats with streptozotocin injection. After 6-10 months, the swelling properties of glial cells in retinal slices upon hypotonic challenge were determined. Nucleotide-degrading ecto-enzymes were immunostained in retinal slices and glial cells. Hypotonic challenge did not change the size of glial cell bodies from control retinas but induced swelling of cells from diabetic animals. Triamcinolone inhibited glial cell swelling; this effect was prevented by a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters, inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A activation, and inhibitors of potassium and chloride channels. In diabetic (but not control) retinas, the effect of triamcinolone apparently involves extracellular nucleotide degradation. Glial cells from diabetic retinas displayed immunolabeling against nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) which was not observed in control retinas. The mRNA expression for NTPDase1 was significantly increased in the retina of diabetic rats. It is suggested that triamcinolone induces the release and formation of endogenous adenosine that subsequently activates A1 receptors resulting in ion efflux through potassium and chloride channels and prevention of osmotic swelling. Whereas adenosine is liberated via facilitated transport in control retinas, an extracellular formation of adenosine contributes to the effect of triamcinolone in diabetic retinas.

  16. Single-channel and whole-cell recordings from on-neurone glial cells in Helix pomatia ganglia.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Jacquet, G; Chagneux, H; Gola, M

    1993-11-01

    A procedure is described for performing patch-clamp recordings on satellite glial cells kept in place within the nervous ganglia in the mollusc Helix. Glial cell properties were deduced from whole-cell and cell-attached recordings. The glial membrane was found to contain densely packed inwardly rectifying K+ channels. Activation of the neurones, under either current-clamp or voltage-clamp conditions, depolarized the glial cell layer wrapped around the neurones and induced a delayed persistent increase in the K+ channel opening probability. These results suggest that the glial channels opened in response to a signal emanating from the active neurones. This preparation provides a useful means of detecting and analysing neurone-glial interactions at the cell and unitary channel levels.

  17. Intelligibility of clear speech: effect of instruction.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2013-10-01

    The authors investigated how clear speech instructions influence sentence intelligibility. Twelve speakers produced sentences in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. Stimuli were amplitude normalized and mixed with multitalker babble for orthographic transcription by 40 listeners. The main analysis investigated percentage-correct intelligibility scores as a function of the 4 conditions and speaker sex. Additional analyses included listener response variability, individual speaker trends, and an alternate intelligibility measure: proportion of content words correct. Relative to the habitual condition, the overenunciate condition was associated with the greatest intelligibility benefit, followed by the hearing impaired and clear conditions. Ten speakers followed this trend. The results indicated different patterns of clear speech benefit for male and female speakers. Greater listener variability was observed for speakers with inherently low habitual intelligibility compared to speakers with inherently high habitual intelligibility. Stable proportions of content words were observed across conditions. Clear speech instructions affected the magnitude of the intelligibility benefit. The instruction to overenunciate may be most effective in clear speech training programs. The findings may help explain the range of clear speech intelligibility benefit previously reported. Listener variability analyses suggested the importance of obtaining multiple listener judgments of intelligibility, especially for speakers with inherently low habitual intelligibility.

  18. Intelligibility of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The authors investigated how clear speech instructions influence sentence intelligibility. Method Twelve speakers produced sentences in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. Stimuli were amplitude normalized and mixed with multitalker babble for orthographic transcription by 40 listeners. The main analysis investigated percentage-correct intelligibility scores as a function of the 4 conditions and speaker sex. Additional analyses included listener response variability, individual speaker trends, and an alternate intelligibility measure: proportion of content words correct. Results Relative to the habitual condition, the overenunciate condition was associated with the greatest intelligibility benefit, followed by the hearing impaired and clear conditions. Ten speakers followed this trend. The results indicated different patterns of clear speech benefit for male and female speakers. Greater listener variability was observed for speakers with inherently low habitual intelligibility compared to speakers with inherently high habitual intelligibility. Stable proportions of content words were observed across conditions. Conclusions Clear speech instructions affected the magnitude of the intelligibility benefit. The instruction to overenunciate may be most effective in clear speech training programs. The findings may help explain the range of clear speech intelligibility benefit previously reported. Listener variability analyses suggested the importance of obtaining multiple listener judgments of intelligibility, especially for speakers with inherently low habitual intelligibility. PMID:23798509

  19. Acoustics of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated how different instructions for eliciting clear speech affected selected acoustic measures of speech. Method Twelve speakers were audio-recorded reading 18 different sentences from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1984). Sentences were produced in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. A variety of acoustic measures were obtained. Results Relative to habitual, the clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions were associated with different magnitudes of acoustic change for measures of vowel production, speech timing, and vocal intensity. The overenunciate condition tended to yield the greatest magnitude of change in vowel spectral measures and speech timing, followed by the hearing impaired and clear conditions. SPL tended to be the greatest in the hearing impaired condition for half of the speakers studied. Conclusions Different instructions for eliciting clear speech yielded acoustic adjustments of varying magnitude. Results have implications for direct comparison of studies using different instructions for eliciting clear speech. Results also have implications for optimizing clear speech training programs. PMID:22411282

  20. 17 CFR 256.184 - Clearing accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR MUTUAL SERVICE COMPANIES AND SUBSIDIARY SERVICE COMPANIES, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 4. Deferred Debits § 256.184 Clearing accounts. This account shall include...

  1. 17 CFR 256.184 - Clearing accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR MUTUAL SERVICE COMPANIES AND SUBSIDIARY SERVICE COMPANIES, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 4. Deferred Debits § 256.184 Clearing accounts. This account shall include...

  2. Flowmeter for Clear and Translucent Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Transducer with only three moving parts senses flow of clear or translucent fluid. Displacement of diaphragm by force of flow detected electrooptically and displayed by panel meter or other device. Transducer used to measure flow of gasoline to automobile engine.

  3. Flowmeter for Clear and Translucent Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Transducer with only three moving parts senses flow of clear or translucent fluid. Displacement of diaphragm by force of flow detected electrooptically and displayed by panel meter or other device. Transducer used to measure flow of gasoline to automobile engine.

  4. 17 CFR 20.3 - Clearing organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...; (13) Gross long non-delta-adjusted swaption positions; and (14) Gross short non-delta-adjusted... organizations shall report end of reporting day settlement prices for each cleared product and deltas for...

  5. 17 CFR 20.3 - Clearing organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; (13) Gross long non-delta-adjusted swaption positions; and (14) Gross short non-delta-adjusted... organizations shall report end of reporting day settlement prices for each cleared product and deltas for...

  6. Clear Corneal Incision in Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al Mahmood, Ammar M.; Al-Swailem, Samar A.; Behrens, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of sutureless clear corneal cataract incisions, the procedure has gained increasing popularity worldwide because it offers several advantages over the traditional sutured scleral tunnels and limbal incisions. Some of these benefits include lack of conjunctival trauma, less discomfort and bleeding, absence of suture-induced astigmatism, and faster visual rehabilitation. However, an increasing incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis after clear corneal cataract surgery has been reported. Different authors have shown a significant increase up to 15-fold in the incidence of endophthalmitis following clear corneal incision compared to scleral tunnels. The aim of this report is to review the advantages and disadvantages of clear corneal incisions in cataract surgery, emphasizing on wound construction recommendations based on published literature. PMID:24669142

  7. Neuronal-glial interactions in rats fed a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Melø, Torun Margareta; Nehlig, Astrid; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    Glucose is the preferred energy substrate for the adult brain. However, during periods of fasting and consumption of a high fat, low carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet, ketone bodies become major brain fuels. The present study was conducted to investigate how the ketogenic diet influences neuronal-glial interactions in amino acid neurotransmitter metabolism. Rats were kept on a standard or ketogenic diet. After 21 days all animals received an injection of [1-(13)C]glucose plus [1,2-(13)C]acetate, the preferential substrates of neurons and astrocytes, respectively. Extracts from cerebral cortex and plasma were analyzed by (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and HPLC. Increased amounts of valine, leucine and isoleucine and a decreased amount of glutamate were found in the brains of rats receiving the ketogenic diet. Glycolysis was decreased in ketotic rats compared with controls, evidenced by the reduced amounts of [3-(13)C]alanine and [3-(13)C]lactate. Additionally, neuronal oxidative metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose was decreased in ketotic rats compared with controls, since amounts of [4-(13)C]glutamate and [4-(13)C]glutamine were lower than those of controls. Although the amount of glutamate from [1-(13)C]glucose was decreased, this was not the case for GABA, indicating that relatively more [4-(13)C]glutamate is converted to GABA. Astrocytic metabolism was increased in response to ketosis, shown by increased amounts of [4,5-(13)C]glutamine, [4,5-(13)C]glutamate, [1,2-(13)C]GABA and [3,4-(13)C]-/[1,2-(13)C]aspartate derived from [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The pyruvate carboxylation over dehydrogenation ratio for glutamine was increased in the ketotic animals compared to controls, giving further indication of increased astrocytic metabolism. Interestingly, pyruvate recycling was higher in glutamine than in glutamate in both groups of animals. An increase in this pathway was detected in glutamate in response to ketosis. The decreased glycolysis and oxidative

  8. The Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursor.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Constantinides, Michael G; Gudjonson, Herman; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-05-20

    The discovery of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cell populations effecting different forms of type 1, 2, and 3 immunity; tissue repair; and immune regulation has transformed our understanding of mucosal immunity and allergy. The emerging complexity of these populations along with compounding issues of redundancy and plasticity raise intriguing questions about their precise lineage relationship. Here we review advances in mapping the emergence of these lineages from early lymphoid precursors. We discuss the identification of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor characterized by transient expression of the transcription factor PLZF, and the lineage relationships of innate lymphoid cells with conventional natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. We also review the rapidly growing understanding of the network of transcription factors that direct the development of these lineages.

  9. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  10. Clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rabade, Nikhil R; Goel, Naina A

    2014-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common epithelial neoplasm of lacrimal gland. A clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma arising in the background of pleomorphic adenoma is common in the salivary glands but very rare in the lacrimal glands. We report the case of a 27 year old man whose lacrimal gland pleomorphic adenoma recurred several times over a period of four years and ultimately evolved into a clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma.

  11. Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    goal of producing a processible form of the conducting polymer polyaniline ( PANI ), the Phase I program concentrated on development of the synthesis of... polyaniline , on the other hand, has not only been successful in every respect, but makes other attempts towards processing PAni seem awkward and obsolete...29/92 TITLE AND SUBTITLE .... 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines 6. AUTHOR(S) - 63218C 1602 0O Dr Floyd L. Klavetter 7

  12. Vapor pressure of germanium precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangrác, J.; Fulem, M.; Hulicius, E.; Melichar, K.; Šimeček, T.; Růžička, K.; Morávek, P.; Růžička, V.; Rushworth, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    The vapor pressure of two germanium precursors tetrakis(methoxy)germanium (Ge(OCH 3) 4, CASRN 992-91-6) and tetrakis(ethoxy)germanium (Ge(OC 2H 5) 4, CASRN 14165-55-0) was determined using a static method in the temperature range 259-303 K. The experimental vapor pressure data were fit with the Antoine equation. The mass spectra before and after degassing by vacuum distillation at low temperature are also reported and discussed.

  13. CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ruess, Roger W.; Feller, Ilka C.

    2011-01-01

    Background CO2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured CO2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO2 efflux. CO2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10 600 tonnes km−2 year−1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km2 year−1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO2 efflux (27 umol m−2 s−1), but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. Conclusions/Significance Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks. PMID:21738628

  14. Skin optical clearing potential of disaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Shi, Rui; Ma, Ning; Tuchina, Daria K.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zhu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Skin optical clearing can significantly enhance the ability of biomedical optical imaging. Some alcohols and sugars have been selected to be optical clearing agents (OCAs). In this work, we paid attention to the optical clearing potential of disaccharides. Sucrose and maltose were chosen as typical disaccharides to compare with fructose, an excellent monosaccharide-OCA, by using molecular dynamics simulation and an ex vivo experiment. The experimental results indicated that the optical clearing efficacy of skin increases linearly with the concentration for each OCA. Both the theoretical predication and experimental results revealed that the two disaccharides exerted a better optical clearing potential than fructose at the same concentration, and sucrose is optimal. Since maltose has an extremely low saturation concentration, the other two OCAs with saturation concentrations were treated topically on rat skin in vivo, and optical coherence tomography imaging was applied to monitor the optical clearing process. The results demonstrated that sucrose could cause a more significant increase in imaging depth and signal intensity than fructose.

  15. Megacolon in Chagas disease: a study of inflammatory cells, enteric nerves, and glial cells.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Alexandre Barcelos Morais; Lemos, Elenice M; Adad, Sheila J; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Furness, John B; D'Avila Reis, Débora

    2007-08-01

    After acute infestation with the Chagas disease parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, some patients who are serologically positive develop chronic megacolon and megaesophagus, whereas others are symptom-free. Chagas disease with gastrointestinal involvement involves an inflammatory invasion of the enteric plexuses and degeneration of enteric neurons. It is known that glial cells can be involved in enteric inflammatory responses. The aims were to determine the nature of any difference in lymphocytic invasion, enteric neurons, and enteric glial cells in seropositive individuals with and without megacolon. We have compared colonic tissue from serologically positive individuals with and without symptoms and from seronegative controls. Subjects with megacolon had significantly more CD-57 natural killer cells and TIA-1 cytotoxic lymphocytes within enteric ganglia, but numbers of CD-3 and CD-20 immunoreactive cells were not significantly elevated. The innervation of the muscle was substantially reduced to about 20% in megacolon, but asymptomatic seropositive subjects were not different to seronegative controls. Glial cell loss occurred equally in symptomatic and unaffected seropositive subjects, although the proportion with glial fibrillary acidic protein was greater in seropositive, nonsymptomatic subjects. Development of megacolon after acute infection with T cruzi is associated with maintained invasion of enteric ganglia with cytotoxic T cells and loss of muscle innervation, but changes in glial cell numbers are not associated with progression of enteric neuropathy.

  16. Plasticity of Neuron-Glial Transmission: Equipping Glia for Long-Term Integration of Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Croft, Wayne; Dobson, Katharine L; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of synaptic networks to express activity-dependent changes in strength and connectivity is essential for learning and memory processes. In recent years, glial cells (most notably astrocytes) have been recognized as active participants in the modulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, implicating these electrically nonexcitable cells in information processing in the brain. While the concept of bidirectional communication between neurons and glia and the mechanisms by which gliotransmission can modulate neuronal function are well established, less attention has been focussed on the computational potential of neuron-glial transmission itself. In particular, whether neuron-glial transmission is itself subject to activity-dependent plasticity and what the computational properties of such plasticity might be has not been explored in detail. In this review, we summarize current examples of plasticity in neuron-glial transmission, in many brain regions and neurotransmitter pathways. We argue that induction of glial plasticity typically requires repetitive neuronal firing over long time periods (minutes-hours) rather than the short-lived, stereotyped trigger typical of canonical long-term potentiation. We speculate that this equips glia with a mechanism for monitoring average firing rates in the synaptic network, which is suited to the longer term roles proposed for astrocytes in neurophysiology.

  17. Osmotic swelling characteristics of glial cells in the murine hippocampus, cerebellum, and retina in situ.

    PubMed

    Hirrlinger, Petra G; Wurm, Antje; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Bringmann, Andreas; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Glial cells are proposed to play a major role in the ionic and osmotic homeostasis in the CNS. Swelling of glial cells contributes to the development of edema in neural tissue under pathological conditions such as trauma and ischemia. In this study, we compared the osmotic swelling characteristics of murine hippocampal astrocytes, cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, and retinal Müller glial cells in acutely isolated tissue slices in response to hypoosmotic stress and pharmacological blockade of Kir channels. Hypoosmotic challenge induced an immediate swelling of somata in the majority of Bergmann glial cells and hippocampal astrocytes investigated, whereas Müller cell bodies displayed a substantial delay in the onset of swelling and hippocampal astroglial processes remained unaffected. Blockade of Kir channels under isoosmotic conditions had no swelling-inducing effect in Müller cell somata but caused a swelling in brain astrocytic somata and processes. Blockade of Kir channels under hypoosmotic conditions induced an immediate and strong swelling in Müller cell somata, but had no cumulative effect to brain astroglial somata. No regulatory volume decrease could be observed in all cell types. The data suggest that Kir channels are differently implicated in cell volume homeostasis of retinal Müller cells and brain astrocytes and that Müller cells and brain astrocytes differ in their osmotic swelling properties.

  18. Effect of minocycline on induced glial activation by experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Toru; Adachi, Rie; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Fields, Henry W; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement causes pain to a patient. Glial cells are nonneuronal cells in the central nervous system and are implicated in various types of pain. In this study, we assessed glial activation responses after experimental tooth movement using immunocytochemical detection of anti-CD11b (OX42) and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity to illustrate the microglial and astrocytes response, respectively. In addition, the effect of minocycline in reducing pain during tooth movement was also investigated. Fifty-five Sprague Dawley rats with and without administration of minocycline after 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days (n = 5, for each) of tooth movement were used. Immunohistochemistry for microglia (OX42) and astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein) were performed at the medullary dorsal horn (trigeminal subnucleus caudalis). Three-dimensional quantitative analysis was performed with a confocal fluorescence microscope and a software program. There was a significant increase in the OX42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in response to tooth movement in the medullary dorsal horn. Furthermore, systematic administration of minocycline, a selective inhibitor of microglial activation, significantly attenuated the nociceptive c-Fos expression in the medullary dorsal horn that was induced by experimental tooth movement. These data indicate the possible importance of microglial activation in the development of orthodontic pain. This is also the first report on the systematic application of minocycline. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Glial architecture of the ghost shark (Callorhinchus milii, Holocephali, Chondrichthyes) as revealed by different immunohistochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Ari, Csilla; Kálmán, Mihály

    2008-09-15

    This article presents the first study on the glial architecture of a representative species of Holocephali, Callorhinchus milii (ghost shark). Holocephali are a small subclass of Chondrichthyes, with only a few extant genera, and those are considered to have a brain organization more similar to squalomorph sharks than to galeomorph sharks, skates, and rays. Three different astroglial markers--glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100 protein, and glutamine synthetase (GS)--were investigated by immunohistochemical methods, applying both diaminobenzidine (DAB) and fluorescent techniques. They revealed similar glial structures, although most of them were detected by immunohistochemical reaction against GS and visualized by DAB. The predominant elements were radial ependymoglia spanning the area between the ventricular and meningeal surfaces, as in squalomorph sharks. Other similar features were the light appearance of myelinated neural tracts devoid of immunoreactivity, and the glial architecture of the reticular formation of the brain stem, cerebellum, and tectum, the latter with recognizable layers. The immunoreactivity of the vascular walls was similar; however, it is believed that different cell types form the blood-brain barrier in chimeras and in elasmobranchs. Some glial structures, however, resembled those of skates, rays, and galeomorph sharks. In C. milii astrocyte-like elements were observed in the telencephalon, using GS and S-100, although typical astrocyte-rich regions were not found. In some areas, especially the telencephalon, not only endfeet but also cell bodies were observed to be attached to the meningeal surface, with processes extending into the brain substance.

  20. A transcriptional network controlling glial development in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Bauke, Ann-Christin; Sasse, Sofia; Matzat, Till; Klämbt, Christian

    2015-06-15

    In the nervous system, glial cells need to be specified from a set of progenitor cells. In the developing Drosophila eye, perineurial glia proliferate and differentiate as wrapping glia in response to a neuronal signal conveyed by the FGF receptor pathway. To unravel the underlying transcriptional network we silenced all genes encoding predicted DNA-binding proteins in glial cells using RNAi. Dref and other factors of the TATA box-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2) complex were previously predicted to be involved in cellular metabolism and cell growth. Silencing of these genes impaired early glia proliferation and subsequent differentiation. Dref controls proliferation via activation of the Pdm3 transcription factor, whereas glial differentiation is regulated via Dref and the homeodomain protein Cut. Cut expression is controlled independently of Dref by FGF receptor activity. Loss- and gain-of-function studies show that Cut is required for glial differentiation and is sufficient to instruct the formation of membrane protrusions, a hallmark of wrapping glial morphology. Our work discloses a network of transcriptional regulators controlling the progression of a naïve perineurial glia towards the fully differentiated wrapping glia.

  1. Glial cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M.; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M.; Pavan, William J.; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers1. ILC3 development has been considered to be programmed1. Nevertheless, how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a novel glial-ILC3-epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate II22, downstream of p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Strikingly, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic factor expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88 dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired ILC3-derived IL-22 and pronounced propensity to gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light into a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing glial cells as central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation via neurotrophic factor signals. PMID:27409807

  2. Plasticity of Neuron-Glial Transmission: Equipping Glia for Long-Term Integration of Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Wayne; Dobson, Katharine L.; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of synaptic networks to express activity-dependent changes in strength and connectivity is essential for learning and memory processes. In recent years, glial cells (most notably astrocytes) have been recognized as active participants in the modulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, implicating these electrically nonexcitable cells in information processing in the brain. While the concept of bidirectional communication between neurons and glia and the mechanisms by which gliotransmission can modulate neuronal function are well established, less attention has been focussed on the computational potential of neuron-glial transmission itself. In particular, whether neuron-glial transmission is itself subject to activity-dependent plasticity and what the computational properties of such plasticity might be has not been explored in detail. In this review, we summarize current examples of plasticity in neuron-glial transmission, in many brain regions and neurotransmitter pathways. We argue that induction of glial plasticity typically requires repetitive neuronal firing over long time periods (minutes-hours) rather than the short-lived, stereotyped trigger typical of canonical long-term potentiation. We speculate that this equips glia with a mechanism for monitoring average firing rates in the synaptic network, which is suited to the longer term roles proposed for astrocytes in neurophysiology. PMID:26339509

  3. Signaling molecules regulating phenotypic conversions of astrocytes and glial scar formation in damaged nerve tissues.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Phenotypic conversion of astrocytes from resting to reactive (i.e., astrocytic activation) occurs in numerous brain disorders. Astrocytic activation in severely damaged brain regions often leads to glial scar formation. Because astrocytic activation and glial scar largely affect the vulnerability and tissue repair of damaged brain, numerous studies have been made to clarify mechanisms regulating the astrocytic phenotype. The phenotypic conversion is accompanied by the increased expression of intermediate filament proteins and the induction of hypertrophy in reactive astrocytes. Severe brain damage results in proliferation and migration of reactive astrocytes, which lead to glial scar formations at the injured areas. Gliogenesis from neural progenitors in the adult brain is also involved in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. Recent studies have shown that increased expression of connexin 43, aquaporin 4, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and integrins alter the function of astrocytes. The transcription factors: STAT3, OLIG2, SMAD, NF-κB, and Sp1 have been suggested to play regulatory roles in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. In this review, I discuss the roles of these key molecules regulating the pathophysiological functions of reactive astrocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Accounting for nonmonotonic precursor duration effects with gain reduction in the temporal window modela

    PubMed Central

    Roverud, Elin; Strickland, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of forward masking are not clearly understood. The temporal window model (TWM) proposes that masking occurs via a neural mechanism that integrates within a temporal window. The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR), a sound-evoked reflex that reduces cochlear amplifier gain, may also contribute to forward masking if the preceding sound reduces gain for the signal. Psychophysical evidence of gain reduction can be observed using a growth of masking (GOM) paradigm with an off-frequency forward masker and a precursor. The basilar membrane input/output (I/O) function is estimated from the GOM function, and the I/O function gain is reduced by the precursor. In this study, the effect of precursor duration on this gain reduction effect was examined for on- and off-frequency precursors. With on-frequency precursors, thresholds increased with increasing precursor duration, then decreased (rolled over) for longer durations. Thresholds with off-frequency precursors continued to increase with increasing precursor duration. These results are not consistent with solely neural masking, but may reflect gain reduction that selectively affects on-frequency stimuli. The TWM was modified to include history-dependent gain reduction to simulate the MOCR, called the temporal window model-gain reduction (TWM-GR). The TWM-GR predicted rollover and the differences with on- and off-frequency precursors whereas the TWM did not. PMID:24606271

  5. Nucleation precursors in protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Vorontsova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal nucleation is a central problem in biological crystallography and other areas of science, technology and medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that protein crystal nuclei form within crucial precursors. Here, methods of detection and characterization of the precursors are reviewed: dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and Brownian microscopy. Data for several proteins provided by these methods have demonstrated that the nucleation precursors are clusters consisting of protein-dense liquid, which are metastable with respect to the host protein solution. The clusters are several hundred nanometres in size, the cluster population occupies from 10−7 to 10−3 of the solution volume, and their properties in solutions supersaturated with respect to crystals are similar to those in homogeneous, i.e. undersaturated, solutions. The clusters exist owing to the conformation flexibility of the protein molecules, leading to exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and enhanced intermolecular binding. These results indicate that protein conformational flexibility might be the mechanism behind the metastable mesoscopic clusters and crystal nucleation. Investigations of the cluster properties are still in their infancy. Results on direct imaging of cluster behaviors and characterization of cluster mechanisms with a variety of proteins will soon lead to major breakthroughs in protein biophysics. PMID:24598910

  6. Diamond films grown from fullerene precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Zuiker, C.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1995-07-01

    Fullerene precursors have been shown to result in the growth of diamond films from argon microwave plasmas. In contradistinction to most diamond films grown using conventional methane-hydrogen mixtures, the fullerene-generated films are nanocrystalline and smooth on the nanometer scale. They have recently been shown to have friction coefficients approaching the values of natural diamond. It is clearly important to understand the development of surface morphology during film growth from fullerene precursors and to elucidate the factors leading to surface roughness when hydrogen is present in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) gas mixtures. To achieve these goals, we are measuring surface reflectivity of diamond films growing on silicon substrates over a wide range of plasma processing conditions. A model for the interpretation of the laser interferometric data has been developed, which allows one to determine film growth rate, rms surface roughness, and bulk losses due to scattering and absorption. The rms roughness values determined by reflectivity are in good agreement with atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. A number of techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and near-edge x-ray absorption find structure (NEXAFS) measurements, have been used to characterize the films. A mechanism for diamond-film growth involving the C{sub 2} molecule as a growth species will be presented. The mechanism is based on (1) the observation that the optical emission spectra of the fullerene- containing plasmas are dominated by the Swan bands of C{sub 2} and (2) the ability of C{sub 2} to insert directly into C-H and C-C bonds with low activation barriers, as shown by recent theoretical calculations of reactions of C{sub 2} with carbon clusters.

  7. 76 FR 47529 - Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance for Clearing; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 1, 23, and 39 RIN 3038-AD51 Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance... August 1, 2011, regarding Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance for Clearing....

  8. 17 CFR 39.4 - Procedures for implementing derivatives clearing organization rules and clearing new products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...,” only those rules that have been so approved. (b) Self-certification of rules. Proposed new or amended... of § 40.6 of this chapter. (c) Acceptance of new products for clearing. (1) A dormant derivatives...) Acceptance of certain new products for clearing. A derivatives clearing organization that accepts...

  9. Advancements in the Underlying Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia: Implications of DNA Methylation in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing-Shu; Huang, Nanxin; Michael, Namaka; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic and severe mental illness for which currently there is no cure. At present, the exact molecular mechanism involved in the underlying pathogenesis of SZ is unknown. The disease is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in SZ pathology. Specifically, DNA methylation, one of the earliest found epigenetic modifications, has been extensively linked to modulation of neuronal function, leading to psychiatric disorders such as SZ. However, increasing evidence indicates that glial cells, especially dysfunctional oligodendrocytes undergo DNA methylation changes that contribute to the pathogenesis of SZ. This review primarily focuses on DNA methylation involved in glial dysfunctions in SZ. Clarifying this mechanism may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventional strategies for the treatment of SZ and other illnesses by correcting abnormal methylation in glial cells. PMID:26696822

  10. Forebrain engraftment by human glial progenitor cells enhances synaptic plasticity and learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoning; Chen, Michael; Wang, Fushun; Windrem, Martha; Wang, Su; Shanz, Steven; Xu, Qiwu; Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Bekar, Lane; Betstadt, Sarah; Silva, Alcino J; Takano, Takahiro; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-03-07

    Human astrocytes are larger and more complex than those of infraprimate mammals, suggesting that their role in neural processing has expanded with evolution. To assess the cell-autonomous and species-selective properties of human glia, we engrafted human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient mice. Upon maturation, the recipient brains exhibited large numbers and high proportions of both human glial progenitors and astrocytes. The engrafted human glia were gap-junction-coupled to host astroglia, yet retained the size and pleomorphism of hominid astroglia, and propagated Ca2+ signals 3-fold faster than their hosts. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was sharply enhanced in the human glial chimeric mice, as was their learning, as assessed by Barnes maze navigation, object-location memory, and both contextual and tone fear conditioning. Mice allografted with murine GPCs showed no enhancement of either LTP or learning. These findings indicate that human glia differentially enhance both activity-dependent plasticity and learning in mice.

  11. The soft mechanical signature of glial scars in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Weber, Isabell P.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Koser, David E.; Soleman, Sara; Haenzi, Barbara; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.; Fawcett, James; Franze, Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) alters the molecular and cellular composition of neural tissue and leads to glial scarring, which inhibits the regrowth of damaged axons. Mammalian glial scars supposedly form a chemical and mechanical barrier to neuronal regeneration. While tremendous effort has been devoted to identifying molecular characteristics of the scar, very little is known about its mechanical properties. Here we characterize spatiotemporal changes of the elastic stiffness of the injured rat neocortex and spinal cord at 1.5 and three weeks post-injury using atomic force microscopy. In contrast to scars in other mammalian tissues, CNS tissue significantly softens after injury. Expression levels of glial intermediate filaments (GFAP, vimentin) and extracellular matrix components (laminin, collagen IV) correlate with tissue softening. As tissue stiffness is a regulator of neuronal growth, our results may help to understand why mammalian neurons do not regenerate after injury.

  12. The Neurosteroid Allopregnanolone Modulates Specific Functions in Central and Peripheral Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faroni, Alessandro; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Since the first observations on the existence of “neurosteroids” in the 1980s, our understanding of the importance of these endogenous steroids in the control of the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) has increased progressively. Although most of the observations were made in neuronal cells, equally important are the effects that neurosteroids exert on glial cells. Among the different classes of neurosteroids acting on glial cells, the progesterone 5α-3α metabolite, allopregnanolone, displays a particular mechanism of action involving primarily the modulation of classic GABA receptors. In this review, we focus our attention on allopregnanolone because its effects on the physiology of glial cells of the central and PNS are intriguing and could potentially lead to the development of new strategies for neuroprotection and/or regeneration of injured nervous tissues. PMID:22654838

  13. Detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilaments in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J Luis; Franco, Luis Manuel; Salinas, Eva

    2003-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an infection caused by Taenia solium larval metacestodes in the central nervous system. The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neurofilaments (NFs) can be used as markers of glial and neuronal damage, respectively. We studied the GFAP and NFs of 68, 160 and 200 kDa in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with NCC by Western blotting. Our results showed that patients with NCC had significantly elevated GFAP levels in the CSF compared with the control, whereas NFs of 68, 160 and 200 kDa were not detected in the CFS of NCC patients. We concluded that GFAP could be used as a marker of glial damage in the CFS of NCC patients.

  14. Opioid-dependent growth of glial cultures: Suppression of astrocyte DNA synthesis by met-enkephalin

    SciTech Connect

    Stiene-Martin, A.; Hauser, K.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The action of met-enkephalin on the growth of astrocytes in mixed-glial cultures was examined. Primary, mixed-glial cultures were isolated from 1 day-old mouse cerebral hemispheres and continuously treated with either basal growth media, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin plus the opioid antagonist naloxone, or naloxone alone. Absolute numbers of neural cells were counted in unstained preparations, while combined ({sup 3}H)-thymidine autoradiography and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunocytochemistry was performed to identify specific changes in astrocytes. When compared to control and naloxone treated cultures, met-enkephalin caused a significant decrease in both total cell numbers, and in ({sup 3}H)-thymidine incorporation by GFAP-positive cells with flat morphology. These results indicate that met-enkephalin suppresses astrocyte growth in culture.

  15. The soft mechanical signature of glial scars in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Weber, Isabell P.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Koser, David E.; Soleman, Sara; Haenzi, Barbara; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.; Fawcett, James; Franze, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) alters the molecular and cellular composition of neural tissue and leads to glial scarring, which inhibits the regrowth of damaged axons. Mammalian glial scars supposedly form a chemical and mechanical barrier to neuronal regeneration. While tremendous effort has been devoted to identifying molecular characteristics of the scar, very little is known about its mechanical properties. Here we characterize spatiotemporal changes of the elastic stiffness of the injured rat neocortex and spinal cord at 1.5 and three weeks post-injury using atomic force microscopy. In contrast to scars in other mammalian tissues, CNS tissue significantly softens after injury. Expression levels of glial intermediate filaments (GFAP, vimentin) and extracellular matrix components (laminin, collagen IV) correlate with tissue softening. As tissue stiffness is a regulator of neuronal growth, our results may help to understand why mammalian neurons do not regenerate after injury. PMID:28317912

  16. TNFa/TNFR2 signaling is required for glial ensheathment at the dorsal root entry zone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cody J; Wheeler, Michael A; Marjoram, Lindsay; Bagnat, Michel; Deppmann, Christopher D; Kucenas, Sarah

    2017-04-05

    Somatosensory information from the periphery is routed to the spinal cord through centrally-projecting sensory axons that cross into the central nervous system (CNS) via the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ). The glial cells that ensheath these axons ensure rapid propagation of this information. Despite the importance of this glial-axon arrangement, how this afferent nerve is assembled during development is unknown. Using in vivo, time-lapse imaging we show that as centrally-projecting pioneer axons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) enter the spinal cord, they initiate expression of the cytokine TNFalpha. This induction coincides with ensheathment of these axons by associated glia via a TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2)-mediated process. This work identifies a signaling cascade that mediates peripheral glial-axon interactions and it functions to ensure that DRG afferent projections are ensheathed after pioneer axons complete their navigation, which promotes efficient somatosensory neural function.

  17. The digestive neuronal-glial-epithelial unit: a new actor in gut health and disease.

    PubMed

    Neunlist, Michel; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Mahé, Maxime M; Derkinderen, Pascal; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne

    2013-02-01

    The monolayer of columnar epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract--the intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB)--is the largest exchange surface between the body and the external environment. The permeability of the IEB has a central role in the regulation of fluid and nutrient intake as well as in the control of the passage of pathogens. The functions of the IEB are highly regulated by luminal as well as internal components, such as bacteria or immune cells, respectively. Evidence indicates that two cell types of the enteric nervous system (ENS), namely enteric neurons and enteric glial cells, are potent modulators of IEB functions, giving rise to the novel concept of a digestive 'neuronal-glial-epithelial unit' akin to the neuronal-glial-endothelial unit in the brain. In this Review, we summarize findings demonstrating that the ENS is a key regulator of IEB function and is actively involved in pathologies associated with altered barrier function.

  18. TNFa/TNFR2 signaling is required for glial ensheathment at the dorsal root entry zone

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cody J.; Bagnat, Michel; Deppmann, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Somatosensory information from the periphery is routed to the spinal cord through centrally-projecting sensory axons that cross into the central nervous system (CNS) via the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ). The glial cells that ensheath these axons ensure rapid propagation of this information. Despite the importance of this glial-axon arrangement, how this afferent nerve is assembled during development is unknown. Using in vivo, time-lapse imaging we show that as centrally-projecting pioneer axons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) enter the spinal cord, they initiate expression of the cytokine TNFalpha. This induction coincides with ensheathment of these axons by associated glia via a TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2)-mediated process. This work identifies a signaling cascade that mediates peripheral glial-axon interactions and it functions to ensure that DRG afferent projections are ensheathed after pioneer axons complete their navigation, which promotes efficient somatosensory neural function. PMID:28379965

  19. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  20. Functional study of endothelin B receptors in satellite glial cells in trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Hanani, Menachem

    2011-07-13

    There is immunohistochemical evidence for endothelin (ET) receptors in satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia, but there is no information on the function of these receptors. We used calcium imaging to study this question in isolated mouse trigeminal ganglia and found that satellite glial cells are highly sensitive to ET-1, with threshold at 0.05 nM. Responses displayed strong desensitization at ET-1 concentrations of more than 1 nM. A large component of the response persisted when Ca was deleted from the external medium, consistent with Ca release from internal stores. The use of receptor selective agents showed that the responses were mediated by ETB receptors. We conclude that satellite glial cells display endothelin receptors, which may participate in neuron-glia communications in the trigeminal ganglia.

  1. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Owen, James E.

    2016-04-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ˜50 au implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called `thermal sweeping' mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scalelengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. This less efficient clearing of discs by X-ray driven thermal sweeping leaves open the issue of what mechanism (e.g. far-ultraviolet heating) can clear gas from the outer disc sufficiently quickly to explain the non-detection of cold gas around weak line T Tauri stars.

  2. Clear anterior rhinorrhea in the population.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kenneth; Rubinstein, Elaine; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2015-11-01

    Clear anterior rhinorrhea is commonly observed in older adults and is widely known as "senile rhinorrhea." Although appreciated in the literature, no studies support that clear rhinorrhea increases with age. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of clear rhinorrhea in adults and the variation between young and old. Additionally, we sought to determine if clear rhinorrhea was bothersome enough for patients to seek treatment. A questionnaire was randomly distributed to 158 adults, 76 young adults on the University of Pittsburgh Undergraduate campus, and 82 older adults at Longwood Retirement Community in 2011. Older subjects reported more drip and an increase in rhinorrhea over time regardless of gender (p < 0.05). Participants wanting to seek treatment reported drip occurred more often, that they used more tissues, and were more bothered by drip compared to those not wanting treatment (p < 0.05). Clear, anterior rhinorrhea affects older adults regardless of gender significantly more often and more severely than young adults (p < 0.05). The more frequent and bothersome the nasal drip, the more likely individuals would elect treatment. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  3. Cloud Clearing of Infrared Sounder Radiances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, R.; Serio, C.; Kelly, G.; Tramutoli, V.; McNally, A.

    1994-02-01

    R. RizziEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, England European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany C. SerioDipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli, Italy G. KellyEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, England V. TramutoliDipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica deil' Ambiente, Potenza, Italy A. McNallyEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, EnglandThe paper compares the performance of three different schemes for computing clear-sky brightness temperature from cloud-affected measurements. Both the ability to detect clouds and to estimate the equivalent clear-sky brightness temperature are examined. Simulated brightness temperatures computed from the ECMWF operational analysis are used as a reference, together with Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-derived sea surface temperature and cloud content within High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) fields of view. Cloud masks obtained from the cloud-detection schemes are compared with cloud masks obtained from AVHRR data; clear-column brightness temperatures for HIRS/2 channels 4, 7, and 13 are compared with the simulated ones; simulated clear-column brightness temperatures in the HIRS/2 window channel 8 are validated with equivalent products from AVHRR data. The comparison highlights some problems in the operational implementation of the NESDIS cloud-clearing scheme and with the operational filtering scheme of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office.

  4. The "Big-Bang" for modern glial biology: Translation and comments on Pío del Río-Hortega 1919 series of papers on microglia.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Amanda; de Castro, Fernando; Del Río-Hortega, Juan; Rafael Iglesias-Rozas, José; Garrosa, Manuel; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    The word "glia" was coined in the mid-19th century and defined as "the nerve glue". For decades, it was assumed to be a uniform matrix, until cell theorists raised the "neuron doctrine" which stipulated that nervous tissue was composed of individual cells. The term "astrocytes" was introduced in the late 19th century as a synonym for glial cells, but it was Santiago Ramón y Cajal who defined a "third element" distinct from glial cells (astrocytes) and neurons. It was not until 1919 when Pío del Río-Hortega, an alumnus of the Cajal School, introduced the modern terms we use today, and thoroughly described both "oligodendrocytes" and "microglia" to clearly distinguish them from astrocytes. In a series of four papers published that year in Spanish, Río-Hortega described the distribution and morphological phenotype of microglia. He also noted that these cells were the origin of the rod cells described earlier in pathologic tissue, and recognized that resting microglia transformed into an ameboid phenotype in different types of brain diseases and pathologies. He also noted the mesodermal origin of these cells and recognized their phagocytic capacity. We here provide the first English translation of these landmark series of papers, which paved the way for modern glial research. To heighten the value and accessibility of these classic papers and their original figures, an introduction to this critical period of neuroscience is provided, along with unpublished photographs. By adding comments to the translated text, we provide sufficient context so that contemporary scientists may fully appreciate it. GLIA 2016;64:1801-1840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Loss of glial neurofascin155 delays developmental synapse elimination at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Sherman, Diane L; Dissanayake, Kosala; Soucy, Geneviève; Desmazieres, Anne; Lamont, Douglas J; Peles, Elior; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Wishart, Thomas M; Ribchester, Richard R; Brophy, Peter J; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2014-09-17

    Postnatal synapse elimination plays a critical role in sculpting and refining neural connectivity throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, including the removal of supernumerary axonal inputs from neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here, we reveal a novel and important role for myelinating glia in regulating synapse elimination at the mouse NMJ, where loss of a single glial cell protein, the glial isoform of neurofascin (Nfasc155), was sufficient to disrupt postnatal remodeling of synaptic circuitry. Neuromuscular synapses were formed normally in mice lacking Nfasc155, including the establishment of robust neuromuscular synaptic transmission. However, loss of Nfasc155 was sufficient to cause a robust delay in postnatal synapse elimination at the NMJ across all muscle groups examined. Nfasc155 regulated neuronal remodeling independently of its canonical role in forming paranodal axo-glial junctions, as synapse elimination occurred normally in mice lacking the axonal paranodal protein Caspr. Rather, high-resolution proteomic screens revealed that loss of Nfasc155 from glial cells was sufficient to disrupt neuronal cytoskeletal organization and trafficking pathways, resulting in reduced levels of neurofilament light (NF-L) protein in distal axons and motor nerve terminals. Mice lacking NF-L recapitulated the delayed synapse elimination phenotype observed in mice lacking Nfasc155, suggesting that glial cells regulate synapse elimination, at least in part, through modulation of the axonal cytoskeleton. Together, our study reveals a glial cell-dependent pathway regulating the sculpting of neuronal connectivity and synaptic circuitry in the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412904-15$15.00/0.

  6. Technical note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2014-11-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued, not only about their contribution to the global methane budget, but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify in vivo formation of methane and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C-positionally labelled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labelled methionine clearly identified the sulphur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  7. Technical Note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2015-03-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued not only about their contribution to the global methane budget but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds to be identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify the in vivo formation of methane, and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C positionally labeled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labeled methionine clearly identified the sulfur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  8. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site. PMID:24455373

  9. Renal clear cell carcinoma and tonsil metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Macri, Gian Franco; Marinelli, Caterina; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site.

  10. Tonabersat inhibits trigeminal ganglion neuronal-satellite glial cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Damodaram, Srikanth; Thalakoti, Srikanth; Freeman, Stacy E; Garrett, Filip G; Durham, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    Sensitization and activation of trigeminal neurons are implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine, acute sinusitis, and allergic rhinitis. Cell bodies of trigeminal neurons that provide sensory innervation of the dura and nasal mucosa reside in the trigeminal ganglion in association with satellite glial cells where they communicate via gap junctions. Gap junctions, channels formed by connexins, modulate the excitability state of both neurons and glia under pathological conditions. Tonabersat, a compound being tested as an antimigraine drug, is thought to block gap junction activity. To investigate the cellular events within trigeminal ganglia that may account for the significant comorbidity of migraine and rhinosinusitis and determine the effect of tonabersat on neuron-satellite glia communication. Sprague Dawley rats injected with True Blue were used to localize neuronal cell bodies in the ganglion and study neuron-glia signaling via gap junctions in the trigeminal ganglion. Dye coupling studies were conducted under basal conditions and in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha injection into the whisker pad and/or capsaicin injection into the eyebrow. Changes in connexin 26 and active p38 levels were determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the effect of tonabersat prior to chemical stimulation on gap junction activity and expression of connexins and active p38 was investigated. Injection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a cytokine implicated in the pathology of acute sinusitis and allergic rhinitis, into the V2 region was shown to lower the amount of capsaicin required to stimulate neurons located in the V1 region of the ganglion. While injection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha into the whisker pad or capsaicin injection into the eyebrow alone did not cause increased dye movement, the combination of both stimuli greatly increased neuron-satellite glia communication via gap junctions in both V1 and V2 regions. The change in gap junction activity

  11. Optically clear film for tactile interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yairi, Micah

    2016-09-01

    For years, rigid plastics dominated as cover lenses in mobile and computing devices before being replaced by rigid glass sheets, which have become the current de facto standard. This is changing again. Optically clear, soft polymer films and film stacks now offer a promising alternative to glass. These polymer films provide a fundamentally different user experience, dramatically improving the user experience of writing and drawing, while also providing good durability. Tactus has developed an optically clear stack of polymer materials for use in a writing-first device. Details, usability studies, and performance data will be presented.

  12. Glial Modulation by N-acylethanolamides in Brain Injury and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, María I.; Kölliker-Frers, Rodolfo; Barreto, George; Blanco, Eduardo; Capani, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glial cells and represents a key element in normal aging and pathophysiology of brain damage. N-acylethanolamides (NAEs), naturally occurring amides, are known for their pro-homeostatic effects. An increase in NAEs has been reported in vivo and in vitro in the aging brain and in brain injury. Treatment with NAEs may promote neuroprotection and exert anti-inflammatory actions via PPARα activation and/or by counteracting gliosis. This review aims to provide an overview of endogenous and exogenous properties of NAEs in neuroinflammation and to discuss their interaction with glial cells. PMID:27199733

  13. Glial Modulation by N-acylethanolamides in Brain Injury and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Herrera, María I; Kölliker-Frers, Rodolfo; Barreto, George; Blanco, Eduardo; Capani, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glial cells and represents a key element in normal aging and pathophysiology of brain damage. N-acylethanolamides (NAEs), naturally occurring amides, are known for their pro-homeostatic effects. An increase in NAEs has been reported in vivo and in vitro in the aging brain and in brain injury. Treatment with NAEs may promote neuroprotection and exert anti-inflammatory actions via PPARα activation and/or by counteracting gliosis. This review aims to provide an overview of endogenous and exogenous properties of NAEs in neuroinflammation and to discuss their interaction with glial cells.

  14. PREDICTING SIGNIFICANCE OF UNKNOWN VARIANTS IN GLIAL TUMORS THROUGH SUB-CLASS ENRICHMENT.

    PubMed

    Fichtenholtz, Alex M; Camarda, Nicholas D; Neumann, Eric K

    2016-01-01

    Glial tumors have been heavily studied and sequenced, leading to scores of findings about altered genes. This explosion in knowledge has not been matched with clinical success, but efforts to understand the synergies between drivers of glial tumors may alleviate the situation. We present a novel molecular classification system that captures the combinatorial nature of relationships between alterations in these diseases. We use this classification to mine for enrichment of variants of unknown significance, and demonstrate a method for segregating unknown variants with functional importance from passengers and SNPs.

  15. Synaptic multistability and network synchronization induced by the neuron-glial interaction in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarevich, I. A.; Stasenko, S. V.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of a synaptic contact between neurons that forms a feedback loop through the interaction with glial cells of the brain surrounding the neurons is studied. It is shown that, depending on the character of the neuron-glial interaction, the dynamics of the signal transmission frequency in the synaptic contact can be bistable with two stable steady states or spiking with the regular generation of spikes with various amplitudes and durations. It is found that such a synaptic contact at the network level is responsible for the appearance of quasisynchronous network bursts.

  16. [Structure of the glial cells in the nervous system of parasitic and free-living flatworms].

    PubMed

    Biserova, N M; Gordeev, I I; Korneva, Zh V; Sal'nikova, M M

    2010-01-01

    This study is devoted to ultrastructural and immunosytochemical investigation of the nervous system in parasitic and free-living platyhelminthes to learn if glial cells exist in the nervous system of flatworms. We described the ultrastructure of different types of glial cells and the peculiarities of myelinization of gigantic axons; immunoreactivity to the S100b protein is revealed. Comparative analysis of the glia structure of annelids and platods is given; structural, functional, and evolutionary aspects of myelinization of gigantic axons, which are revealed in cestodes, are discussed.

  17. Precursors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Rosswog, S.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out a systematic search of precursors on the sample of short GRBs observed by Swift. We found that approx. 8-10% of short GRBs display such early episode of emission. One burst (GRB 090510) shows two precursor events, the former approx.13 s and the latter approx. 0.5 s before the GRB. We did not find any substantial difference between the precursor and the main GRB emission, and between short GRBs with and without precursors. We discuss possible mechanisms to reproduce the observed precursor emission within the scenario of compact object mergers. The implications of our results on quantum gravity constraints are also discussed.

  18. New Worlds Observer Precursor Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, C. F.; Lo, A. S.; Dailey, D.; Glassman, T. M.

    2007-06-01

    The New Worlds Observer architecture uses an external occulter to extinguish the on-axis light from a star and a separate telescope to collect the light from objects around that star, such as planets and debris disks. The separation of the starlight suppression capability from the photon collection capability makes the New Worlds Observer architecture very flexible. This paper describes NWO concepts ranging from low-cost precursor missions to Terrestrial Planet Finding (TPF) missions, and provides a path that extends beyond TPF to Planet-Imager and LifeFinder. Low cost precursor missions could be launched on a Minotaur using a small(~10 meter) occulter to work with a small(~0.5 m), telescope. Intermediate precursor missions could be accomplished by launching a larger occulter as a secondary payload to work with existing telescopes such as SOFIA or JWST. The former may allow direct detection of known giant planets, while the latter has the potential to discover Exo-Earths. A full TPF mission would consists of a large occulter working with a dedicated telescope; this can potentially find many terrestrial planets, as well as perform a host of ancillary astronomy investigations such as imaging debris disks and characterizing atmospheres of Jovian planets, as well as making general astrophysics observations. By utilizing the in space servicing capabilities that may be developed for the Exploration program, the lifetime of these occulters may be greatly extended by refueling and repair. In the future, larger occulters (>100 m) could be assembled on orbit. Thus, when coupled with a large telescope, the NWO architecture provides a path towards Lifefinder. NWO is a flexible architecture that allows scalability on all levels to suit the budget available for Exo-Planet Missions.

  19. Common precursors for neural and mesectodermal derivatives in the cephalic neural crest.

    PubMed

    Baroffio, A; Dupin, E; Le Douarin, N M

    1991-05-01

    The cephalic neural crest (NC) of vertebrate embryos yields a variety of cell types belonging to the neuronal, glial, melanocytic and mesectodermal lineages. Using clonal cultures of quail migrating cephalic NC cells, we demonstrated that neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system can originate from the same progenitors as cartilage, one of the mesectodermal derivatives of the NC. Moreover, we obtained evidence that the migrating cephalic NC contains a few highly multipotent precursors that are common to neurons, glia, cartilage and pigment cells and which we interprete as representative of a stem cell population. In contrast, other NC cells, although provided with identical culture conditions, give rise to clones composed of only one or some of these cell types. These cells thus appear restricted in their developmental potentialities compared to multipotent cells. It is therefore proposed that, in vivo, the active proliferation of pluripotent NC cells during the migration process generates distinct subpopulations of cells that become progressively committed to different developmental fates.

  20. Retinoic acid regulates the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laeng, P; Décimo, D; Pettmann, B; Janet, T; Labourdette, G

    1994-12-15

    Cultures of oligodendrocyte precursor cells can be grown from brain hemispheres of newborn rats. These cells, also called O-2A progenitor cells, can differentiate in vitro into oligodendrocytes or type 2 astrocytes. Basic FGF and PDGF are known to stimulate their proliferation and delay their differentiation. Lack or excess of retinoic acid (RA) has been known for a long time to alter brain development suggesting that this compound is involved in normal brain development. Here we report that RA partially inhibits both the proliferation and the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. It also down-regulates the mitogenic effect of bFGF on these cells while keeping them in an immature stage. RA is more effective than bFGF in inhibiting myelin basic protein mRNA expression in these cells, and like bFGF, it preserves their bipotential character. RA nuclear receptors RAR-alpha and their transcripts are expressed in oligodendrocyte precursor cells as seen by Western blot, Northern blot and in situ hybridization. The expression of RAR-alpha transcripts is stimulated transiently by RA alone or associated to bFGF. The expression of RAR-beta transcripts is not constitutive and is induced by RA alone or associated to bFGF and to a lesser extent by bFGF alone. These results suggest that retinoids participate in the control of the development of glial cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage.

  1. Nogo-a regulates neural precursor migration in the embryonic mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Carole; Schröter, Aileen; Thallmair, Michaela; Schwab, Martin E

    2010-10-01

    Although Nogo-A has been intensively studied for its inhibitory effect on axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system, little is known about its function during brain development. In the embryonic mouse cortex, Nogo-A is expressed by radial precursor/glial cells and by tangentially migrating as well as postmigratory neurons. We studied radially migrating neuroblasts in wild-type and Nogo-A knockout (KO) mouse embryos. In vitro analysis showed that Nogo-A and its receptor components NgR, Lingo-1, TROY, and p75 are expressed in cells emigrating from embryonic forebrain-derived neurospheres. Live imaging revealed an increased cell motility when Nogo-A was knocked out or blocked with antibodies. Antibodies blocking NgR or Lingo-1 showed the same motility-enhancing effect supporting a direct role of surface Nogo-A on migration. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of embryonic day (E)15.5 embryos demonstrated that Nogo-A influences the radial migration of neuronal precursors. At E17.5, the normal transient accumulation of radially migrating precursors within the subventricular zone was not detectable in the Nogo-A KO mouse cortex. At E19, migration to the upper cortical layers was disturbed. These findings suggest that Nogo-A and its receptor complex play a role in the interplay of adhesive and repulsive cell interactions in radial migration during cortical development.

  2. Neurogenesis and precursor cell differences in the dorsal and ventral adult canine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Aileen; Dalton, Marshall; Sidhu, Kuldip; Sachdev, Perminder; Reynolds, Brent; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-04-23

    During evolution a unique anterior-posterior flexure posited the canine dentate gyrus in two distinct dorsal and ventral positions. We therefore sought to explore neurogenesis and neurogenic cell-related difference along the canine hippocampal dorsal-ventral axis. Post mortem histological analysis revealed 49.1% greater doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells and a 158.5% greater percentage of double labeled DCX-positive/neuronal nuclei (NeuN) positive cells in the dorsal subgranular zone compared to the ventral. We then show neural precursor cells isolated from fresh hippocampal tissue are capable of proliferating long term, and after differentiation, express neuronal and glial markers. Dorsal hippocampal isolates produced a 120.0% higher frequency of sphere-forming neural precursor cells compared to ventral hippocampal tissue. Histological DCX and neurosphere assay results were highly correlated. Overall, we provide the first evidence that the dorsal canine hippocampus has a markedly higher rate of adult neurogenesis than the ventral hippocampus, possibly related to a greater frequency of contributory neural precursor cells.

  3. The Presence of Modifiable Residues in the Core Peptide Part of Precursor Nisin Is Not Crucial for Precursor Nisin Interactions with NisB- and NisC

    PubMed Central

    Khusainov, Rustem; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2013-01-01

    Precursor nisin is a model posttranslationally modified precursor lantibiotic that can be structurally divided into a leader peptide sequence and a modifiable core peptide part. The nisin core peptide clearly plays an important role in the precursor nisin – nisin modification enzymes interactions, since it has previously been shown that the construct containing only the nisin leader sequence is not sufficient to pull-down the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. Serines and threonines in the core peptide part are the residues that NisB specifically dehydrates, and cysteines are the residues that NisC stereospecifically couples to the dehydrated amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that increasing the number of negatively charged residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin, which are absent in wild-type nisin, does not abolish binding of precursor nisin to the modification enzymes NisB and NisC, but dramatically decreases the antimicrobial potency of these nisin mutants. An unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all serines and threonines in the core peptide part and an unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all cysteines in the core peptide part still bind the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC, suggesting that these residues are not essential for direct interactions with the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. These results are important for lantibiotic engineering studies. PMID:24040355

  4. 77 FR 66219 - Clearing Agency Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... Flexibility Act Certification VII. Statutory Authority and Text of Rule 17Ad-22 I. Background A. Statutory... clearance and settlement systems is based upon the regulation of registered clearing agencies. Over the... ``credit default swaps'' or ``CDS''), the largest category of OTC security-based swaps, by permitting...

  5. Clear Communication in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manchester, Bette

    2009-01-01

    One of the essential factors of successful integration of technology in classrooms is the role and relationship of the technology coordinator in supporting integration efforts. The vision for the use of technology in each school and district and the leadership role of the tech coordinator must be clear and understood by all. This article presents…

  6. Acoustic characteristics of clearly spoken English fricatives.

    PubMed

    Maniwa, Kazumi; Jongman, Allard; Wade, Travis

    2009-06-01

    Speakers can adopt a speaking style that allows them to be understood more easily in difficult communication situations, but few studies have examined the acoustic properties of clearly produced consonants in detail. This study attempts to characterize the adaptations in the clear production of American English fricatives in a carefully controlled range of communication situations. Ten female and ten male talkers produced fricatives in vowel-fricative-vowel contexts in both a conversational and a clear style that was elicited by means of simulated recognition errors in feedback received from an interactive computer program. Acoustic measurements were taken for spectral, amplitudinal, and temporal properties known to influence fricative recognition. Results illustrate that (1) there were consistent overall style effects, several of which (consonant duration, spectral peak frequency, and spectral moments) were consistent with previous findings and a few (notably consonant-to-vowel intensity ratio) of which were not; (2) specific acoustic modifications in clear productions of fricatives were influenced by the nature of the recognition errors that prompted the productions and were consistent with efforts to emphasize potentially misperceived contrasts both within the English fricative inventory and based on feedback from the simulated listener; and (3) talkers differed widely in the types and magnitude of all modifications.

  7. Plant Histology: Clearing and the Optical Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Clearing is a simple and rapid technique in which 75 percent lactic acid is used to remove pigments and cytoplasmic contents of fresh leaves, enabling microscopic view of various internal leaf layers. Procedures for using the technique (which helps students gain a more thorough understanding of plant anatomy) are given. (DH)

  8. Still No Clear Answer on Graduation Prayer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendor, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Supreme Court graduation-prayer decision in "Lee v. Weisman" (1992) and implications of the "Jones v. Clear Creek Independent School District" case, which the Court decided not to review in 1993. Discusses the New Jersey graduation-prayer experiment and ruling of third District Circuit Court Judge Theodore A.…

  9. Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, O. W.; Carey, T. R.; Lowell, P. S.; Meserole, F. B.; Rhudy, R. G.; Feeley, Thomas J.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this project to develop an advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process that has decreased capital and operating costs, higher SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, and better by-product solids quality than existing, commercially available technology. A clear liquor process (which uses a scrubbing liquid with no solids) will be used to accomplish this objective rather than a slurry liquor process (which contains solids). This clear liquor scrubbing (CLS) project is focused on three research areas: (1) Development of a clear liquor scrubbing process that uses a clear solution to remove SO{sub 2} from flue gas and can be operated under inhibited-oxidation conditions; (2) Development of an anhydrite process that converts precipitated calcium sulfite to anhydrous calcium sulfate (anhydrite); and (3) Development of an alkali/humidification process to remove HCl from flue gas upstream of the FGD system. The anhydrite process also can be retrofit into existing FGD systems to produce a valuable by-product as an alternative to gypsum. This fits well into another of FETC's PRDA objectives of developing an advanced byproduct recovery subsystem capable of transforming SO{sub 2} into a useable byproduct or high-volume valuable commodities of interest. This paper describes the proposed processes, outlines the test approach, and preliminary Phase I test results.

  10. Team Planning to CLEAR Up Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Professionals and parents need effective systems of teamwork for planning restorative outcomes with troubled children and youth. This article taps the resilient problem-solving process C*L*E*A*R, which is drawn from the Response Ability Pathways (RAP) curriculum. Participants examine the timeline of Challenges, Logic, Emotions, Actions, and…

  11. Development of a Clear Fiber Cherenkov Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, N.; Han, S.; Ito, H.; Kawai, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Kodama, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a new PID detector consists of clear fibers. PID efficiency was measured with 470 MeV e{sup +} beam. As a result, this detector with thickness of 5 cm has the PID efficiency of 95 %. (authors)

  12. Cloud clearing technology assessment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This report describes work done by W.J. Schafer Associates (WJSA) in support of the Long Pulse Chemical Laser (LPCL) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1986-1987. The present document emphasizes work in the area of cloud hole boring. It consists of the Final Task reports for Tasks II (Meteorological Statistics), III (Cloud Clearing Concept Development) and IV (Fluid Mechanics). A separate report on ASAT analyses has been prepared and was delivered to the LANL program manager in April 1988. (This document contained results from several WJSA IRAD projects which are considered proprietary, hence they are not included in this Final Report Volume.) A third document describing work on laser kinetics analyses (Task I) will be provided separately. The present document is the Final Report for this subcontract. It describes work in the areas of cloud clearing mission analysis, cloud clearing experiment recommendations, and meteorological statistics relevant to cloud clearing and laser weapon propagation. 20 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Lake Mead--clear and vital

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessells, Stephen M.; Rosen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    “Lake Mead – Clear and Vital” is a 13 minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

  14. Still No Clear Answer on Graduation Prayer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendor, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Supreme Court graduation-prayer decision in "Lee v. Weisman" (1992) and implications of the "Jones v. Clear Creek Independent School District" case, which the Court decided not to review in 1993. Discusses the New Jersey graduation-prayer experiment and ruling of third District Circuit Court Judge Theodore A.…

  15. Hardwood Sprout Development on Cleared Sites

    Treesearch

    Frank W. Woods; John T. Cassady; Charles X Grano; Robert L. Johnson

    1961-01-01

    Clearing forest land of undesirable vegetation, with a view to obtaining desirable trees, is becoming increasingly common in the South. Bulldozers and other heavy equipment are generally used in such efforts. Success is measured largely by the degree to which recovery of the unwanted plants is prevented or slowed. This Occasional Paper contains three articles on the...

  16. Plant Histology: Clearing and the Optical Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Clearing is a simple and rapid technique in which 75 percent lactic acid is used to remove pigments and cytoplasmic contents of fresh leaves, enabling microscopic view of various internal leaf layers. Procedures for using the technique (which helps students gain a more thorough understanding of plant anatomy) are given. (DH)

  17. Age-Dependent Netrin-1 Signaling Regulates NG2+ Glial Cell Spatial Homeostasis in Normal Adult Gray Matter.

    PubMed

    Birey, Fikri; Aguirre, Adan

    2015-04-29

    Neuron-glial antigen 2-positive (NG2(+)) glial cells are the most proliferative glia type in the adult CNS, and their tile-like arrangement in adult gray matter is under tight regulation. However, little is known about the cues that govern this unique distribution. To this end, using a NG2(+) glial cell ablation model in mice, we examined the repopulation dynamics of NG2(+) glial cells in the mature and aged mice gray matter. We found that some resident NG2(+) glial cells that escaped depletion rapidly enter the cell cycle to repopulate the cortex with altered spatial distribution. We reveal that netrin-1 signaling is involved in the NG2(+) glial cell early proliferative, late repopulation, and distribution response after ablation in the gray matter. However, ablation of NG2(+) glial cell in older animals failed to stimulate a similar repopulation response, possibly because of a decrease in the sensitivity to netrin-1. Our findings indicate that endogenous netrin-1 plays a role in NG2(+) glial cell homeostasis that is distinct from its role in myelination.

  18. [Electron microscopic and cytochemical research on the function of the glial cells in a focus of local cortical destruction].

    PubMed

    Kleshchinov, V N; Koĭdan, E I; Kolomeets, N S

    1986-08-01

    The activity of DNA-RNA-protein synthesizing system of some glial cells was studied using electron cytochemical method for determination of chromatin state and RNA-particles. A dependence of functional state of satellite glial cells (oligodendroglia and astroglia) on the tinctorial neuron state (hyper- and hypochromic scale) was shown. The functional state of interfascicular oligodendroglial cells has been characterized.

  19. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl(-) channel subunit, activates the slow gate of CLC chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-09-02

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl(-) channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction.

  20. The involvement of MAP kinases JNK and p38 in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Y. O.; Bibov, M. Y.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    The role of JNK and p38 MAP kinases in functional inactivation and necrosis of mechanoreceptor neurons as well as necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment (10 -7 M Photosens, 30 min incubation, 670 nm laser irradiation at 0.4 W/cm2) in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was studied using specific inhibitors SP600125 and SB202190, respectively. SP600125 enhanced PDT-induced apoptosis of photosensitized glial cells but did not influence PDT-induced changes in neuronal activity, density of glial nuclei around neuron body, and necrosis of receptor neurons and glial cells. SB202190 did not influence neuron activity and survival as well but reduced PDT-induced necrosis but not apoptosis of glial cells. Therefore, both MAP kinases influenced glial cells but not neurons. JNK protected glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis but did not influence necrosis and proliferation of these cells. In contrast, p38 did not influence apoptosis but contributed into PDT-induced necrosis of glial cells and PDT-induced gliosis. These MAP kinase inhibitors may be used for modulation of photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  1. Antimicrobial peptide precursor structures suggest effective production strategies.

    PubMed

    Vassilevski, Alexander A; Kozlov, Sergey A; Grishin, Eugene V

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) constitute a diverse group of compounds that serve a common goal that is host organism defense from infection. Due to their antimicrobial properties, these molecules attract practical interest as potential antibiotics for medical and veterinary use as well as enhancers of plant disease resistance for agriculture. Broad AMP utilization is restricted by the expensiveness of their production using conventional chemical synthesis. For this reason, a number of chimeric genes have been developed for recombinant AMP production in prokaryotes. However, recombinant peptide instability and/or high toxicity to host cells dramatically reduce the yields. In this paper, we review patented strategies of fusion protein design for AMP production. In several cases, the proposed strategies clearly mimic the organization of natural AMP precursor proteins. We describe the main principals of natural AMP precursor organization and fusion constructs adopted and/or artificially designed by man.

  2. The absorption spectra of carbonates and their precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.

    The carbonates calcite and dolomite have been discovered in the dust shells of evolved stars (Kemper et al. 2002) and young proto stars (Ceccarelli et al. 2002). The mechanism for carbonate formation with a aqueous or non-aqueous process were discussed in their papers. These processes have not yet been reproduced in a laboratory experiment. First of all, we measured the mass absorption spectra of varous carbonates were measured in the mid- and far-infrared region. These spectra show very strong and broad peaks in the far-infrared region. The calcite and dolomite have peaks at about 92 microns and 63 microns, respectively. The alternative process of carbonates has not yet been clear. We investigate the alternative process measuring the spectra of the precursors of carbonates. We will report the preliminary results and discuss about the alternative process comparing the measured spectra of the precursors with the observation.

  3. Annealing of aromatic polyimide precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of the thermal behavior of polyimide precursors: an isomeric pair of crystals of the complex formed by p-phenylenediamine with the separated isomers of the di-isopropyl ester of pyromellitic acid. Specimens of this material were isothermally annealed in the temperature range 120 C to 170 C for periods of time up to 1 week. Although this temperature range is well below that customarily used for imidizations, the working hypothesis was that it would be more likely that a polymer embodying at least part of the precursor structure could be formed if the molecular motion was minimized to that actually required for the formation of the imide linkage. The progress of the annealing was followed by: infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the meta monomer yields a structure of chains of alternating acid and base and suggests that this monomer is amenable to polymerization with a minimum of geometrical disruption.

  4. Precursor missions to interstellar exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, R. A.

    This paper summarizes material developed over a three-month period by a JPL team of mission architects/analysts and advanced technology developers for presentation to NASA Headquarters in the summer of 1998. A preliminary mission roadmap is suggested that leads to the exploration of star systems within 40 light years of our Solar System. The precursor missions include technology demonstrations as well as missions that return significant new knowledge about the space environment reached. Three propulsion technology candidates are selected on the basis of allowing eventual travel to the nearest star taking 10 years. One of the three propulsion technologies has a near term version applicable to early missions (prior to 2010) - the solar sail. Using early sail missions other critical supporting technologies can be developed that will later enable Interstellar travel. Example precursor missions are sail demonstration missions, including a solar storm warning mission demonstrating a simple sail, a solar polar imaging mission using an intermediate sail, and a 200-AU Heliosphere Explorer mission using an advanced solar sail. Mission and technology strategy, science return, and potential mission spin-offs are described.

  5. Temporal control of glial cell migration in the Drosophila eye requires gilgamesh, hedgehog, and eye specification genes.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Attix, Suzanne; Gunning, Dorian; Zipursky, S Lawrence

    2002-01-17

    In the Drosophila visual system, photoreceptor neurons (R cells) extend axons towards glial cells located at the posterior edge of the eye disc. In gilgamesh (gish) mutants, glial cells invade anterior regions of the eye disc prior to R cell differentiation and R cell axons extend anteriorly along these cells. gish encodes casein kinase Igamma. gish, sine oculis, eyeless, and hedgehog (hh) act in the posterior region of the eye disc to prevent precocious glial cell migration. Targeted expression of Hh in this region rescues the gish phenotype, though the glial cells do not require the canonical Hh signaling pathway to respond. We propose that the spatiotemporal control of glial cell migration plays a critical role in determining the directionality of R cell axon outgrowth.

  6. Expression of a set of glial cell-specific markers in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hui Jeong; Jeon, Sang-Hak; Kim, Sang Hee

    2014-06-01

    The types of glia in the central nervous system (CNS) of the Drosophila embryo include longitudinal glia (LG), cell body glia (CBG), and peripheral glia (PG). Transcription factors, such as glial cell missing and reverse polarity, are well-established general glial cell markers. Only a few glial cell-specific markers have been identified in the Drosophila embryonic CNS, thus far. In the present study, we employed the glial cell-specific markers for LG (vir-1/CG5453 and CG31235), CBG (fabp/CG6783 and CG11902), and PG (CG2310 and moody/CG4322), and comprehensively analyzed their expression patterns, during the embryonic CNS development. Our study validated the specificity of a set of glial markers, and further revealed their spatio-temporal expression patterns, which will aid in the understanding of the developmental lineage, and investigating their role in the development and homeostasis of the Drosophila CNS in vivo.

  7. Shiga toxin-2 enhances heat-shock-induced apoptotic cell death in cultured and primary glial cells.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Toma, Tomoko; Shimizu, Masaki; Kuroda, Mondo; Wada, Taizo; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively controls the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) environment using specific structural and biochemical features of the endothelial cells, pericytes, and glial limitans. Glial cells, which represent the cellular components of the mature BBB, are the most numerous cells in the brain and are indispensable for neuronal functioning. We investigated the effects of Shiga toxin on glial cells in vitro. Shiga toxin failed to inhibit cell proliferation but attenuated expression of heat shock protein 70, which is one of the chaperone proteins, in cultured and primary glial cells. Furthermore, the combination of Shiga toxin and a heat shock procedure induced cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation in both cells. Thus, we speculate that glial cell death in response to the combination of Shiga toxin and heat shock might weaken the BBB and induce central nervous system complications.

  8. Robotic Precursor Missions for Mars Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Pirjanian, Paolo; Schenker, Paul S.; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Das, Hari; Joshi, Sajay

    2000-01-01

    Infrastructure support for robotic colonies, manned Mars habitat, and/or robotic exploration of planetary surfaces will need to rely on the field deployment of multiple robust robots. This support includes such tasks as the deployment and servicing of power systems and ISRU generators, construction of beaconed roadways, and the site preparation and deployment of manned habitat modules. The current level of autonomy of planetary rovers such as Sojourner will need to be greatly enhanced for these types of operations. In addition, single robotic platforms will not be capable of complicated construction scenarios. Precursor robotic missions to Mars that involve teams of multiple cooperating robots to accomplish some of these tasks is a cost effective solution to the possible long timeline necessary for the deployment of a manned habitat. Ongoing work at JPL under the Mars Outpost Program in the area of robot colonies is investigating many of the technology developments necessary for such an ambitious undertaking. Some of the issues that are being addressed include behavior-based control systems for multiple cooperating robots (CAMPOUT), development of autonomous robotic systems for the rescue/repair of trapped or disabled robots, and the design and development of robotic platforms for construction tasks such as material transport and surface clearing.

  9. Robotic Precursor Missions for Mars Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Pirjanian, Paolo; Schenker, Paul S.; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Das, Hari; Joshi, Sajay

    2000-07-01

    Infrastructure support for robotic colonies, manned Mars habitat, and/or robotic exploration of planetary surfaces will need to rely on the field deployment of multiple robust robots. This support includes such tasks as the deployment and servicing of power systems and ISRU generators, construction of beaconed roadways, and the site preparation and deployment of manned habitat modules. The current level of autonomy of planetary rovers such as Sojourner will need to be greatly enhanced for these types of operations. In addition, single robotic platforms will not be capable of complicated construction scenarios. Precursor robotic missions to Mars that involve teams of multiple cooperating robots to accomplish some of these tasks is a cost effective solution to the possible long timeline necessary for the deployment of a manned habitat. Ongoing work at JPL under the Mars Outpost Program in the area of robot colonies is investigating many of the technology developments necessary for such an ambitious undertaking. Some of the issues that are being addressed include behavior-based control systems for multiple cooperating robots (CAMPOUT), development of autonomous robotic systems for the rescue/repair of trapped or disabled robots, and the design and development of robotic platforms for construction tasks such as material transport and surface clearing.

  10. Odontogenic ghost cell tumour with clear cell components: clear cell odontogenic ghost cell tumour?

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    A case of odontogenic ghost cell tumour (OGCT) with clear cell components was encountered in the mandible of a 63-year-old man. The tumour revealed ameloblastomatous-type epithelial components accompanied by clusters of ghost cells and dentinoid juxtaposed to the odontogenic epithelium. In addition, some areas of the tumour tissue showed sheets and islands of clear, glycogen containing epithelial cells, which were separated by a thin fibrous connective tissue stroma. Both ameloblastic and clear cells exhibited positive immunoreactivities for cytokeratin 19 and AE1/3. It is not known whether this tumour represents a clear cell change of a pre-existing OGCT or a separate and distinct neoplasm derived de novo from the odontogenic epithelium. This tumour was given the term 'clear cell OGCT' because it captures the clear cell components, which is one of the most prominent distinguishing features of the tumour.

  11. Perceived gender in clear and conversational speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booz, Jaime A.

    Although many studies have examined acoustic and sociolinguistic differences between male and female speech, the relationship between talker speaking style and perceived gender has not yet been explored. The present study attempts to determine whether clear speech, a style adopted by talkers who perceive some barrier to effective communication, shifts perceptions of femininity for male and female talkers. Much of our understanding of gender perception in voice and speech is based on sustained vowels or single words, eliminating temporal, prosodic, and articulatory cues available in more naturalistic, connected speech. Thus, clear and conversational sentence stimuli, selected from the 41 talkers of the Ferguson Clear Speech Database (Ferguson, 2004) were presented to 17 normal-hearing listeners, aged 18 to 30. They rated the talkers' gender using a visual analog scale with "masculine" and "feminine" endpoints. This response method was chosen to account for within-category shifts of gender perception by allowing nonbinary responses. Mixed-effects regression analysis of listener responses revealed a small but significant effect of speaking style, and this effect was larger for male talkers than female talkers. Because of the high degree of talker variability observed for talker gender, acoustic analyses of these sentences were undertaken to determine the relationship between acoustic changes in clear and conversational speech and perceived femininity. Results of these analyses showed that mean fundamental frequency (fo) and f o standard deviation were significantly correlated to perceived gender for both male and female talkers, and vowel space was significantly correlated only for male talkers. Speaking rate and breathiness measures (CPPS) were not significantly related for either group. Outcomes of this study indicate that adopting a clear speaking style is correlated with increases in perceived femininity. Although the increase was small, some changes associated

  12. Connexin43 and connexin47 alterations after neural precursor cells transplantation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Theotokis, Paschalis; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Touloumi, Olga; Lagoudaki, Roza; Lourbopoulos, Athanasios; Nousiopoulou, Evangelia; Kesidou, Evangelia; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nepheli; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Karacostas, Dimitris; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Irinopoulou, Theano; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    Exogenous transplanted neural precursor cells (NPCs) exhibit miscellaneous immune-modulatory effects in models of autoimmune demyelination. However, the regional interactions of NPCs with the host brain tissue in remissive inflammatory events have not been adequately studied. In this study we used the chronic MOG-induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in C57BL/six mice. Based on previous data, we focused on neuropathology at Day 50 post-induction (D50) and studied the expression of connexin43 (Cx43) and Cx47, two of the main glial gap junction (GJ) proteins, in relation to the intraventricular transplantation of GFP(+) NPCs and their integration with the host tissue. By D50, NPCs had migrated intraparenchymally and were found in the corpus callosum at the level of the lateral ventricles and hippocampus. The majority of GFP(+) cells differentiated with simple or ramified processes expressing mainly markers of mature GLIA (GFAP and NogoA) and significantly less of precursor glial cells. GFP(+) NPCs expressed connexins and formed GJs around the hippocampus more than lateral ventricles. The presence of NPCs did not alter the increase in Cx43 GJ plaques at D50 EAE, but prevented the reduction of oligodendrocytic Cx47, increased the number of oligodendrocytes, local Cx47 levels and Cx47 GJ plaques per cell. These findings suggest that transplanted NPCs may have multiple effects in demyelinating pathology, including differentiation and direct integration into the panglial syncytium, as well as amelioration of oligodendrocyte GJ loss, increasing the supply of potent myelinating cells to the demyelinated tissue.

  13. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    PubMed

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  14. How a radial glial cell decides to become a multiciliated ependymal cell.

    PubMed

    Kyrousi, Christina; Lygerou, Zoi; Taraviras, Stavros

    2017-02-07

    The V-SVZ adult neurogenic niche is located in the wall of the lateral ventricles and contains neural stem cells, with self-renewing and differentiating ability and postmitotic multiciliated ependymal cells, an important structural and trophic component of the niche. The niche is established at postnatal stages from a subpopulation of radial glial cells, determined during embryogenesis. Radial glial cells constitute a heterogeneous population, which give rise, in addition to niche cellular components, to neurons and glial cells. The mechanisms that direct their fate commitment towards V-SVZ niche cells are largely unknown. In the present review, we discuss recent findings on the signaling networks governing fate commitment decisions of radial glial cells towards multiciliated ependymal cells. We highlight the role of two novel factors: McIdas and GemC1/Lynkeas and the molecular pathways which they activate in order to promote ependymal cell differentiation. Finally, we discuss a possible crosstalk of known signaling pathways, such as Notch, STAT3, and BMPs, for the specification of ependymal versus adult neural stem cells in the V-SVZ niche. GLIA 2017.

  15. Maintenance of Fura-2 fluorescence in glial cells and neurons of the leech central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Munsch, T; Deitmer, J W

    1995-04-01

    Identified glial cells and neurones of the leech central nervous system (CNS) were injected iontophoretically with the calcium indicator dye Fura-2 to measure intracellular Ca2+, while simultaneously recording the membrane potential using a double-barrelled theta-type microelectrode. Both glial cells and neurones responded with Ni(2+)-sensitive Ca2+ transients upon membrane depolarization, indicating Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. In contrast to neurones, the glial cells showed a rapid loss of fluorescence with a half-time of 6.3 +/- 1.8 min (n = 6) after dye injection. Both kinetics and amplitudes of the stimulus-induced Ca2+ transients were affected by this rapid dye loss. The anion exchange inhibitor probenicid (2 mM) significantly reduced, but did not prevent, the loss of Fura-2 fluorescence, suggesting that some dye left the glial cell via an anion exchanger. In order to compensate this fluorescence loss, we injected Fura-2 throughout the experiment. Under this condition, similar Ca2+ transients could be elicited repeatedly for more than 1 h. In Retzius neurones single injections of Fura-2 yielded enough intracellularly trapped dye to allow measurement of intracellular Ca2+ for up to 30 min after the end of injection without large decrease in absolute fluorescence.

  16. [Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland: report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Vajtai, I; Bodosi, M; Varga, Z; Ormos, J; Vörös, E

    1995-08-27

    Referring to two individual cases, the authors review clinical, radiological and histological features of benign glial cysts of the pineal gland. Both patients were young females with aggravating headaches and with convulsions in one case. Symptoms were referable to a space-occupying cystic mass of the pineal gland. On histology, both lesions proved to be non neoplastic cysts without an epithelial lining. Their histogenesis and low growth potential were reinforced by immunohistochemical analysis of pineal antigens and proliferation markers. Glial cysts of the pineal gland are not infrequent, but symptomatic occurrences are exceptional. Most glial cysts are of dysontogenic or degenerative origin. Sometimes, however, the role of hormonal influences or paraneoplastic factors must be considered. Symptoms caused by glial cysts of the pineal gland are non-specific and radiologic imaging technics may contribute little to etiologic diagnosis. Pineal cysts are curable by surgical resection or stereotactic decompression. Whatever the diagnostic approach, emphasis must be laid on the histologic examination in order to avoid unnecessarily aggressive treatment.

  17. Flavonoids Modulate the Proliferation of Neospora caninum in Glial Cell Primary Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa de Matos, Rosan; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pena Seara Pitanga, Bruno; Amaral da Silva, Victor Diógenes; Viana de Jesus, Erica Etelvina; Morales Pinheiro, Alexandre; Dias Costa, Maria de Fátima; dos Santos El-Bacha, Ramon; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Cátia Suse

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation. PMID:25548412

  18. Myricetin and quercetin attenuate ischemic injury in glial cultures by different mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have demonstrated that polyphenols from cinnamon and green tea reduce cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction in C6 glial cultures following ischemic injury. We tested the protective effects of the flavonoid polyphenols, myricetin and quercetin, on key features of ischemic injury. C6 cultures...

  19. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) shows circadian oscillations in crayfish Procambarus clarkii putative pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María de la Paz; Escamilla-Chimal, Elsa G

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies of glia have examined glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and its relationship to the circadian rhythms of different organisms, they have not explored the daily GFAP oscillations in the putative pacemakers of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii or in other crustaceans. In this study we investigated the daily variations in GFAP concentrations in the eyestalk and brain, which are considered to be putative pacemakers in adult P. clarkii. In both structures, the glial GFAP was quantified using the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and double labeling immunofluorescence was used to detect it and its co-localization with protein Period (PER), an important component of the circadian clock, in various regions of both structures. The ELISA results were analyzed using Cosinor and one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni and Scheffé's post hoc tests. The results of this analysis showed that the GFAP levels present circadian oscillations in both structures. Moreover, GFAP was localized in different structures of the eyestalk and brain; however, co-localization with PER occurred only in the lamina ganglionaris, specifically in the cartridges of the eyestalk and in some of the cluster 9 brain cells. These results suggest that as in other invertebrates and vertebrates, glial cells could be involved in the circadian system of P. clarkii; however, thus far we cannot know whether the glial cells are only effectors, participate in afferent pathways, or are part of the circadian clock.

  20. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Meertens, Laurent; Labeau, Athena; Dejarnac, Ophelie; Cipriani, Sara; Sinigaglia, Laura; Bonnet-Madin, Lucie; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Zamborlini, Alessia; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Coulpier, Muriel; Missé, Dorothée; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Tabibiazar, Ray; Gressens, Pierre; Schwartz, Olivier; Amara, Ali

    2017-01-10

    ZIKA virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glial scar size, inhibitor concentration, and growth of regenerating axons after spinal cord transection☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiping; Sun, Yanping; Chen, Xuning; Feng, Shiliang

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method was used for numerical simulation. The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection. The simulation test comprised two parts: (1) when release rates of growth inhibitor and promoter were constant, the effects of glial scar size on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and concentrations of inhibitor and promoters located at the moving growth cones were recorded. (2) When the glial scar size was constant, the effects of inhibitor and promoter release rates on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and inhibitor and promoter concentrations at the moving growth cones were recorded. Results demonstrated that (1) a larger glial scar and a higher release rate of inhibitor resulted in a reduced axonal growth rate. (2) The axonal growth rate depended on the ratio of inhibitor to promoter concentrations at the growth cones. When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells. PMID:25657689

  2. Inflammation-like glial response in lead-exposed immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Struzynska, Lidia; Dabrowska-Bouta, Beata; Koza, Katarzyna; Sulkowski, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies on lead (Pb) neurotoxicity have indicated this metal to be a dangerous toxin, particularly during developmental stages of higher organisms. Astrocytes are responsible for sequestration of this metal in brain tissue. Activation of astroglia may often lead to loss of the buffering function and contribute to pathological processes. This phenomenon is accompanied by death of neuronal cells and may be connected with inflammatory events arising from the production of a wide range of cytokines and chemokines. The effects of prolonged exposure to Pb upon glial activation are examined in immature rats to investigate this potential proinflammatory effect. When analyzed at the protein level, glial activation is observed after Pb exposure, as reflected by the increased level of glial fibrillary acidic protein and S-100beta proteins in all parts of the brain examined. These changes are associated with elevation of proinflammatory cytokines. Production of interleukin (IL)-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha is observed in hippocampus, and production of IL-6 is seen in forebrain. The expression of fractalkine is observed in both hippocampus and forebrain but inconsiderably in the cerebellum. In parallel with cytokine expression, signs of synaptic damage in hippocampus are seen after Pb exposure, as indicated by decreased levels of the axonal markers synapsin I and synaptophysin. Obtained results indicate chronic glial activation with coexisting inflammatory and neurodegenerative features as a new mechanism of Pb neurotoxicity in immature rat brain.

  3. Postnatal development of neurons, interneurons and glial cells in the substantia nigra of mice.

    PubMed

    Abe, Manami; Kimoto, Hiroki; Eto, Risa; Sasaki, Taeko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2010-08-01

    We investigated postnatal alterations of neurons, interneurons and glial cells in the mouse substantia nigra using immunohistochemistry. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), parvalbumin (PV), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba 1), CNPase (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) immunoreactivity were measured in 1-, 2-, 4- and 8-week-old mice. In the present study, the maturation of NeuN-immunopositive neurons preceded the production of TH in the substantia nigra during postnatal development in mice. Furthermore, the maturation of nNOS-immunopositive interneurons preceded the maturation of PV-immunopositive interneurons in the substantia nigra during postnatal development. Among astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes, in contrast, the development process of oligodendrocytes is delayed in the substantia nigra. Our double-labeled immunohistochemical study suggests that the neurotrophic factors such as BDNF and GDNF secreted by GFAP-positive astrocytes may play some role in maturation of neurons, interneurons and glial cells of the substantia nigra during postnatal development in mice. Thus, our findings provide valuable information on the development processes of the substantia nigra.

  4. Deletion of aquaporin-4 renders retinal glial cells more susceptible to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Pannicke, Thomas; Wurm, Antje; Iandiev, Ianors; Hollborn, Margrit; Linnertz, Regina; Binder, Devin K; Kohen, Leon; Wiedemann, Peter; Steinhäuser, Christian; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    The glial water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is implicated in the control of ion and osmohomeostasis in the sensory retina. Using retinal slices from AQP4-deficient and wild-type mice, we investigated whether AQP4 is involved in the regulation of glial cell volume under altered osmotic conditions. Superfusion of retinal slices with a hypoosmolar solution induced a rapid swelling of glial somata in tissues from AQP4 null mice but not from wild-type mice. The swelling was mediated by oxidative stress, inflammatory lipid mediators, and sodium influx into the cells and was prevented by activation of glutamatergic and purinergic receptors. Distinct inflammatory proteins, including interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, were up-regulated in the retina of AQP4 null mice compared with control, whereas cyclooxygenase-2 was down-regulated. The data suggest that water flux through AQP4 is involved in the rapid volume regulation of retinal glial (Müller) cells in response to osmotic stress and that deletion of AQP4 results in an inflammatory response of the retinal tissue. Possible implications of the data for understanding the pathophysiology of neuromyelitis optica, a human disease that has been suggested to involve serum antibodies to AQP4, are discussed. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Glial glycine transporter 1 function is essential for early postnatal survival but dispensable in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Eulenburg, Volker; Retiounskaia, Marina; Papadopoulos, Theofilos; Gomeza, Jesús; Betz, Heinrich

    2010-07-01

    The glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) is expressed in astrocytes and selected neurons of the mammalian CNS. In newborn mice, GlyT1 is crucial for efficient termination of glycine-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. Furthermore, GlyT1 has been implicated in the regulation of excitatory N-methyl-D-asparate (NMDA) receptors. To evaluate whether glial and neuronal GlyT1 have distinct roles at inhibitory synapses, we inactivated the GlyT1 gene cell type-specifically using mice carrying floxed GlyT1 alleles GlyT1((+)/+)). GlyT1((+)/(+)) mice expressing Cre recombinase in glial cells developed severe neuromotor deficits during the first postnatal week, which mimicked the phenotype of conventional GlyT1 knock-out mice and are consistent with glycinergic over-inhibition. In contrast, Cre-mediated inactivation of the GlyT1 gene in neuronal cells did not result in detectable motor impairment. Notably, some animals deficient for glial GlyT1 survived the first postnatal week and did not develop neuromotor deficits throughout adulthood, although GlyT1 expression was efficiently reduced. Thus, glial GlyT1 is critical for the regulation of glycine levels at inhibitory synapses only during early postnatal life.

  6. Age-dependent responses of glial cells and leptomeninges during systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Tokuda, Yukie; Zhang, Xin-Wen; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Systemic inflammation causes the age-dependent differential glial responses, but little is known about how age influences the barrier function of leptomeninges during systemic inflammation. This study was conducted to elucidate the relationship between the glial responses and the levels of tight junction proteins, occludin and ZO-1, in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. In young AA rats, microglia and astrocytes localized to the proximity of the leptomeninges expressed interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. The level of occludin significantly increased. In middle-aged AA rats, however, glial cells expressed IL-1beta and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-synthesizing enzymes. Furthermore, occludin and ZO-1 significantly decreased, resulting in the increased permeability of leptomeninges. In the cultured leptomeningeal cells, IL-1beta and PGE(2) caused a marked loss of occludin and ZO-1, respectively. Pretreatment with IL-10 and TGF-beta1 significantly antagonized their effects. These findings establish that age strongly influences the barrier functions of the leptomeninges through the age-dependent differential glial responses during systemic inflammation.

  7. Ganglionic GFAP (+) glial Gq-GPCR signaling enhances heart functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Alison Xiaoqiao; Lee, Jakovin J; McCarthy, Ken D

    2017-01-26

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) accelerates heart rate, increases cardiac contractility, and constricts resistance vessels. The activity of SNS efferent nerves is generated by a complex neural network containing neurons and glia. Gq G protein-coupled receptor (Gq-GPCR) signaling in glial fibrillary acidic protein-expressing (GFAP(+)) glia in the central nervous system supports neuronal function and regulates neuronal activity. It is unclear how Gq-GPCR signaling in GFAP(+) glia affects the activity of sympathetic neurons or contributes to SNS-regulated cardiovascular functions. In this study, we investigated whether Gq-GPCR activation in GFAP(+) glia modulates the regulatory effect of the SNS on the heart; transgenic mice expressing Gq-coupled DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) (hM3Dq) selectively in GFAP(+) glia were used to address this question in vivo. We found that acute Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP(+) glia significantly accelerated heart rate and increased left ventricle contraction. Pharmacological experiments suggest that the glial-induced cardiac changes were due to Gq-GPCR activation in satellite glial cells within the sympathetic ganglion; this activation led to increased norepinephrine (NE) release and beta-1 adrenergic receptor activation within the heart. Chronic glial Gq-GPCR activation led to hypotension in female Gfap-hM3Dq mice. This study provides direct evidence that Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP(+) glia regulates cardiovascular functions in vivo.

  8. Cinnamon Polyphenols Attenuate Neuronal Death and Glial Swelling in Ischemic Injury

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brain edema is a major complication associated with ischemic stroke and is characterized by a volumetric enlargement of the brain. Astrocyte swelling is a major component of brain edema. We investigated the protective effects of polyphenols isolated from green tea and cinnamon in C6 glial cultures s...

  9. Flavonoids modulate the proliferation of Neospora caninum in glial cell primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Matos, Rosan Barbosa de; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pitanga, Bruno Pena Seara; Silva, Victor Diógenes Amaral da; Jesus, Erica Etelvina Viana de; Pinheiro, Alexandre Morales; Costa, Maria de Fátima Dias; El-Bacha, Ramon dos Santos; Ribeiro, Cátia Suse de Oliveira; Costa, Silvia Lima

    2014-12-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation.

  10. Ganglionic GFAP+ glial Gq-GPCR signaling enhances heart functions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jakovin J.; McCarthy, Ken D.

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) accelerates heart rate, increases cardiac contractility, and constricts resistance vessels. The activity of SNS efferent nerves is generated by a complex neural network containing neurons and glia. Gq G protein–coupled receptor (Gq-GPCR) signaling in glial fibrillary acidic protein–expressing (GFAP+) glia in the central nervous system supports neuronal function and regulates neuronal activity. It is unclear how Gq-GPCR signaling in GFAP+ glia affects the activity of sympathetic neurons or contributes to SNS-regulated cardiovascular functions. In this study, we investigated whether Gq-GPCR activation in GFAP+ glia modulates the regulatory effect of the SNS on the heart; transgenic mice expressing Gq-coupled DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) (hM3Dq) selectively in GFAP+ glia were used to address this question in vivo. We found that acute Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP+ glia significantly accelerated heart rate and increased left ventricle contraction. Pharmacological experiments suggest that the glial-induced cardiac changes were due to Gq-GPCR activation in satellite glial cells within the sympathetic ganglion; this activation led to increased norepinephrine (NE) release and beta-1 adrenergic receptor activation within the heart. Chronic glial Gq-GPCR activation led to hypotension in female Gfap-hM3Dq mice. This study provides direct evidence that Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP+ glia regulates cardiovascular functions in vivo. PMID:28138563

  11. Satellite glial cells in situ within mammalian prevertebral ganglia express K+ channels active at rest potential.

    PubMed

    Gola, M; Niel, J P; Delmas, P; Jacquet, G

    1993-10-01

    Patch-clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells wrapped around sympathetic neurons in the rabbit coeliac ganglion. With the cleaning method used, the glial cells could be kept in place and were directly accessible to the patch-clamp pipettes. Whole-cell recordings showed that glial cells had almost ohmic properties. Their resting potential (-79.1 +/- 1.2 mV) was found to be very nearly the same as the K+ reversal potential and approximately 20 mV more negative than that of the neurons they encapsulated. Unitary currents from ionic channels present in the glial membrane were recorded in the cell-attached configuration with pipettes filled with various amounts of K+, Na+ and gluconate. Only K(+)-selective channels with slight inwardly rectifying properties (in the presence of 150 mM [K+]o) were detected. These channels were active (Po = 0.7-0.8) at the cell resting potential. The channel conductance, but not its opening probability, was dependent on the [K+] in the pipette. Cl(-)-selective channels (outwardly rectifying and large conductance channels) were detected in excised patches. The properties of the K+ channels (increased inward current with [K+] and detectable outward current at low [K+]) are well suited for siphoning the K+ released by active neurons.

  12. Improved Visualization of Neuronal Injury Following Glial Activation by Manganese Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Aditya N.; Zhou, Biyun; Epstein, Adrian A.; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Luo, Jiangtao; Gendelman, Howard E.; Boska, Michael D.; Liu, Yutong

    2013-01-01

    Research directed at anatomical, integrative and functional activities of the central nervous system (CNS) can be realized through bioimaging. A wealth of data now demonstrates the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) towards unraveling complex neural connectivity operative in health and disease. A means to improve MRI sensitivity is through contrast agents and notably manganese (Mn2+). The Mn2+ ions enter neurons through voltage-gated calcium channels and unlike other contrast agents such as gadolinium, iron oxide, iron platinum and imaging proteins, provide unique insights into brain physiology. Nonetheless, a critical question that remains is the brain target cells serving as sources for the signal of Mn2+ enhanced MRI (MEMRI). To this end, we investigated MEMRI’s abilities to detect glial (astrocyte and microglia) and neuronal activation signals following treatment with known inflammatory inducing agents. The idea is to distinguish between gliosis (glial activation) and neuronal injury for the MEMRI signal and as such use the agent as a marker for neural activity in inflammatory and degenerative disease. We now demonstrate that glial inflammation facilitates Mn2+ neuronal ion uptake. Glial Mn2+ content was not linked to its activation. MEMRI performed on mice injected intracranially with lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased neuronal activity. These results support the notion that MEMRI reflects neuronal excitotoxicity and impairment that can occur through a range of insults including neuroinflammation. We conclude that the MEMRI signal enhancement is induced by inflammation stimulating neuronal Mn2+ uptake. PMID:23729245

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α modifies the effects of Shiga toxin on glial cells.

    PubMed

    Leu, Hue; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shimizu, Masaki; Toma, Tomoko; Wada, Taizo; Ohta, Kunio; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin (STX) is one of the main factors inducing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in infections with STX-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Approximately 62% of patients with HUS showed symptoms of encephalopathy in the 2011 Japanese outbreak of STEC infections. At that time, we reported elevated serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in patients with acute encephalopathy during the HUS phase. In the current study, we investigated whether TNF-α augments the effects of STX in glial cell lines and primary glial cells. We found that TNF-α alone or STX in combination with TNF-α activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling and inhibits growth of glial cells. The magnitude of the NF-κB activation and the inhibition of cell growth by the STX and TNF-α combination was greater than that obtained with TNF-α alone or STX alone. Thus, this in vitro study reveals the role of TNF-α in glial cells during STEC infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Satellite glial cells in sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia: in search of function.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2010-09-24

    Glial cells are established as essential for many functions of the central nervous system, and this seems to hold also for glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. The main type of glial cells in most types of peripheral ganglia - sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic - is satellite glial cells (SGCs). These cells usually form envelopes around single neurons, which create a distinct functional unit consisting of a neuron and its attending SGCs. This review presents the knowledge on the morphology of SGCs in sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia, and the (limited) available information on their physiology and pharmacology. It appears that SGCs carry receptors for ATP and can thus respond to the release of this neurotransmitter by the neurons. There is evidence that SGCs have an uptake mechanism for GABA, and possibly other neurotransmitters, which enables them to control the neuronal microenvironment. Damage to post- or preganglionic nerve fibers influences both the ganglionic neurons and the SGCs. One major consequence of postganglionic nerve section is the detachment of preganglionic nerve terminals, resulting in decline of synaptic transmission. It appears that, at least in sympathetic ganglia, SGCs participate in the detachment process, and possibly in the subsequent recovery of the synaptic connections. Unlike sensory neurons, neurons in autonomic ganglia receive synaptic inputs, and SGCs are in very close contact with synaptic boutons. This places the SGCs in a position to influence synaptic transmission and information processing in autonomic ganglia, but this topic requires much further work.

  15. The role of NO synthase isoforms in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger, involved in the implementation of various cell functions. It regulates various physiological and pathological processes such as neurotransmission, cell responses to stress, and neurodegeneration. NO synthase is a family of enzymes that synthesize NO from L-arginine. The activity of different NOS isoforms depends both on endogenous and exogenous factors. In particular, it is modulated by oxidative stress, induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the possible role of NOS in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Antinecrotic and proapoptotic effects of NO on the glial cells were found using inhibitory analysis. We have shown the role of inducible NO synthase in photoinduced apoptosis and involvement of neuronal NO synthase in photoinduced necrosis of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The activation of NO synthase was evaluated using NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of neurons expressing the enzyme. The activation of NO synthase in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was evaluated as a function of time after PDT. Photodynamic treatment induced transient increase in NO synthase activity and then slowly inhibited this enzyme.

  16. Visualizing the live Drosophila glial-neuromuscular junction with fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Dee; Gilbert, Mary; Auld, Vanessa

    2009-05-13

    Our project identified GFP labeled glial structures at the developing larval fly neuromuscular synapse. To look at development of live glial-nerve-muscle synapses, we developed a larval tissue preparation that had features of live intact larvae, but also had good optical properties. This new preparation also allowed for access of perfusates to the synapse. We used fly larvae, immersed them in artificial hemolymph, and relaxed their normal rhythmic body contractions by chilling them. Next we dissected off the posterior segments of each animal and with a blunt insect pin pushed the mouth parts backward through the body cavity. This everted the larval body wall, like turning a sock inside-out. We completed the dissection with ultra-fine dissection scissors and thus exposed the visceral side of the body wall muscles. The glial structures at the NMJ expressed membrane targeted GFP under the control of glial specific promoters. The post-synaptic membrane, the SSR (Subsynaptic Reticula) in muscle expressed synaptically targeted dsRed. We needed to acutely label the motor neuron terminals, the third part of the synapse. To do this we applied primary antibodies to HRP, conjugated to a far-red emitting flurophore. To test for dye diffusion properties into the perisynaptic space between the motor neuron terminals and the SSR, we applied a solution of large Dextran molecules conjugated to far-red emitting flurophore and collected images.

  17. Controlled Adhesion and Growth of Long Term Glial and Neuronal Cultures on Parylene-C

    PubMed Central

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Murray, Alan F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the long term development of networks of glia and neurons on patterns of Parylene-C on a SiO2 substrate. We harvested glia and neurons from the Sprague-Dawley (P1–P7) rat hippocampus and utilized an established cell patterning technique in order to investigate cellular migration, over the course of 3 weeks. This work demonstrates that uncontrolled glial mitosis gradually disrupts cellular patterns that are established early during culture. This effect is not attributed to a loss of protein from the Parylene-C surface, as nitrogen levels on the substrate remain stable over 3 weeks. The inclusion of the anti-mitotic cytarabine (Ara-C) in the culture medium moderates glial division and thus, adequately preserves initial glial and neuronal conformity to underlying patterns. Neuronal apoptosis, often associated with the use of Ara-C, is mitigated by the addition of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We believe that with the right combination of glial inhibitors and neuronal promoters, the Parylene-C based cell patterning method can generate structured, active neural networks that can be sustained and investigated over extended periods of time. To our knowledge this is the first report on the concurrent application of Ara-C and BDNF on patterned cell cultures. PMID:21966523

  18. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires.

  19. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  20. Pediatric spinal clear cell meningioma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Colen, Chaim B; Rayes, Mahmoud; McClendon, Jamal; Rabah, Raja; Ham, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    In this report the authors describe a unique case of spinal clear cell meningioma in a 13-year-old girl. Clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) are not uncommon. To the authors' knowledge, 14 cases of pediatric CCM occurring in the spinal canal have been reported. Factors lending resistance to meningioma initiation and invasion are analyzed. This 13-year-old girl presented with pain radiating down her left leg. Admission MR imaging showed an inhomogeneous enhancing intradural-extramedullary mass at the L4-5 level. Resection revealed a CCM, and radiotherapy was subsequently administered. Postoperatively there has been no recurrence in > 2 years. In this paper the authors report a case of CCM and provide a comprehensive literature review on this disease. Current recommendations for its management are still debatable, especially in the pediatric population, and the authors propose an algorithm for its treatment and surveillance.

  1. SPECIAL MINING MANAGEMENT ZONE - CLEAR CREEK, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, Karen; Esparza, Leon E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of mineral-resource surveys, a substantiated resource potential for sediment-hosted cobalt-copper-gold-silver deposits has been identified in the Elkhorn and upper Garden Creek areas of the Special Mining Management Zone - Clear Creek, Idaho. Areas of favorable host rock, but with less strong evidence of mineralization, were classified as having probable resource potential for the same kind of deposit. A probable resource potential for porphyry-type copper-molybdenum deposits is assigned to areas along Clear Creek and upper Squaw Gulch based on the presence of extensive stockwork fracturing and alteration of the nonporphyritic granite, introduced disseminated magnetite, and the close proximity of known Tertiary plutons. The nature of the geologic terrain makes the occurrence of organic fuels on geothermal resources extremely unlikely.

  2. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  3. PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF CLEAR-AIR TURBULENCE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An attempt was made to test the hypothesis that reports of clear-air turbulence ( CAT ) on March 14-15, 1962, were associated with narrow layers (upper...did not contradict the hypothe sis, as many reports of CAT were made in sloping baroclinic or adiabatic layers. In any case, the Richardson numbers...index of CAT intensity which should be proportional to the energy of CAT is derived from the eddy energy equation. (Author)

  4. Gastrin Induces Nuclear Export and Proteasome Degradation of Menin in Enteric Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Meininger, Cameron A; Kang, Anthony J; Photenhauer, Amanda L; Hayes, Michael M; Sahoo, Nirakar; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Ding, Lin; Giordano, Thomas J; Else, Tobias; Madrigal, David J; Low, Malcolm J; Campbell, Fiona; Baker, Ann-Marie; Xu, Haoxing; Wright, Nicholas A; Merchant, Juanita L

    2017-08-28

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (MEN1) locus encodes the nuclear protein and tumor suppressor menin. MEN1 mutations frequently cause neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) such as gastrinomas, characterized by their predominant duodenal location and local metastasis at time of diagnosis. Diffuse gastrin cell hyperplasia precedes the appearance of MEN1 gastrinomas, which develop within submucosal Brunner's glands. We investigated how menin regulates expression of the gastrin gene and induces generation of submucosal gastrin-expressing cell hyperplasia. Primary enteric glial cultures were generated from the VillinCre:Men(1FL/FL):Sst(-/-) mice or C57BL/6 mice (controls), with or without inhibition of gastric acid by omeprazole. Primary enteric glial cells from VillinCre:Men1FL/FL:Sst(+/+) mice were incubated with gastrin and separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Cells were incubated with forskolin and H89 to activate or inhibit protein kinase A (a family of enzymes whose activity depends on cellular levels of cyclic AMP). Gastrin was measured in blood, tissue, and cell cultures using an ELISA. Immunoprecipitation with menin or ubiquitin was used to demonstrate post-translational modification of menin. Primary glial cells were incubated with leptomycin b and MG132 to block nuclear export and proteasome activity, respectively. We obtained human duodenal, lymph node, and pancreatic gastrinoma samples, collected from patients who underwent surgery from 1996 through 2007 in the United States or the United Kingdom. Enteric glial cells that stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP+) expressed gastrin de novo through a mechanism that required PKA. Gastrin-induced nuclear export of menin via cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR)-mediated activation of PKA. Once exported from the nucleus, menin was ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. GFAP and other markers of enteric glial cells, e.g., p75 and S100B, colocalized with gastrin in human duodenal

  5. Modification of potassium movement through the retina of the drone (Apis mellifera male) by glial uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, J A; Orkand, R K

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in photoreceptors and glial cells (outer pigment cells) of the superfused cut head of the honey-bee drone (Apis mellifera male). When the [K+] in the superfusate was abruptly increased from 3.2 mM to 17.9 mM both photoreceptors and glial cells depolarized. The time course of the depolarization of the photoreceptors was slower with increasing depth from the surface. Half time of depolarization was plotted against depth: this graph was compatible with the arrival of K+ being exclusively by diffusion through the extracellular clefts. However, as we then showed, this interpretation is inadequate. The time course of depolarization of the glial cells was almost the same at all depths. This indicates that they are electrically coupled. Consequently, current-mediated K+ flux (spatial buffering) through glial cells will contribute to the transport of K+ through the tissue: K+ ions enter the glial syncytium in the region of high external potassium concentration, [K+]0, and an equivalent quantity of K+ ions leave in regions of low [K+]0. Intracellular K+ activity (aiK) was measured with double-barrelled K+-sensitive micro-electrodes in slices of retina superfused on both faces. When [K+] in the superfusate was increased from 7.5 mM to 17.9 mM an increase in aiK was observed in glial cells at all depths in the slice (initial rate 1.7 mM min-1, S.E. of the mean = 0.2 mM min-1), but there was little increase in the photoreceptors (0.3 +/- 0.2 mM min-1). The increase in aiK in glial cells near the centre of the slice could not have been caused by spatial buffering; it presumably resulted from net uptake. We conclude that when [K+] is increased at the surface of this tissue, the build up of K+ in the extracellular clefts depends on extracellular diffusion, spatial buffering and net uptake. The latter two processes, which have opposing effects, involve about 10 times as much K+ as the first. This is in rough agreement with less direct experiments

  6. Modification of potassium movement through the retina of the drone (Apis mellifera male) by glial uptake.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Orkand, R K

    1983-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in photoreceptors and glial cells (outer pigment cells) of the superfused cut head of the honey-bee drone (Apis mellifera male). When the [K+] in the superfusate was abruptly increased from 3.2 mM to 17.9 mM both photoreceptors and glial cells depolarized. The time course of the depolarization of the photoreceptors was slower with increasing depth from the surface. Half time of depolarization was plotted against depth: this graph was compatible with the arrival of K+ being exclusively by diffusion through the extracellular clefts. However, as we then showed, this interpretation is inadequate. The time course of depolarization of the glial cells was almost the same at all depths. This indicates that they are electrically coupled. Consequently, current-mediated K+ flux (spatial buffering) through glial cells will contribute to the transport of K+ through the tissue: K+ ions enter the glial syncytium in the region of high external potassium concentration, [K+]0, and an equivalent quantity of K+ ions leave in regions of low [K+]0. Intracellular K+ activity (aiK) was measured with double-barrelled K+-sensitive micro-electrodes in slices of retina superfused on both faces. When [K+] in the superfusate was increased from 7.5 mM to 17.9 mM an increase in aiK was observed in glial cells at all depths in the slice (initial rate 1.7 mM min-1, S.E. of the mean = 0.2 mM min-1), but there was little increase in the photoreceptors (0.3 +/- 0.2 mM min-1). The increase in aiK in glial cells near the centre of the slice could not have been caused by spatial buffering; it presumably resulted from net uptake. We conclude that when [K+] is increased at the surface of this tissue, the build up of K+ in the extracellular clefts depends on extracellular diffusion, spatial buffering and net uptake. The latter two processes, which have opposing effects, involve about 10 times as much K+ as the first. This is in rough agreement with less direct experiments

  7. Leucine-nitrogen metabolism in the brain of conscious rats: its role as a nitrogen carrier in glutamate synthesis in glial and neuronal metabolic compartments.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ryosei; Cohen, David M; Henry, Joseph F; Burrin, Douglas G; Reeds, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The source of nitrogen (N) for the de novo synthesis of brain glutamate, glutamine and GABA remains controversial. Because leucine is readily transported into the brain and the brain contains high activities of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT), we hypothesized that leucine is the predominant N-precursor for brain glutamate synthesis. Conscious and unstressed rats administered with [U-13C] and/or [15N]leucine as additions to the diet were killed at 0-9 h of continuous feeding. Plasma and brain leucine equilibrated rapidly and the brain leucine-N turnover was more than 100%/min. The isotopic dilution of [U-13C]leucine (brain/plasma ratio 0.61 +/- 0.06) and [15N]leucine (0.23 +/- 0.06) differed markedly, suggesting that 15% of cerebral leucine-N turnover derived from proteolysis and 62% from leucine synthesis via reverse transamination. The rate of glutamate synthesis from leucine was 5 micro mol/g/h and at least 50% of glutamate-N originally derived from leucine. The enrichment of [5-15N]glutamine was higher than [15N]ammonia in the brain, indicating glial ammonia generation from leucine via glutamate. The enrichment of [15N]GABA, [15N]aspartate, [15N]glutamate greater than [2-15N]glutamine suggests direct incorporation of leucine-N into both glial and neuronal glutamate. These findings provide a new insight for the role of leucine as N-carrier from the plasma pool and within the cerebral compartments.

  8. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury.

  9. Stress proteins and glial cell functions during chronic aluminium exposures: protective role of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Sood, Pooja Khanna; Nahar, Uma; Nehru, Bimla

    2012-03-01

    Involved in the ongoing debate is the speculation that aluminium is somehow toxic for neurons. Glial cells cope up to protect neurons from this toxic insult by maintaining the glutathione homeostasis. Of late newer and newer roles of glial cells have been depicted. The present work looks into the other regulatory mechanisms that show the glial cells response to pro-oxidant effects of aluminium exposure. In the present investigation we have evaluated the inflammatory responses of the glial cells as well as HSP70-induction during aluminium exposure. Further, the protective role of curcumin is also evaluated. Aluminium was administered by oral gavage at a dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt/day for a period of 8 weeks. Curcumin was administered i.p. at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.wt./day on alternate days. Enhanced gene and protein expression of HSP70 in the glial fractions of the aluminium exposed animals as compared to the corresponding neuronal population. Aluminium exposure resulted in a significant increase in the NF-κB and TNF-α expression suggesting inflammatory responses. In the conjunctive treatment group of aluminium and curcumin exposure marked reduction in the gene and protein expression of NF-κB and TNF-α was observed. This was further reflected in histopathological studies showing no evidence of inflammation in conjunctive group as compared to aluminium treatment. From the present study, it can be concluded that curcumin has a potential anti-inflammatory action and can be exploited in other toxicological conditions also.

  10. Spontaneous glial calcium waves in the retina develop over early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb L; Mishra, Anusha; Newman, Eric A

    2009-09-09

    Intercellular glial Ca(2+) waves constitute a signaling pathway between glial cells. Artificial stimuli have previously been used to evoke these waves, and their physiological significance has been questioned. We report here that Ca(2+) waves occur spontaneously in rat retinal glial cells, both in the isolated retina and in vivo. These spontaneous waves are propagated by ATP release. In the isolated retina, suramin (P2 receptor antagonist) reduces the frequency of spontaneous wave generation by 53%, and apyrase (ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme) reduces frequency by 95-100%. Luciferin-luciferase chemiluminescence reveals waves of ATP matching the spontaneous Ca(2+) waves, indicating that ATP release occurs as spontaneous Ca(2+) waves are generated. Wave generation also depends on age. Spontaneous wave frequency rises from 0.27 to 1.0 per minute per mm(2), as rats age from 20 to 120 d. The sensitivity of glia to ATP does not increase with age, but the ATP released by evoked waves is 31% greater in 120-d-old than in 20-d-old rats, suggesting that increased ATP release in older animals could account for the higher frequency of wave generation. Simultaneous imaging of glial Ca(2+) and arterioles in the isolated retina demonstrates that spontaneous waves alter vessel diameter, implying that spontaneous waves may have a significant impact on retinal physiology. Spontaneous intercellular glial Ca(2+) waves also occur in the retina in vivo, with frequency, speed, and diameter similar to the isolated retina. Increased spontaneous wave occurrence with age suggests that wave generation may be related to retinal pathology.

  11. Glial cell response to 3,4-(+/-)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Joseph M; Cholanians, Aram B; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J

    2014-03-01

    3,4-(±)-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-(±)-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), a primary metabolite of MDMA, are phenylethylamine derivatives that cause serotonergic neurotoxicity. Although several phenylethylamine derivatives activate microglia, little is known about the effects of MDMA on glial cells, and evidence of MDMA-induced microglial activation remains ambiguous. We initially determined microglial occupancy status of the parietal cortex in rats at various time points following a single neurotoxic dose of MDMA (20mg/kg, SC). A biphasic microglial response to MDMA was observed, with peak microglial occupancy occurring 12- and 72-h post-MDMA administration. Because direct injection of MDMA into the brain does not produce neurotoxicity, the glial response to MDMA metabolites was subsequently examined in vivo and in vitro. Rats were treated with MDA (20mg/kg, SC) followed by ex vivo biopsy culture to determine the activation of quiescent microglia. A reactive microglial response was observed 72 h after MDA administration that subsided by 7 days. In contrast, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of MDA failed to produce a microglial response. However, thioether metabolites of MDA derived from α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA) elicited a robust microglial response following icv injection. We subsequently determined the direct effects of various MDMA metabolites on primary cultures of E18 hippocampal mixed glial and neuronal cells. 5-(Glutathion-S-yl)-α-MeDA, 2,5-bis-(glutathion-S-yl)-α-MeDA, and 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-α-MeDA all stimulated the proliferation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes at a dose of 10 µM. The findings indicate that glial cells are activated in response to MDMA/MDA and support a role for thioether metabolites of α-MeDA in the neurotoxicity.

  12. Glial cell modulators attenuate methamphetamine self-administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Snider, Sarah E; Hendrick, Elizabeth S; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2013-02-15

    Neuroinflammation induced by activated microglia and astrocytes can be elicited by drugs of abuse. Methamphetamine administration activates glial cells and increases proinflammatory cytokine production, and there is recent evidence of a linkage between glial cell activation and drug abuse-related behavior. We have previously reported that ibudilast (AV411; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine), which inhibits phosphodiesterase (PDE) and pro-inflammatory activity, blocks reinstatement of methamphetamine-maintained responding in rats, and that ibudilast and AV1013, an amino analog of ibudilast, which has similar glial-attenuating properties but limited PDE activity, attenuate methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization in mice. The present study's objective was to determine whether co-administered ibudilast, AV1013, or minocycline, which is a tetracycline derivative that also suppresses methamphetamine-induced glial activation, would attenuate active methamphetamine i.v. self-administration in Long-Evans hooded rats. Rats were initially trained to press a lever for 0.1mg/kg/inf methamphetamine according to a FR1 schedule during 2-h daily sessions. Once stable responding was obtained, twice daily ibudilast (1, 7.5, 10mg/kg), AV1013 (1, 10, 30mg/kg), or once daily minocycline (10, 30, 60mg/kg), or their corresponding vehicles, were given i.p. for three consecutive days during methamphetamine (0.001, 0.03, 0.1mg/kg/inf) self-administration. Ibudilast, AV1013, and minocycline all significantly (p<0.05) reduced responding maintained by 0.03mg/kg/inf methamphetamine that had maintained the highest level of infusions under vehicle conditions. These results suggest that targeting glial cells may provide a novel approach to pharmacotherapy for treating methamphetamineabuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Glial Cell Contribution to Basal Vessel Diameter and Pressure-Initiated Vascular Responses in Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Bui, Bang V.; Cull, Grant; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that retinal glial cells modify basal vessel diameter and pressure-initiated vascular regulation in rat retina. Methods In rats, L-2-aminoadipic acid (LAA, 10 nM) was intravitreally injected to inhibit glial cell activity. Twenty-four hours following injection, retinal glial intracellular calcium (Ca2+) was labeled with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-4/AM (F4, 1 mM). At 110 minutes after injection, intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated from 20 to 50 mm Hg. Prior to and during IOP elevation, Ca2+ and retinal vessel diameter were assessed using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography/confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Dynamic changes in Ca2+ and diameter from IOP elevation were quantified. The response in LAA-treated eyes was compared with vehicle treated control eyes. Results L-2-Aminoadipic acid treatment significantly reduced F4-positive cells in the retina (LAA, 16 ± 20 vs. control, 55 ± 37 cells/mm2; P = 0.02). Twenty-four hours following LAA treatment, basal venous diameter was increased from 38.9 ± 3.9 to 51.8 ± 6.4 μm (P < 0.0001, n = 20), whereas arterial diameter was unchanged (from 30.3 ± 3.5 to 30.7 ± 2.8 μm; P = 0.64). In response to IOP elevation, LAA-treated eyes showed a smaller increase in glial cell Ca2+ around both arteries and veins in comparison with control (P < 0.001 for both). There was also significantly greater IOP-induced vasoconstriction in both vessel types (P = 0.05 and P = 0.02, respectively; n = 6 each). Conclusions The results suggest that glial cells can modulate basal retinal venous diameter and contribute to pressure-initiated vascular responses. PMID:28055098

  14. Glial cell modulators attenuate methamphetamine self-administration in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Sarah E.; Hendrick, Elizabeth S.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation induced by activated microglia and astrocytes can be elicited by drugs of abuse. Methamphetamine administration activates glial cells and increases proinflammatory cytokine production, and there is recent evidence of a linkage between glial cell activation and drug abuse-related behavior. We have previously reported that ibudilast (AV411; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine), which inhibits phosphodiesterase (PDE) and pro-inflammatory activity, blocks reinstatement of methamphetamine-maintained responding in rats, and that ibudilast and AV1013, an amino analog of ibudilast, which has similar glial-attenuating properties but limited PDE activity, attenuate methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization in mice. The present study's objective was to determine whether co-administered ibudilast, AV1013, or minocycline, which is a tetracycline derivative that also suppresses methamphetamine-induced glial activation, would attenuate active methamphetamine i.v. self-administration in Long-Evans hooded rats. Rats were initially trained to press a lever for 0.1 mg/kg/inf methamphetamine according to a FR1 schedule during 2-h daily sessions. Once stable responding was obtained, twice daily ibudilast (1, 7.5, 10 mg/kg), AV1013 (1, 10, 30 mg/kg), or once daily minocycline (10, 30, 60 mg/kg), or their corresponding vehicles, were given i.p. for three consecutive days during methamphetamine (0.001, 0.03, 0.1 mg/kg/inf) self-administration. Ibudilast, AV1013, and minocycline all significantly (p<0.05) reduced responding maintained by 0.03 mg/kg/inf methamphetamine that had maintained the highest level of infusions under vehicle conditions. These results suggest that targeting glial cells may provide a novel approach to pharmacotherapy for treating methamphetamine abuse. PMID:23375937

  15. Molecular and polymeric ceramic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, L.G.

    1991-08-01

    The development of new methods for the production of complex materials is one of the most important problems in modern solid state chemistry and materials science. This project is attempting to apply the synthetic principles which have evolved inorganic and organometallic chemistry to the production of technologically important non-oxide ceramics, such as boron nitride, boron carbide and metal borides. Our recent work has now resulted in the production of new polymer systems, including poly(B-vinylborazine), polyvinylpentaborane and polyborazylene, that have proven to be high yield precursors to boron-based ceramic materials. Current work is now directed toward the synthesis of new types of molecular and polymeric boron-containing species and on exploration of the solid state properties of the ceramics that have been produced in these studies.

  16. RIBOSOME PRECURSOR PARTICLES IN NUCLEOLI

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Ming C.; Perry, Robert P.

    1969-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles containing the precursors of ribosomal RNA were extracted from L cell nucleoli and analyzed under conditions comparable to those used in the characterization of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Using nucleoli from cells suitably labeled with 3H-uridine, we detected three basic RNP components, sedimenting at approximately 62S, 78S, and 110S in sucrose gradients containing magnesium. A fourth particle, sedimenting at about 95S, appears to be a dimer of the 62S and 78S components. When centrifuged in gradients containing EDTA, the 62S, 78S, and 110S particles sediment at about 55S, 65S, and 80S, respectively. RNA was extracted from RNP particles which were prepared by two cycles of zonal centrifugation. The 62S particles yielded 32S RNA and a detectable amount of 28S RNA, the 78S structures, 32S RNA and possibly some 36S RNA, and the 110S particles, a mixture of 45S, 36S, and 32S RNA's. When cells were pulsed briefly and further incubated in the presence of actinomycin D, there was a gradual shift of radioactivity from heavier to lighter particles. This observation is consistent with the scheme of maturation: 110S → 78S → 62S. The principal buoyant densities in cesium chloride of the 110S, 78S, and 62S particles are 1.465, 1.490, and 1.545, respectively. These densities are all significantly lower than 1.570, which is characteristic of the mature large subunit of cytoplasmic ribosomes, suggesting that the precursor particles have a relatively higher ratio of protein to RNA, and that ribosome maturation involves, in addition to decrease in the size of the RNA molecules, a progressive decrease in the proportion of associated protein. PMID:5815062

  17. 77 FR 12896 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency....'' \\11\\ \\11\\ CHX 2009 Letter. Section 19(a)(3) of the Act provides that in the event any self-...

  18. 77 FR 12896 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Pacific Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Pacific Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency..., 2006), 72 FR 814 (Jan. 8, 2007). Section 19(a)(3) of the Act \\14\\ provides that in the event any...

  19. Chemical cleaning clears San Miguel's boiler tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.; Wofford, J. ); Magel, R. )

    1994-06-01

    This article describes chemical cleaning of the San Miguel Electric Cooperative (SMEC) boiler, an opposed-fired, natural circulation, reheat unit. At maximum continuous rating, steam flow is 3,054,000 lb/hr at a pressure of 2,925 psig. The superheater and reheater design temperatures are both 1,005 F. Boiler volume is 69,000 gallons. The Unit 1 boiler had not been cleaned since 1980, its original start-up date. Tube sample analyses indicated deposit densities ranging from 12 to 26 grams/ft[sup 2]. Utility boiler tubes will, over time, accumulate an internal layer of iron oxides and other deposits that inhibit flow and heat transfer, even with well-controlled water chemistry. Tube deposits can speed up corrosion, cause tube overheating, and be a precursor to tube failure. Deposits can influence such phenomena as phosphate hideout, and reduce boiler efficiency. For many utility boilers, a periodic cleaning is necessary to remove internal deposits before they can cause serious problems. Regardless of the benefits, chemical cleanings often make plant managers, engineers, and operators anxious because the process has been known to cause equipment damage or extend the length of an outage.

  20. Amyloid precursor protein in Drosophila glia regulates sleep and genes involved in glutamate recycling.

    PubMed

    Farca Luna, Abud Jose; Perier, Magali; Seugnet, Laurent

    2017-03-17

    The Amyloid Precursor Protein (App) plays a crucial role in Alzheimer disease (AD) via the production and deposition of toxic β-amyloid peptides. App is heavily expressed in neurons where the vast majority of studies investigating its function have been carried out, while almost nothing is known about its function in glia, where it is also expressed, and can potentially participate in the regulation of neuronal physiology. In this report, we investigated whether Appl, the Drosophila homolog of App, could influence sleep-wake regulation when its function is manipulated in glial cells. Appl inhibition in astrocyte-like and cortex glia resulted in higher sleep amounts and longer sleep bout duration during the night, while overexpression had the opposite effect. These sleep phenotypes were not the result of developmental defects, and were correlated with changes in expression in Glutamine Synthetase (GS) in astrocyte-like glia, and in changes in the gap-junction component innexin2 in cortex glia. Downregulating both GS and innexin2, but not either one individually, resulted in higher sleep amounts, similarly to Appl inhibition. Consistent with these results the expression of GS and innexin2 are increased following sleep deprivation indicating that these two genes are dynamically linked to vigilance states. Interestingly, the reduction of GS expression and the sleep phenotype observed upon Appl inhibition could be rescued by increasing the expression of the glutamate transporter dEaat1. In contrast, reducing dEaat1 expression severely disrupted sleep. These results associate glutamate recycling, sleep and a glial function for the App family proteins.StatementThe Amyloid Precursor Protein (App) has been intensively studied for its implication in Alzheimer Disease (AD). The attributed functions of App are linked to the physiology and cellular biology of neurons where the protein is predominantly expressed. Consequences on glia in AD are generally thought to be secondary

  1. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein Function in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Marlène; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2016-01-01

    The Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called APP-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioral deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation. PMID:27507933

  2. PLANETARY CHAOTIC ZONE CLEARING: DESTINATIONS AND TIMESCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Sarah; Malhotra, Renu

    2015-01-20

    We investigate the orbital evolution of particles in a planet's chaotic zone to determine their final destinations and their timescales of clearing. There are four possible final states of chaotic particles: collision with the planet, collision with the star, escape, or bounded but non-collision orbits. In our investigations, within the framework of the planar circular restricted three body problem for planet-star mass ratio μ in the range 10{sup –9} to 10{sup –1.5}, we find no particles hitting the star. The relative frequencies of escape and collision with the planet are not scale-free, as they depend upon the size of the planet. For planet radius R{sub p} ≥ 0.001 R{sub H} where R{sub H} is the planet's Hill radius, we find that most chaotic zone particles collide with the planet for μ ≲ 10{sup –5}; particle scattering to large distances is significant only for higher mass planets. For fixed ratio R{sub p} /R{sub H} , the particle clearing timescale, T {sub cl}, has a broken power-law dependence on μ. A shallower power law, T {sub cl} ∼ μ{sup –1/3}, prevails at small μ where particles are cleared primarily by collisions with the planet; a steeper power law, T {sub cl} ∼ μ{sup –3/2}, prevails at larger μ where scattering dominates the particle loss. In the limit of vanishing planet radius, we find T {sub cl} ≈ 0.024 μ{sup –3/2}. The interior and exterior boundaries of the annular zone in which chaotic particles are cleared are increasingly asymmetric about the planet's orbit for larger planet masses; the inner boundary coincides well with the classical first order resonance overlap zone, Δa {sub cl,} {sub int} ≅ 1.2 μ{sup 0.28} a{sub p} ; the outer boundary is better described by Δa {sub cl,} {sub ext} ≅ 1.7 μ{sup 0.31} a{sub p} , where a{sub p} is the planet-star separation.

  3. Uele River, Cleared Pasture Lands, Zaire, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-05-16

    STS049-91-079 (7 - 16 May 1992) --- This 70mm frame, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour, features a dendritic drainage pattern in Zaire. Cleared pasture land shows light green in this color photograph, in contrast to the dark, closed-canopy forest of Zaire. Remnant woodland along minor streams indicates the intricate drainage network of this hilly region. Scattered vegetation-free spots show the deep red, tropical soil of the region. The sediment-laden stream is the Vele River just west of the village of Niangara. A crew member used a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera with a 250mm lens to record the image.

  4. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  5. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  6. ClearedLeavesDB: an online database of cleared plant leaf images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leaf vein networks are critical to both the structure and function of leaves. A growing body of recent work has linked leaf vein network structure to the physiology, ecology and evolution of land plants. In the process, multiple institutions and individual researchers have assembled collections of cleared leaf specimens in which vascular bundles (veins) are rendered visible. In an effort to facilitate analysis and digitally preserve these specimens, high-resolution images are usually created, either of entire leaves or of magnified leaf subsections. In a few cases, collections of digital images of cleared leaves are available for use online. However, these collections do not share a common platform nor is there a means to digitally archive cleared leaf images held by individual researchers (in addition to those held by institutions). Hence, there is a growing need for a digital archive that enables online viewing, sharing and disseminating of cleared leaf image collections held by both institutions and individual researchers. Description The Cleared Leaf Image Database (ClearedLeavesDB), is an online web-based resource for a community of researchers to contribute, access and share cleared leaf images. ClearedLeavesDB leverages resources of large-scale, curated collections while enabling the aggregation of small-scale collections within the same online platform. ClearedLeavesDB is built on Drupal, an open source content management platform. It allows plant biologists to store leaf images online with corresponding meta-data, share image collections with a user community and discuss images and collections via a common forum. We provide tools to upload processed images and results to the database via a web services client application that can be downloaded from the database. Conclusions We developed ClearedLeavesDB, a database focusing on cleared leaf images that combines interactions between users and data via an intuitive web interface. The web interface

  7. The c-Jun kinase signaling cascade promotes glial engulfment activity through activation of draper and phagocytic function.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, J M; Doherty, J; Hackett, R; Freeman, M R

    2013-09-01

    After neuronal injury or death glial cells become reactive, exhibiting dramatic changes in morphology and patterns of gene expression and ultimately engulfing neuronal debris. Rapid clearance of degenerating neuronal material is thought to be crucial for suppression of inflammation and promotion of functional recovery. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase (dJNK) signaling is a critical in vivo mediator of glial engulfment activity. In response to axotomy, we find glial dJNK signals through a cascade involving the upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases Slipper and Tak1, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase MKK4, and ultimately the Drosophila activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional complex composed of Jra and Kayak to initiate glial phagocytosis of degenerating axons. Interestingly, loss of dJNK also blocked injury-induced upregulation of Draper levels in glia, and glial-specific overexpression of Draper was sufficient to rescue engulfment defects associated with loss of dJNK signaling. This work identifies that the dJNK pathway is a novel mediator of glial engulfment activity and a primary role for the glial Slipper/Tak1 →MKK4 →dJNK →dAP-1 signaling cascade appears to be activation of draper expression after axon injury.

  8. The c-Jun kinase signaling cascade promotes glial engulfment activity through activation of draper and phagocytic function

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, J M; Doherty, J; Hackett, R; Freeman, M R

    2013-01-01

    After neuronal injury or death glial cells become reactive, exhibiting dramatic changes in morphology and patterns of gene expression and ultimately engulfing neuronal debris. Rapid clearance of degenerating neuronal material is thought to be crucial for suppression of inflammation and promotion of functional recovery. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase (dJNK) signaling is a critical in vivo mediator of glial engulfment activity. In response to axotomy, we find glial dJNK signals through a cascade involving the upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases Slipper and Tak1, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase MKK4, and ultimately the Drosophila activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional complex composed of Jra and Kayak to initiate glial phagocytosis of degenerating axons. Interestingly, loss of dJNK also blocked injury-induced upregulation of Draper levels in glia, and glial-specific overexpression of Draper was sufficient to rescue engulfment defects associated with loss of dJNK signaling. This work identifies that the dJNK pathway is a novel mediator of glial engulfment activity and a primary role for the glial Slipper/Tak1→MKK4→dJNK→dAP-1 signaling cascade appears to be activation of draper expression after axon injury. PMID:23618811

  9. Mathematical and experimental approaches to identify and predict the effects of chemotherapy on neuroglial precursors

    PubMed Central

    Hyrien, Ollivier; Dietrich, Jörg; Noble, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of chemotherapy on normal cells of the body create substantial clinical problems for many cancer patients. Relatively little is known, however, about the effects, other than promotion of cell death, of such agents on the function of normal precursor cells critical in tissue homeostasis and repair. We have combined mathematical and experimental analyses to identify the effects of sublethal doses of chemotherapy on glial precursor cells of the central nervous system (CNS). We modeled the temporal development of a population of precursor and terminally differentiated cells exposed to sublethal doses of carmustine (BCNU), a classical alkylating chemotherapeutic agent used in treatment of gliomas and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, as a multi-type age-dependent branching process. We fitted our model to data from in vitro clonal experiments using the method of pseudo-likelihood. This approach identifies several novel drug effects, including modification of the cell cycle length, the time between division and differentiation, and alteration in the probability of undergoing self-renewal division in precursor cells. These changes of precursor cell function in the chemotherapy-exposed brain may have profound clinical implications. Major Findings We applied our computational approach to analyze the effects of BCNU on clonal cultures of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells – one of the best-characterized neural progenitor cells in the mammalian brain. Our analysis reveals that transient exposures to BCNU increased the cell cycle length of progenitor cells and decreased their time to differentiation, while also decreasing the likelihood that they will undergo self-renewing divisions. By investigating the behavior of our mathematical model we demonstrate that precursor cell populations should recover spontaneously from transient modifications of the timing of division and of differentiation, but such recovery will not happen after alteration of cell fate. These

  10. GDNF facilitates differentiation of the adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells into astrocytes via STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Boku, Shuken; Nakagawa, Shin; Takamura, Naoki; Kato, Akiko; Takebayashi, Minoru; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Omiya, Yuki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •GDNF has no effect on ADP proliferation and apoptosis. •GDNF increases ADP differentiation into astrocyte. •A specific inhibitor of STAT3 decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •STAT3 knockdown by lentiviral shRNA vector also decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •GDNF increases the phosphorylation of STAT3. -- Abstract: While the pro-neurogenic actions of antidepressants in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are thought to be one of the mechanisms through which antidepressants exert their therapeutic actions, antidepressants do not increase proliferation of neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Because previous studies showed that antidepressants increase the expression and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in C6 glioma cells derived from rat astrocytes and GDNF increases neurogenesis in adult DG in vivo, we investigated the effects of GDNF on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cultured neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Data showed that GDNF facilitated the differentiation of neural precursor cells into astrocytes but had no effect on their proliferation or apoptosis. Moreover, GDNF increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, and both a specific inhibitor of STAT3 and lentiviral shRNA for STAT3 decreased their differentiation into astrocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that GDNF facilitates astrogliogenesis from neural precursor cells in adult DG through activating STAT3 and that this action might indirectly affect neurogenesis.

  11. Glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter determines transgene expression in satellite glial cells following intraganglionic adeno-associated virus delivery in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongfei; Xu, Hao; Fan, Fan; Shin, Seung-Min; Hogan, Quinn H; Yu, Hongwei

    2017-09-23

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated therapeutic gene transfer to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is an effective and safe tool for treating chronic pain. However, AAV with various constitutively active promoters leads to transgene expression predominantly to neurons, while glial cells are refractory to AAV transduction in the peripheral nervous system. The present study evaluated whether in vivo satellite glial cell (SGC) transduction in the DRG can be enhanced by the SGC-specific GFAP promoter and by using shH10 and shH19, which are engineered capsid variants with Müller glia-prone transduction. Titer-matched AAV6 (as control), AAVshH10, and AAVshH19, all encoding the EGFP driven by the constitutively active CMV promoter, as well as AAV6-EGFP and AAVshH10-EGFP driven by a GFAP promoter (AAV6-GFAP-EGFP and AAVshH10-GFAP-EGFP), were injected into DRG of adult male rats. Neurotropism of gene expression was determined and compared by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that injection of AAV6- and AAVshH10-GFAP-EGFP induces robust EGFP expression selectively in SGCs, whereas injection of either AAVshH10-CMV-EGFP or AAVshH19-CMV-EGFP into DRG resulted in a similar in vivo transduction profile to AAV6-CMV-EGFP, all showing efficient transduction